4 Burst results for "Heather Chaffee"

"heather chaffee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:35 min | 11 months ago

"heather chaffee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Space Australia is updating its national construction code in twenty twenty to an extreme heat is being considered in the changes but new codes would primarily be aimed at new buildings and the people most affected by heat tend to be folks like merry Khanyar living in older buildings that were designed long before bouts of extreme heat were much of a thought don't get me wrong I appreciate the roof I have as my head and being able to pay pay for it do that but I think sometimes it's poor design but with public housing the nonprofit leases Conyers home knows this is an issue divisional manager heather Chaffee says she hears it from clients all the time for us as a housing provider in a tricky housing market it's it's distressing to be honest Wentworth often doesn't own the homes they rent Chevy says so it makes it hard to make modifications instead they focused on morning tenants when extreme heat is coming but she knows that's not enough heat she says is a global social justice issue it's the poorest people that are going to take some for the months so she says there needs to be a larger societal discussion about how we prepare for extreme heat because this is summer just showed it's already here Nathan rott NPR news west Sydney Australia moving to a different part of the world the war in Syria is one of the most devastating and complicated conflicts in the world on Friday Russia the Syrian regime's main military backer and Turkey announced a cease fire in northwest Syria it has for now stop the fighting in the province near the Turkish border NPR's Jana Raff is near that border and joins us now from and tacky Jane thanks so much for joining us thank you so it's been three days since the ceasefire was announced there have been ceasefires before is this one holding it is actually for the most part and there's really quite a lot at stake here for Turkey for Syria and particularly for those one million civilians who are massed along the Turkish border who have been trying to get to safety with intense fighting for this no there's still immense devastation a lot of destruction they're hospitals destroyed very little very few supplies coming through for the people there but the ceasefire does for now appear to be holding and what has this meant for people living in it lit province well you know they're very grateful of that the airstrikes have stop to that there's no world artillery that there's no shelling but there's still no shelter there's not enough water and there's a real fear that this ceasefire will hold a we reached a resident of includes city her name is it have had DC and she's a trainer for an aid organization and this is what she told us I'm afraid of that this agreement is not the truth in any sign and the government sees them or us and may bye bye lands so we are very iffy now this is a single mother she has two sons there ten and sixteen she says she lives with two hours of electricity a day but worse is the constant worry as she tries to keep her voice safe and you can actually hear that worry in her voice I want to forgive me I want to cry I try to bring them up in spite of all these difficulties in life I'm living alone it is not an easy thing when the night is coming I'm sorry but she says despite that she wants to stay in a club she wants her sons to grow up in their own country you know over the years Turkey has taken an almost four million refugees but now they're encouraging Syrian refugees and migrants who are already in the country to leave what's causing this shift so really what it is is the numbers of their almost four million refugees in Turkey an enormous number of people and at first Turkey was very welcoming but especially now since Turkish soldiers have been dying in the recent fighting there's been growing resentment we went to one of the city's today where there were attacks by Turkish citizens against Syrian shopkeepers after the funeral of a Turkish soldier who was killed in the fighting and they were saying you all should go home why are you here you should be fighting the Syrian government the problem is there are no homes to go back to in Syria and for many of them there's no where but here that's NPR's Jane Arraf in tacular along the Turkey Syria border Jane thank you so much thank you you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news every election year there are races across the country that are decided by tiny margins yet every election there are also tens of millions of people who could vote but don't NPR's miles parks from our life hit podcast has this guy to the process and maybe deciding an entire election with your ballot well good morning everybody nothing I've seen so many people on board of elections for we're gonna go back a few years the date is January fourth two thousand eighteen and there's a packed a room in a government building in Richmond Virginia all eyes are on a lady with her hand in a big blue ball minimize surely you get the pollster okay yeah that is the sound of democracy after elections in twenty seventeen control of the Virginia state house of delegates hinge on a single seat the ninety fourth district in Newport news Virginia and every Swiss close really close there's a recount of the two planets Shelly Simons David Yancey hi at eleven thousand six hundred seven votes Virginia law says that in situations like this the winner gets chosen at random they really decided which party will control half the legislature first state with a population of eight million people by picking a name out of the bowl the winner of house district ninety four is David Yancey one more person voting in this race could have swung either way and it's important to mention that voting isn't hard or scary for most people a recent NPR Marist poll found that the majority of people get into and out of the polling places quickly and they don't run into issues when issues do come up though experts say they usually have to do with your voter registration so the first tip on making voting easier for yourself is to get registered and do it early Michigan secretary state Johnson Benson deadlines for registration vary from state to state nearly all in every single state if you register thirty days prior to an election year good once you're registered the next step is to get informed you're gonna need to decide who or what you're gonna vote for nonprofits like the league of women voters often put out candy guides for local races and Benson says your local newspaper can also be a good place to start wherever you get your information you just need to make sure it's reliable Benson says you should be actively seeking it out not getting it by scrolling through your social media feeds I think the key is to be proactive rather than reactive to information we may be getting it's when we're reacting to links that are sent to us or posted and simply relying on them to be official and reliable that we set ourselves up to be misinformed or manipulated once you're ready and prepared you actually have to go do the thing voting is a little different everywhere but in most places there are three ways to vote early by mail early in person and on election day in person the key is make a plan and don't wait till the last minute that's according to Shelly Simons she is the candidate who lost by drawing in twenty seventeen you don't know when the election comes around when that could be your vote and I think if people don't at least go out and cast their ballot they they don't get a chance to shape the future Simon's right again last year for that scene Virginia this time.

Australia
"heather chaffee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:18 min | 11 months ago

"heather chaffee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Me wrong I appreciate the roof I have as my head and being able to pay pay for it we'll do that but I think sometimes it's poor design but with public housing the nonprofit leases Conyers home knows this is an issue divisional manager heather Chaffee says she hears it from clients all the time for us as a housing provider in a tricky housing market it's it's distressing to be honest Wentworth often doesn't own the homes they rent Chevy says so it makes it hard to make modifications instead they focused on warning tenants when extreme heat is coming but she knows that's not enough heat she says is a global social justice issue it's the poorest people that are going to take some for the most so she says there needs to be a larger societal discussion about how we prepare for extreme heat because this is summer just showed it's already here Nathan rott NPR news west Sydney Australia moving to a different part of the world the war in Syria is one of the most devastating and complicated conflicts in the world on Friday Russia the Syrian regime's main military backer and Turkey announced a cease fire in northwest Syria it has for now stop the fighting in the province near the Turkish border NPR's Jana Raff is near that border and joins us now from and tacky Jane thanks so much for joining us thank you so it's been three days since the ceasefire was announced there have been ceasefires before is this one holding it is actually for the most part and there's really quite a lot at stake here for Turkey for Syria and particularly for those one million civilians who are massed along the Turkish border who have been trying to get to safety with intense fighting for this no there's still immense devastation a lot of destruction they're hospitals destroyed very little very few supplies coming through for the people there but the ceasefire does for now appear to be holding and what has this meant for people living in it lit province well you know they're very grateful of that the airstrikes have stop to that there's no real artillery that there's no shelling but they're still not enough shelter there's not enough water and there's a real fear that this ceasefire won't hold a we reached a resident of includes city her name is it have had DC and she's a trainer for an aid organization this is what she told us I'm afraid of that this agreement is not the truth in any time and the government system or not show may attack us by rockets by lands so we are very iffy now this is a single mother she has two sons there ten and sixteen she says she lives with two hours of electricity a day but worse is the constant worry as she tries to keep her voice safe and you can actually hear that worried her voice I want to forgive me I want to cry I try to bring them up in spite of all these difficulties in life I'm living alone it is not an easy thing when the night is coming I am a fate but she says despite that she wants to stay in outlook she wants her sons to grow up in their own country you know over the years Turkey has taken an almost four million refugees but now they're encouraging Syrian refugees and migrants were already in the country to leave what's caused this shift so really what it is is the numbers of their almost four million refugees in Turkey an enormous number of people and at first Turkey was very welcoming but especially now since Turkish soldiers have been dying in the recent fighting there's been growing resentment we went to one of the city's today where there were attacks by Turkish citizens against Syrian shopkeepers after the funeral of a Turkish soldier who was killed in the fighting and they were saying you all should go home why are you here you should be fighting the Syrian government the problem is there are no homes to go back to in Syria and for many of them there's no where but here that's NPR's Jane Arraf in tacular along the Turkey Syria border Jane.

"heather chaffee" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

05:27 min | 11 months ago

"heather chaffee" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Austrailia just ended its second hottest summer on record. The heat was extreme feeding months of devastating wildfires. Those fires Drew International Attention. The heat less so but as NPR's Nathan Rot Reports. Extreme heat is a deadlier threat. Australians by and large are pretty direct people so it figures walking into Mary Con Yards House west of Sydney. She would get right to the point. Good how are you hot cooking here? It's about thirty eight degrees Celsius outside one hundred Fahrenheit which is relatively cool compared to what it's been like this frontal at least it keeps some of the heat out some not much. Three fans are humming in Conrad's living room. The lights are off to save money on electricity in con- yards banks cleaned to her forehead like she just got out of the shower. Just vacuumed ZANU. Coming and this is what happens to me. Lives in community housing a rental unit for lower income. People that's located in Greater West Sydney a fast growing part of the country's largest city that a few months ago held another distinction the hottest place on Earth about one hundred and twenty degrees Fahrenheit or as Conard puts it. It was hot and when its stinking hot door. Just you know hot hot like it is on this day. Conard like many people in West. Sydney has a really hard time running. The air conditioner. Day is not an option. It's too expensive so is moving. It's a struggle. It's really a struggle. You WanNa do things but the heat just zaps it out of you. Heat waves as well as being a silent killer. It's a social killer. Lucinda coats is a scientist with risk. Frontiers a private research center that focuses on natural hazards like bushfires cyclones and flooding about twenty years ago. Coats had the grim task of cataloging. How many people? Each of those natural disasters had historically killed in Australia. And that's when we first thinking hang on a minute hate wives. They seem to have killed more people than all the other natural hazards combined. Yes all other hazards combined with elderly people in the poor. Most at risk code says it's too soon to know how many people may have died during this past. Summer's extreme heat but history might provide a somber clue in one thousand nine thirty nine in two thousand nine. Australia had devastating bushfires black Friday and black Saturday as they're now called both were preceded by heat waves and those heatwaves alone code says are each believed to have killed more than four hundred people the deadliest fire a hundred and seventy three is twice as many as succumb to the bushfires but the heat waves didn't get nearly the same attention. It was all fire photos of crying families. And cinch teddy bears and you can see why the the newsworthy bushfire is a terrifying thing but heatwaves. How can you take a picture of a heatwave? I've got a powerpoint presentation with a young chap just holding a water bottle and drinking out of the water bill. That's that's my picture of a heatwave. So it's really hard to communicate the immediate danger and there's a fast growing need to communicate that danger. A recent climate report by the Australian government found the country has warmed by more than one degree Celsius just in the last century. Extreme heat events are increasing in frequency as is the risk of extreme fire and extreme flooding. All of which has happened in Australia and just the last few months. Sebastian vouch is a research fellow at western Sydney University. Who's focusing on climate change in urban heat? Everything's extreme. It's exactly like how scientists for thirty years predict climate change to actually pan out and it's not twenty thirty forty or fifty anymore. It's twenty twenty. We have it. It's happening vouches. There are ways you can build for heat. For example houses could be painted. Certain color to reflect light. Green or living roofs could provide insulation. Houses could be built smaller with more room for treason greenspace. Australia is updating. Its National Construction Code in twenty twenty. Two and extreme heat is being considered in the changes but new codes would primarily be aimed at new buildings and the people most affected by heat tend to be folks like Mary concert living in older buildings that were designed long before bouts of extreme heat. Were much of a thought. Don't get me wrong. I appreciate the refi. Have my head and being able to pay pay for it and do that but I think sometimes it's poor design went with public housing. The nonprofit that LISA'S COGNAC. Thome knows this is an issue. Divisional Manager Heather Chaffee says she hears it from clients all the time for us as a housing provider. Tricky housing market. It's it's distressing to be honest. When often doesn't own the homes they rent chaffee says so? It makes it hard to make modifications instead. They focused on warning tenants. When extreme heat is coming but she knows that's not enough heat. She says is a global social justice issue. It's the poorest people that are going to suffer them iced so she says there needs to be a larger societal discussion about how we prepare for extreme heat because as a summer just showed. It's already here Nathan Rot. Npr News West Sydney Australia..

Austrailia Sydney Nathan Rot Mary Con Yards House Lucinda coats Conard scientist Greater West Sydney Heather Chaffee NPR Conrad Npr Australian government western Sydney University Thome Mary
Australia's Extreme Heat

Environment: NPR

05:07 min | 11 months ago

Australia's Extreme Heat

"By and large are pretty direct people so it figures walking into Mary Con Yards House west of Sydney. She would get right to the point. Good how are you hot cooking here? It's about thirty eight degrees Celsius outside one hundred Fahrenheit which is relatively cool compared to what it's been like this frontal at least it keeps some of the heat out some not much. Three fans are humming in Conrad's living room. The lights are off to save money on electricity in con- yards banks cleaned to her forehead like she just got out of the shower. Just vacuumed ZANU. Coming and this is what happens to me. Lives in community housing a rental unit for lower income. People that's located in Greater West Sydney a fast growing part of the country's largest city that a few months ago held another distinction the hottest place on Earth about one hundred and twenty degrees Fahrenheit or as Conard puts it. It was hot and when its stinking hot door. Just you know hot hot like it is on this day. Conard like many people in West. Sydney has a really hard time running. The air conditioner. Day is not an option. It's too expensive so is moving. It's a struggle. It's really a struggle. You WanNa do things but the heat just zaps it out of you. Heat waves as well as being a silent killer. It's a social killer. Lucinda coats is a scientist with risk. Frontiers a private research center that focuses on natural hazards like bushfires cyclones and flooding about twenty years ago. Coats had the grim task of cataloging. How many people? Each of those natural disasters had historically killed in Australia. And that's when we first thinking hang on a minute hate wives. They seem to have killed more people than all the other natural hazards combined. Yes all other hazards combined with elderly people in the poor. Most at risk code says it's too soon to know how many people may have died during this past. Summer's extreme heat but history might provide a somber clue in one thousand nine thirty nine in two thousand nine. Australia had devastating bushfires black Friday and black Saturday as they're now called both were preceded by heat waves and those heatwaves alone code says are each believed to have killed more than four hundred people the deadliest fire a hundred and seventy three is twice as many as succumb to the bushfires but the heat waves didn't get nearly the same attention. It was all fire photos of crying families. And cinch teddy bears and you can see why the the newsworthy bushfire is a terrifying thing but heatwaves. How can you take a picture of a heatwave? I've got a powerpoint presentation with a young chap just holding a water bottle and drinking out of the water bill. That's that's my picture of a heatwave. So it's really hard to communicate the immediate danger and there's a fast growing need to communicate that danger. A recent climate report by the Australian government found the country has warmed by more than one degree Celsius just in the last century. Extreme heat events are increasing in frequency as is the risk of extreme fire and extreme flooding. All of which has happened in Australia and just the last few months. Sebastian vouch is a research fellow at western Sydney University. Who's focusing on climate change in urban heat? Everything's extreme. It's exactly like how scientists for thirty years predict climate change to actually pan out and it's not twenty thirty forty or fifty anymore. It's twenty twenty. We have it. It's happening vouches. There are ways you can build for heat. For example houses could be painted. Certain color to reflect light. Green or living roofs could provide insulation. Houses could be built smaller with more room for treason greenspace. Australia is updating. Its National Construction Code in twenty twenty. Two and extreme heat is being considered in the changes but new codes would primarily be aimed at new buildings and the people most affected by heat tend to be folks like Mary concert living in older buildings that were designed long before bouts of extreme heat. Were much of a thought. Don't get me wrong. I appreciate the refi. Have my head and being able to pay pay for it and do that but I think sometimes it's poor design went with public housing. The nonprofit that LISA'S COGNAC. Thome knows this is an issue. Divisional Manager Heather Chaffee says she hears it from clients all the time for us as a housing provider. Tricky housing market. It's it's distressing to be honest. When often doesn't own the homes they rent chaffee says so? It makes it hard to make modifications instead. They focused on warning tenants. When extreme heat is coming but she knows that's not enough heat. She says is a global social justice issue. It's the poorest people that are going to suffer them iced so she says there needs to be a larger societal discussion about how we prepare for extreme heat because as a summer just showed. It's already

Australia Heather Chaffee Sydney Mary Con Yards House Scientist Conard Lucinda Coats Greater West Sydney Conrad Australian Government Western Sydney University Research Fellow Thome Mary Divisional Manager Lisa