4 Burst results for "Helen Brownsville"

"helen brownsville" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

05:03 min | Last month

"helen brownsville" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Entering a new era now. New covert strategies. There's some new knowns and we've got a vaccine hello and welcome to corona pod. I'm noah baker and joining me this week after a little bit of time away. And i'm sure this is going to please many. Is amy maximun. Amy how are you. I'm good and i'm very excited to be back. So you've not been on the show for a little while but in the meantime you have been very busy winning yet. Another award i wanted to say. Congratulations well thank you very much. You know and i know it very much to a whole team of people at nature who've helped make all those stories possible so you along with helen. Brownsville from stat and other amazing reporter have won the victor cohn price. And some of the work was particularly highlighted by the judges was your work on equity and disparities within the pandemic and your reporting more broadly. One of those pieces formed a corona pod special that we may up at a link to that in the show notes that people are interested and this kind of disparity is really going to form a big part of what we're going to talk about today. Which is boosters. By which i mean vaccine boosters amy to start with i think it's probably good to define what we mean when we say vaccine booster in this scenario. Yeah so there's different kinds of boosters that people are talking about you know. Israel's begun rolling them out. germany and france have said they're going to in september for people who are elderly israel. Same thing people who are elderly the u. k. Is considering it what we're talking about in these cases is an additional shot off and a third dose of vaccine or sometimes we're talking about an mri maxine on top of say like the astrazeneca vaccine. That's slightly different than in the united arab emirates where they're now saying he should have boosters for people who've had some of the other vaccines like the vaccines from china which are from inactivated viruses. But for the most part. I'm talking about a third dose of an manet vaccine and so the concept regardless of whether or not we're talking about a third dose of the same vaccine you've had before or third dose of vaccine that works in a different way that has a different platform is that you might be able to strengthen the protection that you have against kobe. Nineteen or perhaps lengthened the amount of time that you are protected against in nineteen now we can discuss the likelihood of either of those two things happening as time goes on but to start off with reminders of the immunology behind. Why someone might want booster so when you first get vaccinated. We've seen that. There's a big surge of antibodies against the virus. In this case you know the corona virus and those antibodies are part of the immune response to protect you if you get infected again however with vaccines what happens. Is you also generate other. Antibody responses like long-lasting b. cells that will patrol the body notice when there's an infectious agent like the krona virus and generate. Antibodies so what studies have begun to find is that there is declining. Antibodies say several months six months after you've got on your full doses of the vaccine and so the thought is well maybe this decline in an antibody response means there's less protection but the trick there is so far we don't know because we see that with a lot of other vaccines. i think. That's actually a quote in a feature written by our colleague you in callaway in nature all about boosters. In which researcher says there's not a vaccine in the world that doesn't have a drop off of antibody titles that's just what happens with vaccines. The real question is whether or not that drop-off in antibody titles over time correlates to a drop in protection and that's a difficult question to answer in many ways especially because we still don't really have a correlate of protection. There's a put about that as well. Another link to that in the show notes and then there are other reasons that it's difficult to measure this kind of stuff. So for example behavior gets involved when people have had a vaccine that they've been told as ninety five percent effective. Maybe they're less likely to wear masks. Maybe they're less likely to distance from people because they feel a sense of protection and so therefore the behavior change can change the overall number might be because acting in a different way then they might have been during a trial and that kind of stuff in the real world is really really hard to pick apart right. Yeah like unless it's very careful trial. It is really tough. I think it's confusing. Actually frankly i think all of us here at nature. we're constantly talking amongst ourselves. About the latest studies with suggestions on vaccine efficacy around the world. And they're really hard to follow because like you said there's so much else that can go into what's happening in the real world like if you're comparing vaccinated to unvaccinated people well the unvaccinated population changes say depending on how much people have already been infected. And then there's other things that account for why you might see rising cases among vaccinated people if behavior is massively different than it was previously the first round of people vaccinated before delta was around is that delta. That's changed whether or not they're being infected or is it that those people are saying more exposed than people who are vaccinated later like for example. Health workers were vaccinated. I this is all the say. There's a ton of complicating factors that makes each of those studies..

noah baker amy maximun victor cohn Brownsville Amy helen united arab emirates amy germany france Israel israel china callaway delta
"helen brownsville" Discussed on The Current

The Current

07:16 min | 1 year ago

"helen brownsville" Discussed on The Current

"Are on the right track and the economy's. GonNa rebound and things are going to be good what he wants to so going into November You know people who say things that are. That conflict was that. They. Get Silence. Yeah, now he dr found. She was one of the people you interviewed for your recent piece to talk about how to turn the covid nineteen situation around in the US just in the last couple of minutes that we've got what's the what's at the top in terms of the advice? You heard from these experts. Well, you know there's there's a lot of things that people can do effectively you know. He said, and others have said and others are doing you know. Start the reopening over. Do it right this time. Do it slowly. Don't act like this isn't happening. Be Cautious and also you know. Give people good communications that they can help That can help them. Make choices for where they live. You know one of the people I spoke to talked about. Tailoring the messaging to your locale so that you'd have almost like a a weather report you know giving you an indication of how much virus is spreading in your area right now and how? To you know act as a consequence of that to make sure that you lower your risk. And when you look at the big picture, what do you see as sort of the prognosis here? What do you see as a long term? Public health consequences for Americans. If this virus isn't brought into control. Just going to continue to be a mess in this. Country country's GonNa. Pay For economically hustles. are either overwhelmed already or going to be overwhelmed I mean of course the big fear. Is that going into the autumn. you know flu season starts and in the notion of trying to deal with the surge of flu cases which. You know in about Lucy's and can overwhelm health systems as it is and Cova cases at the same time. Nobody really knows how that's going to be doable. Just in a couple of words Helen. What would you advise Canada as it begins to reopen? Be Prudent take it slow. You know be cautious. Learn to live with his virus. We need to understand that until there's vaccine until a lot of people have some immunity to this. That we need to embrace a new normal. You know thanks. Okay thank you so much Helen really appreciate it. Thanks for having me on Helen Brownsville is an infectious disease and global health reporter with stat at news website. We reached her in Boston. told the court. US One small man giant wheel. Wish say official that I'm wrong person right now. Uncover season seven. Dead? Wrong Killed pepple if they may be. Available on CBC. Listen and wherever you get your podcasts. I'm Keith Macarthur. Unlocking Bryson's brain is a podcast about my son. The rare disease that keeps him from walking or talking bracelets perfect, and his life is really hard, and our families search for a cure. Oh my gosh, maybe science ready for this. It's part memoir part medical mystery. We can do just about anything modifying DNA heart in my throat. Cure is controversial unlocking brain. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. One of the experts that Helen Brands will talk to about how the US might turn. The situation around was a mish Adele. Who advocates for what he calls a harm reduction approach. He's an infectious disease, doctor and senior scholar at the Johns. Hopkins Center for Health Security Good Morning. Good morning when you talk about a hell, a harm reduction approach to dealing with the Covid, nineteen situation in the United States, what does that look like exactly? What it looks like is kind of the reality that we're facing meaning that there are people that are going to be socially interacting that are going to be pursuing activities that bear some semblance to their normal life, and there's always going to be a risk that they could either contract or acquire the virus and I think that trying to dogmatically. Apply social distancing to every situation and kind of shaming people. Doing that has not really resulted in anybody changing their behavior. We know people are going to get infected. We know that we cannot in the United States Dr. Pieces two zero or get hospitalizations completely eliminated or deaths eliminated, so we have to give people the tools. To be able to to live their lives safer knowing that the viruses out there and I think that that's just something that we're. We've done pretty successfully from with sexually transmitted infections with injection drug use where we kind of changed the paradigm, realizing that this is a problem now that we're stuck with established itself in the human population in the United States has made multiple failures early on in this pandemic, and is not going to be able to get the control of Taiwan or even Canada when it comes to this virus, so when you talk about tools what are some of the most effective measures that could be undertaken now to reduce the harm to the American population. So really the it has to do with giving people guidance on how to do things safer. Just being very explicit, saying instead of saying don't ever go. Into a restaurant say maybe if you go to an indoor restaurant to eat, you should find one. That's less crowded. You should make sure that you can stay sixty two part. You should wear a face covering except for one. You're eating you. You should try and. Eat dinner with people that you already have mixed with and not try to mix with other other people that you that are from different. Parties that that causes a degree of transmission risks, and the same thing is true for for if if bars are open, maybe you should wear a face shield and use a straw when you go into a bar. Those types of those types of recommendations trying to do to eat out doors to stay outdoors as much as possible when you're doing something social. All of that really changes the way we think about this instead of scolding people for doing things because they're going to do it anyway. And what happened in in in my in my city of Pittsburgh is when the bars open, it was as if the whole city turn twenty one. All of a sudden and everybody went to the bars and they were very crowded. That's because people had this pent-up. Desire to go to these bars, and there was no guidance about how to do it safely. And all of a sudden the vars are overrunning transmission events occurring and I think that also have the the other part of harm. Reduction is making sure we have the infrastructure to deal with it, and that includes making sure that health department have enough case investigators in contact rates because we don't have that in many parts. And fixing our testing problem, because if you are going to live with this virus, if you're going to take a harm reduction approach, we need public health tools, and we can't have somebody waiting seven days to get a test back. That also has to has to be fixed in in maybe even something from HIV we do, is we? We have home testing for HIV. People can be tested for HIV in the privacy of their. Their home. We need to actually accelerate that type technology so that we can empower people to be able to to decide whether or not it's me for them to go out based on if.

US Helen HIV Cure Canada flu Helen Brands Helen Brownsville Hopkins Center for Health Secu Lucy Keith Macarthur Bryson Pittsburgh Boston. official senior scholar Cova reporter
"helen brownsville" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:23 min | 3 years ago

"helen brownsville" Discussed on Here & Now

"Hi, Helen, Peter eighty thousand flu deaths hasn't been that bad since nineteen seventy four. Do we know why? Well, nobody really ever knows why one flu season is really bad and other flu season isn't except for sort of the basics. Last flu season was most of the activity was caused by h three and two viruses, which really hit old people and little kids very hard. And another problem with h three seasons is the vaccine doesn't work as well against h three viruses when they make the vaccine. There's some problems mutations that arise in the development of the vaccine, and they always know that they're. Going to have a less effective vaccine against a tree when there's not a lot of h three activity that doesn't matter so much, but in a season like last year where virtually everybody who got sick was sick with h three and two flu that really does matter a lot in about the vaccine. The overall effectiveness of last year's flu vaccine was just forty percent. Is that considered a failure? I mean, like how does that stack up to two previous years? Okay. So the overall effectiveness is is a isn't great, but when you break it down by strain, it was even worse than that. It was twenty five percent effective against h three and two. And as we mentioned before, h three and two was the virus that was causing most of the illness last year. So what they estimated in February when they released those figures was that essentially, you know, one in four people who were vaccinated, were protected against the strain that was causing the most illness that's not great. It's not ideal, and it will likely have some people questioning whether or not it's even worth to go out and get a flu shot. This season. Certainly. People always question whether or not it's worth it, but you know, the vaccine contains protection against three or four different strains of flu depending on which senior get influence. A b causes a lot of illness, especially in little kids and the vaccine. The influence of be component of the vaccine typically performs better than the strand to component and the h. one in one component of the vaccine, which is another influence a virus. That part of the vaccine also typically performs better. Like last year, the estimate of the performance for each the h one n one component of the vaccine was about sixty seven percent, but very few people were infected with h. one one flu last year. So it didn't matter to the numbers from last year last season. Tell us anything about what this season is going to be like, no, you know what people in the flu. World will say to you is if you've seen one flu season, you've seen one flu season going forward. There's no way to estimate what this flu season would be. Like. I think people in the flu world would think that because so many people were sick last year was hugely bad year that there will be a lot of people in in the broader population who have some antibodies to flu and that this year might be milder, but you know, nobody would bet their house on that never know in these strains change, Helen, Brownsville, public health reporter for stat news. We pursue time today. Thank thank you Peter..

flu vaccine flu Helen Peter Brownsville reporter sixty seven percent twenty five percent forty percent
"helen brownsville" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"helen brownsville" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Beautiful singing that and from an italian classic to modern pope we'll be looking at the rapidly evolving trends in musical tastes and the research that says pope is getting sadder each song has twelve features such as happiness or relaxed nece or dance ability so we were able to look at the trends in those indices in we found that for example the happiness index was going down considerably my studio guest today is bbc health and science reporter katie silva and you've been relating how long you're likely to live yes money and i don't want to but because i'm a stray leeann it's actually going to be a little while but i've got quite a fun little calculated tell you about that you can also calculate everyone can calculate how long they going to live okay we'll be having some fun with that in a moment but first to the outbreak of a bola in the democratic republic of congo now at the time of coding this program that have been at least forty five people infected and twenty five people on known to have died but the international community has swung into action fast with a visit from the director general of the w h o and confirmation that people in certain areas will be given an experimental vaccine will this be enough to prevent the spread of a disease which killed more than eleven thousand people in the outbreak of two thousand fourteen in just a moment we'll get the latest from bbc science and health reporter katie sova but first earlier this week claudia hammond spiked to helen brownsville a senior writer for the us health website stat she says people are worried about the locations of the current cases there are a couple of reasons for that one because which is being considered the epicenter where the hospital is is on a lake so it's a port city end the lake actresses out into the congo any vangi rivers which means that people from the coral will could get on a boat and travel widely and another thing that is a concern.

pope health and science reporter congo director general katie sova claudia hammond writer bbc katie silva reporter helen brownsville us