35 Burst results for "Heath"

"heath" Discussed on Pretty Basic with Alisha Marie and Remi Cruz

Pretty Basic with Alisha Marie and Remi Cruz

03:55 min | Last week

"heath" Discussed on Pretty Basic with Alisha Marie and Remi Cruz

"You gloves on. Could we fight. I could see you guys fighting the caller daddy girls original cast Original original cast. We could win because we we want that sixty million dollar because if you guys want or even if you're going against them you'd get that cloud that caller daddy fan base. I'll think about how much money would make from seeing them two together again. Okay idea that was smart or we could talk team and we just off of us. We'd go against the tmz baby. Let's fucking battle donald the podcast entity. Cody noel yeah. That'd be good fight. Who'd you go for cody or noel. Beat my ass. I i feel like i have a chance for some reason. Quick and like. I'd probably go for gopher tony i would also like diving crazy. Great circle to duke or something crazy else kind of got that like the edge to him. He's like low key bad boy. We're talking about fighting though. What is it yes. That's how it could be the short haircut. I don't know anybody with like a short haircut. I just feel like they're just like if you had long hair i'd be like i'd go for normal said tim. Gee that's way better. I think i think the four of us could make a lot of money if there was like an actual fight with really. Oh yeah i think we could get set it up one hundred million. Is that what you want. That's answered everything are fucking. The press conference would be bears. Yeah i'd everyone's like yeah we know this is. That's probably why we would make any money because everyone knows nobody tune in if we were actually fighting but they've probably wait for it to be on talk or something like this highly caps on twitter. Do they set it up like you beat them. And it's like you beat cody co and they play it as like the guy who does sweet treat dessert review zanu bad. Just stand a chance. Yeah it'd be a fair fight. Yeah well with that with that on that note. Thank you guys. So much for watching. Pretty basic. don't forget to subscribe to zane. and heath unfiltered. Shot yourselves out. What else do we have to plug you. Just follow both of us on my instagram and twitter. Handle holdaway post wants. A monster. Was ads aimed at heathrow on everything. And and we have a podcast. Zana heat unfiltered. She's pointing at me. 'cause i forget my oh i'm looking at the people up here that one. That's not even you and we also have a podcast ethan filter. You could check us how we post every mondays. Audio version and video. Version dot com. He channel yes also forget. We do video format of pretty basic. Now you've dot com pretty basic podcast. Keep listening to us on podcast or spotify wherever you listen to your podcast and we'll catch you next time. Bye very good has good like i'm jumbling. Over my words you can find this. Youtube dot com filtered thank you..

Cody noel gopher tony cody co noel cody donald tim twitter zane heath Youtube
"heath" Discussed on Pretty Basic with Alisha Marie and Remi Cruz

Pretty Basic with Alisha Marie and Remi Cruz

04:01 min | Last week

"heath" Discussed on Pretty Basic with Alisha Marie and Remi Cruz

"Love seeing how other people run their show just makes me feel a little embarrassed. I have like a little notebook. I'm like okay flat. Before the fucking martin are margaret. We have to like pull it out and everybody can see it. Yeah we airdrop videos or yeah. This is always show everybody video. We don't just come up with a different brand but he is going back to previous day heath from zenit wh- either way. Thank you so much for being here. Thank you appreciate it goes having us. Oh my god. This is so exciting us. I feel like i feel. Like i'm the zane to your. Heath you agree. Oh i feel like we'll find out by the end of that. I think so. I think what are what are some of your black too often Halfway there yeah exactly. I think that's pretty much. Our personalities wasn't like oh. I've been there i feel with. This is our first time meeting ever. So we do some icebreakers with our guest I'm assuming you haven't listened to pretty basic which is totally fine. Because we're not really the demo. I get it. Oh a little bit. I watched like washington and a half but still it's research i watched. I watched the episode. Where you guys did this room. Because i i was like because we were trying to always thinking new ways so once again just jealous of other people exactly can never have what we have and i saw it was just like oh my god that looks incredible and then and then i watch like a little bit from the sega. Obviously you subscribed. We know and left a review. Thank you very important guys. Make sure if. I started this on apple podcasts. Okay so let's start off with our questions. Okay we are going to start off with a little Hotseat if that's okay chopin right. You know it's not too bad. Promise you drink yet for us. This is no. This is really not that bad yet. We promised so. We often ask our guests. What is your favorite drink. This is easy alcoholic or not whatever. It is macaroni. Yeah a beer. No it's a it's a mixed drink. It's like a cocktail so it's jin sweet. Vermouth and campari only guy thing right acted like i knew what it was. That sounds amazing. Yes it's like super bitter flowery. But i drink really fast. Like if i'm out. I'll knock back like six tequila drinks and i'm just like i can't do that so i'll take the one in just like kind of like hey. Classy started to like on the rocks or something a little bit of lives down to quit. I can't. I can't get because it's disgusting so i have to kinda just like sip it. We can't do auto service auto services bad club. Yeah you just feel like you have to. It's they're see like have it in your hand and those are the worst night. I we make sure that we never put money but we would never get table or get a bottle. It's crazy we may we george drinking before we show up to. Yeah exactly known. Every time we every time we leave them like who covered that that got fifteen thousand dollars. I don't think promoters are paying for those people's right so imagine one time i showed up to. I think it was hakkas on her. I was omnia like so drunk. And i was like. I'm going to get a table. So i walk over to promote. Hey can i get a table there. Like it's going to be like eight hundred singing. And i went right back to the general and i just said there and i never went back. Is that people are paying for those tables though. Like there's always somebody buying tabling rich man. I got do those little sneak. We always sneak.

margaret Heath martin sega washington apple george
How Canada and the Western World Failed Afghanistan

The Big Story

02:17 min | Last month

How Canada and the Western World Failed Afghanistan

"I'm jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Stephen save holds the patterson chair and international affairs at carleton university. Among the books he's written is adapting in the dust. Lessons learned from canada's war in afghanistan. And he also co hosts a podcast about canada's national security called the battle rhythm hasty. Hello i'm doing all right like many canadians. I kind of spent the weekend. seeing progressively more and more disturbing images coming out of afghanistan especially kabul and. I'm i'm wondering if you could maybe describe what we're actually seeing and hearing about in afghanistan right now. Well it's the collapse of the government that we've been trying to build for the past twenty years The taliban were kicked out of the country by american forces and then in two thousand and two There developed a un effort that became a nato effort called isaf the international security assistance force along with a variety of other international partners to try to build a self sustaining afghan government. And then two thousand fourteen. Nato largely pulled out three years. After canada pulled out of combat and for the past seven years there was a nato effort to train the afghan army and last year. Donald trump Negotiated deal the taliban that would vote the remaining few americans that were left in afghanistan out before this summer there about two thousand five hundred americans soldiers mostly doing training and doing coordination type stuff and So that was Trump's decision last year and then when it became president there was a question about whether he would live by the deal which had a deadline of may fifth at all. Americans are supposed to be out by may fifth and the by racial thought. That would be too fast. That that we would be able to get our stuff in our people out in his In his mind and so they sent the data september eleventh and over the course of the summer The taliban made a series of deals with a variety of actors within afghanistan that led to the collapse of the afghan national army forces that were guarding a variety of places around the country until the only thing that was left was couple which fell this weekend.

Afghanistan Jordan Heath Rawlings Patterson Chair And Internatio International Security Assista Nato Canada Carleton University Taliban Kabul Stephen Afghan National Army UN Donald Trump
How the IPCC Report Is About More Than Just Climate Change

The Big Story

01:51 min | Last month

How the IPCC Report Is About More Than Just Climate Change

"I'm fatma fitting in for jordan heath. rawlings this is the big story. Brick smith is the president of the canadian institute for climate choice. Herrick thanks for being here. It's pleasure so what was your first reaction when you read the report while i mean. Let's let's just acknowledge that this thing is massive minutes thousands of pages. Hundreds of scientists around the world have been working on this thing for the last many months of fourteen. Thousand studies were incorporated and summarized and synthesized in this reports enormous amount of information. This is the most significant update to what we know about climate in in many years over half a decade. There's a lot of stuff now does not surprising me for anybody. That's been keeping track of climate change science and the the notion that warming is getting is happening more quickly than expected. would not be news. I think one of the more significant aspects of the report is the unequivocal linkage. Based on the best available science that recent extreme weather events are being driven by climate change in the idc has never been that explicit before. And of course there's this whole new discipline called attribution science that's That's quite new. This new kind of science is makes it possible for us to say yeah. This particular heatwave is being driven by climate change that is a. That's a very new Development in the climate change debate. And i think very powerful because long story short what this report does is. It brings climate change home for people. Climate change is a health concern.

Fatma Jordan Heath Brick Smith Canadian Institute For Climate Herrick IDC
How to Talk About the End of the World

The Big Story

01:29 min | Last month

How to Talk About the End of the World

"In for jordan heath. rawlings this is the big story. alex steffen award winning environmental writer and climate futurist. Who has spent the last thirty years or so exploring the growing planetary crisis and what lies ahead for humanity. His newsletter is called the snap forward which is also the title of his forthcoming book. He joins us from the san francisco. Bay area hey. Alex thanks for being here so this this may sound like a very basic question to start but in light of everything that's happening in the world pertaining to the climate crisis. How are you doing. are you coping. Okay how has news been hitting you lately. Well i mean there's so there's a there's upside downside for having covered the apocalypse speed for thirty years you know The downside is i've covered the apocalypse. Beat for thirty years. The upside is that. I have you know a little bit of a harder skin. Perhaps than some. But i've also learned to set of skills for coping with the bad news and the farther i go into understanding. What's going on around us now. Actually the more enthusiastic and optimistic. I i i feel. I think there are lots of reasons to feel like the best is yet potentially to come right. It's not too late and the best future. We can still win is better than what we have now. So it's a mixed bag. I guess you know are alternating between apocalyptic despair and enthusiasm for the new. I'm excited for

Jordan Heath Alex Steffen Bay Area Alex San Francisco
Can Toronto Police Itself out of a Homelessness Crisis?

The Big Story

02:09 min | 2 months ago

Can Toronto Police Itself out of a Homelessness Crisis?

"Jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Leilani fara is a former un special reporter on the right to housing. She is currently the global director of the shift which is a movement to secure the right to housing. So the perfect person to talk about what's going on in toronto recently. Hello alani hi there. Thank you for taking the time. Maybe we could just start for people outside of toronto and people who haven't been following it. Tell me about how the city has been handling encampments of an housed people that have formerly at least existed in parks across the city. Yes so with. The pandemic came actually a significant increase in the number of people living in parks across the city of toronto actually across canada. But we're talking about toronto. So i'll keep. I'll keep my comments there. And there are a number of reasons for that but one of them was of course the downsizing of shelters because of the social distancing rules that were part of the prescription to Try to curb the pandemic and so you know. Big shelters became smaller shelters. So let's say there were thirty beds. It might have gone down to fifteen beds. Hundred beds might have gone down to thirty beds and with nowhere to go. A lot of people ended up in parks. There are other reasons as well. As the pandemic ruled on it became increasingly clear that congregate or you know settings where a lot of people reside were becoming Hotbeds of Spread of covert and so a lot of people. Were thinking wait. I think i'm better off even though as really tough living. It's actually some of the living in parks. I actually might survive in a park. Whereas i may not in a shelter and of course we all know. Shelters are really hard places to live at the best of times so so toronto. The city of toronto saw this steep increase in the number of people living in parks and many parks park cats and bigger parks across the city.

Toronto Jordan Heath Rawlings Leilani Fara UN Canada
Will We Still Use Masks When All the Mandates Expire?

The Big Story

01:55 min | 2 months ago

Will We Still Use Masks When All the Mandates Expire?

"Jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Dr mitsukoshi hori is a professor of schumann university in japan. He's currently working at its overseas campus chaucer college and canterbury in the uk. He has a phd in sociology and has studied the history of mask wearing in japan. Hello professor horry. Hello hi before. We talk about eastern versus western views on the practice of mask-wearing. Maybe you could just go way back and explain. When did public mask wearing for health reasons originate. Yes three shows. It's only tonight's in the west. The practice of muscle building was by the carey out in the especially medical institutions across the west also in japan. I think the musk willing was popularized during the spanish flu onto make then i think public. Musk willing encouraged in the west Both in europe on the north america in the case was a ban it was introduced to the japanese authorities during the time at the practice commodity carried out in the in the west. Then his authority impetus Japan so that was kind of the footage of mosque wearing and after that pandemic past. Where did the practice remain in. Where did it vanish. It remained in japan. But somehow it's disappeared in north america and europe and i stood on though why disappears. So that's the kind of you know the big mystery. Probably we need further research on will and that's

Jordan Heath Rawlings Dr Mitsukoshi Hori Schumann University Japan Horry UK Musk North America FLU Europe
The Great Seed Panic of 2020

The Experiment

01:17 min | 2 months ago

The Great Seed Panic of 2020

"Just start from the very very beginning like set me in time Where should we start law. Summer people might be aware there. A story that bubbled in the media for a couple of weeks in the summer of twenty twenty writer. Chris heath noticed a strange national news story. It has been happening all across the nation including right here in our area is in most people's newspapers and it was on tv all over the place. What's behind this rather odd phenomenon. People across the country are getting unsolicited packages. Listen to this new idea where it came from. I didn't order it. People have been receiving mysterious packages that they did not order people. All over america started receiving. These completely baffling packages. They appear to have chinese writing on some of them. Seen here from the tampa bay times are usually marked with chinese characters and incite were packets of c- seen called mystery seeds and they have appeared in mailboxes and more than two dozen states. Usda has now put a warning saying not to open these packages or even planting the seeds. There's nothing on the package. Seemed to explain what the seats were redressed to the people who received them as far as they were concerned they had no idea why they were being sending

Chris Heath Tampa Bay Times America Usda
"heath" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

WGBB Sports Talk New York

06:21 min | 2 months ago

"heath" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

"Kind of kalki tiny get upset when my kids like dad. We don't do that anymore. We don't play video games like well. I got my twelve year old. Exactly yeah now you. That's a great way to keep keep involved. What your kids. That's a great thing how you know i heard you talking about the all star game. Yeah did you see those. I looked at them. There isn't that horrendous. They remind me of heath. i don't know if you remember a couple years back. These features uniform south channel yet. Yeah how teams would look in the future and they they kind of had the the The up and down diagonals team names and and it was absolutely hideous. And that's what these are. Yeah they they really are now. I will say this. I like the uniform not bad. The hats year. The uniform is ugly. And you're going to see every guy in that. Like i said when i was a kid used to like seeing the washington senators. The minnesota twins the oakland a.'s. See everybody out there. It was colorful and Enjoyable but the putting these guys in this is horrible. Why why can't we just have an all star game. Where like old school. So it's like you're wearing your your your team's uniform but the original like old school uniform right way back when that would be kind of like we're going back in the day all all star game or something. See those uniform. I love when a team. Where's the throwbacks like when the atlanta braves where the old hank aaron style uniforms. You know something like that I i really enjoy that. The the old like softball the dark or the blue shirts with the white pants for the atlanta braves. But these are gonna look horrible and then what about the home run derby. What do you think of that. I i actually haven't. How are you going to the home. Run derby this year. I don't know but they'll find a way. I don't like looking at the rules anymore until the home run derby because they just be invent the wheel and already one. Yeah no i. I just i don't get it. I really don't now. You played independent ball Heath and in an independent league up here is the atlantic and they have the robo umpires and you should have seen the other day that they punched this guy out. The ball was about a foot off the plate and the umpire called him out. Struck him out and The robo i. I have no idea. These changes in the game today. The seventeenth doubleheader. I just spoke to. Larry bowa about that. Kinda stuff and those those changes that manfred instituting in our great game. That are not for the good i just. I don't understand what an effort what he doing to. The game is really ruining the game right. You believe i. What is he just trying to do things to basically go. Look what. I did really really anything. No i don't think because they are Okay with it. Yeah yes young yes people or they actually say like these things and they don't care about what actually the people want. Did he come from his. He is he was he a fan before this or you know. Did he come from corporate. I don't understand the lawyer. Well most of them are but still you should have some sense of game in the history of it and What goes on in a historian. You really cool to have somebody that was real passionate about baseball. Yeah actually run major league baseball. I really do think it would be really. It'd be really cool because then you people. The young people would know the history the past and not. Just try to you know. Like here's the thing like you said the seattle future game right. That was super bad and it looks back as one of the worst uniforms ever right. They look back at that time. Nobody ever win and tried to even design their uniform like that. You know that's how bad it was and now currently we're doing it again. Who would you say. He throughout your. Your career was your best teammate. My best teammate. Oh gosh Billy wagner my teammate. For one year. He was unbelievable. A rookie mike cameron and cliff floyd with great guys. You know through my hat first. Half of my career was there and the app. And i see them and talk to those guys all the time. in the bullpen. I would have to say doug brocail guide san diego that helped me out a lot. My first year there but You know over like my career without talking about older guys. And kind of my. Maybe my players would be nick hundley or With long he's got starting pitcher. Right where adrian gonzales. Those are probably probably my best. He makes over the long haul. Good answer well he spell. I tell you it's been a real pleasure. I thank you for taking time out of your sunday night to spend some with us up in new york. And i wish you nothing but the best thank you and hey what's up in a couple of months. I might be do a search on a blast from the past. it's in bayshore. Yeah how like that. Movie blocks from pat. But buddy. Yeah all right. He's you take care. That's he spelled folks. Well that'll do it for me tonight on sports talk new york like to thank my guest. Larry bowa and he's spell my engineer brian graves. And of course you folks for joining us. We'll see you next week. A.

atlanta braves kalki Larry bowa minnesota twins hank aaron heath oakland softball Heath baseball washington atlantic doug brocail Billy wagner cliff floyd nick hundley mike cameron adrian gonzales seattle san diego
"heath" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

WGBB Sports Talk New York

06:46 min | 2 months ago

"heath" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

"Not we're speaking with heath bell tonight on sports talk new york talk about the slide in the all star game he. That's that's another memorable moment. You come in from the bullpen and the all star game that was your third consecutive all star game by the way. So you're in three of them and you did a slide in front of the pitches mad you. You broke up a bunch of grass but You did it for the fans right. Yes so i remember the fan Were kind of getting upset at players on rabin's serious about the game that mad and and that was the year that i mean back then the red sox yankees were always battling for first place. Who's going gonna win. And i think. Roy derek jeter were both heard at the time. They just came back from their injury. A couple of weeks before the all star game. God named all-star year and they said they're not sure if they're gonna go the all star game because it's all the way out in arizona and they were already you know they were at home both of them so they're on these coast and back. Then you know monday. Was the homerun derby to tuesday. Was y'all sir game wednesday you had practice in everybody's late on thursday so there really wasn't often if you went to the all star game you literally were traveling the whole time. He never got any rest. So i was fans were kind of upset whatnot and i said you know i want to bring some fun back game i got to do something and one of my kids was watching. Angels in the outfield. And if you remember that movie. That team wasn't very good. And there's a picture that would slide into the mountain walk around the mountain time. Throw the ball down or the rosin. Downs rotates all right. So i was like i'm going to slide into the mound because actually his last name was ask and we have a One of my One of the bullpen guys was anthony vast. And it just kind of it kinda hitting in had like flying right. Everybody in san diego is like do you do that. You should do that. And i was like all right well. I'm gonna keep it quiet. Because i don't want people to talk me out of it and then Both boots votes. He gives inspirational speech. Our manager that how the all star game is important because the giants wouldn't have won the world series last year. we didn't have home field advantage. I kind of thought about not doing it. But i already told public sandoval that third. I asked him. Hey i slide in you make sure you get everybody the wedding and he goes. Oh you should do it so anyway. I forgot so during the break before the game thinking. Maybe i'm not gonna do it so then if you watch it on youtube i sprint in from the outfield and when i always keep my head down. Didn't know the camera guy who's behind me. I really wish. I would've known. Because i would have probably beyond prime standard look back at. That would have been kind of fun. But i did know. He's behind me. Then i got the until dirt. And i pick my head up and sandovol and i was slowing down centerville. Because i wasn't going to do it. The center all literally get everybody out of the way like he has moved moved booth. I'm like now. I gotta do it now. So then i slid in pick out the ball from bugsy but she looked at me when i got to these guys and he walked away and molina starts laughing because San francisco had brian wilson. You know the free. Yeah and but that's what you were saying. I got you guys now. What i was doing for fun though. Good time and and you know the key part is now known as the slide guy. Now there's a good pitcher. I'm just known as pitcher. The star game the swing and it's kind of fun. It's kind of cool. Yeah he's and there you go. That's your legacy man. A lot of people ask me. Hey can come speak a little league or high school in key. Comes sliding into the mound. Sometimes they do. sometimes. I don't depends if i'm wearing pants or not. I won't side if i'm wearing shorts right now you. You don't wanna be like those old white sox uniforms can't now now now you once compared yourself to hans solo and you four star wars sneakers And then that spring training that that's another thing that got you some Some ain't there right. Yeah i'm a big powers guy grown up there wasn't a whole bunch of it out there and then My youngest son now he's Almost twelve he kind of embrace he started liking star wars when he was really young. So we kind of had that going. And then i kind of kind of the stores the jet. I guess you said kind of started coming out of me. So and i kind of we. We still do to this day. He's twelve and i'm forty four. I'm you know when you go into a grocery store. And they have the automatic doors. Sure we always walk up and before a game between us. We got to run up. And who's Who's using the fourth. I ca- yeah people so it's like no i use the because now i yeah. That's that's a great way to share something with you kid. Yeah big kid like my first all star game. I'll always remember because they were like what. What is this like. And i'm like this is. This is people that are older like us. This is going to toys r. Us in your parents saying go ahead and buy whatever you want to kids christmas morning. Just like all these. This is so cool now. You you like toys don't you. He's kasai. there's a store out here. On long island we went to the other day called. Blast from the past doc. Gooden was there signing autographs so we went over there and they they have stuff. You wouldn't believe in this story you you would probably love it. Toys from the past action figures games. I it's a haven over there. Yeah i'm just a big kid that my wife. When she says she has five children including me. Yeah i'm i'm just a big kid. I don't think i've really. I've the only time i've ever been around is when i had to plan my kids. I kept telling my kids to your homework and don't lie. So i don't you know have signed so But as my kids are getting older. Now i mean i have a twenty three year old and nineteen year old a seventeen year old and my little twelve year old I can just. I just be more of a kid again in just having fun with them and.

red sox yankees Roy derek jeter heath bell rabin Downs arizona Angels bugsy new york anthony brian wilson giants san diego molina sprint youtube San francisco Gooden
"heath" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

WGBB Sports Talk New York

07:28 min | 2 months ago

"heath" Discussed on WGBB Sports Talk New York

"Now back to the show. Yes we are live. We are back with sportstalk new york here on w. g. b. b. from beautiful downtown merrick long island as i said before it's great to be back on the air and spending some time again with you folks after a few weeks off already Th the mid summer classic is upon us now but wait till you see the uniforms major league. Baseball has devised for the allstars. Absolutely hideous. you can google google it and check it out for yourself. This is Rob manfred again at work with some of his tremendous ideas. It used to be great when i was a kid. the introductions the players in their different uniforms This is just something else for manfred to ruin about The great sport of baseball other than that A great sports state. Today folks wimbledon novak djokovic wins again. I believe that's his third or fourth in a row wimbledon title. so he's an immortal over there The mets of course back to their old tricks dropping a game to the lowly pirates and england italy when a game that was if you caught it. England goes down on the home pitch over there. The hallowed turf wembley stadium. Italy wins on penalty. Kicks Not much of a soccer fan. But i'll watch it on occasion and it was a pretty good game today. Let let's keep the sports memories role in the long here. Our next guest three time all star two time and rolaids relief man of the year national league saves leader in two thousand nine. It's a pleasure to welcome to the show tonight. He spell he. He's good evening. We're doing great. We're doing great and we hope you guys do the same out there now. He's you grew up in california. Who are your sports. Heroes in your favorite teams growing up You know i didn't. I didn't watch much sports on tv because one there wasn't it wasn't always on right and i used to. I mean i was outside all the time flying a plane sports so i never during the summer watching. Wgn the cubs harry carey. You know now. Seen or the atlanta braves. I always thought were really boring. The tvs but they play games. And then i'd go outside and mimic them but My my really like it was kinda like roger climate Growing up because he threw hard or was mark great because he went to local high school in california. Oh okay for like a year and then. Wgn you know you know the cubs And then i was. When i was just when i was little league for some reason for like five six years i was on the cubs so i used to think i was a cub But the one guy. I really remember watching was reggie jackson when he was on the angels and i always wanted to be ready. I always thought reggie was either. Hit a home run struck out right. I always tried to be reggie when i was growing up in really workout see. I'm a little older than you heat. So i all. I was exposed to where the local mets and yankees and then on saturdays. You had what was called the game of the week with kurt gowdy. Sandy colfax pee. Wee reese Coupla guys like that during the broadcast and it would be a game from out of town and he got to see harmon killebrew. And willie mccovey and willie mays and guys like that so that that was a real treat. But that was the most exposure that i got when i was a kid. Now your dad go ahead heath. I'm sorry i did that. Yeah you don't have the closure like you have now any no not at all not at all. These kids lucky now. Your dad was a marine and he set a good example for you didn't he. Oh yeah he was. He was a great man he was always respect. Everybody and Go about your business and one thing. I always tell my kids now. I kind of feel like my father. Now said judge people in three ways. You're in you have three three ways to judge the money. And i was like. What does that mean. He goes first time. You need somebody. You don't know if he lost his job or had a bad day or somebody got magic so Just give us some grace then. The second time you need came thing happens. Third time you're finally realized. Is that a nice person is a mean person. You like those guys. Do you not like this guy. So just Basically you know. Give it some time in your third time your reaction to something or somebody will be the best reaction because you know maybe somebody got fired that day or lost you know Their parents got mad at them or they didn't turn in their homework or they got into an accident or something. You just don't know everybody's pastor history so give everybody great good way to be excellent now. You were selected by the devil rays back in ninety seven the sixty nine year round. You didn't sign with tampa bay though. Why didn't you. I wasn't allowed to by Okay yeah they. I asked him. I said are you gonna offer me like thousand bucks or something. They said now folly drafts. Follow you guys. Remember what those are. Yeah oh boy. That's no good. I take the alvarez. They actually gave me a half or the hat around and then the next year. I didn't get drafted actually the next year. Ninety eight facilities called me up and said we're gonna we're thinking about drafting you in the twenty first round. Are you gonna sign for thousand dollars. And i said Probably not because Or wait now. I said no. This is what i told them The philly in ninety seven. sorry. Long ago i'm old now. In in ninety seven the phillies called him since second round or the we want to draft you and for thousand bucks and i said well. I'm the first one in my family to go to college. I'm i'm at community college. But and i wanted to family to finish a year of college and my dad didn't finish highschool got his ged after the marines but So school was important then They said well i. I'm going to tell the court you know that had the front office. I don't know if we're gonna. I said okay. Then the rate didn't drop me and then the race drafting sixty nine round as a draft and follow then in nineteen ninety eight the next year my sophomore year in college. Nobody called me. The rockies called the oakland called me. And i said i don't care what you guys give me. I will sign and nobody drafted me. So then i called Bob minor scouts in the mets. Because i just had a good relationship i said. Why didn't they get drafted this man. He just gave me some generic london and then he ended up calling me a couple of weeks later when i was in alaska plane during the summer league in cleveland ball and said we didn't drop players. Do you wanna come play as.

merrick long island Rob manfred cubs hallowed turf wembley stadium baseball reggie kurt gowdy Sandy colfax google willie mccovey novak djokovic harry carey Wgn california national league reggie jackson atlanta braves harmon killebrew willie mays
Meet the Invasive Species Rampaging Through Ontario Forests

The Big Story

01:51 min | 2 months ago

Meet the Invasive Species Rampaging Through Ontario Forests

"I'm jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story david. Uk vetch is the entomology technician at the invasive species center. Hey david fellow. Can you start just for the folks like me who haven't really thought about this problem until it reached a critical mass. I guess what are these. Moths that we're talking about today. Well they're a moth that has been in ontario for a number of years now almost forty years now however a lot of people don't really recognize them more or see them too often until they get to these larger outbreak status. We have had about three or four Sort of larger outbreaks since nineteen eighty five nine hundred ninety one as well as in two thousand and two. They were all outbreaks over One hundred thousand hectares of defoliation to put some of that into perspective. One hectare is equal to about the same size as the soccer field. So that's a large area That has been defoliated by these gypsy moth species. It's a type of lep adopter or a type of moth and butterfly and this moth has come over from. Europe was brought over by a french scientist and he was basically trying to mate are native silkworms species With this gypsy moth in order to try and create a new species that can produce silk. So that's really what how the moth got here. And why became a problem is because that scientists at the moth got away from him and started many issues in the massachusetts area and is slowly expanded from there

Jordan Heath Rawlings Invasive Species Center David Ontario UK Soccer Europe Massachusetts
What Stories Should We Tell on Canada Day?

The Big Story

01:28 min | 3 months ago

What Stories Should We Tell on Canada Day?

"I'm jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story i today. We welcome either. Ju an associate fellow at the yellow head institute. Eva is initially bakeware from desch. Kenzi chippewas of the thames. First nation. you've let's just start with this. What if anything has candida day historically meant to you well. It's always been a day of celebration for a settler colonial state that has never included me or my community or indigenous peoples more. Broadly and i've never celebrated canada day. So i was raised by my parents as inish knob. A on. my mother's side in an ongoing way on my father's side and my dad was very adamant that we are not citizens of the state but in fact were members of our pre existing nations and so things can today was not really in our family celebrations. And it actually wasn't until nineteen fifty that first nations people were even granted canadian citizenship. So candidate hasn't really ever been Something that i don't think anyway in my immediate family and circle has been celebrated and canadian citizenship by need to remind folks is not actually something that our leaders even desired at the time. It was something that was a. It was an involuntary enfranchisement to the state because our leaders had always asserted that we are nations.

Jordan Heath Rawlings Yellow Head Institute Desch Kenzi Chippewas JU EVA Canada
What Does the Future of Money Look Like?

The Big Story

01:59 min | 3 months ago

What Does the Future of Money Look Like?

"Jordan. Heath rawlings is the big story. Michael doyle is a freelance reporter and journalist based in toronto who examined the future of money in canada for the globe in mail. Hi michael jordan. Can you start us off. Just because it's such a useful way to think about this. At least i found it useful by telling us the story of money on the island of yap certainly Yup is a tiny island. That is now part of micronesia in the south pacific and for hundreds of years. They had a very unusual form of currency and that was these gigantic limestone rocks and the bigger they were the more valuable they were and also of course the bigger they were the more difficult they were to actually physically exchange with each other so over time they Just left the rocks where they were and In order for them to figure out who owned which rock which note of currency for lack of better term. They created basically a form of a ledger. And in the form of an oral history of who owned each rock and how the rocks transacted from person to person on the island and so that's how they effectively did business. That's how they exchanged Goods and services for hundreds of years. Now tell me how that relates to wear. Our use of money is heading certainly It's actually a really great analogy. Because in one example it sort of captures a snapshot of what money has been for hundreds if not thousands of years since the since we came up with the idea of money however long ago that was And at the same time it also short sort of shows us where technology is going to change money in the near future so the question of what money is a really weird thing. it's kind of like a philosophical rabbit hole. You go down but at it. Sort of core form money is

Heath Rawlings Michael Doyle Michael Jordan Micronesia South Pacific Jordan Toronto Canada
B.C. Has a Blueprint to Save Its Oldest Forests

The Big Story

02:07 min | 3 months ago

B.C. Has a Blueprint to Save Its Oldest Forests

"Jordan heath. This is the big story. Sarah fox is the bbc investigative reporter for our friends at the narwhal. Sarah hi how are you doing. I'm doing really well. how about you. i'm well thanks ya do. You want to explain as we get started for people who don't live anywhere near bc. And i've never seen it. What is old growth forest. Exactly and What does it look like sure. So old growth forest. There's kind of the the official definition. And then there's a y you think of when you hear the words old growth for us so the official definition is that on the coast where where the growing season is longer in tends to be wetter. That trees that are older than two hundred and fifty years are considered to be old growth in other parts of the province. It's trees that are one hundred and forty years old. But i think when when people think of old growth imagine those kind of icon ick photographs of these enormous cedar. Douglas fir trees that are as tall. Skyscrapers in is wide as a boss. The the old growth forest because the trees are so large the kind of the light filters through them in a different way they're draped in mosses and lichens and just kind of fallen logs. Over centuries have become nurse logs for for other trees but the the will growth force are much more than the trees. Of course there. Hot spots for bio-diversity their home to all kinds of species including a species at risk of extinction that to depend on these forests on the interior of b. species like a caribou on the south west mainland part of bc. We've got the spotted owl here on the island and other areas. We've got the marbled murrelet bird and of course these old forests are huge stores of carbon and they filter water. They have many many environmental

Jordan Heath Sarah Fox BBC Sarah Douglas Fir South West
Making Hot Sauce and Working to Save Wetlands

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 3 months ago

Making Hot Sauce and Working to Save Wetlands

"A family in Louisiana world famous for their Tabasco sauce is helping to conserve wetlands the idea along Avery island is to protect the region from hurricanes and floods we've been making Tabasco sauce here four four hundred fifty two years Harold took Osborn is CEO of mackel Haney company Roshen fight there is in the marshlands it works well in south Louisiana we like a slow pace at which we can slow things down it has a really positive affect plant manager heath Romero says the strategy is to grow grass forms a barrier so it catches the sentiment behind it you get the other grasses that take off and as it builds up you know you reclaim March Osborne says the effort is probably a standoff but Avery island is slowly rising I'm a Donahue

Avery Island Mackel Haney Company Louisiana Heath Romero Osborn South Louisiana Harold Osborne
What Happens When Hidden Histories Become a National Conversation?

Unreserved

02:17 min | 3 months ago

What Happens When Hidden Histories Become a National Conversation?

"At the end of may. When news broke that the remains of more than two hundred children had been found at the kamloops indian residential school. It was news to many canadians. Who learning about the history of residential schools and the role. The canadian government played in the creation. It seemed to mark a new sense of awareness across the country in indigenous communities. Grief came quickly but not shock and not surprise. These types of losses are well known in our nation's and in our families and in real time we watch the rest of the country feel the depths of this history daniel heath justice is a colorado born citizen of the cherokee nation and he's an author and professor of critical indigenous studies and english at the university of british columbia. He joins me now to talk about what happens when hidden histories come to light daniel. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me. We're talking about hidden histories on the show today and for me the idea of hidden histories is interesting. Because they're not hidden for everyone up until a few years ago when unreserved would would air story about residential schools. We'd get emails from people telling us that they had never heard of this before the show for sharing this information and that's a luxury indigenous people don't share. It's in our families. It's it's part of our history. How do you think so much of this. History hasn't made its way out of our communities. I struggle with that question. I think there is a sense in many ways that this is only about indigenous people rather than being very much about settler colonial canada. I think there is a sense for a lot of people that when we say school. We mean an educational facility which these were not. I mean these were re education and torture camps. I think we have to start naming them for what they were. I think non-indigenous people Just tune out because the the level of the horror if they had to face it would radically transformed their feelings about the country that they live in if they honestly address that

Kamloops Indian Residential Sc Canadian Government Daniel Heath University Of British Columbia Colorado Daniel Canada
Why Hiring Canadians With Disabilities Is a Competitive Advantage

The Big Story

01:54 min | 3 months ago

Why Hiring Canadians With Disabilities Is a Competitive Advantage

"Jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Katie lafferty as a producer on employable maecenas season. Four of which launches today wednesday. June ninth at eight pm eastern on tv. Hey katie hi there. Thanks for joining us. Why don't you start on. Because i am kind of ashamed to admit. I didn't know the show existed until i learned about season four and and i've watched a couple episodes now and it's really insightful. And i just i guess. I'm glad that it's a hit now. But i want to know where the idea came from at the beginning and what you guys were trying to achieve absolutely so. I think it was fine years ago that we started in development on this series. And it's actually a bbc format series that we brought over to canada with a m. I and so you know. I think the main focus of the series Were were following people with disabilities and neurological conditions. Who are trying to enter the workforce all of our job seekers have unique talent and abilities but have had a really hard time getting their foot in the door and so the real purpose of this series is to educate employers in the general public on. What is a very untapped job market of of people who could bring so much to the workforce can you give me some examples of how Underappreciated and underemployed employed people who are neuro divergent or people with disabilities are absolutely. I mean i think. I noticed it the most when i started casting for this show. It was one of those situations where i thought okay. Let's let's see if we can pass this show. who knows. It's a really really interesting and important concept but are we going to be able to find job seekers who really fit the description

Jordan Heath Rawlings Katie Lafferty Katie BBC Canada
Trudeaus Liberals Promised to End the Blood Ban

The Big Story

02:00 min | 3 months ago

Trudeaus Liberals Promised to End the Blood Ban

"Jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Justin length is an investigative reporter. The canadian journalist who has been covering the blood banned for how long now just Like six years. Maybe longer many many enough years too many years i think. Why don't we just start at the beginning For people who heard this of like a talking point in a political fight over the last decade or so. How old is the blood band. And where did it come from right so you you go back about four decades in and you've fair confronted with the really disquieting reality of the blood of the tainted blood scandal right. You had cases the hundreds of cases across the country Where folks received blood transfusions that were not adequately screened that ultimately led to sero conversion for hiv that ultimately impacted them With other new hepatitis diseases as well as other infectious diseases And it was a national scandal. It was absolutely shattered. People's illusions about the blood system a better health system right it. It it fundamentally you know weakened trust in a meal what governments ought to be doing to ensure the health and safety of people who rely on government services so you go back to that point and you realize the sort of risks inherent in what protecting the blood supply you know actually means and unfortunately from that you know there was a good thing came from that. Which was we actually had a conversation about what Ensuring safety of the blood supply actually means but on the flip side you also started to see This really sort of reactionary and knee-jerk blame placed on the queer community in canada. Who of course have historically faced higher hiv rates of that other

Jordan Heath Rawlings Justin Length Hepatitis Diseases Canada
What Does Pride Look Like in Small-Town Canada?

The Big Story

01:47 min | 4 months ago

What Does Pride Look Like in Small-Town Canada?

"I'm jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Sheltering is the co director producer and editor of a new dock from extra called small town fried facial jordan. Before we get into the details. Maybe just tell me. Which small towns did you guys go to absolutely so we went to taber alberta Which has a population of about nine thousand people We also visited annapolis royal in nova scotia and they have a population of about five hundred people and Our last location was in norman wells in the northwest territories and they have a population of about eight hundred people. This documentary is fascinating And i love the idea behind it and we're going to get into the specifics of where you went and what you saw. But can you just start by explaining in general what is so fascinating and meaningful about pride in small town. Canada so My partner of twelve years Grew up as a closeted queer teen in the mid nineties. Much like myself Only she grew up in a small town nestled in the also in the ottawa valley This would have been in the mid nineties when You know the internet and gsa's and all of that good stuff. wasn't readily available to us and In two thousand eighteen her small town Called smiths falls celebrated their first Pride event. I think it was about fifty. People may be that what walked down their main street with their rainbow. Flags and Her mom was there and she got very emotional. And i asked her if she was okay and she said i just never thought i would see this happen. here in my small town

Jordan Heath Rawlings Nova Scotia Alberta Jordan Ottawa Valley GSA Smiths Falls Canada
Stanley Tucci on Julia Child and the making of Julie & Julia

Radio Cherry Bombe

02:08 min | 4 months ago

Stanley Tucci on Julia Child and the making of Julie & Julia

"How the roles. Paul child come to you. We'll show. I was at a friend's christmas party. Our friend of maryland A friend was natasha richardson. She passed away. And but if you wanna talk about a great cook that she was an amazing but so we were at her her annual christmas party and said would you like to plan paul child in this william gonna make nor about junior child and i said no are you getting. I said yes. I have to to say no search and laura also. I loved julia child. In fact i wrote a book. No i didn't. I was asked to go was invited to her birthday. Ninetieth birthday or something. I couldn't go. And so that i can go but i remember watching when i was a kid with my mom. My mom was a huge fan of hers and so she's such an inspiration for me. She along with them. Insist that wonderful british air on heath on give Those two were just the most brilliant Tv cooks you know. Then were incredible. Anyway i i i just loved julia child force marilyn nora and we ended up doing it about a year later. You know you mentioned your ninetieth. Birthday ocean remember her being on larry king for her ninetieth birthday. And he says so julia. What's the secret of life to you of of your long life. And she said well. I have lots of different things in very small quantities. I have a very good time. We only right that she was absolutely right. She knew how to do it.

William Gonna Natasha Richardson Julia Maryland Marilyn Nora Paul Laura Larry King
Does Your Home Have Dangerous Levels of Radon?

The Big Story

02:05 min | 4 months ago

Does Your Home Have Dangerous Levels of Radon?

"Jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Declan keogh is a reporter at the investigative journalism bureau which combined with toronto star on this investigation. Hey declan hi how are you. I'm great. thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me. Why don't you start with some basic science and explain what is right on Rate on a naturally occurring gas The comes from the breakdown of uranium in soil. Its presence across the globe when it's outside it just kind of dissipates into the air and when it's in your house it gets trapped inside. How does it end up in homes in the first place. It comes from the ground often through the foundation whether it's cracks in the foundation or newer foundations. It just it just comes up out of the ground. We'll get into the details of this in just a second. But what does it do to somebody Living a house over you know decades or a life span With high levels of radon. I think it depends But but the general consensus is. It is the second leading cause of lung cancer in canada. it gets in your lungs it. It messes with your dna and If you're unlucky it can turn an lung cancer which is of course the deadliest form of cancer. So that's the main thing It it levels. And and the length of time all play into it lifestyle but there's estimates that for an increase of one hundred. Becquerels per meter cubed which is the unit they measure the in It can increase your your risk of lung cancer by sixteen percent. wow how did this story start For you guys. I guess it started with the data. You got your hand you want to sort of. Tell me the process here. Yes so I work at the investigative journalism bureau. And we're a pretty new nonprofit newsroom and were based at the school of public health at the university of toronto

Jordan Heath Rawlings Declan Keogh Declan Lung Cancer Toronto Canada Cancer School Of Public Health University Of Toronto
What Happened to the Wage Subsidies the Government Gave Businesses?

The Big Story

01:38 min | 4 months ago

What Happened to the Wage Subsidies the Government Gave Businesses?

"I'm jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Patrick breath our is the tax and fiscal policy reporter at the mail and he along with several of his colleagues worked on this investigation. Hey patrick jordan. I for those who didn't encounter it during the pandemic. Can you just explain what the emergency wage subsidy is. It's the candida emergency wage. Subsidy is one of the big programs. In fact the biggest program that auto was rolling out to about this time last year to help a businesses as the pandemic release sent the economy into a tailspin. And the idea was rather than you know. Pay money to people after they had lost their job to try and keep them from losing their job in the first place by subsidizing their employers and the deal was if you keep people on staff the government will subsidize up to seventy five percent of their salary in order to avoid layoffs which businesses qualified for. That was kind of anybody who could apply pretty much. Everybody i mean the were. You know there's sort of were. Businesses added along the way So the very first duration of this was a very small subsidy only for small business that lasted about a week before an uproar pushed the government to lodge the the candidate emergency wage subsidy so any company then that could show that it had a thirty percent revenue. Loss for comparable period could qualify. And then once you've qualified you could get as they set up to seventy five percent of wages subsidized. Not just for employs. You might have laid off before in the company.

Jordan Heath Rawlings Patrick Jordan Patrick Government
"heath" Discussed on Death of a Film Star

Death of a Film Star

02:17 min | 5 months ago

"heath" Discussed on Death of a Film Star

"Episode <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> <Silence> of death <Speech_Music_Male> of film star <Speech_Music_Male> next tuesday <SpeakerChange> <Music>

"heath" Discussed on Death of a Film Star

Death of a Film Star

05:50 min | 5 months ago

"heath" Discussed on Death of a Film Star

"Phrase in large capitals across a single page. He searching trying to unearth new life in an old character and the search goes to some dark places he lists things. The joker his joker finds funny blinds. Babies landmines aids beloved pets in bad road accidents but a time it comes to filming heath in deep his minds of well went clicking through combinations of quirks to unlock new parts of the joker. He gives an interview. The reporter finds a place to sit among the empty glasses and discarded clothes in his apartment. He say's he's sleeping only two hours at night that his brain won't let his body rest the he talked to sleeping pills last night when one didn't work and still woke up an hour later. He's dark night. Coastal see it be exhaustion the tension. He's hard to reach. He's always in private company him and his character locked together. But that's he. When he films program mountain he punches brick walls. The capsule his characters pain even of duty. He sleeps the energy that creativity that relentless restless mind is his gift and his burden. The dark knight has been over for nearly three months when his misuse climbs stairs sprawling loft apartment. She knocks brings his mobile. I guess no response. But that's not unusual. She lets herself in. She finds heath imbed. She sets up the massage table and tries to rouse him. Bought his shoulder is cold. The medics only take minutes to arrive. What's it doesn't matter. How fast they get their he already dead. He has been for a while his blood swimming with prescription medicine hills to promote sleep. Dumping nerves and calmer coffees. Rundown body has struggled to shake off. Together they slow his system to a standstill together. They gently snuff out that liked within. He's just twenty eight his film career just a decade young but with the power and variety that might take others a century. The final act plays out on a new york street. He's buddy leaves. The apartment building on a trolley post by police amok lit by the flashbulbs waiting photographers and in the days and weeks to come flowers and notes fill the sidewalk in memory of the man who was and the moments that will never be.

twenty eight new york street two hours single page last night three months an hour later
"heath" Discussed on Death of a Film Star

Death of a Film Star

03:36 min | 5 months ago

"heath" Discussed on Death of a Film Star

"Of a team so anne hathaway is breaking out of a pigeon hole as a princess. Jake jillian hall has been a fan of the story for years. All are aware the film emerging from the rookies has a point beauty of his own and the power that will make ways for beyond the final scene is heath. he isn't a young cowboy. Swelling mix of anger love and confusion anymore. He's a lonely middle aged man. He stares at the shirt of his dead lover and the postcard of the mountain they shared years ago. His eyes filled with tears and the screen fades to black. The film is a sensation. A love story that sparks a cultural war some cinemas refused to show it whole country's bannet some seeds propaganda others see prejudice in their response. Everyone asks the question. Have you seen it for he. Though the sex scenes with jake a simple this is how he approaches them. This is what he says when an interviewer asked him about moment that so many actors shied away from. I guess you'd love for me to say that it was difficult that i wanted to vomit but the straight factors. It was just another person of experience love. I know the extent of love. We have to choreograph. It was definitely like walking on the moon for the first time but it wasn't the of a mule. I was kissing a human being with us. He's view is not the laws when the film comes out only sixteen of fifty states have employment laws preventing gay people being blocked from jobs. Gay marriage is legal in just one massachusetts. It is only two years since the supreme court with outlaws in thirteen states. That criminalized homosexuality gay rights are a modern fight over age old principles religion. Freedom justice equality. America's values reexamined.

Jake jillian hall thirteen states anne hathaway jake sixteen first time two years one massachusetts fifty states heath years ago America years
"heath" Discussed on Death of a Film Star

Death of a Film Star

04:33 min | 5 months ago

"heath" Discussed on Death of a Film Star

"The road tripping kit from perfect is being offered the fast track to the list. The presentation finishes and every face turns to heath to read his reaction. He stands excuses himself and slightly lease for the bathroom and once there he explodes. He's curses echo of tiles. He punches the cubicle door. He stares into the mirror looks at his face. He's ticket to a world he doesn't want this is what he feels. This is what he sees. In the reflection. I started to feel like a bottle of coke. He says and there was a whole marketing scheme to turn me into a very popular bottle and you know co tastes like shit but posts everywhere so people will buy it. Those doubts on new that resistance to his roller coaster. Rise was already there but you don't see it in his performances not on the big screen anyway. A year before he strides out onto a tv set a live band place on blandly upbeat music alive audience. Applauds talk show. Host an elder statesman of the late night chat circuit stands to shake his hand but he looks startled so composed in character. He seems exposed when asked about himself. He fidgets he. Laughs nervously. looks away from his questioner offers. A one word answer. The interview lasts five awkward minutes. Then the host gratefully throws to bon jovi performed on the roof of his manhattan studio because he doesn't want to play heath he doesn't want to polish his own.

one word bon jovi five awkward minutes A year before manhattan
"heath" Discussed on Death of a Film Star

Death of a Film Star

06:30 min | 5 months ago

"heath" Discussed on Death of a Film Star

"This is a crowd podcast. From the makers of death of a rook star and death of sports star. This is death of a film star episode. One he ledger when the news breaks. His face is everywhere. It has been for weeks. The trailers the post as the teasers time to coincide with christmas to build the buzz for the summer and when you see is his face that stays with you when the screen fades to black as billboards recede from view. He doesn't he said onto your mind's eye that face smeared in whites grease paint a slash of red across the mouth. Shock of dark blue around the is his air lanc. His face weathered is limbs evie and somewhere deep within a spark a of chaos and energy so dazzling so vital. It sets you on edge. You can't take your eyes away from it. Can't take your mind of it's shocking. Heath ledger has been found dead so when the news breaks. That's what you think of twenty years old academy award nominated when a frantic nine one. One call is made from his loft apartment. That's the connection. It makes he as the joker the mania the depression the darkness. The death when you take on apart so completely is hard to get out the lines blur things merge actor and character meet and mix each changes the other. And if you're good enough the audience con- see the seems. It's the oldest trick in cinema the enduring magic the slice of hand that leap in belief. But he's not that joker not the havoc and hysteria or the madness and malice. He's another he can leave it when the film wraps he could shed that skin as easily as he puts it on just as he always has see when you're playing cards. The joel cut is impossible to pin down. It defies definition. It can stand for any other card in the pack and then it will move. Again is constantly changing confounding expectation. You can't take it at face value. And that's heath that's his joker because he's an actor who doesn't play by hollywood's rules. He's a man who doesn't follow suit. Sixty faces stare at. This is not what you do at guilford. Grandma not in nineteen ninety six not ever. He shoulders heaving stairs by the music. Dies away. he's just spun and slid across the stage. Impromptu don's routine the aim isn't to entertain is to convince because the other dance claw students don't want to dont's don't really at school. Cadets is the big thing. Teenagers stamping shouting. And saluting swapping toy guns. For the real thing. If you don't do it you have to do. Something else. And some are so desperate. Believe sign up for gopher grandma's. I don stroup. Food is in perth. Australia pass solar city between the indian ocean and the outback. The whole reason exists for mining eye on oil gold aluminium out of the read. The i'm burning heat locals date for their living. Just as their fathers and grandfathers did perth is heavy industry. Hard men and old fashioned values work hard play hard. Don't think too hard. He stat runs an engineering business at the weekend. He racist 'cause he puts a young heath and go karts and he s- could he wins a few races tearing around dusty town trucks. He could follow the family. Inherit the business adopt the interests. And maybe he will if his parents stay together instead when he eleven they devos. it isn't messy is pretty much as good as divorce. Guess his mama that. Take the children on holiday together. Heath welcome to stay with either however long he wants but he's world expands by far more than just another bedroom. He sees a truth. One that takes far longer to dawn on other children for some in fact it never does. I realize my parents just humans. He says it wasn't the death of something but the birth of something else. He sees a world of possibilities choices. His parents didn't even consider let alone make. He takes up chess. He covers his room in abstract art. He plays peter pan in a school play and he starts the dance troupe. Heath promises them what he has already realized performing can take them places and he's right a few months later that reluctant audience own state alongside he. They're under stock white lights in the convention hall in perth biggest hotel he front and center all in black. This show a history of fashion. Three time wins.

Australia christmas indian ocean One call nine Three time peter pan Heath Sixty faces eleven each One hollywood nineteen ninety six guilford twenty years old a few months later one
"heath" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"heath" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

"Have, you ever gotten those spots where you start treating your business, your leadership, your team, maybe even your family and quite frankly your entire life like a game of mole, like you hit this one thing and you think you're good, and then another thing pops up and then another thing boss up. Then you have to hit two things at once and then you need five hands because you have to five things at once they keep coming up and you're going frantic and you're going crazy and you just can't get to all of it. Have you ever been there? Whenever you engage in that version of life. That's a lot like whack a mole. You start to realize that you're focusing only on symptoms and you never actually get to the source from the Ramsey network. This is the entree leadership podcast where we business leaders grow themselves, their teams and their profits. I'm your host. Alex Jed. Today, we get to talk with Dan Heath WHO's an author and researcher who has spent over a decade working on this exact. Exact topic, not just how you as a leader solve problems, but how do you prevent them from ever occurring? How do you not just attack the symptom, but get down to the source to the root cause. Now, he calls this upstream thinking and it's the title of his new book upstream and this whole idea that can transform your priorities, your leadership, and your team would all originated with a parable about you having a picnic by the river? So you and a friend are having a picnic beside a river. You've laid out your picnic blanket. You're just preparing to sit down and eat when you hear a shout behind you from the direction of the river and you look back and there's a child and the river. Kinda thrashing around apparently drowning and. Instinctively jump in both of you and you fish the child out you bring them to shore and Just. When you're adrenaline starting to recede a little bit, you hear a second. Shout, you look back and it's another child also apparently drowning. So you go. You rescue them, bring them to shore, and no sooner. Have you done now that you hear to shouts now it's two kids in the river, and so you're in, you're out, you're rescuing kids and you're starting to get exhausted. And about that time your friend swims to shore and starts walking away as though to leave you alone and you say, Hey, where you going I can't do this by myself. All these kids they need rescuing, and your friend says I'm going upstream to tackle the guy who's thrown all these kids in the river, and that in a nutshell is what this book is about. It's about this phenomenon. What's so often life whether it's our personal life or a businesses we get trapped in the cycle of reaction, we're putting out fires responding to emergencies. We're always. Always downstream dealing with problems after they happen, but we rarely make the space. We rarely devote the time and attention that we would need to go upstream and forestalled head off these problems before they ever happen, and that's what I'm chasing with this. I'd love to know what was the genesis of this thought being a book for you. Where did that come from? As something that you said man I want to spend a ton of time studying researching and writing about that. The first time I started a file called upstream was in two thousand nine. And two things that happened was I heard that parable for the first time. Then it was the first time. This notion of upstream thinking was planted in my head, and the other is around the time. I heard that parable I had this conversation with the assistant deputy chief of police in Canadian city, and he told me this story of this thought experiment really stuck with me ever since and he said, imagine you've got to police officers and one of them goes down in the morning during the morning rush. And she positions herself in this intersection. That's kind of notorious. It's chaotic. Accidents there, and just by being a visible presence in that intersection, she calms people down. She gets them to be more cautious and she prevents accidents from happening. So that's officer one. and. Then officer to go to a different part of downtown where there is prohibited right turn signal, and she hides around the corner and when people cheat and and make that prohibited right turn. She jumps out and slaps them with the ticket. And this deputy chief said, which of these two officers do you think did more for the public good and for public safety and he said? Indisputably was the first right. She probably prevented some accidents maybe even prevented someone from being killed. But if you ask who is going to be praised who's going to be rewarded, who's going to be promoted, it's officer to because she comes back with a stack of tickets that show what she's accomplished, and meanwhile, if you think about officer one, how does she prove? She did anything. You know how do you prove that something did not happen. And we might say, well, you can look at data and that's certainly true I mean. We could keep a log of how many accidents happen at this intersection before and after the officer was stationed there, and if there's a downtick claimed credit for that. But notice even in that scenario where we have the data backing up our work, we still don't know. Know who exactly was helped? There was some guy headed downtown to go to his job that morning and he noticed the presence of the officer. He slowed down a little bit. He was fine in an alternate reality where she wasn't there. He would have been in a crash in died that morning. He'll never know that that's right. Officer will never know who? Who she helped. So there's this kind of maddening ambiguity about upstream work that even though it's essential, even though it can stop problems before they happen. It also brings a lot of ambiguity and complexity, and in that idea coupled with that parable Kinda. Got Me hooked and I've been fascinated by ever since

officer deputy chief Ramsey network Alex Jed Dan Heath researcher
"heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

10:43 min | 1 year ago

"heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Right take care. Thanks and now. My favorite part of the show. The fact check with my soul mate. Monica pattern welcome. Welcome welcome to the fat check L. A. Double Welcome. We've just popped the air on in your apartment because it's GonNa be a sweltering eighty eight degrees in the ruck and Los Angeles area. Today scorcher a real barn burner sell. It's to stay Cinco Demayo but it's now when this airs. Well Yeah but that's okay you don't like to keep the illusion alive. They no you know right that we're not recording this day of. They're smarter than that. They might want not WanNa know recorded a week ago. Something happens with when things feel. It's now occurred we record two days ago. This is Thursday's episode okay. Okay you won. You won that one Barron Square clean a clean victory happy Cinco Demayo. Sorry Dax ruined Happy Birthday Gabby shepherd my niece. She's a single two mile baby. That's fine know. A lot of people feel like Cinco de Maya is tricky. Why cultural appropriation. We all celebrate. Say Day we're not Irish. We can all Party on Cinco de Mayo. No country is sitting there going. Wait another country celebrating this day. We celebrate they'd be so flattered. There's four kids in college saying it's cultural appropriation. Well it is not this. Yeah sure. It's so silly I do think it is different. A bunch of white people wearing sombreros and speaking in accents and stuff move. A bunch of Brown people are draping American flags over their shoulders on Fourth of July. In Lucknow fireworks in Guam fucking great. I'm flattered by that it's again you know. It's the the same reason it circles back. Always that Americans are in power and in charge. Yeah and other people are not well. You know we have different opinions on this. And that's I don't really lovely. I don't have that opinion if you put him Brown facing you know. That's an issue. That's now you're culturally appropriate. If you're celebrating this Mexican holiday your fucking nodding your head to something. That's positive but people try to make positive things negative because some people want to hate hate hate nice to look at all sides videos. I've looked at that side and I've concluded for me personally. I think it's silly doesn't seem like he looked at it. You don't have the full argument articles about it and that went my conclusion after reading the articles was this is preposterous. No one in Mexico's mad about this. I don't know what they think in Mexico. I assume they think is fine. I surveyed all them. Okay great great great. Can I just say? Let's get in a fight. This is the kind of Shit that makes people think liberals are insane fucking shit on our our brand so bad when we do shit like this so silly I disagree I disagree. Don't celebrate Cinco de Maya. That's another country's holiday in your white but we might sound you posture. No why does it have to be so defensive? I can't the people who are reacting like you just said Yeah. Take a second and think okay. That seems a bit crazy and extreme. Why could that be true? Still feels like saint. Paddy's Day to me. You really do a thousand percent. You think there's a difference between Saint Patrick's Day and Cinco de Maya think. Irish people are different for Mexican people who get shit on and is well known in every single while all my geography books it Mexicans do are the Irish people hated the Irish Erastus against the IRS. Now not during the famine yet. But celebrating Saint Patrick's Day was a movement and making them real people and not drags. That's how you come out of that. Well we all embracing and celebrating. I mean I think people who are pro building a wall no immigration they like eating tacos on Cinco Demayo. It's not like they're super empowered even in this country and we're celebrating. Butcha disconnect. Well everything can be racial so people in Ukraine. Have a standard of living. That's a tenth of what ours? They are almost equally disadvantaged under prioritized on the global scene but if they had some holiday that we celebrate it over here be literally the only difference at that point because the power dynamic would be the same structure and who has access. And who's the hegemonic that hasn't changed between the Ukraine and Mexico but because they're white that's cool because they're brown that's not cool that is silo. Ukrainians aren't oppressed here. Mexicans are there's a no Ukrainians are oppressed here. They come here and they have no means. They were doctors in their country. Now they're driving Uber's and they live in poverty and they're not empowered. I mean I think if we had a holiday where people running around wearing whatever and speaking in their accent. And I said if you're if you're imitating a generic Mexican accent that's an issue. I think it's fine. I think it's extreme to say it's cultural appropriation. But I I also get it and I think to immediately dismiss it as like. Oh liberals like it's just not paying attention to what's really going on but I disagree. So the native Americans have an issue with people white people wearing the Indian headdress. That makes sense. That was a religious ceremonial headwear. That people worn in not even all native Americans would dare put that on so that that makes sense to me some rare there's no religious aspect to it. There's no there's nothing important about it. It's a fucking hat. They invented like the cowboy hat so if they wear the cowboy hat. We're not like. Oh they're appropriating America. They're like Oh. We invented a hat that that works well to block the Sun. They're wearing it yet but they're not also saying and Americans. You can't come here it's different. We have a different relationship with Mexicans in this country where it's very political and divisive and a lot of people don't want them here and then they're gonNA wear their hat and eat their food and act like it's fine in those cases but it's not fine for them to be taking our jobs and we should build a wall. It's not the same but then I think that just then turned into yet a different debate. Which is is it hypocritical for people who are racist against Mexicans to be celebrating their holiday. Thousand Percent Yeah right there shifts. Yeah Yeah Yeah I guess that's what I mean and they're probably certainly are some people who hate Mexicans or xenophobic that are doing taco Tuesday. And that's one hundred percent. I people idiot. I also know like the Mexican restaurant down the street from my parents house. I know people who go there and eat there who are racist against Mexicans and can't put two and two together but do you think the road out. Xenophobia is have less interplay between the two cultures are more. It's not inner play. It's like white people are hanging out in a room with other white people eating tacos and wearing some barrows. That's what's happening. I'm again like now. I'm like I feel like I'm getting a little forced into a box that I'm like really pro. Yes and I don't but it requires some examination. I think everything requires some examination. And that is what's it's is clearly a step in the correct direction. Not Not in the wrong direction. But but what do you have to say about what I just said about? It's just white people hanging out with other white people. It's not like it's causing people hanging out with other white people so you're saying it's bringing people together food. They enjoy the food. Oh I like the food or I'd like to go there. Oh I heard it's really authentic there. Oh and then I go there and then I see all the people co Mingling as the solutions so Kazakhastan Kazakhstan aware. I don't know anything. I'm more Zena phobic about. I don't even know what the fuck happens in Kazakhstan so if Mike Culture started getting interwoven with Kazakhstan I started having. Oh my God I love their fucking sausage and I love this and I love that now. I have an interesting Kazakhstan. I might want to visit Kazakhstan. I it's in my mind. They're starting to become de other and more. Oh like you know I agree all right. So urban legends. At that part was very interesting. I thought in this episode sure I like urban legends. If you go Kapiti you can see a big old list. But what's your your favorite one. Is the coffin. One I mean. It's so preposterous. Yeah that's funny. The kidney wants the best thing has got to be the best a yeah. That's a really good one and one that everyone knows. I'm trying to think if there is any moment that I actually believed it did you. I'm sorry I did. I've had a few encounters that have had big impact one bloody Mary. That's probably the I think the most famous one or car where you know you go into a dark room and staring into the mirror and say bloody Mary three times. She appears youth. There was another really popular on when I was in high school that it was that gang initiation okay so gang members who are being initiated into a gang. They drive on the road with their. Yes I know you. High Beam them to let them know that their lights are off. They turn around and murder until they get into the real. No that's because if someone's going to risk committing murder which everyone acknowledged it's a risk. They're going to kill an enemy. Not a random person makes no sense to you. Never know an initiation would be like go. Kill this guy who we hate. Okay also the the one about this one. I still believe it so when I go into movie theater I always check the see. Because there's one about I think still gang members or just people put in the C with AIDS or sure. Yes you have to check the seat before you say. I always check the seat before I sit. It's a habit at this point but I also still believe in at ten percent. You know the Cactus Swan or someone brings a cactus home to their house and they think they hear it making noises but they're like of howling keep listening to it and I must be imaginable and in the middle of the night breaks open and like a thousand. Scorpions.

Cinco de Maya Kazakhstan Mexico Cinco Demayo Saint Patrick Ukraine Los Angeles murder Barron Square Kazakhastan Kazakhstan Lucknow Guam Dax Brown IRS Mayo Cactus Swan
"heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

14:49 min | 1 year ago

"heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Lack of ownership lack of ownership is is something curious about about upstream versus downstream works with downstream work. Usually it's pretty clear. Who's on the hook for something if your house is on? Fire the fire department's job to come and put out the fire. Right it's It's very easy but when you start thinking about upstream issues. It gets more complicated like if you were to ask. Whose job is it to keep your house from catching on fire. There's probably at least a half dozen different parties you could point to ranging from the homeowner themselves the course to the fire department to the people who write the building codes to the people who built your home and the materials they used and on and on and and when authority is kind of diffuse in that way a lot of times what happens is nobody takes it. Because it's nobody's job. Nothing gets done on the problem and so a lot of times. You know these. These problems emerge from the gaps between silos in authority. One of my favorite examples of this is related to the the website expedia so this is the travel site. You know where you can book. Flights and hotels and whatnot are back in two thousand twelve. This got him Ryan O'Neal. He started doing some research on their call center so they have a one eight hundred number where you can call. If there's a problem. He finds out that for every hundred people who booker reservation on expedia fifty eight of them in the calling the call center and it just blows his mind. This is an online travel site. This is supposed to be all about self service. What's going on here? And so he digs into. This turns out that the number one reason people are calling is to get a copy of their itinerary. That's it oh of their tenure. Twenty million calls were placed on two thousand twelve upper a copy of the itinerary and so they all just kind of collectively slap their foreheads at once and and when their attention is pointed at it becomes a very easy. Fix The issue was lot of these. Things were getting caught in spam. So you can change the way you send emails or people thought it was a solicitation and deleted it and you can add self service tools. So people can go back online and get their own itinerary. As as a technical problem. This was not a big deal sharp. But what's interesting about it to me is. I mean. This is a hundred million dollar problem. Like twenty million calls times five bucks a piece and nobody was aware of it. Basically Until Ryan. O'neal does this work is he as CEO or just snow. He was in the customer experience group. He was just you know a guy a couple levels below the CEO. And he's just doing this research and and it turns out that expedia like virtually every other company is divided into these silos. You've got marketing team. Whose job it is to to get customers to the site. And so they're measured on people. Can they attract? And then you've got a product team whose job it is to make a a great website that kind of funnels people toward a transaction and so one of the things they might be measured on his. What percentage of people who visit end up doing a transaction? Then you've got the tech team and they're measured on things like up time for the server and then you've got the call center and they're measured on. How quickly can I get somebody off the phone? And how happy are they when they hang up? And all that kind of makes sense on a micro level but then when you ask a simple question like whose job is it to keep customers from needing to call for help. The answer is nobody right right. Nobody in that whole system and in fact it's even worse than that because none of them even stood to gain if that happened like nobody would get a bonus no one get praised and this is what happens so often in organizations is is. We get so hung up on specializing in on efficiency. That we miss bigger problems. Like we're so focused on. How can we reduce the amount of time it takes to deal with an itinerary? Call the case. Can we get it for three minutes to two minutes and forty five seconds and you forget. There's a bigger issue here was. Why does anybody need to call for an idea? How do we stop calls right? In general right corporations. Don't have someone in charge of synthesis right like looking at all the different components of the system and then and then figuring out how they're interacting asking those big questions. That's not really a position that exists right and you can't really major in that Kenu. Well I mean sadly it does exist. But it's it's one person that's the CEO. This egos in really the only person who lives above the functions and silos. But it's just it's such a buzzkill that these things would have to escalate to that level to be dealt with and in fact that's what happened. Inexpedient it did have to escalate to the CEO the CEO took it on and said this is madness. We need to do something about this. And then the leaders of the of the silos came together to work on collaboratively. But you're right. You wish that there was some more organic solution to this. Where where people were more naturally crossing silos without having to come from on high. There's no pre-set space for workers to step out of their job. You read it like an essential that they talk about Bill Gates you know. He had a baked into his schedule. It was every couple of months and he took a week and he just he just thought he just thought about a bigger global issues at Microsoft and he left the trees to look at the foreperson it for him so crucial for all these other great. Ceo's and stuff. It's so important to leave your narrow point of view to try to gain some perspective and to start doing some of that synthesizing. Exactly what you're what you're focusing on here is something that call in the book tunneling which is a a term. I stole from another book. I'll scarcity a psychology book that's great here's the essence of tunneling. A woman needed Tucker For Her dissertation at Harvard followed around a bunch of nurses for hundreds of hours just shadow them to see what their days were like and she pretty quickly discovered. They're always solving these weird problems. Pop Up you know. Sometimes they're simple like their department runs out of towels and so they have to run down the hall and steal some towels for another group or you know. Sometimes it's medication. That's not available when they need it. Sometimes it's really weird things like Anita Tucker writes about this one day that the nurse was trying to check out a woman who just had a baby and part of the checkout processes to recover that security. Anklet they put around. You know The wrong baby home and in this case it was missing which is a big deal. Because now you've got to security threat. But they found the anklet in the baby's bassinet. So problem solved and then weirdly. The exact same thing happened a few hours later. A DIFFERENT MOTHER. Different baby missing anklet. This time they couldn't find it and so they have to go through another protocol to make sure the MOMS taking the right baby home and so Anita Tucker writes that these nurses they were resourceful and solving problems. They were spontaneous improvisational. They didn't need to run to the boss every time. Something bad happen and so it's like this this really inspiring portrait of nurses but if you flip it around and look at this different perspective you realize what I'm describing here is a system that never learns never improves because these nurses had gotten good at working around problems in fact what what surprised? Anita Tucker so much was. She didn't find a single instance of where nurses were doing. Root caused level analysis like. Hey why were these anklets? Do to make sure this problem doesn't happen next week and to be clear like this is not to poke it nurses or throw stones at them. Well especially now time the environment I mean. Let's wait till we're all healthy and then we'll start through then we'll throw stones versus so I mean. I think all of our sympathies are with the nurses right that that. What could they have done about this like? They've got twelve patients. Who Need Them Right now? I mean can they just pause everything to do like a formal root cause analysis and try to get the manufacturer on the phone? And I mean it's absurd. Yeah but when you think about it if we can't figure out a way around that trap it just dooms them to continuing to solve or work around the same problems every week every month forevermore and so back to your point about Bill Gates and others like we need a way to allow employees to step off of that hamster wheel and engage in systems analysis. To be clear. This is not like some some genius idea. I just thought up. People are actively working on this like in health systems. They have what they call a safety huddle in the morning where they'll get together a bunch of doctors nurses and they'll say okay looking back on yesterday. Were there any near misses where something went wrong? in what were the circumstances and today do we have any complicated patients that we need to talk through to make sure we have all of our ducks in a row so that would be the ideal forum for this nurse to said we had this weird thing happened yesterday where two babies both had their security anklets ball off like. We need to look into that so I think it doesn't take much. We don't have to revolutionize the way people work but we do need to build in these little escape valves where they can kinda step out as you suggest about of the trees for second to see the first and then and then get right back in and it feels like it has to be a cultural thing. Were businesses recognized. There's going to be two dead days a month or whatever it is and that's a cost of doing business and ultimately it's going to save a Lotta money but it I guess it takes courage right because a lot of these things are hard to measure their long term goals. They don't bear immediate fruit. So so it takes some willingness to spend the time in capital to see in the long term. How it works. Is that one of the big hurdles. I mean it. It's always hard in the moment because I mean even even as a Dad. This happens all the time. Where like you constantly in these situations like getting a kid's shoes on or you know getting them out the door. Whatever you face this fork in the road where you could do something the right way and it would take like ten x what it would take to just do it the quick way you know and so you always do it the quick way because it's faster but then you do it the the quick way a thousand times in a row and you would have been better at just you know deviating and fixing the problem once and for all one time for the sake of of not getting back in the river again and again and again. Yeah the ounce prevention I was just thinking scale in these circle I had a big issue with a big company earlier. This year was a catastrophe to say the least and it was exactly this. It was a breakdown of that companies. So huge the scale is so large that like you know. I couldn't talk to the same person more than once. Nothing was getting communicated but I can also recognize from their standpoint. Like how could they possibly fix it? They probably think Oh. This is just too big. This is impossible to do but let me just piggyback on that because I thought the same thing when you're talking about the Chicago School district although you get the economy of scale with great numbers do you also transversely get it. Just gets almost impossible to manage. There must be exponential issues as things grow now. Yeah I think it cuts both ways you know back to that quote about every system is perfectly designed to get. The results gets like if if you're getting good results than the inertia favor you know. The system is kind of baked properly. But but if you're not it can be a tall order and you know Chicago public schools. It took them a good fifteen years to turn it around. I mean this was. This was not a quick win situation and it took some fundamental ways of redesigning the way they serve students they had to make a mindset shift where before teachers think about their role as. It's my job to teach a good lesson. It's my job to test. Students have learned the things that I've shared but if they fail that's ultimately the kid's fault. That's that's a problem on their shoulders and and in the new model what they realized is. It's not just a kiss our problem and now if a kid fails it's a joint problem of the teacher and the student that part of their role is to support the student and they started doing this really innovative work. This is based partly on the work of a woman named Elaine Allen's worth and academic who studied the situation and found something fascinating that you could predict in the ninth grade who is.

CEO Anita Tucker Ryan O'Neal expedia Bill Gates fire department solicitation Chicago School district Chicago Microsoft booker Kenu Harvard Elaine Allen
"heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

15:53 min | 1 year ago

"heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"World of AIDS. You Know I. I have heard other versions of that one but years is way better. I love the miniature coughing in the box. That's amazing a woodworker. Or He's a miniature doll house woodworker so somewhere. There's like Dallas furniture being made for this. I feel like the through line between all of these. I was going to bring up the one that everyone thinks. Someone from their high school got hotdog stuck in their vagina. Yeah Yeah Yeah. And then the hotdog got shoved up there yet and everyone has that story but everyone has a story so it's not true but I feel like fear is the through line between all of these legends and the stickiness. Is this like fear that you feel like you could get taken advantage of are susceptibility or something? You're onto something important here. Which is which is the the fuel for virtually all sticky ideas whether they're true or not or urban legends or not is emotion and legends. You right tend to have a couple of different bases of emotion fears very common one as with the kidney. Thieves has with the casket and the box But disgust is another all time classic. You know you've probably heard the stories of like the Kentucky Fried rat or you know you find an eyeball in your Coca Cola. Some beautiful ones from that genre and in fact hilariously chip at one point did some academic research where he varied the disgustingness of different versions of urban legends to see if it associated with memory ability. And of course it did the more disgusting basically. Yeah but you know it'd be fair that there's a side to all this and this is what got us so excited about. The book is was just kind of trashy sleazy terrifying ideas. That were sticky. This would be a pretty short conversation. Yeah but if you think about something like proverbs. Proverbs are another example of a class of ideas that stick naturally and yet they contain moral truths you know not not sleazy false ideas something like a bird in hand is worth two in the Bush and if you notice you know the similarities for instance. The The concreteness is one of the things we talk about in the book is a quality of a sticky idea and the bathtub. Full of ice is a very concrete. Serie detail notice. The proverb is is talked about in this visual language. Word hand is worth two in the bush. Rhino it's it's not. It's not some abstract more lesson. It's it's something you can see back to that idea of a film strip that embeds itself in your head and so many proverbs have have that kind of quality and so in the book. What we're doing is kind of comparing all these ideas that stuck really well. Proverbs conspiracy theories urban legends great lessons in school marketing campaigns. And we're trying to figure out what all of these things have in common like what's What's the engine of their stickiness? And can we learn some of those principles to make our own ideas stickier? Okay now. We're going to talk about upstream. So you're just lab designed for me and my own pet peeves this this yes my number one most hated thing in the whole world more than getting my kidneys removed without my permission is being a part of a bad plan like when someone comes out and they they launched the plan and then. I have a role in this plan but I can see that. It's just a very flawed plan right or were we're addressing something so downstream. I'm like we're going in circles. We need to back up. So this is my number one thing that gets me. Irrationally angry at things. So I'm so delighted about upstream to concepts that we need right out of the gates. Right is just. What is this system. How how does this system differ from a person? I think those are. That'd be some relevant groundwork. Yeah and maybe even in one step further as well just because I know the the language upstream may be familiar. Some people like I discovered this this term in this concept when I heard a parable awhile back. That's that's well known in public health but not so much outside there and it goes like this. You and a friend are having a picnic by the side of a river and just spread out your picnic blanket. You're getting ready to sit down and eat. And then you hear a shout from the direction of the riverine you look back. There's a child thrashing in the river. Apparently drowning you jump in you save the child you come back to shore and you're kind of just as your adrenaline starting to recede a bit. You hear a second show you look back. There's an child drowning and so back in you go. You fish them out. Then there's two more children and back and forth and back and forth you go and it's exhausting all this life saving work and then you see your friend swimming to shore steps out and starts walking away as though to leave you alone and you go. Hey where you going? I can't do this by myself. And your friend says I'm going upstream to tackle the guy who's thrown all these kids in the river right and that in a nutshell is what this book is about this this kind of trap that we get into so often in life in our personal lives and work. We're we're we're always reacting things yelling out fires and we're dealing with the emergency of the day but we never make our way upstream to deal with things a systems level that that could have potentially prevented us from needing to be in the river. Fishing out drowning kids. Get to your point. The question you asked about systems probably my number one favorite quote that I learned in researching this book is. Is this one from Paul. Batali healthcare expert every system is perfectly designed to get the result it gets. I wrote that down. I bet is so fantastic. Every system is perfectly designed to get the results. It's getting kind of quote that just sticks in your mind and it changes the way you see the world. There's stories in the Book About Substance Abuse and homelessness and dropping on a high school and one of the stories is about Chicago Public School district at one point. Cps AKAKA public schools. They were graduating. Only about fifty. Two percent of the students like people had a coin flips. Chance that number seemed impossible when I read that. So what year was this as one thousand nine hundred fifty two percent fifty two percent? And also you. It's a humongous public school system. Six billion dollar. Did I six billion dollar budget which is about the same as the city of Seattle is three hundred thousand students. I mean this is a massive massive system and the point of that quote in this context is if you think about it. You're not failing half your students because people aren't trying hard enough or because they're not showing enough enthusiasm you know you're not gonNA hire a motivational speaker to come in and get people jazzed up and then graduate eighty percent. This is a system that has been designed to fail half its students so if you want different results you have to figure out how to reconfigure and redesign that system. Yeah it again. Back to that quote you just said it is designed not intentionally but if the results are what they are fifty two percent then regardless of the intentions this is what the systems producing and will likely produce forever unless intervened. Yeah yeah that's a really big example of a system that's broken but but it also applies to smaller things like you know. I have two young girls I know you too. I see some artwork behind your screams. Young girl. Yes that's that's Mama as a giant if you find the same thing happening whatever. It is meltdowns at bedtime happening every night. I mean what you got to ask yourself is. This is a system perfectly designed to get the results gets in anytime you see consistently bad results. You gotTa be thinking. Something's wrong with the system. What do we change? The system is not a matter of like just rejigging our attitudes in the moment. It's something about this process that we have to tweak boy that is so true right in simple examples are like okay great so when we give them sugar at six. Pm or seven Pretty predictable outcome at seven thirty PM. Exactly right these things just become kind of self perpetuating and that was true at Chicago public schools by the way like one example of what they found when they started thinking about this. As a system was disciplined policies. This was the era one thousand nine hundred eight of being tough on discipline zero tolerance that kind of thing and and so. I talked this one woman. Sarah Duncan who had a big role in the chain and she said during that era. Two weeks suspensions were doled out like candy. Like a couple of kids would shove each other in the hallway and they both be slapped two weeks suspension. But what we know now from the research is if you take a kid is kind of on the border you kick them out of school for two weeks. They come back their lost and they can't catch up. They end up. Failing classes failed. Classes are a heavy predictor of dropping out of school. And so it's like these unexplored trails of where the assistant principal who slapped him with that suspension. Never in a million years. Would it have occurred that person? Hey this may be the reason. They don't graduate from high school. It's things become opaque and kind of Hard to trace inside systems but but once we flip around Linz and think how could we rewire this for for better outcomes often we can change them but really quick just so as we move forward. I want everyone to have a really good concept of system. Yeah yeah I I would just think of a system and this is a loose definition obviously but in terms of you know the the participants involved in so your family is are those of the collaborators involved in that system if you will and then your habits your routines so your your bedtime processes routine of some kind and the example you gave of well you know. We've just gotten in the habit of getting him. Chocolate milk. Fifteen minutes before bedtime. Ah-ha maybe that has something to do with these results. Were seeing you know. These things that that we often do. Unconsciously can lock in become part of the habitual recipe for the bad results that we don't like by the way one of the funniest things I've ever heard on your show is. I don't remember which episode this was a you were talking about. You know you're a little bit of an older father like I am. And and just how older fathers I think. There's a lot of advantages to that. But we're also a lot lazier and relieved to hear you relate. I laughed when I heard that because I find that I spend a lot of energy like coming up with low Energy Games. For my daughter's you know like one of one of my greatest triumphs is what I call theater in the sky which involves the my my four year old. Denial just lay down on the ground. That's the laziness part of it. Yeah we'll hold up like dolls or little figurines or whatever inevitably it's on an Elsa to be honest okay signing to be truthful it's also Jinyu she's on Because she has the magic powers naturally and you know we'll just have like some kind of little story that happens and and the whole time just getting to lay down on the floor but she's loving it because it's a story it's on Elsa said anyway. Maybe maybe I'll frame that as an upstream solution to a to a child rearing problem. Yeah okay so when wanting to look at systems and to go upstream to try to find the source of problems in into address those there are some initial barriers according to you. So let's start with the first one is problem blindness problem. Linux says we can't solve a problem when we don't see it so this this thing happens where when we've been living with the evidence of problems for a long time often we just kind of to now you know when it's so ubiquitous we just kinda lose sight of it and one of my favorite examples of this is. There's a guy named Marcus Elliott. Who was hired as a trainer for the Patriots and this was a time when patients had been plagued by hamstring injuries. They had twenty two hamstring injuries. In one season and you know some of their best skill players were.

Bush Elsa Dallas Chicago Public School district Batali Seattle Chicago Cps AKAKA Marcus Elliott Patriots Paul principal Sarah Duncan Linz
"heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

14:20 min | 1 year ago

"heath" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"I am so excited to be talking to you. Guys I I feel like now I am like one degree of separation from idiosyncrasy personal connection when all that great comedies of all time I mean. Did you sort of know at the time that this was going to be a thing you know. Look this script was the funniest script I had ever read and I had turned down a really great movie to be in that movie. I wanted to work with Mike Judge and we got there and everything went seemingly well and then we wrapped and then months and months just kept going by and it was becoming apparent. Fox was not going to release it but they contractually had to put it on some amount of screens and all this adding up to us. Finally Finding out that the movie tested terribly right like yes really terribly. Oh Wow. This is a very on topic because obviously Fox is a system right. There's all these mechanisms and levers and one of them rightly globally. Speaking is that you don't throw thirty million dollars marketing a movie. That's testing at thirty. It's just GONNA a bad bet for you but I will say the one thing that a very smart person pointed out. Has it not occurred to the studio that the people that go see a free movie that they know nothing about are the people being made fun of by the movie so you should expect these very low scores so there was no slot in this system to kind of comprehend that that might be the issue that makes right? Yeah so no I thought. Oh No we did this movie. No one saw. It didn't even make a million dollars and I'm like Oh here's kidding me know why and I thought Oh this is just disappeared into the ether and I feel terrible for Mike because it was a great movie and then through the course of time it turns out I maybe more people have seen that movie than other movies. I've been in. That had done great initially so then a great for me. A great life lesson of like you don't know the outcome of really anything until the the time horizon is such that you can evaluate it. I use time right correctly probably not I'm in for it also tells you like I mean I think money correlates a little bit with quality but not very much. It's a good reminder yet I would love because you study all kinds of things and you study systems and you study data and we look for outcomes in Hollywood is one of the weirdest business models out there. Because you're weekly introducing a new concept or a new or new idea. Write your first book made to stick. Why some ideas die and other stick so you come across any kind of Hollywood stuff and then you're researching that book. The one thing we came across is is kind of a model of a sticky idea is the high concept pitch. And you'll have to tell me whether this is still a thing or if this is all You know thing of the past but the way movies would pitched as jaws on a spaceship was the alien high-concept pitch and die. Hard on a bus was speed. And there's just what's so beautiful about those from a communications perspective is. There's just so much meaning packed into the very short phrases. When you hear die hard on a bus it tells you a lot of the foundational elements of the whole thing. You know you already have an intuition about who the star is GonNa be in. You already have an intuition that this is probably a summer release not a winter release into the high concept pitch is kind of a model of how to communicate a lot with a little and the problem is your example is is a one in a million perfect execution of something so you're basically promising to things that are once. A decade collapsed. Together it does enact some some kind of emotion that makes people want to buy it. But I mean the odds of you executing jaws and star trek in one picture. You know what a high bar but it's aspirational. I mean. That's the point. Is You want to get people thinking about the best case scenario and I think what's even more powerful about it is just. How much exposition is packed into that? Like you can do the same thing with businesses like if you if you went back in time to win net flicks was first being pitched as a thing and remember the first iteration of Netflix was like DVD's being sent in the mail. It must've seemed like a very weird idea at the time. And so to think about having to explain this new model and the shipping and you could just condense that down and say well net flicks. It's our new idea. It's Kinda like blockbuster video with no late fees drive in fact something they came up with and it kind of gets you in the right mental space in two seconds or all of blockbuster in your mailbox exactly right. I just punched up their time. I think that would've really worked out that eighty year. So what is what is your history. I know that you throughout your career worked a lot with your brother and chip right and now your new book upstream is Solo Project. You've left the Beatles. I'm curious immediately before we talk about upstream. 'cause I have an older brother who's older and WHO's younger? He's older. He's ten years older so he's Fifty six I'm forty-six I mean. He was off to college. By the time. I was eight years old so we don't have a lot of memories together really growing up like we kind of developed our relationship as adults and it's kind of like a senior partner junior partner thing which is totally legitimate amies. He's a lot older. He has a lot more experience and he's he's sort of the. You know the wise elder in the family and he teaches at Stanford he does. He's in the business glee actually just retired from Stanford Business School. So he's doing other stuff now but he was there for many years. Yeah Yeah because I was I was thinking maybe the gap would be so big that he might have looked onto you lovingly at times and thought. I'm going to help him. I often hear from Bill. I can imagine working with my brother on a book and I think it's because most brotherly relationships you know there's that sense of competition and you're always trying to one up each other and it would have been pretty pointless for him to engage in any sort of competition with me with ten years age difference pretty much good at dunked on me at anything. Yeah and so. I think that takes a lot of the. The Ego out of our relationship is is. I don't think we've ever really felt competitive with each other. Like you know we have to compete for attention or or whatever. I think. It's just a really healthy healthy place to start but you certainly have had to share accolades. In praise in that yeah the meagre quantities. We've gotten yes. We see those UK when we first started working together on made to stick. I mean first of all it was no picnic at first because we're we're very different people in and we had never worked on something as as big as this and I. I'm sort of like the student who in college would have started a major paper at like three. Am in the morning like fueled by no does and then just blaze through it. And he's the student who would turned it in like a week early just to make sure it was done and kind of off of his desk and so you can imagine some of the tensions that we had during this verse process but he and and later my wife. I think over a period of about ten years have slowly almost beaten the procrastination out of me which I am eternally grateful for all my Gosh. Please share their their method. Their methodology is kind of slow attrition over a period of years relentless work. You can eventually be healed. So all you procrastinators. Oh you have to do is get a sibling and a spouse that will collaborate against you and at the ripe age of forty or forty seven. Forty six forty six. Yeah you'll you'll finally not procrastinate job during retirement that's right now made to stick is and I hope you take this as a comic. Because he's my all time favorite. It's glad well ask Ya. It's a little mouth thank you. I do take that as a compliment. He's one of my all time favorites and really kind of someone who blazed the trail for for all of these kinds of books that are now everywhere if I had to describe the cottage industry. It's like it starts with these kind of Social Science theories or social science data. And it's got some overarching kind of hypothesis. The genius of it is then. You just keep derailing into these personal stories or or stories so much storytelling in which ironically is part of made to stick one of the elements that you're looking to have is something that can be passed on orally what what we were chasing with made to stick was was just a very simple question. Why is it that some ideas that you hear stick with you change Your Life? Change your behavior and others just kind of pass in one ear and out the other and my brother had done a lot of research actually on urban legends. It's one of my most favorite topics urban legends so literally. The first story in the book made to stick is Classic Urban Legend. It starts with I shouldn't get. I just gave away the punch lines in urban legend. Forgive me for that. So a friend of a friend of mine is a big business traveler. He's always flying around for work and and he had some extra time in the airport on the way home from a trip. Recently any stopped in the airport bar before he could even order a drink. This attractive woman walks up to him and asks if she could buy him a drink. And this isn't something that happens to this guy very often. We will sure I'll have one. So she walks up to the bar. She orders to drinks for her for him. They have a cheers moment. And He's thinking this is the best day of my life takes a big chug and then blacks out and some unknown amount of time later. He wakes up in a strange hotel bathtub. Full of ICE. Sure and there's a there's a sign on the wall of the TUB says. Don't move call nine one one. And there's a phone right by the TUB and he called nine one one and he describes the situation. The operator says Sir. Can you reach behind you in the TUB and see if there's a tube sticking out of your back to the guy like a finger? Kind of Numb and clumsy from the icing reaches behind many feels a tube and now he's freaking out even more. What's happened to me? I don't understand.

Mike Judge TUB Hollywood Fox Netflix Stanford Business School UK senior partner partner
"heath" Discussed on Zane and Health: Unfiltered

Zane and Health: Unfiltered

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"heath" Discussed on Zane and Health: Unfiltered

"You were in Numidian after thousands like that this is okay. Well this is currently the way I feel as I can. We all say are signs verse because people. Yeah Doc. I'm a Scorpio. Obviously Virgo Hands Sir. Okay well the thing is is as I know you are taught me a todd and Scott all have birthdays within the week. So we're all the same sign. We are all nothing alike that's true hotter and Scott are all three equally opposite. People Scott's nothing like nothing like he just no one's like the stars say otherwise bullshit it is it is. I'm sorry do believe in that Shit. I feel sorry for Youtube. Aries so what can I say the positive qualities of an area. Do you want your determined. You're passionate you're bold old. You're competent euro born leader yourself motivated assertive in your risk tape. How about you you think that applies to heath but that's also also say the negative ones irritable additive impulsive pessimistic intolerant egocentric trick in progress? Nasty Nasty Zaentz. Also impulsively pulses. Yes you get an IPAD. I pat on the Zane is jealous. Distrustful devious irrational and SNOOTY.

Scott Numidian Scorpio Youtube Zane todd
"heath" Discussed on Zane and Health: Unfiltered

Zane and Health: Unfiltered

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"heath" Discussed on Zane and Health: Unfiltered

"We're not cutting out shit. That's we're done. Cutting this is unfiltered. This is all sort of email goes guys could just talk some shit is it's unfiltered after girl. I don't care well. Let's do it. I got a lot of talk about. We could start off with how we can start off with. The intro is copied cheers. Cheers guys welcome back to our podcast. This is heath unfiltered your host Zane. And I'm your host heath and we're yeah we gotta get harboring them in their kind of just like Mariah here to say hi guys. Hey doing good on you know I was just GonNa say I'm sorry for the last episode and remember remember and don't remember what we talk about if we do bring up things that we talked about in the LAS podcast we apologize. We used to watch it. We don't know I I'm too scared to listen to or watch it. I've been tagged in a couple of snippets and I'm like what the hell is this literally. Don't remember anything It's a good podcast. I know like Mariah was fucking crying. We had matt being White Heath and I were just I was. I was definitely. Don't like that's the scariest thing is drinking with a mission. Shen to get fucked up Mariah had the same mission to because she was fucking. Yes I did yes we did. Force it down her throat to be complete right. You're not you're not drunk enough yet. My Dad watches this. He's like the just three men forcing alcohol. It sounds like the house.

White Heath Mariah Zane Shen matt