26 Burst results for "Heckman"

"heckman" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

02:20 min | 6 d ago

"heckman" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"Not cut ties absolutely these things are formative from their backgrounds previously in that they manifest so yet not only the rise of the who'd but also the israeli black panthers Other sort of protests in the mabaso transit camps in the nineteen fifties and nineteen sixties. We see a lot of deep roots for contemporary mizrahi politics. In israel with connections to their antecedents in the middle east and north africa and with increasing back and forth migration not migration the tourism in particularly between morocco in israel that only becomes stronger. Look is the connection. Then between the history that you're telling about moroccan jewish politics over the course of the twentieth century and in these bigger issues of historic agency political agency that we see in jews throughout the middle east and in israel in particular. What are the ways in which we can draw connection there as we kind of step back and try to understand the broader history of middle eastern north african jews. Yeah i mean. It's one place among many where we see jewish political agency. Were jews do politics. Moroccan jews jews of moroccan descent. Make up a large percentage of mizraki him in israel today and understanding this story of jewish political activism in morocco these deep roots of jewish political life in morocco sheds light on contemporary politics in israel on contemporary politics and morocco and because of recent current events political life in morocco and political life in israel is even more publicly connected than it was previously in so it shows how these things matter still in both of these geopolitical contexts are will thank you so much. I'm really glad we had a chance to talk about your book and the big issues that connect with it. So thank you so much for joining me on the podcast. Thank you very much. And thanks to you for listening to this episode with all my heckman until next time i'm jason let's dig and this is jewish history matters..

israel israeli black panthers morocco middle east mizraki north africa heckman jason
"heckman" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

05:21 min | 6 d ago

"heckman" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"There are times where they actually do better under christian rule. They do under muslim rule in medieval spain. Right so it's not such a tidy history in that sense but morocco positions itself as one of the heirs to on the loose to the legacy of all of the lose to the events narrative to whistle spain and its treatment of jews in morocco. In many of its historical publications in contemporary publications this was an argument marshaled. During the struggle for independence saying we welcomed jews in fourteen ninety. Two and morocco is always opened. Its doors to jews in therefore morocco is a you know this wonderful home in always been very tolerant of jews and the moroccan jewish communists that i write about also embrace that narrative to a large extent. Demo- levy called tigerish or living together. You preferred in arabic term to convincing eric. Calderwood and isabel roar have both written about the kundi vents narrative from different standpoints from the spanish imperial standpoint from northern Moroccan jewish standpoints. Eric calderwood's book is colonial on the loose in talks quite a bit about the quote romanticize confidence yeah narrative and that narrative is very strong today in morocco. Morocco is very proud of still having a jewish minority living in morocco. The jewish tourism is a prominent part of morocco's touristic economy. You see in morocco. Meaning the city of fez in particular. There are a number of jewish unesco world heritage sites jewish cemeteries and synagogues are very well marked across the country. They're very very prominence in so the convinced. Narrative is one in which the communists participate in which we see this idealized for of rocco take shape and the states very much benefits from the co events narrative. Even when it's challenged writes in two thousand three there was a set of bombings in casablanca that included jewish cultural centers in casablanca than you know the king said you know. No this is basically the land of codependency. A- we have the legacy of land loosely. This is not morocco shing against any sort of extremist version of morocco. That wouldn't have.

morocco spain Eric calderwood Calderwood isabel eric fez unesco casablanca rocco
"heckman" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

05:15 min | 6 d ago

"heckman" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"How jewish life could operate in future morocco. What the state would look like. I mean they condemned the moments of anti-semitism and violence that took place in morocco in the nineteen forties fifties largely surrounding events around israel and palestine. That were these flare ups about violence than Anti-zionism that verged on anti-semitism in morocco and elsewhere in the middle east north africa and so they condemned those moments but they also took a very harsh line toward the majority of moroccan. Jews saying that. Most moroccan jews were not involved enough in the national political movements that they were not committed enough patriotically so they spent a lot of time issuing propaganda directed at moroccan jews calling on them to become more involved which largely fell on deaf ears. A lot of these figures were representative of political liabilities for the wider moroccan jewish community. They rocked the boat. They could get somebody in trouble with the french authorities. They were not part of a majority political party. either right. The communist party was relatively small relative to other national liberation organizations that were operational at the time and suffice it to say the communist party was much more open universalist in its vision of moroccan nece than other national liberation groups in morocco. Most moroccan jews did not heed the call of moroccan jewish communists. Most of them were rather alienated by. What the moroccan jewish communists called for and said and many were very understandably nervous when there were deaths of jews in woosh dorada in nineteen forty eight when there were boycotts of jewish businesses in the early nineteen fifties in that persisted until later into the nineteen fifties nineteen sixties. There was reason for them to be to be nervous. Nineteen sixty one was a terrible year for moroccan jewish life in the sense that the king mohammed v died suddenly had been very popular among moroccan. Jews he died under a relatively minor operation unexpectedly. The egyptian pan-arab nationalist president gamal abdolnasser visited casablanca and this resulted in violence against jews in in casablanca elsewhere and a zionist migration illegal migration ship known as the pisces sank which brought big scandal into morocco. As well in nineteen sixty one. I'm this is after independence right. There was this sort of honeymoon period after independence where where people were more optimistic. But in the early nineteen sixties again. We see a growth in anti zionism verging anti-semitism and growth of political instability in morocco. That made us very nervous. And that nervousness persisted into the nineteen sixties with conflagrations with palestine in israel that ended up taking shape in in a number of alarming ways chore jews in morocco whereas the communists i mean they acknowledged those threats but they were largely dismissive and seemed to take the approach that jews should ignore those threats and instead buckled down and they just hadn't proven their patriotism in their moroccan nece enough. That was their problem. One of the things that you've highlighted here is the way in which jews. Morocco had a series of different options for what kind of politics. What kind of cultural frame or framework that. They wanted to identify themselves with or participate in you mentioned for instance the audience and the the french colonial cultural context of trying essentially to inculcate jews in morocco and elsewhere in the middle east and north africa into a francophone cultural sphere. Also the question of communism moroccan nationalism not even to mention zionism jewish nationalism. So how is it. The jews in morocco navigated this kind of process of thinking about where it was that they belonged how they thought about themselves and their aspirations for the future and so on and so forth and ultimately the ways in which you know for your group of people. Communism became the political direction in which the moved. Why is it that these different options are significant for the way in which we think about the experiences of jews in morocco. In this timeframe. Yeah so there..

morocco middle east north africa palestine casablanca gamal abdolnasser israel mohammed v north africa middle east
"heckman" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

03:37 min | 6 d ago

"heckman" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"Welcome to jewish history matters. I'm jason los dig and today i'm joined by alma heckman to talk about twentieth century moroccan jews and especially moroccan jewish communism and its broader politics. Which is the focus of her. Recent book the sultans communists iraq and jews and the politics of belonging. Listen in as we dive into the history of moroccan jewish politics the development of zionism communism and nationalism in morocco and north africa at large. And why it's important to think through the choices and the agency. The jews in morocco and beyond have had in determining their fate and politics throughout the twentieth century alma. Rachel heckman is an assistant professor of history and the noise feld levin chair of holocaust studies at the university of california santa cruz. She's the author of the sultan's communists moroccan jews and the politics of belonging which was published by stanford university press in two thousand twenty one. Thanks so much for listening to our conversation. I'm so glad to be able to welcome almo- onto the podcast to talk about important issues about moroccan jewelry. North african jewish history at large and the power of politics in modern jewish life. Hi alma thank you so much for joining me on the podcast. Thanks so much for having me. I was just thrilled to get my hands on. Your book is just such a phenomenal topic. Really really exciting Set of issues. And i'm glad that we get a chance to talk about so much one of the things that i think that we can maybe start out with israeli really. Just what is the story here. Where you're writing this book about what you call the sultan's communists and but it's really about is about the place of jews in the changing political and cultural environment of morocco over the course of the twentieth century. What does this mean. How do we look at jews in morocco from the early twentieth century. Going forward from there. And what is the role of jews in the changing politics of morocco in the region the jumping off points really that so many histories jews in morocco limit their story to between you know sometime in the late nineteenth century to nineteen fifty six when morocco gets independence and then the vast majority of moroccan jews leave morocco for the most part they go to israel all they also go to france. They go to canada. They go to other parts of the world but there have not been so many studies about jewish political.

morocco jason los alma heckman Rachel heckman feld levin north africa sultan santa cruz iraq university of california stanford university israel france canada
"heckman" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

05:04 min | 2 months ago

"heckman" Discussed on EconTalk

"But it doesn't and that's the part that i think there's an improvement material in broome but you're not changing the dependents. Traditional measures of educational mobility is what the education of the family. What the errands. Education was with the education of the jewelry. Okay and so what happened. Very interesting in denmark. Very we'll longtime suits. Go back one hundred years when i say we know. Denmark is very very famous collecting data for being very very meticulous and the allies today. You know the danish actuaries in the journal last world a fame they found that actuarial science. But there's a lot of data a lot of governments that disney enacted but one thing was true was that in the nineteen hundred. Say nine thousand nine ten a lot of days lot many wally. If your father didn't go to school you much less likely to go to school. That's true in a democracy primarily your world sign and so what happened was that denmark started expanding programs in the rural areas and targeting for disadvantaged children and so for a while those targeted programs operated away that actually promoted educational attainment so there was a big rise in the nineteen early part of twentieth century. Were danish children. They have much more vision than that other parents. Well suddenly them and this is an interesting part of it around the middle twentieth century. This is work by the way from my co author and the guy named with christians works and these guys actually showed that around the middle of the century. The educational policies began universal. So instead of going after the disadvantage they became across the board and what happened was social will village that had been witnessed in the first battle. Century started the vantage. And the reason why it's very interesting and that is universal. Alyce a tableau. They give you a check. You can go out and checking to go of these school but well educated parents. More affluent parents are better. Able to draw on jets to advise their job to reinforce. What is the learned in those school and so those universally provided program actually turn off the vehicle for promoting social mobility. Rowlett's that actually this idea of educate so who was managed by universal program the most advantage. And this is a binding. That's been it's not just throwing. Denmark is a study that was done. I would say it's school choice in in In boston chris walgreens at the university of california at berkeley arabia adams. He studied use of school choice. Any bound that school choice was actually very beneficial. And he found it. School choice was particularly beneficial. Charters very beneficial in For the most disadvantaged children and this is the interesting part. Who are the kids that were going. Charters rule among those eligible the most advantage it was. The parents sought out those school. So even though the bottom of the barrel benefit more their parents were at ben born and so this universality really created more inequality than was originally intended. And so that's the way that inequality can operate. The family plays a very important role. It's kinda like a captain in the wheelhouse telling the giant what to do where to go. What opportunities say what steps to do and what not to do you commit crime. Should you study at night. Do you do your homework and us. And it's no sahgal imploded. The nobody wants to talk about. And it's beautiful because denmark is a case study where almost every obvious solution. Whoa externally invo solution is at work. Everybody's not the same galician. Everyone's that this and that and yet everybody doesn't go to college. They don't they don't take advantage manageable and they don't they're not getting reading and writing or so started off this program talking about the role of family and i would want to say yes. Let's talk about that. Because that is what i think. The main lesson is armstrong's and even though you can accent transfers accessible but you can't acce transmitter than the naacp them into more effective or less effective parents those are things that actually need a somewhat deeper approach to really thinking about value provide true social opportunity for children..

Denmark broome chris walgreens wally Alyce disney ben born Rowlett jets sahgal university of california arabia berkeley adams wheelhouse boston armstrong naacp
"heckman" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:44 min | 2 months ago

"heckman" Discussed on EconTalk

"Children. Those children will make back and they will not develop the skill that their counterparts might and they not participated in those broken. So there's a sense of incentives facing these children that do not promote their skills and their for this evasion the larger environment so they become. I don't wanna say detached but they developed much less of what their potential might be and and that sounds like it's been creates a mentality that i think is very very dangerous for their own will be it's harmful and that's the other part. Is that a lot of these parents in the welfare state. They're they're all well. And i'm not guessing though the militias with parents that are out there trying to hurt their children u. way but some of the less advantage errands who are still advising their children and the day to day of the year award. Notice spool you. Now do this do that. Don't have any crime and so forth and so on those influences remain and those children are not insulated against that so they may have more money more food on the table they may have worn income security but some of the basic values errands and families provide are missing and that is not achieved. That's not achieved by preschool. It's not achieved by these nursery or childcare center or formal education. None of those factors happens aid for what is missing. Which is the early family years. And it's not like a government program for saying is gonna somehow galvanize the parents not at least the kind that are emblazoned denmark. And so i think the really or thing recognize is that to me. The study emphasizes in a way that i'd never recognized the powerful role of the family that the family is is every as an american looking into the whole discussion of inequality in the united states. Seeing these two trillion dollar packages triple trying to reenact the welfare state. You realize that these buying formulas are basically reincarnations of the danish welfare instant almost line by line unlimited child your universal freaking free college tuition you go down the list of things that biden promised in his presidential address and that many others and it's not just biden it's not even just now my grant a lot of republicans. A lot of will really believe that with this list of social policies in place the world is going to be a better place and provide opportunity..

denmark biden united states
"heckman" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

03:10 min | 2 months ago

"heckman" Discussed on EconTalk

"They boost up the poorest families because they get their education provided for free they get their childcare perhaps provided for free or highly subsidized. So what's what's discouraging about this if you're if you're dane from denmark and you hear this result why wouldn't you just say well so what what's the big deal. So the welfare state has to compensate for the fact that poor children end up with poorer income when they grow in the poorest part of the income distribution when they get older and richard children they also end up richard but the government kind switch. It out is that. Is that how they'd react or am i missing something well. That's the hollis. Yes and they're very proud of that policy snow. There's no question if i were to state. What government policy years in what many danes with. Its agreed to them. They be completely. I'm bored with what the statement is you just name what. What are they missing. What's the what did you find that. It's surprising to them. Well what we find. Is that the children across generations. I know more skill than the children of low skill. Baron skills in terms of education in terms of the social emotional ills in terms of various aspects of striving in engagement in society are really very different. There's no strategy by family origin. And that yes. They get the same material resources but they don't have the same strategies for life and they're not really fully inclusive and so the sense of agency of being a danish child being being fully developing your own essential is the war to end. In fact it is warranted. It is an example in our earlier work. We didn't cite it in this particular favor today. I the one you were signing ending. Though but the structure found earlier was there was a program. Designed targeted towards children who are very disadvantage. And these are kids who had dropped out of school or were given some kind of remedial training and so all well adventure but what happened is the subsidy that they were given was subsidy than moralists induced them not to go to school and not to work and then the light consequences of dissipating so yes. They were equalised when they were eighteen. Seventy but when they were thirty five thirty six bay lack the skills of those who had not participated in the room and so there there are strong our whole disincentive effects operating throughout the whole system. Don't it's an issue that if you're guaranteed you're told you basically don't meet describe who are and you basically are told when you're in school but yeah the benny school with also get the subsidy. That's targeted towards disadvantaged children. Those children will make back and they will not develop the skill that their counterparts might and they not participated in those broken. So there's a sense of incentives facing these children that do not promote their skills and their for this evasion the larger environment.

richard dane hollis denmark Baron benny school
"heckman" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:44 min | 2 months ago

"heckman" Discussed on EconTalk

"And access open to everyone and let's expenditures least measured on school as measured by teachers our and other dimensions of child the quality school schooling. The children are getting is about the forced the same teachers salaries and universal overall arthur denver. Maybe a slight modification for us the living. But it's very close to universal. And the reason why i can confirm all these policies in place is that i've been analyzing what is called registered data from from denmark. Unlike the us in denmark. There are registered. Everybody signs up at birth and they up adapt in the in the register and so we can monitor every major event every event actually in the life of gains from birth. That you know where they go to school win. They're born with the quality of the school is who else went to them. What neighborhood they lived in. We know a lot of things about them that we family we know what earnings they had. I don't want that. They add where they move who their neighbors are in. So we're able to really measure the full extent of what welker stay in. Denmark is acting on what out people are sorting out. People are interacting. So it's a very rich opportunity to study social mobility denmark. But as you were saying as you were saying did denmark has actually been viewed as a model state and so and the dame's themselves you as a model state it's not a social state. They was validly social welfare..

arthur denver denmark welker us
Washington, DC appeals court sends lawsuit over Trump financial records back to lower court

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 9 months ago

Washington, DC appeals court sends lawsuit over Trump financial records back to lower court

"On the House Oversight and Reform Committee got another shot at getting Trump Hotel documents from the General Services Administration. Federal news Networks jury Hackman has more three judge panel in the D. C. Court of Appeals is sending the committee's case back to the lower courts to decide the merits of the document request. Do you see? Federal court dismissed the lawsuit in August 2018 on procedural grounds. Lawmakers asked for monthly statements of the hotel's revenues and expenses and correspondence between G s A and the Trump transition team. Jury. Heckman Fed Loose network President

House Oversight And Reform Com Trump Hotel D. C. Court Of Appeals General Services Administratio Hackman Federal Court Heckman
Major Events In Houston  Expected Back Next Year

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:34 sec | 11 months ago

Major Events In Houston Expected Back Next Year

"The head of houston's events venues says he's expected to see major events coming back in the second half of next year he houston's tourism industry has been hurting since large conventions and concerts are still cancelled. Michael heckman is acting. Ceo of houston first corporation. Not seeing as many out and out cancellations which is good news. I think that the the vaccine news is Is the light at the end of the tunnel. We'll see how it's ultimately distributed and brought the scale harris county remains at a level one cove threat level officials are discouraging. Any large gatherings

Houston Michael Heckman Houston First Corporation Harris County
Houston Sends Emergency Text Alert To 4.7M Residents Requesting They Cancel Holiday Gatherings During COVID-19 Surge

Houston Matters

05:07 min | 11 months ago

Houston Sends Emergency Text Alert To 4.7M Residents Requesting They Cancel Holiday Gatherings During COVID-19 Surge

"On tuesday. Show harris county judge. Lena hidalgo reiterated the seriousness of this latest surge of covid nineteen cases later tuesday to reinforce at the county released an emergency broadcast alert urging residents to stay home wear masks and cancelled gatherings that last part is not welcome news for folks whose job it is to promote and encourage such gatherings or those who rely on such events convention and visitors bureau officials owners of major convention and performance venues nationwide hotels. You name it. There are all sorts of industries that have had to radically rethink what they do how they do it and what they can or cannot plan for and promote communities. What exactly can such folks do in houston amid a pandemic leading to record setting numbers of infections by the day. Let's ask houston first acting president and ceo. Michael heckman michael. Welcome to houston matters. Good morning it's great to be here. Thank you for joining us. You took on this role at houston. I back in august. Though you've been with the local government corporation that manages city owned buildings properties and parking for a number of years in other roles how has the pandemic impacted the work. Houston i is doing. And we'll be doing in the coming months well it it was This year's been a lot of change for a lot of people pretty much. Everybody and many many industries maybe none more than the travel live events and tourism business Once march hit we had to really really React in a different way Than what our plans. Our plans completely got thrown out the window. We were looking for a record year for tourism for twenty twenty or conventions. We had a great convention calendar In once it became clear over time that that wasn't gonna happen. We had to shift immediately to You know we pulled our domestic and international advertising. We shifted to community support. We shifted to things like stations To be able to put people eventually back in in hotels But the impacts for the hospitality community and anyone in the live event. Business has been Extreme houston i operates. The george brown convention center avenida houston jones hall worthy miller outdoor theatre among other venues. While many if not all those venues very much this at the moment and haven't been able to for a number of months. Can some events conventions meetings concerts. Would you be scheduled at least several months out. Maybe if not a year or more from now well we're looking at at. I'll get to the performance. Venue in a moment but You know we're looking at next year Currently and what are our best View of it is today and talking to all of our convention. Clients is We're seeing shift from q one and q two two major conventions that have moved back into q. Three possibly q four. We're not seeing as many outhouse cancellations which is good news. I think that the vaccine news. is Is the light at the end of the tunnel will see how it's ultimately distributed and brought to scale Hopefully that will be over the first six months of twenty twenty one But but some green shoots as we see them as you know for example Offshore technology conference otc move from may back to august and we'll see some additional shifts of some major conventions that will move back into into q three and q four so after july. first we have seen No cancellations related to covid On our calendar so the second half of the year could be A busy convention year. In the meantime what can and is being done through the george r brown convention center these days. I think if you look at some of these small safe events that were able to do For for example the symphony in jones hall Outdoor programming again. That's that's physically distanced. That safe safeties number one priority for for any of our attendees for any guests for travelers for that matter. You know that's why. We've rolled out the the houston clean initiative in partnership with many of the sports events and venues And hospitality sector Whether that be restaurants or hotels is houston clean Is a promise to ease or anyone that may travel is. There's there's a minimum amount of Protocols that each one that takes this pledge we'll put into place so as we develop this level of confidence with with attendees travelers. Hopefully we'll be able to to be able to get That visitor economy in the hospitality economy be able to be restarted. But there are some events that you're you're able to do where we're going to be Hosting events down here at the the avenida friday night there will be The alley theatre will have their Their tree lighting Down here The ice at discovery green there are events small in nature that you're able to do At this period of time but safety is the number one

Houston Lena Hidalgo Michael Heckman George Brown Convention Center Jones Hall Worthy Miller Outdo Harris County George R Brown Convention Cent Michael Jones Hall Outdoor Alley Theatre
Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

04:37 min | 1 year ago

Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

"This is but why a podcast for curious kids from Vermont public radio I'm Jane Lindholm On this podcast, you ask the questions and it's our job to find interesting people to answer them. In this episode, we're talking all about dogs. Now, if you WANNA learn about cats check out our companion episode that episode includes some amazing facts about how cats communicate with humans in a special language they make up with their own individual human family. But in this episode, we're going to stick to barks instead of meows. Lots of your dog questions had a common theme you to know about some of the ways that dogs are different from humans. Jessica Heckman is a veterinarian and a dog researcher and she has a blog called the dog Zombie because she's obsessed with dog brains studying them not eating them anyway I. Guess You could say she's a dog scientists and she's here to answer your questions. Our first one comes from Margot who is five and lives in Amherst Massachusetts. Why did Adopt Tales That's a great question Margot whenever someone asked a question about why does one type of animal look one way and is set up one way and why is another type of animal built a different way the way I like to think about it is talking about that difference why? Why what we use it for? So dogs ancestors, wolves, ancient wolves had to run to catch their dinner and tales helps them balanced when they ran so that was they had them back. Then and dogs some dogs still do have to run as part of their job, right? Like she herding dogs have to do a fair amount of running but dogs also use their tails to communicate. So that's another good reason they have tails. They don't use noises quite as much to communicate as humans do but they use body language a lot more than humans do. So with dogs a tale, it's really high means I'm confident a tale that's held low means I'm. Nervous a tale that's really clamped rate underneath there but means please don't smell my but right now and also I'm really scared and then a wagging tail something all really familiar with because it can mean that the dog is happy but also you can see it in angry dogs I would just caution you to be really careful when you see a wagging tail overall, we try to look at the whole dog, not just the tail to interpret body language but the tail. Is definitely a very important part of the dogs tools for speaking why might dog wag its tail when it's happy or when it's mad? Why would drag tail for both possibilities I think from the dogs perception that they might be seeing something different from a wagging tail than we do. They have this very complex set of tools that they use in body language and we as humans because we're not dogs. We just have trouble fully interpreting that and so I think that. A. Wagging. Tail. It might look a little bit different to them with the dog is happy than if the dog is angry and we as humans might just not be able to perceive those differences. And sometimes, I think a dog who is angry or alarmed or considering that they might possibly by you will wag its tail almost as an appeasement gesture to say like Hey I'm not a threat I'm not don't hurt me but they might still be thinking I'm kind of scared of you and I'm prepared to bite if you come any closer. So it's just It's just always important to look at the whole dog to look at his face and his eyes, and you know how he's holding the rest of his body and not just the tail hello money aller five, six years old I live in Falls Church Virginia and my question is why thumbs up partner Paul. Hi Alex well I think dogs have their thumbs up on their paws to keep them out of their way because they are basically walking on their hands rates they're using their four limbs for something differently than what we use them for horses by the way have taken this to extreme they walk just on the tips of their middle three fingers. Into hooves. So I almost feel like it might be a better question to say why are human thumbs so far forward rather than why our dog thumb so far back we're actually the ones that are unusual. Because humans and other primates like monkeys and apes we have this unusual hand that we use to hold things because we evolved to climb rate, and so we would use our hands to climb up a tree and then humans are thumbs are are even more different than in other primates because we have these very complex hands that are good for really delicate work like holding pencil and things like that. So we're actually the unusual one but yeah, they they walk around their paws obviously and they don't want their thumbs to get in the way.

Researcher Vermont Margot Jane Lindholm Jessica Heckman Amherst Massachusetts Falls Church Virginia Alex Partner Paul
Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

04:32 min | 1 year ago

Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

"I'm Jane Lindholm On this podcast, you ask the questions and it's our job to find interesting people to answer them. In this episode, we're talking all about dogs. Now, if you WANNA learn about cats check out our companion episode that episode includes some amazing facts about how cats communicate with humans in a special language they make up with their own individual human family. But in this episode, we're going to stick to barks instead of meows. Lots of your dog questions had a common theme you to know about some of the ways that dogs are different from humans. Jessica Heckman is a veterinarian and a dog researcher and she has a blog called the dog Zombie because she's obsessed with dog brains studying them not eating them anyway I. Guess You could say she's a dog scientists and she's here to answer your questions. Our first one comes from Margot who is five and lives in Amherst Massachusetts. Why did Adopt Tales That's a great question Margot whenever someone asked a question about why does one type of animal look one way and is set up one way and why is another type of animal built a different way the way I like to think about it is talking about that difference why? Why what we use it for? So dogs ancestors, wolves, ancient wolves had to run to catch their dinner and tales helps them balanced when they ran so that was they had them back. Then and dogs some dogs still do have to run as part of their job, right? Like she herding dogs have to do a fair amount of running but dogs also use their tails to communicate. So that's another good reason they have tails. They don't use noises quite as much to communicate as humans do but they use body language a lot more than humans do. So with dogs a tale, it's really high means I'm confident a tale that's held low means I'm. Nervous a tale that's really clamped rate underneath there but means please don't smell my but right now and also I'm really scared and then a wagging tail something all really familiar with because it can mean that the dog is happy but also you can see it in angry dogs I would just caution you to be really careful when you see a wagging tail overall, we try to look at the whole dog, not just the tail to interpret body language but the tail. Is definitely a very important part of the dogs tools for speaking why might dog wag its tail when it's happy or when it's mad? Why would drag tail for both possibilities I think from the dogs perception that they might be seeing something different from a wagging tail than we do. They have this very complex set of tools that they use in body language and we as humans because we're not dogs. We just have trouble fully interpreting that and so I think that. A. Wagging. Tail. It might look a little bit different to them with the dog is happy than if the dog is angry and we as humans might just not be able to perceive those differences. And sometimes, I think a dog who is angry or alarmed or considering that they might possibly by you will wag its tail almost as an appeasement gesture to say like Hey I'm not a threat I'm not don't hurt me but they might still be thinking I'm kind of scared of you and I'm prepared to bite if you come any closer. So it's just It's just always important to look at the whole dog to look at his face and his eyes, and you know how he's holding the rest of his body and not just the tail hello money aller five, six years old I live in Falls Church Virginia and my question is why thumbs up partner Paul. Hi Alex well I think dogs have their thumbs up on their paws to keep them out of their way because they are basically walking on their hands rates they're using their four limbs for something differently than what we use them for horses by the way have taken this to extreme they walk just on the tips of their middle three fingers. Into hooves. So I almost feel like it might be a better question to say why are human thumbs so far forward rather than why our dog thumb so far back we're actually the ones that are unusual. Because humans and other primates like monkeys and apes we have this unusual hand that we use to hold things because we evolved to climb rate, and so we would use our hands to climb up a tree and then humans are thumbs are are even more different than in other primates because we have these very complex hands that are good for really delicate work like holding pencil and things like that. So we're actually the unusual one but yeah, they they walk around their paws obviously and they don't want their thumbs to get in the way.

Researcher Jane Lindholm Margot Jessica Heckman Amherst Massachusetts Falls Church Virginia Alex Partner Paul
"heckman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"heckman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Eric Heckman. So we've come to the time in our show. And when Eric gives us an example of someone's wealth story, and it's always a good lesson to see how something has worked out the best for somebody else, and we could apply that to our lives. Hope police. So, Eric, what do you have for us? Well, there's one of talked about a lot before it's in my book, worry less wealth, but it's actually about my my parents situation with my mom unfortunately passed away at right after they retired, But for my dad that that had happened during the dot com days, and so you know what happened was we'd positioned His money to where there was some guaranteed money. There's a guaranteed lifetime income money. There's some guarantee money, it couldn't be lost. There was some steady income money and, of course, the normal market money and, of course when the wayto nine crash happened You know, stock parts definitely went down, but he had that steady income coming in. And then he also had that lifetime income and he had some money that's guaranteed the incoming crab from And that is market went back up. It all worked out. And you know, that's to me. One of the biggest Keyes is making sure you've got a plan. That's works. They could be tested. And you know there's no better person. I think to try to test this on is somebody you really care about? Write your own parents. You want to make sure you know they did enough to take care of you. You make sure that you're able to take care of them and and you know, so that's one of the ways that you know, I've actually been on the prove that my process works that it's critical to do it this way. So many people are just working with investment advisors that are really asked managers that they just say, Hey, let's have it all in the stock market, Saul having the stock market and you know this year was crazy. I mean massive down turn and massive upturn. And you know, yes. So far, it looks like all that stock stuffs worked, But, you know, we don't know The year's not over the volatilities that over and we know it as life goes on. These things happen every three or four years anyway, So that's one of you thinks one of the biggest. Keyes is having some money's in different areas and having some protections in that way, You know, it's gonna work. No matter which retirement you get if it's a good time, bad time or somewhere in between. So really, what we want is help. You actually figure out how to put that all in a cohesive plan, and you know, that's what we're here for. So you know again, if that's something you'd like to take 15 20 minutes on the phone with me. Just find out what's going on with your situation. See if we can help you at all. If we just answer some simple questions. Hey, what's were here for me? With all this craziness going on? We just won't be able to help anybody We can sew. Again. If you wantto do that, I'll have to do is text the word visit for the link to a book or you could just give us a call. So again. Text word. Visit 804 54 11 84 Again. Text word. Visit 804 54 11 84. Or go online. The wealth creator radio.

Keyes Eric Heckman Saul
"heckman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"heckman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Of Heckman financial right here in the Silicon Valley area and today we're talking about risks that you need to know about in retirement it's always good to go over them one we truly truly know about is is inflation do you remember what the movie prices were when you were a kid Eric well the funding I did as a kid there's this movie theater that had triple features to rip ball wow so it's a good question is by a Buck or two or something I don't know yeah India's it was always the movies that come out you know six months ago or whatever else I want to do the price of lot of stuff meat and other things is still really record high and so wise that will be more demand right and just over time everything will get more expensive cars get more costly everything gets more costly and you know one of the things you don't want to do in retirement is just think okay I'm all good I've I've got enough money for retirement yeah right now that's fine well think back twenty years ago what you're making that and see if you can try to live on that same income today yeah so that's one of the things you have to watch out for and so yeah having some server in guaranteed income now that has some increases that can be really helpful obviously stuff on the market can be helpful but again you have to balance it with everything else so I know it sucks they're always end up going back to the same awful word that four letter word having a plan and you know but that that's really what it comes down to is is doing some planning and then if you can plan out how much of that inflation effect will be then you can see is is your money going to run out when you're seventy or when you're ninety a big difference between those two right so and just do a quick phone calls laughter is the best way to start twenty thirty minutes on the phone I'll have to do is give us call eight hundred four five four eleven eighty four again though no pressure no risk no costs or anything like that explicit in.

a Buck or India Heckman Eric
"heckman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"heckman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"With Eric Heckman Erica's president of Heckman financial right here in the Silicon Valley area I'm Lou M. Palmer and today we've been talking about how we're in a time of crisis of course and just how to lead with the steady hand of retirement so Eric this is the time I'm in our show where we usually have a wealth success story so you're in the middle of everything that we're experiencing right now can you shine some light on something positive please yeah it's just more one of my things I can do any time in my job is is when I see clients actually that and take that big leap that even though one of them called said it was like Wiley coyote and going off the cliff but but the the big lead to retirement and so I have a client who just retired and and it's funny because I had one last year do the same thing but on April fools I don't know what is with April fools day but the the there's a reason that you get to be a popular data retire against but yeah in you so one of things we did last year beat me up prior to him retiring is is we kind of went over the plan and the always reset it while he's got a lot of money in the market and almost it's been a long long time with this one company and so yeah we said now the let's do an in service distribution to take to lower that risk so in service distributions where you're working at your company still and you can withdraw some money out of your retirement plan and roll to an IRA so a lot of companies allow you to do that once you're fifty nine and a half and so they they allowed him to do it and so we we took a bunch of money and some of I put a steady income stuff a lot of input and guaranteed spots and you know with the downturn obviously is very kind of crazy weird time to be retiring as as he's literally sheltering in place before his last day at work great I mean how weird for being at a company for thirty plus years in your last day on the job is not there here is how last two three weeks of of his job was at home so yeah it was very odd in that sense of of the things but I mean our process really what we do is we look at the five key areas first is the biggest one is income plan having a written income plan to say okay am I going to be okay as my money to last the rest of my life it's best of seven phone call let's just see is there anything we can help you with is there any questions you have any I mean even if it's just hello which thing should I pay or not pay and we're we're literally helping anybody out there today at all so again no cost no obligation issuance of a.

Eric Heckman Erica president Lou M. Palmer
Why do Muslim women wear burkas?

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:38 min | 1 year ago

Why do Muslim women wear burkas?

"It is of course generally the case that women were is discussed an judged in a way that what men were is not that discussion and judgment is exponentially more intense. Certainly in the Western world where what? Muslim women were is concerned. To the extent that roughly nine hundred million women of wildly various nationalities cultures beliefs backgrounds at cetera often reduced to one garment. Which almost none of them. Actually wear a corrective now exists in the form of. It's not about the Burka. An Anthology of essays by Muslim women writers activists poets and more including two monocle twenty four contributors some Danny and Yasmin Abdelmajid. It's not about the Burka subtitled Muslim women. On faith feminism sexuality and race is edited by Mariam Con. I spoke to marry him at Midori. House earlier before we get into the contents of it's not about the Burka of let's start with the title of it because intern. Certainly if the way that the you know I don't need to tell you this but in terms of the way that the media discusses Muslim women in particular it has become about the Burka. Why do you think that is why the fascination with this one garment not really worn by that many Muslim women? I think it's many things I if I'm honest. But it's also so so many things being it's easy to use of lead or perpetuate or portray a group of people. If you say everyone is like this one thing everyone does one thing whereas one thing so it's that also we live in a patriarchal society so it's very much this obsession with women or women just in general and their bodies and having power over them and what they can win what they can't wear so very much From all sides within the Muslim community outside of it though I would argue that the Birkat narrative has been built on the outside of within the western sphere And so yeah that's where it comes from and to the reason that is not about the backer is it's not about the back is because back when me and my publisher looked into. It is the most politicized Tom. Or what around Masuma if you type in Muslim women burqas most likely unless it's changed in the last year year and a half and I very much doubt that with our current prime minister continuing tests? Fallas stereotypes I would. It's dillistone such Tom. Even though I can't I can't remember the stops for the UK Whitley but for France which banned the buck When they were in that legislation there was only about two thousand women wearing the buck in the whole sixty million population of the country. So I find that. Really curious that people feel the need to Control and portray missing minute specific way and it's just easier to control a bunch of people if you say everyone's this one traditionally submissive type of way so the idea is presumably then that it's not about. The Burke is a corrective to that. You get several female. Muslim writers to write about being female Muslims. If you want a show and say yes if you want the longer answer we live in a society that is capitalist on. You need to sell a market audience. Something they can recognize on the you know the Shannon's and the the you know Giles's and the Tom's need-we to recognize a narrative that has been built around Muslim women and it's not about the backyard the buck is what they recognize about. Masud women think. Oh this is great. It's going to be exactly what I know completely does the opposite so that very much. I didn't go into it. Thinking this book was not called. It's not about the bucket from inception. actually hated figuring out a title. It was the worst part of the entire process. I can guarantee you that And it was kind of a very bitter bitter part for me because I came to this realization that regardless of whether I wanted to or not I would have to undo a narrative that I played no part in creating So I did it by literally giving them the title and thought well the books not going to give you anything about. Boko the job. How did you go about assembling your roster of contributors very much so Research and People often think it was me and a bunch of Friends. Very much was not This is me literally so really trying to reach out to as many of women as I could from different spaces and spheres age-groups coaches religious practice within the Muslim community And saying Hey. I'm doing this thing. Would you like to be a part of and there wasn't any special person? It was literally just research googling and speaking different seen who they were influenced by as well and so so people like Yasmin Abdelmajid. Everything that happened with her in Australia was a huge thing and I had been following that and I really love the way that she carried herself but she was honest integrity. And then Salma Donnie. And Her TEDTALK mcquay regular voices. On nautical twenty four hours and. They are very powerful with that. Voice is an apologetic. And I knew I wanted that. But then I also didn't want this book to be a collection of known voices or without form. So then you know respectfully not to say the EPA didn't have platforms or even an audience but they weren't as well known Osama and Yasmin. Russell people like Jamila Heckman. Who writes about a struggle with mental health and You know the part that I wish you talked about was how she believed.

Yasmin Abdelmajid TOM Yasmin Mariam Con Intern Masuma Salma Donnie EPA Publisher Danny UK Prime Minister Jamila Heckman Osama Giles Russell France Australia
"heckman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"heckman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Eric Heckman we've come to the time in our show when air gives us an example of of someone's wealth success story always a good lesson to see how things can end up working out for the best what do you have for us today Eric well I guess you call it taking the chips off the table and so I used to joke antennas on a convention or you know some sort of conference and with other visors after the dot com bust that I specialize in working with ex millionaires I had so many clients that could have been literally millionaire but they don't pay the taxes it will sell it because it's going to keep going up and you know all these kind of ridiculous scenes over here and so really it's just more about yeah I can imagine early the show you have got one clan whose late forties and sold a bunch of stock in the on startup and now he's locked in he's made it real yeah I was gonna pay a huge tax bill but he's also keeping the majority of the money so you know as long as you keep the majority of it still it's good to do and I've got other clients like an apple and other places where their stock keeps going up in ecstasy this year's them great we'll take some of that off the table you keep selling some of that keep pre position so those assets and a really just make sure that you're not leaving it all on there because what can go up can also go down and so sometimes you don't know how fast and how quickly and win but yeah okay you know you may regret that I could mean excel is more or something like that but you know ones when she like in a lot of money you don't have to worry about that stuff anymore because if you've made enough who cares yeah you could be a little bit more but you know that money is really no it's yours and it's not going to go away that is so much of a bigger yeah just bigger of thing that they're feeling and bear reassurance and that extra time you know couple percent more you could have made so yeah I would definitely say yeah one of the best things to do is take some of those chips off the table if you've got someone shot a bunch this year time to be sawn off at least ten percent of it the island to save up to sell tons but at least get some of that off there and then make that real I shut it is been about the do's and don'ts of retirement planning what would you say Eric is our biggest takeaway of the show well of course like ours I am a nagging let's say do a plan perhaps they get that plan in place that four letter word yeah that income plan but you doing that really gives you a road map it gives you that that guy posts to say Hey I can spend this much money and I'm going to be a okay as long as these things happen is along the way you want to be checking in and saying Hey am I still on track and now so forth but yeah you got to have that plan in place and then you can know where your assets are you know what your risk level is know how much volatility have again take charge of your financial future text the word visit to eight hundred four five four eleven eighty four again text word visit eight hundred four five four eleven eighty four or you can book online at wealth greater radio dot com that's all for.

Eric Heckman
"heckman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"heckman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"With their attack minute Heckman financial Eric I want you to give us a wealth success story I know you have one for us I always kinda like to end our show on something positive so what do you have for us today you will is more just a really just more about locking in those gains on the negative side I had a claim back in nineteen ninety eight where we do the five year plan they were to Toby this couple blocks or office and he had three point five million dollars of the Dobie stock and lives all options is all taxable he sold a five hundred thousand I told the soft almost three million because then we build a lock in this plan well he can retire for almost fifteen years because of that remaining three million turned into five hundred so I've been working with actually not just one but several apple people and couple other people from some other firms around the area to Google person and some other ones that Mr realizing that Hey yeah I should be locking in my dollars and so sometimes it's tough because last year experts in the year look like who's very smart as we saw Ansel stocks as their drop in now this year why would you silence of so high but now I mean I have one client we're he said Hey every year to soft ten percent ten percent and the funny part was at first he he every time I did it went up by more than ten percent so he never actually lowered how much stock he had so now he's a levels twenty percent and since this shot up so much the only down a tiny bit from where it was at the beginning of the year even though he he sold off a ton of the stock and the so that's one of the nice things from now it'll be more diversified okay FSI shoots up again Hey yeah he could make more right but don't be doing that mass doing the math of Hey this money is now locked in and we got some gains a diverse fight it out I'm not going to be all set and neo one huge drop away from just haven't almost nothing again and so I think more more people right now there's a lot of money sitting there going hold that we've made how much this year then how much you might want to look at that and going boom do it in my really well diversified or not I mean if you've got more than ten percent of of your assets in any one stock and that's the way iris most of the guys are on auto pilot where they just sell so many every single quarter and they're just always disposing of some just always be lowering down that risk and so if you're CEOs doing it you might want to do it too so again if you would like some help with that yet so they hearing good Heckman financial so I have.

Heckman
"heckman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"heckman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"By Heckman to eight financial hundred and four insurance five services four eleven eighty four or go online request it directly at once critter this radio dot is wealth com creator time radio is ticking and the show end of and the year bring is to coming a boil information so Eric about securing I wanted a to comfortable know if you would talk retirement about tax considerations your host that we need to be thinking is a well about known speaker before the and end of the certified year financial obviously planner that's a big with one all of the non tax profit planning financial is knowledge what you institute do and at the author the end of of worry the year less tax wealth reporting that's what you do wells in April creator radio then I was like take waited to yeah when you see the news in some stores been robbed and they're saying okay this with the thieves got office and all the stuff and that's just reported it there's nothing you can do about anything at that point in terms of planning but if you wanna call theft planning their theft prevention probably better be better yeah then you'd be talking about how to the beat of the security system what should to the put bars on the windows or you know whatever types of things the alarm systems and all that yeah that's that'd be planning and so what we would do with taxes the same thing we want to planning so a lot of planning stuff can only be done in the current calendar year so there's some investments you know like there's oil and gas investments by about the only one that you can put money in and get anywhere from a least eighty five to use a ninety to ninety five percent of whatever you put it would be instant tax deduction and so that's something where if you may be sold off a whole bunch of stock sold a rental property or you know whatever was where you had a huge abnormal tax year that might be something you might wanna be looking in also if you had big large gains in the last hundred eighty days these are the capital gains if you had any capital gains like that you might even want to look at and opportunities on the this is a really cool very unique kind of complicated and investment but basically allows any gains within a hundred and eighty days to be invested into one of these programs and then you'll have to pay the tax for seven years so my gosh so that's a long time that love that money to for and grow what we do is we create the blueprint to worry less walls were we want you to worry less for retirement more about having fun and you know which drink to put the umbrella and and so really what we want is first and foremost gore that income plan figure out what your income is they'll look like for the rest your life look at how you're invested and then after that the tax ramifications of all three of all those areas so the investments how you're gonna get your income you know what's tax moves should used to be doing today yeah we are certified in doing tax stuff so we actually know that and the only thing is crazy when people go to advisors say they they can't give you tax advice and they're talking about all this taxable stuff and then we also go over the health care legacy that's the five areas of the blueprint to worry less wealth it's something we do for no cost what we do is we first of the first and worry less well visit talk about what are your concerns see if you're right fit for us and then we'll go to that second appointment and that second one will be really more showing you where what course sure you're on right now what path you're headed down what issues but we'll take care of right now so if that's something you like to take advantage of all your to do is.

Heckman
50 Years After Perry: Quality Early Childhood Has Second Generation Effect, Study Finds

Morning Edition

03:39 min | 2 years ago

50 Years After Perry: Quality Early Childhood Has Second Generation Effect, Study Finds

"The truth about the news, you don't really know the most important stuff on the first day of a big news story. May have to follow up and follow up sometimes for years. And in this case decades, more than fifty years ago, educators enrolled children from poor families in a preschool program in insulating. Michigan, what came to be known as the Perry preschool project, showed that early childhood, interventions have powerful effects for disadvantaged kids. Now, there's new work on this project, and NPR social science correspondent chunk of them spoke with Noel K. So what's the new findings while to understand the finding? No, all you have to understand the context of the program was initially started to boost the academic scores of kids. But in a few years, data showed it didn't do that. But as research track the kids into adulthood, they found that kids who went through the program had better life outcomes than kids into control group. They had more earnings more stable long-term relationships less trouble with the law. The new compares the children of participants who went through the program with the children of participants who are in the control group. Here's James Heckman economist at the university of Chicago and a winner of the Nobel prize. The children of the participants are healthier, earning more. They have a better social emotional skills are more likely to graduate high school and go onto college less likely to be incarcerated or even have ever been arrested. So what you see is beneficial effects that go onto the next generation. So you're a kid whose parents, went through this program and got the early intervention. And today, you are more likely to be doing better than the child of someone who didn't get this early intervention. That's right now what then did the early intervention entail? What was what were these kids getting the program provided in no training and stimulating environment kids, learn things like communication skills, basic arithmetic, and what I call non cognitive skills. How to stay with the task if you don't succeed at first, how to work with us how to cooperate with others the program. Sent teachers into the homes of the kids, where they worked with the parents to decide stimulating activities for the kids, so that the positive environment of the program could be extended into the home. I mean, what's so interesting about this is you hear about these interventions and you just assume okay, they work in the moment, if they work at all they work in the moment, it isn't a mockup of finding Noel, Heckman and his co author on the new study, garnish popular say, there's also a relatively simple explanation for the finding the original group at turns out, they're more likely to have stable families and earnings. So they provide their own children with a nurturing environment far richer, than that is for the non treated children. This is a social program that not only benefits the recipient it goes on. And the gift that keeps on giving. If you will now Heckman says that expanding high-quality programs like Perry will definitely not be cheap. But I think the data shows that the multigenerational return on investment. It is simply staggering one more thing about this. It's really interesting, you said at the beginning that the original aim of this program was to get these kids grades up and that didn't work. That's exactly right. I mean, the study was started in one thousand nine hundred sixty s when cognitive scaled inability was seen as the be all and end off a successful life. I think what this study showed that, in many ways, cognitive abilities, doing wet on a test is actually not what drives your success in life? If these non cognitive skills, conscientiousness, grit resilience. These are the things that come in whether people are

James Heckman Noel K. Perry Preschool NPR Michigan Nobel Prize University Of Chicago Perry Fifty Years
"heckman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:41 min | 2 years ago

"heckman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Radio with Eric Heckman. I'm Lee Graham, former Eric is president of Heckman financial or their mission is to get you to and through a worry, less wealth retirement. We're talking about women money and retirement today before we go on though, I'd like to ask you about a financial fail. Eric that we can learn from. It's always something good that we can definitely learn a lesson from well. This one's more about slack quite a failure. But very potentially could be so one thing I wanna move someplace different retirement. Doubt sounds cool. Sounds unique sounds, hey, that'd be great. And at a client that mostly usually meet with him as she comes in it. Yeah. So the more critical meetings and stuff, and he one time confided me that they wanted to move to why he said, it was a fifty fifty chance I think actually may have set of sixty percent chance that they ended up moving back after a while. And so there's a big debate to we saw the house don't sell the house. They decided finally this the cell housekeeper life easier. Now they've been out there for two years. You know, they were back in towns or meeting, and yeah, she's complaining about the humidity. And the heat rains every day. It is a Hawaii. It's it is right. It's based tropical island. But it is tropical. The hard part is if you're really serious about moving there's a lot of different things you can do. But I think it's always martyred us to maybe not say your house for a year or two and just give it a little bit more time just to make sure you really like all the seasons. Wherever you move to write some seasons, initially, maybe great. And then it's like, oh, I don't like this timeframe or something like that. So just one of those things if you're thinking about leaving the valley, which so many people are because my live anywhere else in the world cheaper. And. Yeah. So if you're thinking about doing that. Really really sit down and do some planning and do some real thought about what's the best way to do it because it's really hard to come back here. I mean, there's no way that they would be able to buy in the same neighborhood to their in before this got up too much of the property tax would probably be about triple what they were paid at the time. So yeah. So what else things is gonna move. Yeah. Be careful. Planet out. Yeah. Go there for at least. If you can't stay for any length of time, go there during the different seasons prior to retiring and the house. Yeah. Great idea. Well, we can always learn from those financial, Phil. So thanks for that, Eric we've been talking about women many in retirement today, and we've all heard of the quote, unquote, breadwinner, interrelationship seems like usually that refers to the man now I'm not saying that in today's world, I'm kind of saying that in the past because the statistic is changing. But let's go ahead and use that scenario, let's say, the husband was the breadwinner or is the breadwinner. What if the wife has not been involved in the decision making of the finances in retirement, Eric what can go wrong. So what are the amazing stats out? There is eighty percent. Of men die married. Eighty percent of women die single or widowed. And you go Hala. Those numbers match. Right. Well, this because so many so many women are widowed because they live longer than the right? So the kind of eye-opening talk about this is really the fact that most men will never know if their financial plan worked. I mean think about the houseman will never know if their plan works or not because the only way if you know your plan worked as if whatever your work. Yeah. Working on planning for you got to the end of. If their spouse lives, another five or ten years longer. They don't know what happened after one social security. Check was lost. They don't know. What happens after that? That goes from married filing jointly to single your tax rate actually goes up with Lahavi, less income. Yeah. There's a lot of things that change after one person's passes away in obviously, if you're married the woman lives longer guess who's going to be running the finances. And if she has not been paying attention or have doesn't even know where the stuff is that could be really hazardous, especially if you've got old 4._0._1._K's and IRA's companies that hey, I remember these are, I know where I know my Loggins, and blah, blah, blah. Well, if you're not here, and she's having to take care of it does she know all those places and especially with e statements nowadays, electronic statements, electric statements. I think can be really hazardous in some ways. Because if there's nothing paper, how does somebody know? And are they look at your Email, or are they finding it? And so there's just a lot of issues. So I mean, literally something just as simple as right hit Hollier accounts down. I mean, it seems very low tech in today's world. Right. So let me if you wanna go fancier, Google spreadsheet share share it with each other or something. At least knowing where those assets are can be a huge difference in what happens because if all of a sudden, you're having to take over all the stuff and know where things are. Oh my gosh. It's a lot of stress and strain. Obviously initially. It's shock great Kosovans passed away. And then all of a sudden you're having to make all these decisions. And yeah, so it can't be very tough. So at least having some organization. Yeah. Having some stuff or you write it down and just knowing where all that stuff is Miami. We do two different talks in terms of both of these issues. Smart women, talk and also smart couples. And and so those are things that if you if you wanted to tens of sessions, really learn some more tools, some more things that you should be doing. The smart women is for married or single. It doesn't matter. It's just really focused on women's issues. It's only allows the only people allowed in the door are actually women. So that's some awkward situations are some guys wanted to come in. It's not really the thing. Yeah. But, but we do have another talk I couples which is very similar information about how to couples talk and how they learned about money. So yeah. So that's only like to look at definitely go to our website. We have lots of different sessions coming up in the next few weeks here, but it's a wealth, creator radio dot com, again wealth, creator radio dot com, or you also.

Eric Heckman Lee Graham president Hawaii Google Hala Phil IRA Hollier Lahavi Kosovans Miami Loggins Eighty percent eighty percent sixty percent ten years
"heckman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"heckman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Founder of Heckman financial, Eric Hackman, and Eric gives you solid independent personalized financial advice. He's a well known speaker, and he's an author too. And he can provide you with advice to get you to and through retirement with worry, less wealth. So we're talking about the three stages of retirement. We have the go years, you're slow go years. And then this stage that comes next, and that is the won't go years really probably the most important plan that you have to figure out. So how do you stress to clients that they should have strategies in place to help ensure that they are covered for this last stage of retirement. Yeah. Well, this is the stage at really none of us really want to talk about. It's a little tougher and use it when your health not so great, Hugh may or may not be widowed by this point. And yeah, you really have to figure out how you can get the quality of life you want. What are you going to be doing and more importantly, really who's around to help you? I mean, I've got one client here that the kids are down in southern California. They're going down to visit them and then there had enough. She calls her aunt or something. But just somebody who she is cared for a lot. She's in a home right now, and they had to come back up to help her and do all this stuff for her. And it's very nice of them to do it. They're not related technically. But it's nice. If you have a friend like that. But if you don't know who's going to be there to help you who's going to be there to help take care of you you want to really make sure you have all the financial illegal stuff set up. Right. You wanna have.

Eric Hackman Heckman financial Eric Founder California Hugh
WHIRL - The Blockchain-Powered Pay It Forward Crowdfunding Platform.

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

04:59 min | 3 years ago

WHIRL - The Blockchain-Powered Pay It Forward Crowdfunding Platform.

"So massive warm. Welcome to the show case tell the listeners a little about who you are. And what you do. Thanks. My name is Martin Heckman, she'll roll world com document, actually and very experienced professional in the charity and the relief humanitarian world now will is the first community driven crowdfunding platform Bill on blow chamber, can you just set the scene and tell me a little bit more about exactly what is and what kind of problems do you solve? And also, what makes it unique from other solutions out there? Yeah. Thanks so much. I'm happy to do that will is based on the paid for it. So the whole ideas that you can raise Before the social Ducasse like local to research for one and a half years and to make the very heavy ready, and for many people listening, I suppose the first question, I gotta ask or ask themselves. How different from Kickstarter indigo. Go fund me and all the other solutions out there and also wise blockchain so important to this will crowdfunding solution. And how could you not make it in any other way, we are different in world because which you can see right now is that the cost of form assure space charts by other platforms is very high will very low fees five percent. So that's one there's There's a a little. lot of success rates are going down at the moment's everywhere. Who's basically there are so many options so many thousands of people to funds in the Danish. If your project is not fun, it'll be cancelled. So in real difference. You have a queuing system as just mentioned earlier, the queue will give you when you're once your indicate you and your campaign for your own dream adept moment, you're sure in the Bill gets a funded. So that is unique we using block Chang, basically, the post from a long time ago, the Austin aware elevated in two thousand fifteen years started to look around yet initial version completely outside of blockchain, and we were seeing like to go global one of the things many issues are there, but the banks so for this reason, we created the wilt open. And

Martin Heckman Ducasse Blockchain Block Chang Austin Two Thousand Fifteen Years Five Percent
Australia threatens ANZ, Deutsche and Citi with criminal charges over share issue

BBC World Service

02:20 min | 3 years ago

Australia threatens ANZ, Deutsche and Citi with criminal charges over share issue

"Head of the senate finance committee orrin hatch called it a tax hike on americans that would hurt consumers manufacturers and workers alike the eu mexico and canada have all how to respond in kind targeting us goods an interim prime minister of pakistan has been sworn in during a ceremony in the capital islam about the caretake excuse me the caretaker prime minister naseer milk is retired judge and former chief justice he'll preside over an interim period before national elections which must be held in the next sixty days seconda kimani reports from islamabad five years ago after the previous have actions pakistan swords first democratic transition of power between two political parties today the government was replaced by caretaker setup after successfully completing its term in office in marks ten years of continuous democratic rule seen as an achievement in a country that has been ruled by the military for nearly half of its existence journal elections will take place on the twenty fifth of july and are expected to be tightly contested competition authorities in australia say that criminal cartel charges are being prepared against one of the country's biggest banks and to of it's advisors citigroup in deutsche bank all three banks have denied wrongdoing phil mercer reports under australia's competition laws individuals found guilty of criminal cartel offenses could spend up to ten years in prison and institutions find millions of dollars the allegations involve anz the nation's third largest bank and a senior executive as well as deutsche bank and citi group an american investment company they all intend to fight any charges brought by australia's public prosecutors the case relates to the sale of almost two billion dollars worth of shares to large institutional investors in two thousand fifteen th abc news russian media has said the north korean leader kim jong un complained of us heckman ism to the visiting russian foreign minister sagala rav telling him he wanted to boost cooperation with moscow he told mister level he hoped denuclearization could happen in a phased manner the bbc's howard griffith is at the korean border walks north korea to russia is very different to what.

Sagala Rav Phil Mercer Islamabad EU Orrin Hatch Russia North Korea Howard Griffith BBC Moscow Senate Finance Committee Kim Jong Un Senior Executive Australia Deutsche Bank Citigroup Pakistan
"heckman" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

Homo Sapiens

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"heckman" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

"Good again gene this from me they have a guiding light for how to embrace your sexuality and how to be brave she is a brave passive just folate been herself as an on a at a think of me i was using my sexuality to make a thing to kind of get in with a certain crowd everything i rise just because it's happened to me or like it's all deeply past conversation with marique heckman is coming up stay tuned people are they even chewed state put custody the first time i came across the recap hackman woes a photo friend's wedding but i can of about a commit a wedding casse at night sorted flew about portugal didn't need the room three who who i am again the fact that you have the panicattack not on ryanair's the thing remains i need i really weird because it was being people who is very where i saw a picture of this young woman and a trousersuit and amazing and it looked like it was sort of light maybe pistachio it was pistachios zip share shoes are that giving a piggyback or having on someone's by being given a piggyback and i just thought who's this woman i'm a treat by her she's just called is or about her she just feels like him superstar talent william yes of course question for you it is kashmir but it's very old we have a conversation about your has dollar like here because he got a shaved inside partick all for cabaret thanks.

marique heckman hackman ryanair portugal partick