19 Burst results for "Hedera Hashgraph"

What is Hedera Hashgraph HBAR

Asia Crypto Today

00:38 sec | 4 months ago

What is Hedera Hashgraph HBAR

"3 a.m. Saturday January 21st, 2023. What is hit or hash graph hbar? Hitter has graph is an open-source public distributed ledger that utilizes the fast, fair, and secure hash graph consensus algorithm. Decentralized applications depths are becoming an increasingly popular way to build decentralized and trustless systems. With the advent of blockchain technology, it has become possible to create decentralized systems that can be used for a wide range. The post wood is hit or hash graph HBA R appeared first on Asia crypto today.

Hitter Asia
"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

05:08 min | 4 months ago

"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

"Right. Well, you guys could be like stellar. If you want to look up to a project and they just decided on a whim, they're going to burn half their supply and just did it. So, you know, that changed their tokenomics. You know, that was back in 2019, you know, like that's not the way decentralization is supposed to work, where the person in charge says, hey, let's not tell anybody, and let's just burn half the coins. Absolutely insane. Obviously, stellar much more centralized than hadera. So let's talk about other layer one blockchains for a moment because, you know, I'm of the opinion. I think Ethereum is going to pass Bitcoin to market cap. I think that when you look at the potential of a decentralized Internet, it's just a bigger value proposition than that of digital gold or a hedgeable asset. And we're a long ways away from talking about Bitcoin as real currency and reserve currency and things like that. So you have Ethereum that's up there. I believe cardano, I think cardano eventually going to pass Ethereum. And four to 6 years, you've got algorand, you have ICP, with Solana, we don't really talk about it anymore for obvious reasons. Tezos, cosmos. There's a big landscape out there. And for me, layer one blockchains have always been my best investment. And I don't think that's going to change necessarily in the next bull run. Maybe layer twos will be a little better. But what when you look across the landscape, who do you see as the serious competitors? To you guys and like, where are you guys at in the process of trying to gain adoption and get up there with the big boys? I mean, your top 50, but not top ten. So sure, what is important, I think, though, is to look and in the names you said are all people that are competitors. But what's important is to actually be building things, especially now during a crypto ranger. Having actual real world applications building on you that are important applications, they aren't just people investing in these coins because they like the name and then just trading the coins for other control coins and learning out coins you can trade other coins. That's sort of a shell game within the industry. I'm talking about real applications out in the real world. These are the sorts of things that we've been talking about. And so for example, we have two of the banks that are on the council. Standard bank is the biggest bank in Africa. And shinhan bank is the oldest bank in South Korea. And they set up a thing using stablecoins they created, not algorithmic stablecoins. Inter allow you to do remittances. And you could very easily work in South Korea and earn South Korean yuan and then send it to your family in South Africa who use Rand and have it all be translated easily because each bank is turning it into a stablecoin and then trading the stablecoins and it happens in seconds for fractions of a penny for the transfer.

cardano hadera Solana shinhan bank South Korea Standard bank Africa South Africa
"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

05:19 min | 4 months ago

"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

"Opposed to other ledgers, some individuals, or each of those people, is decentralized person, but it's maybe a handful of people. That's the difference. You know, Bitcoin has a dozen people that run the pools. And so you have a great deal of power that's fairly concentrated. Yeah, and then you'll get the blockstream developers and how much sway that blockstream has over the voluntary Bitcoin developers. Look, if people want to parse down anything, there's no such thing as completely decentralized. It doesn't really exist. I mean, somebody had to come up with the name of Bitcoin, you know? At some point, there was one person that made some decisions. Now granted the network the way it runs is the most decentralized that we have out there today. But, you know, I think it's very fascinating when you get into the centralization versus decentralization argument. Now, one thing about you guys is I wanted to ask you real quick. Go off script here a little bit. And ask you about what is going on with can I just in general with centralized exchanges and obviously the insolvencies they've been horrible and they just seem to continue, haven't had one, I don't know, since last week, maybe. What do you think from your standpoint? Is a way that decentralization or a layer one blockchain? Do you guys see yourself layer one, correct? Oh, yeah. Polkadot says zero now. Now there's other ones saying we're layer zero, you know? Okay. Or negative one. Yeah, there you go. I like it. Whatever. But what role do you think that layer one protocols and blockchains have in the future of crypto trading, investing and keeping people safe when it comes to losing all their money on these exchanges? We have seen horrible things happen in the recent past. And what bothers me is that they were avoidable. They really should not have happened. Look, if you can trade on a deck, if you're talking about tokens, you should just be using DEXs, why you'd be centralized at all. If you have to go from Fiat to the token, then yes, you need a centralized exchange. But that centralized exchange should serve as an exchange, not as an investment company, not a D.C. firm, not anyway. If you separate out these things and if you let each person do just what they can do, I have a very low opinion of custody as well. And I think Derek is the way to fix that. That's a big push this year for us is to get away from custody. You know, people say, not your keys, not your coins. Well, you know, there's a lot to be said for that philosophy. And you really should keep your own keys and use Derek or something to protect it. So I think that a lot of these problems that we're seeing in our industry are teething pains of the industry. I hate it because it was painful, and I hate it because it was really avoidable, but in the future where we're going to end up is that we centralize as little as possible. And Fiat to crypto okay, you have to have a central guy in some sense, but a lot of the other things that are going on don't have to be centralized and they should be decentralized. Yeah, I agree with you totally. And I learned my lesson. You know, the thing is I came in crypto. I mean, I came in 2012, I went through my gosh.

Polkadot Bitcoin Fiat Derek D.C.
"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

02:31 min | 7 months ago

"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"Now let's get on to the show. Speaking of superheroes that we look up to is our boys over at hedera, mance Harmon, Lehman Baird, they're building one of the most amazing blockchains in this crypto space and that's who you guys have decided to build on, not Ethereum, not polygon or any one of the more popular ones, but potentially, again, another new innovative thing. What was it about hadera that made you want to go there and use their different tools than some other platform? So we spoke to all of the platforms and we thought hedera was a great fit for two primary reasons. So one on the tech side, we do have a web three web three focus team. They reviewed the technology. They were very excited about it. That's less MySpace. But my interactions with them and we spoke to all the people you've sort of mentioned here. When I spoke to them, honestly, I just thought that their business development side, you know, it was by far the best that we had worked with. You know, I think there really interested and developing the token. And I think you're going to see they brought a lot of other partners. That we think will develop out that ecosystem. And we want to be a part of that as well. So I think one of the big, the biggest trades is honestly what we're seeing them doing on the business development side and we thought that people were there were great at what they do and great to work with and we thought it was a perfect fit for us. Do you ever kind of envision a future where the hedera hashgraph is just one blockchain that hosts the karate tokens and there'll be maybe cross chain. You'll be able to have karate tokens on Ethereum or cardano and stuff like that. Maybe three or 5 years down the line or you guys married to one chain. Yet, well, so we're doing all of our AirDrops on hedera. But we also have tokens of their build on Ethereum. So we're launching on both networks. So I think you mentioned the December is like the launch month tokens are going to go live. And I also think I remember you saying, you know, the exact parameters for receiving tokens is not yet published. But what can you tell listeners about how we can get our hands on karate tokens and get involved? Well, I think the easiest thing

mance Harmon Lehman Baird MySpace
"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Thinking Crypto News & Interviews

Thinking Crypto News & Interviews

05:59 min | 7 months ago

"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Thinking Crypto News & Interviews

"You have the lummis gillibrand Bill. But yet you have the SEC and their enforcement actions and now the CFTC, they just went after okie down and the U.S. treasury going after tornado cash. What are your thoughts? Are you optimistic that we're moving the right direction? I would love to get from a building standpoint where you guys are seeing from your end. Sure. And so if I think about us as a network, we've always had a regulatory compliance spend. We've been very conservative. I say we, I mean, Manson Lehman, who built this network from the beginning. We're very conservative being headquartered in the U.S. and trying to do things aligned to the current regulation of the day. There certainly gray areas and in those gray areas, you know, I think we buy and large have taken a more conservative oriented approach. I do think there's a lot of positivity in things while whether or not I agree or disagree with each provision of the Biden executive order or the Loomis gillibrand Bill, et cetera. The fact is, is that we are a part of the conversation. We as crypto are a part of the conversation. I don't believe we're going away. It's going away, and I believe that's the challenge for the SEC, is there's so much money. And there's money so much money on the sidelines, still, right? When you look at how much money is invested in U.S. equities, et cetera, there's this idea that at some point, our market cap from a crypto perspective has to be taken into account by the SEC and determining how can they play well with who we are, you see different things, whether it's the SEC ripple case and what Brad garlinghouse and others are thinking. I mean, there's so much that we don't know and don't see related to that. But I'm an optimist. I think that there is going to be regulation that comes and with regulation comes more certainty and clarity with that clarity comes more investment, more innovation, faster change related to what we're doing. And so I see all of that really being a positive impact on what we're trying to do. So for us, we tried to take the approach of we want to continue to educate, educate the market on the technology, where it is, it's benefits. It's use. That's why we really, really focus on the use cases that are going to be deployed on the network. That's what's going to grow. That's what's going to grow the network. That's what's going to grow use. And so we want to have conversations with the various regulators throughout this journey, help educate them, give them insights that they may or may not have. And also keep abreast of the changing wins. As they continue to evolve. Yeah, absolutely. And hopefully the U.S. can get this right maybe next year. You know, Congress, I know right now with the midterms and so forth, it's a mass but hopefully next year, Congress can act and we get this get the green light for the entire market and folks can really start building even more without fear of any type of situations that with the SEC and so forth. Yeah, that's right. I think one of the other things that is interesting and it kind of dovetails into your original comment around. How do you guys get these big enterprises? You know, when you look at some of the networks like Ethereum and others that

SEC gillibrand Bill Manson Lehman Loomis gillibrand CFTC Brad garlinghouse U.S. treasury U.S. Biden Congress
"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Thinking Crypto News & Interviews

Thinking Crypto News & Interviews

04:04 min | 7 months ago

"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Thinking Crypto News & Interviews

"So when you think about speed, finality for us is under four seconds. Look at the finality of Ethereum or Bitcoin or other networks. A significantly longer. And so for us, we don't want to have the moniker of we're a blockchain because that has its own connotations, which oftentimes are good from a decentralization perspective, but not necessarily from a scale perspective in terms of speed. Or security. And so we want to define a different class. Whether you call it blockchain two, again, I personally don't like that only because that kind of puts us under that blockchain umbrella. We want to say, hey, there's a new and different way to do what many blockchains were in our trying to do. And this is us. And I think as we continue to evolve the network, this last year, we became fully open-sourced. I don't think a lot of people know that still. So yeah, so on August 5th of this year, the entire algorithm and everything above it and below it is completely open-source. And so that's really, really important because now guess what? Any project anywhere can download the full source code and effectively begin writing and creating. The other thing that's happened is we become EVM compatible. So if you have, if you want to take your salinity based application, put it directly on the EVM and begin to run a natively on hedera. There's no need to do a layer two roll up to make this happen. It makes it really, really simple. And I think that's why we're seeing so many projects coming from Solana polygon and others. NFT projects that are just exploding because we made it really simple.

Solana polygon
"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Thinking Crypto News & Interviews

Thinking Crypto News & Interviews

05:31 min | 7 months ago

"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Thinking Crypto News & Interviews

"And so as I was thinking about what do I do next? I built my career in the early days of the Internet. I was a web developer, you know, developing and languages that probably don't exist anymore. Things like cold fusion, visual basic C++. I know that exists. But Java to some extent JavaScript. And so I felt like, as I was continuing to keep track of cryptocurrency, Bitcoin, Ethereum, et cetera, I just had an investment thesis personally that said, you know, where are the workloads or applications getting built? It was that simple. And these were applications, I didn't specifically look for DeFi related applications. I wasn't looking to speculate on any given token or chain, per se. But I was looking at where are the developers centralizing and what and where are they building? And so as I began doing research, certainly came across Ethereum, others like quant, chainlink, cardano, for their smart contracts, et cetera. I then came across hedera, which had a lot of enterprise brands associated to it that caught my attention. I didn't know what it meant at the time. And so like, I guess any good sleuth. I went to LinkedIn to see who I knew at hadera. And lo and behold, I knew Christian hasker, Christian and I worked together many, many years ago at quest software where I was a senior executive and ran both the business unit there as well as mergers and acquisitions. And so I reached out to Christian and said, you know, I'd love to learn more about hedera. And so that kicked off this possibility around how does hadera continue to further decentralize what they were doing. Not just the decentralization because they do have, you know, now I think it's 26 or 27 council members, you know, and that's going to 39. So there is decentralization there while we don't have permissionless nodes yet. The fact is, is that I felt like, you know, further decentralizing in creating a foundation, like other chains had was something that was interesting. Yeah, that absolutely makes sense. And Shane, something you mentioned about you worked in the early days of the Internet, you're a coder and things like that. I've found myself speaking to a lot of entrepreneurs and even folks who work in web one point two. Are now jumping into crypto and it's so interesting to see that evolution. And some of the biggest names, you know, your Jeremy lairs, the Mike Belgians, the guys are at netscape and so forth. They're all here now. Well, even, you know, Mark andreessen, who ultimately created that for as an investor, you know, they've got their crypto fund that they created with andreessen Horowitz. And so there's certainly a lot pouring into this. And I think this idea of and I think it was Chris Dixon, who said this idea of web one was read, web two was read, right, web three is read write own.

hadera Christian hasker LinkedIn Jeremy lairs Shane Mark andreessen netscape andreessen Horowitz Chris Dixon
"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Thinking Crypto News & Interviews

Thinking Crypto News & Interviews

02:34 min | 7 months ago

"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Thinking Crypto News & Interviews

"You can trade from anything to anything. For example, you could trade between cryptocurrencies and precious metals. It's an amazing platform that I've been using for years. And in fact, I still use to this day because there won a great exchange, there are reputable and they're one of the only exchanges that still list XRP. Many of the other exchanges have delisted XRP due to the SEC lawsuit, but you can still get XRP on uphold. So I've interviewed the CEO, the founder and many other representatives from uphold over the years. And I'm a fan of this platform. And once again, there's some great features like trading between different assets very easily. You don't have to convert to a currency and so forth. They're used by ten plus million users. They have over 200 cryptocurrencies. And they have a very easy to use app. The interface is really nice. So I can certainly vouch for this platform. Once again, I've been a user for years. So if you'd like to learn more about uphold, please visit the link in the description. Welcome back to the thinking crypto podcast, your home for cryptocurrency news and interviews with me today, Shane higdon, who's the cofounder and CEO of the H bar foundation. Shane, great to have you on the show. Likewise, Sony, thanks for inviting me. Well, as Shane, I'm a big hedera hashgraph fan, and I hold the H bar token in full transparency. So I'm super excited to speak with you. And all the great things you guys are doing. But let's start with your background, where are you from? And where'd you grow up? Great question, so I am from east Texas. I live in Texas currently, and born and raised. I did move around professionally, so I lived in Southern California for a while. Boulder Colorado for a while, but came back to my roots back in 2014. To be close to the family. And how did you end up working at the H bar foundation? So that's an interesting intersection. So as I previous to the H bar foundation, I was advising a FinTech unicorn called high radius and prior to that, I was president of one of the divisions at a company called BMC software, which had gone, which was a publicly traded company that went private by Bain, Golden Gate, and insight venture partners. We then, after almost 5 years, then sold that company to KKR, they continued to do incredible things and continue to innovate under their new leadership.

H bar foundation Shane higdon Shane SEC east Texas Sony Southern California Boulder Texas Colorado BMC software insight venture partners Bain Golden Gate KKR
"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Crypto Current

Crypto Current

05:33 min | 8 months ago

"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Crypto Current

"On that. Some of the brightest in the world. It was just at the masari conference, and their engineers were saying, we see everyone doing the same props are following the same process here to aggregate that data and some people are doing it better than others. I think over the next few months, we're going to see some more leaders emerge in sort of that I don't want to call it layer zero because it's not a layer zero type protocol, but it will serve some of the same functions. Aggregating lots of data from lots of different chains together, making it available for business analysts and data scientists to consume easily, we're not there yet. And I think some tools like doing analytics are getting there. Some chains, I don't want to name any names, are a little bit further along in that data science path than others. But yeah, that's the way the industry is going. I think we're still going through that infrastructure phase where we're trying to get all the data compile it and then make it shareable at scale. The scale piece, I think, is a little bit more challenging with the blockchain data. As opposed to a traditional web two database where scale is not an issue, we can just run as many programs as we need to. Yeah, some of these APIs for these different chains are a little bit more restrictive because of the architecture and the way the data works. So I think we have some progress to make on those few pieces of the architecture in terms of aggregation, getting the data and then sharing it. Right. And I was having a conversation with someone about this the other day of just how nascent web three is compared to web two and how a lot of foundation is being built right now, but we're as more foundations being built the faster we can move. The easier it will be for these aggregators to take data be able to use it in constructive way and then move faster onto the next target thing that they're trying to solve. So I'm excited for it. I'm looking forward to that particular conversation. But as you look towards Aggie, what's something that you're looking for at the conference? Definitely meeting people connecting and discussing what other people are saying in the interoperability space. As a data person, it's kind of where my passion really is is in the data science things, analytics, and then being able to work with being able to work so closely with the data on the cutting edge of this technology industry. It's a true privilege to be honest. Because there's so much that needs to be built and so much that needs to be done from the data perspective. So I'm really curious to see what other people are doing, learning more about what other projects are up to and how they're handling some of the same problems that all of my grantees are seeing that I'm seeing. So I can't wait to just get other people's perspectives. Definitely. And I think there's going to be a good group of people that not only are focused on that, but also have a ton of other verticals that they're pretty in depth in. So I know I'm looking forward to seeing you there listening in. And as we kind of wrap up here, man, what's a final thought that you want to leave with everyone listening in today? Keep building. I think it's time to build and get your products ready. And if you're scared to take a jump into starting a product, go ahead and do it. I think now is the time. When the next bull market comes back around, I think it'll be quick. It'll be sudden. And some products will be ready and some will not be. So I think the people that have their products ready to go are going to be in a much better position to take full advantage of when the market flips over the next couple of years. Yeah, so again, I think the other piece I'd like to finish with is the hammer back on that architecture piece. That is what's holding this industry back in my opinion from the developer's perspective. Being able to get the data and do whatever you need to do with it quickly at high volume. There's not many chains that can really do that right now. Like I said, some are better than others, but that scale piece that volume piece, we're not there yet. So definitely keep an eye on some of those other data companies that are bringing all of the chain data together from all different blockchains and projects. I think we have a long way to go in terms of enabling developers across the whole industry. So I can't wait to see once we unlock that piece once we don't get the data volume unlocked across the whole industry. What do we build from there? Where does the industry go from there? I think we're at the very beginning of all that. Which goes back to your original final thought of builders need to build right now. Thank you for joining us for another episode of coconut oil to get past this other side. Whoever is prepared and ready to go from just discovering the space may not be as we get closer to getting this architectural figure out. Cryptocurrency go faster and we get a little closer to our gas adoption. Help this web page. I really appreciate you spending some time with us today. What are ways that people can connect with you and learn more about what's going on at the H bar foundation. Yeah, you can follow me on Twitter at Cole enright. You can

H bar foundation Cole enright Twitter
"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Crypto Current

Crypto Current

08:16 min | 8 months ago

"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Crypto Current

"We are continuing to let you all know about the conference we have coming up is going to make it happening Friday, October 28th, and today we have another special speaker that's going to be at the event and sharing a lot of great insights. We have colon right who's the director of analytics at the H bar foundation. How are you doing today, Cole? Great, great. It's a pleasure to be here. Super excited. No doubt, man, well, excited to learn more about what you got going on and what we're going to be doing at ag me, but first let's learn a little bit more about you. Can you give us a little background on yourself? Sure. Absolutely. So I guess I started my crypto journey back in early 2014, 2013, heard about this Bitcoin stuff, started collecting a couple of them, that was a long time ago. And then kind of forgot about it, sold them all back in 2015, felt like a genius at the time. And spent a long time in the web two world from there. And I guess at the exact top of the market, I decided to make the jump from web two to web three. Full-time. So I think I'm not alone there. But so right now I'm a director of analytics at the H bar foundation. And my job there is to help us measure the success of our grants. We give out grants to organizations and developers building on the H bar on the H bar network on the air hash graph. And we need a way to determine how successful those grants have been, whether that be on chain or with their project updates. That's the primary role of what I do now. And that's really cool. I think it's amazing that there's these people that can literally receive money to come and build on top of the hedera hashgraph ecosystem. So for those who are builders in this space, especially during these various times and are looking for opportunities like this, have been looking for a way to kind of kickstart their entrepreneurial journey into building this space and they think that hedera could be a great place to start. Walk us through the process of how they would be able to apply for a grant and what are some things that you look for when choosing someone. Yeah, absolutely. So to apply for grants pretty simple, we just have a form on our website where we fill it out and then we go through a number of reviews and approval processes to a due diligence, of course. And at the end of that process, we'll distribute some funding, whether that be H bar, tokens, for some USD C, U.S. dollars as well, depending on what's needed. The types of companies we're looking at. We're looking for people with really realistically we're looking for people that already have a go live date kind of in mind for their product and already have something that is in development ready to go in progress or something that they're trying to pick which chain to build on how to decentralize and we try to push them over the edge to come over to our network. Versus some of our competitors. Gotcha. And I know back when we were first talking about you get involved in this, it was cool to see the various types of companies that are coming and building from NFT plays to foundation plays to interoperability like there's a lot of really cool projects, what are some of the ways and I know I just listed a couple, but what are some of the different kind of verticals that y'all recently have been giving some grants to if you're able to speak on it? Yeah, absolutely. So I guess so we have a number of funds for specific industries. We have our sustainability fund, which focuses on sustainable projects, ESG type things, a lot of a lot of trust layer type applications there where auditing how carbon credits are produced and then made liquid on certain markets. So sustainability is one of the biggest ones I'd say for us. We also have a very large metaverse fund where we're trying to get people to build out their worlds on our platform. And then we have some more boring funds like crypto economy and some infrastructure funds as well. So that's kind of how we're thinking about it from a developer enablement perspective and metaverse sustainability and then just want to sort of in other fund after that. Yeah, and I know that a lot of people are fired up in a lot of those categories, especially as it relates to the metaverse, but recently just came from a conference yourself and was able to go and meet network and meet some pretty cool people. And leading up to Aggie, you know, there's been several conversations that have been to this year. I know that we both met as NFT and this year and there's some others that you've gone to, why do you think it's important for people to continue to go to in person events like during these various times? Right. I think it starts with the people, for sure. Getting to see the people in person, the technology is great. We love the technology for sure, but the people that are building the technology and making those connections. I think there's something more to that. So for example, I got to meet the guys running the brave team on the brave wallet in a brave browser. And now we're buddies. So now I have a extra level of trust. We talk about trust later all the time. There's that extra level of trust now that I've met these guys. So I think that's absolutely critical to be able to know who's behind the project. Who's the who are the leaders and the builders behind the product? As you can see, you can read a pitch deck and look really good, but if the people behind the product are not, you know, they're not the kind of people you want to be partnered with or something like that, then the pitch isn't worth anything. So I think continuing to make this connection is making friends in person throughout the community is critical. Definitely. And it's really good that FaceTime and to build that rapport, I think is essential in once you have that kind of report somebody, it's easier for you to then go and meet more people and get more access to resources for something you're either building or want to learn more about in our curious about. And that's one of the main reasons why we're doing aggre why we are putting this conference together so that people can come together who are building in the web through community right now, seeing some of the local talent that is in Austin and you are going to be featured on a panel that is focused on interoperability. So what are some of the ways that H bar foundation are taking active steps towards interoperability in that future? Yeah, so this is a big focus for me. So as you can imagine, I look across a lot of different grants. We have a lot of different a lot of visibility across who's building what. And I'm starting to see some patterns emerge in the data connectivity piece. How different applications are getting on chain data, interacting with it in their applications. So everyone's kind of going about this in a similar architecture, but slightly different execution. And the architecture would be so the data lives on chain. So challenge one, how do we get connect to the chain data? How do we get the data? So everyone's got their own way to do that. There's usually an API or something like that. And then comes the aggregation piece. How do you aggregate that data the raw data coming out of the chain into normalized tables that you can read out of a spreadsheet? And then how do you turn those raw tables into an application? Turn that into a front end website where you can actually interact with your wallet and make web three calls. So those are the three steps that I'm seeing a number of different organizations work on. And the aggregation layer taking the raw data from the chain and compiling it into a meaningful database. That's the big challenge I'm seeing right now in the industry. And some extremely talented data engineers are working

H bar foundation Cole U.S. FaceTime Austin
"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"Co host pizza. Mind here bryce paul's here with us as well. Bryce fed a while serving able to come together. And do one of these things together. How you bet man yes man. Sometimes it seems the craziness of life. You'll grab guest all gas. I always think that the best episodes are when you and i are together in action And so luckily. We've got an amazing yesterday who scheduled sync up extremely well with ours as well. We have dr leeman baird from hadera hash crap with us Dr barry welcome to the show. Thanks great to be here. Be here with you. This is wonderful. And did i pronounce that one hundred percent correctly. You did leeman barrett very nice. Thank you. I'm buried and you prefer doctors baird leeman had just cullman lebron. Everyone custom given her and leaving. I mean you. You have a renowned snoring You know a really renowned for offer you've been bent waters of a very profound aspects that run decentralized and distributed systems. And so it's an honor to have you on the on the crypto. One podcast and we briefed you before again crypto. One audience. is you know cook. Don't want one. We're not your typical audience. You might write a professor oriole dissertation do or a cryptographic white paper or anything like that. But you know you got such an interesting background. I think that people will be learning a lot here over the course of the next thirty forty five minutes. So can you can you. Could we introduce yourself in. Let us know a little bit about your background. Sure so i'm leaving I enjoy doing stuck with nafta with computers a computer scientists. I've done all sorts of different things. I was a professor a long time. And i've started a bunch of companies and i like to write programs for fun like to do math refund. Enjoy teaching stuff Just all sorts of different things to do a wide variety of things a lot of different things in my past. Yeah.

bryce paul dr leeman baird hadera Dr barry leeman barrett baird leeman cullman lebron Bryce
"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"A friend on Putting together an open source stripe. Because i think that's the answer. Basically cool okay so i was about to start talking about banks because you said banking but as you pointed out banking doesn't need banks or doesn't mean banks right it. Doesn't it really needs. It just needs middleware. I understand so this all fintech all banking all of this defy. All of these areas are extremely hot right now and i think this is a great time to be starting startups in this area is also a great time for the big old giants have been around for one hundred years to get into this area and i think we're seeing both. We are seeing a lot of smart starts coming in. And we've seen some of the old fogy organizations have been around forever also getting in and we're seeing the regulators starting to say. Well maybe this isn't all such bad stuff. The banks were recently told that they're allowed to hold you less shooting. The custodian of these things can running note in a network. This is cool. Our council has several banks on it. The oldest bank in south korea and the biggest one in africa and one of the oldest financial institutions in japan are council. And it's not just banks. You talked about payments. Pause is a household word in australia. They're doing payments and of course they've been doing payments non blockchain ways for a long time but they're not part of our council and they're using hadera. They're building on. How dare to do payments. So you'll pay at. The store was enough poss which is every australian. Apparently knows that name and you'll be flowing through hadera so i think that this is exciting and i liked what you said. What you said made it sound like we're disintermediating. We're not allowing these big organizations. That have a stranglehold all payments to control all payments. But we're actually going to be more decentralized and allowing people to do it more easily without having the stranglehold from the big players. And i think this is what ledgers night enable now the big players that are smart become nimble and they'll get to compete also but ultimately we the consumers. The people will benefit that we will not be held hostage by a small number of players. We'll have more choices and then all the players have to act better. I swear i wouldn't even care paying the amount of money. I do to infrastructure providers if they were just better designed the sykes so janke every time. I have to log into my bank. I'd feel a little bit sick. You know i even my sixty one thing. I'm pretty excited about this new credit card companies business credit card company your header hash. Great your business right. You actually have a okay. Do you want to ask what are used for business. Credit cards is that. I don't know if that's a security risk if i ask you that you don't have to answer. I don't know. I have an american express card and must do you. Do you log in amex to do stuff. I don't know. I have people in the company that well i bet if you talk to them. They'll say it's horrible. Because i mean no offense to amex. I'm sorry. i shouldn't criticize republican. Amex could do with with interface upgrade. And the only reason i mentioned that is because there's companies ramp and brex these sort of credit these new credit card companies that are competing and they're they're quite Quite interesting because they just unify expense reporting and expense management ended. It is a credit card is is unification point we're going to build a unified system credit cards very compelling vision and it's just like that's what i want the banks to be thinking like make can't seem to get there it's it's there's too much legacy it's really hard to make that move and i i feel for them but i'm really looking forward to up to a better world please please. And this is the problem. Monopolies the problem with oligopolies is. They need to be good enough. That people will use them. But if you have no choice. They don't have any better than just barely good enough. And when you have more players then you have more competition you have hungry eager startups and they do it right and they work really hard on making exactly what users want and what users need any the users don't even know what they want they don't even know what user would be best for them user. Experience would be best for them but you need to find what user experiences best for them and make it a high priority. And i love that and a lot of people say well we can rake in the dough without having to bother about that i if users are happy enough they don't go to our other equally bad competitor size spied but if you can start building little companies that are able to truly care about the user experience then it's a win. It's a win for you and it's a win for all your users so okay right. So can we go deeper on banking infrastructure and. I can't tell me. When do we get this future. Sorry i kind of like derailed us a little bit maybe can ground us around the conversational but more. When do we actually get this stuff in a so. We do have in. In other countries banks have been more freedom to get involved with now even in the us the banks are able to get involved in some of these things. Run a note and ledger and whole digital assets. The regulation is slowly becoming clearer. I hate that. We still don't know exactly what the regulations are. But they're slowly getting better and so. I think that we will see the traditional banking industry will be more and more moving in this direction. And if governments do cbs's the central bank digital currencies if the compulsories themselves have their their actual currency being available on the ledger. That's the ultimate stable coin depending on the country. But that'll be great as all these things. Start to integrate but but it is a spur if a government is doing it. Then that spurs all of their banks and all our businesses to start doing banking using measures and this is the direction we absolutely are headed. I think every country is headed in this direction some degree. Us congressman was talking about other countries are far farther down the line than even than that. So that is important. But of course i understand when you say banking you don't just mean banks you also mean. Is it possible to set up systems. Cubie set up systems where just small organizations are taking money lending a fraction of out keeping a reserve doing all the things that banks do but may be able to get the government to allow them to do it because the ledger itself insurance. They can't cheat or do the wrong thing. In various ways and so the regulation becomes a lighter hand that small startups can afford to do not just big companies have to spend millions of dollars on compliance maybe so maybe a lot of areas of compliance can be made cheaper even all the tax system. This really hard. Maybe that can be made much easier using ledgers. Maybe new kinds of financial things. Start to take place so you can talk about people. The developing world. That don't have access to traditional bank accounts because they don't have entity okay ledgers can start to bring them identity. Legis can even start to bring them things that take the place of a bank account they can make it possible for them to interact with each other and do buying selling perhaps without as much of this traditional financial infrastructure involved and yet the ledger can be made such that. It still trustworthy. Which is why we have. The traditional infrastructure is because you have to trust where your money is going and that's what ledgers bring is trust to the financial world so may be able to see this. We will see this with micro payments micro payments even extend to right now. Everything online is is supported by advertising or bi monthly subscriptions. You don't really have a choice..

janke south korea giants sykes Amex japan africa australia cbs Us
"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"The carbon your network is using and more but it's even better to have your carbon footprint low in the first place and then it's even better to have people building on top of you for green things to change the world so those are some of the ways that we're doing is a lot of other things people that are recording immutable now. A records at the holocaust. So that in the future holocaust-deniers can see these things recorded by the people that were there. People had firsthand knowledge. We have people that are combating fake news by recording news on our systems are even going into war torn countries ensuring that notifications get to the people that are in danger if the war is moving towards a certain area than the people are warned ahead of time. These are real world things built on darah that are making the world better so we are both getting traction in the real world having real real big customers big companies using us and lots of startups using us. But we're also make an impact on the world in the things that are being built on us. Some of them really are impacting. The world in some cases in ways. You really couldn't do until you have a fast ledger. Ledgers really do make a difference. They're wonderful really good to hear that. So deploying the stuff what's the current infrastructure look like today is actually decentralized where you're running your nodes gimmie the bird's eye view the infrastructure. So it's on every continent except antarctica. Yeah we're in australia but not antarctica but every other continent it's in countries around the world is in every region of the world. We have computers spread around the world. Because we want the network to be decentralized we would not want for example a coal mine to have a problem that then shuts down a third of your passion power. That's not good. That's not the kind of decentralisation that we want who went to kind of decentralisation if a power plant goes down maybe one of our knowns goes down it just one not third of our news so we are spread around the world. We are sprayed on different countries under different governments. That's the other thing you don't really want most of your notes to be under a single government because you never know what that single government will do. It could shut you down. It could even take over your notes and caused them to maliciously do bad things which makes it hard even move offshore instead we are under different governance. Governments under different cultures are council members. Some of them are universities. We have companies and they are diversified in different areas different markets through even diversity in time they have term limits and they have to leave after a while so we are trying to be decentralized in how we set up our infrastructure and how we have our council. The number of nodes we have is small. It's broken it is spread out. It is run by these people. It will be growing over time. We have a pathway. Where right now. They are permission but they will go to uncommissioned so anonymous people can run notes. Were doing that as we get to the point where the proof steak kit is. Sure to be safe enough. Spread out enough. The tokens are spread out. Enough so we have that path that will be doing and our network. You can see what's going on. We even have dashboards. We can watch which computers are up and down see their history you can see real time stats on them. The council itself is transparent and decentralized. We publish the minutes of all meetings so it's not talking in smoke-filled rooms behind back it's the whole world can see what they're doing and the people doing it or people that care about the reputation you know. These are big companies big universities top ten university top ten companies that kind of organizations and it's totally transparent and i think the decentralisation really goes along with transparency it doesn't matter if you say anywhere in the world can help run this thing and build it if then power just over time divulge to a small handful of people that are actually building it and running it and they meet behind closed doors and they're strangers don't know much about them so we have tried very hard to be decentralized governance and transparent and our governance and making sure that you know who they are that you can trust them and then our intrastructure falls that your background is fascinating. You have a very serious background. I have a ton of respect for you given your credentials just a brief condensation for the listeners. You into the computer science at the air force academy than you did a so. You're clearly a and then you resume just goes off like that and your your founder. You're you've done tons of work. Why when you could work on literally anything in the world. are you working on. Hit air hash graph. I want to work on something that matters. Yes i could do anything. And when i was a professor that matters you are changing a few lives but it's a few lives. I want to do something that really matters on a on a larger scale and i really love teaching. Being a professor was a lot of fun but for the last twenty years. I've been starting companies. I've been trying to move towards things. Make the world more secure more efficient. We disinter mediate so that you don't have to have central authorities that have power over you but the people themselves have the power i think at this point in history for ledgers for this whole blockchain industry is amazing. Because you don't over sell it. It's not going to do everything but it is going to affect every piece of society. It's not going to do the whole economy but every piece of the economy is going to be affected by ledgers. I think that we're going to see as a result of this revolution. When he gets done. You'll be able to do things cheaper and faster and simpler than you can today but you also be able to do with more trust. There'll be less powered that centralized because you don't have to go through a trusted third party to interact with someone you just interact with them and it won't take you weeks to do a cycle search on your house. It happens three seconds because it's on a ledger. If i wanna see you money. I don't have to know who you are. You know who i am and we go to a third party and and escrow i can just do with ledgers ensure that actually works. If i'm a company claiming i have organic food. I i've actually read about some of what organic means it starts with organic farmers the united states and they get their milk. And then they say oh. There's not enough. So they go to other countries and organic milk. But freeze dried reconstituted k. Maybe it's still organic. It's still not enough. So then they go to developing world countries and they go to these very poor farmers are desperate to make a living and they say opinion a little bit mark. You tell me your milk as organic. You know what they say. Yeah it's organic. This kind of thing is a problem. And there's no easy way to solve it unless you have some way of immutable recording for the world where everyone is seeing the same thing of things like providence. Ledgers are going to change the way the world works just like the internet changed the way the world works and make information more freely. Ledgers are gonna make information flow more trustworthy early if that's a word and they're going to allow us to be able to interact with each other in ways that we haven't even done before. Let calix see have you seen spencer. Dinwiddie has set up this company. The creators galaxy. What what does it do. So what he has done is he's is. He's a row level basketball player. Spencer dinwiddie his finger famous. He started by token zine his own career his own future about his own future value his future income and creating markets for his own future income. That's pretty cool. And they went further and start token tokenism. Things like shoes he wears. And then he used. This tokens ation system to set it up so that fans can interact with him in new kinds of ways that they can even vote on what shoes he wears the next game. These sorts of things for him as a creator to token is and to monetize and to share with fans things that were not available before and it was so cool that he created calisi the creators galaxy.

antarctica air force academy australia Spencer dinwiddie token zine united states providence Dinwiddie spencer basketball
"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Where are we today. Are you powering anything. That is at donated. Sarong away powering. Anything that's like really meaningful production technology. Yes so many in two senses. Is it changing the world and is it just doing a lot of transactions every second we processed over one point three billion transactions. That's more than anyone more than a theorem in bitcoin. Put together but it did it in a year and a half and we're accelerating i told you. I think we'll have a month at some point because people are using it. so is it meaningful. Yes we have lots of real users doing real things. Those were not test transactions. There's a real transactions that real pain people are using so in that sense. Yes this is being used in the real world. We have enormous interest from both start ups and big established companies that want a system that is cheap fast. That is secure. That has predictable price. I should say that to we have to pay. H bars of course like any ledger paying your cryptocurrency but the pricing is pegged to the us dollar so as you have cryptocurrency price volatility. Your company that you're building on this can still predict your costs. So that's another thing that we do to make this real world so people using this in the real world and they like the fact that the costs are predictable. I don't have to wonder if the price of the h bar goes up or down tenfold tomorrow either. Way is the price of my transaction. Going up or down. You'd have to worry about this head to the dollar. They'll pay more or less h morris based on the price but in us. It's constant so these are why we're getting a lot of traction in real world companies using it and of course council itself is using it. Who'll is using it. They're one of our council members share they own in control us or delay piper. One of the largest legal firms of the world is using this for token ization. There's a lot of people using us but that might not be the full question. The full question might be. Is this having a real impact on things in the world. that matter. Is this in some ways helping the world. Yes so it is helping say with covert is being used for tracking the providence of kobe. Vaccines to see if they have been kept cold. It has been used for tracking the providence of other things. You might wanna make sure that things evaluating your food really is good. It claims to be organic. Is it really. Organic was produced with slave labor or child labor or other unfair practices. You can track the province and people are doing this tracking providence of things on dera people are also using dare for markets that help the world become greater so carbon credit markets we have carbon credits being tokenist and traded on darah and then we have renewable energy itself being tokenist and traded. And the idea. Is that if you put a solar panel on your roof you might want to sell excess energy back to the grid you might want to have a market of people who are consuming energy and people who are it. This encourages more people to build the reusable energy. If you can put a windmill in your backyard or a solar panel on your roof if there's a good market for you to sell your energy with supply and demand not just the electric company but supply and demand actually a real market. Then you're more likely to do it. And so there are people building. These kinds of markets on darren and so dairy is having an impact on the real world by allowing things like these markets in carbon credits electricity. But i said it was fast and i said it was cheap..

h morris piper kobe dera us darren
"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Where are we today. are you powering. Anything that is at. Don't even sarong away powering. Anything that's like really meaningful production technology. Yes so many in two senses. Is it changing the world and is it just doing a lot of transactions every second we processed over one point three billion transactions. That's more than anyone more than a theorem in bitcoin. Put together but it did it in a year and a half and we're accelerating i told you. I think we'll have a month at some point because people are using it. so is it meaningful. Yes we have lots of real users doing real things. Those were not test. Transactions as a real transactions. That real pain people are using so in that sense. Yes this is being used in the real world. We have enormous interest from both start ups and big established companies that want system. That is cheap fast. That is secure. That has predictable price. I should say that to. We have to pay h bars. Of course like any ledger. You pay in your cryptocurrency but the pricing is pegged to the us dollar so as you have cryptocurrency price volatility. Your company that you're building on this can still predict your costs. So that's another thing that we do to make this real world so people using this in the real world and they like the fact that the costs are predictable. I don't have to wonder if the price of the h bar goes up or down tenfold tomorrow either. Way is the price of my transaction. Going up or down. You'd have to worry about this head to the dollar. They'll pay more or less h morris based on the price but in us constant so. These are why we're getting a lot of traction in real world companies using it and of course the council itself is using it. who'll is using it. They're one of our council members share. They own in control us or delay piper. One of the largest legal firms of the world is using this for token ization. There's a lot of people using us but that might not be the full question. The full question might be. Is this having a real impact on things in the world. that matter. Is this in some ways helping the world. Yes so it is helping say with covert it is being used for tracking the providence of kobe. Vaccines to see if they have been kept cold. It has been used for tracking the providence of other things. You might wanna make sure that things evaluating your food really is good if he claims to be organic. Is it really. Organic was produced with slave labor or child labor or other unfair practices. You can track the province and people are doing this tracking providence of things on dera people are also using her for markets that help the world become greater so carbon credit markets we have carbon credits being tokenist and traded on darah and then we have renewable energy itself being tokenist and traded. And the idea. Is that if you put a solar panel on your roof you might want to sell excess energy back to the grid you might want to have a market of people who are consuming energy and people who are it. This encourages more people to build the reusable energy. If you can put a windmill in your backyard or a solar panel on your roof if there's a good market for you to sell your energy with supply and demand not just the electric company but supply and demand actually a real market. Then you're more likely to do it. And so there are people building. These kinds of markets darren and so dairy is having an impact on the real world by allowing things like these markets in carbon credits electricity. But i said it was fast and i said it was cheap..

morris piper kobe dera us darren
"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"And so using building bridges as nets on hadera using the consensus service is also a good way to interrupt rate between ledgers. So i think we'll see both. I think we'll see the kurt earl three the current systems that maybe sometimes you you do various things where you tell things on one ledger. Smart contract ledger hashes revealed to another ledgers smart contract. You can do some things like that for swaps you can also go further and have something like these networks that act bridges the validations. You have to trust in the bridges and then they can as an oracle on both ledgers. Tell each the other said and then ultimately you can build those on top of the consensus servants which is very fast way of doing it. And then ultimately can you state proofs cryptographic proofs and messages flow between ledgers. Well this is the path the world is on and just like the internet started with a bunch of gardens and ended up with a single internetwork. I think we're seeing the same thing in the world ledgers and this is great and then. Cdc's will play into this. All sorts of applications will play into this where the whole world is in one sense one big ledger and another since they aren't but all interrupted that makes the whole world. Seamless this is the world we're going towards the key axes of trade offs between these different multipurpose blockchain's so i i don't want to use the theory today because the transaction costs are too high. I can't really do micro payments or detailed smart contract infrastructure. That is not high margin there because it's just gonna be expensive to to really have any value over time. The costs are going to drop for theorem. That's for sure. But i presume that with their hash graph. You're doing something that lowers the cost. Do i have that right absolutely. And it's all about tps. How many transactions per second can you do there was a certain cost in running nodes and though they somehow have to be reimbursed for that and if you can only do a handful of transactions each second then that cost is spread over smaller number of transactions but if you can do ten thousand transactions per second then that cost is spread over a large number of transactions. They can become cheap so hopefully we'll have to own a couple of years that makes them faster and in their price might riveted go down per transaction. Which is what you care about. We're currently slowing ourselves down to only ten thousand per second people aren't using that yet but we have users that keep using more and more and we have in the pipeline users that will be doing a lot seeing recently talked about. Hey we're over. A big and transactions processed. We expect to get to be doing that every month. A billion a month we expect to be really doing a lot of transactions and so the cost to run the network. it's amortized over a lot more transactions. That's the key to having locals you have to be able to do. Lots of transactions per second. and so. We're doing that and ultimately. I think everyone needs to do that. And i think those are the two big things you need is the cost and then you also need the security abt and some other things i think are important but if you can have the speed that gives you low cost and still be secure with that speed then. It's a good combination and this is what we need to. How does it hash craft work. Can you tell me just how it works and broad strokes i. I'm not in a theory expert. But a basically understand theorem is a multi purpose blockchain with a smart contract language built on top of it. I know a little bit about finality and stuff. But i know how to do. You know customer something but some about merckel trees and whatnot but can can you give me the right level of abstraction that helps me understand. The key breakthroughs of hitter hash graph. Sure so we do the same things on top of the ledger. Area smart contracts and things that we had to consensus service any logic could do a consensus service if it was fast enough but if you can only do it a dozen it's like inter six a second or fifteen second than you want to consensus service so the stuff that we're building on. Top of the ledger is sort of traditional. Except we get to do some more things because we're fast the reason we're fastest because of what's happening under the hood and that is we are running these extremely secure ways that had been known for thirty years of coming to an agreement so we've over thirty years how to do agreement where you have finality. Absolute guaranteed finality very quickly. And you have this as synchronous byzantine fault tolerance. There's no leader. You don't have to do any proof of work. You're using lots of electricity but there's no leader can take turns being leader you don't. We don't elect leaders. Every node is equal and they're basically voting with each other and the problem with these thirty year old systems is they have to send lots of votes back and forth in order to come to a consensus but the nice thing that you can shut that anyone computer doesn't matter they still reach consensus. Shut down a third of them almost a third and they'll still reach consensus and you have these strong mathematical guarantees on it. Even if the internet is slow even if you de dos computers. Even if there's firewall slowing down some packets and not others you still have all. These guarantees hash graph though is different because the problem with those voting algorithms that you have to send all these votes back and forth and just uses a lot of time. A lot of bandwidth and so on in hash graph. Every node is just sending messages to the other notes and so when you submit a transaction every node consumers these transactions out. We don't have to take turns putting the block on the chain. I mean you could say. It's a direct today cyclic. Graph daggs are a picture of it right here but the important thing is that they're all notes or the same they're all adding transactions to the immutable ledger at the same time. They're not taking turns. They're doing it with gossip. Which is the fastest way to get these things out. But of course then you need consensus on what order to put them in and you would say That's the stuff that's going to be very slow. What we do is every time we send one of these messages. We had on just to hashes just two little notes at the bottom of the message. Saying here's the last message i created. And here's the last message i received. That's it we're all gossiping with each other and sharing these transactions with each other and we all are these notes around these messages around but every message has these two little hashes that you know the creator that message when they created it with the last message ways they created and the last message that they received. You can put these together like puzzle pieces that fit together and you can see the entire history of how we talk to each other. You actually get a history of how the entire gossip process worked. When i get a message. I don't just know that i now have the message. I know exactly what pads it flute flute through the network and it might have branched out. It's like a tree reached him and then return reached him and it reached me and i got it from this branch but also other brands spreading. I see the complete history and given that much information i can run those old thirty year old algorithms in my head with no vose whatsoever going over the internet. It's virtual voting in my mind. I can say you know. He ran one of those thirty year old algorithms. I know exactly how you would vote. So don't bother voting. I'll just pretend that you voted that way and run the algorithm. And you still get all of those math proofs that the f. t. and we've actually had computers check the math proofs and they are true and carnegie mellon professor was did that setup seal systems to check it and so you get this extreme security but the speed is just. The speed of gossip is just how long it takes to have goss about these transactions. And we don't have to send any extra messages at all to consensus. We don't have to use proof of work to say whose turn it is to add to the chain. It's everybody's turn at the same time we don't have to take turns on who the leader is. Everyone's leader at the same time. Everyone is equal completely decentralized. That's referes profound and you're essentially revealing that. There is a domain specificity to these different blockchain's your revealing a bias towards certain applications. In hadera hash graph. What are those kinds of applications optimized for. I know you listed some but can you.

kurt earl Cdc oracle Graph daggs carnegie mellon goss hadera
"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"I think we'll see both. I think we'll see the kurt earl three the current systems that maybe sometimes you you do various things where you tell things on one ledger. Smart contract ledger hashes revealed to another ledgers smart contract. You can do some things like that for swaps you can also go further and have something like these networks that act bridges the validations. You have to trust in the bridges and then they can as an oracle on both ledgers. Tell each the other said and then ultimately you can build those on top of the consensus servants which is very fast way of doing it. And then ultimately can you state proofs cryptographic proofs and messages flow between ledgers. Well this is the path the world is on and just like the internet started with a bunch of gardens and ended up with a single internetwork. I think we're seeing the same thing in the world ledgers and this is great and then. Cdc's will play into this. All sorts of applications will play into this where the whole world is in one sense one big ledger and another since they aren't but all interrupted that makes the whole world. Seamless this is the world we're going towards the key axes of trade offs between these different multipurpose blockchain's so i i don't want to use the theory today because the transaction costs are too high. I can't really do micro payments or detailed smart contract infrastructure. That is not high margin there because it's just gonna be expensive to to really have any value over time. The costs are going to drop for theorem. That's for sure. But i presume that with their hash graph. You're doing something that lowers the cost. Do i have that right absolutely. And it's all about tps. How many transactions per second can you do there was a certain cost in running nodes and though they somehow have to be reimbursed for that and if you can only do a handful of transactions each second then that cost is spread over smaller number of transactions but if you can do ten thousand transactions per second then that cost is spread over a large number of transactions. They can become cheap so hopefully we'll have to own a couple of years that makes them faster and in their price might riveted go down per transaction. Which is what you care about. We're currently slowing ourselves down to only ten thousand per second people aren't using that yet but we have users that keep using more and more and we have in the pipeline users that will be doing a lot seeing recently talked about. Hey we're over. A big and transactions processed. We expect to get to be doing that every month. A billion a month we expect to be really doing a lot of transactions and so the cost to run the network. it's amortized over a lot more transactions. That's the key to having locals you have to be able to do. Lots of transactions per second. and so. We're doing that and ultimately. I think everyone needs to do that. And i think those are the two big things you need is the cost and then you also need the security abt and some other things i think are important but if you can have the speed that gives you low cost and still be secure with that speed then. It's a good combination and this is what we need to. How does it hash craft work. Can you tell me just how it works and broad strokes i. I'm not in a theory expert. But a basically understand theorem is a multi purpose blockchain with a smart contract language built on top of it. I know a little bit about finality and stuff. But i know how to do. You know customer something but some about merckel trees and whatnot but can can you give me the right level of abstraction that helps me understand. The key breakthroughs of hitter hash graph. Sure so we do the same things on top of the ledger. Area smart contracts and things that we had to consensus service any logic could do a consensus service if it was fast enough but if you can only do it a dozen it's like inter six a second or fifteen second than you want to consensus service so the stuff that we're building on. Top of the ledger is sort of traditional. Except we get to do some more things because we're fast the reason we're fastest because of what's happening under the hood and that is we are running these extremely secure ways that had been known for thirty years of coming to an agreement so we've over thirty years how to do agreement where you have finality. Absolute guaranteed finality very quickly. And you have this as synchronous byzantine fault tolerance. There's no leader. You don't have to do any proof of work using lots of electricity. But there's no leader can take turns being leader you don't. We don't elect leaders. Every node is equal and they're basically voting with each other and the problem with these thirty year old systems is they have to send lots of votes back and forth in order to come to a consensus but the nice thing that you can shut that anyone computer doesn't matter they still reach consensus. Shut down a third of them almost a third and they'll still reach consensus and you have these strong mathematical guarantees on it. Even if the internet is slow even if you de dos computers. Even if there's firewall slowing down some packets and not others you still have all. These guarantees hash graph though is different because the problem with those voting algorithms that you have to send all these votes back and forth and just uses a lot of time. A lot of bandwidth and so on in hash graph. Every node is just sending messages to the other notes and so when you submit a transaction every node consumers these transactions out. We don't have to take turns putting the block on the chain. I mean you could say. It's a direct today cyclic. Graph daggs are a picture of it right here but the important thing is that they're all notes or the same they're all adding transactions to the immutable ledger at the same time. They're not taking turns. They're doing it with gossip. Which is the fastest way to get these things out. But of course then you need consensus on what order to put them in and you would say That's the stuff that's going to be very slow. What we do is every time we send one of these messages. We had on just to hashes just two little notes at the bottom of the message. Saying here's the last message i created. And here's the last message i received. That's it we're all gossiping with each other and sharing these transactions with each other and we all are these notes around these messages around but every message has these two little hashes that you know the creator that message when they created it with the last message ways they created and the last message that they received. You can put these together like puzzle pieces that fit together and you can see the entire history of how we talk to each other. You actually get a history of how the entire gossip process worked. When i get a message. I don't just know that i now have the message. I know exactly what pads it flute flute through the network and it might have branched out. It's like a tree on reached him and then it reached her then reached him and it reached me and i got it from this branch but also other brands spreading. I see the complete history and given that much information i can run those old thirty year old algorithms in my head with no vose whatsoever going over the internet. It's virtual voting in my mind. I can say you know. He ran one of those thirty year old algorithms. I know exactly how you would vote. So don't bother voting. I'll just pretend that you voted that way and run the algorithm. And you still get all of those math proofs that the f. t. and we've actually had computers check the math proofs and they are true and carnegie mellon professor was did that setup seal systems to check it and so you get this extreme security but the speed is just. The speed of gossip is just how long it takes to have goss about these transactions. And we don't have to send any extra messages at all to consensus. We don't have to use proof of work to say whose turn it is to add to the chain. It's everybody's turn at the same time we don't have to take turns on who the leader is. Everyone's leader at the same time. Everyone is equal completely decentralized. That's referes profound and you're essentially revealing that. There is a domain specificity to these different blockchain's your revealing a bias towards certain applications. In hadera hash graph. What are those kinds of applications optimized for. I know you listed some but can you.

kurt earl Cdc oracle Graph daggs carnegie mellon goss hadera
"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"hedera hashgraph" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Purpose built for real time analytics and you can power sub second analytics that allow filtering slicing and dicing in real time again. You can try it out at rock set dot com leeann. Welcome to the show thanks. It's great to be here. So the place i wanna start. This podcast is with a fundraising round. You got i believe. In twenty eighteen from ari. Paul and block our capital so ari paul. Being one of the most respected investors in the world crypto. The fact that he would put one hundred million dollars into hadera hash. Graph is significant to me. Can you tell me where the product slash thesis slash infrastructure was at when you received that financing. Yeah so one. Hundred twenty million actually came from a large number different people but where the project was at at that point is we had the hash craft algorithm that has all sorts of nice math proofs about it. We had implemented in the ledger system itself. We had been already for several years selling it as a private ledger so we had customers using it as a private ledger. And we're now starting a public. Ledger had darah with its own cryptocurrency and so on and so that's what they invested in and they knew that it would be a while before we opened up to the world and people could actually trade the cryptocurrency but they believed in the project then and still seem to be very excited about it now. Our early investors have done very well obviously and they're still very excited about what we're doing and how we're growing convince me of the significance of hadera hash graph in as few words as possible. How would you do that so it is. Ten thousand transactions per second is what we've slowed it down to can go a lot faster. It is ace and critics byzantine fault tolerant which really does mean a level of security that you don't always have and it's math proofs of that that have been checked by computers by carnegie mellon other people and it is governed. Well the governance is transparent. You know who the governors are. They're spread around the world. They're large organizations. Care about the reputations and anything they do wrong we'll be known and act is checks and balances on each other and they're in different countries under different governments. And so in that sense. It is decentralized governance and transparent governance. Those are the key. Am i using this for the same use cases of as a theorem so you can run smart contracts. You can store files on it. You can do crypto currency on it. It has tokens at the native layer. Which is nice you can near see twenty contractors something but you can also do. Our native layer tokens which are of course much faster and much cheaper. I said before it was very fast. It's also very cheap. You're paying a tenth of a cent to transfer token to someone or one hundred percent to transfer cryptocurrency or to send a message to the to the consensus service. And that is the other thing that you don't have with most ledgers. Is this consensus service. The hadera ledger. That has the trust of the council and of the nodes and the decentralisation that trust can be brought to a private network that is using hadera to do it's consensus so you can build a private ledger on william us. Ea talked about theory. You use the theory of you can build a private ledger on hyperloop or can do you can do these private ledgers. But you plug in at the bottom. The consensus engine is darah. And all your transactions flew through hadera and you can encrypt them. If you want privacy but had darrow puts them in order darrow puts timestamps on them had dairy ensures that everyone in the world can see exactly which transactions went through and which ones didn't immutable record. All of that comes from dera and so it allows you to build these fast private networks that can be fast in private and whatever logic you want but with the trust inherited from area so we have all of those things does the same things although a subset of that not all of that if i deploy smart contract to hadera can i use solidity. Yes you can take a smart contract that runs on theorem and just transported over without any changes. It does that it even supports commands. Like tell me the time stamp on the latest block. We don't exactly have the latest block but it uses the transactions consensus time stamp to give you that answer and the reason we do that is to be as compatible as possible so if you want to write a spark contract for things like atomic swaps. That will actually work. Well so yes. It is very compatible. Can you paint a picture for me of the multi blockchain ecosystem that we're moving towards so for example. We have a theory. That is i would say the analogy is a theory is aws. And it's so pioneering that it's going to capture perhaps a plurality of value among multipurpose blockchain's we don't know for sure but it may capture a plurality evalu- but there's going to be plenty of room for salona hash graph. What else. I don't know matic network or something but anyway you have these different multipurpose blockchain platforms. That can run smart contracts on solidity or on another language or whatever they're going to have different performance systems. What does that world look lake. Yeah remember the early days of the internet. There were actually private. Networks there was prodigy and america online. I think microsoft had one and they had their own little thing like the world wide web and their own little thing like files in their own little thing like email and they were separate networks but the internet is the internetwork it allows them to connect to each other and eventually the web just bid spread across the entire internetwork and the whole internet does the web. It's all seamless but it's actually different computers running on different little networks all connected together. You have the same thing with email and other other services. I think we'll see the same thing in the ledger. Speeds in the world of blockchain and dot what we'll see is a number of these ledgers and they differ in various ways and maybe use one rather than another but it's very important then to also then connect them altogether and that is what's happening what you end up with. Is you end up with bridges between them. You might have to have a set of alligators. did you have to trust. In some sense. It tells each ledger. What happened on the other ledger. And so the two are talking to each other currently. That's the way it's done. I think ultimately it will be based on state proofs where a ledger can do something and then give you a cryptographic proof that this was the consensus of that ledger. And you take the cryptographic proof to another jury now. It knows what happened on the first one. And so that makes it very easy then to move tokens from one ledger to another or have a wrapped token one ledger. That that is from another ledger. We have lots of ways of doing that today. But i think ultimately what will end up happening is that we will have things based on state proofs to make this easier. This is something that we're doing because our we'll be doing very soon. We have a former state proof right. Now that moore notes can understand will be doing to make it easy to also have intellectual communication using them in addition to the degree that we continue to use bridges that are little networks of their own. Had darah can do the consensus service that i just described to allow them themselves to be powered by hadera. Have the trust of durham and so using building bridges as app nets on hadera using the consensus service is also a good way to interrupt rate between ledgers..

hadera ari paul darah carnegie mellon darrow ari Ledger dera Paul Ea ledger microsoft america moore durham
Google joins Hedera Hashgraphs Governing Council

Insureblocks

08:05 min | 3 years ago

Google joins Hedera Hashgraphs Governing Council

"Man's. Thank you for joining us today for our listeners. Thank you great to be back. It is great to have you back and for our listeners. Who Haven't heard you on our previous podcast. Can you please give them a quick introduction on Yourself Asher So my name is harmon? I'm one of the CO founders of their Hash craft alongside Dr Leeman Baird We've been working together. Lehman I for twenty six years always in deep tack. The we've done reinforcement learning or machine learning research for the Air Force. We talked computer. Science at the Air Force Academy cybersecurity managed massive software program for the Missile Defense Agency and then decided we wanted to become entrepreneurs and this is our third startup we to prior startups in the space of identity and access management and sold one to Fortune. Five hundred the other private equity and Leman wanted to solve a really hard math problems specifically how you can achieve the limits in terms of security in a consensus algorithm distributed consensus algorithm simultaneous to maximizing performance. How you can do both at the same time. And after of hard work he invented the Hash. Graph which is consensus algorithm like blockchain is a consensus algorithm. Has Graph is an alternative approach that has fantastic properties again both in terms of security and performance and we decided to take that tha market and here. We are years later now with their hash graph. Brilliant end in that one answer. You've athlete answered the next two questions. All I can one so fishing deeper interested. Yeah Yeah I mean I think it will be useful is because one of our typical questions is please define what is blockchain and Like we did in the last podcast if you perhaps could have another go at it and at the same time point out the differences between Blockchain and a hash graph. Why Hash crowd is so much more efficient than Blockchain system sure well blockchain as a term refers to two things it refers to a data structure. Which is a chain of blocks of transactions? And it's very serious just like it sounds in the way it's created and it also the the term also refers to a consensus algorithm that enables a community of of participants each of which that holds a local copy of that chain of blocks to come to agreement or consensus on which block to put next on the top of that chain in their by everyone keeps a consistent chain of blocks and often. It's proof of work. You know the use of a really hard cryptographic puzzle into novel ways that makes it possible for the community to to come to consensus on on which blocks you go on top of of the chain. But it's designed to be slow and it. The use of proof of work causes it to be slow and The the fact that there is a single chain that everyone uses also limiting in terms of its architecture hash graph similarly is a term that refers to both a data structure in this case. It's a graph in the mathematical sense. It's a graph that is whose nodes are or verticals are linked together with Hashes gripped graphically in. So it's a data structure in there's also consensus algorithm. That makes it possible for those that have a copy of the Hash graph to calculate how each other how the other nodes in the network would vote on the order of transactions and so they come to to agreement on the order of transactions that get captured in this in this graph because it's a graph rather than a chain all of the transactions. They're flowing into the network can be processed simultaneously. There is no need for proof of work. This process that slows down blockchain to give the community time to come to agreement. There's no need for any of that and so we've basically eliminated the too constraining factors. Proof of work is no is not there. And it's a graph. Instead of a chain and the result of that is fantastic performance in it's got some great theoretical properties specifically it does achieve the limit in terms of security at something called a synchronous. Byzantine fault tolerance. It's the best one can do and in its novel in those ways Brilliant thank you very much for that and we had actually gymnasts or very recently. Come on our show. He's the CEO of core and he was telling us about how he build his colonel virus tracker using Darah Hash craft for exactly the same properties. You just described now. We've had you on this show for about ten ten eleven months ago. What industries and geographies are we seeing the most adoption of our has graph? Well I wouldn't say that there's geography necessarily. That is adopting. Maybe more than than another and the industry's when thinking about the industries. It's it's also it's more like this. It's not really that there is necessarily one industry. That is adopting faster than another but the way I would sort of segment the market or break it down in terms of what is adopting versus. Not Is that. There are a lot of enterprise use cases that are being presented in that. We're you know we're working on with partners and council members that are kind of boring in nature in some ways. What I find interesting is that while most of the market is looking for a really sexy killer. Commercial consumer focused use case. You know everybody's looking for that killer APP. That is primarily focused on building a big consumer focused use case. Our experience is just the opposite. It's for example as a category just audit based applications where you WANNA take some information in get a consensus time stamp on it and use that in various ways maybe their regulatory related. Maybe you need to be able to to just store information improve that it. It was what you claim. It was on a on a given date. There's just a whole broad range of business to business process optimization focused use cases that I think are the ones that are going to end up being the ones that take the whole market Mainstream or result in its mass adoption. And so that's the distinction that I'm seeing. It's it's not a one particular industry or one geography is more focused on B. Two B. process optimization versus consumer focused applications

Blockchain Dr Leeman Baird Harmon Lehman Missile Defense Agency Air Force Air Force Academy Leman CEO