8 Burst results for "Heather Hartnett"

"heather hartnett" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

Art of the Hustle

02:24 min | 6 months ago

"heather hartnett" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

"It's <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> it affects <Speech_Female> in disproportionately <Speech_Female> affects women <Speech_Female> so something that's near and <Speech_Female> dear to my heart ed's <Speech_Female> home they're growing <Speech_Female> rapidly so <Speech_Female> those are the types of investments <Speech_Female> that we make <Speech_Male> an <SpeakerChange> founders <Speech_Male> that we back <Speech_Male> that's awesome. <Speech_Male> That's really <Speech_Male> cool <Speech_Male> Well i really <Speech_Male> appreciate you taking <Speech_Male> time to be on the <Speech_Male> program and <Speech_Male> i really have always <Speech_Male> been inspired by <Speech_Male> not just <Speech_Male> the work that you do <Speech_Male> and the creativity <Speech_Male> that you bring <Speech_Male> to it. But <Speech_Male> you're just awesome every <Speech_Male> time that you're ever <Speech_Male> in a room where <Speech_Male> people always <Speech_Male> feel better <Speech_Male> feel brighter. <Speech_Male> You're a true <Speech_Male> peace heuer. <Speech_Male> It's pretty incredible. <Speech_Male> I've never <Speech_Male> seen you <Speech_Male> seem like your <Speech_Male> heartbeat is up <Speech_Male> whatsoever <Speech_Male> in yet like you've <Speech_Male> been constantly <Speech_Male> increasing <Speech_Male> speed while decreasing <Speech_Male> tensions since we've become <Speech_Male> friends so <Speech_Male> it's <Speech_Male> it's it's <Speech_Male> been a really remarkable <Speech_Male> thing to see <Speech_Male> and i just <SpeakerChange> i'm a big <Speech_Male> fan of yours. <Speech_Female> It's incredibly <Speech_Female> kind of journalists <Speech_Female> Day will <Speech_Female> reiterate <Speech_Female> that said <Speech_Female> this before but the community <Speech_Female> that you've built <Speech_Female> really. I attribute <Speech_Female> anything in <Speech_Female> my career. <Speech_Female> You know <Speech_Female> ten years to <SpeakerChange> the <Speech_Female> community <Speech_Female> the people that <Speech_Female> you curator amazing <Speech_Female> and the <Speech_Female> intention that <Speech_Female> you have you started summit <Speech_Female> religiously through <Speech_Female> everything you do <Speech_Female> every iteration <Speech_Female> of what you <Speech_Female> so. I'm honored <Speech_Female> to be a part of <Speech_Female> the community <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Male> talking to you today <Speech_Male> or honestly. <Speech_Male> I think like your parents <Speech_Male> in iowa <Speech_Male> on the <Speech_Male> organic farming <Speech_Male> in mindfulness <Speech_Male> tip. I don't <Speech_Male> think summit really. <Speech_Male> Was <Speech_Male> you know author <Speech_Male> of that. Ethos <Speech_Male> i think it's more of a <Speech_Male> generational ethos <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> like our <Speech_Male> generations <Speech_Male> entrepreneurs wanted <Speech_Male> those <Speech_Male> priorities. Listen <Speech_Male> if it was nineteen <Speech_Male> eighty eight. <Speech_Male> I'm sure i would have been <Speech_Male> on some <Speech_Male> fox shit right <Speech_Male> you to <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> pursue a <Speech_Male> whole other <Speech_Male> lifestyle like <Speech_Male> we wouldn't have the same <Speech_Male> inputs we wouldn't <Speech_Male> have seen sort <Speech_Male> of like the <Speech_Male> excesses that <Speech_Male> bring you know happiness <Speech_Male> right like so <Speech_Male> so ultimately. I think <Speech_Male> that we got really <Speech_Male> lucky that we had <Speech_Male> great mentors early <Speech_Male> on it. <Speech_Male> And and you <Speech_Male> know i think that <Speech_Male> like you're talking about <Speech_Male> Skating <Speech_Male> to where the puck's <Speech_Male> going it sounds like <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> grew up <Speech_Male> at the iceberg <Speech_Male> that ended up <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> becoming <Speech_Male> the rivers right like <Speech_Male> it's. It's incredible <Speech_Male> that you've had <Speech_Male> this exposure <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to these things that <Speech_Male> are so important to <Speech_Music_Male> so many people that we <Speech_Music_Male> care about. <Speech_Music_Male> You know for so <Speech_Music_Male> long. I really <Speech_Music_Male> do hope you. <Speech_Music_Male> You know incredible <Speech_Music_Male> success with <SpeakerChange> human. And <Speech_Female> anything else you do. <Speech_Music_Female> Thank you

iowa
"heather hartnett" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

Art of the Hustle

09:09 min | 6 months ago

"heather hartnett" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

"Seventy percent of men don't even know the different condoms shapes exists trojan. Condoms has over thirty different varieties of condoms to choose from from thin ribs to lubricated non lubricated just to name a few if condoms are to taif you try the fuller fit of ecstasy for that added sensation. Try the textured feel of ribbed. Std's unintended pregnancies or something. Everyone wants to avoid. And there's no other brand to trust then trojan condoms. Condoms have the reliability of a brand. That's done this for over a century. It's all about what feels right for you so head on over to amazon. Then grab a box of trojan condoms and maybe that second box. You've been wanting to try out. I just said that like there's more great ideas out there than there are like people activating on them at the same time. Your idea to probably isn't that great. It's good and it's in the right direction but once you start moving on it you realize that there is like a ton of hair on it right like there's just all these things you haven't considered all these complexities that you haven't put together. And then like no. What the businesses or the non profit or artistic project. It's always just like longer. You assume at first you know. We always underestimate what we can do in three years. And overestimate what we can do in one and you know like i definitely think that you know like for us our with our summit journey we were always really open with are dumb ideas in fact we celebrated them and then you know someone would catch us you know about that talking about it and then give their interpretation or what could work even better and so i think that additive process of like getting to get into a cycle with other people that think entrepreneurially is really really helpful and like the truth is is that most people are risk adverse. You know and like most people that are successful. Pay someone else to help them with their investments to be risk adverse for them right. So it's it makes me happy to hear you talking about you. Know the type of psychographic that you're looking for in the entrepreneurs that you support back was a good point for you. I mean i would turn the question over to you to you. Have seen more founders than than any anybody really. You've created assembled. Such incredible group founders. That was the genesis of summit. Do you see some attributes that you didn't maybe didn't even know at that point. The that's what everybody embodied because at heart tell the bathwater is one. If you're in it have you think about that. Can you identify that energy now. Better because you're around it so much. I would say it's just so different. You said risk tolerance. I was such a cowboy in. So i also am you know hesitant about recommending high high risk tolerance. I almost see it more like being comfortable with being naive in like one. You have to be naive enough to like go into the business and then when you talk to people both your potential customers potential advisors to find the questions that you need the answers to you. Don't know what to ask right like you've just never been down the path. There's like people who've been the game thirty years like you haven't seen shit. There's just no way you could so you know that that beginner's mind that willingness to share what you need like if you said like hey jeff Great to talk to you everything's awesome. It's like okay. Well what is there for me to do in this relationship. Like if you're not willing to say like hey i don't know how to solve this thing and then i'll be like. Oh man i can't wait till like be actually useful and beneficial and you know keep it sorta this triangulation of goodwill this favor economy moving forward in an ecosystem. I love that founder. Economy that's a great way of putting it. We we try to invest portfolio of givers. Because if you have this reciprocity amongst that group of people it's only net positive so we You're absolutely right. They're always going to be individualistic people. Who win. But i think in the long term if you're investing in people who know how to get back to that community it's just a longer term view boy and it's more fun and the seizure and like you don't have to do all the work yourself and i wonder if it's different times in people's lives do like you're more individualistic when you're earlier or maybe not because need more sport and then as you as you get older you understand that it's a long life. Why love the the term that infinite game you know like infinite games. They never end. There's not like a beginning to end a winner and loser and you know. I think if you take the sport metaphor like you're mentioning you know fit. I you want to hit the game. Winning shot be the star player. And then you're like man that's really not scalable like you can build stone. Buildings not skyscrapers where you're the key man or woman because like your time isn't scalable so then you have to learn a whole other skill set which is like managing strategy scaling a business and then you realize that like there's just always a factor above the sport or the game that think the iran. So i've just i. That's my favorite part of the entrepreneurial. Journey is just like you know. Kind of like inner discipline multidimensional multidimensional chess in the sense. You know it's like just just the most fun most sort of intellectually challenging game and like there's physical limitation if you're if you're lucky you know like certainly like there's there's if you if you if you don't have any sort of mental issues like you you don't you know we all cap out in. Pro athletes are really pro. Athletes like they are top. One percent physical human specimens to begin with the mental game in. Oh so so you know for us for all of us. You know human humans out here you know. This is the thing i'll say. Is that like plenty of like not that brilliant people that are way more successful than us like it's not a direct correlation with having to be like a genius or having to be like the most likeable person in the room. Plenty of very normal people that have had a good idea and absolutely crushed the game. I agree. I think if one quality that i that i think is is just massive insatiable desire to grow it's just constant growth and roast is not is not always comfortable right but i think we and i see this company can only grow as fast as the human. So you asked me about meditation to like if you're on a journey of self actualization you're constantly going to be asking curious asking those questions. Every investor talks about it in different way curious you know rapid Raider growth whatever it is but it's really the quality that you don't know anything in this moment you less than you did ten minutes ago. It's still asking that question all the time yup totally and for you what what are you. What are you seeking at this point like. What are the things that you hope to bring more of into your life because a bunch of it i think by personal impersonal. Why is really picking stock in people. It's it's how can you give resources to people who think are best suited to be the catalyst to bring us into fruition. There's nothing more satisfying than backing somebody with. Nobody else sees it yet. And if you really good at this for for multiple decades. So i could kidding myself here. But i've more than once felt that gratification of understanding. Somebody's value before the society proves it out social for it and giving them the resources to be able to build on it. And then you know the x. So satisfying i love it. And so if there's any way that i can play in small part in being a boost for for that genesis of an idea coming to fruition being company s why is the commercial aspect of how to do that as a job And i also love to see what new things entrepreneurs are tackling. When i started investing when i started adventure impact. Investing wasn't even a thing. I was investing in now. The leapfrog that where it's just if they really conscious founder In on paper what are some of the most successful investments that you guys have made so far like what are some of the standout companies. That's a good question we have. We've known the founders of skin for a long time invest in their company weep on kevin minhsiu from news. she's also part of community. We seated varela stages of a company called current which is smart banking platform. That's grown phenomenally. Well a lot of our companies are still early. So they're not household names yet but they're getting their tiny organics is a baby focusing on or a great. Oh when i'm very excited about. Its paloma health and their digital health platform for testing and diagnosing viral challenges. You know they've created incredible community based healthcare plan for an increasingly diagnosed disease and.

jeff Great amazon chess iran kevin minhsiu varela
"heather hartnett" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

Art of the Hustle

07:45 min | 6 months ago

"heather hartnett" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

"Let's make home care better together. Talk to us about the future of work because we've talked around it a little bit but i want impact that further because i think that's something on everyone's mind. Yeah definitely the the feature to us. We have four categories that were most excited about and we say unsurprisingly into the future work as human so the areas that we are really excited about one newark armaments self explanatory. We have you know we're not going back to the same way. It was and the the next one. I'm excited about recalled. Lifelong learning the education system is going to be changing online. Education could be just as sufficient. I think people are going to think about certificate programs a lot more than four year college education if that gets them. The job revenue-sharing i essays are becoming income. Share agreements would become something. That's more popular so all those structures lifelong learning. What is not what what is going. Come share agreement income Agreement is just basically that Can you have a discount on an education platform certification course in exchange for sharing your future her future portion of your income and i think people have tried this for a different various ways. Another public companies like lambda one job easy. That's coming up. People are dead finding ways that you can ensure an increase in your income coming out of certification program and for that you're willing to rep share essentially your future income and he is really interesting. You're betting you're betting on people picking stock on in people in. That's been a thesis of mine for a long time. The third bucket. I love is we call redefining the resume so for so long. The resume bank. Dan were you've worked is what defines you and i think that's definitely going to change the career ladder so to speak is now looks like lattice and at what point. Are you mapping your skills to a whole new career. People change a career now three four five times in their lifetime as opposed to a previous generation. The last one is worker wellbeing. So how is your company organization. You're a leader. How how is your mission. Satisfying what is it. What role does it play in your your employees life because there's a lot to now so those are the areas that we're really excited about. We have eighteen founders right now in the humans in the wild program who are tackling various Challenges around those for forbid buckets. Let's talk about access in of like you know who is getting these investments. I don't i might be setting you up for you know something. That's embarrassing so i hope but i just know anybody personally. I imagine that you're very thoughtful about investing in diverse in gender diverse in economically diverse international entrepreneurs. But talk to us about how human is democratizing. That access to founders. It goes back to his in philosophy that you're talking about that it's not even it's the right is the right thing to do. Definitely be quality and we're so far from from equity and in quality the this is also where there is so much opportunity because they're investing in underrepresented founders or underfunded areas. That's where you've been had the most leverage with your capital. So i absolutely think that it's an incredible business decision to diversify your talent pools where you picking founders from. What attributes are you looking for a. It shouldn't be they all went to excellency college. And that's you know social proof that there will be a good entrepreneur. It's just not that's not. There's no correlation there so you really have to do the work to say what are the founder traits that were really looking for in their communities. Are there areas or network nodes that we can tap into to identify founders who are in those different types of areas. That's a great. We'll talk more about that. So what is the example of a network. Node that you tap into well. We talked about philanthropy early on and one of our personas that we talked about internally is can the phd in life. Did you start A nonprofit organization about a lot of women. Actually who are phenomenal. Operators is sometimes. It's easier missouri nonprofit than it is for profit in society's view so you know we invested in phenomenal woman. Megan o'conner in the non profit space for a long time. She decided she's a part of it. Applied her talents to the education sector and we invested in her company. That was bringing technology to tutoring an education and that persona of founder might not have been a typical tech investment prior. But because we said what you know how to do a lot with a little you know how to sell your vision and investors and all sorts of sheets. She knew how to sell and she knows the skills needed for her company. So you can be really thoughtful about how you're mapping skills than you can find talented founders in a lot of different places you know about network nodes more than anybody with some community is who are those carriers people people who embody the values that value and can you then have them kind of recruit and curie founders to to come in and you so that's what we do. We do our our application process. We'll see three or four or five hundred founders who are applying for these twelve spots and and then we picked the people who we think are going to be phenomenal and were very careful about. The construction of the class is their diversity of thought background of misty. You absolutely don't want much thinking your company so imagining that like you know there's listeners. Who are you know. p- i. I think they're more great ideas out there than we realize i. I've heard i heard so many awesome ideas. We all have different ideas as entrepreneurs for things that we could pursue if only we had the time or bandwidth and often just like building. The consortium of people. But i'm just curious to like. I have an idea that i have some conviction around. I haven't started a company. Perhaps i'm in a habit corporate job or you know. I run a non profit or i'm in a nonprofit but like i have an idea for something that could be market based solution that can scale grow support myself my family and have a positive world impact so take us through some of the steps if you found me. I'm raw talent. I got all the building blocks. But i mean I'm clueless in terms of what to do next with this there. So many resources out there now for people who are hanging about being a founder find some founders that resonate with you and see how how they think and then in their programs of just being with other people who are like my life that there's one called day one there's one on-deck their their communities so that people can bounce these ideas of each other but then more importantly can you start inner testing iterating idea to see if it comes to something taking something from nothing and then there are incubator programs there. Are you know. There's just so much out there that you can start testing your idea and putting it towards but i i see the world in terms of people so i just say throw your idea against the wall against as many people as you possibly can to get all of the feedback and and then just start to watch built and then once you get that traction you know then.

lambda newark Megan o'conner Dan missouri
"heather hartnett" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

Art of the Hustle

08:15 min | 6 months ago

"heather hartnett" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

"Started meditating in their teens. started practicing. Something called transcendental meditation and in the seventies it was really popular and you know there was kind of spike in popularity. A couple of people actually wanted their kids to be able to grow up with transcendental. Meditation so i would say that we were a part of a intentional community and and In a way that our parents were just very progressive. They was this. Where was this geographically in iowa size regionally from chicago but they moved to iowa. When you're young where there are other folks who who wanted organic farming and meditation in the school systems and you know a lot of things that have come to fruition now but were not in the eighties. It was it was in hindsight right. I can't believe that my parents have that foresight. But i'm very grateful to have that early on in. It's definitely shaped the way that i i look at life. You know from from the beginning. Will i know that before you moved into investing. You were headed development at the david lynch foundation correct. Yes so my after school is any business school. And i did go out to the bay area. I started working in venture serendipitous laid. My father is not nor grandfather was not from our end. So i didn't know what business i wanted to start and so venture something. I can fell into where we had a family friend and he said well. I see entrepreneurs every day. Why don't you come analyze them. And see what could be good investments. And that was when i first got bit with the buck but simultaneously. I was out in the bay area. Avid film director. David lynch was starting a an organization and he was saying. I would like to be able to bring meditation to at risk youth in inner city schools. And so i started volunteering. What was becoming a foundation and got to know. David lynch and bob ross is executive director and eventually release fell in love with the organization and many years later ended up moving to new york and opening up the new york office. It bob in started building out the nonprofit are of tradition. What what overlaps you see between this work you know. I- mindfulness is so important. And you know. I definitely feel like my performance as entrepreneurs an internal game. You know like the work that we do internally is the thing that's going to have the biggest impact on our outcomes not necessarily a podcast we hear or talk. We listen to you. Know what is the thing that you kind of see. What's the pattern recognition that you apply from your your previous work to your current work. I think any type of meditation practice. Whatever works for you. Years should integrate some sort of some sort of that reflection for me. Tm has brought a sort of witnessing value equity to what i do. So i can ride the highs and lows with a with a certain amount of witnessing so you're not tossed about as as life can really do for you now. I'm not saying that. I approach everything perfectly but i can definitely tell the difference when i when i'm regular with my practice or when i'm not how things affect me i think investing that's a huge huge part of it. It's just can you. We just had an incredible volatility in the market. Can you stand what you're doing confusing when everybody else. Zagging can really understand your internal conviction. Because you can't you can't look to anybody else to give to give you that conviction. I think a lot of those things are kind of abstract benefits of tm. Some of the more practical just you know at a time wed mental health is so so important. Burnout is real. Live in new york city. There's never a time to stop so unless you have an intentional practice to be able to stop. There was just no way that you can control that. So i think for all those reasons. I'm grateful for it. I can always be more judicious factors. That can always. There's always more that you can do but you just of have to be easy with yourself and do it can. what's funny. You know what comes up for me. When i hear you saying that is like we're kind of in this entrepreneurial moment of like good artists borrow great artists steal and you know the copycat culture of you know hollywood right now where it's like. Whatever spiderman eighteen alike the fifth installment of the same movie with new actors and actresses. Right this it's similar like the copycat business of entrepreneurship. And i think what gets lost. Is you know when you really look at a lot of these companies that have like an original creative vision years later. They often don't really stray from that. Creative vision. I don't even remember the head space when we were building our brand identity for summit for instance and like really caring about you know the guidelines in the in the we built like an eighty six page brand doc like we worked with incredible people on our icon iconography and like you know like our language and all these things and like it's such a head space to get into and to your point if you don't have like self belief in the point of view it's very easy to tack to whatever's working right now. Just always be chasing whatever's working right now. So i can see what you're saying where it's like if you want to identify a visionary on moore say somebody that makes sense to resource into bed on to support you know in in helping sort of maintain that self belief in the vision you started with. I do think that the results actually speak to. I just always keep seeing this now. I'm like That company sold there. It started ten years ago. Or it's under new whatever it is but that sort of vision always seems to stick with these things i think it's a great point and we have saying internally it's the myth of the big idea everybody always says you come up the fabric. Come up with that idea and the thing is is that it's not the idea. Ideas are everywhere and everybody can kinda pull it from the consciousness of the moment but an executions the big part of it except for also it's just constantly being awake to where the trend is going so seeing a there's say see through the matrix like you were talking about that steadfast. You don't know the exact timing but that's where you can really have that intuition that bounces back and forth. I think best founders naturally. Do tap into this is sometimes people say you have to be a little bit in an outlier of crazy and sometimes it's not just somebody who's has that connection internally and i i love it you can feel you. Resonate with founders. Who really have that. You know to your point. The technologies can have outpacing the human condition right so we are strapped twenty four seven. We hear this all the time technology. But who's taking care of the human side of it and if you're not i joke that one of the first to atlas meditations now british thinks that the titian comes run out. Yeah it's it's one hundred percent right and that like we're over stimulated and rest it and now we're seeing some of these technologies come online that really lower the barrier for us to like get involved in something so i wouldn't say like it's it's pretty barrier for most people in their mind selects a get into transcendental meditation less they're exposed to it directly from someone that demystify whereas like you can just download com where you can download waking up and you're like right in the game you know. Each station is kind of saying that. There's one medication right. It's it's not. there's so much nuance to meditation. And sometimes some type of right for for pain management. I mean they know so much more about the brain functioning now too and so you know. Do you have an overactive magdala. Tm is classified as automated transcending in soda lousy to acquire part of your mind but in the result of that is that your body settles down. So you're getting depressed so we got enough depressed..

David lynch david lynch foundation iowa bay area bob ross new york chicago bob new york city hollywood moore
"heather hartnett" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

Art of the Hustle

07:50 min | 6 months ago

"heather hartnett" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

"You so much for having me. It's a pleasure has gone out there. it's going well. I'm downtown new york city right now. A live in greenwich village. Newark's coming back to life. It's been really kind of interesting to see how resilient every everyone's blend so excited to have you on the show. Your work has focused on the future of work for a long time which even powered through the organizations that you've been a part of most notably human ventures talked us a little bit about what you're seeing right now. Yes oh i. I run a what we call a business. Creation platform and that is comprised of venture fund and a startup studio and we bring in entrepreneurs we work with nora's at the earliest stages of when they're building their companies and we provide tools to be able to create and then we provide financing to be able to to capitalize and that structure is one of the best. It's i'm so grateful to be able to be doing it. Because what you get to do is think where the world is going to be tomorrow into expanding ten years and then you start working with founders. Who think that far in advance and and you give them the resources to be able to just built and so being around people who always see challenges opportunity who always see the world it ten steps ahead. I think is one of most aspiring things to do. Tell us more about that. So how do you pick the people that are in your cohorts who who gets your investment. Who gets your incubation time. You know i think a big pieces of human ventures is that one of the biggest arbitrage opportunities is really identifying talent head of the market and say that because for years and years cloud finance industries in metric capital particular has been really focused on a particular type of entrepreneur and it was true ten fifteen years ago notch for nora had a an archetype but as you know industry start to open up to tack and tech becomes ubiquitous. Every company has to have can bet ease of use customer satisfaction in understanding the efficiencies at technology brings the founder profile changes at the same time the arcs of you know the way that society views companies ed social paradigm apparent shifted so the consumers very conscious about what they're consuming and buying and And then the employee wants to know who they're working for almost their personal passion. Admission is being satisfied for what they're working in. So i think it's become extremely complex to the founder and way to be able to identify them is now becoming more sophisticated so at human we will generally have these that are about the world where the world's going we call it. The human needs economy. So that for us right now is the future digital healthcare and wellness and mental health. And then the future of work and how we are identifying an skilling and reskilling talent and then also communities so what companies are understanding community based healthcare community based products that that drive more than just a transaction but the drive you know that camaraderie and really affinity with a brand. So that's what we've coined the kind of the human beings economy. That's what we look for and then we do calls for founders whose building these areas who were building the next platforms to be able to bring healthcare to underserved communities etc. Sarah and we do what we call a cohort model of entrepreneurs in residence. And you like this jeff so internally. We used to say this person starting their next company. They're in the wild. They're in the wild and so we just figured why don't we actually name that. So we have a program called humans in the wild. It's what happened when a founder and if you're found are you you resonate with us because you are ensured You're saying they're saying i need to. I need to think of the next the next thing because naturally if you're a founder once founder always hungry you will always think about so when you get a group of people who are building together it creates one ten creates incredible energy totally you get this ecosystem affect you get this like our liberation is bound up together shared experience same team in same dream kind of vibe where everybody's sharing resources which when you go from like being a lonely entrepreneur to having any sort of reason for this kind of overlap with the preneurs feels like in an unbelievable wind behind you i really you know. The old saying rising tide lifts all boats it so true and the dynamics of having shirt experience creates a trust and bond that then as people have success and failures you you have this really trusted network and it takes the burden off of being alone when i also kind of like this. Ecosystems approach as like an investor too. Because you know not all companies work out. But you're making a big investment almost like helping fund a phd for these founders in like business experience right and so if you can either invest in their second or third company or repatriate those talent in resource pools to the other organizations that are inside of the ecosystem. I imagine that has a really positive return to for the fun. And and i guess that takes me to my question. Like the putting my heartless capitalist pig had on you know. How does this pencil like this. You know a lot of people who are investment professionals see impact investments in air quotes enroll. There is tell us how this works from a return profile. Yeah a lot of great things. I think you're you're absolutely right. That ecosystem is what you invest in early stage you do. This right will invest in the next three things. A founder does that. We love because to likely won't work out. You know but those founders have had those learnings so paid for them. You know again to the impact question. We specifically didn't call it an impact company when we first started. Because i think that it's become just the status quo. You need to have some sort of a mission or purpose driving. What you're doing if you're building something from scratch this you know the the trials and tribulations to to Great to not have something that drives you through those times and when you have a very coherent underlying set of values our mission you're able to attract unbelievable talent you're able to rally you know investors clients and customers behind something that otherwise people might not feel such an affinity towards so for me. I think it's a term investment play. It's less of a liability in makes the company's much more defensible as they grow so from purely capitalistic standpoint. If you're not thinking about anything altruistic louis. I think that it's it's just smart. Investing able to invest. Where do you think the state where the puck is gone. I like it. You hit me with a gretzky reference schedule. You must be a deadly fundraiser. heather. I have a. I have a total. You know. turn in the conversation that i wanna take. I'm curious just you personally. When did you start. Meditating question. I started meditating when i was five years old five years old. Okay so unpack that. How is that definitely can't take credit for that My parents so drew like mom and dad. I'm super into this stuff. This is a guy named maharishi the game independently..

nora greenwich village Newark new york city Sarah jeff gretzky louis heather
"heather hartnett" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

05:00 min | 7 months ago

"heather hartnett" Discussed on Venture Stories

"There's there's two sides to this coin which is you know. After it sold my company efforts old tricks to fox. I founded human ventures with heather hartnett and human was this incarnation of like the the superpower behind all great companies as the people in this kind of very part and parcel saying about art versus science and that successes like you know where human spend their time attention and and what you demand of others in so that was the early early stage in attention was looking at a later. Stage like people are trying to understand the attention economy or their misplaced because they've high-value value attention but they're not valued properly is a really interesting space. And then you know in a covid world it was kind of a full stop and say will what would we think will be very interesting. Post covid and so. I'm still just kind of feeling out right now. we're gonna Few points you mentioned. One is in a previous podcast. You mentioned some digital. You mentioned something along the lines of you to we've we've tended to overvalue what we can measure And so what can't be measured gets undervalued and that goes speaks. Aren't science point at those really interesting yen. i think that's it. that's absolutely. It's very hard to measure. If someone goes to an event next experiential. We all know it. You know you know. It's really sad that we're not going to south by see us in the everyone. Can everyone can make fun. Thank god we're not in vegas right now Thank god and what a crush on. How much of our careers and our connections people we got to know. What is the relationship worth. I mean i don't know how to put a price on it. They you know maybe maybe salesforce and slack figure it out on star together but but they built our careers in your networks on these things and and they're very hard to value and so if they're hard people just kind of throwing. I'll pay for what i can measure and so i believe that there's a class of things out. There that are very hard to measure their undervalued in the market. Wha what's an example that the does mind to make it a big concrete for people. I one of the first things partnered with a james's firm who were lead live aventures on entre. Becca film festival. Right in tribeca son of these things where it's like it just brand that like people recognize. They don't know everything about it. People recognize the brand and that has intrinsic value. Jane rosenbaum's the like knows how to like put together an event and showed that like moves culture like it was founded post nine eleven to bring people back to downtown new york. It's the stories that told it film festival resonate for decades you see a piece of art that gets traded and ten years later someone becomes a you know a cancer research scientists because of something they tell me how you're going to measure that i tell me how you're gonna say i'm gonna show you the of film festival and is i..

human ventures heather hartnett fox salesforce Jane rosenbaum vegas Wha tribeca james new york cancer
"heather hartnett" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

10:17 min | 2 years ago

"heather hartnett" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Get your super awesome kit, but podcasts. All right back to my conversation with Tim Brown soils just want to go back to the idea of me as a we as as the as the team me, the idea that in the future all have some sort of a technological assistance or a series of suspense in that world that you in to it are do the ideas ever come from the technology or do they always come from the human? I suppose in theory, if the technology reaches a level of consciousness that it can understand the relevance of something going from nothing to something then. Yes, the ideas could come from the today that's not possible because the technology isn't capable of that level of consciousness because it's not so much having the idea is realizing you'll having an idea that's the important piece right in that requires a high level of consciousness about what they should doing about realizing how it's new where it's new wise new wide applies to the problem that you're trying to solve it's hard for me to imagine that being done through something that's purely algorithm. Make so it sort of like an idea is not about the creator. But about the editor, and that you need to be your own editor. Well, I I've I've always believed that is why the world of you'll willed and my world is pretty close together, actually because the creating the woods and editing the woods, and you'll will a part of the ultimately the same act, right? And that's true in design that creating the idea and then. Editing the idea refining, the idea making the idea makes sense of the people is all part of having the idea. Well, it's interesting to me that we've been talking about ideas. And we haven't labeled and good ideas are bad ideas. And as I just note, my fear around this, and I do have the sort of Israel fairs. You're talking it's yeah, I might have ideas, but they might be bad ideas for good news about ideas as the will tells you whether they go bad. You don't have to decide what good about it's why we test things where we built prototypes. So we'll tell us whether we go to good here about idea. Sure. So your job is just is to create ideas. And the the better you get at being designer the better, you get this process. We we loosely call design thinking, the more often, your ideas will be ones that the world will decide we'll be good and worthwhile. That is the satisfaction of mastering the art of design is that more and more of your ideas will be good ones at the beginning. Most of them will be terrible. Just like when you start learning to play piano. Most of those notes. Awful at the beginning even worse. Right. But eventually more of them will will will sound good. And eventually all of them, Los and good, you know, earlier in the season we had Seth Meyers on the show. And it strikes me that we are saying is actually so similar to his discussion in writing. And he says, you know, I read all these jokes. We write all these jokes. And we go through them, all and not all the jokes. I read are good. He says a lot of the jokes. I right. Don't land a lot of them. Don't fall you just keep working just keep doing it. And you depend on the people around you to hone it in and help you find what lens old credit processes have some social component to them in that way. Right. I mean, some people take a long time before they expose their ideas to to others. But it sounds like theft. Does that very early? We do I do very earliest I-. I'd rather expose my ideas early a know that they're bad before I've invested too much evidence from the white too long for them to be so precious that I'm frightened really of what people think about the idea at that point. I don't. Not want to be frightened about what people think about my ideas ideas. Also feel generative to me if you get them going. It's like a spigot of water they keep going. But if you go for a while without one, or if you get very attached to one, it's also how you make least my will design a team sport. Right. If you tighten that have that mindset, then it then it absolutely can be a collaborative act if instead you want to hone the idea to make it perfect becomes an individual act. And there's nothing wrong with either version except that when it's a team, you can think about bigger more complex ideas. That was Tim Brown CEO of Idaho a decade ago. He wrote the de facto handbook for using design and business, and it has just been released. It's called change by design. There was some solid advice wrapped up in Tim's musings. I really connected to his thoughts on creative confidence. Having an idea is not enough. You have to believe in it enough to act on it. And if you're feeling just dry out of ideas, you know, it's probably because you aren't exposing yourself to enough new people and experiences ideas, beget ideas, he are just us not to get lost in the spiral of thinking. But just to start making things just get out there and test ideas as early as possible there are growing number of businesses that have sprung up to help people do just this. They go by different names accelerators incubators some call themselves startup studios this week. Caroline took a look at one of them. Hey, caroline. Hey, Jesse after hearing from Tim and understanding more where good ideas. Come from. I wanted to speak with someone who turns ideas into companies, but good ideas something start from. I think it will never end up being what you thought it was originally that was Heather Hartnett. She's the founder of human ventures, which both invests in companies and works with founders who want to build them. Her success depends on recognizing good ideas before other people do and then she helps them flourish. The we actually have a term the myth of the big idea because I think people put a lot of a lot of emphasis on ideas, when it's really a lot about understanding the market and being where the opportunity is testing how you're approaching that market, and then listening to the customer and and building accordingly. And so I think it's a match of having an insight and then knowing how to listen at human. She will often start with the person who has an idea, and then she tested out when we say we wanna work with the founder, we put them through what we call our workshop process. For just about one hundred days testing that angle going into the strat, you know, into that market seeing what the customers want by putting up landing pages, putting some marketing and messaging around it and seeing you know, what is gaining traction. Now at the end of the hundred days give or take we then will either green life that company to really start incorporate and go full speed ahead with it and put them capital behind it. Or we we scrap it when we start back from the drawing board. So I asked Heather to tell me about a time that this process really worked. She told me about the startup which makes baby food. But when the founders I came to her their idea it had nothing to do with baby food at all they had a company idea in the parenting space around creating a memory book for new parents the digital version, but they ended up, you know, the company now is called tiny organic it's a brand around baby food, and creating baby led weaning food in the early stages of babies life, and their brand is really. Taking off in their creating products that are going to be synonymous with their vision. They saw the white face which was organic food. And so that's what they ended up launching with. But finding the white space is in everything so much of this is about timing. I think some of the ideas that are really innovative are quite simple and the ones that really make an entire market shift. You couldn't hear them in this state of mind and understand them for where the market was going. So an example of that what I mean by that is something like Airbnb before Airbnb existed, you heard of that concept in in you weren't in the right mindset to be able to think that could be a big idea because it was unheard of that you would have the trust in order to have somebody come into your home. And and that sharing economy didn't even exist yet as a generation went through of a mind shift. Right. The entire generation that had went through the recession. Their mindset shifted. And then you can feed that opportunity. Pretty clearly Heather shows us that ideas. Whether they're big like Airbnb or smaller like tiny organics. They all have one thing in common. They probably weren't what they are today when they first started. Thanks caroline. So last week, I asked you to send voice memos about where you're most creative ideas come from. And I learned that a lot of you like me tend to get in the shower when you're feeling stuck. Why do our best ideas come to us in the shower? I don't know. But I heard a lot of other great stories to like this one from authors, Melissa and Jonathan Nightingale who are also married. You asked about daily creative practices when we were writing. How fucked up is your management one of the things that we found really worked was we were working in our day jobs as tech exacts and we've come home at the end of the day. We'd like eat dinner put the kids to bed, and then we just talk about the shit that tech kept getting wrong or your and over again, and we get really pissed off about it. So anger anger at night after dinner at your boss. That's a source of creative inspiration. I hadn't considered next week. I'm talking to me not to so she's a professional influence or a convener of conversations. It's a line of work that is specific to our time. Not something my parents set out to do in the same way. At all the seasonal featuring interviews with a number of people who have jobs of the future. They're doing things that just didn't exist before autonomous car trainers. For example, if you have ideas for types of jobs, he'd like to hear about or if you have one of these jobs, send me a voice memo at Hello, Monday at Lincoln dot com. That's hello. Monday at Lincoln dot com. I'd love to feature some on the show. If you enjoyed listening subscribe and write a son, I tunes it helps new listeners find the show. Hello Monday is a production of linked in the show was produced by Dave pond. And Loris sim with reporting by Caroline Fairchild. The show was mixed by Joe de Giorgi put on Eddie Endo is head of editor's video. Dave pond is our technical director this week the flu is Hello Mondays arch. Nemesis music was by putting to bear impact. Derm? Dan rock is the editor in chief of Lincoln. I'm Jesse Hempel. Thanks for listening.

Tim Brown Caroline Fairchild Heather Hartnett founder editor Airbnb Jesse Hempel Lincoln dot com Dave pond Israel Seth Meyers theft Idaho Lincoln editor in chief Loris sim Dan rock Joe de Giorgi CEO technical director
"heather hartnett" Discussed on Equity

Equity

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"heather hartnett" Discussed on Equity

"As the tech industry makes the world smaller business gets bigger as your company grows h s b bc has the ability to scale with you the fast global network made up of local expertise search hsbc tech industry to contact your local specialist pay everyone christopher gates here in on the producer of equity adhere to announce something theory excited about and that is a new podcast coming from the tech crunch podcasting network is called control team hosted by reporter maggie rose deke an editorial director henry pick abets stay tuned at the end of this episode for a little snippet take it away katie roof coming up on equities hoover gets its tender offer rolling we work buys meet at niantic raises tutors million and jeff phases is worth a hundred billion dollars well welcome to you equity i'm tech cringes katie roof my colleague matthew and is off today but we have crunch based news editor in chief alex mall how low we're joined by heather hartnett is the ceo and partner at human venter thanks for joining us thanks so much for having me your first off a plane you said he'd been on the drawing for about an hour i am right from new york city it's the it's a long flight but actually as you pointed out it's a lot of me time so it's only ruling of a fly and is that for lose that period of time known in calming and no one can explain eye out for two it's also when i catch up on my movies that netflix and you know just little sleet spurt speaking asleep i didn't do that they'll has few days because i've been busy with uber.

netflix new york katie roof jeff hoover henry editorial director maggie rose reporter christopher gates partner ceo heather hartnett alex mall news editor matthew producer hundred billion dollars