26 Burst results for "Heaton"

FDA panel endorses booster shot for J&J COVID-19 vaccine

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | Last month

FDA panel endorses booster shot for J&J COVID-19 vaccine

"Federal health advisers have endorsed a Johnson and Johnson covert nineteen vaccine booster amid growing fears people who got the single dose are not as protected as those who received other vaccines the government says all three U. S. approved vaccines offer strong protection but the J. and J. version consistently shows lower effectiveness than the Medora and Pfizer vaccines which use a different technology FDA advisers like Dr Paul Offit say Americans who've been given the J. and J. shot need a boost I think that frankly would always the panel unanimously voted to back the J. and J. booster which the company's Dr penny Heaton says can be given as early as two months after the initial dose my waiter an even stronger and you response the same panel yesterday endorsement during his poster paint government regulators will decide in coming days whether to sign off Sager mag ani Washington

Johnson Dr Paul Offit J. Booster Dr Penny Heaton Pfizer FDA Government J. Ani Washington
"heaton" Discussed on Invest With Clarity

Invest With Clarity

03:57 min | 3 months ago

"heaton" Discussed on Invest With Clarity

"No one focuses on the opportunity. Investing is one hundred percent about opportunity but that ability to discern between opportunity and fear. You have to have a process in order to have a process. You have to have clarity of that process and once you do that then you understand how the clearly allows you to execute on that process in their forget progress at the same time discipline which is an excellent digging up. I want to backtrack to one thing. You said here quickly before we get to to number three. No we're gonna be wrapping it up. Is it this will use a fancy word for it said awards is called the fallacy of composition which basically says hey look if i don't outperform beat my benchmark every quarter or if not every component in the portfolio is up every quarter us. This great analogy about a vehicle. Right a what we know for people who aren't mechanics you get in you. Press the button to turn the key on and all you know is that the cars transferred to a and b. You're going to press the brakes. You're gonna work. Batteries gonna can ignite the the powertrain etc. He just relate that to the composition of portfolio. When you're disciplined how you know how those components work together. I always liked the way you described that sure. Well it's rare that you have every component of your portfolio working at the same way at the same time that's why they call diversification and asset allocation and you. Frankly don't want to have all your pieces working together at one time because then you're not in a position to take advantage of buying stuff on sale if everything is going up in maybe it's not going up as much as you want. You don't have an opportunity to buy stuff on sale. You don't have an opportunity to buy things at a discount. So it's kinda like your vehicle right your vehicle has heaton it right but in the middle of the summer a using the heat in your car..

heaton
"heaton" Discussed on The Glenn Beck Program

The Glenn Beck Program

02:56 min | 4 months ago

"heaton" Discussed on The Glenn Beck Program

"Thanks mister we're basically at the fifties th. They'll go off to the soccer whatever i liked that. Go like that so you took a mutual friend of a ours Or she took you home last night. Y- heard her drove a friend's house. Yeah a second. I thought i had evening than i know. This is great. I'm surprised i found out from. Yeah no you're right. Yeah but she said that you. You have a pretty convincing impression of me. I've got okay. I've i've been working on a glenn beck impression. Yeah can i. stu Would you ask me if i like bananas. If glenn likes bananas glenn you like bananas. Have you ever seen a man die from potassium withdraw. Not good way to go. So that's my such. Does this apply to is it always about it needs to be deep little ominous and involving potassium. That's that's what i figured out is if i said. Hey how are your kids. They're great now because the everything is taking place of the vestibule of the apocalypse right yes see. Wherever the statements coming from andrew heaton the host of his own very successful podcast the political orphanage comedian and now the author of the new book. Los angeles is hideous. It is a true story and poems written from the heart. Andrine has always good to have you here. Good to be here thank you. Where are you going from here. I'm in hotel until i do show later today. No yeah we're still on the air. I'm sorry my bad. He's allowed to mention my show on the air. Saying on this program. I'll be here the rest of the day. I'll probably have back to tonight. I on what are you going to do from here. You going to be doing comedy clubs or you just going back home to eat. I mean i assume national laureate will be the gal that i'll probably travel around the summer. We'll meet ups. Might go to scotland again. Yeah in other words. You have up until the end of today planned retirement purposes. Be playing milk through your nose and yuk yuks in salt lake city Till the end of september. Los angeles is hideous. The new book get it now..

bananas glenn andrew heaton Andrine glenn beck stu soccer glenn Los angeles scotland salt lake city
"heaton" Discussed on Fake the Nation

Fake the Nation

05:20 min | 5 months ago

"heaton" Discussed on Fake the Nation

"And i wouldn't bet a guardian years ago absolutely out core story twenty twenty when i was drinking a bucket of scotch at a bathtub sobbing eating oreos out of a bowl with a ladle. Because i couldn't do dishes. Oh i should have had the guarantor. So that i find very weird and i look at this first of all. I don't know california a guardianship laws. I'm sure they're very very complex. But it seems to me that the the benefit of the doubt should be. You're saying you should have to really prove somebody's insane. Secondly if you're gonna do it it should the threshold should be. This person literally cannot function in society and is going to be criminally taken advantage of or we'll wind up in prisoner insane asylum that should be the level. Where if it's just. I don't think she's optimizing her career. That is not sufficient. I think guys not sufficient not sufficient. It was crazy because she wasn't even allowed to retain her own counsel because of medical records. That were also kept from the council that she was trying to keep so. It's like for reasons that we don't even. If that weren't clear to her at the time she would put under this conservative ship and then the the lawyer that works with jamie spears which is her dad. A who is the conservative co-conspirator He she had said in the documentary. Oh i've never in my entire career. I've never seen someone get out of a conservative ship because the thing is the idea. Is that also. You should be able to graduate out of it like leads again. Let's say for the sake of argument that she did something more insane than just shaving her head in at a salon or whatever remember that thing she shaved her head or remember she like hit a car geraci. Stop bothering her. And it was like you know anyway. Let's say it was beyond that and it was and there was an actual. You know medical reason that she was put into the conservative ship. I mean however many years of a vague vegas residency later where she's performing at the highest of her abilities of anyone's number one albums..

jamie spears california vegas
"heaton" Discussed on Fake the Nation

Fake the Nation

05:54 min | 5 months ago

"heaton" Discussed on Fake the Nation

"Totally highlighted that same quote it is exactly it is exactly that and heaton. What did you think he meant by that. What were what were the rich countries do really made me feel guilty. Because i've had eight vaccines. And now that i think harding. I want to get into those clubs. Where the hot young people right. I show the by passport laid with that seats to my my understanding the major problem with this and it's fairly complicated and i'm not super aware of the mechanisms in place with kovacs or its various funding mechanisms. My understanding is that the problem with it wasn't funding. That kovacs actually has the money. They have the money right now too hand to pharmaceutical companies to purchase the vaccines. The problems are that there's a limited amount of companies making vaccines very few of them. I think none of them are located in the third world. That really needs it right now although the largest vaccine manufacturers in india. But what's happening is as the vaccines are coming out. Rich countries are immediately buying them and holding them. And that's the big problem from this is it's not that we're refusing to provide information about how to make vaccines or anything like that. It's that we're holding them. And the the logic we sorry entered just to also add not only hoarding the but we have laws for vaccine get developed in our own countries are manufactured in our own countries. Various countries have these laws that you can't even export them until the government says okay now. You can export them so even if a pharmaceutical country wanted to export them and engage in business with another country. They couldn't gotcha. Okay yes yes yes. Also something that's going on. Is that some pfizer. Vaccines were approved. People fail to realize that the countries who needed them don't have the storage capabilities so they're like hey have some pfizer but oh it won't work because you guys don't have the cold storage capabilities. Yeah well i like this. This is kind of nodded up. Is i don't know like the the big problem from from From kovacs's position is bilateral negotiations that that wealthy countries have had with vaccines rather than going in as a global community through kovacs. And i don't know. I don't know that we there's a way a democratic government would have done anything different like imagine if during the twenty twenty debates president trump said. We're gonna do operation warp speed. We're going to have vaccines started rolling out in january and biden had said. I don't think we should do that. I think we should focus on it and their national effort. We're going to prioritize distributing vaccines globally until everybody in the world gets twenty percent. Then we can focus on. The whole of america will probably get finished up around twenty twenty three like he would have killed him. He wouldn't have been able to do it. So i mean that's the thing is like is it. You know jordan. Do you feel like any any country. Angle merckel bite. Anyone could have said. Listen guys here's what's going to happen right now. There's an outbreak in india..

kovacs heaton harding pfizer india government trump biden america jordan
"heaton" Discussed on Boomer & Gio

Boomer & Gio

03:19 min | 6 months ago

"heaton" Discussed on Boomer & Gio

"Well. And.

"heaton" Discussed on Boomer & Gio

Boomer & Gio

07:45 min | 6 months ago

"heaton" Discussed on Boomer & Gio

"Or wherever you get your podcasts. We're talking about some of your athletic exploits and you know how good you are in high school. Football baseball player ever said good. So i felt like i was going to reach out to one of your old high school coaches the great meal heat and who. I played against football in high school when he went to say to him. I want to east. They'd beat us in the championship game. I don't know people up my ribs or not. Somebody did that day so the great deal and joins us this morning. This geos former baseball coach. Neil great to talk to doing boom. Geo could be here. Neil neil so i just wanna to get a scouter reported the two thousand gio for your bellport baseball team and what he was like. You want the truth. Yes the whole truth and nothing but the truth audio. Let the only thing geo couldn't do is run. He never he never pulled the ball. He hit everything the right field. Te'o he was always there on time he was never late And just a great great yet but other. Look at that who was yeah. He couldn't run and he still can't run. That's for sure can lie. Tries to stay sedentary as you possibly can. I just wanted to ask you. I had anybody since then prior to then keep the book better than geo outstanding yes. His mother was outstanding to. She would come in and scriptural the guys out then. I'm ready to go right. And a lot of people probably don't know this but his father you fly over the field and his plane and made sure all our outfield is. We're in the right. Yeah so my mom was actually the bench coach really league team when neil was the coach. Yeah i how many. How many years did you did you coach him. Neil do you remember. God probably up in i the jv level yet. Now you it was. It was varsity as well for sure. Yeah coach is so it was. I could tell you that summer league team. I was in or me. And neil junior both in sixth grade. I believe so. It was six grade all the way up until i graduated high school. Actually it's not. it's a long. It is is a long time. So so neil you know after your baseball career was over. You came back and you you move back to long island and now you've been working with a lotta pictures around here having you i really have on. I'm working at mcdonald's though. We got a great program. Going on down there. And like i said i've had. I've been really fortunate over the years to really work with some outstanding strowman when he was ten match when he was ten anthony cave when he was eleven. We had some really good kids around here. Yeah and it's amazing that you're still doing all that great work all these years later i. We were your first team. You walked right off the major league baseball field onto the little league field and started coaching us. And you had a bruise on your leg from when albert bell drop kick. Did you remember that. yeah. I remember that. What was that all about. But i'll tell you the story. Well that was with the kansas city. Royals were playing. The cleveland indians cleveland. And of course up for us the great george brett hall of fame so he gets drilled by the first pitch. Okay okay so you know what my job is. I'm coming in the game. The pitch and who do i gotta face right off the bat. It could be little second baseman. It's gotta be it's albert bell. God i gotta throw a fastball. His ribs and i know this is gonna be not good. So i drill him he comes out and before you know what the seventy guy on top of the unwritten rules of baseball so to this day Yeah when you see stroman matt's pitch and especially madsen game. Last time watching him pitch. I did i did. I did he. His career is going to be very very good he. He started off a little bit slow. You know it's it's it's it's a it's a transition you know come up to the big leagues and especially in new york planes for the mets a lot of pressure and soon as he got traded he relaxed a little bit. He's got stuff straightened out. It's breaking balls bad. And now he's thrown his changeup behind in the count and he's gonna have a great career so strong. Yeah i was gonna say what about stroman. What do you see from him This year has gotten off to a great start. He's just a tremendous athlete. He's the type of guy i'm trying to remember. Years ago is trying to convince the scouts to draft him in the top three rounds but they didn't like him because of his height. I played with tom gorden. He played twenty five years in the big leagues and same type of frame. Same stop same body. And i was trying to convince the scouts that this guy you gotta take this guy. A lot of them didn't couple of them like them in is where he is now and he's he's a tremendous tremendous athlete when he made him so good was just nasty on the mound is every time he comes workout with me was like he was pitching in the game. We're talking to neal heaton. Who is my former baseball coach from little league up through high school he has been working with some of the great long island. Pitchers that are out there including marcus. Stroman stephen mats and others Do you remember 'cause. I pitched back. Then you taught me like this poor man's changeup where i just it was basically a four seam fastball. But i'd leave space in between my hand in the ball and it would drop the bottom would drop out of it and i feel that in little league. I struck out like fifty guys. I remember what this poor man's change up that you taught me and everybody was so mad that you were the coach because like you were teaching us. All these different pitches and stuff. Yeah i do remember. That was basically a circle. Changeup that i taught basically all the young kids coming up. That's the difference today. The instruction that these kids are getting. Like i didn't get i didn't learn how to throw change up till i was in. Triple eight in the pros. I mean these kids are learning stuff. I didn't learn until i was in almost you know. When i went to university of miami i learned a lot of stuff there but these kids are learning stuff at eleven twelve years old. I learned when i was twenty two twenty three years old. You know when. I remember about you back in high school. You were thrown over ninety miles an hour right and nobody could hit you of course within a major leagues saying he had. He threw his curveball. Buddy also fast ball that that's all anybody ever talked about. Yeah you know the the interesting thing is you know. Pitching is an art. I don't care what anybody says talking to. Trevor bauer talking to roger clemens. Or talking to you all know because you've been through it before when you watch jacob degrom pitch what do you say like. I said i've been you know i played a little. I was fortunate night. I've seen a lot of guys over the years. I never ever in my life. I've seen a guy like that really is getting better as he's getting old. I don't understand it. Usually guys velocity goes down as they get a little bit older. This guy is getting better and better. So what i wanna do. I wanna sit down and talk to him. What his off season program is what he's doing. The young kids can learn from this guy. But i've never seen anything like no. He's the best pitcher. I've ever seen bar none. Wow that's one. Hello nolan ryan burke eleven back to the days all those guys and this guy is just ridiculous. I mean throws a change but ninety miles an hour we unhittable actually hit its unhittable. You gotta get when you're updates like i hope of festivals coming in swing your present. You stuck me at first base. It was a high school time. He's with to first base to see how i would do. And i ended up the not doing so.

Trevor bauer neal heaton twenty five years fifty guys new york Neil neil Neil tom gorden marcus first pitch first team stroman neil ten match ten eleven twenty two Geo long island madsen
"heaton" Discussed on Rocks Across the Pond

Rocks Across the Pond

03:51 min | 8 months ago

"heaton" Discussed on Rocks Across the Pond

"And i just Taking guesses at this but so the reason we are reading this book is it was written by ed luke. The book is trillion est. It is a. it's a novel so it is. It is fiction And ed wrote. This is look Good question will actually that. That is a topic we will discuss when we get into the This is the trillion est. The pen name that ed uses for this book is sagan jeffries. I guess was a. He says that he was a big fan of carl sagan. Growing up in its white. He chose chose the pin. Namesake in jeffries. So ed wrote this book as sagan jeffries mainly because he'd already published a bunch of curling books as at luca which This is not just a novel but it is also kind of reveals ed's theory about creation and the makeup of the universe. He told the calgary. A calgary herald. The first draft of the book was completed in nineteen ninety eight but this was published in the fall of two thousand and thirteen. Ed got inch. Didn't science fiction while reading scifi novels while riding alongside his dad On the family farm in decided that he didn't believe in the big banks we came up with his own theory and then wrote a road novel about it For on the curling side of things ed one to canadian curling championships and won the nineteen eighty six world curling championship yellow won bronze at the nineteen eighty eight olympics. When curling was a demonstration sport jonathan. Do you have anything to add at a about. Ed liquid. the curler he i he also wrote a lot of good curling books back in the eighties and early nineties so he wrote the curling book which is like an early classic with pau gasol He did power curling which i really liked which was actually early version of mixed doubles in there. He's got like all these different versions of the game. You propose the also had one with a lot of sports. Psychology called curling to wins there's actually written and published a lot of books Garda's writer on top of the hour right. So this is the trillion est it really dives into a trillion theory which is revealed throughout the book. I it's also the main point of his website that he's created which is which is just a fantastic trip trip through time into early. Internet ed's trillion is so gio cities. It is just like a badgered. A bunch of waving flag gifts at like just it. You know flash buttons and like a cartoon mailbox that says email like it's a bad It's just it's like walking into a time. Capsule fantastic heaton. It looks like something that we would have created in in class in high school i was i was talking to jonathan before it because i went dowd. A i i i would down on ed. Look which rabbit hole on his youtube page ad by the way. I think i've seen so far. I like luca. Which i'm saying this for a place of love and admiration. The the youtube shuttle looks like a public access attempt at getting a show. Picked up by the sci fi network circa nineteen ninety-seven like it's a very very specific like very what point animated curtains that come up. There's this like really cool. Graph lady like laser graph lady and it is like like whoa song playing and then it just stops her just like i had a hard stop at the two seconds. Then this guy talking like oh horrible microphone recorded at his car About what he thinks about black holes i it. It's like it's it is sort of its own parody..

youtube two seconds eighties Ed carl sagan first draft nineteen ninety eight early nineties nineteen eighty eight ed thirteen one jonathan nineteen ninety-seven nineteen eighty six world curl luke two thousand est theory canadian
"heaton" Discussed on Rocks Across the Pond

Rocks Across the Pond

02:49 min | 8 months ago

"heaton" Discussed on Rocks Across the Pond

"A everybody. Welcome to rocks across the pond. It is a curling podcast. Coming to you from richmond. Virginia my name is ryan mcgee and joining me in southampton england. Is jonathan haber. Croft in jonathan We are a curling podcasts. But you wouldn't know that if you listened to this episode. yes today. We're going to space we are. We're going to. We're going to review a sci-fi book on curling podcast. I honestly it's been a while since i've been this kind of excited to do In episode. Because i think it's going to be It's going to be very different It'll be kind of cathartic we've actually had to talk about curling lately because they started playing so to tournament enough for you to turn amounts is enough for me. It's time to talk about not curling again. All right so we do. We have guest since we are talking about a sci-fi book. We're not just talking about any sifi book. We are talking about a sifi book written by canadian champion. Curler ed luca which in here to discuss the book Is someone who knows absolutely nothing about curling but he does know a lot about sifi. We are joined today by indra. Heaton heaton is an author writer and political satirist he host to podcast including alienating the audience which i listened to take a deep dive into what science fiction is really about. He also hosts the political orphanage. Which i don't listen to. But i assume tries to make politics digestible through He is the thinking. Man's nerd. And i have known him since he was fourteen. So while i have plenty of stories that i could tell you about heaton. I would just be putting myself at the scene of the crime so i'll leave it at the fact that he is my friend. He is very funny. Very adept at operating a military grade searchlight. Welcome heaton did you ever think you would be appearing on a curling podcasts. No this is not where. I'm pleased with how my life has turned out that this is now the apathy of media career however it is not what i thought would happen. I do have a curling anecdote i know like. I know that it's that thing where you have a broom while you're skiing like i know that's the thing i I got invited to apply to be a writer on john. Oliver and it was about the olympics. And the joke. That i had in my application script was whenever i watch curling i liked to pretend people are taunting roomba by sweeping before the thing can get to the thing because i it's that was very funny. Visual image of them like quick. Sweep before the rubik gets here. So that's what. I always think. Whatever i see curling and that exhausts my knowledge of curling. But it's nice to be here. Thank you for having me. Yeah it's it's great to have you here to bring us some much-needed needed knowledge rather than jonathan..

ryan mcgee today southampton england olympics Virginia fourteen heaton jonathan haber jonathan Curler indra Croft Heaton heaton canadian john. Oliver richmond luca
More EMP mp3

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

06:03 min | 11 months ago

More EMP mp3

"Welcome to kiss myths and mysteries. I'm your host kent chrome yesterday. I painted a dark picture. Should the earth's be hit by a solar flare containing electro magnetic pulses. I listed the following points affected by. Emp the power grid would go down. There would be no heaton no electricity. Atm's all online banking debit credit. Cards would be shut down. The supply chain would stop creating a shortage on foodstuff and no internet last on the list. I mentioned cars. Most cars would no longer work. Today's podcast is what you could do to protect. Your way of life should emp. Rain down. and i'll start with cars. The conventional wisdom. Is that if your car relies. On any delicate electronics it would be toast in the wake of emp attack or solar flare. This is origin of that idea. Cars built during and after the nineteen eighties are not. Emp safe however real world testing with the mp simulators has yielded mixed results regardless of which camp you fall into the bigger issue is that after a large scale. Emp flare or devastating. Coronal mass ejection. As i like to call it. It is very likely that fuel production distribution systems would be knocked off line so in the absence of some type of alternative fuel source. You would very likely find yourself stranded even if your car were to survive in. Emp in a study released two thousand four. The emp commission subjected thirty seven different cars and trucks to simulated emp and found that none of them suffered permanent crippling damage. Although the results were somewhat mixed the study subjected vehicles to simulate emp attacks both while shut off and while running and it found that none of the vehicle suffered any ill effects if the attack occurred while the engine was off the attack or the solar flare occurred while the vehicle were running some of them shut off while other suffered other effects like aronie s plinking dash lights. Although some of the engines did die when subjected tune emp each of the passenger cars tested by the emp commission. Did start back up. The study findings suggested that ninety percent of the cars on the road in two thousand four but suffer no ill effects at all for many. Emp while ten percent would either stall or suffer some other ill effects. That number has no doubt gone up in the intervening decade says. There are more cars on the road today. That make you self delicate electronics. But none of the vehicles tested by the emp commission suffered permanent damage. There are few possible reasons why the electronics in our cars may be a little bit more robust than we give them. Credit for the first. Is that the electronics. And cars and trucks are already somewhat shielded and they also tend to be a little more robust. The most consumer electronics due to the harsh conditions are subjected to while on the road another factor. That may help protect their electronics. In a car is that the metal body of the vehicle can act as a partial faraday cage. This is why you could survive your vehicle being struck by lightning. That's also why your car radio. Antennas are located outside rather than inside vehicle. Of course your car isn't a perfect faraday cage or you wouldn't be able to make and receive phone calls. We could assume the your car has a better than fifty fifty chance of surviving exposure. Emp the real issue is fuel would become less accessible. But let's leave cars on the road for now and look a communication simply. There wouldn't be any of the casual cell and landline phone calls. We'd like to make why cell towers landlines should be fried. But you notice. I said casual calls. Communication would fall to ham radio. But only those hams that were operated by generator. A battery that had been protected by faraday cage. Of course that begs the question. What the hell is a faraday cage and why would it protect discontents from emp. A faraday cage is an enclosure used to block electromagnetic fields. These cages often look distinctly. Well cage like solemn or simple as chain link fences or ice pales others use a fine metallic mesh regardless of their exact appearance. All thurday cages take electromagnetic radiation and distributed around the exterior of the cage. However your microwave can be used as a faraday cage. It might be big enough for a car or motorcycle battery if you have one of those very old like one thousand nine hundred fifty ish. Refrigerators were lead line. You could use it as a faraday cage and costly protect generator or car battery forgetting for a moment that you won't have access to fuel for your car. You won't be able to use a cell landline. Keep in mind. That country's gridwood down no electricity in your tap go dry. If you have a well you could use a bucket to retrieve water. Woodstove would provide warm possibly heat for cooking. The thought of cooking reminds that unless you have been stocking food. There would be nothing to cook in an extremely rural area. You could hunt maybe poach a cow but then can you feel dress an animal that large you know how to build a smoke house while you get water manually from your well heat cook with woodstove end up living off. What you hunted down. Storing access meat and a smokehouse. House you bill. With the hammer and nail power tools wouldn't be affected by emp but then faraday cage to protect power source for your power tools.

Emp Commission Heaton ATM Faraday Cage
Amazing Race 32 finale recap and winners

Rob Has a Podcast

01:39 min | 1 year ago

Amazing Race 32 finale recap and winners

"Think you really do yourself any favors starting in a different spot because your baby could be in any of those cakes rights not placed in cake number six hundred thirty in each and every one it could have been one on the table or it could have been one of the racks but doesn't matter because both she and madison had to go back once over because they weren't even even no matter who they chows. Congratulations to the winner of the amazing race. Draft it is. Mike bloom there. We go mike bloom did it. He had the fifth pick overall. Took willing james so that that's sting's because Each of us Myself jess dan. Heaton we all had the chance to take a shot at will in james. It was mike. Blum who took them fifth overall winner of the amazing race draft. Thank you boys for doing that. I mean it's interesting as well. I know that said this all the way back during our preseason podcast. it's also notable will and james our first male male team winners since the apprehension season twenty four Which is crazy. Considering that spoiler alert going back all the way to the beginning of the amazing race three out of the first four teams that one were male male teams so just sort of see whether it was due to the casting or the circumstances. It's been a while since this type of thing is happened. I would also not call willing. James typical alpha males. But it was a fun thing wrong. I'm happy to continue to go undefeated in our amazing race strapped here until we meet again. Well the fire my i. It's though i think you know just

Mike Bloom Jess Dan James Heaton Madison Blum Mike
"heaton" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

06:28 min | 1 year ago

"heaton" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"Shaw. Now in fewer than ten minutes, my goals extract the best advice in the world's smartest and most interesting people might ask them just by questions. My gas today's actress producer and author Patricia. Heaton Patricia is best known for starring roles in the sitcoms. Everybody loves Raymond the Middle and Carol Second Act. In this episode, you'll learn about how her mom's death impacted her life how she has reinvented herself overcome obstacles and wide being both a leaper Anna planner has led to her success. How did the death of your mom during your childhood affect how you see the world, your work ethic and life choices that death of my mom was what I consider to be? WHAT CS Lewis Calls? A severe mercy because it gave me at a very young age, a sense of my own mortality and the fleeting nece of life I've always felt that life needed to be lived because you didn't know how long you have and I think that's probably part of why I pursued acting when there was no one around me necessarily encouraging me to do it and I also think it prepared me for things like this pandemic that we're in right now because I always known since I was twelve that bad things can and will happen in life. It's just a matter of when when the pandemic hit I thought. Oh, I was wondering when the next bad thing was coming and here it is. So I wasn't as taken aback by it as some others might have been because I've already experienced terrible loss in my life. And most people struggled during major life transitions because as humans we fear and are uncomfortable with change how did you overcome the mental and emotional obstacles you face as you transitioned from your first year second act and then commit to pursuing your new goals. I have always had a love of adventure and when I came out to Hollywood, I read a couple of books. One was called final cut about the making of Michael Cimino Movie Heaven's Gate, which was a disaster. I was so fascinated by the way the crazy way that Hollywood works and I just felt I had to see it firsthand I wanted to be in this crazy world because nothing ever stays the same and every day something new happens even if it's something bad, it's something different and it's not boring. So I think buying my nature, I enjoy a challenge it makes me feel alive and so for me trying something new is invigorating as opposed to being a scary thing. And there's always something new in acting eve. The most successful person is going to lose their job at some point you know Raymond ran for nine years, but it nine years I was out of a job. Again, it's a little terrifying, but I'm looking forward to the next thing. So I've been a little bit blessed with a sense of adventure and find change exciting and like my dad and his brother I'm a lifetime worker with no plans to retire because I use that being productive is good for our mental health. You. Would agree I totally agree I can never. Have a business manager that says, well, you know we have to save for your retirement and I keep saying we're not retiring if someone will hire us, we will work because we love our work and you recently said that you want to die on a sound stage. What but what motivates you to continue to stay productive juggle multiple projects and challenge south for some reason, I feel a bit on Moore D- When I'm not working. Now that could be either a good thing or a bad thing I don't get my identity or worse as a human being from my work. So I can be out of work and know that I can still contribute to the world, but I given a certain gift. To share with the world and so I'm most comfortable when I'm able to share that. You know right now I'm transitioning a little bit into producing as opposed to performing which I also very much enjoy. It's not just producing a show or a movie that you hope will either lift people's spirits or help them see the world in a different way or give them empathy for someone else but it's also just the wonderful people I've. Met all over the country and all over the world that makes it really exciting to look at how they're skilled and look at the gifts that they have. I love all that stuff I really enjoy watching the creative process happened whether it's through the art director or the makeup artist or the writer. So I'm GonNa feel that just really suits my personality because I love meeting people I love the creative process and I love change. And I see that all as an adventure and I I'm a celebrity ambassador for an organization called world. Vision is the largest non-governmental organization, the world and the largest variety of clean water and through them. I've also been able to travel around the world and see a lot of hope happening as clean water comes to these countries. So I think that's what keeps me going is the love of all the New People I get to meet. Personal fulfilment wife journey of self discovery fall by personal and professional achievements. Accomplishments. How has your? Efforts made you more personally fulfilled in shape this next phase your life you know I think as you get older, I'm sixty two although as I said earlier, I've had a very clear if my mortality since my mother died, but it really comes home to you the older you get and you start realizing that you have you know God Willing Safer Myself God willing twenty five to thirty good years left. So you WANNA make the most of that and I've always known that charitable work is important component of life being raised Catholic and also seeing my father when he was paying the bills every month writing checks out to charities even though he was always very concerned and Nervous about money because he's a newspaper Guy who's paying for Catholic Education for five kids and you know it was a struggle, but he always contributed.

Raymond Heaton Patricia Hollywood Michael Cimino Catholic Education producer Shaw. Lewis business manager Moore director writer
From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

Learn to Code with Me

46:03 min | 1 year ago

From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

"And we're back in today's episode. I speak with Michael, Pimentel. Michael Story is fascinating worked in the glassblowing industry specifically for film sets for nine years before he started teaching himself how to Code. And what makes him even more? Interesting is the fact that he doesn't have a college degree. Anti never went to a coding bootcamp. He is entirely self-taught. and. That is exactly what we're GONNA be talking about today. How he taught himself to code. WOW, working fulltime. How guys first job in tack and how he got more roles in the tech industry as time went on. If you tips for staying motivated while learning how to Code. This episode is for you enjoy. Hey. Michael. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. It will on six February I'm real excited to talk with you. You have like interesting. Self taught experience in. That's what I would like to dive into I. Could you share with us how you got started in software engineering? Absolutely so kind of Story kind of goes back to a few years ago when I was working for a company that made life for the film industry now working there as a manufacturer glassblowing really interesting work. Kind of working in a manufacturing type of shop warehouse, loud, working on a lay, that spun in a really hot environment I was there for a really long time and things just. Kinda didn't progress in terms of career. Wise and financially it was just really typical I live in California and California being one of the most expensive place live. It just wasn't sustainable. married and I have a child and that it just wasn't something that I could maintain so it kind of motivated me to start thinking I need to. Probably either go back to school or another another route career choice so i. can you know build to support and have a career that can provide general finance, support and everything like that, so it kind of led me to back to. My interest in computers and everything like that, so I started to do some online, searching and everything like that and it. Brought me to software development coding, you know some booming career choice that is really big right now and everything like that was like okay. Maybe I should go back to school for that, but at the time it really wasn't the best option I went acted. As a couple of glasses time, that's what I could afford at my community college, and then just got really difficult to maintain a full-time job and take one or two classes, and it got really expensive, because my wife was what was going to school in college and everything like that, so it was really difficult for us to support both less going especially you know. Not really knowing what I wanted to do. So I I did a lot of searching and I came across recode camp and recode camp. You know like when you get on their landing page. It's like learning one to code for free and always people learn this way and I was like wait three. This isn't make sense. This will usually scams off there. Start off Rian. Then you have to pay something and everything like that and you know to my surprise actually was free, and then so I started I jumped right in, and just started to go to the curriculum, and it sparked my interest and I was like. Wow, this is really cool. It's it kind of. Goes about in a way that. Gets you interested really quickly? You know with hd Mounsey assassin how you can get feedback on the webpage really quickly. Let's kind of how it started because I. Just I just couldn't go. That route was a canoe into school because it was just really expensive and I already had like a car loan, I couldn't get like student loan. It was just wasn't really practical. It's like cave. Do put myself some really extreme debt that I don't know if it's GonNa lead to something. That's GONNA pay in the end so I had to find another option and looked like learning to code on my own free resources when that resource beginning with recode camp was was the route I took. Awesome so I, want to backtrack a little bit to your. Your work before you got into coding, so you you okay? You said he was a manufacturing role. I haven't made notes that you were a glass blower which anti note that is for movies today shows. Definitely. What is it glasses? Sure okay, so a glass blower, typically like of someone like Google glass large usually someone that takes some raw material which consists of the materials, t make glass essentially depending on what what the? The. End Product is going to be different types of glass. Of course so basically you take them in you hit Heaton furnace, or with a really hot torture claim so that it becomes like in this malleable state, and then you shape it essentially so what I did there? We work on a leave, and we basically built like the light bulb globe. It's spun on a lathe and then you would really. Really hot with a hydrogen oxygen burners, two thousand degrees, and then you shape it based on certain dimensions so basically they would take that, and then we'd have a filament type that would basically you know, have some kind of chemical reaction than light up base off whatever the the fixture needed you know for the filming, so the specific light that they made there was an Hmo which is like a chemical. Name that I really don't know all the details into it, but it basically replicates the color of the sun so like if you see like on film sets, use those lights that kind of are the background that make everything look real, daytime and night-time filming. Those are the lights that we made when I worked there we're one of the few American companies still made them like with our hands, still as opposed to a machine meaning making them in a in a warehouse somewhere. But in a sense, essentially, that's what it was. We were just making them with a glassblowing. That's what I did while working there while I think nine or ten years. We Really, oh my goodness. Wow so start I'm surprised. It was that long because for people. Listening to this show were actually speaking through video so I can see you so I'm like. Wow doesn't look like he can hold a John. Young so young to have a job for that long. Then start another career. Okay? Wow, that awful. How did you get into that? Because that feels very niche, you're essentially making bulldogs. That camera crews in production crews are using on the sets of TV shows I mean. We were chatting before we recorded you live in California. I know like the entertainment industry is. In the movie industry in all of that is obviously very prominent out there is that kind of how that happened or It's interesting so actually the reason why I got into it is because my dad worked in that industry or like thirty years, and I had come out of working at John Juice and I was their. First job actually was working as a team member workup to insistent manager, and then eventually needed to make more money, because I got married at a really young so I. My dad ended up helping me getting the job there and you know I just ended up staying there for a really long time, but it's really how I got into. It was as my dad was in that industry longtime. He had connections and everything like that. Dot It. Did you go to a trade school or anything for glassblowing? No I actually just learned on the job. And still to this day is one of the most difficult things that I've ever done. Physically I for almost anything that can compare it to I think. Programming is its own challenge, but is like the hardest physical. Thing I've ever had to learn because it was like. If you don't do it right the first time, then you ruin it. So there's no going back and fixing it once. You kind of ruin it because the glass that we would work with you'd have to mix it with metals, and then once it's kind of melted to a certain point, you can't go back in extract those materials out of the glass, so it's Kinda ruined. If you don't do it, right is probably there really nerve, wracking or when I did that job. Yeah Wow, it also sounds like it could be dangerous if you're working as really like high temperatures. Absolutely I got burned really bad third degree burns I have degree burns like all my arm from it, but yeah, it was. It's definitely. Was I'm just curious. Did that have any role in your decision to look for a new job like I? Know you mentioned like the financial side, but were there other things, too? Yeah absolutely a that part being okay, so the big part, actually a aside from like the financial reasons that it just didn't pay that much. It was the work environments. It is in the Central Valley of California which in the summertime gets you know triple digits consistently and the warehouse that it is done is basically like a garage. It doesn't have an air condition. It doesn't have any of those things so the environment itself was. was just really really taxing. There's been a couple of times when I had gotten heat exhaustion, I got sent home because of it because like say it's one hundred, three, hundred ten, even outside inside that shop where you'd be working is a hundred twenty one hundred thirty degrees, and it was just unbearable is the if you've our to look back on some old twitter posts? I probably have pictures of like a thermometer in the area. And it's just like maxed out because it was just so hot, but yeah, that's that's probably WANNA be. A motivating factors to wanting to look for another job. It got to point where I was like. I need to get out of here. No matter what this job is just killing me physically, and you know a lot of other reasons you can imagine in an environment like that the people that you tend to work around kind of like really. Not The best work environment because you know on a lot of stress and you know tend not to get along very well when they're under a lot of stress is mentally and just everything that came along with that job, so it just became kind of like a hostile work environment as well so it was like a lot of. Factors that Kinda came into me like I have to get out of here you to find something else you know. Yeah well I mean that definitely makes sense. There's a few other people or one that is coming to mind that. We had on the show in a previous season. Whose name is Josh Camp? And he was a hope I. Stay this right a horse I think it's a horse fairer fairer, hope, number news right, but he would change the hooves on horses, which could also be really dangerous. Obviously, a horse kicks you and I believe it was an injury that ultimately led him to. You know look for other work in in what will link to that in the show notes for people listening now 'cause it. Was You know a few years back when we had on the show and any other episode, I believe it could have had a few where there was someone with a moron. Sick physically dangerous or physically labor job, and that's kind of what led them to to make a pretty big pivot because I can like working for you as a glass blower in those in that environment, physical Super Super Hot. It's totally different from working as a software engineer. And when you started coding, you mentioned using Free Co camp in other free resources. Were you still working fulltime as the glass blower and you are learning outside of that? Yes I was so I would I had a fulltime job there, and because of the heat I would work really really early hours I try to go in his earliest possible as three in the morning. Get off at noon or whatever it was Leonard Twelve so that time that I would get off of course I'd already so exhausted. Matt jobs so I have to go home and sleep a little bit and then. The thing with those interesting with that is. It was hard for me to be going having a fulltime job like that. Maybe some people can relate to that. You know like a maybe just a fulltime job in general is exhausting, but this job probably pushed it because of the environment itself the hostility behind it. That kind of gave me more motivation to be like you know what I'm really tired right now. And I'm not really motivated to to learn coding complete, foreign and difficult, but when I get off work the way I did time, so you know wanting to leave that place so bad that it was just that extra boost motivation for me to learn and study and just do everything I needed to do to succeed in it on just because it was just so bad. I got desperate. Really desperate I just remember that I tend to forget that, but then when I do remember I'm like wow, it helps me to be like really grateful. You know to where I am now, and it was really hard working fulltime job in learning, because I did learn while working there probably about a year and a half, maybe almost two years I was learning. And There was there were times when I would make huge progresses, but then. At the same time thinking like is this really possible? How do people get a job doing? It's like yeah. I can build a website, but there's more to it you like. Is this all I need to get a job type thing you know But Yeah! It was it was hard and I. Don't want to say like Oh yeah. It's super easy because it. Wasn't especially having to work fulltime job in it's all I could just you know. Take days off now and everything like that. I had to work. But yeah. It was difficult. So you were. Doing ice, you said for like one and a half two years where you were doing boom things at the same time. appleaday mentioned this earlier, but you. Free Co camp. Did you use any other resources or you mentioned Community College? Were you taking classes there? Yeah so additional to recode camp so the there's a lot of other things that I did that helped me so free code camp opened up at the time. I haven't camp while, but at the time had lake. Away that you would join and beat up and it was through facebook. It was like face, looking need groups or something, and it was like find a recode camp. Meet up because I. Guess they had like an umbrella. Recode camp meet ups that you can join, and you would basically type in your city in order find the nearest one that was that was organized and everything like that, so I found one in my city and it was you know a few people apartment that would meet up in so I joined that group and I reached out on their. Pre Cochem does a really good job with trying to connect people, so it's like hey, introduce yourself in post on there, so that people can no, no your journey Cetera so i. did that and I ended up meeting up with the organizers of that? Meet Up. We met at starbucks talked about you know everything on learning this and that where you and Rico camped up thing so eventually, I got more involved in that met more people that were learning as well and then now it. Kinda led to Terry member Oh the Mita. Dot Com meet up. There was also the recode. KEMP MEDIA DOT COM for our area that was attached to that facebook group. And, he was like yeah. I just started this. Meet up group, so we can kind of be more broad for people that don't have facebook. We can just Kinda grow up there and he was like you WanNa, help me with that because you know. He was maintaining full job as well, and he needed someone to Kinda. Fill in that gap where he couldn't. You know sounds like yeah. Sure I could definitely help with that, so I helped him. kind of on the organization's portion of that. meet up and like. Hey, let's try to meet. Kind of swap the weeks you know will be on a Saturday one week and then. I'll take the next every type of thing we'd be out of starbucks. And then someone posted on the meet up of feed. Like hey does a hack upon coming up, you guys should come reach out and you know I think it was free, and it was in our area, so I went to the hacker thon and myself in a couple of other people that were in that group, and then we ended up a or ended meeting a few other people at that meet up. That were real professional programmers. At the thoughts I introduced myself to them and everything like that met some really really nice. And probably the most helpful in kind person was actually the the organizer of that Agathon. When. I met him and everything like that. He gave me his contact information in and said Hey, we should get together sometime. I'm Cha and he was a professional programmer, running his own business and everything like that, so eventually I stayed in contact with him, and I met up with him, and I told him my journey and what I'm trying to do, super supportive of us all about helping people in my situation, you know like make connections, and even even help them with an internship and everything like that, and that's Kinda weird kicked off actually where it went from me trying to learn to me, actually making connections in potentially those connections leading to jobs. That was huge. Actually so this person that ran out. Pakistan also ran his on meet up. and His name was a little bit more. Mature he had a organized large meet ups and organised like a speakers where he would teach people how to get started with a new technology and all that stuff you know, so. This percent met up with them, and they're willing to like. Hey, you WANNA work on a project with. Wow real project like that's what I need to experience with a project, so I met with him or opt in some of the people that worked with him, and he ended up working with a lot of other guys that or just people in general men and women that were like kind of doing their own thing that a little bit more advanced as As programmers they're building girl websites starting their own software business in lake, a consulting and everything like that. That's where kind of took off. Is that connection? You know I to a upon met some people, and then it led to more people that we're kind of in the same boat as me, and if they are more advanced, they're willing to help me. By struggled with something and everything like that. It was really a douse like typical in me being successful. Yeah that is a great story and Other interviews I've been doing this season. We invite the guests on, and we think they have a really interesting transformation. Story is kind of like who I've been really Trying to get on the show this season and every single person that I've interviewed so far and there's been you know. Handful have all. Had this like really awesome Lake County. Component to their story and men like Kinda. Showing how supportive the tech community is in in various ways, and it sounds like you found that you know through this. Through connections through other connections with more experienced people in the field that helped catapult you forward in the they were able to help support you in various ways and maybe help if you're stuck as you said, build your first project and I think that's really cool I. Think it's really good for beginners to hear that because I know when I first started out in probably you, too. I would imagine it can be really intimidating and feel like very overwhelming, and you can feel really alone, and it's like it's almost. I haven't experienced like trying to break into other industries, but in a lot of ways I feel like even though texts seemed really intense in really hard I mean it is, but there's just such kind and helpful people like a friend, totally random side story, but she's not intact. She was trying to break into. The entertainment like film like Moodley TV shows. and. She had to work at an unpaid internship for like a year in really like claw her way up. She actually does really awesome. producing on really awesome documentaries now but. It was like really hard, very competitive very very. Very like you know and I feel like the tech community is so different from that like it's. People are Super Helpful yeah definitely. I've heard that as well. I'm not sure if it's if it's like the demand in this industry that were like trying to get into maybe people, maybe a logical gotten to it, and they kind of see you know all the hard work that. It takes. I, guess that they want to help other people as well or like coming from something like my background and everything like that. They kind of want to help people as well, but yeah, I noticed that as well as a lot of really helpful people, even before I started going through the ups and everything I joined twitter, and that's when I found like just like a free code cannot co Newbie A. PODCAST are their Hashtag in general dislike just to get help and everything like that, and when I when I reached out that way, just random people that were professionals judgment like hey. I think I'll struggling with. Like centering Adib or CSS, something something kind of silly. You know I needed help with it and some random person was like. Hey, Gimme, your hub Repo albeit with that was like. Wow, some random person that realize but more Santander worked at Microsoft or something like that and are willing to help I didn't even know this person but yeah, definitely noticed that about the industry's is a lot of willing people to help you regardless. Of Your background and everything like that. Yeah another guest I. Literally just had on the podcast said that she had so many breakthroughs. A CAITLIN for people listening to the show and in episode Caitlin. She was talking about how she had so many breakthroughs on twitter asking for help in people that she didn't even know. Offering to help her in various capacities, I feel like twitter is such a good. Well, it's funny. Because social media like every platform kind of has its own. Little like corner or whatever it could be really good for certain things and I feel like asking for help. Like in that way. Twitter is awesome because people will jump in people. It's almost like a forum, but it's not, but people are very like. Communicate unlike you know instagram or something, which is mostly about the photos and it's. It's not the same kind of. Environment just different. Anyway, it's it's interesting. Yeah so switching gears a tiny bit I would like to hear about how the new ended up getting your first full-time real position. Yeah absolutely. So it was when our meet up grew so when I met this person a friend. His name is nate a probably. Give him recognition there because east been so huge in my in my career as a friend and generally slow parental today we kind of joined are meet ups and we grew into this big. Meet Up. And it was like three hundred people. We grew to over three hundred people, and then we. He had connections with someone that was really involved in trying to grow the tech scene in the Central Valley of California. Washable, probably think though in California. It's like tech everywhere. Tech is huge, but that's really isolated towards like Silicon Valley Bay area, and when you go to the outskirts where I live, it's like farms and orchards in just really like farmland in. The outskirts of all the techie over the hill and there's all the big central. Silicon Valley everything like that, but out here it's it's completely different. There's still a lot of factories out here and everything like that, so tech isn't the big thing out here, so he was trying to person. He tried to basically bring tech out this way like hey companies. There's a talent out here as well so he was a part of that big that this big movement. That's still going on today so anyways. We ended up getting a space with his help, and he supported he. He got funding for it and we moved our meet up there. And, we were able to go reach out to the computer. Science professors ask some of the community colleges. They are able to come out. We reached out to people that talk computer science in the high schools I reach people on facebook I went out trying to like introduce myself to all these people, so we can grow all his these groups that are people better in software or coating to hey, come to this, Mita because we can all grow with the tech in the valley, so we had this large event whereas kicking off are merging of our beat ups, and we had I think. Over one hundred fifty people like almost two hundred people from professors in computer science to high school teachers in computer science to people, learning and everything like that so I went up there and I was speaking in front of it, and I was basically motivating other people that were in my position like hey. You guys? Should really you know? I was trying to leaning towards free code camp like if you guys want to learn to cope because those people that were like thinking about it, you know not really that much into it, so I kind of wanted to focus on those people because that's where they had the experience of coming from so was like. Hey, you know it's not that hard to get into it. There's some really really great resources that are free. That doesn't cost anything you know. MEET UPS like this a lot of great connections here and people willing to help you. If you're struggling every twenty five solves talking. They're all that and at that. Meet up was a few other. That worked at companies nearby when Consulting Agency the the banks have some of their software people out in the Central Valley as well and a couple of of the people that were there were friends with my friend, nate, a one that have basically helped me out and everything that always connections. He introduced me to one of guys there and he said Hey his company's hiring. I want you. I want to introduce you to Michael and this is after all is kind of getting already getting. Getting experience with building some projects and everything and my friend was like. Yeah, he knows what he's doing now. He he's employable. He's definitely has experience with building front, and back and software and everything so introduced me to a friend of his name of Josh and he worked for a company that basically did consulting for like probations, law enforcement software. They did software for E N NJ Gallo, a lot of big companies, so they're really established there around for like twenty years so I met with him. And then he was like where we're actually looking for someone. More junior developer is like Amir number. We eventually had coffee. Just Kinda. Talk and everything like that and we just hit it off. We kind of our personalities. Kind of you know He. We liked hanging out and everything like that, so that kind of started like a friendship, you know. We talked for about a year and. And you'd help you with stuff like that and I was like. Hey, and he's like our company is kind of in the middle of Lake, you know hiring, but they kinda. Put a freeze on that everything like that, so after about a year when I. When I met him, he finally called me up one day, and the funny story is that I was getting to a point. In in learning how to Code and currently working where I was almost ready to give up, because it felt like I was putting effort and then. I wasn't getting any any reward from like. If I was applying everywhere and I wouldn't get any kind of response to resume. I reached out to people to help with resume all these things. Did I did a lot? Maybe not everything that could have just because I didn't know, but I felt like I was getting any hits on my resume or If I. DID GET A call. It was like you know I didn't know how to do some kind of algorithm that I didn't learn or memorize or whatever it was, so I was getting really discouraged, almost going to be like. Maybe I do need to go to school at unity at degree. Maybe I need to just join a boot camp or or joint something that is going to make me be more appealing to employers so I was looking. and. Just kind of getting really discouraged at that time. But the funny thing is that I got a call for my friend Josh and he goes. Hey, we have this contract coming up. We need to hire a developer and I've been talking to my boss about you and we'd like to bring you on. He's like. Of course we'll interview you and everything like that and he's like. Are you interested in? He's like. Like I'm almost one hundred percent, sure they've we bring you on because you know like I know you and I know your work, and I can help you and everything like that and I was like. Are you kidding me? And when he told me that I was thrilled, I was actually really scared. Same time this is reality is like real software coding. In, part of me was going to say no like I do this. This is too much like the difference between working on side projects that you know like whatever no one's really going to care about versus working on software that people use so I. I got really scared. I even once. My wife and I was like I. Don't know if I can do this like I'm GonNa. Quit my job and I go do this and then I fail. I can't go back to that job. I can't do that, you know. This is a big decision. You know I've been here for nine years or whatever it was. So ultimately, my my wife convinced me and was like you need to do this. People don't get good things unless they take some kind of risk. Regardless, you should try you know. So I call it my friend. I told him I concerns and Josh was like you know you're just trying to scare yourself out of. It Dude so just take it from me. I'm going to be there to help you, so don't worry us to take this. Just, take it you know and I was like. Okay, let's set up the interview and everything like that and goes all right, so set the interview and. They hired me. And that was basically it I started there with no professional experience. It was all because of someone was willing to help me know again back to that. You know this industry is always really helpful people that are willing to take a chance on you and help me help you and everything, and and and of course there's a lot of challenges you know working in in actually writing real software and everything like that, but in the long run it really helped me in was just huge into getting my job, and then after that first job. Of course, my resume after that just everyone always cared to look at it. You know I I didn't have nearly as. Much difficulty looking for next role after that I think it's like once you get your first job regardless of its junior level, or whatever in in this industry it kind of goes downhill OCTA that you actually get considered. You know you'll get your resume looked at. You'll get that first interview and everything like that. Yeah Wow, so. How long did you work there at the first job? And then what what kind? You don't have to get like super detailed, but like what kind of work redoing essentially. There year, so I started off working on a back end actually of in node framework, or on the no runtime. Basically, the contract was migrating some. It's funny because I went from like barely learning it in writing mostly front end to writing some back in code and the PRI, the contract was basically taking some old enterprise services that were written in Java and then rewriting them on no gs lambda, so that that was what I was doing for like the first four months and after that contract and they moved on to another. Another project and it was more full stack. It was job script. It was using angular on the front end no on the back end and some sequel server, but I got the rightful stack of front end back in using Java javascript note and everything like that. It was really fun. 'cause I got to work on two different big projects there and I learned so much. That's where my whole stack experience kind of took off I got I got to learn so much and the people that I worked with worse huge. It was just I can't even express how thankful I am to people that I work with there and I still am friends with them. That helped me explained things a broke things down. And having been able to understand these other languages. Yeah Wow and I know you recently got a laid off due to cove in nineteen. was that from this same employer or was this another job you had gotten after leaving that company? Another story so I was there at that company for about a year, and then towards the end my wife and I found out. We're GONNA. Have Child and so I needed to. That company was great for it was actually a bump in salary than I currently made up. My Company the light, Bulb Company, but it's I still needed to. I needed to progress I needed to move on and grow my career, and financially so I started to look I started. You know I even asked my boss at the time. I was like Hey I have a child, the ways or any chance that I can move up or anything like that, and you give me feedback, and it was like yeah, definitely, in whatever amount of time so I took that and say okay, that's CREPE. should start looking in see by even get my resume considered now that experience so I started to look, and then I got hired at a start up in the bay area and Silicon Valley. And I was there for almost a year way so i. don't want I. Don't want to interrupt you, but was at working remotely or you move there. I actually had hybrid role, so I would go into the office like an hour and a half commute two days a week. And then worked from home the other days, but yeah, it was a there. I got a taste of the whole silicon valley. Feel of how software companies ran, and my skills went up even higher because of that environment, but yeah, so I was there for about a year and It was a startup that wasn't able to get another round of funding, so actually we all. They started laying people off. fortunately they didn't lay the soccer team like right away, but since we found that out, we started to look all the engineers that worked at that company, or like Oh they're not getting. Funding is a good chance. They're gonNA lay people off, so we all started looking and I got hired at the Credit Union and I. was there for about a year? or about a year exactly actually, and due to the pandemic and everything like that they started to kind of restructure, reorganize everything and effected a lot of teams, including my own team and We're a part of that layoffs will. But yeah, it was. It was kind of something that I. Could. Imagine obviously has affected a lot of people everywhere, and it feels like it's just one of those times. That no-one can have planned for, but yeah. I've been a part of that have been affected by that as well. Yes, so justice like for myself in the listeners, so you basically had three different jobs like intech at this point in each for about a year. Give or take, so you essentially now have like three years of like fulltime software engineering experience. And the most recent position that you've got furloughed related offer a Is that a credit union? And what were you doing there so? It's interesting. 'cause you've such like different experience like from like like a consulting firm to a tech startup to credit union like I imagined that the experiences at each one were quite different like the environment of in the way people work in south. Absolutely so. Go working at a credit union, it's a pretty large credit union and the way things are done there as opposed to the other companies that I worked at. Worse it significantly different so look the startup that I worked at. They were pretty large. Start up there actually around for ten years they had employed over three hundred people. The engineering team was fifty engineers people and. They operated like they were a big tech company and everything like that, so but at the same time I had the experience of being able to shift. To project same time like there's times when I was working on a mobile APP and one for one sprint I'd be working on a whole two weeks on a mobile APP, and then I'd be pivoted to work on their web APP, clients. Front end code, and then after that I'd be working on some hardware code completely different working on a proprietary algorithm that needs to be converted in red on a mobile APP. It was different stuff all the time, and it was really exciting, but also really nerve wracking because of the context, switching a lot and learning new languages at the same time. So that was I learned a lot by lot of the fast paced stuff at that start up, and then when I got to the Credit Union. There was a little bit more relaxed because those only one product that I worked on essentially. Korb, inking APP and there I had a team of eight engineers that were dedicated for this core banking APP. I got brought on as a senior engineer there, and then that that role kind of pivoted towards a lead developer. I was on that project for about four months. And then my a boss. Promoted to the lead developer of that team so essentially there was a lot different roles because for one it was one project, and it was a mobile APP. I had experience with mobile APP at the other company, but not to this extent, it was just a huge mobile APP. And the primary, the primary objective being handling with people's money was probably a significant factor to the change of of like a importance of the application that part probably. At a lot to the stress when I worked knowing that you're working on something that deals with people's money and five hundred thousand active members so that was a big learning experience. And I do. I learned a lot of new stuff learned new languages learned how to do a lot of things that you wouldn't typically do web development, but yeah, it was a lot of differences in structure, probably a lot of different departments that you have to work with before you can get approval in changing something like maybe typically and. Change some piece of code that would maybe look slightly different, because it just makes more sense while at the Credit Union. It wasn't that simple. You had to get a lot of approvals and a lot of test. Writing to make sure lingers securer in a rented to different avenues. You know which was different. Yeah, that yeah makes dealing with financial information. You know sensitive data, and all that would be quite different. I imagined so now that your you by the time episode airs, you could already be in a new job, but. Being active in your job search now. What kind of company aiming to work out? What do you want to stay in like? The financial industry are trying to go back to a startup or maybe a consulting firm that you get to work all these different projects. Yeah, what were you? What did you like the most I guess? Let's see. Probably a ideally would wouldn't stay in the financial industry just because. All the little differences in how delayed development can be due to all those hoops. You have to jump through, but probably most fun I had was. Working in consulting agency. Because working so many different things. Different projects everything like that, but a lot of them had their own pros and cons. You know in terms of like. What I would prefer probably something that is more established due to. More stability just because of everything. That's going on right now. I've heard a lot of people have lost their jobs regardless of the industry even in software I would probably prefer stability. If I could choose regardless of the industry but Yeah. It's probably it's probably more geared towards that. You know what I can find that it is more stable and everything like that. I do have a few other avenues in alert. You know companies that I'm going through right now so I am confident that something will end soon. That's probably the good part is that they're still a high demand for software engineers and everything like that, so there's a lot of good a good places that are hiring right now and everything like that. But. They do specific Yeah Yeah Gotcha so I'm. Kind of jumping around here, but I really wanted to ask this question, and it goes back to your glassblowing experience. I was wondering if there was anything from that or your position before a Jumba juice that you. Were able to transfer or in some way to you in your job, your new job as a software developer. Probably the thing that. I don't know if it helped me, but there's a few different things probably so working probably in an environment that required me to have a lot of perseverance, probably aided to my benefit, and in general and just work ethic. It helps me To be able to deal with probably stresses and deadlines Challenges in my current role because I dealt with that a lot on any. Of can can relate to that. Is You know working in a place like that or just any kind of work that requires them to give a little bit extra is required, just laken. Succeed or do well their job. It probably just helps helped with those areas in work ethic to work hard enduro ally and everything like that but also know what I want going forward, and what I don't want in a career or or next role. Also of a big part of that. Working at that company helped me in was. Probably having difficult conversations with my employer I had a lot of those at that company and it prepared me to be able to deal with those difficult situations. A lot better at all night, other roles a and what I mean, my difficult situations, probably dealing with difficult people another one being having a conversation with your superiors about compensation You know asking for what you feel like. You deserve and everything like that I've had a lot of those, and they didn't go so well at that company that I feel really confident and know how to approach those types of people or Whenever those conversations need to happen, you know. It can be difficult for a lot of people, but I think have so much experience with it that it's. It's kind of more fluid and how to do in the right way. It's aided a lot in that in in my career going forward. Yeah that makes sense and like. I, I can only imagine like the stressors you deal with being in an environment with the glassblowing like Super Hot. You said you were sent home from heat exhaustion, the stress like literally the physical danger bringing yourself. It's like working from home as a software engineer or star office in Silicon. Valley is like the stress level would be so much less like the. They compare Cinderella the stressors you're dealing with compared to maybe like the ones at the other place. Yeah, like whole other scar accord whole other thing, right? We are like running at time and there's one last question I want to ask before we wrap this out and it's just if you could share any like final advice to people listening right now. Who are just starting out? Maybe they were where you were like. You know four or five years ago. Whenever whenever you got your start. What advice would you give them? All. Let's see so I. Think for one perseverence when things feel like it's difficult, it may be difficult at first, but the more and more you do it in the more and more you practice. You'll eventually understand it some complicated things that I. That I could not have imagined when I first started of doing I'm able to thoroughly explain. They seem like almost simple. Now I think the more and more you do it. The the more natural feel, and it'll be really simple. Just just keep on doing it and things easier. also in your journey and learning. It's really important to try to reach out to people to make connections go to meet UPS ask questions. Because those are going to be the areas where where you're gonNA find a connection that can help you find that career and ultimately successful in in this career field. But those are probably the two biggest ones is. Now I know it's hard at first, but it gets easier, and it gets fun on the challenges they start to face. Get really exciting, and it's really rewarding. Ultimately you know all hard work will pay off as long as you just keep to it. And it will pay off so yeah, awesome, great advice in a great way to end this interview. Thank you so much again for coming on. Where can people find you online? Yeah absolutely. Probably a mitre twitter, a twitter handle is mit p. j are eight eight. Or my website is just a my name, my first name Michael or implemental. Dial my personal, Mitchell my last name.

Twitter California Michael Story Credit Union Josh Camp Facebook Central Valley Software Engineer Silicon Valley Mita Starbucks Hostile Work Environment Mounsey Google Pakistan End Product
"heaton" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"heaton" Discussed on Switch4Good

"I exercise regularly and is that. Is that true is that? Am I telling myself the truth that I'm making my own? What would it be endorphins and that I need that is that is the opposite of not having endorphins, depression or is there? Something else. I think that I'm not a doctor. I certainly wouldn't Even come close to pretending to be but in my study. An demise in endorphins are one way to absolutely fight off depression anxiety, anything that causes a a sense of tension or depression, and then denied is the answer to that but of course it's not the only reason for depression. They're all kind of experiential and genetic reasons for that. There's there's a there's an enzyme that breaks down an end to mind, and some people have a genetic mutation where they do not do not do not produce this. It's called F. AH, and those people have a tendency to never be depressed and have absolute scientific studies that show that these folks that don't have that enzyme that depression. They seem to be able to escape through life and just. Keep their keep a smile on their face. And it's it's a genetic. It's true genetic mutation. A is there a possibility that we've kind of created our own Addictions to our addictions, because we are chasing that release of the Serotonin and dopamine, we just want more and more and more and more, so it's a natural like addiction. There is so much research on this topic right now, Is, another I think. We've mentioned that it's another neurotransmitter that is highly highly addictive, even even more so than Serotonin, but it is temporary, so we leaves us. Wanting more and dopamine is not pleasure. It's not an demise, not adore fins. Dopamine. Is that searching feeling? It's it's. It's someone's on a video game or they're on social media, and they're looking for another. Thumbs up another good comment or another level on a game, and so the more that our world has become digital, and we have constant stimulation. The more we as a society are addicted to dopamine. So we look for in all kinds of places in in in food, certainly some some exercise of but the biggest way to really buffer are craving of dopamine is through oxytocin. It really has the ability to diminish our need for dopamine, so trusting loving relationships. It's our. We're struggling right now as a society because we're not being touched like we're used to you know I'm a touch touch someone on the arm. I put my arm around people now I'm so careful to not even shake hands, and that's diminishing our oxytocin over time an NRA demise. Yeah I remember. Being on the road when I was racing professionally and I. You know early on I had just fallen in love with my husband. And you know the that feeling that you're saying last two weeks. was you know like last month's or Throughout the beginning of that relationship and I remember being you know wherever we were a Spain Spain France. You know really really far away from him and I would notice that over the many days and even weeks as we would normally be gone for three or four weeks. That I would get this kind of low grade depression and it took a couple of years to realize what was happening, but I wasn't hugging anyone 'cause. We weren't hugging each other as teammates. And you're not hugging your coaches and you're not hugging the nutrition. None of us are hugging each other in some, maybe that mattered more than others but I was coming home and doing a lot of hugging 'cause I'm falling. Laugh a lot of other things, and then I'm on the road and there's just it says boom zapped just like it's kind of been in this corona virus and it it. It took quite a bit to understand that. and. It did help to get a couple of my teammates on board with some with some hugging practices. It really really did it sort of changed. That wasn't a complete replacement, but it definitely helped with me starting to feel lower and lower, and they noticed that they experienced some of that, too. You know what people a lot of people would say to hear. You say that dot is that's in your head, and it is in your head. Right Truth Yeah it's it's in your brain and that there is absolute truth to that. There's a lot of research especially now with people being separated about tapping I. Don't know if you're familiar with that, but it's it's A. It's a therapy that you can use. If you don't have the opportunity to love your pet or or hug someone, some people will say well, you know I'm an introvert. I don't need that. We, all need that and we find ways to replace it. All kinds of ways and dopamine addiction is is up there with avoiding the need for Oxytocin but. We all need it and caroline again comes into play here. She's A. She's an example of that. She's just naturally will. Come and Rub your shoulders and hug you and just kiss your cheeks and express love, and it comes out of nowhere, and it is the natural biological need for oxytocin. I'm Olympic cyclist dots. Bausch and I'm here to tell you if you've got milk then you've got a lot more that acute white moustache. There's a good chance you've also got indigestion. A hormone imbalance, excess, fat, poor circulation, and less energy when I learned the truth about how milk does a body bad. I totally ditch dairy. And if you've been thinking about doing the same thing, then switch for good dot. Org is a great place to start at switch for good. You'll.

dopamine oxytocin Spain Spain France Olympic Bausch NRA caroline
"heaton" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

06:55 min | 1 year ago

"heaton" Discussed on Switch4Good

"We have a special guest today. I know and I. Don't know if we need to do some kind of legal disclosure related to her. You do do. We do okay I'm related to her. She is my cousin, my first cousin, her mom and my dad, sister and brother so. I have been as you know dying to have her on, and we finally have the opportunity so I'm really excited to introduce her Her name is Tara Heaton. And, she's been an extraordinary inspiration to me my entire life. She's helped me to find joy in the most challenging of times, and my very first memories of Tara are win I bounded across the football field when I was three years old as the mascot of her cheerleading squad in South Carolina. Athletic. Like a little tiny Chubby! Round I was tall and. But I just you know I just I don't even really know. She's a few years older than I am, but I don't really know how many but when you're that age, it's it seems like a lot and I just remember thinking that she hung the Earth Stars, the moon and everything in the entire our entire orbit. And I still to this day. Think that quite frankly she has a just a beautiful personality. That's magnetic. You know those people that you just you meet them, and then you're just like. Oh, I wanNA be around you now forever in almost every minute of every day. She's that she's that type of person, and and obviously that's pretty rare. but her life journey has been tangled and messy and filled with some challenges that most of US could not even dream of trevor scene with our head on straight, much less being able to find the joy in these types of challenges. Tara was a top performer in her sales career, but in two thousand five, her life changed dramatically after her daughter was diagnosed with an irreversible brain injury that doctors initially thought was just kind of the flu, she dove into studying the human brain, desperate to help her daughter. Caroline, and along the way she discovered that understanding human behavior was the key to effective communication. Now the founder of her own firm end Point Communication Tara helps individuals and businesses get results by owning their passion and purpose, and by implementing powerful knowledge about brain chemistry to be successful. This revolutionary way to look at sales and marketing has helped me and the whole team switch for good immensely, because at the end of the day, our work here is obviously focused on people successfully changing their behaviors when it comes to food. And especially when it comes to what is on their plate? Tear is going to help us, and you learn how to be more. Communicator in your. Business, and in your life, and she might even share some examples of how you can share your feelings about being plant based or Vegan with your family. That won't start a war, and maybe she'll share some secrets about you, Dottie. Okay, maybe I'll come Tara the Fisher good podcast. What an introduction Thank you so much for having me on. I am really really excited to contribute to the beautiful work that you all are doing. Thank you. before we dive into your fascinated journey because we do want to go a bit chronicle chronological. But before we do that. I got an email from you this morning. Okay, and it was your company's newsletter which I get, it's fantastic and the subject line said it's your fault. Okay and I was like. Well, I! Don't know how I feel about that. What am I being blamed for? Dovan I learned that basically the gist of it was that we have to take responsibility for both our failures, and we get to take responsibility for our successes but not to blame any of it on anyone else. Can we start by you explaining why that is so important and so important to be aware of and to implement in our lives. Wow, that is a fantastic question, and this is one of my favorite topics. Because it is very easy to hide behind variables of which we have no control. And that that leaves us an victimized state, and also leaves us with something that is not acceptable to any of us, and that's powerless, so as long as we blame our inability to make change or to try harder or to get up tomorrow and go at it in a different direction. As long as we blame those on variables over which we have no control, it's a losing battle, so no matter what we're looking at no matter how high the mountain is, I feel like we have to turn the light on ourselves and say what can I do differently tomorrow to change the results, and that has served me well for a lot of years and. That! Was it powerful for me? Because as you said in your email, especially in on teams of businesses marketing sales whether you're selling a widget, or whether you're selling an idea like we are here at switch for good I ultimately need to take ownership and responsibility. It's not the marketing and communications departments fault. It's not social media's fault. It's not the designers fault right? Ultimately I need to take responsibility for the things that work in the things that don't work. I think that's the essence of leadership is is is an and sometimes it's hard to do, but when there's wins. Give credit to the team. And when we struggle, we're tough enough to put on our shoulders and do a better tomorrow so. I, remember I read an article. One of my character flaws is defensiveness with my husband. She doesn't have any flaws. Doesn't show up as much with people. I'm not as close to, but I always want to be right, and that stops me from looking at when I make a mistake, because I actually feel like if I'm wrong, then I'm a bad person. which I know is crazy and being a good person is like the ultimate thing that you're right. Yeah, I've always thought to be good. Good good good means doing the right thing and not making a mistake, even if it's an a mathematical mistake you know, and I remember reading something or a woman challenged herself to say every day I apologize for doing that next time I will do better. And that was a revelation to me. And when I started doing it more, it felt like. It felt so easy and that things sort of became just a weight off.

Tara Heaton US flu South Carolina founder Caroline Dottie football trevor
"heaton" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"heaton" Discussed on Switch4Good

"It's more powerful than that. We'll hello out there. Everyone. We are so so pumped to welcome you to the switch for good podcast. I am Olympic silver, medalist and switch for good nonprofit founder Dot C., Bausch. And I am Alexandra Paul a certified health coach and a longtime actress. Years ago, my life was radically transformed when I made the switch for good away from eating animals and animal based products. My athletic performance was greatly enhanced much to my surprise, actually by the power plant based eating dropping all animal products from my life has finally aligned my values with my diet. And now I feel more balanced and more at peace with food and with my body. Alexandra and I started this podcast with you in mind. We are here to take you on a transformative journey to learn the power of eating plants and help you redevelop a healthy relationship with food and a more whole relationship with yourself each week we bring you, doctors, Dietitians, psychologists, prominent athletes and other interesting guests who have deep rich information and inspiration to share. We welcome you every week. Join US on the journey to switch for good. This is the future. Hello and welcome to the switch for good podcast. I'm Alexandra Paul and I'm here with my wonderful co host dot C., bow tie dot C.. High?.

All About Alocasia 'Polly'

On The Ledge

09:19 min | 1 year ago

All About Alocasia 'Polly'

"Plant is allocated Paulie applaud. That certainly poses some challenges for most of us. Mere Mortal House plant growers and Today. I'm joined by Mireya of instagram account. Born gardening to help you pick your way through the minefield that is allocated Eur polly care. Maria is a gardener. In the wonderful city of Baja. Lana did I say that. Well probably not in Spain. And she is a DAB hand at growing this plant. A member of the asteroid Klein with those vein leaves the look so stunning when you buy them and look some terrible as they start to die. So where have we all been going broke? Will his my chat with Mariah so we will find out Mireya. We are here to talk about. Alec as your Paulie which I think might be up there as the number one plant that people find a bit tricky to grow. It's a beautiful beautiful plant though and I can understand why everyone is so captivated by it isn't one of your favorites. Yes is eased one of my favorites for me. It's a plan. I associate with the tropics and just takes me straight to the tropics and with this deep green Arrow shaped way. Wavy edged leaves mesmerizing. I mean I can spend hours looking at A. It's unbelievable really nice and I think that's why a lot of people would have in. The House is Yeah. It does seem very widely available now. I think it must've been being being mass produced and so everyone can get their hands on this blog now but not everyone can keep it happy and the number of times. I see a post from somebody saying my Poli is dead. Wayne Coors is a day polly. How do people kill this particular law? I think the number one issue with this plan is maintaining the high levels of humidity and warmth as well in in the House. You know to recreate this kind of ganguly environment in a house is quite is quite hard. It really likes sort of temperature from sixteen to two seven degrees so that could be a tricky especially in the UK in the winter when the Heaton is on the air. It's way dry. I mean I live in the Mediterranean. So that helps quite a bit because he is quite warm Resolution is very humid. So it's sort of like lifestyle. I know by St Louis talking about high levels of humidity which are to trades in a house about fifteen percent of up. So I think what he what is good. Is to have a humidifier few hours a day if you can if you can have one. I mean I don't have one so what I use is pebble trade. We've so when J.j This humidity around it. And what I really like doing as well. Which mind is in this environment is grouping grouping the plans which claimed his micro and you really works. My one is surrounded by Begonias Theis fans which is they will require high levels of humidity on. I think he's really nice as well. Because you create a little landscape like literally to your landscape of having them scattered around the house so I think this this this works. That's a good point because people often want to display this plot as a specimen plan on its own because it is so gorgeous but as you say it's probably going to be much happier in agree with all the plots where it's it's possibly going to get a bit of a boost not just looking at my little Thermometer slash humidity monitor in here and it's only thirty two percent humidity in here right now which is terrible. I think you know the winter. Obviously I didn't know how you'll heating works here in the UK mainly have radiators. Which are you know hopefuls being piped through and it's makes yes so dry states they have avenue which is even worse so there is a real issue. That as you said humidifier can breed really help. I think it would be excellent. It's it's it's it's the it's the trick the humidifier if you have the heat on he. I live in various choir choir. Small you know by a flag and you really need the heating on winter so we quite lucky without the you polly was getting too little humidity. How would she know? What size does it? Give off that. It's really unhappy is it so the crispy edges to the lease is that it produces this brown tapes and sometimes we see Yellow Halos as well on the leaves then when we when we started saying that it. That's that's what it needs really and sometimes what happens as well then using all my God. You know it's so we can. We get that confusion between humidity on wartime with sometimes is really difficult to handle and restart over watering and then what happens is a leads to grow pot and then with a prominent as well does it. It can it di- back can go into dormancy and winter and lose leaves and then come back in the spring yet. That's what he does actually below twelve degrees. It goes into dormancy. Need to keep in place. But don't worry if you see that growing leaves coming out image just is having FBI arrest during the period and then in the spring will come back. Come back to live so the bright again and you can you can start again with the winter and you have to look at match less obviously and defined with this plot the oftentimes. It needs reporting when you buy it because it's been posited into something that's possibly not suitable in terms of potting mix. Then I think What I do with mine I? I like to try to regularly regret as I can. This sort of Equi jungle me soil which I try to create my own with the potting soil. Potting ORCHID BAR. It is possible the one and then alight and then. I think we're really works as well as could innovate finally In in the mix and because he keeps it gives the soil them. Which is what this plan likes as well. It doesn't like soggy soil like Saddam so spag. Moore's is great doing that so I think he's good if you can get hold of some spinal Moscow. Someone can mixing it with the soil and mix it. Yeah because sometimes comes in when you buy is not is it just you water him water and all the nutrients and unique to to change it a bit and we'd like to this. Hugh applaud. What's the regime there? We don't want it alongside the CACTI and succulents possibly now now. We don't want with in full Sun. Full side is not advisable egg because they will just banned leaves and and the economy comes from San alikes. Brian direct sand. Actually so a really likes my. My one is in east facing window a few a couple of away from the window and get the morning sun. Which is the best son because sign is strong so it's going really well there. Nfc South facing window is especially in the main Rainey's it's you can have it in the UK. Maybe the winter months. It'd be alright but I will keep a few a few feet away. Not South is this applaud the Subject to draw like if he did keep near near window a cold drafts. Presumably won't be good for it either now doesn't like graphs suffer now. So that's why is bad to say a few away from the window because if you if you have a draft in will kill it definitely doesn't at all and if you have a shady area a one maybe one grow so well I would advise as well. It's too late at least once a month so it will improve with capture in lines for the leaves. Because sometimes you get you get the state the best on the leaves in that. What do you use the ducks? Just damp cloth. Yes a damn close and I think is really is really good for the land and every like is like a set of penalty from his long relaxing and connects you with a plan even more so. I think he's a good thing to do. I do with my ray. I tried to do it

UK Mireya Paulie Mortal House Instagram Spain Lana Baja Maria Polly Wayne Coors Mediterranean FBI Mariah Alec Ducks St Louis NFC Heaton
US Supreme Court hears arguments over Trump's tax returns

Politics and Public Policy Today

05:38 min | 1 year ago

US Supreme Court hears arguments over Trump's tax returns

"Told why were there three cases today that the Supreme Court heard we're trying to get trump's financial records financial records some sort of legal standpoint and different goals our members of Congress and Congress would actually work in the present financial records and also the district attorney that's for Asian financial records as part of an investigation that hush money payments to twenty eight so this is going to the emoluments as well about a million and then tripped up on the question of who even has the right to start an emoluments case to file an appointment well the question is standing on the condition but rather the question for today what is what can you put the president in a post that Congress and the people have the right to investigate other people but how much does the president have to get and so we're looking at executive power versus legislative power in the course of law enforcement power it sort of it was two distinct cases that I think one of them what will become of one of the the congressional one I thought was pretty well perhaps surprisingly well for him I wouldn't think it but when he was a good news there why do you say that well no not really the house is if you were asking for the you know making the case that they should be allowed to have access to trump's financial records the court kept asking for a limit on that power okay you say Congress has the power to in its financial records how did that go other cases where the Congress couldn't get dependent take a sample of his blood because they got all the you know one of the women and the houses well the the only limit is we can ask record on anything that legislation has been the subject of possible legislation they won't you know is there any of that because you just put a question on anything in the house quickly come up with a good answer to that okay thank you Mr Tony to be saying look you know we have a legitimate one question how are you and if you don't get the records from the president giving him and everybody connected to him can you use it after the whole length of this term so David Farenthold is there any precedent for a president eight not giving financial records and be should he or she be compelled to this is a classic case of seeing that the president one from Watergate and one from whitewater press button Clint was trying to avoid being deposed and the president lost both those cases any sort of a landmark you cannabis rulings or even just the president appointed him into look no you're not above the law the president but back up to this the disregard has spoken with one voice and these two recent cases and said you know the president is not above the law I don't think both of these cases are likely to be unanimous one about in Congress and like it was gonna be back up here Congress doesn't want to be in that want to be seen is telling companies predict in that you know the president is different than any other man they may do that in this case are qualified now of course he's been carried these teleconference cases live today and when you were listening did you hear any justices that stood out to you I thank John Roberts and Neil Gorsuch particularly with the judges actually interesting questions Roberts particularly was very hard on the house's lawyer you know he said a couple different times this test is not at the with the power and then the next I will be going hard after president trump's secular the president of the limitless power the president is temporary immunity from prosecution president I think Robert that's really good question no I'm not at the printer definitely cover the convolution Heaton but the reading I've seen taken away that the prescriptions with the profits mixed signals in the year to get the outcome you might think you would be for trump on the house and against trump on the matter and you mentioned that you do cover the trump organization you've written a book about it in fact yes I've come to terms charitable giving our promises but you're getting yes that is one of the things do we know anything about the trump organization it's we don't know it better than we do about other companies the private company that doesn't say very much about it so but we've now learned a bit about it from public records I'm going to have to tell a little bit of itself so that the public is not doing that well now especially because it's closing its properties wasn't because president trump through that so much of its customers away and we know it relies a lot on allied internment government so sort of put money into its properties so when do we expect a decision on these three cases what I'm sold out he would work for us but in this case I think we'll see more thank you for the fall elections is there any chance it could be delayed until after the election I mean you never say never special event going on that that's the thing I've been hearing is that gonna happen at the end of the service so you can read in The Washington Post David Fahrenthold and his colleagues for report on today's Supreme Court

Supreme Court Donald Trump Congress
"heaton" Discussed on The Entrepreneur's MBA with Adam Kipnes

The Entrepreneur's MBA with Adam Kipnes

14:27 min | 1 year ago

"heaton" Discussed on The Entrepreneur's MBA with Adam Kipnes

"And everyone can listen. They are great partner for me and today's guest is a speaker coach of communicator. A impactful teacher for her clients. She's been doing this for a number of years. Has Really interesting background on how she got to where she is. Susan Heaton Right. Thank you for being on here and helping me. Put some of this out to the world. Thank you so much inviting me Adam. I really looking forward to this. I'm very I'm very excited to and being impactful being a good communicator is so important yet. A lot of us don't know what it sounds like on the other end so it's great to have someone like you to help coach us through that because sometimes we think we're doing it right but is hitting. How did you learn this? How did this become part of your life? And how did it lead to a business? Do you know a big dot so really interesting question. Pick hers as a schoolgirl. I was very quiet Tom. If I promise to my sister psycho a psychological interview but I was told to be quiet. Be quant speak up at home and that was valued and yet that meant that I was becoming invisible at school and lacking confidence because I wasn't being my authentic self but it was only later on really when I went to music college that I started hit to discover some of the things sister. Essential to make an impact to develop confidence to have presence and to really be able to communicate with your audience and you you went to music to music school. You were an opera singer. That's something you need to be front and Center for that. Where did that transition happen for you where you were comfortable being front and center after being as you said invisible in the background during your growing up life can I? It's really you know all of these things. It's so interesting to look back because I remember being five years old in a massive church singing a solo in in a Nativity play and instead of my parents and grandparents single. Well Tom they said why. Did you look around Dolph towards the five year old and people were coming up saying how wonderful that walls so I really learned to not way not to show off and that I wasn't good enough but for some reason when I went on stage and I really knew my stuff I would manage to get into my zone of excellence what I call my zone of excellence and everything was right? Am I just felt comfortable there? I'm sure that it's because I gave myself permission to do that without showing off. That's interesting because as a singer you haven't intimate talent right. Yes people can learn to be better and can have coaching said to be better. But it's an innate talent. Do you see people have that same presentation talent. That is just within them. They just didn't know it. Absolutely the some people that have just thought it haven't they. They've got that presence not by showing off but just spy being you notice you knocked his the energy and to your drawn to them through school and being a professional singer was there. It was always an issue. Always an inkling of a business. Mind behind you or is that something that you developed later. In Life I don't come from an entrepreneurial family so in fact my my family are from in the medical profession or the teaching profession. So I'm a first for generations back. There was another musician whose all also an entrepreneur interestingly enough but I think that I was always slightly cautious when I was a musician. I always made sure I had other income streams coming in so I also built up a singing teaching practice which was very successful and I knew that I have that. Income coming in was that needs based or was did that desire based or both both really because as a singers a musician. It's very seasonal very up and down on so you you need to have those streams in To make sure you don't worry so that you can be the best you can be. I love that as you continued to go through your singing career. You were you other people did. Did you always have your own speaker coach? Is that something that you developed because you already had that in your life or did you just go out and sing self taught? How did tell us a little bit about that process? Well I didn't go to music colleges and undergraduate so I didn't know what you would call school. After high school. I went to university and studied something completely different geography and I really wanted to be an explorer. I want to see the world. A my plan was to go to different countries teaching and I I did accomplish that but unfortunately it was involved in a very serious car accident in Kenya and I was the only survivor of very very very very lucky. That you know I. I'm here but I had extensive life changing injuries so came back to the United Kingdom. It was only a couple of years later that I went along for notation to being one of these big choirs in London. And you have to audition and I never done Solos before. And the conductor who's now a worldwide known conductor stopped me and said Susan you singing out to the you're not singing vocal range but you've gotten incredible not true voice on really think you need to get it trained professionally and possibly think going to college and eventually. I did go to. Music College scholarships for it unjust grabbed every opportunity. That's fantastic. I'm sorry. Obviously about what led to that but it turned out to be very beneficial in your life as as you. What made you transition away from. A professional singing career You're well on your way to that being probably a well paying in full time career although as you said a bit bumpy what what made you transition away and look at different avenues for how you are going to deliver your message right. I'm sure that Any the listening to this podcast. Will it will resonate with them. I found it very difficult. Combining motherhood with being a singer as a single. You're an athlete to you. Have to have your mindset. You have to be physically on top form and really know your stuff and I did a couple of things and I felt that I was compromising. I just didn't feel the I was in top form and in the end I decided to To retire a singer which at the time was really really tough. But it was the right thing to me and my family but When my son went to school I was meeting people when not from the music industry so they were professionals whether they were lawyers accountants. Hr directors all all sorts of things like that and they kept asking me. How is it that you can project Your Voice? How is it that you always look so relaxed when you speak? How is it the Eagle Real presence when you walk in room and eventually I realized that there was possibility of the business so initially what I did was to work with teachers? And let trust basically. Because I'd been a teacher for a couple of years before it was familiar and it was vocal health and presence but I realized that there was a big a market and a market that possibly had a bit more money. Dare I say because certainly new not she came to the there is not much money in education so I created my Looked what was essential to being a great communicator. And I came up with five key skills that I believe are essential and they all merge into each other. Sometimes there are things that people naturally are brilliant tat but it might be that one of the other skills. They need a little bit of support with so that they can develop those skills and so the the model tie a methodology ty created discord the superstar communicator and the five skill areas audience. Who really understand your audience. You can engage content creating content so that it really lands well with your audience thinking of stories thinking of the great start thinking of a great call to action for example keeping things brief preparation and that includes managing your fear in with that managing your nerves. How do you prepare yourself physically and mentally so that you're going to do a really good performance whether that's in the meeting presentation pitch all of those things and the actual performance side which? I'm clued body language in that and the impact that you make when you're speaking and the last one is the voice now. That's not singing. That is about making sure that the way you speak as clear so that other people can really engage with you. That's wonderful and that's so important not only in the spoken word or the presentation but also in the in the written word how do how do people or how do you help? People communicate through writing so it sounds like them as if they're speaking that makes sense. Yeah I think that that's a really interesting one. It's not married at the time. Currently focused on however never say never not be tool surprised if in a couple of years time I have on board a specialist in written word. But if you start listening to yourself when you speaking to other people you will become aware of what type of language type of vocabulary that you use. And that is the same. When it's the spoken word to the to the written word and then you're finding your own written voice interesting now. You mentioned as you were talking that when people noticed your presence and heard you speak not in from a stage but just in general communication general meeting meeting with people you said you saw that. There was a business in that. Tell me about your thinking in in the business I mean were you looking for a business. At that point you were retired from singing. What were you looking for a business or did your mind just go there? How did that all happen where you said? Oh there might be a business here. My my mind went there because remember at the time I was still doing my singing teaching I got my singing teaching practice but I think in the back of my mind. I knew I didn't want to do that for another thirty odd years with respect to my pupils whom I adored but I felt that I needed a new challenge. And you definitely took one on. We'RE TALKING WITH SUSAN. Heaton right on the entrepreneurs MBA. Podcast With Adam kipness when you win that new challenge came did you said you were. You thought there might be a business. How did how did the business form like was at one client at a time or did you sit down and say I'm going to the masses? Tell us a little bit about that personal transformation. I went one to one really and trying to get workshops. I didn't go full out until my son left home. Eighteen months ago again parents. I'm sure that you will resonate with this. When you've got a kid who's got special needs. He's dyslexic slot. Immoral support is required and I was fully committed to being a mother as well but wanted to have a business on the side so four of those years. There was an element of it. Being a lifestyle business older did very well but in the last eighteen months twenty months I've been able to devote significantly Moreton on to really build it and with as you said one on one clients but you've also worked with some of our world's largest corporations how do you. How do you balance the.

Susan Heaton Adam kipness Tom partner United Kingdom London Kenya Dolph Moreton
Coronavirus: List Of Canceled Or Postponed Hollywood & Media Events

GSMC Music Podcast

06:33 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus: List Of Canceled Or Postponed Hollywood & Media Events

"The outbreak of the corona virus. More than twenty thousand music events between January and March have been cancelled or postponed in China and Hong Kong costing two billion in ticketing and box office losses. According to the China Association Performing Arts with the disease reaching more than forty countries billboard has compiled an ongoing list of major concerts and events that have been postponed or cancelled due to the outbreak. Now they do have a list that includes January and February but since we're in March I'm just in March so march. I set it off called off dates in Asia on Sunday. Due to unforeseen circumstances and for everyone's safety the ban also cancelled their opening slots for Jimmy eat world on March twelve and thirteenth in Manila and Singapore March. Second Wolf parade cancel European and UK dates for the tour supporting their latest album. Thin mind the first show was scheduled for March second. In the Netherlands March second Luchino coil cancelled their tour of Asia and Australia are home region of Lombardia. Italy is in the midst of a con. A Corona virus break. Everyone's health and safety must come first and this includes our fans March Third Malamah postpones his upcoming concert in line amid outbreak. Italy march third ultra Abu Dhabi. The Middle Eastern edition of the Miami Bass Festival is cancelled. It will set to happen in March fifth or six March third where I carry. His postponed postponed her Honolulu date until November. I was so excited to come back to Hawaii on my anniversary month. But evolving international travel restrictions forced us to consider everyone's safety and will being march third where to singer. Young blood called off a tourist later to kick off in South Korea as well as shows in Japan Hong Kong the Philippines and Singapore. At first I was going to say. Fuck it and calm but we have been advised again too seriously. Not March third. Ultra music festival flagship. Miami Festival scheduled for March Twentieth through the twenty second is called off. According to the city officials slipknot postponed a planned Asia tour slated to kick off a march twentieth with a two night. Not fess were fellow. Hard rockers. Whitesnake sons of Apollo. And Michael. Sh- NECKER FEST OFF cancelled dates March fourth as a result of apple pulling out of this year south by southwest festival along with twitter. Amazon. Tick Tock facebook and other major companies Spike Jones. Bbc's story documentary is not slated to premiere at the event. Nine inch nails has also dropped out of the film. Portion of the annual film are at the Annual Festival Dinesh Nell says. We're sorry we won't be giving our watchman keynote at South by southwest share because we had some surprises in store however it was the right decision March fifth Louis Thomasson tweeted to fans at the president of the Council of ministries had decreed that his march eleventh show at the fabric in Milan had been called off March Fifth Queen and Adam Lambert notified fans that the group's plan may twenty six show at the Acor hotels arena in Paris has been postponed following a government decree and France to cancel all indoor events over five thousand capacity's capacity in France until the thirty first of May in an effort to contain the spread of Corona virus. The Band said they are working with promoter to reschedule the date and will announce a new one soon march fifth organizers of Tomorrowland winter and France and stars that they have canceled the twenty twenty winter edition of the Electronic Dance Music Festival and Tomorrowland winter. Twenty twenty was set to run March fourteenth through the twenty first at the French. Alpine ski resort in out. Bay Day I do not say French word but yeah so. Don't be surprised if we hear. Coachella will be cancelled and teen choice award winners. Salmon Colby have announced a thirteen date Paranormal German tour across the US that includes stops in New York Chicago Nashville and more Cumulating with an appearance at the Fonda in Los Angeles on May Twenty Six. That's still set to go. Hopefully it will continue now onto the top. Ten songs played in the United States according to Apple Music. Roddy which is the box is back at number one low baby gonNA heating up temporarily held that spot but I knew radio would be number two LAVAR that way number three low baby commercial featuring losy fart number four low baby ain't GonNa Heaton up number five baby scarred number six little baby. Whoa NUMBER SEVEN LITTLE BABIES. Something approved number eight. Live off my closet. Featuring everyone's favorite feature future again got ever INS favorite feature future and again this little baby number nine bad bunny latiff cell number ten future drake life is good now. Let's compare that to the top. Ten songs played globally according to apple music number one rowdy rich still locally and in the US That's the box number two lows evert that way number three low baby commercial featuring Lil boosie. Burt number four little baby and GonNa Heaton up number five of the weekend lining lights number six future featuring drake life is good number seven bad bunny loudly for cell number. Eight bad bunny. See via Tom Mama. Yano only language I speak is English so I can't pronounce that now. Fighting English could barely pronounce English. Words number nine low baby emotionally scarred number town. Little baby will now. What have I been German so I ran through? Little babies might turn. There is a reason why is all over the top team in the US and globally? It jams I don't have a fall of standouts but live off my closet. That title trips me up. 'cause it don't make sense. I want to say live off my chest or live from my closet but live off. My clothes closet does not flow naturally. But the SAN's slaps forever will low Wayne and catch the sign. I really enjoyed to keep it. Real kid is talented but not really my cup of tea. I may listen one more time I had never heard of G. Herbert until

Asia United States Apple France Italy Hong Kong UK China Association Performing A Manila Twenty Twenty Hawaii China Jimmy Miami Honolulu Amazon South Korea Facebook BBC
Patricia Heaton's husband David Hunt accused of inappropriate touching on 'Carol's Second Act' set

Toby and Chilli

00:19 sec | 2 years ago

Patricia Heaton's husband David Hunt accused of inappropriate touching on 'Carol's Second Act' set

"Our producer David hunt who's the husband of produce Patricia Heaton has been accused of inappropriate touching on the set of the CBS sitcom Carroll's second act two female writers claim they left the show because of his actions CBS denied both the women's claims but the women are being paid per their contract that have been removed from

David Hunt Patricia Heaton Carroll CBS Producer
"heaton" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

11:15 min | 2 years ago

"heaton" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Just grade on me. That would be agonizing. Warren goes I overall in the worst possible president draft, we go to Sarah Gonzales news, and why it matters there. I would say Jill LeBron because I can't handle the social media videos. Oh, she just be four years of working out video and a beer pong with water. That's unacceptable absolutely dollars. The latest latest is democracy dollars, democracy dollar. She's giving away dollars to her into her voters. So that one to everyone so that they can donate to her campaign. Yeah. What does so that she can get sixty five thousand donors? So that she can make the debate stage. Oh my gosh. She's given away shirt bucks. Yes. Farms. Playing with water is just that. I to the board surprise surprise. I thought for sure Sanders would go number one or least number two to go to Andrew Heaton with Andrew Heaton. I'm gonna get Bernie Sanders. Sanders. My nightmare might nightmare is to have to choose between Trump and Bernie Sanders, I'm going to get him out real quick. I don't have to make that decision. I will say that's a huge value. Pick number three overall. Am. Getting Sanders at three is is something I did not. Target gray. From Pat gray unleashed goes number four while. Still pretty good ones to choose from. I'm Cory Booker. Number two pick. Yeah. My number two. Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker on the same team. There's no way. For obnoxious. Now, I will say to picks in a row. Here's snake draft format. That's how snake draft works here. Yes. We do. You didn't say we're doing explain that to me and Star Trek. Okay. So let's say captain Kirk had the last pick of the first round he gets the first pick of the second round. So that we all even it out. Fourteen. Okay. Let's go back around this this next generations. Piedra? What's happening? Play. Now at the point where I've got two picks in a row a lot of guns on the field. And I still on the board. I'm gonna go when I first pick Bob Frank over or. Take Mr. hand. Gesture somebody climb begun counters like he's feline could not just could not take it. If if Bob Franken work was on our TV anymore than our is. And with my next pick. This is not right. It starts to get a little bit difficult here. I'm gonna go with I will go with Eric Eric swale? Well is just now. No, you might not know who he is. He's currently pulling zero percent. But he's a guy that goes on MSNBC says the most outrageous things he can to get attention. He's basically running on getting rid of the second amendment right now. He's an irritating attention hog. And I would say both of my picks went down that road of Rourke and and swallow well, so swallow goes number six as the worst possible president out of this crappy field next up, Pat, gray. Wow. With John Hickenlooper Greeley Hickenlooper. Gotta take these because I don't know who's left Hickenlooper is a climate change nightmare. Luper is all about climate this climate that green new deal. He he is a true believer in Al Gore ISM t. Andrew a little bit. I like the moderate. I will say Andrew has his chance to take another one off the board right now with the let's see the eighth overall pick your crappy candidate draft. I left New York about six months ago, and I would be horrified. If Bill de Blasio became president after I skipped yet, I'm going to pick. Offensive in the race. So. On the fence. He can't pill from on the fence. That would have been a good pick though. I will say very good pick right in that case. I'm gonna go with Julian Castro. All right. Taken all of my picks. Now Castro's interesting because you could get two for one there. There is a twin involved. So you're taking both twins off the board. Here can I can I do that third place. Okay. Castro times to goes eight th overall to Andhra Hedin if something's off with Indra heating now the news, and why it matters Sarah Gonzalez with the ninth pick. I'm gonna go Kamla because I think she's she is going to be viewed as a moderate, but we all know that she's not anymore. Could be dangerous. I mean, anytime you got a woman running for president you have to question these women who say this. It's only women who say they don't want women presidents. I want that to be known to the nation. So I'm going to go for I'm gonna go for Joe Biden. Because I think there's a chance he just is drooling on himself within the first eighteen months. Whoever he picks, you know, when you're voting for Joe Biden, you're really voting for vice president. You're going to kill Joe Biden. Even Joan joked about that. No. I'm saying have you heard speeches lately where he's like. Slipping drooling. Well, you might be all right. We are now in the third round. Glenn Beck's second straight pick here in our stake format drawing understands except for everyone. Other than me, you're go here. I'm gonna go to I'm going to go for Pete Buddha judge because I I I just I don't trust. I don't trust anybody who everyone says you're supposed to hate Chick-fil-A on your side. And you don't be could be good. But it could also be a massive mask. Yeah. Night going check president notes. He keeps saying speeches to look running for president when you know coming from being a mayor of south bed. I made it is it's beyond bold. Say that about yourself. And I just don't want to four years of the first lady first man, what do we call it? That would be. All right. So we've gone through eleven picks here in our disastrous democrat draft and next is Sarah Gonzales of the news and white matters. I'm going to go with Wayne Wayne. Tells me he doesn't have the experience. He he's the mayor of Miramar Florida that. Miramar Miramar, Florida does not change anything. So. Yeah, we'd miss a good one because we've been picking on kind of the annoying policy stuff picking someone who probably is not qualifying Amy khloe still on the board. She is. She is Andrew Heaton has an opportunity to take someone off the board now engine democratic disastrous drafts molten that's a great question and many people who are voting are asking the same. Okay. I'm going to do a wildcard go. Okay. Democratic representative. You're gonna leave Marianne Williamson on the board who Williams okay ovarian. That's an Oprah. Guru. Is that the psychic from Florida? No, no. I don't know if he's from Florida. But she is she's she's a new age. She's not a sighting. To be president. Scree? That is not. Another pick coming up. However, but not before Pat gray has his third round selection. Who's the worst democrat left on the board? I think of good. I'm torn between Andrew Yang wants to eliminate circumcision. Who I just confused Jim Hickenlooper for John Hickenlooper John Hickenlooper? The name. I think I'm gonna go Andrew Yang. Andrew Yang on board. Like, Andrew Young. I mean, except the, you know, the whole circumcision some weird stuff going on on the fifth thing that he personal choice. He didn't want to ban. It accepted that I know people who are like I don't know why ever talked to those people. In fact, I think I never talked to them again. Because it's just like why are we talking about this move on with our lives? Yes. Anyway, my heart started to flutter there as I thought Pat might take an important pick out of my draft with my third round pick. I am absolutely going with Jay Inslee Inslee is a is a huge climate guy. It's really running a one issue campaign on the climate. He is just the first state to legalize human composting that captain that happened to twenty four hours, humid composting is now in play which is interesting, but I will say he also blamed the flooding in Iowa on Donald Trump, which I thought was a nice touch. So I'll go Jay Inslee there. And I gotta say because I am terrified of Sarah Gonzales, allowing Oprah and Kim Kardashians. Guru. To be president of the United. No, don't do it. I am absolutely taking Marianne Williamson. Man. I do not know that we already have too many Kardashians in the White House. I want more showing up Marianne Williamson off the board with my fourth round. Pick. Pat, gray is up next crush McKay. We're going to do that here in a second. I. We're we're close to finding the next president of the United States and one that I think no one will know. Just a second. I let me tell you about our sponsor is CarShield going out to the garage with your dad or your grandpa and working on the car and fixing cargo to the auto parts store betting happening anymore. You open up the hood. And you're like, I don't even know what it what what what is this. You can't fix your own car anymore. And when they break down that kinda sucks because it could be a sensor, and that sensor is, you know, a thousand bucks two thousand three thousand dollars my son in law had to pay three thousand dollars for a stupid sensor that. Brake lights or something like that. And it's like he used to be in my day. There was just a wire running from the thing you stepped on the bag to turn age. Age now. Now, you've got sensors doing everything and they're really expensive. But if you have an extended vehicle protection from CarShield, you don't have to worry about a lot of this stuff. They they cover a ton of things that go wrong with your car. They've already paid out two billion dollars of. They're they're pretty big with that. All right. Just man. I.

president Pat gray John Hickenlooper Greeley Hick Bernie Sanders Sarah Gonzales Andrew Heaton Andrew Yang Marianne Williamson Andrew Elizabeth Warren Florida Joe Biden Donald Trump drooling Julian Castro Cory Booker Jay Inslee Inslee Andrew Young Jill LeBron Bob Franken
"heaton" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"heaton" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Off with Andrew Heaton. I'm your host Barbara Walters. Something's off with Andrew Heath available now wherever you download your favorite podcasts. Glenn beck. Spring is here time to open up the windows. Refresh yourself in your home with blinds dot com with over fifteen million windows, covered and thirty thousand five star customer reviews. Blinds dot com is America's number one online choice for custom window coverings. They make the entire process super super affordable and really easy. Whether you're looking for energy efficiency, recently, moved or you just want to rejuvenate, the feel of your home. Blinds dot com makes the whole experience enjoyable, and simple, and inexpensive. Plus every order gets free samples free shipping. One hundred percent satisfaction guaranteed. Right now, they're bringing black Friday savings to April now through April fifteenth is blinds dot com. Spring black Friday sale. Get up to forty five percent off everything plus an extra five percents off with the promo code Beck. That's blinds dot com. Get up to forty five percent off everything plus an additional five percents off if you use the promo code Beck. It's blinds dot com. Promo code Beck. Rules and restrictions do apply. By simply safe home security, a good honest company, something you really don't find in companies anymore. A group of people that really care. Simplisafe is one hundred percent committed to helping you fear less at home. They protect your home twenty four seven and have totally disrupted the security industry. Simplisafe CEO started this company from the ground up at his kitchen counter. And I remember when we started working with them. I think they had six employees. Now, they're the fastest growing home security company in the country. They protect over three million people already, and they still run it like a small company with the same values. They started with we simply safe..

Glenn beck Beck Andrew Heaton Barbara Walters Andrew Heath America Simplisafe CEO forty five percent One hundred percent one hundred percent
"heaton" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"heaton" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"If you're a long-time listener of the program, you know, that it is Super Bowl it is the big game weekend. And and that means that Stewart has gone today and Monday because he goes every single year. So how do I approach the big game weekend without somebody who really knows it don't worry about it. We have it covered. Andrew Heaton, joins me about the big game in one minute. Glenn Beck program. And you're good. You're good on football. Right. Andrew. Oh, yeah. Okay. I've got a whole list of his I'm not. Yeah. Because I'm not good at football. You know that and you're good. I don't know anything about it. But I've got suggestions on how to fix it. I know the two teams playing. So you're better than I am a security a security breach occurs when an intruder gains unauthorized access to it organizations protected system or data. Right. That's what it security breaches. Security breaches are happening now all the time, and we used to just have to worry about banks and things like that. Now, it's databanks. It's your phone. It's your ipad. It's it's your computer anything that has personal information. They can get it. Now, it's really it's really disruptive. And there are countries that are trying to do it to the average American not just countries trying to hack into CitiBank, they're hacking into your stuff. Lifelock dot com, promo code Beck. This is the way to stop it. Nobody can protect you from all of the.

Andrew Heaton Glenn Beck football Stewart Beck CitiBank Lifelock one minute
"heaton" Discussed on Hollywood Handbook

Hollywood Handbook

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"heaton" Discussed on Hollywood Handbook

"So you're you're asking just the nice quest. So well, hang on. This is how they do a lot of these. Yeah. So. Hey, somebody else that you think would host. Okay. Do you like do like Patti, Patricia Heaton? Okay, Patricia Heaton. Okay. Newbie and ride. You want to be Patricia Heaton? I don't know who that is. But yeah. Google them. Really fast. Sure. Sure. Sure. She was in the reboot of goodbye, go. I don't know. What that come with? Okay. Go ahead. Hey, Patricia Heaton here from. Hey. Hey, hey, Patricia sorry to interrupt. They're gonna be in. Everybody loves Raymond reboot. Oh, that's who. I have you thought about doing? Okay. She wouldn't say that necessarily. You know, what I mean, she wouldn't necessarily say that. But, but this is the kind of thing they do a lot where you know, it's part of the way through the monologue, and then a cast member, and it's nice because you get to learn their names because Patricia Heaton, you should have done. What Kevin did which Kevin very good job is gone. Oh, hey, Sean what's going on? And I go. Hey, I got ask fi love. Everybody has seen them all a hundred times, you guys gonna do a reboot ever. Yeah. And she goes, I don't know. I guess that'd be up to Ray. And then Ray Romano stands up the. Optime? Yeah. How's it up to me? You know, I asked you to do it last week. And then she goes, well, I can't do it. Because Brad Garret doesn't want to do with number goes, excuse me. And he's like he's like, no hang on. No way and everybody who. And then, you know, so on and so forth. She the mom in the middle was. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Yeah. No. I know who she is now. Yeah. The middle. I don't think I'm gonna ask a reboot that one because it's too soon. Yeah. We're we're saying I'm still on the show in ten fifteen years. Okay. Let's do it. Let's bring Patty and Oscar she wants to remove the middle. So so these are some good monologue pieces. What else might have cast member we doing during the monologue. Maybe like a song or a dance number where you could come in. And join them. Right. Right. Right. So say somebody else who might host. Okay. Dwayne the rock Johnson. All wrestling this for you. I had an idea that the rock could be doing one of his direct to camera Instagram videos. We goes, hey, it's four in the morning. I just got off set. These people have been waiting out to see me. They've been waiting on the corner for for about seven hours. I'm going to drive by there and give them a little bit of a thrill. They've been waiting here all night. Hey, guys, get the fuck out of my way fucking with him. I'm fucking with. Now. I loved you fucked by fans. Okay. Hey, guys. No seriously, come on. Let's talk. And so what he'll do is. He looks crazed. He's been he's been up for and everyone. He's been up for about thirty six hours. He shows you a little bit that he's like a human being and a fun guy by having exactly one swear early on and doing some sort of semi prank on a fan before. He then shows you that he loves his fans in his a nice guy. Yeah. What if what if he's doing a Instagram video where he's going to meet his fan who he assume has been waiting for thirty six hours. Put it's just like you eating like a place of pizza or something that could be good. If people knew these hit screen videos as well as I'm hoping they do just for me to even brought it up. Yeah. That could work. So it's the rocky comes out. He goes, hey, it's so great to be hosting SNL. And I always love being in front of a live audience. Because so often, you know, I'm working on a set, and I've got the cameras there..

Patricia Heaton Brad Garret Instagram Dwayne Ray Romano Google Patti wrestling SNL Raymond Sean Kevin Patty Oscar thirty six hours ten fifteen years seven hours
Disabled community slams casting of able-bodied 'Stranger Things' star as 'The Elephant Man' lead

Trending Today USA

00:44 sec | 3 years ago

Disabled community slams casting of able-bodied 'Stranger Things' star as 'The Elephant Man' lead

"A disability group over. In Britain They. Got mad and they're at this able bodied actor he's. A dude who plays Will's brother and stranger things Charlie Heaton and he is going to. Be. In the new adaptation of the elephant man but I guess because, he doesn't have elephant man disease people are mad because he's playing the dude who plays out who was the elephant man yeah so they're like it's so bad. That he's doing that they say many disabled actors that still often face. Huge barriers to break into the, business and not only are. The roads few and far between? The castings locations often inaccessible that was the direct quote from. The, statement that this group put out. So from now on new role you. Cannot be an actor does you can't be an actor it just has to. Be true life stories about

Charlie Heaton LA Britain Manhattan Eighty Day