4 Burst results for "Hebron Hills"

"hebron hills" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

07:08 min | 3 months ago

"hebron hills" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"Tommy's is machine learning in satellite imagery to study the soils fungi and carbon cycle. His first big result came in two thousand fifteen where he a team of scientists estimated. How many trees that are on us. Three trillion far more than previously thought. But we also knew the that was about half of what existed before human civilization and that was still losing about ten billion trees every single year. So we're constantly losing these vital ecosystems that are important to all life on earth. A few years later. Tom and a team of researchers then extended the models to see where there was space for more trees on earth. A post doc. At tom's lab. Francois boston came up with the idea. And let the study. And that revealed that there's room for over a trillion new trees and all of the areas that are not currently intensively used for agricultural urban land. And so that really set in place. The scale of the restoration potential in forests. It was a really exciting result. When the study was published the authors had reforestation was the most effective solutions karma change to date two thirds of all emissions from human activities remain in the atmosphere today could be removed according to the research but both these claims attracted intense criticism from his. I have to say twenty. Nineteen was both a very exciting year for our research but it was also one of the hottest years of my life. And i i still feel that anxiety of two thousand nineteen because you know as with any major advance in science you expect a lot of pushback. I remember the day. Paper came out. And i was science correspondent at the independent and it popped into my inbox and then all of this criticism popped into my inbox from other scientists which was sent by the science media centre and read through the criticisms and they were so. Convincing is the first time. I've decided not to publish a paper. Based on the weight that criticism. And then i woke up the next morning to find out that every single other news organization had published it. Phoebe story highlights not about the split reactions to this paper. I reached out to an environment journalist who was also covering a research at the time and he says he found the scientific criticism a mix of both substantial concerns unless substantial dislike. The new kid on the block talk is a new generation. also he's using very different techniques. He is picking up on the potential of satellite imagery to tell us things that we didn't know before. My name is fred perry cyber uk based science environment journalist. I also write books including my latest one trillion trees one of the claims in the paper. The fred and many others questioned was where it said we could you forests the map. Included ecosystems the traditionally have very few trees like african savannahs and fred knows how serious planting trees in the room. Location can be. He's visited a desert in israel. Where trees during the opposite of weight expect them to de couple of hours out of tel aviv. Gob up towards the hebron hills and right up against the border with the west bank is a very large area. Reforest that had been planted in the last fifty years. Roughly i talked to scientists. There have been measuring. How much call them. These forests to taking up these pine trees that may be gone to and what the effect is on the ecosystem and it turns out that those trees are still having an overall warming of the planet. The trees are warming the planet because of the change in the cephas is albedo pasta word. For how much. Earth reflects solar energy back into space and a bright sunday. Desert reflects more solar energy than doctorate canopy and if they survived so back twenty forty they will maybe get into the cooling category because there will be holding enough carbon to offset the loss of reflect tippety of the desert surface but probably because of climate change. Those trees will be dead by then. I saw areas in the forest. Where most of the trees were dead. Because of a drive to ten years ago most people are expecting a big decline in rainfall in the eastern mediterranean region. The trees only go going initially because they were irrigated but Irrigation has long since ceased and will be difficult to restore even if you wanted to do critics including front say. Tom's mom show. We can refer areas where few trees not troika tom argues. This is a misunderstanding of what they were showing the right way to interpret. This information is not about where trees can be planted cont. This model was simply a model to show where trees might naturally exist and in many many grasslands there is a natural low level of tree. Cover anything up to ten percent tree. Cover can be a natural healthy grassland and that can be one tree in your field of one tree in a larger and larger area and that might be a natural state of things and so when all model showed that trees can potentially exist in those regions it could be perceived the wrong way to suggest that you should plant trees that and that is absolutely not the case about a year. After the paper came out the team did release corrections and clarifications other aspects of the paper. They said they did mean to present. New forests is more important than cutting greenhouse gas emissions but they knew of no other carbon capture solution as large as reforestation. They also made it clear that more trees would sequester less than half the amount of carbon from the ad that the paper initially suggested. There is plenty of legitimate criticism about this paper but one thing that is noticeable is the did focus minds how nature can help us fight. Climate change very few if any other scientists conjoined a direct line from their research to the front lawn of the white house. Yes it was grasped by some people as this terrible opportunity to greenwash essentially to plant load of trees and then they don't need to conserve existing forests or cut emissions which is absolutely the wrong way to be looking at this and the wrong lens to be seeing trees through but it was also taken up by a many many many many many people on the other side of that argument who are interested in revitalizing bio-diversity for the local biodiversity and wellbeing of human populations around the world as well as the fight against climate. Change thomas continuing to build on his big data ecology research. He's also co chair of the un decade on ecosystem restoration an international project to re wild and revitalize an area the size of china on. He's launching an online platform called restore which is like a google maps of biodiversity. It will combine the latest metrics on the natural world with global map of conservation projects including reforestation schemes. If it successful restore could help promote the kind of ecological restoration. That will help us. Mitigate.

Francois boston science media centre hebron hills Tom tom Tommy fred perry Phoebe tel aviv west bank fred israel uk mediterranean white house thomas un china google
"hebron hills" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

08:13 min | 7 months ago

"hebron hills" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"By hedge funds and those are some of the headlines. This is democracy now democracy now dot. org the quarantine report. I mean we couldn't. The united nations is appealing to the world to address the dire humanitarian situation in gaza as a ceasefire between israel and hamas holding for a fourth day. The eleven days rally assault on gaza killed two hundred forty eight palestinians including sixty six children. They're more than seventeen hundred. People were injured. The un is estimating at least six thousand residents of gaza. We're left homeless. After their homes were bombed by israel which has maintained a blockade on gaza for the past fourteen years. Meanwhile tension remains high across the region on sunday. Dozens of jewish settlers backed by israeli security forces stormed the mosque compound. The third holiest site in a slot on friday israeli security forces fired stun guns rubber bullets at palestinians outside the mosque israeli prosecutors have also filed terrorism charges against three jewish men who pulled palestinian man out of his car in the city of bochum two weeks ago and viciously beat him. A police official said quote the three defendants engaged in inciting the mob before the victim arrived. They stole looted. From and destroyed stores owned by arabs. When they saw an hour they carried out an extremely mercilus beating unquote. Some initial press reports had mistakenly said the victim was jewish. Meanwhile in the east jerusalem neighborhood of shakespeare sharar israeli authorities are continuing their campaign to forcibly evict palestinians from their home so jewish settlers can move in. We go now to shake sharar where we're joined by muhammed occurred. He's a palestinian activist and poet. Who's organizing to save his family's home. His debut book rivka will be released by haymarket books later this year and welcome back to democracy. Now can you talk about the cease fire now in its fourth day what it means and the wreckage in its wake and then we'll talk about what's happening to your family and the other residents of shaka sure are thank you. Thank you amy. It's good to be back. I think the ceasefire means a lot of things first. It means that the resistance the palestinian resistance some be of grassroots or otherwise as has been able to accomplish its own conditions has been able to withstand a brutal nuclear superpower that is sensitive senselessly carpet bombing us trip where people two million people are be seized but a day we are seeing that israeli authorities did not respect. The ceasefire conditions. Oxo mosque has been invaded more than once. There has been a mouse arrest campaign. And she'll still under an illegal. Blockade colonial is still business as usual in occupied palestine at large plane in more detail. What happened on the awesome. Hosk starting on friday and explain the significance of this mosque and islam a lot mosque for palestinians who are muslim one. It's the holiest site in palestine. The third holiest site in islam and it is continuously rated and stormed by the israeli police and army occupation forces working with israeli settlers. That are usually are and what happens. Is that oftentimes worshipers are met with brute force inside the mosque. This is stun grenades. Rubber-coated bullets sometimes ammunition. People are detained. Harassed pit brutalized and the images. We have been seeing this. Violence are not unique. What's been unique is up. Primarily palestinians are making noise about what's happening we're finally recording and the world is finally listening yesterday over. I believe one hundred and something storm demoss. Ke- do incite violence to provoke palestinians. And of course occupation authorities ransacked the mosque rent suck the worshippers and wounded many. Explain shake sharar. It seems now. The world has heard about your neighborhood in east jerusalem Your own situation. You and your twin sister mona. I wanted to play that clip. That went viral for people to understand What's taking place. But i if you can put it into context. How is it possible that a jewish settlers has been living in your house for years. Exp- go back in time. Of course i mean. I think There's two things to be said about. Shows the dan in the now the den is. It is a microcosm of israeli reality. That's really subtler. Colonialism in palestine a large. It is absurd to people to hear that. There's a settler from long island squatting in my house but he wouldn't be able to do that without being emboldened by disraeli really occupation forces by an israeli additional system that is inherently colonial supremacist and buy american ducks dollars. The person in my house has been there much. Like many israelis have inhabited homes that belong to palestinians that were thrown out of them that were massacred that were forced to lead. And this is the situation in the entire neighborhood. You have settler organizations that are registered in the united states that are working and collaborating with as radio authorities to fabricate documents to throw out palestinians. I think it's important to put in context that we are community of refugees that is facing billionaire back subtler organization working in different countries. And what's happening in iraq is not just it's happening in san where more than eight hundred palestinians are about to be made. Homeless and one hundred homes will be destroyed demolished. This happening in the south hebron hills it's happening in iceland where the saudis are building quote unquote national parks to behave ask colonial borders to prevent natural community growth in palestinian communities. There's many and a million ways in which palestinians in jerusalem or dispossessed and sometimes it's a judicial system sometimes it's artillery and weapons and sometimes it's national parks but it all behaves in the same way. I also want to just make a quick note. That shows has been under an illegal blockade for the past three weeks. No palestinians no palestinians. Not even not even journalists are allowed into the neighborhood except the people that live there and even those of us who live there are still harassed in question than shoved around. I've been more than i can. Count them that's been the same reality for other people. This is happening. The neighborhood is blockaded barricaded with cement barriers meanwhile israeli settlers can just walk in. No questions asked and often times if not most of the time. They are armed with their rifles or pistols. So i wanna go to that viral video showing your twin sister muna confronting the israeli settlers. Who's been living in part of your home for twelve years along. You know this is not your house. Yes but if i go you don't go back. So what's me i didn't do. I didn't do this. How it used to yell at me. But i didn't do this gaining my house. And if i don't see someone else going to.

jerusalem iraq yesterday palestine bochum twelve years three defendants three two weeks ago more than seventeen hundred friday eleven days fourth day san sixty six children muhammed one hundred homes islam south hebron hills more than eight hundred
"hebron hills" Discussed on Serienweise - Der Serien Podcast

Serienweise - Der Serien Podcast

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"hebron hills" Discussed on Serienweise - Der Serien Podcast

"Want hefty in understanding. Mentally For No fee light on. Phoenix Goud on a massage appetizers even some cooked on. Zepa focuses all happy. If I keep feeling Filippini's Azeem will be good fortune. Does he does in disaster hedged. On does manmade on Hebron Hills loads of FEMA does for me I the masonic momentum top is in India museum up. Top Decision Biba awfully five is this. Yeah. Hoffman this. I think. The governor's Clich does either for on nurses. Not, really one REDUC HERE'S A. Monitor thirty on the scene demand vary not via. Dot Com but the but the GIG. On Potsdam's tussauds up, he'd foyer. Capitalist, does the Austrian nerd Tonelli Tate in business not busy also has the under the. Desert. denarcotizing. Abbott also on loggers and vicar, and from kid some teenagers enough all your does is credited at us was clashes finish vocal hooked void Delia offer. Does but in. But in let's inspired by folding instant on Media Einstein damage need social phobias and. As illegal. As me all. The fuss comes on top from fit. By me in a top dividers. Look as soon as end that's you won't fantastic. These costume designer would thanks decent sites in the Colossus eight to go looks over the Hood Human British Kozlov. Midwestern wall versus Dustin. Even. Kane Clyde on. Get of adult by. The. Demon listens to hear beyond the zero to come over the. Audience an eel wonderful opt to shine filler I'm elites embed on, skip done in shuten shops and Adama. off in fit or lungs Hoesch diked. See Zozo Paul's. One top. Heaton, whatever he gave us the awesome St- the Hondas stimulus bill does Montas manganze zied the Mon-.

Hebron Hills Heaton Tonelli Tate Phoenix Goud Filippini Zozo Paul FEMA Potsdam Zepa shuten Kane Clyde Hoffman India museum Abbott Montas manganze Delia Desert. denarcotizing Dustin Adama.
"hebron hills" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

11:32 min | 1 year ago

"hebron hills" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Director of community outreach and Alan Parker here to talk about an issue that's not only a problem in our city but also a big problem across the country with the current statistics showing the U. S. unemployment rate rising from three point five percent in February the fourteen point seven percent in April the highest level since the Great Depression however he and homelessness well they obviously increase as well people are struggling families are struggling almost half of the homeless in Wisconsin are families but on any given night there are only enough shelter beds for about half of this homeless population so what can be done there are going to stations that are stepping up in a big way my first guest today is Maureen Atwell executive director of the Hebron house in Waukee shot Hebron hills is the oldest nonprofit organization in Waukee shot fully dedicated to providing emergency short term shelter in long term housing solutions to individuals and families welcome to the show today Maureen thank you we talk a lot about why people do what they do I think it's it's inspiring to hear how people use their passion and their talents to make a difference in the lives of others I love the quote that says purpose is the reason you journey has Jen is the fire that lights the way now we've heard some really interesting personal journeys over the last few years on the shelves so tell us a little about your journey and why serving people living in poverty became so important you so it's not it's not a a straight path it was quite a journey and I actually started volunteering with the homeless about twenty years ago I've been volunteering in shelters and doing sort of fundraising for a long time but I only just came to Hebron house about nine months ago so it was a really long journey to get here I began working with the homeless a long time ago I don't remember exactly what kind of set it off I think I got maybe an email from a shelter like a solicitation email saying Hey we're in need of socks and portable toiletries and a little personal size twelve trees I do remember that really clearly because I thought that is so we that's such a strange item to be in need of socks and personal supplies toiletries why it why and I kinda let it go for awhile and then I remember for some reason I just couldn't get it out of my mind why on earth are they so desperately need of socks so I ended up calling the shelter myself and staying you know I got this email the solicitation email from you that said that you're looking for socks and toiletries and I'm just wondering why you may explain to me that the homeless typically don't get socks donated because when people are finished with their socks they throw them away and and they probably should throw them away frankly but it means that a lot of homeless people don't have socks and when I was calling it was the dead of winter I think it was January or February I was living in New York City and it was really cold and I just thought about people being on the street without socks and it really it just it it hit something in me and so the toiletries I I was kind of like why you know why do people need toiletries if they're homeless why the personal sized toiletries because I'll I'll buy some full size shampoo bottles that's horrible for someone to be without toiletries and they said well you know people who are homeless they're carrying around everything they own and they don't have the luxury of carrying around these huge bottles of shampoo and conditioner and soap and mouthwash and so having these small little portable things makes it a lot easier on them and that to me really hit a chord because I myself from you know kind of early in my adulthood have had a lot of times where I didn't have everything that I needed and my story is that I I went right into the work force I basically didn't go to college until I was in my thirties and I was you know a young person with a high school degree I was lucky I had a high school degree but I was working for many many years at minimum wage jobs and there were so many times where I could not make ends meet and where I was really really scared and didn't have enough to eat and I was lucky because there are so many people who ended up a lot worse than I ended up and you know kind of along this journey that's why the homelessness situation really spoke to me and that's why I got involved with volunteering but then in the meantime while I was volunteering for the homeless and just working my regular jobs I began traveling and that was my passion I really really enjoy traveling the world I went on a solo fourteen month round the world trip I ate you know would save my money I lived in Mexico for nine months it was so important to me to be able to travel when I was traveling I saw things that I never thought I would see and I remember being in Cambodia and seeing children who had been victims of landmines and people who had been human trafficked for their entire lives from from childhood on upward and there were these organizations that were helping them and I really wanted I just felt called to help and so I ended up volunteering in Cambodia and later in Thailand with some of these organizations and while I was volunteering with them I I felt kind of helpless I felt like what can I contribute other than what I'm giving right now because I can help them sweep the floors I can help them serve meals I can help send envelopes you know like whatever it was that I was helping them with it's like this is going to last for a day but once I got home the help that I give it's not going to have a huge impact that's what that's kind of when I started thinking you know I was already in my thirties at that point and I was like you know what I want my college degree because I want to be a it'll make a big difference in the world and I want to have the ability to do that and if I don't have a college degree I I can't make as big a difference is I want to make so when I went home from that trip like I said that was a fourteen month trip when I went home I ate and rolled in college and I worked full time during the day and went to school full time at night and kind of right away but you know I can have an even bigger impact if I go to law school so I went right from college to law school and when I got out and went right in the public interest and I worked in the district attorney's office for seven years I worked for Waukesha county for a few years and their child support division but when I saw you know and and kind of this whole time I was working my way up in in a leadership role and when I saw that there was a leadership role in a homeless organization in Waukesha I couldn't believe it I mean the fit was just perfect and so I was I got the role in September of twenty nineteen I've been there ever since and I cannot tell you how happy I am that this it's it's like this house that was so twisted and all it all becomes clear now in my mind and the we are taking on on journeys through our life experience for a reason right I mean there is where where we're supposed to be usually for a bigger reason and you had told me that you moved into the basement at least temporarily at the Hebron house so you could be there with your staff right the services they need it to the community so tell us about these important services that you wanted to be sure he run house provides so I'm the house we actually recently changed our name in September we work Hebron house of hospitality but we do so much more than just a shelter and so we changed our name to Hebron housing services so that to better reflect what we do because we have three different homeless shelters we have to low income housing units and we do case management for the homeless so this is this is a really big foot print that we have and we have a really really big impact on the community our we have two shelters that are emergency shelters short term basically thirty to forty five days and we have one shelter that is a pretty rare shelter is considered a safe haven shelter and that is our Jeremy house shelter that's for people who are mentally ill and chronically homeless and that's a little bit longer term shelter typical stay in that shelter is about six months so the the different things that we do the different services that we provide for this community are so incredibly important in terms of providing emergency housing providing low income housing which is is certainly something that we do that a lot of people don't actually realize and then providing case management services for the homeless and providing that kind of longer term steps stabilizing home for people who are really really struggling with chronic homelessness and mental illness well and you said that you've got three different homes one of which is the juvenile house what's special about the Juno house and and how is that different from other shelters so I am incredibly proud of of June a house that is just something that I think is really unusual and that is that in the traditional shelter system the shelters were typically are gender specific so men in one shelter women another shelter and not meant that families got split up and homelessness is really hard on children it's really really traumatizing and have the family split up is even more traumatizing so our Juno house shelter has family rooms and that means that families can stay there together so anybody who comes in and presents as a family is a lot of to stay in their own room and that means that families don't get split up and I think that that is so incredibly important to children and to families in general facing homelessness absolutely that's a wonderful lot offering and that makes the juvenile house special right one in America sixty nine percent of homeless live in emergency shelters or transitional housing but thirty one percent are unsheltered living on the streets or in abandoned buildings vehicles are parked you run house wants to be a part of the solution it changed the staggering statistics and end homelessness stay tuned as we discuss how they plan to go about that mission we'll be back in a moment senior homes have sure been in the news lately those big places really made folks rethink risking exposures and locked arms even before all of this I saw my own death suddenly having to go into several seemingly great big homes and sought intimately that this just is not right I'm Tom take night.

Alan Parker Director of community