20 Episode results for "Heart Rate"

FitLabPGH Video Podcast: Are You Measuring Heart Rate When You Move?

FitLabPGH

07:19 min | Last week

FitLabPGH Video Podcast: Are You Measuring Heart Rate When You Move?

"We are fit lab. Pga podcast and promoter of the ethos move into the lifestyle not just an activity because movement is part of what makes life complete we bring you interviews with people in the pittsburgh area who understand movement as part of what makes life looking for a new movement idea or just want to hear interesting stories about people who make movement a priority and this is the podcast for you and the pittsburgh pennsylvania and addition to interviews three times a week released one minute movement tippin lifestyle hack videos and most thursdays we featuring pittsburgh mover to leg or four-legged check out the videos and features on social media. We suggest or instagram account at fit l. a. p. g. h. You can find our podcast on whatever. Podcast after us for podcast. Listening or subscribe to our web page. Fit l. a. v. p. h. dot com. Each hod cast episode will be long enough to pique your interest and short enough to hold your attention. Check out our sister. Podcast moving to live a podcast for moving professionals and amateur aficionados featuring interviews with movement professionals with a variety of experience education and responsibilities one request for the interview. If you like what you hear please leave us a review on your favorite podcast app and tell your friends about us to. We appreciate it and it helps promote the idea. That movement is a lifestyle. Philip a pittsburgh podcast and promoter of idea that moving his style not just an activity. We're encouraging people to think of movement as the norm not the abnormally. And what are the things that people have a tendency to. Do they want to crush it or they want to do their two or three times a week workout. And they don't do anything the rest of the time we want to. Promote the idea that you accumulate movement throughout the day walks jogs doing a little. Bit of activity even petting the dog. Who knows she's going to the park in a few minutes and one of the things that we know from listening to some of our moving to live experts are sister. Podcasts don moxley. Marcelo is one of the most important. If not the most important fitness tool or piece of equipment or toy that you can buy a heart rate monitor. You've got a variety of options out. There you can get a heart rate. Monitor this on your wrist. Which which is a watch. This is a chorus watch. This heart pull their makes one. I believe santo makes one. They're good starting point. But you have to remember that if there's a lot of wrist movement or a lot of gripping with your hand it doesn't give a very accurate result if you're just gonna lie there flat and meditate and look what it does your heart rate. That can be a good use of a risk based heart rate monitor. I've had times around spinning down the road on my bicycle holding the handlebars with a fairly strong grip. Because pittsburgh roads and i looked at my heart rates one hundred and seventy five beats a minute which. There's no way was doing that. Because i wasn't working that hard. So the most accurate way to measure heart rate is with a heart rate chest. Strap he can pick them up for anywhere between forty and eighty dollars. The nice thing about it is. If you've got to watch the picks up heart rate you can probably use a chest strap or a arm. Strap that will talk about in just a minute. But only if it's a bluetooth or aunt compatible and polar makes an h. Ten heart rate monitor scrapped the chest. This is a war who and the arm strap is by neo. Checkout moving to lives podcast with marcello aller. He works for them and what they allow you to do. Is you put the chest strap on and whether you're reading the occur watch a variety of apps on your phone you're able to measure your heart rate and record your heart rate one of the favorite things that i like to do with measuring heart rate is i like to measure it for two or three minutes when i get up in the morning with one of these devices and the reason i do that and i tracked it is i can see what's my heart rate doing. I know that if i went out and had a couple of beers this pre covid the night before. My heart rate's gonna be elevated deal. The day i know my heart rate's going to be elevated and one of the interesting things i've noted for those of you who follow fit lab pittsburgh on a regular basis. We used to have emma the chocolate lab who had epilepsy mitzner every day. But one of the things that i've found is my mourning heart rate is lower. I have less stress. Because i'm not waking up in the middle of the night worried that when she turns over. He's having a seizure. Most of us want to crush our workouts. And we'd much rather have an idea of when we're going to hard and try to make the majority of our time easy aerobic workouts fifty fifty five percent of your max estimated heart rate up to maybe seventy percent if you train heart rate zones zone one or zone to should be the maximum time or the maximum time that you stand when you're doing aerobic exercise and then the cherry on the top. The high intensity workouts the heavy resistance training etc again. We're talking non athletes for health and wellness is the smaller amount. So i mentioned the disadvantage of the heart. Rate monitor pickup. The chest hurry monitors. Pickup by mentioned. Is the most accurate unless you're gonna do. Ekg which you're not going to do unless you're in the hospital it has the disadvantage of you have to wet it. You have to strap it around your chest underneath your shirt. If you're a woman underneath your bra and it has a tendency to slide down and it's just not always that comfortable to wear. That's why a good in between not very accurate really accurate but literally a pain in the chest. Is the arm strap. this is from meal. I know polar makes one. I liked the meal one for a couple of reasons. First of all the battery life is pretty good. Second of all the charging port is very easy to use. And third of all. I picked up with my watch and then when it sinks over to strava. I'm able to see what my heart rate was at different times when doing different types of running and biking this can be worn either on the arm. Actually the floor armour can be worn up here and when you press the button. This is the really cool thing that i learned the summer. When it's picking heart rate you get a flashing blue light. The way i realized that it did that is i was going through one of the tunnels and the rails to trails and i looked at my arm in the dark tunnel and it was flashing. You can also set it up if you use the mio program which comes as an app for your iphone or your droid so that your heart rate zones have different colors. It's picking up heart rate. Probably one of the most accurate or the best ways to do it because it's not as much of a pain is putting on a chest. Strap it's much more accurate than this and it gives you a much better way to make sure you're not crushing it all the time because none of us crushing it all the time as one of my clients said in the past said you know this thing about getting older when they talk about needing more recovery. It's actually true. So our goal is to make movement a lifestyle not an activity and make it the norm not the ad norm. So don't crush it. Check out your heart rate and let us know what you do for your favourite moving activity and the pittsburgh pennsylvania area thanks for listening to the latest episode of p. h. Intro an exit music is marathon man. Jason shaw check out the show notes for contact info for our latest guest links to other information mentioned in the episode and a link to her sister. Podcast moving to live. Don't forget to check out our videos and features and our website. fit l. a. b. p. g. h. dot com until next time. Keep on moving.

pittsburgh don moxley heart rate chest marcello aller mitzner Marcelo pennsylvania santo Philip emma Jason shaw
Bonnie Tsui On Why We Swim

The Rich Roll Podcast

2:19:32 hr | 19 hrs ago

Bonnie Tsui On Why We Swim

"Swimming in my life has changed over time. I mean it has played different roles but especially over the last year. I think about getting a water as such relief like flotation weightlessness unburdening. I think is is really what happens. Physically and mentally emotionally. I think you know you can't help respond to the medium in that way like so profound from this fire. Hose barrage of badness in the world. You know. I think just have a momentary pause from that a relief from that is just. It's such a gift because it's so easy to do and yet not everyone does it. I'm bonnie toy. And this is the rich role podcast. Rich role podcast. Hey everybody welcome to the podcast. Real quick time is running out on our plan. Power meal planner new year's discount. So if you would like access to thousands of amazing plant based recipes customized to your preferences if you would also like all the groceries to prepare said recipes automatically delivered to your door plus tons more awesome features all for just a dollar fifty a week than act now before midnight january thirty first by going to meals ritual dot com use promo code power twenty eight check out and you. My friends will save twenty dollars off an annual membership. That's twenty dollars off an annual membership when you go to meal. Stop ritual dot com and use promo code power twenty at checkout. Did i mention that. Bonnie choi's year. not only is she wonderful. She's here to discuss my very favorite subject swimming and more. Broadly the allure of water. Why despite its dangers it seduces us and the evolutionary psychology behind. How it went from being this thing that we related to only in terms of survival this thing. We just tried to survive into one of the world's most popular activities a thing that we seek out. But i were brought to you today by athletic rains here to help you. Nail your 2021 health goals you guys have heard me go on and on about this product for a long time and for good reason packed with everything you need to meet your body's demands with a full spectrum of essential vitamins minerals fighter nutrients micronutrients enzymes probiotics and more. It's the most complete formula out there and my favorite one. Nutritional insurance ingredients are all carefully selected at their highest quality and most natural source. It's of course plant based it's gmo. Free sugar free dissolves easily. It tastes great even in water. And it's super convenient. Keep a few travel packets in my car and in my backpack. So whether you're here in the us canada australia europe or the uk head to athletic green dot com slash ritual and claimed my special offer. Today get a twenty serving pack for free valued at seventy nine dollars with your first purchase. That's athletic greens dot com slash ritual to get a twenty serving pack for free valley. Seventy nine dollars with your first purchase. We're also brought to you today by whoop a physical insight membership service. That provides a fitness tracker for free. That's the colorful band thing that you always see me wearing on my wrist and what it does is it measures. A panel of biomarkers like heart rate variability resting heart rate sleep performance strain even respiratory rate. Which is actually a pretty great indicator of when you perhaps might be getting sick. It syncs with an app on your phone that crunches all the data and delivers you. Personalized and super helpful insights. Like how much sleep you need. How recovered your body is to take on the day and how strenuous your day was from everything that you put into it in and outside of training. It's pretty awesome. I never take it off for all you swimmers out there tuning in. It works great in the pool. I use it to track all my workout metrics basically. It's a godsend when it comes to dialing in my daily routine so i can consistently perform optimally. If you're looking to be smarter about how you sleep recovering train so you could be at your best. You gotta check out and right now for my listeners. Woop is offering fifteen percent off when you use the code. Rich ritual at checkout go to whoop dot com. That's w. h. P. dot com and use the code rich role at checkout to save fifteen percent off your order. Unlock your best self today okay. Bonnie lifelong swimmer magna cum laude graduate of harvard. Vanni is also a contributor to publications like the new york times. She's the author of a book. Called american chinatown a people's history of five neighborhoods which won a whole slew of very fancy awards and her new book. Why we swim also been widely lauded including being named time. Magazine's list of the one hundred must read books of twenty twenty. It's definitely one of my favorite reads of the year. And this is a conversation about that book. It's a love letter to swimming and a deconstruction of our historic relationship with water through the lens of survival wellbeing competition community and flow but underneath it. All this is a conversation about why to be swimmer is to be a seeker so check it out. This is me and bonnie raitt. We're rolling so nice to meet you. Thank you for doing this applied to answer. Glenn meteo. I appreciate you coming down from northern california. And i'm so glad that you jump in the ocean today before we started. I would've been horribly. Thank before conversation about swimming. It was it was one of those beautiful sunrises. I mean you kind of get jaded living down here. I think california's specifically to change. And i paddled out this morning and took a photo and send it to a friend who lives here and he said i think we talked about it. Sort of like maybe puncturing his jaded heart even his after being out here. Well there's a lot of reasons to complain about los angeles but the beaches and the weather is not one of them. When i see you know what. I hear you talking about surfing at ocean beach. I used to live in san francisco. I'm like oh my god. so cold. And unforgiving and uninviting on some level compared to battle it's about all part of the thing right. And it's like i think about it i like to think about it as Making a date to go wrestling with the ocean in the morning. And i expect it right at. Ob you always expect that it's going to be somewhat pele ships even on a an easy low you know baby day but But i kind of like that. I kind of like Being challenged and i m okay with it because my myself buddy carolina paul. she's She is one of the first. She was one of the first female firefighters san francisco. She's just like you know she's a pilot tough and she has basically had like nine ten eleven twelve lives of of adventure. She will go out and look sand on the beach looking out and every time she goes. It doesn't look that bad every time. we're no matter what it could be. You know overhead double overhead. And she'll just say it doesn't look that bad and then so we'll go. We'll try it you know we'll be repelled back we'll know booted out of the whitewater but i think just like having that mindset is a good way to be and i and i like that about kinda gets easier the more you do it but it never quite gets easy enough number of times. I couldn't count the number of times. I've stood on an outdoor pool deck in ridiculously cold weather staring at the pool. Knowing that the water in the pool is warmer than the water in the air and sliding unable in that moment where. You're just staring at nine. How am i going to get into this water. It's breaking the seal. No it's still the membrane it's like an invisible member between you right and it and yet it's it. I think that it takes something. It takes some activation energy to break that seal. Every time no matter what but It's always worth it right. Yeah always you never like. I wish i hadn't done that. Are the pool. Still all closed up north. They are stave starting to reopen so my local pool the albany aquatic center Just north of me in berkeley That sort of my home pool and i. It didn't open until very recently right month. Two months and So i just ended up swimming in the bay for the last. Eight months or surfing did they. Didn't they close aquatic park. Also did they did. Because i think too many people going there in the beginning and then they closed the dolphin club in south end rowing club the facilities. So even now i've friends who seems like pretty low risk but i think in the beginning it seemed right just the flat and we didn't know enough right right right so this the flocking together but now we know of course few outside great you know in the water ocean breezes great like keep doing it survive. Get through this you know. There's a couple pools that are open down here but they all migrated to these online platforms. Where you have to reserve lake. Yeah you got that right. But every time i look at i log in an all. Everything's book yeah. I never know. I just like to go like oh i got. I got an open our. I'm going to go do it like it's difficult for me to know day to day right so the other week i like booked elaine every single day day and i didn't make it once because snell things on the wall because it's a long drive actually from my house to and you know i'm struggling with. I did the exact same thing that you just did this morning. They opened up. And i said i'm just gonna this one's open this one's open. I'll just snatch grab them. Yeah sometimes i show up without a reservation just to see if somebody doesn't show up because i've missed so many. I assume people are having the same issue. Any luck hitter with them anyway. I'm so glad to talk to you about my very favorite subjects swimming and the human relationship with water and this book that you created is just a beautiful work of art it must be incredibly gratifying to have it be so well received. I mean making the time. One hundred must read books of twenty twenty. I mean that's probably right as well writer. Somebody's been writing for a very long time. That's that's quite the accolade. Yeah you know i. I've been thinking about this book for many years before i decided to write it and and figure out how to frame such topic. Swimming is a top. It's not a it's not a book it's not a story. It's not a narrative. And i had to provide that night to figure out how to do that in a way that felt right to me and to see it finally out in the world and of course i could never have imagined that it would come out into the world during a time when most people actually couldn't go swimming was just very strange and And then of course the know over the months. I mean it came out in april the hardcover and then it will came sort of rolled out around the world in the summer. And then we'll the paperback will come out this coming april but to have then the gift of those months where people were thinking about the relationship to swimming in a way that they always had. They always taken it for granted. They'd never interrogated. Why it made them feel. They were just show up the pool. You know dealer workouts. Either friends basically did not enter their minds. Because we didn't have to do things like make lane reservations. Two weeks out to get some time with the water and to get these. I've gotten the most incredible letters from people. Just i mean it's it's i would never have thought that The book would get people to swimming. Open water that was it was. I didn't have any a specific intentions. There's no agenda agenda. Exactly it was meant to be this Cultural and scientific exploration of our human relationship with water and with swimming. and how. it's so curious that we we as a species are not born knowing how to swim. we have to be taught. That's a very interesting thing about us. Humans and about you know higher order primates right. You make the point that we're the only land mammal that doesn't instinctively know how to swim. Never really thought about think about once. I started to look into this and i You know in the book. I list examples of dogs. Cats cats hate water but they'll they can swim right. Bats can swim. Bats can deliver her razi like butterfly. It's really yeah. I look look after we finish talking. Please zigal it's just So we have this You know we're we're we. We came from the water. But we're not suited to anymore so we have to start. We've been kind of clawing our way back to as land animals and and part of it is of course survival but also it is so much more than that once you learn how to survive the water. It's can be so many things and that sort of how i laid out the book. The question is presented in title. Why we swim. And then it structured in these five ways we can answer that question. And i wanted to get out of that because i want it to be the expansive and really inviting an invitation to to come in the water right and look at it. I took it to be very like sort of a swimming version of chris. Mcdougal's born to run ads ways. That joke with him about it. There's a little bit of murakami about when i think about running. It's like a swimming version of that. Wow the born to run thing with the born fronting though it would have been great if you found some undiscovered tribe somewhere of super swimmers to a too much on the head right right but it but it has that vibe it has that feel to it and you know i'm somebody who's who's passionate about the water and somebody had a you know on a personal relationship to something from long back as i can remember and i've thought deeply about it and i've written snippets about it over time. I wrote my college essay about feels like to be like underwater. The something i've been thinking about for a long time but never thought about what that might look like in an expanded comprehensive Version of captured. It perfectly like. It's the perfect book that fires on all cylinders and it. Is this weird. You like when you telescope. And look at humanity's relationship to water over time like there's an anthropological kind of aspect to your book. There's this push pull like were drawn to the water. Coastal you know. Real estate is expensive for a reason or something about being by the water that that appeals to us on a very profound level and we're also terrified of it and repelled by it so it's that tension yeah exit exit interesting. I really wanted to get it. That i wanted it to be a book that was not just for swimmers but for people who didn't don't call themselves that think of selves that way. And why is that right there. It's because of this tension that you speak of between life and death you know immersion submersion flotation like this. This kind of Talk about in the book. This poorest nece between states that i think is like it's the it's so matic about the water and so alluring and that we want you know we see this gorgeous sparkling water. We want to get in it. I mean kid you look at. Babies are just in the bathtub. They're just enamored with it because it's it is not of us. It's not for us. Necessarily we need waters. We needed a obviously but when we see around us in our environment. There's just something that is talking to us on a very essential level. And i wanted to explore a bit. So what do you make of that. What is well. I was really interested to the course of my research. Discover that our brain activity changes with the sound of water seeing water. You know we know about how we respond to greenspaces right. We as humans are set points in the environment that we respond to some Crepe book by florence williams called the nature fix and she talks about how we are evolutionary suited to respond to certain set points in the environment and make sense right so we You know being in the forest being by the water and so we have always known this on some level right so the books and philosophers and writers and poets since time immemorial have spoken about right. You talk about the greeks. Yeah you know the wasp. We're going to get into right and so once you start looking you realize it's everywhere it's everywhere across time and so i was very interested to know And wanted to learn a little bit more about the science starting to catch up to explain. Why is how our bodies respond. Not just Physiological with physiologically with immersion And with the mammalian reflects and all that but that just being near water not even getting in looking at it walking by smelling it listening to him That you know. Our our brain activity are alpha. Waves like Increasing and that's that's calm relaxation creativity. I mean that's good stuff and we know that to be true. Yeah it's it's no mistake that images of sunset beach right on tation apps and and you know there's something about the the start of the waves crashing and the light bouncing off the surface and the smell to that that produces this calming effect. That can't be replicated in other environments and i just know personally when you swim as somebody who runs and rides bikes and does all different kinds of things. There's something unique about swimming. The experience of that and how you feel in the aftermath of that is very different and unique and special. What do you think it is me. Think about it. I think there's something about the submersion and the muting of the sound the sound of what the waves you know what that does in your ear canal and and and the the sort of suspension of gravity and the loss of feet like you you lose your sensation of your limbs in the same way that you have on land like all of those things combined to create this You know very different experience. That i think. Is you know healing to the human body. Yeah i mean just mind. Flotation weightlessness an unburdening. I think is is really what happens. Physically and mentally emotionally. I think you know you can't help. Respond the medium. In that way i think And there have been times i mean. They're they're know the swing in my life has changed over time. I mean it has played different roles but Especially over the last year. I think about getting water as such relief like mine. So profound from this fire. Hose barrage of Badness in the world you know. I think just to have a momentary pause from that a relief from that is just you know it is so it's such a gift because it's so easy to do And yet Not everyone does it right when things to do it. And it's kind of the last frontier if you wanna get away from the phone and it changes your perception and your relationship with time. It's uncomfortable if you haven't done it before because you're like wait you know. I need to listen to music. Or i need to you know like i. I'm not comfortable with not being over stimulated of let that go you're left alone with your own thoughts in a white count. The worst right. Why would i do that. These devices where you can get underwater audio in their figuring that out. And i'm like i don't want any part of that. I need to protect this place. Is the one place where get away from. All the i think about you know they've had sort of somewhat crappy technology to do that for a time doesn't work so exactly and there's a reason why you don't see people using them Very often i mean by. I mean i would say like in a pool in any given day. Ninety eight percent of the people are not anything like that right. Hope it stays that way dude. Let's take it back to the beginning. I mean the obvious question is like wh- you know why write this book. What from whence comes your deep appreciation and love of the water. I mean i gotta go back to my parents right by now. I've talked about the story so many times. Maybe you haven't heard it. Maybe the navy heard it. So this is the book tour. Cancel these book tour. Go in different directions but you got to this story. So it's it's a really good story My parents met in a swimming pool and hong kong. And that's our family origin story. And it has you know we when we were kids growing up and heading to the pool for swimming lessons and my parents would be there and and then over the years. We joined the swim team and we became lifeguards and it always be people who came to know us laughed when we told them that our parents had men and swimming pool because it was just it was too perfect. Yeah there's that black and white photo of your parents there. They're quite young when they met they were i think they were. I asked my mom recently. Anything they were eighteen nineteen something like that. I mean they're just gorgeous hospital. You know. I just want to read. Because i see them you know. I hate to say this. But i have never seen him so happy. This beautiful Unfiltered the both of their smiles are so big you know and And i and it is a memory that i never had myself but i look it and i like to think of that as a time when they were really happen. You know So my dad was a lifeguard and my mom was at the pool and But when we grow up They were always at the pool with us or at jones beach in the summer. Spending time together. It's just very much baked into My brother and my experience of our nuclear family. Because until i was i guess in junior high early high school my parents were together extensively and then my father started kind of they separated but we didn't really know it as such so. He started traveling back to hong kong and then to china. He's an artist. He's a bright. He's actually i m e he wanted he wanted an emmy and He and i were so close. When i was when i was a kid And i was the one who accompanied him on trips. You know we. I grew up in new york on long island. Mostly i would go with him to client trips Intimate hatton and we'd go to the mat and we would just spend hours with him in his studio he. We were very close. And so i associate. You're telling me about Your at your college essay about swimming. I wrote my college essay about swimming. Art writing and those things were now they think about it They still army. You know they. I knew from a young age at those three things were so essential to who i was. Certainly it's actually. I was visiting my mom this summer. Back in new york and she made me clean up the garage. And i found my college and i thought It's very strange to be looking back at this person and understanding what state state many things in the same you know. Essentially this This relationship i have with the water and also with writing and creativity. That's something that. I trace back to my dad. Yeah very. he was the permissive free spirit. Yeah absolutely yeah you know. He was fun and he was a kid and he's today at seventy three years old. He's still kit. He is he. He actually hasn't changed that much. But i have you know was your mom. More of the taskmaster then. Oh totally. Yeah she was strict one. I don't actually remember smiling. It's terrible it's so terrible but you know after they divorce which was really really painful. They didn't they didn't Finally toes in college and But then i got to know my mom. This as who she was she was a person who is not in relationship to my dad. She was fun. She had her own ideas she was she had stories to tell And i. That's when i got to know her. You know as a real person. You need both of those. Yeah you know. I think you need you. Need the artistic sensibility. But you need the the regimented person. Well oh yeah. I you know she was the one who set it up my desire for order my desire to prepare like all of those things come from her like my sort of risk averse. Older person self is because of her. Nsa those things lovingly. And because i understand that those are things that you need to operate beer responsible. Human in this world and i take the fun and the creativity and the light from my dad. But i also know that in the context of our family that that really ruined our family this sort of shirking responsibility and Not owning up to that so profoundly. Both parents have shaved me to be who i am and i came up pretty good. Thanks so it worked out you know could have gone terribly however also and yet you're an artist so you have to focus and organize your life but you can also be a free spirit and creative and follow these whimsical passions that you have to track down these stories. Yeah that's my mom. I remember my mom said to A good friend of mine And it was not in a this was when i was twenty two and i took off for a few months to go on a fellowship to new zealand was came back and i had student loans to pay off and i said i really want to work at this adventure magazine. They're paying me right now. But i just i'll just stand up take waitressing job or something in new york while i'm doing and she said she turned my friend and she said bonnie is such a free spirit and she was not a compliment right now. It was It was but you know what though to her credit like a couple of weeks later she said you know. If you really wanna do this. I will support you in this and i did. I did it for six months. And then i got paid money actual money and and there we go. That was probably a big step for her. It was actually now. They think about it really was. I have to ask about that if you yeah but you grew up in and around pools. The time swam competitively. You and your brother but you didn't end up swimming in college right. You wrote in college. I by the time i got to college. I wasn't good enough to swim in college. Like not no i but i was done with competitive swimming Because college to me represented like something new like. Somebody's super fun and exciting. I always knew that i was going to college. Was going to be in the place where i got to meet new people and things and i very much felt that i wanted to do that because i wasn't you know. I think i was a very old person when i was like a kid. I was like. I want to be twenty eight something like that i just wanted to have autonomy and and road crew and i you know it was essential. It's almost cliche rowing right. Sculling in the child. Really calling the ivy's i'll within sight as you're on the was still water sport though it is i want it and i was talking to a friend about this recently You know i love. I just thought it was so cool to have a different perspective of water. And when you know when you're swimming so solo right. You're on a team but the experience of swimming is very much you in the water. And when you're in a boat with seven other people and you have to become what you have to move in unison. Almost all of the time. I would say like ninety eight percent of the time you can feel like a slight tug of someone else. Who's not in quite in your sink. And then the two percent of the time when you are flying together is just so magical. It's like it's as if you are taking flight and you didn't even you're not try And i was thinking about this the other day. Because i wanted i really loved experiencing water from a different perspective and then I only quit because You know you're looking at me. And i'm not a giant person. Probably between like cox incisa a lightweight. Enough to be a car i was. I was not I'm only five four. I was like the the coach said to me. Your technique is great. Puts you in stroke in this boat. You know but you have to put on like twenty pounds. And i had already packed on like i was eating like a crazy person. You know in the the freshmen dining hall. I was working out in the weight room. I was urging like a maniac. And i just was like i think i have maxed up. I don't know that i can gain anymore. Wait to do them. It was weird. It was like i'm done well then joined waterfall again. Another water sport but it was fun. I mean it was. It was hard. I just realized that after a while that Playing sport in college and you know this more than anyone is. It's that's all you're doing. Yeah it's pretty uncompromising. And i didn't want you wanted to broaden your yeah aperture your horizons. Yeah what's what's interesting about your relationship to swimming. In highschool is that the pool represented like this refuge for you right like you. Had you know a complicated relationship with your peers in school. Better the pool which was much more diverse literally a pool of all different kinds of people. It was kind of like a refuge. A place where you felt at home. And i think that's worth exploring a little bit and i really liked how you you did. This kind of archaeological dig into the history of the united states and its relationship with swimming and in particular you know pool building and the pool and how that changed over time. So let's talk about that a little bit. Because i think it's it's it's pretty interesting. I know like i grew up in the northeast and most high schools don't have pools whereas in other parts of the country they do and that tracks back to our sort of checkered relationship with with race and segregation. Yeah i i really appreciate meeting. I didn't understand The extent to which the current gap the racial gap in swimming ability between especially blacks and whites in this country is so traced back to This era of segregation in our country and it that it the fact that it persists to the degree that does i mean i think the rate is that The latest statistics show that Black kids are five times. They drown out rate five times. That of white children right. I mean that is just. It's horrible and i You know and then it's not just Swimming access education. But it's also then when you break through to join a team you find a team swimming you love it and then you feel like you're the only one or you're the you're swimming remains very white sport And you don't feel welcome or you don't feel That you belong or that you have positive images and stories I think that that has a really profound effect on whether you want to keep doing something you know so like i. I recently got to talk to The founders of an organization called black swim and ebony rosamund was is the founder and she was talking about how in her daughter started swimming. And then i think the reason they started the organization is because when they googled like black kids swim they would. They would come up with The top google hits were like black. People can't swim or i don't know how to swim when i was growing up as a kid. There was this trope like a black kids can't swim right higher body density or something like that like some crazy reason why black people weren't good at swimming right ridiculous then that is pervasive and it persists and that's you know. Those are the like ridiculous things that i heard growing up too at the same time i think of my experience as you Pointed to was really special for me. Because i grew up I swam on a team that was in the next town over and it was very diverse. Community freeport. new york. you know has large african american and latino a demographic and it also the team also attracted kids from all across long island and you know even though i was at one of the you know the quote unquote the only in my high school. Ah town away. Two towns away That pool was super diverse. The head guard A you know the the at that pool where i lifeguarded. The freeport wreck was Was black you know and she. I don't know. I think to see my point is to be able to see representation around. You is no small thing. I really Credit that experience. With making me i am today. We'll be right back. But i brought to you today by seed but next evolution of probiotics if you listen to my podcast with dr will bolsa wits. That was episode five thirty eight. Then you already know that. The quality of your microbiome has a massive impact on overall health. Our bodies are essentially half human cells and half microbial which is why it's vital to care for the billions of microscopic friends. We call the gut flora. But here's the thing. 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The all i think there was one in chicago to a couple of these gigantic glass ceiling. You know like they look like arboretums that were gigantic that went the way of the dodo rightly they just disappeared yet. They were so. This was a shift in Public pools from being You know during the progressive era there were there were pools for like before that was public hygiene. They were actually bathing facilities like working class. Immigrants would go and men would go on alternating days with from women and So so it was much more a gender split with these pools and then once they became you described these like pulls basically like pools than public pools were then for recreation. And so then. We're for families and were then public authorities. You know that the sentiment was that People of color could not swim in these pools with white people and so they were. They were turned away from a lot of pools. There were During the civil era the public the pool spaces the watery spaces the beat even public beaches that they were sites of protest and In the book. I talk about how There was this incident Calls of bloody sunday. It was like in public beach mississippi. And it's it's where blacks to be you know to use the public beach and and they're you know there were riots and many of these pools that happened. There was violence. And and if you think about it we're talking about how water is freedom. Water is relief. Water is so universal to all of us as humans and yet this essential This essential thing was not available to remove one And i think the right of leisure the right of recreation was something that was was seen as symbolic of this fight for equal rights equity and so ultimately these pool palaces closed down they just shudder right and then hence begins this movement towards the backyard pool so the public pool kind of you know isn't a primary focus anymore because it's complicated for those reasons after desegregation. You know you'd think that the fight is over you know equality one but actually A lot of whites than of means like fled the public community perennials and built their own backyard pools. And you'll see this. it's interesting 'cause california especially southern california is such a an epicenter for this backyard pool culture and it's beautiful. I mean look at these photos of like palm springs in la and It is such a it. Is this very golden light on perfect Visual history and yet where are the black people you know where the people of color in these records and And i think that that that is being rewritten and pushed out. And and you know that that Beautiful bubble is being punctured in a way that is Starting to be in in a way that is really important to our understanding of what the images actually meant. Admit exclusion right. it feels. It feels like there's still some way to go though because the country is littered with these public works pools that are all over the place many of which sit drained right an empty like that pool in central park at the north end of the park massive pool like most of the time. There's no water in that pool like there seems to be a lot of Establishments like that all over the place that either because they lack funding or for whatever reason and i'm unfamiliar with they don't they're not really you know they're like in disrepair. Yeah it's really expensive to maintain a pool. And what i learned in this pandemic period is reporting a story about a reopening of a public pool in my neighborhood and i learned that most municipal pools the public pools around. My cities are operate at a deficit. So they're hemorrhaging money and the the season in which they would take in revenue is the summer camps and All like swimming lessons and swim teams in for this entire year they they did not have any of the and so now they're even more in the hole and so now as as many pools have struggled to reopen and some limited fashion right so but it's one lane per person Spaced out. they were losing money. Before i hate to think about what it means because The sad fact is a lot of these. Pools will not reopen even after the pandemic. And so that to me is i mean it's hard to stomach because that means then another generation of of kids might not get right what we had And that's just really. It's hard i think about. You know in in the course of researching this book I learned that swing. Education is universal. It's part of the public school education in so many other countries. And i think that would be amazing. If that were the case in this country it would make such a difference but but you need adequate pool access to do that at and the most schools don't have pools or don't have a pool. That's proximate enough or is accessible. It just comes. It's it's a really huge funding issue. But i just think about these in iceland. Every town has a poor every time. I know tiny tiny town like one hundred. People hasn't let's talk about iceland because this is a big part of the book it's super fascinating. I mean first of all we should mention you said at the outset that you broke the book up into these various sections survival wellbeing community competition and flow. Which kind of cracked the code for you and helped you figure out a way how to write a book about swimming. This is like this. Th-they real amorphous thing right but kind of planning your flag in these various categories provided you with like some footing to do this a big part of the book or the early part of the book is about iceland and in particular this one fisherman whose name. There's no way. I'm going to be able to pronounce but i'd never heard of this guy before and it's an unbelievable story i will tell you about good liquor frit thorson. How long did it take you to figure out to what that roll off your tongue with ease. It's been many years. Say it one more time and good liquor thorson but the thing that we have to know is that his nickname is lawyer and everyone calls him that so i will henceforth very good call him lawyer because that's way easier So i opened the book with the story. Because how could i not right. It's a story that my husband told me one night and he'd heard it from he works in with fisheries in the oceans and i think he'd heard it from an icelandic friend and this story is famous in iceland because in one thousand nine hundred four There's a fishing vessel. That capsized off the coast of iceland and Good liquor for thorson. Loy was the ship's mate and he was like he was twenty two. he was super young But it was the the fishing. Trawl caught on the sea. Bottom and then and then it overturned and everyone got thrown over board and everyone's in the water holding onto the boats kill before sinking. And you know this is bad news. Forty one degrees water. It's freezing it's the middle of the night and they are they are unable to deploy the life raft and the sad thing about is that they were supposed to Self deploring liferafts had become a sort of saying fairly recently at that time in and they were supposed to have installed that in the boat but they had done it so this boaters thinking and the few of them are left are holding onto the keel. And then they say you know we're gonna start swimming captain and loy and so they start swimming and pretty soon. He's the only one left. Was there a lighthouse. Like how were they skirts. So it's six colome at least six kilometers away. So he's it's the lighthouse on this island which is off the coast of the main island of iceland. It's called heyday and it's part of a best. Many are archipelago. I've been practising islands. But he so he saw the light house the light from us and he started swimming and he's swimming swimming swimming and he's wearing like a flannel shirt and jeans and a sweater right that part confuses me because i would just take that all. That's holding back off. I can't remember what the i mean. He certainly lost his boots. But he's swimming and You know he's talking to seagulls and and it's it takes them six hours six hour six kilometers any gets to shore now. The thing to understand about this island is that it is a akanik. Island wing involve iceland. And i think it was ten years before that there was a volcanic eruption that had resulted in the island. Got bigger by like twenty percent but then they're also these like shear foot cliffs and like ferry spiky lava fields so he gets washed ashore at the base of one of these hundred cliffs so he gets there and he cannot get out. There's no way for him so he has get back in and start swimming so swims around to a place where he can finally get out and he's walking across this lava field and he's you know his feet are bleeding because it's really sharpened like there's a frozen Ah sheep sister. It's like a double water that feeds waters animals and he liked punches through. Because he's so thirsty. He's been out there for hours and hours. And then he trudges into town and you know. I think days breaking and there's like a light on the first house and he like walks up to the house and there's like bloody footprints behind us now and it is just insane because then they're like i cannot you know they rush him to the hospital. They can't i can't discern his like heartbeat very faint and his or his like the can't really read his body temperature but he has no signs of hypothermia So like you. And i yes. That's crazy twenty minutes max. Forty one degree water. It'd be dead everyone else to everybody would die. And then how long was the trudge into. I i really. I don't even know if he knows. How the illyria was the air temperature. I can't remember what the air temperature was but it was significantly colder than that And he you know they. He's just a little dehydrated he's fine And he's in the hospital for observation and it turned and it's not for some time when they have done some Research and studies that he's taken part in but he has this The reason he was able to survive. Okay a. He's a very good swimmer. Everyone iceland swims. He was trained to be a such as a sailor and he has. He's like a seal. His fat is two to three times normal human thickness. He's a kept his core body. Temperature studio dude. He's a big guy he's six four. I don't know how much you ways but that you know you can see photos of him from that. He's not unusually gigantic. But he's he's a solid guy but you think about plenty of guys who are really big. Who would die very quickly in water that cold. it's not it's not about the fat but certainly the quality of the fact the call. Or where the us in the right places to protect the organs. Yeah it's crazy right so he comes this massive hero also a science project right. Yeah and he he gets so much media attention that it kinda compels them to become this recluse that's right And so you can imagine that came across the story. I thought this is. I gotta talk to this guy because it just is so compelling and i know that he doesn't You know he's told the story before but has been a really long time since he talked to journalists but of course the first thing you find when you go him is that this happened to him and then also that he doesn't talk. What soured him on the whole thing. He told me it just. He felt that his story was being misrepresented and of course he started to feel harassed right so like his friends died. Yeah it's it's horrible deny celebrated for something. It's quite tragic. Yeah i think at a certain point. You just wanna live your life. You just want everyone to leave you alone And it kept coming up and coming up and to be honest though. I mean i wanna i wanna point out that. He was very vocal in the first years after the accident because the conversation they had on the boats kill was like and he told me this later on was if someone someone makes it they have to tell and he said you know nine times out of ten actually nine point nine times out of ten. Nobody survives this and so they don't know what happened and he said i was the person who could tell and so he was advocating. He spent quite some time advocating for for the mandatory was. Yeah like self point liferafts and you know they have the swim every year in his honor for like the last thirty five six seven years Called good lipson ridings. Good liquor swim and it's everywhere it started out as something that the navigation college do you know. All the sailors did with their clothes on too but in a pool right. Yeah because everyone would wasn't why right. i know. They breed them strong in iceland. Very hardy crazy but it's interesting because he became the symbol of slavic resilience right. It's a embraced him. And that story. And the you know honoring him with the tradition of the swim because to icelanders. As a people like this is this is what he's like the epic symbol of. There's a mile resilience and so he accepted that mantle. Then after a while just you know. He's he's a very Well so i i. It was hard for me To figure out. Then how can i approach him in a way. That's going to engender trust from this guy who's been burned by the media and wants to be left alone right there. Was you being the dutiful journalist. I did play you. Play the long game. Play the long game. Well there was a movie. I guess Not too long. After i found out about history. There was a movie by this like blockbuster icelandic director Cor- i think is his last name Like did some everest movies. I think with like denzel. Washington a really Mark wahlberg and. He's directed that these big blockbuster movies and he but being icelandic he was obsessed with the story of could refer thorson and and when he i guess he was a teenager when this happened and he said you know this to me is the story. This is like the adventure story. It's like What does it mean to be a person in spec in the sea and and what drives someone right and so he they approached the producers approached Lawyer about the film and he was just like you know. I think at this point. He was kind of things quieted down. He was starting to live a life. That was more to his speed. No he has grandkids his kids. He has you know why he he works. You know he's still works in a fishing for a fishing company and he was just like make the movie. When i'm dead like i don't want any part of this. But they made the movie it made it anyway. Made anyway right and his. We felt betrayed. He felt betrayed and his. You know to You know he lives in a very small town on small island in a very small country. Everyone knows the town. You know protects him but people. So i was just like okay. How do i how to. Why follow my you know. Sort of storytelling instincts. And also i respect this person as a human. I respect his desire for privacy. What if i write him a letter. So i wrote him a letter. I wrote him a letter. And then i ran it through google translate into ice and then but but you can't pitch right. So what's the just. I appreciate you like. What is the letter. I said I said i. I think i told him that i was. I was working on a book about swimming in. I knew about his story. And that i would love to just talk to him about what swimming means. I wanted to hear from him somewhere right so he he wrote back almost immediately but he said no and then i thought that's. That's so disappointing. But then we started to have this like pen pal relationship and we just am. I remember my husband and said like you could just write him and see what happens. You know just so. We started because there's something about his opening message to that to leave the door open a little bit He just said something about you. Know i have not had great experiences in the past. Journalists has anything to do with your project but he said something in the email. And i'm trying to remember what it was like. If you the message being sort of if you can prove to me that you are trustworthy. Not in so many words but yeah i got the sense and So i just kept writing. And and i would send him in a little bits of trivia or when i was in japan you know doing some research i would send him a photo from there and because he i think. He said that he He something about swimming. Saving lives and And that was an he used emoji. Thought would he use them. Oj if he wasn't leaving the door a little. I don't know it was interesting. Yeah so. I just persisted and then i didn't meet him in person until a year later and i still like to the day that we actually met in person. I did not know. If he was actually going to see me right to iceland iceland you end up getting an audience with him and the guy ends up being like your buddy he is this wonderful funny He loves jokes storytelling he's just A very endearing guy and he actually you. We got to the point where he he. He trusted me with a story and then he quickly you know he had an interest in my family and we went my god now. It seems so long ago. The summer of twenty last year. Two thousand nineteen we went to the faroe islands and we went to iceland to see him and you know he he and his wife being very experienced grandparents like they just had all these snacks. The deal for my kids you know. My kids adored them because they were just like. Can we go visit lawyer. Maria again again and again and again and to i mean yesterday my son told me he said can we go back there and on on christmas you know he sends a. He's attacks with the photo because he looks like hemingway crossed with santa claus. Now that's kind of exactly how i would envision him. He sent a photo of himself in a santa suit and said i think this guy says he knows felix and teddy was hilarious. Like he's he's a great guy but what did he tell me. I mean he. He told me his story. But also i what i realize is that so much of what historian means is what other people say about him. What he means to them So i tried to do this kind of twinning effect of like telling both at the same time because it is about the stories we tell ourselves. Yeah and on some level. It's his story but it's the national story right right. And he's got a release that and allow people to have their own experience with who he is. What what he endured. yeah. I think that's right. But this kind of opens the book up to this kind of dialogue about not just human survival in the elements and in water but also the unique properties of cold water human exposure to cold water talk about brown fat like converting the white fat brown fat and all the new studies that are going on right now about how cold water exposure extends longevity and is healing to the body right One of the studies that i looked at showed. Okay so you're warm warm water versus cold water right so i think it was like an hour immersion in ninety degree. Water is very comfortable ferry relaxing Reduction in pain. You're just like your its positive effects on your body at a same amount of time in like fifty six degrees or something like that was like dopamine levels through the roof. Like metabolism revved. Up like feelings of Euphoria i mean and it is just like very alive. Wellness kind of things that are measurable but also things that you experienced. That are a very cute. No reduction in inflammation of course And i just think it's so interesting know the way it. It speeds up. Metabolism is actually like on its face. Cold exposure is not that great for you right to the cardiovascular. It's terrible it's just like jackson your blood pressure very quickly at first and then over time you actually lowers your blood pressure. Because it's just your your heart and your blood. Vessels are then able to handle it over time within a single session or with repeated exposure with repeated exposure. Yeah so you know. We talk about Were the the sort of longevity scientists. I talked to hero tanaka. He was talking about how he went to japan. Back to japan where he's from and he studied the ana right so those free diving Grandma's really like you know they're they're real divers diving for shellfish And they a- lifetime of cold water exposure right there. Cardiovascular health is amazing their hearing is terrible because the cold water really disturbed. You're hearing but they They're know he wanted to know about The they're cower their arteries you know. Were they flexible or had you know was it. Like was their experience Over times had that made them something a little bit more akin to marine mammal. They're able to Cope with with The water and he found that they were like they're just they're cardiovascular. Health was really great And you know. I think they live to be quite old. You know and The traditions there's been renewed interest in just like these people who Hugh two thousand year old traditions and are able to do things that we wouldn't imagine doing you know in our modern done they're not dying disease right And and that you know the hero. Tanaka also did research with arthritis cold water swimming and what i was really interested in. Was that the swimming practice Lessen the effects of arthritis know from pain perspective from an inflammation standpoint from a mobility increased mobility and those effects lasted for much more. Be much more time beyond the actual time in the water and show is just like the benefits are are are Enduring and i found that really compelling super interesting. Yeah so your way into this. Cold water world quickly becomes our mutual friend. Kim chamber right. Who who's a looming figure throughout the book like other than yourself like almost the primary protagonist throughout this. I mean he's not be larger than life. I mean she's just a. I love her so much and i just think the world of her. She's amazing but she brings you down to the dolphin club and introduce you to the whole aquatic park. The whole system. That's that's exactly what it is. It's an ecosystem and it's a very with that is i. Used to live around the corner from there. So i never i mean i've swum in aquatic park anytime from alcatraz and all of that but i was never like a member of the dolphin club. I only know a few of those people. I know veto. And yeah but it's up. I mean so the dolphin club and the south end rowing club They've been around. Since the late eighteen hundreds stage they share an actual building You know but they're cornell's arrivals but their friendly rivals and they loved to trash talk and and they are very much The the members are like hard bay swimmers. Cold water swimmers. Most of them. You know take pride in the fact that they don't use wetsuits Do it year round and have this. I mean there is a celebration of like the hardiness. The vicar the you how long to stay in in right cool to go and swimming aquatic park in a wet suit. Well you can't do. You know what i did i was. I was afraid. I was gonna get ridiculed but people were very nice to me but they just say you can't bring your is into the into the club. Yeah they say outside. I'm like okay. it's almost like You know when the wet wet suit like there's like a. There's a line. It's like no passage through the stay. Nowhere suchard space. But so it's this and it's all ages like all body types It is amazing to me that That thirst this community there. It still amazes me. And i've seen it and it's just beautiful. And so kim kim the first woman to swim from the farallon san francisco. She is a six person in the ocean. Seven and she did all of this After almost i mean. I think all of your listeners will probably familiar with her story but that she almost lost her debut. Tation after this accident Where she fell down the stairs and she. It took her two years to relearn how to walk. She was embarrassed about her scars. Part of the rehab was like you know maybe swim and she by her own description was horrible swimmer when she started had horrible technique. And then one day She's invited by a couple of guys at the pool. Two to swim. The dolphin club at aquatic park. And she said this. Is i love the way she describes as she she says not. Many people have a visual record of their rebirth and she said that they happen to like video her that day when she got in the water and started swimming and she said like you know. Here's this like broken skinny like One hundred twenty pound woman who is just like Has been through hell and and is like the biggest shit eating grin face. Then she's in this water and she feels so alive and she feels She feels report like literally was her. It started this completely new life for her as a marathon swimmer as freakishly accomplished. And i think a large part of that of course is that she is a very resilient person she also talks about how she has a very very high pain threshold which has gotten to her into a lot of trouble. Well i mean the whole thing with her leg when she fell down the stairs that day she kind of ignored canard it and she drove to work in the their leg was like twice the size and then she passed out and then she got to the hospital and it was like you. You know all that swelling was killing all the nerves in her leg and they almost had to amputate a leg and so she laughs at it. Again of course than that pain tolerance Of course allows her also to extraordinary things And she also had a bout with a couple of bouts with gain beret And it's more recent more recent. Was she doing now. She seems to be doing pretty well. We talked Recently few weeks ago a couple of weeks ago. And you know she's swimming you know. During during the pandemic she is she's back in the bay swimming And she's trying to knock out the seven summits also right that deducted table for that was her goal. I think when that really was. I mean she was. She was well on her way. When game happened to her And i don't know if that's something that's still on the table. But she wanted to be the first person to do. Both of those things yeah. Nobody's overdone done that. They don't get any ideas people. I'm not doing it. But what's even additionally compelling about her is not only her her love for cold water like she took to it immediately. Her freakish endurance capacity. But also this interesting relationship with fear because she swam from the farallon islands san francisco to. You can't see anything like it. Sounds like my worst nightmare. It is pretty much everybody. She's like She thought it was fine. So that's an a thing on top of all of this makes her separates or i think right the fear. I mean she'll be the first person to talk about how she was afraid. So many times about You know the people seeing her scars. That's one thing i mean. Just that she had changed so much from that person who fell down the stairs that day and then over the course of becoming this swimmer and then You know breaking these world records and Then coming to this point where she wanted to make these swims bigger than herself right so then turning her attention from her own struggles outward to say. Okay if i have a voice. What can i use this for. And she did that. Colibri swim red sea thing now. The one that went to the one across the border a write in mexico. You wanna and that you know she did that with the mexican swimmer antonio argueta's and they were like the ambassadors you know across and it was really to call attention to all the deaths of the border you know it was. She kept saying that it wasn't. She didn't want it to be political. She wanted to be about life and caring about life and she said when they swam across and got out the beach in tijuana. All these school kids were on the cliff wearing the colored t. shirts and cheering. And she's like this. It was like wanting to use the swim as a as a way to bring people together. And i and i really i i so admire her for for all of the this evolution that she's gone through an life i mean she always talk about how. It's hard for me to imagine this but she said she was a really shallow person like before. All of this really yeah. You can't imagine right. She's glowing light. Yeah but something got activated in her activated know and in the ven diagram of these various buckets or categories that you've divided the book into you know she overlaps survival with community Yeah for sure yes. She is that bridge because You know not just the healing part but the you know. She survived so many things in her life because of swimming. And then what was the thing that kind of brought her back from both her leg injury and then from gamma-ray and Was away for her to rehab her life. She really did do that. But it was through this amazing community at the dolphin club. And i think about i remember being in the locker room there. The locker room. And that's something that. I super miss in this time. Like the locker room at the pool posts swim. Stick the chatting and the secrets and the and you're you're in everybody's you know intimate space. But i don't know what it's like the men's locker. Actually when asked you this. Because it's not. I mean at least from my perspective off like this. I think kim has described the dolphin club. Sean as like a hen house. Everyone's sharing like nino stories of like illness or boyfriend troubles or things that they're struggling with. I don't know what it's like on the other side. It's changed with different phases of life. But i think the the unifying principle. Is that when you complete a swimming workout. You're kind of. It's like this pipe cleaner for your mind and your soul right like you emerged from that experience like feeling very grounded and and also open right so then when you go to the like you know like the one. I swam in college. You everybody goes into the hot showers and is in there forever right quick. A quick shower get dressed. You stay in that hot shower as long as possible and there's a lot of you know there's a lot of conversation that goes on there and even in master swimming yes same fisher I mean i don't know what the women's locker room like. Yeah there's a lot of bonding and i think. Yeah it's different with men because men are It's harder to get men to you. Know have kind of intimate conversations with their friends in their peers. But there's something about that locker room experience. That's yousef to that in the wake of just enduring like a difficult workout together and you know. Maybe it's the same in track and field or any other sport. I don't know but it's certainly. You know a tight knit bond that you have those people that you do this hard thing together and even though it's individual you are doing it as a collective right. You're doing it you doing it apart together. Yeah yeah yeah. That makes it interesting. Well talk about the The wellbeing component of this. Because i think there's a lot of people listening who either are swimmers or people who are perhaps intrigued by the idea of maybe getting into goldwater for the first time. You know trying to learn how to swim. When they didn't learn as a kid there's so much wellbeing to be mined from the sport or just this activity. I mean i. I also want it. You know we talked a bit about the the physical and physiological benefits right of immersion. But i also want to talk You know a big part of the well. Being is the flow maintenance. The flow state. It's it's where your mind goes When you're doing it. And i think again what's so interesting about swimming and makes it unusual and unique in the sort of sports world is that you are You're alone you're in your head a lot. Your senses are muted. you're not really talking to someone else. I mean even if you're doing a workout together even if you're doing long swim together with someone you know in the bay or the ocean or whatever. You're you're not chatting the you if you were going for a long running and so your Your awareness i mean i think it depends on okay so i want to talk about two things like pool swimming a super different from open water writing so in a pool. What's so great about that is that it's this very known circumscribed the distances known. Your body is knows where do the turns. And you know you you can. Your mind is freed in a way that is different from open water because open water your have acute now. This year That i a little bit of hyper vigilance. Yes in open water. Yeah and even. If you're someone like lynne cox or cam chambers in your swimming for like a shit ton attire like just so long. You are still tuned to what's going on in your environment in a way that's again you're attentive dangers Potentially dangerous although your crews probably doing that. But when you're out there. I mean you're i i find that when i'm swimming in the bay constantly scanning you know it's miss. You can't really stop yourself from doing that. Even if you know this place They're still some alert you know. And then then the acuteness in the present -ness of being in the water is like again like taking you out of that your head and all the shit that's going on outside of the am. I think to be to be forced to pay attention to that mariah. You're just compelled to be in the moment and present. Yeah and you have four that our forty five minutes or whatever. You have forgotten about just everything. All of the things that are holding. You down are occupying preoccupying. You and right now there's money that But i mean actually. I just really like in this conversation with the way a great conversation can take you out. I haven't thought about kobe for a while. So thank you for that you. A one and korea. I really appreciate just. But i'm distracting right but to be so that you know being an open water is a. I don't wanna say distraction because distraction sounds negative like distraction. Sounds like It's not quite the right because it seems like it's something that you shouldn't be focusing your attention on but it it compels your focus in a way that i think is super useful and again. It's a relief. It's it's it's a it's a breath away from the rest of everything right your normal state of being your normal Land self and then in a pool. It's i find it no less I know a lot of people. Don't love swimming pools. But i really love pool. I do too and when people say it's boring. I don't find it boring at all or something about that. Constriction like having stare at the black line the whole time but because you know exactly how long the pool is and you know that. Your environment is static. Essentially back to save the opportunity in safe right that you don't have to think about it right and it allows you to to live in this state of presence but also kind of in you talk about this in. The book is well like this state right. You're not you're not. you're not on land. You're not underwater. You're kind of in between and there's something about that. That place puts your mind in a in a place to problem. Solve or to be in this active meditation state and that's very related to the breath of course and you talk about that in the book as well like the regulated inhaling and exhaling the comes with that that you has some impact on your sympathetic nervous system in a certain particular way. You're allowed to wander. I mean you're allowed to make connections and things are floating around and you. They're they're not tethered in the same way. I think that Again i come back to. The quality of the medium is like there are things. Don't have to be connected in the same way. At least for me. I have have interrogated myself many times over the writings book. When i'm swimming like what the hell i think about. How am i thinking about these things and I wrote a great amount of the book in my head. When i'm sure i'm sure you get stock. Go swim and then by you know not focusing on it. You are allowed. You're able to free associate and solve that problem so that when you you're in the locker room afterward you're like i got it i think that's the I love that term. The the soft fascination right there's something that's holding our tension but not to Closely so that you're able to Do that free association that you're talking about just so great. Yeah and it's it's different from running. Running is analogous. i suppose but the experience isn't quite the same. I mean summaries. Definitely not for me. I love running too but the feeling that i have afterwards is different. Yes different certainly makes me more tired and definitely more hunger hungry. I don't know. Why do you get so hung and also talked me about this when i after a workout i have to pee like four hundred times. I can stop going on. That doesn't have to me running. It's weird right i. It's got to be about like hide high pressure on your body that somehow. Then you're like every all the water gets literally have to go to the bathroom like ten times over two hours. If there's someone listening who knows why this happens. Please email us because tweeted that question really. I got a bunch of answer so any time ago there is some biological reason. I think part of it has to do with being horizontal part of it has to do the temperate water temperature. You know the even even when you're in a seventy five degree pool it's still so much colder than your body. Body is expanding a large percentage of its resources just to keep you warm on top of the exercise. You're doing yeah. I think that the tiredness and the hunger and also it's like a delayed thing right so you're not really thinking about. I mean. I don't really get hungry when i'm swimming usually but then like you know. Sometimes i'll be in the shower. And i'll just be like holy shit. I'm so hungry. But i freaked out. Open water swimming do you. Why don't i don't mind it in tropical locations where i can see everything but in the pacific. It's so murky and not being able to see the bottom and then your your mind starts wants you know your your food chain. You're unbelievably vulnerable. And then it's difficult for me to like relax and enjoy it well. Part of that is definitely the temperature Do you have particular moments that you recall as being super terrifying over water. I will say that. When i'm with other people it's fine sometimes. I want to just go by myself. But i'm reluctant to do that. I just don't feel like that's a responsible thing to do. So i've done it. But then i'm nervous because i'm alone and no one quite knows where i am right. Yeah one of the things about open water. Swimming in the time of covid was i kept telling myself that you have to be more conservative than you might. Otherwise you want anyone to save you. And i got freaked out when i did the alcatraz when mrs are longtime ago my buddies and i did it without a wet suit Because we were you know twenty five or whatever and it's like your puss if you wear a wet suit so we did without wetsuits and i just remember being halfway. Not that far. What is it like columbia and a half or something like that. It's like What a mile half. Maybe yeah Being in the middle like perhaps like smack in the middle. And i just stop for a moment and looked around and i was like. I'm in a shipping channel. Freak me out because massive boats annual wasn't the marine life it was like the fact that like there's gigantic cargo ships that pass through there but my hands and my feet out so they just felt like nobes. You're doing the fisher. I didn't do that again without a wet suit. I had a similar experience. When i was doing malcolm and then i hit a patch seaweed and you know when you hit something when you're swimming you you can't stop yourself from doing that. Jerk right and it was like my heart was like in my mouth. And then i just think oh see we do. We do you just you. You're right you can't see anything. Yeah and it's freaky touch issue. I'm not. I'm not really afraid of like if i'm in hawaii and i can see everything. Even if i saw a predatory fish like. I don't know that it would scare me that much. I've been recently. I've been working for the last couple of months on a story about fear and that involves shark involved sharks and someone who spent a lot of time with them and i was thinking to myself that i have never charged. Haven't been thing for me either. Rights on something that is occupied my mind but i also have been really intrigued by how it occupies the imagination of so many people who would never encounter sharks but it lives in their imagination of course jaws but also that it convenient receptacle for your fear right it personifies whatever. Fear that you have. Yeah and actually it just is a way for you to Deal with it like it's all of these other things And when we were talking earlier about the you know being in the dark deep ocean sharks like that being the the most profound fear or the scariest place primal when it is. Do you know this guy. Michael muller photographer. Who's done all these Photo essays on great whites and he swims outside of the cage and incredible. He's on the podcast now. He's creating this virtual reality really series where you put on the goggles and basically you're swimming with great whites outside of a cage. Have you tried it. He let me test it in the middle of the podcast. We took a break. And i put him on and check it out. It's it's wild right but they're using this now in kind of a a canoe fear conditioning. Exactly yeah yeah to work with people who have. Ptsd and other kinds of fears to help. Help them like process. All of that and healthy way. Yeah i think that that. Fear exposure or exposure. Therapy is really interesting and i think it's fascinating how. Vr can help with them And i'm really curious about how the technology the so much of the earlier iterations of it have made people so nauseous. I think they're still working out. I think i would have been developed. A fear of nausea. But but it's i think. I don't know how you could possibly sell for that problem because your body. Your inner ear is just doing whatever i don't think the. How do you correct that you know how do you. I don't now solve the disconnect. I mean yeah. I don't know. I don't know the answer that you can talk you. Should you should interview him When you look at cam or people like lynne cox or lewis pugh or martin. Strahl like these epic super long distance swimmers lewis like swam in the arctic circle. Right and didn't martin swin the amazons. And i like a ridiculous amount of butterfly didn't he did you. Do you think it's hilarious. How is that. He's like. He swam the whole amazon river butterfly. I'm like that's not humanly possible. I don't know what do it can't be the butterflies form like. I would like to see that. It's still crazy impressive. i can't imagine i like. What is it that these people share Definitely a high pain threshold I think there's duff. I what i what i have. Gleaned from talking to some of these incredible endurance swimmers is that they they they are different. They're definitely different from us from your endurance athlete. I don't like cold. Oh go ahead. I think cold is a is a is a divisive thing amongst i mean i like it after. I've done it. And i put myself in that sitting in front or that reason but i. I'm not like kim who i can't wait to get into right. She just jumps right in They're very. There's like a certain singlemindedness. I think And certainly an ability to. I think disassociate from their bodies and a lot of ways because their bodies are enduring so much not just with the coal but with the the length of time and the distance that they're swimming But they seem like they have all kinds of different reasons for That they say lewis. It's very much about environmental preservation. Like he has a big y. You know a big bridges behind why he does what he does but he also talked about how before he started doing that I think he was a lawyer. Wasn't he lawyer. i think so And then just started I think that he he so wanted to swim. He kind of developed the reason reasons to swim over the course of time but he was at very driven person so like i think that these athletes are do start out as very motivated people. Whatever it is a kim. Kim was super motivated. Like doing her and her You know silicon valley. Or adobe. I think so. I think that they have just turned their focus and vision to something that they can really go. All in a in a practice that rewards that right yeah And it is very extreme. Like i i don't i am. I think i'm trouble talking about it. Because i don't understand it myself even in the competition part of the book and actually this is interesting. I asked lynne cox. And i asked lewis pugh about competition. 'cause and lynn really chafed against me. asking her that question because she said i'm not competitive swimming against anyone else And then it kind of as you can still be internally composed xactly and that actually was. She kept talking. She chafed against because she didn't see it as She she didn't see it as being externally motivated. But what anyone else was doing. I think that was the thing that she that rubbed her the wrong way to to think about but she you know she she is the she is concerned with it though like it was about being the first and the coldest in the longest right but it was against herself for sure. I think that Because once she started talking about it became this. It was clear them. She is a competitive person. Even though she didn't necessarily like to think of kim it all seems so easy like laughing and smiling and nothing but the thing. Yeah oh but she is like. She's in her. Did you talk to ross. Edgeley didn't talk to russ edgeley. Ross usually i remember cotto remember when he did the last a year and a half ago yes when he did the great british it was the book was done. But i remember reading about that and thinking hewitt interesting guy zone book. He's great yeah. Yeah he's i mean he he's also a force of positive energy like he really. He's he's insanely fit and trains like a madman right. he's always laughing like it is play. I mean there's another theme of the book. The relationship between swimming and play and kim has that ross definitely has that like he's a beast but he's literally constantly cracking jokes and just you know lighting up. Whatever room that he walks into. He's very charismatic. In that regard. And what's interesting about him is he. Looks like a bodybuilder. He has unbelievable endurance book about this combination of endurance and strength. And how that works because you would think you gotta be really lean to be able to do something so long but he swam all the way around great britain. It was bananas. And he crazy documented the whole thing along the way he had the rashes on his neck amount. Like open sold like gaping. Cyo one when he's doing this and he came out into the podcast like right afterward like literally had just use scars yeah he was putting that heavy heavy duct tape on it and all kinds of stuff but he's somebody who grew up as water polo player was kind of competitive swimmer but not at an elite level or anything like that and just comes up with these events to do so. He's internally competitive. It's competitive with himself in battling the elements. But it's not about. There's never anyone else that he's competing against other than himself. Right and and elements here. I think that you to do all these things. You have to have some motivation. That is just very consuming externally motivator internally. I it's just it is and and i think that e because you've had conversations with all kinds of people who are pushed to do extraordinary things. I'm sure that they're sort of like you. Know know whether it's something that they were always striving for approval from someone or that. They always just wanted to Know that they were capable of something more than what everyone told them do Or whether it's for some. I want to raise awareness about something but it is i there is. How do we talk about. it is important. I suppose that it's not necessarily. It doesn't necessarily matter What what the specific thing is. But there's gotta be some force that is compelling us to do it right. I loved the backtracking into the history of of swimming and in particular competitive swimming tracing it back to its roots all the way to ben franklin inventing the hand paddles which was like. That's blew my mind. I can't stop thinking about that. I mean he. He is the true renaissance man. Of course you know. It's unbelievable and that cave in the sahara where it was basically a tomb right where there were drawings of people swimming in upon. When at one time very long ago the sahara was a lush green. The green area wasn't the desert. It was dotted with paleo lakes. You know that story love that the you know the first human record of swimming in the middle of the desert ryan africa because of course but that you look at these images in it really looks like people are just press stroking walls and i also love that. The the hungarian explorer who discovered that cave at the time was almost he wrote a book about it. And he speculated that there were actual lakes bodies of water around the cave at the time that the drawings were made and of course the theory of climate change than was just outrageous and so radical and he was like his editor. His editor reportedly was so like that that he put a footnote. That said. i don't subscribe to this like harebrained idea of that. At one time there was water right of course race. Yeah but at that time it was pretty radical and now of course there's so much evidence about about the green sahara and that there are you know. Hippo owns tortoise shells like fish. You know mittens of clam shells like it's just amazing to think about. Yeah it's crazy. Yeah and to think that humans relationship with water dates back to the inception of mankind. Yeah and and certainly before any re- you know this is. This is probably dates back up to ten thousand years ago but we likely knew how to swim way before. It's just that there's no. There's no trace of evidence. Yeah let's talk about the samurais okay martial art swimming. This is something else. I had no idea about which is super cool. So there is of course. There is a swing martial art in japan. So neon eho is The term for it in japanese. The japanese classical swimming art so much like judo or kendo. There is there's the practice and it originated with the semra During the feudal period of japan and think about all these parcels of land that had to be protected by these different samurai clans and because of japan being archipelago. And there's different you know there could be on. The ocean are on the edge of a lake or river. The clans each developed their own schools swimming so they had different techniques for how to protect They're you know the the land that they were objecting and there are these one my favorite tidbits. Is that the sort of egg beater technique of synchronized swimming has its has been described in samurai scrolls like hundred miles. And if you think about some of the things that they taught in these schools of swimming the called radio. I'm not pronouncing it right are y you that You would learn how to cut through breaking waves with your arms like in a parallel fashion or that you would learn to approach in a very calm lake. You know submerged by most of your body and you learn to leap up out of the water into a boat. There's doesn't move called the flying mullet. you can also google this too but this is from a warrior culture. Okay use water to your advantage exactly so it is much in the same way that now martial arts you know. They are practice right. They are physical but also psychological practice philosophical practice a whole body practice and mind and i love. I loved learning about new. Hana because it it was a different way to think about swimming outside of this western idea of Competition in racing and it is fascinating because Neonatal is still practiced in japan today. And there and i went to japan to research. Isn't you know in the tokyo olympics. They were supposed to have an exhibition of well. Yeah i i spoke with the The a lot of these masters of different schools of neo who were preparing this exhibition to kind of reintroduce to the world and perhaps introduce the for the first time what the foundation of japanese swimming net. The national team's success. That we know it today so much of it breastroke right. They've been have been really dominant brush. Look for a long time and there's an interesting historical link to the techniques of neon eho I mean i remember talking to one of these masters of of the the art and he was trying to explain. And we're. We're observing a class in yokohama of these swimmers Taking the class and he said you know he was. We're observing the glide in certain formations that they would mean swimming in and he said you know you know kitajima kosgei keita's even just like the world record holder just this dominant known for like this incredible glide and he said that snia now like like. That's the skill that we teach and that has been ingrained into coaching Yeah it's it's fascinating To track that You know the antecedent of japanese swimming success back to that practice. And i didn't know that the japanese were so dominant at the end of the nineteen twenty nine hundred thirty four olympics. They won twelve medals or something like that. I had no idea that. They like blasted. Yeah that was crazy. And it's all rooted in this practice. Which my sense is. It's not quite a chi thing but maybe where they might share some sensibility. Is this idea of learning how to use. Learn how to work with the water being symbiotic with the water and using it to your advantage like we all know the swimmer who isn't so experienced and they're in a race or a triathlon or something like that never. They're fighting the war. They're making the water work again. You know what i mean and and really you know. Swimming is about fitness of course and technique. But it's really about financing. It's it's this Delicate relationship and this touch in this field that develop over time and some have an innate talent for where they just know how to flow with the water of make it work for them and those tend to be the most successful swimmers. I think that the taichi analogy is really salient. In this in this context. I mean it is about Working with the element and figuring out how to use it to your advantage and be really efficient too. I think that's something that people don't really think about with swimming. And they think that it's like you said when when there's when people are starting to swim are starting to learn how to swim competitively and go fast like there's so much muscle there's so much like windmilling you know. You're just trying to like overpower with brute force and really it's about like your timing your angle of your the position of your body in the water and if you have that it's actually quite you're not expending a lot of energy One of the things. That's interesting about lynne. Cox says that her buoyancy especially in in saltwater she's like neutrally buoyant so she's in that perfect body position to be swimming for hours and hours and hours and miles and miles because she has that writing a little bit higher than average person would and she's talked about that and so that also helps her with her very very long swims But it's also about touch and finance like you go for sure and in this practice they have much like karate like you get lines on your cap or whatever stripes in some cases because i asked him i said how do you even know who's the master and they said look at the caps and they all have their special caps and high. It was so cool to learn about it And i i hope to get. The opportunity actually had been trying and planning to get to the tokyo olympics so i could see that happen See that sort of reintroduction of How to the world. But what's your sense of whether the olympics are going to happen or not. Well can they make a bubble big enough. I don't know right. What do you think. I don't know it's changing so quickly. I mean the spikes that we're seeing right now feel pessimistic about it but we'll have to see but at some point they have to make a decision. There's so many moving pieces and so much money at stake. They can't just snap their fingers right beforehand and say it's happening or it's not like at. What point do you passed that point of no return in terms of the green light or the red. And now we're getting and then we'll be getting into the point where it is in the same as the winter olympic right again. Which is kind of ironic. Can you imagine being an olympic athlete space of not knowing. It's like a state of suspended animation. I think it's so. I so feel for those athletes who are not knowing their training and then they have to calibrate their training for another year and i think it will like break. A lot of people have if it doesn't have it'll play the advantage of the younger less experienced athlete. I suppose who who who benefits with additional time but there's so many people that are hanging on and trying to make ends meet while they do it right and without that certainty is probably really difficult to get sponsor support. Lakes gotta be really challenging. Turns out it's expensive to be expensive to live another idea that i really love about the book. Is this idea that to be. A swimmer is to be a seeker. Some level and and when you track through history there are so many leaders and great thinkers. Who had this profound relationship with the water from throw to lord byron. You know even jfk like people who would gravitate towards the water in times of crisis or as a daily practice to basically help them be more self actualized. Better manning's I love that. Fdr was the one who put the pool right. Fdr put pool in the white house and it lives under the white house. Press pool briefing room which is just is that what it's better than i don't actually know i've never quite been able to pinpoint if that's why but I recently had Yeah i recently was talking about this with someone and you know one of the reporters at npr who who goes the who reports on the white house said yes. You can see the tile so you'd be in the room so it's underneath the mahone you can still see the tile and like where where the pool actually is is is a bunch of like internet servers and i thought that is oh and that hillary clinton wanted when they moved into the white house. She wanted to reopen the pool again as poll. Somehow that didn't happen but I thought that would have been great right while i know. Jfk swam a lot and in particular. It was very helpful when he was in the middle of the cuban missile crisis to try to like get some distance and balance so he could solve. This unsolvable problem. isn't it fun. Think about a hidden actor in on these moments of his one won't imagine being fdr the freedom of being able to get out of the wheelchair blend that he hit his. Yeah nobody knew yeah. He hit his. It was so hard And then it finally became a impossible to hide his physical. You know limitations right. So how do you think about that relationship between being seeker and being in the water. Well i i mean i certainly think it's true for myself One of the i. I wrote my first book American chinatown about how. I notice that when i would go to a city i would the first the first thing i do look to see if there had chinatown china would go to see it was interesting. It was a little window to see. How is this place different or the same To me across the the chinese to ask. And then i realized what i do with swimming is that i look for a place to the swimming pool. Or body. water and How often is the pool in chinatown. There's the chinatown ymca here. And cisco i know gorgeous pool But not that often. But i i don't know i think that water water and seeking it is something that for me. It's about finding freedom. It's about finding a new perspective is about finding a new way of looking at things. I mean isn't that what being a writers so for me. It's like these. Two things are a hand in hand For sure about how my mind works out. Why what's the longest you've gone without swimming. Oh that's a great question Even when i tore my acl many many years ago a cut. I remember this. I had that stupid machine that like moosonee at night and my husband made me sleep on the couch because it was like not sleeping next to that god. That was like fifteen years ago. I wasn't out of the water for that long. But i but it's because it's rehab. It's recovery. it's like one of the. I like the only things you do when you're you know recovering from surgery in many in many cases right. It's interesting that when people get injured on land they send them to the pool pair themselves and then they go back on land and then towns the crab. I had learned hamilton here the other day. And he's got these legendary pool workouts and part of the philosophy behind it is that very thing which is when you injure yourself and you go to physio they teach you all these rudimentary like things and you come and do them for a while. And then you're healed and then you stopped doing them. And he's like we should just keep doing them. And what if we do some of the more rigorous exercises in the pool where you remove the thing that's making you injured in the first place and create the support of environment that allows you to do more with less risk laird. Hamilton is basically saying what every physical therapist is like yelling at their at their patient. And saying give me. why don't you keep doing it. My brothers here to all the time and he says to me. Because i said my my elbow and my shoulder were sir bothering me. And he said so. Did you stop doing the exercise gave. You could go back and swimming. So that was in the past. So then i stopped of. Let's talk about this guy in iraq. iraq who who was teaching swimming lessons. Because this is another story. I know anything about this guy. Well foreign service. Yeah dude jay taylor. This is another story actually. This section of the book came. He was also another pen pal of mine but he was a pen pal. Like many like time ago. He had read something that i've written for the new york times about Swimming as the last refuge from connectivity and he said i have a story about how it brought people together and it was about community about connection and He was this foreign service guy who got sent to look for posting for a couple of years i think was two thousand eight two thousand ten and it was a time when Beg we're seeing a lot of a lot of active like shelling to the and so it was a pretty hairy time to be there and he was in the green zone which at the time was part was in situated in saddam hussein's republican palace. Now i don't know if you know this. But saddam hussein and his sons were very fond of swimming and so at all of their palaces and homes around iraq they had these crazy pools like just again like luxury upon luxury in the desert is like having a pool that you keep filled and This pool had multilevel diamond wars. In fact you can see there are so i don't know if they're still up there. Some youtube videos of service soldiers like jumping off the diving boards. Which doesn't actually doesn't seem watching them doesn't speak well of us at. There's there's something we descend upon the palace and take it over. It's like a playground. That kind of like imperialist View that has gotten us into trouble but anyway so But in this time of war of course there is a community that forms around this pool because of course everyone is drawn to this one pool. Yeah and suddenly. They're like wait. We're allowed to use this pool. It is like got fountains and tiles. And demi moore's and it is glorious and again it's peace. It's finding quiet. And he said that when he Would get in the pool. He would just then. That's when he stopped hearing the firing range you'd be muffled and otherwise it's like this incessant noise of like military exercises and You know they're the people who were there. Were from all over the world you know. Their diplomats soldiers. Un peacekeepers translators local iraqis. Were you know they're providing support and he saw that that pool was again like everyone on the animals flocked to the watering hole. In this in this case it was like a psychological space like a coping mechanism copy mechanism and he was swimming. He taught swimming lessons for a long time. He was a lifeguard had grown up. Been the baltimore suburbs i think. Dc and he. He has great form and he started to teach let people come up to us. Hey got any tips remain. He would see his colleagues flailing around the pool and he would offer some tips and he's a very like when you read the book you understand that he's just like a very kind he's a teacher he's like a the his his joy and his role in life is to be a teacher. You know he's a very end to do it. And and and you've you've encountered many coaches over life as i and the best coach is one who kind of instills a little bit of fear but all but that that that you want you authorities seek that approval get approval. I wouldn't say that he's a person. I don't know what what he is like as a parent but He's a very gentle guy at this point in his life. But you see that. He has this quiet authority that you want to. You know that he knows things and you want him to share them with and so he's able to kind of i mean i think of him as a pied piper of all of these swimmers in in the green zone because he kind of was he ended up building. This you know baghdad swim club of like a roster of two hundred and fifty. Some people rotated over two years And would be teaching swimming less. I mean they kept having to add classes. They kept coming to like a feel good movie. Yeah it's totally. Awfully day. Taylor folks contacting for the rights with him. I didn't realize what really struck me aside from that story. Is this discussion around How beautiful the sunsets are like. How people would swim like a dusk or dawn like not not at high noon. It's too hot But when the sand would kick up when you would get the really epic sunsets but that was also the danger signal. Because that's when the incoming mortars yeah kerr right because that sand would obscure The ability to find the people who'd been hit right right you cover for It was a good mortaring opportunity. And it's it's just like to exist in that reality like you're in this. You have this pool with fountains but right outside of it like people are getting shelled. Yeah and you know. He almost got hit by a mortar In his trailer like on the third day he was in baghdad. He he really almost didn't live to have. This club teaches people. And it is it sort of underlines this just how again poorest nece between states and that's one of the big themes of the book is like we're i think with swimming. What's so intriguing to me about. It is that it is a sport. It is a practice. It is something we do for exercise but it is it is. It is the difference between life and death and water. That is the reality. I mean that is crazy and we don't. We don't dance very often. It's that close these two. I mean last year this past year is has been an exceptional here to that but in our modern day we don't experience that acute acuteness most of us don't anyway Most of us are lucky. Not to and so i think sports of course competition is a way to experience this acuteness of being right this The adrenaline rush the Urgency of feeling just really alive and oftentimes that you know that feeling is something that we we kind of can only really approximate with something. That's a very heightened experience right but swimming allows you to practice literally putting yourself in an unnatural environment. One that really again. An certainly especially with the ocean can really rob you of the life in pretty short order careful. I don't wanna scare people. I know that doesn't occur. I'm so acclimated to swimming pool. Forget about it. i'm like. I don't think he'll be dangerous. Says that is my natural habits. I'm more hyper aware of that. When i'm in the ocean of course but i know thing but like in the pool like the idea that something bad is going to happen to me is not anything that i think about. Yeah that is a very real thing for a lot of people right. I mean. I think that's super interesting. I wanted this book to explore that with that reader. I wanted to acknowledge that reality that that fear is real like so the people who don't like some Our freight of the water that is very that is a profound fear and that is is something that once you get to to become an adult to be a certain age where you feel that that door is completely closed to you because that fear is so profound and so Prime and it is something that you have to be fucking brave to actually push past that in and say. I want to learn how to swim. And i've talked to quite a few folks who had recently started to take lessons or had Started to try to address their their their fears and their lack of swimming ability Over the course of the last couple of years. And it's you know it's very much tied to some bad experiences. They've had maybe when they were kids. But also there's there's just a lot of there's a lot of bag very vulnerable essentially naked. Yeah you know. And you're putting yourself in this environment where you can't breathe like said talk to the hand you know so it is. It is courageous. Yeah it's doable. If you submit to the process it is a weird thing. It's like violent or anything else like if you don't learn it when you're a young kid it's a lot harder when you're older but that doesn't mean that you can't do it and i know plenty of people who learned later in life and love it. Yeah now and i it does serve. You know everybody has their own relationship with it. I know that your relationship with it has changed over time as has mind but what will always remain consistent. Is this flow like experience that you have in water that i can't replicate in any other way. Yeah you cite like moby dick in that idea of see dreaming like like meditation. Water are wetted forever which is a line of that book case me going. Yeah it is meditation. It isn't it isn't. It's a specific type of meditation. It's moving meditation. I think that's actually a someone had told me recently that they stopped doing yoga once they discovered swimming because it did serve that function for them. Yeah yeah yeah. I'm not surprised but you know what it's better when you do. Both different and different and and surfing is a whole different thing. Right which is another aspect of swimming. I suppose on some level its own unique relationship with water and symbiotically living elements and timing. I mean i. I thought about that this morning. When i got out was just you have to. It's the same principle of you have to time it right. You have to read the water right and then you have to move in just the right way to get on the way otherwise. It's not pretty. Yeah so. I suppose you're going to swim for the rest of your life. I hope so. The they're open. The bulls backups in. Yeah right yeah. I know a lot of Mer- people out of water these days. Just they're not the same. Don't you feel more just i. I feel like when i get in water in the morning. I'm just a better person. I just feel like it's all back way way. Better way more capable and when i said they'd better open the pool soon. I let me please like couch. That i'm not saying be unsafe fish. We could be in a situation where it was or pools could safely open. Yeah because i know that. I'm a better person and i enjoy it and i and i miss it. I know you do to what let's close with. This thought. Which is what is it that you want people to walk away from after in the buck. I think a sense of possibility right. I just think about water these days. And i've given this a lot of thought lately Especially because i can't do. I can't do it as readily as i once couldn't take it and took it for granted like anyone else right that i could get in the water whenever i wanted to find that peace find that You know smoothing back of feathers and time with myself and now it's like this juggling act of trying to find again the lane reservation or the window. Where like i know how to manage you stuff at home with my kids and work and whatever and my husband who only supports me by the way getting out and he's just like oh please go. We'll all be happy. He swam. He is he's a pretty good swimmer. He enjoys the water. He hates the cold he's like you will not get in the cold water with. We woke up the other morning and it was. It was like one of those mornings that where you could see your breath. That's not that usual here in california guys year though. i mean. it's high thirties at night here. But then it'll be eighty two by like two in the afternoon so we got up was before dark and i was getting up to go surf and he looks at me. Goes boy but i really wanted to do right now. is jumped. had to laugh. Because i said you know actually i mean i know sounds insane. Breath sounds pretty good to me in deadline leaving. I love you goodbye. That's hilarious and so he understands me fisher. It took me a long time to come back to that kind of appreciation. Because i was so steeped in competitive swimming young and the idea of the early morning alarm clock you know and then standing on the freezing cold in the dark and i was like i do not need this life anymore. I did that for many. But i've kind of come around to fall in love with it in a new way as long as i don't look at the pace clock because that will give you gonna do yeah. I think it is interesting. And i love to hear you talk about how you had. You had to come around full circle from from what was a very intense and formative experience in your life which is to compete at a collegiate level and a very competitive very gratifying and one of the highlights of my life but also extremely difficult and not without its traumas and like i needed to do other things so there was a long period of time where you want anything to do with the swimming. Yeah i mean you have to have enough distance from it and also to understand that. Yeah like you're at a different stage of your life. And i think you know i. I like to think about how. I came back to swimming as well like i. There are times when i wasn't as president in my life and now it's gonna come roaring back in a very wonderful and real by. Do you have a sense that you're more creative when you're swimming consistently like you're you're more in touch with your create voice. I think so. I mean and again. It was not something that i thought about. Until i wrote this book like i did. Not you know. Examine or interrogate. Why i wanted to get in the water and then would go and sit and right what unconsciously you were. You would not the book right an interested in exploring that it kind of nudged me that way. Yeah well thank you. Thank you talking to me today. I love the book. please go check it out. It's called why we swim very direct answers that question. I really loved it. And i'm so happy that the book is being so well received and so successful. I know you've got another book write about It's like a children's book about a woman. Big wave surfer. It's it's sarah big wave and it's about sarah girl hurt the first woman. So yeah she the one that's in riding giants. She's in everett segment. Oh she probably wasn't one woman that's interviewed around the mavericks discussion and theft. Seen that documentary. But yeah it was. I mean she nine hundred ninety nine. She's in she lives in santa cruz. You know she's a professor era. Its soc she's a it's a wonderful story And and it was my first children's book and it was such a joy to right so far. How did you find like you. I seem you got an illustrator to work with sophie. Deal she they asked. My publisher actually asked me like they don't normally do so in publishing. I only just found this out when they encounter this. It was Usually children's books. You think that that you know the writer and the and the illustrators working together no it's like usually. The writer writes the book and then they find in australia. And really yeah. No it's because it's all. These books seem so house like you have to be some monica. Exactly but and usually the publisher does not consult the author. The publisher just chooses but in this case a let me choose and she said yeah. I don't consult that illustrate. It's two lanes it's like and they had the author and they have the illustrator and they do the pairing. That's like ninety percent of the time. Isn't that fascinating shocking. To me i know because it seems like he's braided together. I mean i guess it works. I feel like they're missing out on an opportunity is what i'm saying. Yeah i think so. Speaking of which. Why didn't you read your audio book. Oh that's a great question I i don't know that the the option was offered to me but they doing. They asked me again. They ask me who. I want it so they gave me a bunch of different professionals. Maybe they thought they needed a professional. But i thought. Angie cain she's a great job but i just think because you're so much a part of the narrative that i would i would have liked to have heard you thank you next time next time down your book. Now throw my weight around attack. Cool well come back and talk to me again. Some time. this is really fun. I changed rich Where should i direct people who wanna learn more about what you're up to. What's the best place you're on twitter and all the things on twitter and instagram and all the things You can find me on my website at bonnie toy dot com easiest way to do it all right. Thanks thank god. Let's go swimming points. Thanks for listening. You enjoyed the show to learn more about today's guest including links and resources related to everything discussed. Today you can visit the episode. Page ritual dot com and you can also find me on instagram and twitter at rich role. If you'd like to support the podcast the easiest and most impactful thing you can do is to subscribe to the show on apple podcasts. Spotify and youtube sharing the show or your favorite episode with friends or on social media is of course awesome and always appreciated and finally for podcasts updates special offers on books the meal planner and other subjects. Subscribe to our newsletter. Which you can find on the footer of any page at ritual dot com today show was produced and engineered by jason kam. Yellow the video edition of the podcast was created by blake. Curtis portrait's by alli rogers and david greenberg graphic elements courtesy of jessica miranda copywriting by georgia ueli and of course our theme music was created by tyler. Pyatt trapper pyatt. And harry. Mathes appreciate the love. Love the support. See back here soon piece.

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Getting Discomfortable with Sarah Peyton

Discomfortable

52:44 min | Last week

Getting Discomfortable with Sarah Peyton

"My great mission is for people to have like a good home in their brains to make brains a good place to live and getting comfortable with sarah peyton. Today's guest is an author a speaker and a neuroscience researcher. Sarah thanks for coming on the show. Thank you aj. I'm so happy to be here on. Earth science educator. But i don't actually do research myself did i say research yeah. It's funny because i when. I read neuro science educator on your site i got really excited because i'm positioning myself as a shame educator and so i was like oh cool another educator on sort of unusual topic and so i'm curious like what is what is a neuroscience educator mean to you wrote to me it means that that i'm an interface between my favorite neuroscience researchers and thus strange and wonderful things that they discover and the general public at large. That needs this information but doesn't really wanna be diving into the research papers themselves. So so that's part of what i see and then My great mission is for people to have like a good home in their brains to make brains a good place to live. Wow i love that image. A good cozy safe trustworthy home in my own brain. That's definitely something i long for. Yes too so i'm curious. I know that you have a read on your website. A very personal story about how you got into this work. I'm wondering if you're open to sharing some of what your journey was to get to where you are now. Sure there are so many different places to start. But i think one of the places to start. Is this interesting thing. that's happened. With people of my generation and the next generation where parents were starting parents in the in the sixties and seventies were starting eighties or starting to think about like how you parent what are the effects of parenting. Huckle would be good. Parents and a lot of parents did a really wonderful sweet job of parenting and kids still came out of their homes coin. Oh my god. That was a hard childhood. Why was it hard. I wasn't locked in a closet. I was beaten what the heck happened to me. And so here. We begin to step into what are the second and third generation effects of trauma. How do they impact parenting the impact. The way people treat their children. How do they impact the way people speak to themselves inside their own heads and then how does that affect us as their kids so my parents both grew up during the great depression united states and had really intense difficult stuff happened to them when they were little tiny people. I recently found on. My cousin gave me a newspaper clipping of my grandmother's divorce from my grandfather describing intense domestic violence and attempted murder that my mother never spoke about. I don't think she even knew about consciously so here she is this lovely woman coming into being a parent herself and really bewildered by how hard parenting was and of course what. We're starting to learn about his disorganized. Attachment and how disorganized attachment really impacts the way brains work. In the way that we transmit our patterns from parent to child I wonder i know attachment theory. I know a bit about it. I'd love to dive into it further. But could you give us a little capsule of what disorganized attachment is all about sure. So a lot of raiders and researchers say that disorganized attachment is a win. The parent is either terrified or terrifying so for a lot of us are parents weren't so terrifying but we could certainly describe them as terrified that there was a frozen fear state within them it. Stop them from Responding maybe even the way they would've wanted to respond like that instead of being able to respond fluidly in reasonable sort of timeframe a sudden here we are was parents who are Out of sync in a way with their own self and out of sync with their children. So we have Parents who are depressed. Who can't you talk to them. And they can't answer or you have parents who had really intense horrific childhood trauma unit to win their toddlers and their memory becomes fractured and so for example with my mom. I would tell her if she did something. That was difficult for me. Here's an example from adulthood in adulthood. She would come and visit me and she would like take my stuff that she didn't think i needed my house and she would take it to the will so i tell her don't do that and she couldn't remember like she couldn't keep hold of that request from time to time. It wasn't something her brain could hold onto. And that's of course difficult enough when you're gonna in your own house but if your mom's not able to really track you know those kinds of intense of like ayman please don't do that then. All of a sudden it's it's it's a. There's a presentation of a fractured reality. And these things are not real obvious. It's not. It's not the sort of thing that you realize it's happening when you're little you don't think about it. You just grow up. And they are dealing with enormous. Shame states because that's kind of the inheritance of second third fourth generation. Family trauma is an inheritance of. There's a way that win is fractured. We'll leave each other and will leave our children. Our children are having to deal with a kind of a suspended in constant state of alarm. Aloneness us this beautiful phrase. Aj used the phrase. I think conditioned trauma when talking about shake. And i do have the sense that that phrase takes us into an understanding the league. The nervous system expectation a being left alone not necessarily physically but emotionally cognitively Is this making any sense to you. Yeah absolutely i'm i'm thinking of my mentors often. Talk about gershon. Kaufman's definition of shame. Which is a breaking of the interpersonal bridge. And how important. It is to have consistent repair and what. I'm hearing with disorganized attachment. Is you never know if the repair is going to happen. So it's it's there's no consistency to the rebuilding of that. All important bond between parent child is at sort of on the same page after nearly now apart what we're starting to get our arms around here is Is this idea of repair. And it repair can be so nonverbal it can be so in the moment you know that the parent or whoever's doing their pair notices. Oh i slipped. All my tension slipped and then they're able to bring themselves back. Daniel siegel says that That repair is the foundation of secure attachment that insecure attachment. The parent is missing. The child's cues something like sixty percent of the time but has the capacity to circle back around and catch the child catch what what was missed but when we actually get into disorganized attachment most of the time as disorganized parents. Don't even know that there has been a rupture than a repair. Needs to be made. Yeah you know you'll see this in disorganized attachment and domestic violence and alcoholism where there's a tearful remorse after every time that something bad happens but that tearful that steady cheerful remorse is not enough to transform us from disorganized into secure attachment. Because of course the behaviors that are being more step on our so Are so destructive and fracturing in numbers selves. So it's almost like when we talk about disorganized attachment were talking about relationships. Don't have any pair in them at all. yeah. I'm really understanding now. Secure attachment to me always seems like this holy grail but to understand that. It's not about being perfect. It's about noticing when there's been a break with the child and repairing it and that seems very doable. A little bit more manageable than trying to be perfect right from the get go. That's really helpful statement. And i'm imagining in the organization parent. You talked about living in this terrified state. so they're they're operating in fighter flight or something and it feels to them. I'm imagining like they're in such danger. That feels so important that they don't have the resources to be thinking about. What are other people around me thinking and experiencing and it just the child subtle cues of needing repair get lost sue. True yeah Yeah what we notice in infancy. Is that children in. Need a kind of a crescendo. And then arrest in interconnected relationship so the baby needs you know movement into intensity intense shared joy or intense expression of distress and being comforted and soothed and and not being asked to be in quotation marks on all the time all the removal of attention and then the return of attention has its own. Good timing when our brains are not fractured It sounds like a delicate dance and delicate dance. Babies need rest When we're disorganized we can't tell any dressed picking like you said we're not picking up. Those subtle cues so. I'm hearing that this was something that you experienced and what what impact did that have on you. Well it quite an intense impact on me. And then of course. I became a mother. Found myself replicating some of these same patterns is is like oh my goodness wanna in a world where where. I can't even stop the forward flow trauma. Even though i know about an i want to There's been a lot of healing since Since my son was a baby So things are quite a bit better now. But i keep making breakthroughs in than going. Oh my goodness i would. We both survived this life up to this point most. Yeah most recently discovered. You had a different question. But this is where my brain's going young most recently. I discovered that. When i would talk to him i would have like a hidden knife that would come out. And then just flash into his ribs And you know. I'd be going along just fine and then i would you know and then i would add and you're not doing drugs. Are you just be like this sudden explosion of yen attack. That was the that was Really characteristic of the way that my own anxiety would disrupt intrude on everyday language. And so i i. It was about two years ago. He's twenty two now about two and a half years ago. I discovered this hidden knife. Quality and i thought i'm just a not gonna wear it happen anymore. Going to do something different. I'm just going to use relational language with him. I'm not gonna not gonna let myself go into those anxious lists. I can still going to go into them. I just not with him. You know i'm gonna make sure they have. When i'm on my own get myself out of there and i'm just committed to only using the kinds of language that i really have discovered in my nurse. Science education that allow the relational part of the brain to flourish. So that you know he's he's already nineteen years old when i start this and it's been enormously beautiful for us. It's transformed our connection extraordinarily and and you know so here. we go we just. I think we do our healing work. We discover what needs to change and and we do our changes as best we can and we and we get tremendous tremendous rewards but we have a lot of morning to do. I like that. There's always hope for me. When i hear about these stories of repair like of course we're gonna screw it up but then there's just so much potential for healing which which gives me a sense of hope and i'm really hearing that in your story that you know we can spend twenty years with someone and then realize ups. I've i haven't been showing up in the way that might have been more ideal but we can work on that and we can do that now. Yes yes it's quite sweet and brains. That's a wonderful thing about being under a science educators that brings her fabulously neoplastic. They're deeply changeable and deeply able and we never quite know. Exactly what's gonna you know going to create the change that makes raman good place to live by an it certainly happens slowly neuron by neuron but but it's quite a quite a fringe. Ernie because so much happens sir. So many directions. I want to go. But i want to circle back. What what for you was the kind of impetus for learning how to heal your brain for like figuring. That out was like an aha moment. Yeah there were a couple one of them. One of the moments was. I started to learn nonviolent communication because i was looking for ways to heal my parenting. I couldn't even at that point. What was wrong with it. But i knew something was wrong. And started to study. nonviolent communication. The fellow who developed non violent communication is named marsha rosenberg and at that time he was still living and he was still traveling around. He came to the pacific northwest. Where i live so i drove to go see him. I paid for a three day workshop which was Something i had never done before. I had never been at any kind of workshop especially not three day workshop and i had been listening to his cd set nonstop before i went to see him speak and at that point he was kind of word for word repeating what he had said on the cd set and like oh no here i am. I've come all this way. But am i gonna do. I know all this by heart already in woman stood up. And she said we're gonna do an empathy sir classical empathy circle. I'll just go to it because at least it's something i don't know yet an hour over there and i had been having real trouble. I had older son another son who Who we had the delight of adopting and we got to keep him for a number of years. We did lose him to alcoholism and deaths and but at that point he was still still with us and I couldn't figure out how to hug him. It was like when i go to hugging my body would just stop. And i couldn't hug him as the heck's going on it was embarrassing like nobody talked about this. Nobody was out there in the world. Saying i can't how much what's going on you know was like you j- shame again because it was so different from what the dominant world was talking about. You know what what is it. Apparent could parent. You just love your kids. Whether they're the doctor whether their birth kids you just love him on. It's just really easy. But i linked sat down with these folks and and the woman said well. Does anybody have anything that you know has bothering them. And nobody said anything for really longtime thought. Well what the heck you know what harm can gonna do. I don't know any of these people. And i started to receive what they call the empathy. Yes says about what. I was feeling what i was needing and i had this transformative experience of on like time traveling and i remembered i remembered being baby being a toddler reaching for my mom and feeling her recoil which was part of our trauma. You don't wanna recoil. Student wasn't that she didn't love me wasn't any of that. It was just hugging. Her was dangerous. And you can feel that when your baby you so tune to your mom and so it was like in my body this expectation. That hugs wouldn't be welcome. That there would be too much for my people that stimulate trauma and and i had this experience in this resonance pace of that becoming so clear and then just disappearing and i went home and i i could hug my boy which was wonder it was more willis. Now's like what happened. I've changed like that in my life. I've never had an experience of neural change. I didn't even know it was neural change. Then what's going on in started. That's when i started to read neuroscience. Has anybody studied this. What happened to me. How did that change started learning about trauma. I started learning about what happens with the way that words touch our brain and change the way brains work. And i discovered a wonderful researcher named matthew lieberman. Who is the author of a book on social which is about the the default mode network data. Matic voice of the brain and matthew lieberman was doing research. That showed that when we named emotions. The emotional part of the brian middle calmed down as long as we named the right emotions stunned. This was exactly what had happened to need. People had named my writing motions and so That was the beginning of this. Whole journey was like wow neuroscience help us see even more clearly how to use language to transform our brains and make them look system. Yeah and you. You talked a bit earlier about that. Relational language Replacing that inner metaphorical knife that you talked about. And i know that non violent communication for me. You know as i've started to explore shame i've noticed that there is ways that i can speak. That are more shaming. And there's ways that i can speak that are less shaming and. I'm imagining that. This relational style of speaking that you're talking about is also probably similar to non violent communication going to be counter shaming and connective as opposed to sort of judgmental and disconnected and. I'm wondering if you could give us a sense of like. When you say relational language. What does that mean exactly. Yes i see non-communication as a bit of a subset of the of the kinds of language there's a barge sort of if it were a big circle of Of the kinds of language that changed the brain monk communications beautiful way to do it. So an example would be greg mcdonald. From my mother of translating non relational language into relational language. My mom As part of the trauma that she grew up with she was really terrified. I might. she's not enjoy the way that my body was she always had the sense in my body was too big so she would say you know. Those dreaded words to hear promoters. Tear your fat. She'll say and i would be devastated. And i would go and chide from seeing my mother and it may be took like five or six years of me noticing first of all that she was doing it because my husband noticed that early in our marriage he noticed she would say stuff like that to me and i wouldn't even remember it like i had lost to the over of so used to her. There was a part of myself that i just turned off when i was with her so i started to notice and i started to get support and people were like a course year. A you're horrified and ashamed to these words from your mom. Of course you want the person who to love. You think that your body's just fine the way. It is and so over these years than i started to get really calm. What her and one day. I remember she said he. Sarah your fat. And i said mom when you see my body to can really worried that i'm not going to be loved and the people are gonna like and respect me. And she said yes. Such a little girls lawyers say member and i and i was stunned. You nominated head coming from me. Spontaneously hadn't planned. It just came from sort of the abundance support that i had received over the years because i think i just became really curious instead of really offended and and the change and for two years actually. She didn't say anything about my body than she started again. I give some empathy guesses and she stopped again. You know it was quite a thing you know. Here's here's lemond relational shaming language that disguises. Great love worry. Worry and i never you know before that moment. I just would have thought that she was doing it on purpose and she just wanted to hurt me but you know it turned out to be something entirely different. I don't think she knew right. I don't think she knew. Yeah in a way. How much you me. I think often you don't know how much we love each other until somebody notices. I love it. What's coming up for me as you share. This is i did a non-communication. It one of these nine day trainings. And there were several instances where. I didn't show up in the way that i wanted to and i was feeling shame and i felt like i had done. I had acted badly and these really skilled nonviolent communicators would do these empathy guesses and they would show me that i. My motivation was coming from a place of love. it would just wasn't an effective strategy. So even i didn't see that. Oh you're right. I did a i did not great strategy but it really was coming from a place of needing connection love and that just that made me feel less shame about my own mistakes and and i'm i'm hearing that in in the story about your mother that she she didn't know how this was really coming from a place of deep concern and love and desire for you to be happy. Is that accurate. Yeah happy or maybe evens safe. Somehow she she grew up in such an unsafe all. So i think even more than happy she she wanted me to be to be in the world and not be harmed not be attacked not be hurt and it must've been a revelation to her even to see. Yeah that is where. I'm coming from and i. It sounds like it had a really impact at least the first time. Yeah both times real impact. Yeah yeah it was stunning and talking about it. There's a part of me that speechless with yeah. Yeah i feel that to actually. And i'm curious about there does seem to be this all important moment where you were able to transcend the knee jerk reaction. That might have come up in you or that. It sounds like in the past came up. This really defensive. Shame reaction an end. I'm i'm curious is why do you think it was that. In that moment you were able to hear it so calmly. Is it because you had received empathy around this issue from other people. And i'm curious how you manage that really important change. Yes and i think this is where this is a beautiful question. I think this takes directly into the heart of merrill change that we are changed by gradually beginning to internalize the people who give us a sense that we make sense in the world. If we were visual right now rather than just audio. I would show you my my my fist with my thumb tucked inside and my thumb tucked inside. Daniel siegel uses this image of the fist to represent the image of the brain with the limbic system and the nikola the thumb tucked inside the deep part of the of the brain. And then as you fooled your fingers down over your thumb. This represents the way that the prefrontal cortex is kind of wrapped around underneath forehead behind the eyes stretches back with its neural connections to the mid july. So so what happens when whenever we have a sense of being understood of making sense to another person is that we is w- we grow it's kind of the software of the brain. A baby comes out At burs wired to communicate wired to communicate both joy and distress and a meter is wired to reach into the rest of the brain hardwired but the brain is not soft wired to have the software installed to reach back and hold the midland that software becomes installed by the experience of human after human or one human time after time saying to us. Yes of course you make sense. Of course you're scared. Of course you're lonely. Of course you are startled. Sure angry of course you felt these things because you make sense that that message for us as extremely social animals is message of belonging and safety and every time that someone says to us. Yes you make sense. A new neurons connected there between the prefrontal cortex anemic too. It's like this is. This is kind of literally the making up the good nest within our brains a good a good brain good place to live and so happily. This is the most nerve plastic tracked in the human brain. Is this bring place. That's changed by relationship. We can be changed by relationship. Gr- example we could have a terrible life you until we're ninety and then just by chance at age ninety we get put into one of these wonderful nursing homes where the people are really kind and understanding. Our brain can begin to change. People talk about this happening to their parents that get into really wonderful nursing homes and all of a sudden they're different person and so we are most changeable here and this is what had happened to me in this experience of suddenly being able to hear my mother differently was i had so many people though had loved and cared for me. When i spoke about how difficult it was with my mom not liking my body and they kind of entered my brain. We do this. We entered one another's brains and become a part of it. So i had all these other people in there with me. Oh yes there you make sense. Of course this would be of setting you know and if you have fifteen people who've been stalled in your brain her going neon no wonder of course your head you don't get as upset Wow this sounds like very intuitive to my experience of shame but to hear the science of it in such clarity is really mind blowing. I'm kind of. I'm kind of picturing. And let me see if i get it. I'd love to recap here. The the big delay this this very primal protective part of the brain kind of having a one way street where it can really affect the rest of the brain but we kind of have to develop the capacity and the wiring to affect it or to kind of control nimby not control it but like hold it and nurtured and put it in a relationship where there's a two way street where we can affect it and it doesn't just take over. Does that is that capturing it. That's catching it. Yes wow and it. Sounds like the the acceptance of other people them seeing us empathizing with us and and saying like yeah that makes sense because we're such a fundamentally social animal. Is this opportunity for us to really accept and make sense of ourselves as well. Yes and that that makes so much sense in a shame lens with shame being this disconnect or this isolate under and then connecting with other people and being reassured. like no. You're you're not Different bad and alone. You're one of us. You're totally normal. Being such a healing message for shame. Yes yes and i often think about About the state of alarmed aloneness in in relationship with shame so you heard about fight flight freeze. I'm sure has fight the this phrase fight flight freeze implies that are only two pathways forgetting upset. Our fear for flight and anger for fight. But my sense is that we have another pathway that we get really upset along that is neither fight nor flight than it is. Actually alarmed aloneness the response that a baby has and this is from punks zips work where he talks about all mammals. Having a panic grief circuit that lights up when the person that we are missing is gone. And there's an alarm in are being at being alone so i started to say fight. Fight alarmed aloneness and freeze. Because we haven't seen response in fighter flight this elevated heart rate elevated blood pressure. There's an increased cortisol. There's that mingling. Running the show rather than the prefrontal cortex. But if you think about that experience of and i think she is a part of of the alarmed aloneness kind of complex of emotions and this is better also something that yuck sent confirms a in what we what we notice is that it's home harm state and it's not fight and it's not flight it something different so i started to think about sheen very much as a natural outgrowth of our extreme and mostly are often unknown and of sushi ability that we belong with people as long as they are safe and treat us well. We belong with people and an another researcher who i love is james e cohen. And he's the guy who does social baseline theory and what he says. Is that if we take a single human and separate them from their tribe from their family from the community from their social group then the way that they will measure in research is going to be below their average that we would need to be looking at people within their social groups in order to get their true baseline when we remove people from their groups. They go below their baseline. And this i think is a huge aspect of the conditions trauma. Response oshane is an curse assistant experience of being alone So it kind of chronic Operating below baseline because of a perceived or real lack of that two way street that develops when we have a sense of belonging. Is that right. Yeah and some people say that she creates the highest flow of cortisol of any human emotion So if we're in her just as that were beautiful but they flew out of my head again. But if we're in this this Chronic a chronic chronic sense of aloneness. Yeah if in this chronic sense of aloneness than we kind of got this elevated cortisol who all the time emily. We read it as like that. There's something wrong with us instead of realizing. Well of course. I have elite coxon completely alone here you know. I may be being bullied. I may be being excluded. Whatever it is that's happening or it may just be that. I've broken my own desire to be an integrity in which case leave myself and then i'm very alone as well. Yeah that brings up a really interesting question. That's been nagging at me as we've been talking because you know and bernie brown talks about empathy as a as an antidote to shame and i'm very aware of when i do feel fully seen in my authenticity. It just is such beautiful healing connective feeling. But sometimes there's a space where i really do need to honor myself and connect and belong with myself and i'm curious it feels to me like there's this polarity as a social animal between our social needs and our individual needs as a single human and finding that right balance seems to be a place of secure attachment and a place of a healthy relationship was shame so i'm wondering if you could if if you could talk a bit about like what. What is the side in terms of our relationship with ourselves that we can call. 'cause we want the brain as you said to be this happy home so is there. Is there some self work here. Yes i do think so and And i and i think you know it can be so horgan can be work with others. It kind of depends on how safe people have been whether that whether we have the emotional blue to move into relationships with others. It's one of the reasons. I wrote my book. Your isn't itself was to let people be able to begin to do the work on their own with the help of the book. Kind of holding them in other people holding them we. We are also often held and and grow from profound relationships with non human things including animals companion animals a sense of nature. the define. These things will often help us. I remember very wonderful relationship. I had with stuffed dog is just like it was a life saving relationship. You know and Because people people were not particularly safe than for many people. People aren't safe enough to let us get close enough to have them. You know be able to say oh heck yeah you make sense. Plus there's kind of a deficit in our society. We don't know how to tell each other that we make sense. You know and offer advice instead of resum them were tell people the buck up instead of resonance or to tell people that you know dismissively go does know who you're a good guy doesn't none of which are none of which are the message you make sense in the missing to make sense is isn't turn your message. Is there space where we tell ourselves i make sense is that is that something that we can do. Absolutely absolutely i call this part of our our our resonant self witness and one of the things that research shows is that if we use our own name when we talk to ourselves. And i'm going to assume here that it works best if nobody's used our name to shameless because if all we ever heard was our name being used as a shaming feel very friendly but if we had any kind of okay neutrally neutral experiences with our name to say to ourselves something like syrah. Of course she makes sense. Of course you're ing. Of course she's struggling shame and gradually gradually as we begin this as a practice of self accompaniment then the resonating of witness becomes stronger and stronger. More able to hold us. I had the experience a couple of weeks ago for the first time in this journey. Which for me has been about ten or fifteen year journey this journey of self resonance of waking up kind of into my own arms like a sense that i was waking up and holding holding. Sarah was so much warps and gentleness and then in contrast this morning i woke up an struggling and i went out into the world. I was walking my dog names. A caution really struggling shame today and i had a couple of interchanges with the other dog owners and dogs and ny spirits lifted and how housing. Wow wonder if i was lonely. Which of course many of us might be during this particular timeframe very relatable. Yeah and so yes. Yes yes i think we can be our own. Resonating of witnesses I hear you talking about talking to yourself. And that's also something that i do and it is. It feels so self compassionate to talk to myself in a new way. I mean they used to talk to myself. I wasn't even aware of it in a very perfectionist self critical way and i've been on a journey of catching it kind of like how you described that that quick knifestab that would come out. I would do that to myself and others does seem to me like we treat others and ourselves the same often so i was stabbing myself and not even realizing it once i started talking to myself like literally saying exactly what you said. Hey j of course feeling shame. Right now i would start to notice these self stabs and be like. Oh wow okay i mean. Of course you're doing that. That's your habituated to do that. It's a an interesting process of learning to kind of accept that part of myself as well. Because i don't want to shame my own self critic so it's been an interesting kind of snake eating its tail but with self compassion. Does that make sense makes so much sense with a beautiful image to self compassion in the snake and now very sleek to to touch that with you. The snake kissing its own tail or something about as he said that what i saw was like a circle of shame becoming smaller and smaller as we as we kind of create this more and more comprehensive holding of self with the self compassion Yes i i like that idea of cause. Shame my mentors at the center for healing shame. Describe it as a multi headed hydra. That's just popping up everywhere on often on both sides like if you do this shame and if you do the opposite also shohei so to be able to gradually bring our shame to one place where we can really see it understand. It seems like Kind of a beautiful A beautiful goal. Yes and much like my dialogue with my mother. It's a very interesting thing to begin to bring that compassion not just to the shamed self but also to the shaming self. Yes to be able to say when when the voices like sarah. How could you be so stupid. How could you upset that the. Aj why didn't you say something different be able to come to this voice also and say oh sarah he gets movie about what you said. You really wanna make sure the message me. Just people actually helps them. Yeah yeah yeah. I love that ability to see the beautiful need and value behind a strategy. That may not have been the most kind. That's that's that reframe is really for me at the heart of a lot of what i learned in non violent communication. And i see you doing it. And it's something that. I really long to bring into my daily life more so i heard you mention your book. And what was the title of the book again is called the your resonant self and there's a website you're resonant self dot com and there's a website your syrup heaton dot com and both of them month. Take you to each other. So yeah your resident self is the name of the book published by norton and there's a your resonant self workbook coming out on may twenty fifth that can be preordered online now and that workbook is all about the kinds of unconscious agreements. We can make with ourselves that then the to immense she is we make agreements with ourselves. Then we break them. You know undoable agreements. I will do no harm. Which is not a doable agreement. You know we can't both be alive and do no harm in hill little bugs for goodness sake. And that's just a tiny thing that we might do but if we have that kind of tracked and then we somebody says to us out. Sarah you hurt me. Why did you do that. And then if i had that contract i'm like oh i can't i can't let it in i. I have a tremendous sense of shame about having broken my contract and again speak to the person to make repair so is the second. The second book work resolved that it's so in line with my understanding of shame from affect theory which thinks of shame as when we have this. These expectations are predictions about ourselves particularly around things that will result in pleasant emotions and when those expectations and predictions aren't met. Shame is how our body reacts. And what i hear you saying with. These agreements is a very similar thing. We we kind of go into the future and create this self image. This idealized self image and sometimes it's not realistic and we can't live up to it and that is often a stimulus for shame. So i'm feeling like these two worlds coming together with what you're saying absolutely so i'd love to just unpack this word resonant. I you know what is that. What does it mean resonance. i i think. The metaphor of musical instruments and in particular fellows helps us a great job to understand resonance. So when we're playing a to monticello the sounds come out as music have different vibrational qualities and they create the different homes. And when we are he'll wins. Life plays on us and the song that comes out of us is really our emotions and humans not being meant to try to live alone are meant to be calmed and soothed by other people saying yes. I hear that too. That life is playing on you and and them saying yes. I hear that tune. This is what it does to my body. When i when i let in what's happening to you for example where. I wonder if you're feeling this. 'cause you needing this or i wonder if it's a bit like this impossible dream guests that i'd like to make for you. Would you love it if you know all of these ways of talking and using language that allow for the music being played by one percent to be caught and reflected by another so resonance for me is a two person system where for example i can have empathy. I can be driving inside my car and has a street carson and i can have empathy and compassion for that person. Drive by an prison would never know that. I had the incompassion to them. Because i don't need to speak to them in order to have it. I don't mean to have any kind of con- conversation dialogue exchange but in order to have resonance with that person that prison would have to say yes to a guess that i made verbal verbal. -able rather we're doing wrong. So residents for me is the territory of yeses that we create together where you know you speak. Msa is it like this my understanding and you say no no. It's like this. And i say like this and you say yes then with that second. Yes moved into a resident space. It's empathy meeting empathy and seeing and being seen and the word harmony is coming up. But i don't mean necessarily peace harmony. I mean like literally these the emotional note of one person meeting and reacting to the emotional note of the other person and both of them witnessing that that's what's coming up for me and so satisfying. It's not just direct reflection. But when we have the sense as i had in this conversation with you a j of both of us coming together with slightly different ideas to start and finding places where we resonate together thing to each other is. It's a so satisfying. I think its greatest pleasure. We have as humans. Yeah i think you're right. And i'm really enjoying it. I'm really feeling this resonance. I can feel it between us even over audio. And it's feels feels connective belonging all the good feelings. Not not the shame feeling so. I'm appreciating this a lot so your book comes out in may and it's a workbook but the previous book has already been released so i can start reading that in advance. Is that right. yes you can your self. It's right excellent and is there anything else you'd like to share with us as we close up Different online offerings. You might have. Or what else can we learn about you yes My website has all kinds of recordings that dan about different aspects of neuroscience and language and trauma and shame and alarmed luminous and lots of things in the store and then Present day i ve offerings continuing into this year with different kinds of Series on relationships on king on violence. on self compassion. So please just come to my website. sarah peyton dot com in. You find all kinds of possibilities. Great well. I look forward to that. And i'll put the web address in my show notes so the listeners can check out more of your work and if they're anything like me i'm feeling a real strong desire to dig more into what you're saying and the research that you've referenced in the books just sound so up my alley. So i can't wait to dive into this world of relational neuroscience. I i never even heard that phrase until i went to your website so i feel like there's a whole world of knowledge that i'm gonna be i can just tell like yes. Yes like i kind of knew it. But i had never been able to fully articulate the science of it. So you're it's filling in blanks for me. So i really appreciate you coming and sharing this with me. It thank you so much for having me as a guest.

Daniel siegel matthew lieberman sarah peyton Huckle foundation of secure attachmen marsha rosenberg Sarah brian middle greg mcdonald gershon Aj Kaufman raiders raman Matic heart rate elevated blood pres james e cohen Ernie pacific northwest
Steven Taibbi

Dr. Drew Podcast

57:26 min | 1 year ago

Steven Taibbi

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Latte like seven eleven B Game Day ready plus tax where applicable valid participating locations farmers insurance knows there's a not so subtle difference between the sound of a car hitting your rear bumper and the sound of a clown car hitting your rear bumper sorry about that the balloon animals at my information we call that a three ring fender bender and we covered it at farmers may know a thing too because they think nothing to click for more under it my farmer's. Truck Fire Insurance Exchange Center affiliates available in every state the doctor podcast everybody as usual check out the swing and sounds check out of everything we have available. Dr Dot Com don't forget the opium Siri the opiates series and also the after dark podcasting guys might enjoy that and of course capable capable of wind in the sale of the Corolla pirate ship by supporting the people that support US click through on that Amazon banner and look out for some of those products. Their carefully selected for the website and for for this show is well. We are welcome to the program Stephen Taibbi. His book is grateful guilt living in the shadow of my heart it's available on Amazon and Google Books Barnes and noble the follow him at Steven with Avista. STV Taibbi T. A. I. B. B. I. Age of six Stephen had two open heart surgeries for atrial acceptable defect repair been told on several occasions he had a year to live three different times forty-six diagnosed with cardiomyopathy which is a devastating devastating illness. Essentially the heart muscle starts to dissolve and not work. people don't live more than a few years with that subsequently has to heart transplant since then and now in a mission to improve how physicians understand patients and vice versa isn't that about right. That's about right good summation. Tell us more. I was fascinated by the whole story so let's let me just run through the medical history just briefly the having an ast repairs not that big effect they do it with a wire now these days but it was cutting edge ars five to to repair it. We're talking nineteen fifty eight so it must have been what we call a right to left shot. They must have exactly what it was and they had to open you up to do that. And survival rate when I was five was fifty percent Roma gun and why the second because they when they opened up the the first time time they discovered there was a second hole. Oh Valve problem they find to valve issues was there was a Venus problem that was plum backwards so they wanted to repair that and they wanted to repair the other show the other shunt the that's the call the whole yeah and but they I didn't think I had the strength at that point so the fixed one hole in the left Venus malformation and the other whole on on operated on and they they sent me home and they said well you know if he makes it if he can get through this year with without dying back into it again. We'll go back and try it again but up to that point nobody had ever lived through till. I was the first interesting and and you were told you had a year to live without with those two operations in the cardiomyopathy no those two operations operations. My parents were told I had your love. I I was told the first time that I had a year to live. When I was sixteen and my I had a severe the problem with Vida my heart at the exact name of it now but I was my resting heart rate was about one hundred and twenty one hundred and something like that it was really high and they said it was a flutter atrial flutter and they didn't know if it was a disease process or if it was just that I had lost control of the heart rate center because the Heart Rate Center had been folded over in the first rodeo operation yeah so that's exactly it. was that fold over that saved. My life on the second operation was interesting. It's so interesting to hear this history because now these kinds of rhythm disturbances are like no big deal. I know go into blade them and that's it. They're done to REV mads. Take Take Care of a minute. I kind of feel good about it. Because I was the first one yeah yeah you can help lead the lead the yeah where we are now lay there but I still helped you interesting and then the second year that was sixteen years old again in sixteen. There were told a at this point my doctor you know he knew this is a new doctor. He knew who I was as far as by personality and how he had to talk to me and we need to talk to me medically as the truth and he got that and he said Steven you're lucky if you have a year and I was sixteen and which was a really interesting year the way my mother-in-law handled that too and then they thought we have to we have have to do a catheterization so through through the Groin and believe me back then it was a lot tougher thing than the way they do it now right. Now I mean it's nothing was the plan then to define your anatomy or to try to play the rhythm source. No they just wanted to see the define the anatomy after put a die in there and see what's going on right so so they did that and while they did that they found out it was the heart rate center and I'm. I'm still I'm sixteen. I'm like a week before seventeen and they said to me well listen and they asked me my permission which I thought was amazing because I was sixteen Michigan F bomb. They should ask my mom but they asked me and they said we WANNA. Do we want to do a cardioversion on you cardioversion and for those of you don't know that means they electrocute. You and the doctor says we'RE GONNA. Put a plate on your back. We're GONNA put it on your chest and we're GONNA ZAP. You is how the doctor said and he goes because most of the time these things work really well. He said we're going to see if we can get you back. On rhythm was the wire still in there's was after the though they took everything out yeah and doctor said on there's just the ANC teensy tiny little bid thing that you may not start up again okay. So what am I supposed to say so so I said okay. Let's go not me out and I woke up to a monitor. That said I was doing eighty. Beats Minute Nice so you were a flutter hydro tack or something and and then the cardiomyopathy which is just stunning now. This is when it really gets like crazy. You're forty six hours after all that and getting through all that then you're going to muscle disease but on top of that though when I was thirty three my doctor told me we didn't mention the fact that I almost died on my seventeenth birthday from what from on heart block instead of on my birthday and remember my first surgeries on my birthday yeah so when I was thirty three almost thirty four. My doctor told me that he didn't know how I did because he didn't think I'd get out of my twenties and he said I don't know how you did this but your normal Donald G is as normal as anybody so he said go out and live right off and I went out and bought a glider. He told me I'm not allowed to fly but I found that I didn't need in a doctor's note for a glider glider. You sit in not not a real sailplane pilot crazy but when he found out he was mad and then he told me whatever you do know acrobatics his finger in my face and so I went out and acrobatics because I had this belief I had to do what they told me. I couldn't do to make myself stronger sure you know and then when I was thirty. Three doctor says you're fine. Go out and live yeah and man. I you know I was already living. I mean because I figured out that I might not live a long time. I've always lived my life really fully and and then I started slowdown gain weight. My wife is a nurse. We couldn't figure it out. I was always able to lose weight easily and and we said we couldn't figure it out. I wore halter and there was nothing on the Halter and then I was walking with a friend of mine of cameraman friend of mine and I live in a very hilly neighborhood and I collapsed. Oh right and so cautious or just temporary just fell syrupy yeah and and I scared the heck out of my friend Larry and he had to drag me home and took me a long time to recover to get my breath back and he wouldn't leave me until I was back. He wanted to call an ambulance. I wouldn't let him but I did. Call the doctor. I'm not a moron. My wife will argue with you but I called Dr. We called the doctor. The next day I went for a stress test nervous about this because I was like I can't be going through all this again you you know and so they did distress any part of you go. I won't go through this all again. No not really that's not the way I'm not built that. Oh yeah so I put me on on the treadmill and literally thirty seconds in on the floor getting oxygen. I felt I I just collapsed and they they had to catch me and lower me to the floor and next thing I know I'm getting oxygen and my wife is being told I'm an end stage heart failure and it was because of idiopathic cardiomyopathy sometimes it's really God playing jokes well but sometimes when people get cardiac valve aww repairs or atrial separately effects of various type and then just having a sustained rhythm like you did can cause a cardiomyopathy so you had lots of risk factor for it. There was not a viral Khartum out though right that they think well. There's an argument. My doctor thinks it's related to my younger thing yeah other doctors. I think that it's my doctors on Dr Donna Manzini. WHO's considered one of the best value specialists in the world I'm very grateful fool that I have her what she thinks. It's because of my past but other high end. MD's say could easily have been a virus but that's that's the you idiot Pathak part. Isn't it yeah but sometimes they can buy the heart and see. Did they do anything like that. No they didn't they just what you have to get on the list right damage did. How long did you wait just about a year and that was the F- The next time I was told that you have a year. How was that experience getting out and be first heart transplant expanded to you because it's a credit approx of the book they called me up by doctor called me up and he said Steven you're in heart failure. The only thing we can do about this is a heart transplant. You're you're in bad shape and I put my head down on my desk and I cried. I cried. I really cried but while I was crying I was leading it in. I was accepting uptick. I was okay. You're sick again okay this. Is this the deal you're dealt. You know I have to deal with and once so it was done crying and I'm not kidding. Me was not a long time. I never cried again not even a single tier because what I did instead. was I started to armor up. That's my way saying it. I've been doing this my whole life marmer up. I visualize myself armouring. I eventually I got the whole suit of armor on I pick up a sword lower my visor and then I get my real weapon in the in gear and that's gratitude Senate become grateful for everything including illness. How do you find that inside. I don't know how to sell because gratitude I people have heard me say many times that I knew when people are doing well well because they express gratitude and forgiveness especially gratitude it finds it makes it. It's meaning making its purpose. It driven I. I don't know it makes makes everything you're doing right it. It's it's getting a nuclear powered battery yeah. It's it's once you have filled yourself with gratitude. There's no room for fear angst for anything else drill in a little bit though because should be able to find gratitude in the setting of all that that's pretty extraordinary if you could put a map together and how you how you found it or you know other than these suited up so that makes sense and you had that experience of doing that okay so you could be grateful for being able to do that. There was a real incident during in this time that that's where it happened okay They WanNa do put a pacemaker on me in and I always told told my doctor. My doctor wanted me to have a pacemaker for years. I always told them no. No come W- come on no come no pacemaker because it was part of that thing that had that I I couldn't listen to the doctors at that point in my life. I wasn't listening to doctors now hyper compliant okay so this is. Dr Comes into my room and he could sit on my bed. I said sure sit down and he tells me you need a pacemaker and I said well. I've always told by Dr don't ever WanNa Pacemaker. They just sat there and I talked to my doctor. He figured out excuse me how to talk to me. He looked at me and he said well. Your ekg is incompatible with life and once that got passed my stubborn wall. I was like Oh when can we do you know so we were in the this was my first procedure procedure after I had been diagnosed with the path of cardiomyopathy so everything's still brand new. I'm still still processing everything and they put you in a machine to do this and there was a steel wall lower lid and there's a steel wall in front of you like you're on a heart lung machine and that's all. I can see the steel waller could see off off to the side. I can't see what they're doing to me and I'm terrified. I am I am so terrified. It's all starting again the cutting me again the whole you know getting overwhelmed with it and and then I realized that I was stiff his aboard and part of me said that rational national pardon me came up and said Hey. You're so stiff. They're about to cut you. Do you WANNA be stiff when they're cutting. You and I said not a good idea so I said how do I do this not like a churchgoing religious guy that way but I'm very religious in my own way and I said what can I do so I decided to say the Lord's prayer so I said the Lord's prayer and when I was done with the woods prayer I was like okay now. What do I do because I don't believe I can ask for things. I just don't think that God's my butler. You're so I'm going. So what do I do and I started thinking. I said well you know what it was supposed to die. When you're five you were supposed to die when you were six. You weren't supposed to get past ten. You could have died on your seventeenth birthday. They didn't but the way that night they didn't think I'd make it through the night you've we've had. We've had this incredible television career. You married to a beautiful woman. You have a nice house. You have a Pug Lopez all over the house. You have all this stuff to be grateful for war and it's all really been gravy and if this is when it's over I've been giving way more than I should have ever expected and once once I had that and a guy onto that take a lot of sitting there stirring in your from the Lord's prayer to that list I made that list what and a have we didn't have for just going if this is it given how much I've been given I'm okay with it yes and then all of a sudden and this is one of those things in my life. I would normally not even agree with somebody when they told me this but all of a sudden I felt a presence and I felt this warmth this unbelievable warmth and I felt this the most the most powerful feeling of love I've ever felt in my life in Iraq and it just R- and then I heard the chorale I didn't even know existed you know but you know all of a sudden. I heard I mean you know. I heard I heard the you know I heard the chorale and I had tears rolling down my face. Nobody could see it but I had tears rolling down my face of happiness and I I was so filled with love and I so filled with joy so filled with gratitude and that's it from there. Did did you ever talk about what was going on at that moment. I'm wondering it sounds like white. People have described to me near death experiences. I wonder if he were flatlined for a second no no they they were just putting it in the pocket for the water was. I'd never lost consciousness. It was all but it was an incredibly powerful thing and then now that I'm so infused with this gratitude. The gratitude stayed with you out of that experience that add experience. I had been working towards it yeah but I think that somehow I got help and that just and then I realized because because here's something that's really interesting as far as way hospitals are today versus back in the fifties when your children there were no toys. There was no television television. You lay in bed with rails twenty four hours a day. Try doing that for a month. I did it twice and it's it's interminable will actually until I started writing my book. I thought it spent a year in the hospital. Each time while it was only a month and each time was thirty one time I'm in thirty one the other and and you think you have nothing else to do but think and I would think how can I help myself here and I would. I yeah that's where I learned how to disassociate disassociating almost immediately in the hospital. I built the cave I climb into and and I could disassociate associates so much I wouldn't. I wouldn't feel what they were doing to me. It turned out that dissociating that which is not the healthiest thing mentally correct so how'd you gain control over there. I went. I got help therapy trauma therapy looking. MBR Or something or I you know that's really interesting. I went to therapist after therapist after therapist and an and and none of them said that I had a trauma or any one woman Sarah Cinnamon and she goes. You're in trauma you are. It's not that may have been a anachronism of history because around the late nineties so we shifted were suddenly everybody was treating trauma. We realized that's mostly we were dealing with so it was severe for me really was debilitated in my life. I mean you hurt my life a lot. Did you have how did you get drinking or anything like that going. That's no but I I just always assumed and this is in the book and this is one of those things when I wrote what this book. I thought I had to be naked. I had to be if this book was going to have any value at all. I had to be one hundred percent honest and I had to admit things. I didn't want to admit one of the things I had to admit in this book was that destroyed had never been given event where I just kept it turned turned into where I thought it was my fault which is typical child thinking right. My my family broke up part of the reason for grateful guilt guilty of the family breaking up I just carry all this guilt and all the shame can tell you the shame I carried and took a long time and and we did. AMD are one time it was unbelievable really loosened the whole thing right and there's even a lot more stuff now. Now you can access the neuro feedback and stuff all kinds of cool stuff because so many people suffer from this and you know in our in my world. It's what you know because you dissociate appreciate you don't regulate effectively yeah and so you try to regulate from outside your body with drugs and Saxon whatever Tang gliding whatever you were doing the gliding was sort of that in their sure sure but it's all it's always of either and then how people respond to that dissociation. Shen is protein to some people try to pull themselves back in their body by cutting in experiencing other people try to induce the dissociation and make it more intense and then just regulate with substances that kind of thing my my real problem with it was that I never felt. I was any good and I felt like if Tom Anybody knew me long enough. They would find out vigil flawed yeah so I would sabotage everything. I sabotage work relationships. I sabotage I've sabotage Taj relationships with women women that could have been magic and sabotage them. You know it's amazing. I ended up with women. I have now I mean in Bose's sanctum choose walk through fire with me you know and and the book doesn't cover this but I had my second heart. Transplant was a disaster how did here because it's not enough organs in New York so I had to come to. La and there was so much scar tissue that it was they had to my in my second. My first heart transplant my third open heart. The doctor told me he had to hack and saw saw way in and told that Roy dangerous. Yes and I told that to this doctor and he said I'm really glad you told me he said are you prepared for the pain and I said to him pains a funny thing. Eventually it stops so but my my my surgery was so bad I was on the how long heart transplant takes five six hours you right easiest right right. I was on the table for fifteen our boy. Oy Got Twenty units of blood and I was open for three days. Oh my God yes it was horrible. Oh I had damaged just from being on the table that long damage edged to your to nerves and and and so as if that's not bad enough they had me folded open and they would they the after fifteen hours they rolled back into my room would a big tigger Durham on me and my wife's looking at my heart beating actually my new heart and and and they rolled me in and out several times looking for this bleed or they couldn't find i. Have you know normally that you've you like three Lavar. Large holes right drains. I have five because there was so much blood loss okay so that's bad enough but now they've had me out real. I went on a win on the ninth. I got the heart on the ninth and woke me up on the eleventh after closed me and they closed the woke wilken up because I was getting dependent on the on the vent and you know what that right so yeah so I was getting dependent on event ventilator and when they woke me up because my you know the top ribs of cartilage those were bent back and for three days recent they dry holes into your sternum to wire you closed. I mean it's a really painful thing. They overdosed me on paint kills so so what happens when you're overdosed on paying for you then you stop breathing so they said okay. We have two choices the vet will he'll be dependent so you don't have a garden though or or no painkillers for five day. Oh my God and that's what they did. Oh my God five days of Nope Ninety three from that yes I do. That's why I'm bringing this up because now it's been three years three and a half years and I have have been able to get a handle on it sure I came out of that. Operation Changed in a way I never knew could be changed and I had two different doctors. Who's tell me you went through the kind of pain prisoners of war go through worse. It was horrible. It was really horrible. Pain happy said yes and and she doesn't call it. PTSD because it's been ongoing she calls it. I forget what she called. PTSD is usually a single event the kind of thing but like she always compares to she being my my therapist drama like something like that she he says it's more like an onion then PTSD which is tougher and and it's I came out of this thing you know here in La.. I knew I was different. I couldn't put my finger on it but I was a different person and it was it was really hard to get back to my life life after I mean and I saw it being afraid of everything when I drive. Somebody comes to a stop sign too fast. I'm I'm like slamming on the brake. It took a long time for me to normalize my life from that pain and I had to learn how to walk again. You know I was over at the park. Apartments was where we were living and I had I use a walker army. It took me like four weeks to learn how to walk again. What happened to the gratitude with all this. I still had it fills their mark. Well you have to see that's when you that's when you have to pull it in the more right I would my doctor says she she 'cause. I don't know how you do that. That's why I but but I would be. I be laying there in writing. I mean literally the word as it's genuinely meant writing pain. I actually made a nurse here my confession the first night because I didn't think I could live through that kind of pain and my wife always wants to know what did you. What is it but it was? The pain was brutal away. I never renew I've had a lot of pain I never knew paint could be like that and and it was when I came out of that I really I was different and it took a long time to get myself back but the gratitude part I'm lying riding and I'm counting my blessings God. That's how you do it. How do you how do you what do that hour. After hour of it well when at least sedated you know proper fault or something no because that would put me back on the vent right so essentially eventually because he's part of the problem is you've had your chest opens your chest. Musculature is not operating normally that is to get all working again yeah right because the muscles muscles have connected yet and they told me that it was like an overstuffed suitcase to heart was a little large and they had to push my chest down to get the calls you know but good but you have to I had. Did you mental tricks for that for the pain for that so I kept hearing myself saying to the doctor will. It's funny that time time is like you know is going to be my friend so every single second that I was in agony. I would be saying to myself okay a seconds this past a minute has passed our thinking. I love that but after our our our how do you sustain the faith and the gratitude and the fortitude I I use strategies and one of the strategies I use. I use what's available to me. When I first got my first KTAR transplant and I woke up from that. There were hallucinations involved. I guess that's fairly common cone. I woke up from this one and I had the same Mussa nations that are the same ones were back and when the pain would get to be too much and when I couldn't count anymore count the blessings anymore I would call on doc loosens I would force the nation's back and I'd get lost in the because there was no TV or anything they're interesting and I would get lost in the loosened that I just ride out the moves nations and see where they took me a while and so I wanted to partner dissociation I guess it has disassociated related to it. Somehow it is but but by doing that I was able to entertain myself you know through the through the hallucinations and distract myself from the pain because I was involved in the loosened and then I wasn't doing that. I was busy counting my blessings or counting my time now. The book is your the mission as described is to improve how physicians understand patients and vice versa right. Where does that come into this narrative. That's not exactly in the the book. That's what my mission is. Now Okay and major hospitals have already hired me to to speak to their doctors because it's part of my strategies always have strategies. I don't go into a hospital. Even if I'm GONNA get a cath. I don't go into a hospital without strategy. Ah One or two strategies already at my ready. You know and I want to teach people how to do that but you know what you mean by strategy okay one of the strategies. I use really came work rate at Cedars. Was You take your gratitude that you're working off and you turn that to other people and you become grateful for everybody. WHO's helping you and it's sincere you can't fake this won't work of fake and every person that comes into my room. I thanked profusely. I don't care who they were. If they came into my room they were there. Help me. That's all I saw if it was a maintenance guy if it was housekeeping person if it was people delivering food my doctors nurses the flow bottomless. I don't care who came in my room. They got thanked thanked profusely and sincerely and for example I had a housekeeping guy and he could barely speak English but he speak enough and I wanted to know his name they asked him about his family because I'm sincere and then I said to him one day. I said you know I really WanNa. Thank you for what you're doing for me because I know you're keeping my room clean. You helping me not infected. You're helping keeping me alive and I want you to know how much I appreciate eight that well. You should see guys to taller. He beamed you know and so my gratitude helped him of course right and what did I get four. I had including room in the hospital but I- housekeeper but that was not my designed by design was to let him know how much I appreciate them. I make it one of my my strategies. Is I make it that. Every person wants to come into my room every doctor every nurse. Everybody wants to come into my room and of course one of the other strategies is humor humorous huge. It's really huge. It's big it's as big as gratitude and this is for patients and when you when you talk to hospitals you're talking to help them coach the the patients up or their staff. I want to coach patients and doctors because doctors need a lot of stuff. We've got to tell you you know that I understand that doctors have have to decide to disassociate themselves a little bit. I understand that but part of me goes too bad. This is what you decided to do and your job doesn't include that that that's protecting you. It's not helping your patient so it it. If I find a patient who's doing something wrong just strong. It's a but the doctors have to do certain things to they have to make sure that the patients dignities intact and then not careful enough about that at all and nurses too aw I find the people who really cared about that. Were like syllabus you know but they have to. They have to do it but the doctors is a big explain. Doctors do with huge and it's bad and it's they talked to other people over you like they'll. They'll come in the doctors will come into my room and they'll ask my wife. How's he doing on a main right there. Esque me you know okay. My Wife's nurse but I talked to another friend of mine was a doctor goes. It's not because your wife's nurse. It's just what we do and and they talk to the spouse so the friend whatever the parent instead of talking to the pay patient talk to me. I talk to the patient I make them feel like you care about them. When you at once you start asking the spouse about the person or whoever else it is then the patient feels like they're being overlooked time. Turn it up with your new favorite podcast expeditiously with Ti here on podcast one joined the rapper entrepreneur family man and activists has Z. Bridges the gap and sheds light on important social topics and much more authentic eyebrow raising dialogue that might make you WanNa pull your dictionary out. De la new episodes of expeditiously with ti every week on Apple podcast and podcast one. I WanNa talk about a subject to get some uncomfortable press associated with that of course erectile dysfunction even when companies offer offer easy solution. They tend to talk about it. Even people kind of embarrassed truth. Is this a common thing. 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Do whatever you gotta do to be near and just talk. That's it right now. Imagine if you're at. What point were you know having done when you notice people talking over you so much our way from you operations. It was through I I. I noticed it at the beginning of my first transplant flat after operation that would imagine that when you'd see that and we'll get we just instinctively thing you have to be aware of and overcome and the other thing another the strategy I use that I really recommend I don't I don't wear down in the hospital not only recovery at smart because it just take off and Indiana picking it up and moving in the act like you're not there. When you have a gallon I figured this out when I was a kid I wear street clothes hospital I wear sweatpants and a button-down shirt not as nice as this one but a button-down shirt pocket because if I need a monitor the monitor goes nere instead of hanging around with next thing and if they want to open they can just open me up from the front and would you also agree patients want to be touched. Yes pulling away away thing. I put your hands on them absolutely other hand whatever you want to get near him there are some nurses who in the beginning when I was getting sick again and before or had that experience there was this one nurse Denise who I was getting if a catheterization and she just would not let go of my hand and I cannot tell you how grateful I am to that girl for that was the same cath where you had the big experience was no no no that wasn't a cath. That was Base Vega Place Yeah Yeah Yeah. This is really interesting stuff. It really is and I think you're onto something. So what else do you tell the hospitals I tell them when you're done with US ultrasound clean the patient up they never do they leave you there or they pick a what's essentially what they used to wipe for your vein to get you covered in coop and they don't give you cleanly off. EKG Pets to go home home and it's always two weeks you've been showering with the forever and taking that thing off is going to hurt you know so oh yeah clean your patients up when you're done with them the same way. I'm saying to the to the patients. Make sure the doctors and nurses want to come into a room the doctors the nurses should be doing the same thing making sure that the patient wants them in the room. I honestly believe that we could cut down a lot of lawsuits against doctor opt for sure. Oh and expense for them and if they would just start being sway with their patients if they I think a lot of times doctors get sued because the patient doesn't like the doctor. Oh yeah because they're angrier angrier doctor for the way yeah. They don't treat them right the they have this this attitude while I'm sorry that's not what you signed up for. You know we're the ones that really I mean the thing that I'm GonNa say legitimately but being too busy as one of the sources of that and and then but the other is being defensive they're scared I know I know but that's where I say. I don't care because just like the way I have to be that away with my situation. I mean there. I say to myself all the time. I don't care that you're that way. You can't be that way. If you WANNA live. I say to myself all the time so I have to say that to. The doctors the nurses to right. They have to have same kind of you know a lot of what I'm saying. That patients should do is a lot the doctor should do. They should just reverse everything in a what I've got here. It says you're interested in understanding between doctors and patients with that means means just that experience the experience each other and and that the fact is that the patient is grateful to see you. You should be grateful to see them. That's GonNa make understanding and communications that much easier. I think how about application of mental health solutions interventions team. It sounded like you had to go search for that yourself and I went from doctor to Doctor Found Sarah. That's got to be very frustrating. It was and I I had one who was a psychiatrist film. I had a really traumatic experience when I was six and I had a I mean really really traumatic experience being in the hospital. You mean Yeah Yeah. I basically was in a sense raped in the hospital but that top of everything else I had this none because it was Saint Francis Hospital. I WanNa say this in the beginning. Saint Francis Hospital saved my life right Saint Francis Hospital back then was the best child children's hospital in the country or was it pre new mark in Roslyn New York and I have nothing in Saint Francis. I have a lot against this none. What happened my mother in this? None just didn't like each other and and one day I'm in my bed and I and there's this mother every week. We all called the nuns mother and and is this this none talking to a novice and she goes an officer of people who don't know as a young. WHO's coming up as none was coming up and she she points at me because is that one is a brat. I never said a word back. Then I never said a word I was silent for for years I was silent and only I was not and I knew that didn't meet but what was really happening was she and my mother arguing and one night she comes in with six novices with a cart would cloth on it. She grabs me. I'm sound asleep. She grabs me out of bed and plops me on the cart and I started screaming immediately immediately because I knew that this was not good and she rolls me into the girl's bathroom and it was it a changing shelf in there and and and she ripped my clothes off in in front of all these nuns just rips off my clothes. It's the whole way down the hall. She's going this will show you this will it should she's saying things like this will show you you brat and stuff like that. So of course course I'm terrified and she she she gives me an animal and instable completely against my will. Nothing's been asteroid. It and I'm screaming screaming. I'm six years old and now I'm screaming. I'm sorry I yelled are going full full and sh- and she she just keeps her hand on me and and I actually said I'm going to explode and then I did your all all over her good for you. I know but at the time I didn't get to feel that that was a good thing six because it so she white me off. She was gentle antle about it. She was gentle about the insertion but but she right wipe me off roughly and she brought me back to bed plot me into bed and I went into a fetal position and post this reset pre second surgery and I never felt safe again for years and I mean I've never felt safe until I was in my late fifties and yet you still retain gratitude spice but of all this yet gratitude gratitude to the secrets of life it really is. Do you have any spiritual insights as a result of all this. I mean you said you're not religious. I make sense of it. All I am the most religious person I know but it's my religion again people today. Nicole spiritually yeah yeah but I'm really I'm really there. That's explain it. I I just look at life as its tapestry. We all involved in a tapestry and in a tapestry on the thread your throat right. There's a thread next to me is a threat on my life right or left is a threat above and below me. That's all I can say. I can just see what's me. I have no idea what the tapestry is but I know part of it. I don't know what it looks like. Quantum theory is built on the same idea. I know I'm I'm really into quantum physics. Okay so you know this is all this. I came up with this before. I figured that part out but I just think that we're on God's Hollick and that whatever is happening to me. Here's how I maintain it. I realize answering your question better now his home maintain it because I believe that everything that happens to me is my holiday. Experience is what God wants me to do is what God wants the path breath that he wants me on this path. There's a reason why I've been in all this pain. There's a reason for I mean because because I only know those four threads of the tapestry. I'm I'm not going to know what the reason is while I'm alive but I know it's there is reason purpose. I have no idea it's just a an explanation and uh meanings not the right word. They're just reason just the reason beyond your knowledge and then when you say God what do you mean. I mean God. I mean you know whoever quantum wave save the whole graph the the one you want to experience when I had out of body experience I had voice talk to me and then I also had that experience with the with the Eh the chorale so I've got a pretty good central different experience so I've got a pretty good sense. There's something else after this. And when did you have a voice talk. Did you join the pacemaker insertion. Oh no the the voice talk to me. I'm sorry that was when I had out of body experience. When I was seventeen oh interesting. Tell me about that but I'll read the book when I almost died. When I was seventeen on my birthday I had an out of body experience experience and I said you know and this was before Kubler Ross. I had never heard of the light. I'd never heard of any of that stuff and I got. I got to see that stuff off and on that come back to you with the pacemaker thing was in a similar connection. No they were completely separate completely different experiences. I mean they couldn't have been more different so fascinating the and I'm going to tell you something. The out of body experience was that night when they took me to when they took me to the hot when the hospital the hospital said actually they took me the next day because I was too fragile they said I was having a reaction to quantity which was high in medicine then then for a long time as Voodoo and now it's coming back for something else is it took us it back training truly rhythm US yeah. That's what they that's. That's what they gave it to me for turned out. I was allergic to it and they said one in ten thousand so I keep winning the right lotteries but it's these experiences are completely different but they assure me that there's something bigger than me. I'm positive about it. When I had my my my out of body I was climbing up through the darkness and then and there was bright light light. It was over here and it was silver. It wasn't white no so far away that it was silver and it was the brightest light at ever ever seen in my life I helped I think this helped me become a lighting director and you know and and and all of them wanted to do is get to that light. It's all I wanted to you do and then suddenly stop. I stop in this crowd. I mean it was it was more crowded than a Japanese commuter train. It was unbelievable and and I swear I heard the gnashing of teeth which is in the Bible. I read the Bible twice. Even though I'm not a Bible Person but there's the gnashing of teeth and and it was so black and it was so cold it was could not have been blacker. Good not have been colder and like a cop can move through a crowd and you can feel that party. That's how it happened to me. Suddenly there was this partying and and this is this is the only way I've ever described it avoided. I've never heard before but that I recognized said no go back. You're not ready yet and I went back and you know so those kind of things when I can draw those kind of things that makes me. It's at least it's certain to me that there is something after this now. I also think that just because it happened to me doesn't mean it's going to happen to you. I I believe in an infinite God an infant God could give us Infinite Experiences Chore so you know just because this is what happened to me doesn't mean it's going to happen to you and just because I see something. This way doesn't mean that you know. I'm really open about that. Because I really believe Infinity Infinity I totally see and if you believe even infinity than it means been right right yes so this whole the whole notion that most humans have about you know this is my human experience that most humans have about infinitude is that it starts today. They're born and that's how that's that's not how forever works forever is a circle so that's why a wedding ring is because that's forever right. Sumani infinity so that means to me that just because I'm on this earth for however many many years I'm on this earth. It doesn't mean that the next thing is forever. I believe that the next thing is the next thing and then there's going to be the next thing after that and I think if we're going to deal with if we have if we have an infinite God who's dealing with infinity. This is just one of our experiences and I get a lot of strength from that into the book is called grateful guilt living in the shadow of my heart and I hope you'll get a sense from what you're going to experience by picking up and reading it's available at Amazon Google Books Barnes and noble. We'll everywhere you buy your books. You can follow Stephen at grateful guilt dot com or on twitter at at Stephen Taibbi T. A. B. B. I really interesting stuff. Thank you for sharing. I appreciate it. Thank you for having me. I really appreciate it hope you have good success in getting hospitals and patients to listen to it'd be somebody's gotta come up with some mechanism of communicating what you've got to both populations. I know that's what I'm working together. It feels like it should be it should be shared or something. I don't know I'm looking. I'm trying. I that's that's my goal and I'm looking for a somehow build team or something to make this happen happened. I'm looking for partners in this. I don't mean money partners. I mean medical students training and I'm looking for something that I that I can you know help as I imagined that as keep doing that. Something's going to click and it's GONNA show itself. Irvine was even thank you very much and and wrap it up and we'll see every Nick Time for Colin Times and topics follow the show on twitter at Dr Drew podcast. That's Dr D. R. E. W. podcast music through today's episode can be found on the swinging and sounds of the documents podcast now available on itunes and while you're there don't forget to rate the show. Dr Drew Podcast as a Corolla digital production hen and is produced by Chris Locked Simona and Gary Smith for more information go to Dr Drew Dot Com all conversation and information exchange during the participation in the Dr Drew Podcast is intended for educational and Tehmina purposes only do not confuse this with rain or medical advice or direction nothing on these podcasts supplement or supersede the relationship and direction of your medical hair tapers although Dr drew is a licensed physician with Specialty Board Certification the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American addiction medicine is not functioning as a physician in this environment the same applies to any professionals who may appear on the podcast or Dr Dot Com in Jordan Harbinger. Show is one of the most popular interview podcasts in the world on the this show your host that's me Jordan Harbinger deconstructs the playbook of the most successful people on Earth and shares their strategies perspectives and practical insights with you so that you you can apply them for yourself. I'll teach you how to read body language and master nonverbal communication. I'll teach you how to network and negotiate recently. I interviewed an FBI hostage. negotiator associated who teaches us how to get people to like and trust you. I also had neuroscientists uneven navy seals tell us develop resilience and mental toughness of course we've also got amazing stories from people that have lived them from crazy kidnapping stories and going undercover with the CIA to illusionists who can seemingly program our brains. The Jordan Harbinger show covers everything that will help you upgrade your brain so you can become a high performer both at home and at work in fact every single episode. Sodas show has worksheets that you can use to make sure you're internalizing and applying what you learned from the guests your about your preview of Jordan Harbinger show which I interviewed interview our very own Dr drew and while you're listening go subscribe to the Jordan Harbinger show available on Apple podcast and podcast one dot com. There's also a link in the the episode notes. That'll take you there. I put my heart and soul into this one and I know you're gonNA love it. Self esteem obviously doesn't care if you're successful team. Is something established anybody five live. I remember I that's and depressing yeah and it turns out I mean you can enhance and you can move it a little bit but most of it is to set early and my was back in my Anna but I don't but it doesn't bother me and I use it like it makes me double check myself. It makes me you you know never feel like I've done enough or good enough. I I might use it as a motivator which is painful and yell at a negative stuff flying at you but it's kind of Nice. If if you want to motivate to do something good it helps you. Thanks again for listening and remember you can find the Jordan Harbinger show available on Apple podcasts and podcast. I ONE DOT com. We go to seven eleven right now. We'll be back in time for the game. I don't know man. I don't WanNa Miss Kickoff. Okay but rebels are two for five dollars right now when I use my seven eleven now dude but kickoff but how are we going to stay on top of our game while watching the game if we're not on that seven eleven game. I don't know keep up. Dude take for five red bull with my seven eleven. Oh yeah okay. I'm feeling you now. 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Now You Can Use Xiaomi SmartPhone's Camera To Measure Your Heart Rate | Tech News

Phenomenal Guruji

00:52 sec | 4 months ago

Now You Can Use Xiaomi SmartPhone's Camera To Measure Your Heart Rate | Tech News

"You are listening to phenomenal Gucci this is Tech News Show. So you can now use your show me phone scam or to measure your heart rate Chaumet, introduce a new health and fitness dragging air. Me held earlier loss to your aired offered staff and stopped tracking BMI MS. A man and woman's have featured to start with the company has greatly improved these feature over the posterior and is now adding a new very useful feature heart rate monitoring me held. You. Download this APP on me store and Google play store.

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Neurosurgeon Dr. Sanjay Gupta On How To 'Keep Sharp'

Fresh Air

47:19 min | 2 weeks ago

Neurosurgeon Dr. Sanjay Gupta On How To 'Keep Sharp'

"Whyy in philadelphia. I'm terry gross with fresh air today. How to help your brain be more efficient and resilient we talk with dr sanjay gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent is written a new book about how the brain functions with practical advice about maximizing its potential. Dr gupta has been a practicing neurosurgeon for about twenty years some of the surgeries he's performed. We're in disaster areas and war zones in iraq. He had to perform brain surgery without the necessary instruments. He needed so we had to improvise with the help of a black and decker drill. We'll also talk about covering covid for cnn. That sanjay gupta coming up on fresh air. My guest to cnn's chief medical correspondent dr sanjay gupta. He's written a new book about the brain. That explains some of the latest research debunks methods about brain function and offers practical advice on improving cognitive function. It's called keep sharp build a better brain at any age. Dr gupta has been a practicing neurosurgeon for about twenty years and is an associate professor of medicine at emory university school of medicine. He's performed brain surgery in war zones in disaster zones including iraq and afghanistan. We're also going to talk about the corona virus which he's been covering for cnn. He got his first dose of the vaccine. Live on cnn. In december dr sanjay gupta. Welcome to fresh air This is a difficult time with the virus. You know people. Lower many people are working at home while schooling their children. And doing more harm than ever before. Because everybody's home and the people who are working have to work in places where they don't necessarily feel safe. How do you think our brains are being affected by all of the stress of the virus. It's been really challenging. You know. I think that there is a thing about stress and the brain that Has long been documented and the headline is that stress is not necessarily the enemy in fact. We need a certain amount of stress. It's what gets us out of bed in the morning makes us perform well on tests. Hopefully all that sort of stuff but it is. That second adjective used unrelenting. That is really problematic here. We don't We we need these breaks from stress. You need that constant sort of ebb and flow. And that's what's missing again. You don't want it to all be good all the time but you need to have that that sort of up and down to some extent with things sort of the way that they are. We're sort of in this in this whiplash sort of timeframe with regard to the brain on one hand. Things are getting worse. We see that the numbers continue to get worse over the last few months and you know going into the spring. It's likely to continue that trajectory on the other hand. We also hear that there is a vaccine that is rolling out it is happening. And that is going to be a significant impact in terms of bringing this pandemic t to an end so it's challenging for the brain right now but it's important to constantly find times when you can either dramatically reduce your stress either by thinking about the future with the vaccine and things like that or other things in your life but i will say in. This really came out in the book the idea of eliminating stress. I'm just going to eliminate my stress. It is not obtainable nor is it necessarily a good idea for the brain. One of the things people are learning to do now is to live with new routines. Because you're working at or teaching your children or getting to work in a different way having to wear a mask. There's so many new routines that most of us have had to learn. Is that stressful on the brain having to like reorganize your life and not follow all the predictable patterns that you were used to i. I would argue that. It's actually very good for your brain To find new patterns new new routines and to mix it up a little bit shocked. The brain shock the body a little bit not in a bad way but just in terms of trying. Different things here. Here's the the thinking. Is that when you start to do procedural things over and over again. You can get very good at them. And that's important in a lot of jobs including in the operating room. I spend a lot of time. But but i think for our brain we want to constantly be using new paths and trails and roads within our brain and that can be as simple as just doing something a little differently eating with your left hand instead of your right hand if you're right handed If you put a tie on in the morning like i do Sometimes closing your eyes and doing it in the dark. The reason being you're just the the more you can recruit different parts of your brain to even simple activities the better it is for your brain now and the better. It is for your long term brain health. A lot of people are multitasking. Trying to do two things at once. Are we fooling ourselves when we're multitasking. I was surprised by this one. Even even though i've been studying the brain for a long time There was a lot that i learned and and the issues around multitasking. Were one of them. You know the the idea that you move from one task to another sounds. Great and very efficient. The issue was that they found. You actually divert a fair amount of attention each time you do that. You may not notice it yourself but when you start to objectively measure this with different types of brain scans scans that are measuring the function of the brain or particular parts of the brain at any given millisecond. You find that you actually expend quite a bit of energy just to switch from one task to another. So you think you're doing both simultaneously but you're probably doing neither as well as you could be and you're probably going to take more time than if you just did them linearly in some way you were at the two things that have stirred a revolution in neuroscience and are thinking about the brain are one the fact that brain cells can regenerate through our lifetimes and to that we can change the brain circuitry through neuro. Plasticity what does it mean that brain cells can regenerate through our lifetimes. We long believed that brain cells neurons would only sort of continue to develop or go through this neurogenesis new brain cell development process at two different times. Really when you were young and still developing your brain as a baby or if you've had some sort of injury and at that point the brain may start to either recruit new brain cells or even grow new brain cells. What we've come to understand the last decade is that even outside of those two conditions just a normal life without an injury or as an adult you can still grow new brain cells. That was a really pretty significant thing. before that the brain was thought to be largely immutable sort of fixed. You know and and really measured only by its inputs and its outputs black box of sorts. we've obviously been able to explore the brain differently and we been able to see this neurogenesis evidence this neurogenesis throughout our entire lives which is which was really a remarkable finding. I think very inspiring as well. So what does this mean on a practical level. What this means is that You can continue to Build new brain cells that can have connections with other brain cells and as a result form you know new pathways throughout your brain. We use our entire brain throughout our lives. The idea that we use ten to twenty percent that is not. That's a myth. But but think of it more like this like if think of your brain just to sort of the surface of the earth or maybe just a a city within that city. There's a few big metropolitan areas where people are spending most of their time. You know the where they work. Maybe where they shop things like that. All the roads to get to these different places are are constantly in. Use the idea when you start to build new brain cells. It's like saying in this big city. In which i live instead of having three buildings and just a bunch of roads. I'm building ten buildings. I'm building a bunch of different areas that are of great function and and interest to my brain. And so you you're you're using the same amount of brain but you're using these parts of the brain now to to have buildings instead of parking lots essentially and and as a result that you can do more you can see patterns that you would otherwise miss you may be faster at processing things. Whatever it may be But that that sort of the the biggest idea i think around neurogenesis in the healthy brain is that you're simply able to create more these paths and trails and and even new buildings and places so so is the act of learning something new what is generating new brain cells. I think the act of learning new things the act of experiencing something new or even doing something. That's typical for you. But in a different way can all generate These new brain cells in these in these new pathways these new functional pathways throughout the brain. And i think that's the most critical thing is that you can use the same roads and go to the same buildings you always go to and pretty soon. You'll be really good at that. That's the practice makes perfect part of things but as you have these new experiences. These new learnings these new activities. Whatever they may be something that gets you out of your comfort zone may be is how i described it. You'll start to build new things. Within your brain you destinations within your brain new pats throughout your brain. It's it's that's that's the the reserve in your brain that you're building by simply doing these things on on somewhat regular basis. A lot of people assume you kind of lose the ability to learn new things at a certain age or to create new habits or new patterns of behavior. Is that true. I really don't think that that's true. I mean you it would be fair to say that you know the brain like any other organ if you were to look at it. It ages that that shouldn't surprise anybody it ages. It's going to change the brain itself just the physical matter. The brain is going to change as you get older but in terms of what it can do processing speed the ability to learn new things all of that that is not limited. Perhaps some of your senses started. Diminish your eyesight. You may need reading glasses. You're hearing things like that but your ability to actually be able to process to understand to apply that that really not only doesn't change it it can actually get sharper can get better as you get older. If you continue to use it it is sort of the use it or lose it phenomenon when it comes to the brain if you think of the brain like a muscle which i think is a fair metaphor. Do you think a healthy brain is measured by. How well you can memorize things her. How do you measure. What a healthy brain is. I think a healthy brain is is really measured by Beyond the basic critical functions Of of me to get you through your day. The activities of daily living. All those things it's really about Your your happiness and and how much joy you have. I know which sounds euphemistic. But if the if your brain is designed to Obviously take care of the critical functions breathing respiration heart rate blood pressure things like that your brain stem functions beyond that. It's it's the things that get you through the day and and create a the most positive living experienced you can have. That's really what the brain should be doing if the brain is working well and we're treating the brain right so your brand shouldn't be saying you didn't do a good enough job but nobody likes you. That's not that's not a healthy brain. That's a toxic brain a taxi right. That's a toxic brain and we all live with that because we live in a society in which that is what we're exposed to often but the brain left to its own devices has one purpose and it's to serve the individual and so how does any oregon serve you. You wouldn't ask about the heart that way. A happy heart is a healthy heart. A happy brain is a healthy brain but they all exist to serve the individual. That's it no one else. So it's encouraging to hear you say that you can keep creating new pathways in your brain you could do even when you're older. Let me balance that with the discouraging news that age. Twenty four is the peak from your brain. So is it all downhill after twenty four. I think i think the idea that we have these sort of artificial peaks in terms of what the brain can and cannot do is already starting to become A little bit antiquated thinking. It was only over the last decade. Or so terry that we even thought that the brain could create new brain cells and become more plastic. So we had this sort of imaging are head that was this peak performance at a certain age and then sort of downhill. After that. i don't. I don't want to be hyperbolic or euphemistic. I mean it is true that the organs age we age. And that's true. That's that's part of life but the brain perhaps more than any other oregon. I think can actually become better as we get older. There's certain things that are you know going to diminish our senses for example But when it comes to things like judgment when it comes to language when it comes to your overall capacity to find happiness those things can actually improve as you get older and i keep coming back to this happiness and joy thing because oftentimes people think about these types of lifestyle changes in terms of preventing illness later. But when we when we really look at this find that there's benefit to doing these things right now. Fear brain like i tell you the eat right and exercise and don't smoke and do all those things and nothing will happen to you. Well first of all. That's not the most inspiring right. You do all these things. He worked so hard and then nothing happens to me. Why why am. I doing it well to prevent illness while. How do i know that i wouldn't have had the illness anyway. How do i know it was all this hard work that i did. The brain is different in that you can close the loop right now you can feel better right away as a result of these actions and one of the ways that you feel better as you just you feel happier you feel more productive. You feel like a better daughter. Better son better spouse whatever it may be you want to get out of bed in the morning. You feel like you have a life of purpose. Whatever it is those things you can feel now as result of these things which i think is important as a doc. We're always trying to inspire our patients to do the right thing by telling him. This will help you twenty thirty years from now. It's pretty tough to make the case. If i tell you that it's going to help you right now. And by the way the way that it helps is that it makes you feel happier. It's pretty compelling to really important things for a healthy brain or exercise which you've talked about that kind of surprised me. I never really associated that with the brain but also sleep. Sleep is really important for good brain function. What happens while we're sleeping. The brain is not at rest the way people might imagine it to be. When we're sleeping. I think a lot of people you know. They realize that we dream and we do other. Things with the brain can be quite active. But i think there's there's there's several important things that are happening but to that. I really focused on one is that is the time when we really do consolidate memories. So you've had all these interesting experiences thresher. Day people that you've met conversations you've had experiences you've had whatever it may be you have these things in part because you want to remember them and add them to your life narrative that process of actually putting them in the memory book if you will putting them in the in the terry gross life. Narrative book really happens at at the time that you sleep. that's the consolidation of memory sort of phase. Some of it is actually placing the memory. Some of it is moving memories from short term the longer term memory and those sorts of things so you have to be able to sleep well in order to remember well and you also have to be able to sleep well in order to forget well because you want to in order to make that life narrative as cohesive as possible. You're doing a lot of editing along the way you're getting rid of some things you're adding things the whole process just like you might write a paper a lot of that's happening while you sleep. Another more. recent finding about sleep is is that there is a sort of rinse cycle. That's happening when you see a rinse cycle that allows certain neurotrophic factors to bay the brain but also to remove certain waste as well from the basic metabolic processes that are happening in the organ. The brain just like any other organ in the body. It's almost like the lymphatic system in the body. The lymphatic system is draining. Lymph in your lymph Draining waste away from your body. That's happening in the brain as well so during sleep. It's really this consolidation of memories this removal of waste and this nourishing of the brain that takes place more efficiently than any other time during the day. Do you think that memory games and crossword puzzles are actually helpful in your brain to remember more things than be sharper. I think that crossword puzzles and brain training exercises can be quite helpful at making the roads in your brain that you use a lot already keeping them strong preventing them from meeting construction and things like that. It's it's kind of the practice makes perfect part of your your brain and some of the brain games can actually increase your processing speed the speed at which you process new content new information but i really do draw a line between that and keeping a brain sharper and building cognitive reserve throughout your life. That's different you wanna be doing different things in order to build that reserve as opposed to doing the same thing better and better. There's a role for both but if it's cognitive reserve you're looking for doing different things things that get you outside your comfort zone. It's probably gonna have a much bigger. Payoff let me introduce you here. If you're just joining us my guests is dr sanjay gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and author of the new book. Keep sharp build a better brain at any age. We'll talk more after a break. I'm terry gross and this is fresh air. This message comes from. Npr sponsor western governors university. Ready to earn your degree but need a university that works with your schedule. Wgn programs were built to be flexible with no set logging. Times and twenty. Four seven access to most coursework. You can earn a respected bachelor's or master's degree on your schedule listeners. Of this podcast have the sixty five dollar application fee waived learn more at wg dot edu slash fresh air. Let's get back to my with. Dr sanjay gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent is also been a practicing neurosurgeon for about twenty years. His new book is all about the brain he debunk. Smith's explains the latest research about the brain's ability to keep learning new things. No matter what your age and how to keep the brain healthy and functioning at its best sorta some for a healthy brain. You recommend movement. You like of strenuous exercise. You recommend a good healthy diet and say that a heart healthy diet has also a brain healthy diet. Get a lot of sleep. How much would you suggest. I think um sleep wise at seven nine hour seems like the right amount. Everyone is nine hours seven nine hours if you can do it if you can. Do you know if you're if you're if you're dreaming in the morning if you're dreaming in the morning right before you wake up. That's a pretty good sign. That probably means that you've spent a fair amount of your evening your night consolidating memories and going through the rinse cycle. And you know you wake up some morning dreams. If you can do that that that's a pretty good sign. Everyone's everyone's different. And that's something that i really tried to focus on in the book as well because we love these this sort of blanket advice on things but yeah seven billion people on the planet. We're all going to be a little different but if you want to put range on things seven and nine hours asleep i give me the honest answer to this question. How many hours of sleep do you get between performing brain surgery and being a c. n. n. medical correspondent and a father of three. You know terry. I'm not getting enough sleep and you know i hate to be one of those people. Who's not practicing what he preaches. But even though. I think i know the right thing to do. Doesn't mean that i always do it and i'm just very honest and transparent about that. It's it's been a really hard year. I mean i know. It's been a really tough year. Since since did since the beginning of two thousand twenty terry i i have been everyday weekends included waking up around five o'clock in the morning sometimes four forty five part of the reason is i need to speak to people on the other side of the the globe and they're ending their days. I'm beginning mine. And i wanna speak to them. You know wanted to speak to folks in china from where the virus you know. They had some of the earliest data. I wanted to speak to them about the outbreak. I wanted to speak to them about their vaccine. Development worthy antivirals working. How are the hospitals. Doing what are they learning in terms of critical care. I mean i was so head down into the story. I'm a neurosurgeon not an infectious disease doctor. but nothing. nothing really mattered. When you're dealing with a novel virus there's so much that we're still learning. So i became so head down in the story in this issue in learning everything about it that i was waking up at four forty five in the morning and because i do television sometimes a shows. Don't go off the air till eleven o'clock at night getting five or six hours a night for a year and it's it's affected me for sure. It's not ideal. How has it affected you. I am not as clear. I'm not as happy. I am tired. I'm not as organized. I'm a super organized fastidious individual that that is kind of my my calling card. Everything is always organized right now. I'm sitting here talking to you. My basement closet. I my. I don't even know if. I have my shirt on inside out or not is i'm talking. Luckily you can't see me my. I have a little caveat. That i put down here in my basement room windowless basement room. Rice sleep a lot. It's littered with with shirts that probably need to be washed and ties and and papers from this year things that i continue to want to read. You know as as we're moving into the next phase of this pandemic. I have all these notes about the vaccine. I got my own vaccine. I took copious notes on the vaccine before. I received it myself. It's just it's my mind and my space are cluttered. And i know that could be a lot better if i simply got sleep and i'm not being hyperbolic. It's true but i've just had a hard time getting there this year understood. Why are you sleeping on a cot in the basement. Well because a lot of times. I don't wanna wake up my family. I have two dogs. I have three kids my wife. And if i'm going to bed around midnight and need to be back up at four forty five. All that means is. I'm gonna wake up the whole house twice so the dog started barking upstairs and that wakes up girls and you know i it. Just no one's happy in that case so at least i can be the only one unhappy that scenario by simply sleep. I don't sleep there all the time. But there's a lot of times when i just you know it's just easier especially if there's a lot going on the kids have zoom school in the morning and tests and things like that it. Just it's it's easier. I'm privileged to be able to work from home. So i can see the family. You know a fair amount. I can pop up during the day. Say hi and sometimes have meals together. But most of the time. I'm i'm in this windowless basement. It's sort of the sensory deprived environment which just everywhere i look. I mean i got post. It's all over the walls Everywhere you look. It's cove it. I totally immersed in the world of covid. You got the first dose of your covid vaccine on. Camera live on cnn. I applaud you for doing that. I think it's really important to show people doing doing that. Because people have somebody different fears and conspiracy theories about the vaccine. But here's my question. Did you try really hard. Not to wince the needle one into your arm just like hey. This is great. I don't feel a thing. I gotta tell you. I really did not feel a thing. It was it was funny. I was talking to this woman. Who is the dean of the morehouse school of medicine. And we were both doing the simultaneously. There's a lot of vaccine hesitancy among black american community. She's an african american woman. She wanted to get the vaccine to demonstrate her her willingness to do this so we were talking and and use it. They were about to give me the vaccine. But i think we had a really good Nurse who who. i don't know it's just. It was just her her touch. It's it's a small needle. It's not as viscous even some of the other vaccines that you get. So i really didn't feel a thing. And i had a bit of a sore arm. That didn't show up actually until several hours later but not so sore that. I couldn't throw a baseball if i needed to. That's always sort of my my measure. Can i still be functional with the arm and I give it another shot in three weeks. After the first one that was it was it was pretty straightforward all right. Let's take a short break here. If you're just joining us my guest is dr sanjay gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent. His new book is called. Keep sharp build a better brain at any age will be right back after a break. This is fresh air this message comes from. Npr sponsor bank of america. You finally decided to learn how to ice skate. So you ordered the essentials. Every ice skater needs a pair of blades. And you helmet and a good set of kneepads and you use your bank of america. Cash rewards credit card choosing to earn three percent cashback on online shopping rewards that you put towards the cost of essential piece of posts skating recovery. A heating pad visit bank of america dot com slash more rewarding to apply now copyright twenty twenty bank of america corporation. That's get back to my interview with. Dr sanjay gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent. He's also a practicing neurosurgeon. His new book is called. Keep sharp build a better brain at any age. How have you dealt with on a journalistic level and just a pure emotional level. With the fact that the trump administration president trump himself have not followed guidelines that the medical experts including medical experts zone administration have put forward. You know he's done. He's not really recommended masks. I mean he'll pay lip service to occasionally he had there was so many times he wasn't wearing them. There were white house spreads because people weren't wearing masks. I mean you know your doctor owner journalists. You know that that masks and the vaccine will help prevent the spread social distancing out. How especially earlier on did you deal with that. It was just infuriating. Terry it And i don't think you need to be a doctor. Journalists to to see that i mean the idea that you were not addressing the most significant public health crisis of our lifetime In any kind of meaningful way in that so many thousands and hundreds of thousands of people were dying was really really discouraging. I mean i resisted a couple of things. I resisted to draw to comparisons between the united states and other countries. Because you know. The every country's a bit different but south korea had their first patient confirmed diagnosis on the same day is the first patient in the united states there. Our country a fifty million three hundred and fifty million so they're smaller obviously but are deaths have been in the hundreds and we've had hundreds of thousands of debts. I hate to say it. But that's a fair comparison and it's infuriating. That the best that we could do was be the worst in the world. So many of these debts are preventable. So many of them and nobody who's lost a loved one to this disease and i know so many families i talk to these families on a regular basis. Nobody wants to hear that. Nobody wants to hear that their loved one died a preventable death. But it's true. You know so. Many of these deaths could have been prevented. Did you have any confrontations with people in the trump administration or governors. That were not doing due. Diligence in recommending mass. I was at the an early white house. Press conference where i ask. President trump questions about this was. We were allowed to ask questions. And i asked him how he could. Sort of Given all that we knew at the time why he still believed that this was no more dangerous than the flu that you know that he had complete control over at all these types of things i interviewed just about every member of the coronavirus task force at one point or another They weren't necessarily confrontational because the task force you know they. They understood the science even if they couldn't necessarily give the messages they wanted to the public. And so sometimes our interviews would revolve around that how it's not so much understanding the science. It's understanding the messaging around the science. I interviewed. I remember ambassador. Burks in late november early december of twenty twenty at the white house and i was so stunned to walk into the white house at that time. I we were actually in the eisenhower executive office building right next to the white house and fifteen twenty percent of people were wearing masks inside that building. We adjust. Spent all this time telling people that if you're going into public places outside of your household indoors especially. You should wear masks at the white house. They were not doing that. Ambassador burks was chair of the coronavirus task force when she sat down to do this interview with me. She wore a mask. We're doing the doors. The people who accompanied her to the interview her assistance. We're not wearing masks it. It was just so strange to me when her own assistance. Were not wearing. Ask not wearing masks. Why do you know well. I don't know but what they said when they saw us us being. You know our television crew producers camera. Folks were all inside. We've all sterilized a place. Where all wearing masks. Obviously and they said something like well. We should probably be wearing masks as well. But we're not you know it. I don't know that it wasn't that they didn't believe in this virus. What i think it really was terry in. This is more subjective. It's that they just didn't think it would affect them you know. President trump declared himself a stable genius after those right after taking a cognitive test and in describing the test. He said that he was able to remember in sequence. The words camera man woman. No i'm sorry. Person just failed person. Man woman camera tv. I know somebody who had a concussion who had to take a similar test. Was he really being tested for a some kind of brain injury or cognitive deficiency deficiency the the montreal cognitive test is is. It's a screening test to try and determine whether or not someone has some sort of Very obvious discernible. Pathology that that's it's a screening test it really. It's it's not that it's not useful test because it can be useful in in the in the in the setting of pathology of some sort or a concussion as you mentioned something like that but in order to really determine whether or not someone has dementia especially you know Mild or moderate dementia. It's actually requires a lot of of of testing. And this is something richard isaacs and taught me a neurologist. Who's been focused on this for some time is that you have to not only conduct many tests but you have to conduct them over time because really trying to get an idea of where the person is and and was that a a singular event where the person at an abnormality or is this something that that's persistent so we made a lot of that that test and we meaning. The president made a lot of that test declaring himself stable genius. But that's that's a screening test. That is very simple and frankly is designed to be passed by everybody. Who takes it unless there's some sort of obvious very obvious problem and even just the words. I'm curious about this person. Man woman camera tv. they're all related. You know a person is a man or a woman or gender queer but that's not in the test So you know person men women camera. Tv for trump people are associated with cameras. He watches so much television cameras. Mtv are associated in these tests. Are the words usually associated. Or do the want to see if you can make memories with words that have no obvious association know they they want to pick disparate. Sort of objects you know right. So when he when he gave this as an example of what he was asked to remember it was probably nothing like what he was asked to remember right so either. He wasn't telling us what he actually. I don't know if you watch that interview that he did with I believe that was the doctor from fox news but he kind of just was motioning around the area at the time. So i'm not sure that those were even the objects that he was being asked to remember during the actual cognitive exam. Frankly i'm not even sure that he had eight actually thorough cognitive exam of any sort. I mean we don't know that for sure and we're not required to know that there's no there's no mandate that he actually shared that he had the test or what. The results of the test were so. I think that was a a proper cognitive exam to remember objects like that would not have chosen those objects. They're usually inanimate objects first of all and they usually have no relationship to each other. I think it's time for another break. So let me reintroduce you. My guest is dr sanjay gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent. His new book is called. Keep sharp build a better brain at any age will be right back after a break. This is fresh air this message comes from. Npr sponsor bank of america. You finally decided to learn how to ice skate. So you ordered the essentials. Every ice skater needs a pair of blades. And you helmet and a good set of kneepads and you used your bank of america. Cash rewards credit card choosing to earn three percent cashback online shopping rewards that you put towards the cost of an essential piece of post skating recovery. A heating pad visit bank of america dot com slash more rewarding to apply now copyright twenty twenty bank of america corporation. This is fresh air. Let's get back to my interview with dr sanjay gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent is also a practicing neurosurgeon. His new book is called. Keep sharp build a better brain at any age. There is a story you tell in your new book about brain surgery that you performed. I forget if it was iraq or afghanistan but involved. A black and decker drill. Because you don't have any of the things that you need to perform this very delicate surgery. Where just about out of time. But could you briefly describe the work arounds that you came up with to perform surgery in a place where you didn't have what you need it. This was one of the most indelible experiences of my life and one that on her. Forget i was covering the the war over there As a reporter. But i was traveling with this group of naval doctors colloquially known as the devil docs and we've been together for weeks at that point and we really got to know each other well They knew that i was a neurosurgeon. And one day a lieutenant Came in Having been shot in the head by a sniper now they weren't really anticipating a lot of these types of injuries because of helmets. And things like that but here was the case and they thought this lieutenant had died. They couldn't find a pulse in the chaos of war when they brought him into the devil. Docs tent area They realize that he was alive. And that was the point where they basically said hey. Can you take off your journalist cap and put surgeons gap and again. These are people that really had been. I knew well mouth weeks. We've been traveling hopscotching around the desert in the middle of a war. The thing is when you when you don't plan on having these types of injuries you don't necessarily have the equipment to do the types of operations necessary that a lot of general surgery equipment and orthopedic acquitted but they didn't have equipment to do what is called a cranny ectomy or craniotomy which is basically when removing part of the skull. We typically have very specialized drills to do that. Perforations and drills and things like that so i needed to take off the pressure on this on this young man's brain. That is the the most crucial thing that you can do in in the setting of an acute brain like that. Just take the pressure off. And the only way that i could really do that wants to have some sort of drill and i realize i was frantically sort of looking around this dusty desert tent that the black and decker drill which we've been using to put up the tents as we were moving around the desert was the only drill that really existed so we we took the bits off the drill and there are several bits and we put them in this autoclave solution to sterilize. Them put a glove a glove on the drill itself. I could hold the drill with you. Know my my sterile hands maestro gloved hands and then basically perforated if you will kind of created a scoreline around the area of bone that i wanted to remove to decompress his his brain and just kept going back and forth like you would in basic woodworking or anything else to the point where it became scored line so thin that i could essentially break off that port portion of his skull and and decompress his brain. That's what needed to to happen. And that's the way that the way that i got it done taking that bone off and then removing the blood collection and and and taking out the the area of pathology in his brain then you had to find something to substitute for the membrane around the brain. Yes so the the the The outer layer the brain is called the dura. And that is the part that basically insulates the brain From the outside world keeps it sterile and hygienic. Because one of the biggest problems you can have is is actually developing meningitis. Encephalitis that can be as deadly as the initial injury itself. We had nothing to us. As dora. And i knew that if i didn't close his brain in some way he would likely become infected especially in that environment we weren't in some sterile operating room. We were in a dusty desert tent barrels. We could make it but it wasn't you know wasn't what we wanted. So what we did was we the only sterile thing that we could really think of at that point was the inside of an iv bag so there was iv bags everywhere. And i knew that the inside of the iv bag was going to be sterile so we basically took an iv bag isolated open and then use the inner part of the iv bag. I sewed that into his existing durra and essentially recreated the outer layer of his brain with this synthetic plastic like material that was able to just close them up wrapping. Wrap his head in be be fairly confident that he at least would not develop an infection. So how is he now. he's doing really well He's he's got some left hand weakness but he's he got married gone to graduate school and he's living his life so one more question in functioning as a doctor in the us. And you're performing neurosurgery in georgia in atlanta one patients. See you or know that you're gonna be their neurosurgeon. What's the reaction you get to being. You know a famous doctor on cnn It's one of three reactions. Typically sometimes you know patients are coming in for trauma and they just. There's no there's no knowledge of of who their doctor really is. They're not either conscious or sort of aware of that. Another reaction on patients who want to come see me from all over the world now because for whatever reason they think if you're on tv it must be good. I think i'm good. But it's not because i'm on tv so that's kind of always a funny thing to me. I mean i always tell them. I'm happy to recommend excellent neurosurgeons in your area. The third reaction which probably would be my reaction is that hey look. i know. you're a neurosurgeon. Here you're good y'all to do television while you're focused on my operation. I want you to just to be focused on my operation. No tv at the In the interim which i totally understand respecting get i balance. These two lives pretty well. And i think that they you know my patients understand that. Well dr gupta thank you so much for talking with us. Terry thank you. What an honor. Dr sanjay gupta is a neurosurgeon and cnn's chief medical correspondent. His new book is called. Keep sharp build a better brain at any age tomorrow on fresh air. Our guest will be journalist street matter. Who's new book is about growing surveillance and social control in china in some cities citizens are monitored and given social credit scores for their behavior. Those who ignore traffic lights or failed to shovel snow might find their travel or internet access restricted. A hope you'll join us Fresh air's executive producer is danny miller. Our technical director and engineer is audrey. Bentham our interviews and reviews produced and edited by amy salad. Phyllis myers san burger lauren. Crandall how do you. Simone theresa madden and rebuild auto Celie and kayla lattimore our associate producer of digital media. Is molly seavy nesper. Roberta shorrock directs. The show i'm terry gross. Ooh

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Best Of: Dr. Sanjay Gupta / Philippine Journalist Maria Ressa

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Best Of: Dr. Sanjay Gupta / Philippine Journalist Maria Ressa

"From whyy in philadelphia. I'm terry gross with fresh air again today. How to help your brain be more efficient and resilient we talk with dr sanjay gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent. He's written a new book about how the brain functions with practical advice about maximizing its potential. Dr gupta has been a practicing neurosurgeon for about twenty years. Also we hear from maria. Raza the journalist in the philippines whose coverage of authoritarian president rodrigo duterte has resulted in internet roles. Death threats criminal charges jail and being chosen as time magazine's twenty eighteen person of the year. She's the subject of a new frontline. Documentary called cuts and book critic. Maureen corrigan reviews a new western. That she describes as the handmaid's tale. Meeks butch cassidy and the sundance kip. This message comes from. Npr sponsor tele doc tele doc offers access to licensed therapists by phone or video to help those dealing with stress anxiety personal or family issues. Tele doc is committed to quality confidential therapy from the comfort of your home available seven days a week matching members to therapists counselors and psychiatrists tele doc. Therapy is available through most insurance or employers and individual plants are also available download the app or visit tele doc dot com slash. Fresh air to get started today. My guests to cnn's chief medical correspondent. Dr sanjay gupta. He's written a new book about the brain. That explains some of the latest research debunks myths about brain function and offers practical advice on improving cognitive function. It's called keep sharp build a better brain at any age. Dr gupta has been a practicing neurosurgeon for about twenty years. And as an associate professor of medicine at emory university school of medicine he's performed brain surgery in war zones in disaster zones including iraq and afghanistan. Dr sanjay gupta. Welcome to fresh air. this is a difficult time with the virus. You know people are. Many people are working at home while schooling their children and doing more housework than ever before. Because everybody's home and the people who are working have to work in places where they don't necessarily feel safe. How do you think our brains are being affected by all of the stress of the virus. It's been really challenging. You know. I think that there is a thing about stress. And the brain that has long been documented and the headline is that stress is not necessarily the enemy in fact. We need a certain amount of stress. It's what gets us out of bed in the morning makes us perform well on tests. Hopefully all that sort of stuff but it is. That second adjective used unrelenting. That is really problematic here. We don't we need these breaks from stress. You need that constant sort of ebb and flow. And that's what's missing again. You don't want it to all be good all the time but you need to have that that sort of up and down to some extent with things sort of the way that they are We're sort of in this in this whiplash sort of timeframe with regard to the brain on one hand. Things are getting worse. We see that the numbers continue to get worse over the last few months and you know going into the spring. It's likely to continue that trajectory on the other hand. We also hear that there is a vaccine that is rolling out and that is going to be a significant impact in terms of bringing this pandemic to an end so it's challenging for the brain right now but it's important to constantly find times when you can either dramatically reduce your stress either by thinking about the future with the vaccine and things like that or other things in your life but i will say in the clearly came out in the book the idea of eliminating stress. I'm just going to eliminate my stress. It is not obtainable nor is it necessarily a good idea for the brain. One of the things people are learning to do now is to live with new routines. Because you're working at home or teaching your children or getting to work in a different way having to wear a mask. There's so many new routines that most of us have had to learn. Is that stressful on the brain having to like re organize your life and not follow all the predictable patterns that you were used to i. I would argue that. It's actually very good for your brain to find new patterns new new routines and to mix it up a little bit shocked. The brain shocked the body. A little bit not in a bad way but just in terms of trying different things here. Here's the thinking. Is that when when you start to do procedural things over and over again you can get very good at them. And that's important in a lot of jobs including in the operating room where i spend a lot of time but but i think for our brain we want to constantly be using new paths and trails and roads within our brain and that can be as simple as as just doing something a little differently eating with your left hand instead of your right hand if you're right handed You know if you put a tie on in the morning. I do Sometimes closing your eyes and doing it in the dark. The reason being you're just the the more you can recruit different parts of your brain to do even simple activities the better it is for your brain now and the better. It is for your long term brain health. A lot of people are multitasking. Trying to do two things at once. Are we fooling ourselves when we're multitasking. I was surprised by this one. Even even though i've been studying the brain for a long time There was a lot that i learned and the issues around multitasking. Were one of them. You know the the idea that you move from one task to another sounds. Great and very efficient. The issue was that they found. You actually divert amount of attention. Each time you do that you may not notice it yourself but when you start to objectively measure this with different types of brain scans scans that are measuring the function of the brain or particular parts of the brain at any given millisecond. You find that you actually expend quite a bit of energy just to switch from one task to another. So you think you're doing both simultaneously but you're probably doing neither as well as you could be and you're probably going to take more time than if you just did them linearly in some way you were at that. Two things that have stirred a revolution in neuroscience and are thinking about the brain are one the fact that brain cells can regenerate through our lifetimes and to that we can change the brain circuitry through neuro. Plasticity what does it mean that brain cells can regenerate through our lifetimes. We long believed that Brain cells neurons would only sort of continued to develop or go through this neurogenesis new brain cell development process at two different times. Really when you were very young and still developing your brain as a baby or if you've had some sort of injury and at that point the brain may start to either recruit new brain cells or even grow new brain cells. What we've come to understand over the last decade is that even outside of those two conditions justin normal life without an injury or as an adult you can still grow new brain cells. That was a really pretty significant thing. before that the brain was thought to be largely immutable sort of fixed. You know and and and really measured only by its inputs and its outputs you know. Sort of a black box of sorts We've obviously been able to explore the brain differently and we've been able to see this neurogenesis evidence of this neurogenesis throughout our entire lives which is which was really a remarkable finding and i think very inspiring as well so so is the active learning something new what is generating new brain cells. I think the active learning new things the act of experiencing something new or even delivering something. That's typical for you. But in a different way can all generate These new brain cells in these these new pathways these new functional pathways throughout the brain. And that that. I think that's the most critical thing is that you can use the same roads and go to the same buildings you always go to and pretty soon. You'll be really good at that. That's the practice makes perfect part of things but as you have these new experiences. These new learnings these new activities. Whatever they may be something that gets you out of your comfort zone may be is how i describe it You will start to build new things within your brain. A lot of people assume you kind of lose the ability to learn new things at a certain age or to create new habits or new patterns of behavior. Is that true. I really don't think that that's true. I mean y- it would be fair to say that you know the brain like any other oregon if you were to look at it. It ages that that shouldn't surprise anybody it ages. It's going to change the brain itself just the physical matter. The brain is going to change as you get older but in terms of what it can do processing speed the ability to learn new things all of that that is not limited. Perhaps some of your senses start to diminish your eyesight. You may need reading glasses. You're hearing things like that but your ability to actually be able to process to understand to apply that that really not only does it not change it it it can actually get sharper can get better as you get older. If you continue to use it it is sort of the use it or lose it phenomenon when it comes to the brain if you think the brain like muscle which i think is a fair metaphor. Do you think healthy brain is measured by. How well you can memorize things. How do you measure. What a healthy brain is. I think a healthy brain is is really measured by Beyond the basic critical functions of of me to get you through your day the activities of daily living. All those things it's really about Your your happiness and and how much joy you have. I know which sounds euphemistic. But if the if your brain is designed to Obviously take care of the critical functions breathing respiration heart rate blood pressure things like that your brain stem functions beyond that. It's it's the things that get you through the day and and create a the most positive living experienced you can have. That's really what the brains should be doing if the brain is working well and we're treating the brain right so you're saying you didn't do a good enough job but nobody likes you. That's not. that's not a healthy brain. Toxic brain netted taxi right. That's toxic brain and we all live with that because we live in a society in which that is what we're exposed to often but the brain left to its devices has one purpose and it's just serve the individual and so how does any oregon serve you. You wouldn't ask about the heart that way. A happy heart is a healthy heart. A happy brain as a healthy brain but they all exist to serve the individual. that's it a to serve. No one else. My guess is dr sanjay gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent. His new book is called. Keep sharp build a better brain at any age. We'll hear more of our interview. After a short break and book critic maureen corrigan will review the new western novel outlawed. I'm terry gross and this is fresh air weekend this message comes from. Npr sponsor. Bank of america. You decided to upgrade your outdoor deck. So you ordered the essentials. A power washer a set of patio chairs and a shiny new grill. And you used your bank of america. Cash rewards credit card choosing to earn three percent cash-back on online shopping or up to five point two five percents as a preferred rewards member which you put towards the cost of your most essential deck edition a bird feeder apply for yours at bank of america dot com slash more rewarding copyright twenty twenty bank of america corporation. Let's get back to my interview with dr sanjay gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent. He's also been a practicing neurosurgeon for about twenty years. His new book is all about the brain he debunk. Smith's explains the latest research about the brain's ability to keep learning new things. No matter what your age and how to keep the brain healthy and functioning at its best so it's encouraging to hear you say that you can keep creating new pathways in your brain. You could do it even when you're older. Let me balance that with the discouraging news that age. Twenty four is the peak from your brain. So is it all downhill after twenty four. I think the idea that we have these sort of artificial peaks in terms of what the brain can and cannot do is already starting to become A little bit antiquated thinking. It was only over the last decade. Or so terry that we even thought that the brain could create new brain cells and become more plastic. So we had this sort of imaging are head that was this peak performance at a certain age and then sort of downhill after that. I don't i don't wanna be hyperbolic or euphemistic. I mean it is true that the oregon's age and we age and that's true that's that's part of life but the brain perhaps more than any other oregon I think can actually become better as we get older. There's certain things that are you know going to diminish our senses for example But when it comes to things like judgment when it comes to language when it comes to your overall capacity to find happiness those things can actually improve as you get older and i keep coming back to this happiness enjoy thing because oftentimes people think about these types of lifestyle changes in terms of preventing illness later but when we when we really look at this we find that there's benefit to doing these things right now fear brain like i tell you the eat right and exercise and don't smoke and do all those things and nothing will happen to you. Well first of all. That's not the most inspiring right. You do all these things you worked so hard and then nothing happens to me. Why why am. I doing it well to prevent illness while. How do i know that i wouldn't have had the illness anyway. What was all this hard work. That i did. The brain is different in that you can close the loop right now you can feel better right away as a result of these actions and one of the ways that you feel better as you just you feel happier you feel more productive. You feel like a better daughter. Better son better spouse whatever it may be you want to get out of bed in the morning. You feel like you have a life of purpose. Whatever it is those things you can feel. Now as a result of these things which i think is important as a doc. We're always trying to inspire our patients. Do the right thing by telling him. This will help you twenty thirty years from now. It's pretty tough to make the case. If i tell you that it's going to help you right now. And by the way the way that it helps is that it makes you feel happier. It's pretty compelling to really important things for a healthy brain or exercise which you've talked about that kind of surprised me. I never really associated that with the brain but also sleep. Sleep is really important for good brain function. What happens while we're sleeping. The brain is not at rest the way people might imagine it to be. When we're sleeping. I think a lot of people you know. They realize that we dream and we do other things. So the brain can be quite active. But i think there's there's there's several important things that are happening but to that. I really focused on one is that is the time when we really do consolidate memories. So you've had all these interesting experiences throughout your day. People that you've met conversations you've had experiences you've had whatever it may be you have these things in part because you want to remember them in and add them to your life narrative that process of actually putting them in the memory book if you will putting them in the in the terry gross life. Narrative book really happens at at the time that you sleep. That's the consolidation of memory. Sort of face. Some of it is actually placing the memories. Some of it is moving memories from short term the longer term memory and those sorts of things so you you have to be able to sleep well in order to well and you also have to be able to sleep well in order to forget well because you want to in order to make life narrative as as cohesive as possible. You're doing a lot of editing along the way you're getting rid of some things you're adding things the whole process just like you might write a paper a lot of that's happening while you sleep. Another more. recent finding about sleep is is that there is a sort of rinse cycle. That's happening when you see a rinse cycle that allows certain neurotrophic factors to bay the brain but also to remove certain waste as well from the basic metabolic processes that are happening in the organ. The brain just like any other organ in the body. It's almost like the lymphatic system in the body. The lymphatic system is draining. Lymph in your lymph Draining waste away from your body. That's happening in the brain as well so during sleep. It's really this consolidation of memories. This removal of waste and this nourishing of the brain takes place more efficiently than any other time during the day. Do you think that memory games and crossword puzzles are actually helpful in training your brain to remember more things than be sharper. I think that crossword puzzles and brain training exercises can be quite helpful at making the roads in your brain that you use a lot already keeping them strong preventing them from meeting construction and things like that. It's it's kind of the practice makes perfect part of your your brain and some of the brain games can actually increase your processing speed the speed at which you process new content new information but i really do draw a line between that and keeping a brain sharper and building cognitive reserve throughout your life. That's different you wanna be doing different things in order to build that reserve as opposed to doing the same thing better and better. There's a role for both but if it's cognitive reserve you're looking for doing different things things that get you outside your comfort zone. It's probably gonna have a much bigger payoff so to sum up for a healthy brain. You recommend movement. You like a day of strenuous exercise. You recommend a good healthy diet and say that a heart healthy diet has also a brain healthy diet. Get a lot of sleep. How much would you suggest. I think Sleep wise at seven and nine hour. Seems like the right amount. Everyone is nine hours seven to nine hours if you can do it if you can. Do you know if you're if you're if you're dreaming in the morning if you're dreaming in the morning right before you wake up. That's a pretty good sign. That probably means that you've spent a fair amount of your evening your night consolidating memories and going through the rinse cycle. And you know you wake up some morning dreams. If you can do that that that's a pretty good sign. Everyone's everyone's different. And that's something that i really tried to focus on in the book as well because we love these this sort of blanket advice on things but yeah seven billion people on the planet. We're all going to be a little different but if you wanna put range on things seven to nine hours asleep. Give me the honest answer to this question. How many hours of sleep do you get between performing brain surgery and being a c. n. n. medical correspondent and a father of three. Yeah you know terry. i'm. I'm not getting enough sleep and you know i hate to be one of those people. Who's not practicing what he preaches. But even though. I think i know the right thing to do. Doesn't mean that i always do it and i'm just very honest and transparent about that. It's it's been a really hard year. i mean. I know it's been really tough year. Since since since the beginning of two thousand. Twenty terry. I i have been every day weekends included waking up around five o'clock in the morning sometimes four forty five part of the reason is i need to speak to people on the other side of the the globe and they're ending their days. I'm beginning mine. And i i wanna speak to them. You know wanted to speak to folks in china from where the virus you know. They had some of the earliest data. I wanted to speak to them about the outbreak. I wanted to speak to them about their vaccine. Development worthy antivirals working. How are the hospitals. Doing what are they learning in terms of critical care. I mean i was so head down into the story. I'm a neurosurgeon not an infectious disease doctor. but nothing. nothing really mattered. When you're dealing with a novel virus there's so much that we're still learning. So i became so head down in the story in this issue in learning everything about it that i was waking up four forty five in the morning and and because i do television sometimes it shows. Don't go off the air till eleven o'clock at night get five or six hours a night for a year and it's it's affected me for sure. It's not ideal. How has it affected you i. I'm not as clear. I'm not as happy i am tired. I'm not as it is. I'm a super organized festus individual. I mean that that is kind of my my calling card. Everything is always organized right now. I'm sitting here talking to you. My basement closet. I my i. I don't even know if. I have my shirt on inside out or not is i'm talking. Luckily you can't see me. My i have a little caught. That i put down here in my basement room Windowless basement room. Rice sleep a lot. It's littered with with shirts that probably need to be washed ties and and papers from this year things that i continue to want to read. As as we're moving into the next phase of this pandemic. I have all these notes about the vaccine. I got my own vaccine. I took copious notes on the vaccine before i perceived it myself. But it's just it's my mind and my space are cluttered and i know that i could be a lot better if i simply got sleep. And i'm not being hyperbolic. It's true but i've just had a hard time getting there this year understood. Why are you sleeping on a car in the basement. Well because a lotta times. I don't wanna wake up my family. I have two dogs. I have three kids my wife. And if i'm going to bed around midnight and need to be back up at four forty five. All that means is. I'm gonna wake up the whole house twice so the dogs are barking if i go upstairs and that wakes up girls and you know i it. Just no one's happy in that case so at least i can be the only one happy that scenario by simply sleep. I don't sleep there all the time. But there's a lot of times when i just you know it's just easier especially if there's a lot going on the kids have zoom school in the morning and tests and things like that it. Just it's it's easier. i'm privileged. I think to be able to work from home. So i can see the family. You know a fair amount. I can pop up during the day and say hi and sometimes have meals together. But most of the time. I'm i'm in this windowless basement. It's sort of the sensory deprived environment which is everywhere. I look. I mean. I got post. It's all over the walls Everywhere you look. It's cove it. I totally immersed in the world of covid dr gupta. Thank you so much for talking with us. Terry thank you what. What an honor. Dr sanjay gupta is a neurosurgeon and cnn's chief medical correspondent. His new book is called. Keep sharp build a better brain at any age. If you're feeling confined these days are book critic. Maureen corrigan has a new novel to recommend that she says gallup's often to unchartered territory. It's an updated western called outlawed. Here's marines review talking to friends. This past week. I've described anna. Norths new novel outlawed as the handmaid's tale meets butch cassidy and the sundance kid. That's glib tagline but there's some justification for it outlawed opens in an alternative america of eighteen ninety four that was torn asunder by a flu epidemic. Some sixty years earlier west of the mississippi centralized government has been replaced by a patchwork of independent towns one of the few things this fragmented america agrees on that women are put on earth to bear children. That's it and because too much knowledge especially medical knowledge of women's bodies is frowned upon barren women are regarded as freaks of nature which is they're ostracized imprisoned and sometimes put to death that status quo is pretty much okay with the heroine of outlawed a seventeen year old woman named ada. She's content to be married off to a man chosen for her and settles into a await her first pregnancy which fails to happen in less than a year. Ada is expelled from her husband's house and after a few twists of fate joins up with the infamous hole in the wall gang in north's novel that real-life band of nineteenth century gunslingers is reimagined as a group of mostly non-conforming gender outlaws who identify as female or non binary there led by messianic figure called the kid in finding a home with the gang. Ada comes to realize that sexual desire can roam as wide and free as here in buffalo on the range outlawed in this quick summary concerned gimmicky. But there's much more going on in the smart adventure tale than just a sly up ending of the traditional western rooted macho individualism and violence for all the ways. North ingeniously stretches the limits of the genre. She's also clearly a fan. She doesn't shy away from the expected. Gunfights and her rendering of such scenes is jittery absorbing but north also dwells on the bloody aftermath of these shootouts and the damage that bullets due to the body in common with writers of classic westerns north also evokes the rugged landscape of the west especially the area around the gang's hideout with salt flats prairie dog burrows and notched wall bright red rock many stories high that gives the hole in the wall. Gang its name. It's there that the final showdown between the gang and the posse of law. Men who are pursuing them will take place most of although it's the affecting character of ada who's the steady draw here once fate tosses her out of her complacent life ada in the time. Honored tradition of the western becomes a hunter like mattie. Ross intrude grit or dare. I say ethan edwards in the vex john ford film the searchers ada is on the trail not of someone but of something. She wants medical knowledge of women's bodies. Ada joins the gang for protection but also to get loot from the holdups to be able to travel and study with a master midwife. She's heard about a woman who practices farther west ada aims to save other infertile women from being ostracized or murdered. There's a moment after she settles in with the gang when ada almost decides to stay put she tells us i saw how the valley now blooming into beauty after the long winter could feel like home would i had planned instead was so amorphous and uncertain but if i stayed in the valley i would learn. Know more about myself or people like me then. I had known when i left. I would die without knowing what made me the way i was. The heroes of the traditional western were always sure about what made them the way they were made a man a man for ada and the other outlaws of the spirited novel the frontiers of gender and sexuality beckoned to be explored maureen. Corrigan teaches literature at georgetown university. She reviewed outlawed by anna north as we take a short break. We'll hear from journalist. Maria raza she's the executive editor and ceo of rap ler an online media organization based in manila. The authoritarian president of the philippines rodrigo duterte has threatened to shut rapper down and he's worn journalists. they're not safe from assassination. Recipe is now facing the possibility of several years in prison. I'm terry gross. And this is fresh air weekend this message comes from. Npr sponsor. bank of america. You decided to upgrade your outdoor deck. So you ordered the essentials. A power washer a said a patio chairs and the shiny new grill. And you used your bank of america. Cash rewards credit card choosing to earn three percent cashback on online shopping or up to five point two five percents as a preferred rewards member which you put towards the cost of your most essential deck edition a bird feeder apply for yours at bank of america dot com slash more rewarding copyright twenty twenty bank of america corporation at a time when many journalists are facing increasing threats around the world. I guess maria raza has stood up to one of the world's most dangerous leaders. Wrestler is a co founder and executive editor of rap ler. An online media organization based in manila. She's been covering the rise of the populist. Authoritarian president rodrigo duterte day since he was a mayor in the philippines when he became president in two thousand sixteen russia and her reporters covered utara territories bloody war on drugs his expanding grip on all parts of the government and his crackdown on the press. Russia and raptor faced thirteen government investigations. Shot faces nine criminal charges. In june raza and another reporter were convicted of cyber liable. Defaming someone online. It's a filipino. Law that's being applied retroactively because the law didn't even exist when the alleged crime was committed. They are appealing and are still fighting of the chargers. They also face constant threats of assassination in jail from detaille his supporters and the army of internet trolls they unleash research sees this abuse of power and the weaponize use of the internet as a danger to democracies everywhere. Maria raza was born in the philippines and grew up in the. Us she worked for cnn for two decades. She ran cnn's bureau in manila and then the jakarta bureau and served a c. n. n.'s lead investigative reporter focusing on terrorism in the region recipe. Decided to make manila her home and created rap ler her fearless work has garnered attention worldwide. Now there's a documentary about her work. Called a thousand cuts directed by ramon diaz. It's available online at pbs dot org and on youtube. Maria raza welcome to fresh air. And i so admire your courage and the journalism that you've been doing so thank you for coming on our show. Thank you for having me. I want to quote some of the things that president deteriora- has said in this first one got a lot of applause. He said if you don't kill me now four months from now i'll roast you like pit. He said just. Because you're a journalist you think you're exempted from assassination and a speech. He said when i became president i said do not do drugs because i will kill you. I have three more years. I'm really going to finish you off. You'll see at his inaugural address he said if you're into drugs some day you'll make a mistake and i will kill you i. It's just horrifying to hear president. Speak about killing his citizens like that. You take a matters word especially with journalists saying that just because you're a journalist you're not exempt from assassination. I think that's the one thing. He's always delivered his threats. You know. the funny thing is in twenty fifteen which was when we were trying to figure out what's really going to run or not. I sat down with him and that was the first time i interviewed him since. One thousand nine hundred eighty nine. So i interviewed him a long long time ago and then in twenty fifteen and in that interview. He admitted that he killed three people on camera. You know. and and at that point maybe the way american journalists covered trump. It was like. I didn't quite know what to think or how to react. But since then every quote that you said it creates a new beginning of how the president uses his power right. He doesn't lie about it. He threatens and you know he he creates a list of the of people he says are drug addicts and in that. He gave me this list. This is now in two thousand sixteen december twenty six already president were sitting at the palace and he gives me a thick list like almost a foot long and he says these are all the drug addicts and i was like. Is this proven. Well no not yet but then slowly over the next few years those people on that drug list. They wound up dead. I think the difference between the united states and the philippines between trump and teradata is you have institutions and while americans say that your institutions aren't strong enough. They were strong enough to hold a strong president. We have a president who's boasted of killing people and continues to encourage the police and the military to kill people. We don't know what to do with that in one of your interviews with president duterte you said to him you brick law you threaten to break the law you've said you killed and yet you have the task of keeping the rule of law. Is it important that people be afraid of you. And he answered yes for the rule of law there must be fear so that's a very brave question to have asked him especially since his government has been investigating and threatening you. What is it like for you to confront him with questions like that. You know that was december of two thousand. Sixteen and i was one of four reporters that he gave an interview to at the palace with president. Duterte at that point. I was really curious because he believes that he understands the filipino psyche. And really his understanding of the psyche is all about bullying. He believes that filipinos do not follow the law and that they must be threatened into doing that. I asked him earlier. You know how are you. How are you going to make this country. We're one hundred ten million people. And it's it's been a a tough a democracy. That's kind of you know had weak institutions week law enforcement and democ corruption. How are you gonna handle this. And he says no. I'll be different. Because i know how the filipinos think. And then he said how he would use institutions lake the tax agency run after and make filipinos follow. What do i know little did i know. Then that the tax agency would come after me. Because i'm doing my job right face. Five tax evasion cases that the government has filed and all because we've been reclassified from a news organization to stockbrokerage. Just like. let me think of. Yeah yeah yes when. I actually go into it. I just go oh my god so there is no longer Well we were reclassified as a dealer insecurities. That's the exact quote. So rap alert as an entity is not a news organization. We are Quote dealer in securities. And because we are we then should have paid all the taxes that stockbrokerage agency would right. That makes perfect sense doesn't it. What makes us much sense as being tried retroactively for a law that didn't exist when the so-called crime was committed which is what happened to you with the liable case so it is really remarkable what you're facing now in the us. A lot of people who do not support trump have n- asking what is the appeal of somebody who has made so many baseless claims who has threatened journalists and who often seems to have no interest in actually governing and. I'm wondering if you have figured out. What is the appeal of duty because he has a lot of followers yes he does I think two things and one of our reporters actually says this in the film. Populism brings an illusion of power to people who may feel powerless and our reporter in the film said he promises revenge. So it's again that split of the haves the have nots. There's a big gap between the rich. And the poor. In the philippines president duterte has styled himself as coming for the poor. Even though that's not actually true his supporters will say he's like someone you can have a beer with but he is in his seventies. so he's he is sexist that this is a misogynist worse and he says things that you would never expect to come from a leaders mouth. I want to hear more about how you think do. Duties attacks on journalists and attacks on other people who oppose him have changed your approach to journalism as the executive editor of the rap ler. That's a great question. I'll say it from experience right so the first target of attack. The woman who went to jail early on in february twenty seven th was senator lila lima former justice secretary former head of the commission on human rights. She investigated deter when he was still mayor for extra-judicial killings when all of the charges when the government was throwing all the charges against her that she was a drug dealer that was a charge thrown against her. We were reporting it as if it was still the old world. And i guess there was a part of me that was thinking that what the government really say all these things if they didn't have the evidence so you question about now. It's happening to me right. Yes the response is yes the government will do it even if they have no evidence in fact the president just in december president duterte named lawmakers who he said were corrupt and then the next census but i have no evidence he still named them and they were then forced to defend themselves the next day right so how does it change the way we report shows i. Is you become very skeptical of government and its process like in december one. The president named these lawmakers. We didn't print those names because when he said there is no evidence why would you print them but in the old days you would print them. Because he's the president right. So the so the i guess the norms have changed in that sense and then the second one is in my case. I think the big shift for me is. I've realized that when you're in a battle for facts journalism is activism and. That's a big shift because i grew up a traditional journalists. I believe i helped write the standards of ethics of three different news groups right so getting to that point where it was actually when i was arrested and after they they detained me and held me overnight. The made a point to arrest me when courts closed and it was february thirteenth. Because the next day was valentine's day right it's february thirteenth twenty eighteen and i couldn't post. It was too late to post bail. I had to stay the night in jail and the next day. When i came out i was so angry. Because the government's power was used to make me feel. It's power to intimidate. That was the goal. And that's when. I realized i don't have to ask anyone else whether you've done anything wrong. I don't have to look for. I know this. So that's when i began to speak and i actually realized in this day and age you have to call it. You have to say ally is alive. You have to challenge in ways that we traditional journalists are comfortable. Part of your arrest is filmed for the documentary. And you speak to the press after your arrested and you are so cool and so calm and your thoughts are so kind of organized when you make those comments and i was watching a thinking. How does she do that. How does she remain calm at a time. Like this and just say what she needs to say. I was so angry when i watched that. When i watched the film it was like getting punched in the gut. Goes when you live through it. It's like it happens in slow motion and you take it and you move on. You know. I live my life step by step. I know which direction i need to go in that particular one. I was detained overnight. There several of these now. I don't know which one that which one it was but in each one. I know that i need to tamp down the anger. It's kinda like doing a live shot right. This is a good thing that i guess. I took from the from twenty years with cnn and doing live shots. All hell can be breaking loose around you and you have to take what you know. Push your emotion down and have clarity of thought and like a live shot. I pegged to. What are the three main things that i want to say. And that's that's how i speak the worse. It is the calmer idea that is so interesting that you're cnn. Experience doing live reporting helped you that make. It makes a lot of sense unrelated note. Do you think that the cameras the cameras from the documentary about you. The other cameras from the press. Do you think they protect you in any way or do they make things worse because it costs more attention to you know they protect you know at the beginning. If you come under attack you think that you know. Just be quiet. at least. That's the impact in the philippines of president. duterte debt. You try to just do your jobs. But that's not the way it works and to me. It all came to a head in december twenty eighteen one time Made me one. The covers the for the person of the year. And i didn't know that that was going to happen. So the first time i saw was tweet and when it came out i was like. Oh my gosh. The first thing i did was i thought it was fall so i sent it our social media team to verify but when i got the call i thought. Oh my gosh now. I'm really going to be targeted. I heard he was targeted. And what i didn't realize and what. I embraced later on. Is that that was a shield. And that's the same thing with the documentary film washington post. I think they're new. Banner says it right. Democracy dies in darkness staying quiet when the constitution is being violated when your rights are being violated. But that doesn't help anyone. And i guess that's the the lesson i've learned the whatever it is. Call it shine the light. Because if you don't it's going to happen over and over again you face nine criminal charges. Now you're found guilty of cyber reliable. You faced the possibility of six years in prison. How likely are you to actually be in prison for six years. I don't know. And i guess that's part of what's difficult about the last few years That's only one of the nine criminal cases that have been filed against me all of them of course politically motivated. I have done nothing wrong but be a journalist. Having said that all the charges combined could send me to jail for one hundred years i mean the rest of my life and how likely is it you know. Let me let me put it this way. It's like how i live my life today. How i fight the battle today will make it more or less likely that i go to jail right. And that's why in a strange way. I think that the battle is the journey. Good journey is the battle is that makes sense. It's i feel like what i do. Today will make a difference will determine what my future is going to be like. I guess that's a good thing. Sorry it's late at night by time right yes. It's eleven o'clock your time at night. Yeah yeah i think. I don't know what the future will look like but i do know that every day that we hold the line every day that we hold power to account makes it more certain though we will remain a democracy and that i stay out of jail. Well listen i wish you safety. I hope you stay out of prison. And i hope you stay healthy. Thank you for the work that you do your very courageous woman. Thank you thank you for having me and for listening to maria wrestler is the executive editor and ceo of rap ler an online media organization based in manila a pbs frontline documentary about her called thousand cuts directed by ramon diaz is available online at pbs dot. Org and on youtube fresher weekend is produced by teresa madden. Fresh air's executive producer is danny miller. Our technical director and engineer is audrey bentham with assistance today from mike villers. Our interviews and reviews produced an edited by emi salad phyllis myers roberta shorrock san brigger. Lauren crandell heidi soman and rebuilding auto. They challenor seth kelly and kayla. Lattimore our associate producer of digital media. Is molly seavy nesper. I'm terry gross.

Dr sanjay gupta maureen corrigan Dr gupta cnn rodrigo duterte terry gross bank of america twenty twenty bank of america oregon Maria raza philippines Meeks butch cassidy Npr breathing respiration heart ra terry emory university school of med manila Ada
Show 1240: The Link Between Vitamin D and COVID-19

People's Pharmacy

59:46 min | Last month

Show 1240: The Link Between Vitamin D and COVID-19

"I'm joe graydon terry graydon. Welcome to this podcast of the people's pharmacy. You can find previous podcasts. And more information on a range of health topics at people's pharmacy dot com as your healthcare provider checked your vitamin d levels lately. Why is this so important. During the covid nineteen pandemic. This is the people's pharmacy. With terry and joe graydon study at the university of chicago suggests that people with low levels of vitamin d in their bloodstreams may be more susceptible to infection with sars. Koby too much is enough to provide protection. Scandinavian grandmothers used to dose their families with cod. liver oil. They had no idea why it might have been beneficial during winter. Months is vitamin d. The magic ingredient in cod liver oil. Which form of vitamin d works. Best coming up on the people's pharmacy get the low down on vitamin d against covid. Nineteen in the people's pharmacy health headlines hospitals across the country are struggling to provide care for increasing numbers of covid nineteen patients at last count. There were more than a hundred ten thousand people hospitalized with this disease as a result. Healthcare facilities might be tempted to discharge recovering patients as soon as possible to make room for newly diagnosed individuals. A study from the veterans administration suggest. That could be risky. The investigators analyzed records from patients discharged between march and july to assess readmission indepth out of more than two thousand people hospitalized. One thousand seven hundred seventy five survived to be discharged over the next two months. One in five was readmitted and nine percent died. The analysis demonstrated that the first ten days after discharge worthy the riskiest in this population which is composed largely of older male. Patients will a ring help diagnose covid nineteen early detection can help people avoid infecting others researchers now report that the ring may be able to detect fever at an early stage of infection. Era is spelled. O you are a it. Fits on the finger and monitors heart rate heart rate variability respiration physical activity and sleep quality. It also collects continuous temperature data. During the day and night information is transmitted to the user smartphone and stored on the cloud the fifty individuals in this pilot study. Were already using or rings before the study began they had also experienced covert nineteen symptoms. The investigators detected changes in daily body temperature patterns a few days before people reported symptoms. Wearable monitors might be able to detect infectious outbreak such as influenza before patients become aware of searches this week. The fda author is to home diagnostic test for covid nineteen unlike previous home tests. This one does not require a prescription and the results can be read and interpreted by the patient even in people with no symptoms. The test accurately identifies negative samples ninety six percent of the time and positive samples ninety one percent of the time that level of accuracy. No doubt figured into the fda's decision to proceed with emergency use authorization. It means however that even people who get a negative result should continue to use precautions as they might still be carrying the virus. The maker is an australian company called l. Loom twenty years of data collected by the dallas heart. Study suggests that one measure of inflammation is strongly linked to depression in two thousand. Researchers recruited a diverse group of texans between thirty and sixty five years old. They filled out. Medical questionnaires provided blood samples and agreed to imaging studies. The scientists have followed them regularly. One research team reports that levels of an inflammatory compound called glass say track closely to the severity of symptoms of depression. Their study could not determine whether say causes depression. Or if it's elevated as a result of the mood disorder. the next story is based on data from an epidemiological study not a randomized control trial. This study was based on data from the uk. Pyo bank over seventeen hundred adults between forty six and seventy seven years of age provided detailed information about their eating habits. They were asked about tea. Coffee and alcohol consumption as well as foods like fruits vegetables fish beat bread cheese and cereal. They were also tested for cognitive performance. Was something called. The fluid intelligence test. Fit to the surprise of the investigators. People who eat cheese daily had better fit scores. Moderate red wine consumption added to that effect people who were at particular risk for alzheimer's disease because of their genetic makeup feared works on the it. The eight a lot of salt and that's the health news from the people's pharmacy this week. Welcome to the people's pharmacy. I'm joe graydon and i'm terry graydon. Scientists have long suspected that vitamin d may influence the immune system's ability to respond to pathogens. How does that relate to covid nineteen to find out. We are talking with an investigator who published a study looking at covert infection rates and previously measured vitamin d levels. Dr david meltzer is the fanny l. Pritzker professor of medicine chief of the section of hospital medicine and director of the center for health and the social sciences at the university of chicago. Welcome to the people's pharmacy. Dr david meltzer. Thank you so much for having me. I'm really glad to join you today. Well we are delighted to speak with you first of all. Why did you study vitamin d. Deficiency what what intrigued you about this concept. Well it's kind of funny i. I'm not someone who's been studying vitamin d in the past. Though the way this happened was i literally got a random email back in march. Just when all this was going crazy and the header of the email said vitamin d deficiency associated with increased viral respiratory tract infections. And i thought oh wow. Kobe viral respiratory tract infections. So i i started reading the article. It was a meta analysis or a combination of many studies. The combination studied the meta analysis was done by adrian. Martineau who's in the uk and what it showed is that patients who had vitamin d deficiency. Who were given vitamin d. Supplementation had a dramatic lower risk viral respiratory tract infections about seb as much as seventy percent reduction and. I thought that was a really striking resolved. Tonight i knew enough from medical school to know that krona viruses or common caused by respiratory tract infections. General and thought. Well this is a corona virus. Maybe it's the same thing and so it occurred to me that we had a lot of patients coming into our hospital who were here in chicago. The university of chicago medicine who were getting tested for coronavirus and that for many of them we might have historical vitamin d values and that we would be able to look within our own data to see whether people who were vitamin d deficient. Were more or less likely than people who weren't to test positive for coronavirus so That's how i got started. Well that is fascinating so you already had the vitamin d data. People were already coming into the hospital to get tested. Please tell us what you found while. So what we found was that patients who were a vitamin d deficient had about seventy seven percent increase in their likelihood of testing positive compared to people who were were not by indeed and that analysis included both reflecting the levels that they had when they were most recently measured but also any intervening treatments. We could measure so that really struck us and we got all the necessary approvals to dig into more detail data and prepared a manuscript. We originally put out a manuscript. I believe it was in late. April or early may that was published on a pre print server a meadow archive and then sent it out for peer review. And that takes awhile even when everyone's trying to hurry up and get things published in in the era of kobe a that was eventually published in jami network open in early september. Now dr meltzer when you say a seventy seven percent increase in the likelihood of testing positive for covid nineteen. That's a relative risk right right exactly. Do we have any idea what the absolute risk might have been well. So i don't remember the exact numbers in our paper and i think it's something like twelve percent versus almost twenty percent. It was it was a big number. But i wanna emphasize that that depends very much on the environment in which you're testing right. If you're testing people who are relatively symptomatic and the prevalence is really high. On average people are going to be more likely to be positive. Where if you're testing people who aren't so symptomatic and the prevalence isn't that higher incidence really with new cases than that number is going to be lower so that absolute effect is in our environment And of course you'd wanna look for similar results in in other environments as well and since the time that study was published there been several other studies that have shown affects honestly not that different from ours in terms of relative risk and in very different settings one in israel one in studies around the us data from us diagnostics so Our result does not appear to be isolated only to are setting. There is one study that did not find the sort of results that that we found And that was a study done in the united kingdom using data from their bio bank. But the problem with that study. Is that the vitamin d levels. Were more than a decade old. And so as you might imagine whether you were vitamin d deficient or not a decade or so ago might not predict very well whether you are right now exactly and i'm holding up a study that was just published today From greece suggesting that people who had low twenty five hydroxy vitamin d levels on admission to an intensive care unit Ended up in a much worse situation. Many of them died If their vitamin d levels were really low. So i guess the real question here is what's going on. Yeah why would vitamin d make a difference while so so i think the first thing we have to say. We don't know vitamin d makes difference. We're not one hundred percent. Sure it could be for example that there was some other illness with these people or condition that caused them both to have low vitamin d levels and to be at increased risk for either getting covert or having a bad outcome with covert. So we need to be careful. Because i don't think anyone you know at least from these population. Studies has really proven that vitamin d per se reduces the risk. That much said there are very strong. Biological reasons to believe that vitamin d improves function of the immune system. It has value in improving a native unity immunity things. You've never seen before adaptive immunity the to respond rapidly to a pathogen. You you've seen in the past and also immuno modulation decreasing inflammation which we know is a critical part of Kobe in addition. I do wanna go back to this meta analysis of randomized trials. Those are the sort of studies in which you can really infer causation. And in those settings there just seemed to be a causal effect. So you know i do. I personally believe there is a causal effect. I think there's a very high probability one hundred percent. Sure no and so i i. I think it's really critical that we do studies that confirm or at least. I should say test this hypothesis. Now that much said you know here. We are hopefully with a vaccine beginning to comment a few days but with the vast majority of us you know not being vaccinated already and not going to be vaccinated Away and what we do know from all sorts of other epidemiologic literature is that many many individuals or vitamin d deficient. And we also know that you can give doses of vitamin d very safely to people as long as you don't exceed recommended levels and i think there can be some rational discussion about what those recommended levels should be and so i don't think we need to be paralyzed in action waiting for the perfect evidence. That's not going to be there in time to help us at least in this pandemic but i think we need to be careful both in how much we take and how we represent what we're doing and and i also believe it's really important that we studied this and we study it rigorously through randomized trials. I'm well we. We love randomized trials on the people's pharmacy but we also recognize that sometimes if the benefit risk analysis. You know favors the treatment. It might not be such a bad idea so inquiring minds wanna know. Are you taking vitamin d. After doing your study. I i am definitely taking vitamin d and recommending it to my friends and family. So i i. i'm putting my mouth where my beliefs are or or whatever the right thing would be so. Yeah i'm doing at an i i. I think that it's a reasonable thing for lots of people. Do i do think there's room for study. I do think that you know you could reasonably debate whether you know what you need is something resembling the rda. Which is you know. Somewhere between six hundred and eight hundred for most people not counting kids you know. The national academy of medicine has said that you can usually go up to four thousand international units a day without you know risk of complications. So that's probably a reasonable upper limit for for most people but we're now doing three separate studies here at the university of chicago to try to better understand What the value of supplementation is and one of them is with a very medically complex group of people where we're talking with them about the risks and benefits and trying to optimize their care and comparing their outcomes to a group of patients who are in control group where we're not as engaged. A second study is a study that originally is involved. Just healthcare workers where where i'm giving different doses so low versus medium or high dose vitamin d. And i'm actually going to try to if we can expand that study into the general population and because we're giving high dose vitamin d up to ten thousand a day were doing some safety monitoring with that and then we're Rolling out a community study In chicago communities really heavily focused on minority populations his as i think most people know at this point the burden of kobe has been disproportionately on minority populations and Vitamin d raises very different issues in minority populations than in caucasians. I think that these issues are on. Vitamin d may be particularly important populations of color. Dr meltzer i hope you'll come back on the people's pharmacy and let us know what you discover from these very important studies. I'd be thrilled to. We've got more in the way. Dr david meltzer. Thank you so much for talking with us on the people spar messy today. Thank you for having me. You've been listening to dr david. Meltzer chief of the section of hospital medicine and director of the center for health and the social sciences and the chicago urban labs health lamp. He's the fanny l. Pritzker professor in the department of medicine department of economics and the harris school of public policy studies at the university of chicago. You can find links to his research in the post about today's show at people's pharmacy. Dot com after the break will examine the link between vitamin d and respiratory tract infections. With dr bruce hollis. What's the evidence. They covert is worse for people with low vitamin d levels. Vitamin d is renowned for keeping bones. Strong but it does a lot of other things as well find out what they are. How much vitamin d does doctor recommend for pregnant women who find out why the medical profession has been so skeptical about the value of vitamin d. You're listening to the people's pharmacy. With joe and terry haden. The people's pharmacy. Podcast is supported in part by coco via memory plus cocoa via cocoa flavonoids support both cardiovascular health and cognitive function by promoting healthy blood flow transporting oxygen and nutrients to vital organs and muscles including your heart and brain cocoa via memory plus has seven hundred fifty milligrams of coq au flavonoids the plant based nutrients from fresh cocoa that have been proven to help boost memory. Cocoa via memory plus is backed by four clinical trials that demonstrated improvement in three different aspects of memory. Long term memory. Spatial memory and word recall the studies. Show improve brain function in just eight weeks. You can try the benefits of cocoa via memory plus with a twenty five percent discount off your first month. Use the code people's twenty five to get the full benefits take daily for eight weeks. Cocoa via is offering people's pharmacy. podcast listeners. A ten percent discount on subscriptions that code is people ten learn more at koko via dot com Welcome back to the feebles pharmacy ontario graydon. Then i'm joe grayton. That people's pharmacy is brought to you. In part by coco via memory plus the cocoa flovent all supplement backed by four clinical studies that show significant improvement in three different aspects of memory. More information at koko via dot com also by verizon an analytical laboratory providing home health tests for hormones gut health and the microbiome now with an annual health club plan online at v. e. r. i s. a. n. a. dot com slash health dash club. Today our topic is vitamin d and its impact on respiratory infections especially covid nineteen. We just heard from. Dr david meltzer that patients at the university of chicago with low vitamin d levels. Were more likely to have a positive covid. Nineteen tests to get a better understanding of vitamin d and how it functions in the body. We turn to one of the country's leading experts on this vitamin or guest. Is dr bruce hollis professor of pediatrics biochemistry and molecular biology and director of pediatric nutritional sciences at the medical university of south carolina. Welcome back to the people's pharmacy. Dr bruce hollis thanks for having me back or spent several years i think spoke last time on this program in two thousand eight and i'm sure we have updates. Oh indeed we do time flies when you're having fun. Dr hollis if we were to transport ourselves back one hundred or more years to scandinavia. We'd probably find that grandmothers. There have been giving their children and even adults for that matter. Their children cod liver oil for centuries now they clearly didn't know anything about vitamin d but their experience and we kinda think sometimes experience has some value that they thought. Maybe this tonic. This cod liver oil. Might fight off colds and flu and maybe other infections as well. What does modern medicine have to tell us about vitamin d and susceptibility to respiratory tract infections. actually a lot. Vitamin d is probably one of the strongest immune. Regulators that we know of i mean it's so diverse in its actions at it acts through the innate immune system which is a primitive system that all all animals have If you don't have a like an octopus era or an insect it's all they have because they don't have bone marrow. Vitamin d works through that through a the antimicrobial peptides control of t cells. It's also functions. In in the adaptive system so in the production of antibodies and again adjustment of t cell selectivity at immune but clearly vitamin d has an impact on respiratory infections both from a standpoint of fighting the infection and also from a standpoint of adjusting the cited kind storm that in many cases are killing people. Now we should explain what a cytokine storm is. Yes we'll side kind. Storm is when pro inflammatory cited kinds are made in two hyphen amount and actually turn on the body and once that happens you enter into something. Like septic shock You the body can't turn it off. Vitamin d up regulates anti-inflammatory cited kinds and don regulates pro inflammatory side kinds. Which is very critical in this disease. That being said is one of the things. Attempts has downers decks methyl. So you know that's been approved a treatment and that's basically what decks methods ona's doing it. Does it better than vitamin d. I think vitamin d sexy systems up. So when you get this. You don't enter into that phase in a critical fashion into the site of kind storm. Now dr hall. We have all just heard Dr meltzer describing his research at the university of chicago. It indicated that people who are low in vitamin d might be more vulnerable to covid nineteen and its complications. Is there evidence that you're aware of that would corroborate that. There's been all kinds of studies. I mean i've been. I've been looking at the study since march in his. It's ironic that there's three initial studies that came out. One was from First little philippines from indonesia than one from india and they were so good that they it was almost. They couldn't be believed which was true. They're all fake. These scientists fake these papers okay and basically the way was patriots. Written is that vitamin d would would cure this. And that's not totally true but there's been plenty of studies. since then one from israel but from a author called malzahn. This is an observational study. Which is what you're talking about. And it was quite involved in fact when that data was presented and it was it was real data. I don't think you could find a vitamin d supplement in israel aftermath literally. There's been other papers of other. Things published on observational studies. That actually been randomized. Trials with giving vitamin d or more active forms of vitamin d and have been very successful at combating covid. Either make making the virus disappear faster or keeping people out of the icu or off ventilation. So there's there's a lot of this work out there. It's gone beyond observational studies. And and the the thing it infuriates me is that i don't know if you heard when donald trump was being treated and end anthony voucher was being interviewed. Somebody pressed him. They said well. Dr fauci what are you take. And he says well. I take vitamin d. And then they proud of them some more and they said well how much do you take and he says i take six thousand units per day yet. You have to pride this information out of them and they won't make this recommendation to the general public although they clearly believe it because they're doing it themselves and to me. That's quite infuriating. But but see. They won't recommend anything any treatment beyond because it's not. Fda approved hasn't been through a quote randomized controlled trial. So they're not gonna be a proponent of its use. Well dr hollis what we have seen is that doctors are perfectly willing to say. Yes you should take a small amount of vitamin d and it is a small amount to make sure your bones stay strong. But they're not willing to talk about other activities of the vitamin. Can you talk. Can you tell us please. What else does vitamin d do for us. Besides keep our bones strong. Well we just been talking us. It's a it's probably one of the strongest immune regulators in the body. The other thing is We've studied in my particular area. We studied vitamin d and and prevention of complications of birth which have been really successful in the last ten years. We've been looking at it to prevent pre eclampsia to prevent preterm birth and In fact it's been so successful that the food and drug administration as of two years ago allows label claims in vitamin d may may improve birth outcomes. That was incredible to me because they don't make those claims let those claims on their light lightly so they were presented with the data from from us and other grassroots health and they petitioned to have that label claim made in the fda allowed it to be. Let me ask quite a level of vitamin d. A pregnant woman might take in order to have that kind of good outcome so our studies were all done on. Four thousand units a day in take our highest levels okay and that was from the duration of when we saw the patients. Which was the first trimester on now. Aben involved in lila other studies prevention of asthma during pregnancy. In in the newborn and and What we see there in those studies With pre eclampsia is. I would suggest anybody who gets pregnant. Has have a vitamin d. Level of at least forty nanograms. Because what happens you know. Of course it. Conception all the lung development is takes place in the first trimester. So if you're only studying after you missed the first trimester and then you start. Supplementing vitamin d or missing a critical parts of lisp placental implantation one development things that vitamin d do and so the ideal studies that we would like to do is do these studies preconception. But it's nearly impossible to do so you have to look at the observational data. Make decision vitamin d is not inouye harmful. I mean we've looked at literally. Thousands of patients giving him this amount and have not had a single adverse event due to vitamin d. Dr hollis i'd like to ask you. Why your colleagues why physicians in general and i don't wanna generalize but for the most part mainstream medicine looks upon vitamins with i. They they know that. There's a certain minimum amount to prevent rickets when it comes to vitamin d and a certain amount of vitamin c to prevent scurvy. But they're really focused mostly on deficiency diseases. And so we keep reading. All you need is a well-balanced diet you don't need supplements it's a waste of money and you've already pointed out that dr fauci. Although he was taking a rather substantial amount of vitamin d himself had to kind of pull that information out of him. It was not something that he was willing to volunteer. Why do you think there's such skepticism when it comes to something like vitamin d. or vitamin c. Well two different things. If you have a balanced diet you can get. I think plenty of vitamin c. You can take a supplement not true with vitamin d. Not in foods we eat and so it should have never been. I don't think it should have been labeled a nutrient should have been labeled hormone. Actually what we're doing is hormone replacement therapy and so the stumbling block. Why do guys Is so resident to do this. I think the problem is the institute of medicine which is called national county medicine anorexia nations which are based only on skeleton. They didn't even recognize that vitamin d. Had anything to do with anything else now. That's that's changed in the last year. Okay with respect to vitamin d and prevention of cancer. I don't know if you've seen the last Information that came out of the vital study which was the big study out of harvard. It was three million hours and they basically what they did is they had thousands of patients and they in the the treatment groups were normal vitamin d. Or the treatment. Group only got two thousand and i was actually consignment scientific consultant on that and i fought for higher levels but i was overruled and so they went with two thousand units. At that time it was a safe upper intake level. And i really thought they wouldn't see very much turns out the recent publication. It's jama open. Shows a dramatic effect of vitamin d protection. Metastatic cancers and. It's the first time that in my recollection at jama or new england journal has published a positive paper on vitamin d. When we would submit our papers to on vitamin d. Positive things they would. They would out like it rejected. So whenever you saw paper come through a jammer. New england about vitamin d and even need to read it. it was going to be a negative study. That's changed here with this. Jama paper coming out. Vital i they they basically just looked at that data and said it's it's not refutable. Vitamin d is is fighting metastatic cancer. Now i do have a question about some studies where they don't show much benefit from quote unquote supplementation and in a lot of those studies. They're giving one hundred thousand international units by injection and that was even true one of the covert studies. They waited for people to be fairly sick. They were in the hospital and then they gave them. The injection injection was an oral dose. It was a big dose. Two hundred thousand international units and it did not make a difference from placebo but that was in patients who were already hospitalized severely. Ill yeah so you take those patients and give him any treatments at rendon severe bid addicts and method zone. Amir all in. They're all basically die and so two try. You're trying to rescue us out the way. Vitamin d works for starters. When you take the vitamin d it has to be metabolically activated. And that's just not enough time to have that happen. Vitamin d treatments. Like these other things needs to be done in a preventative manner or early on in the sickness. When somebody is just becoming ill you know the viral load is lower. If you come in and do it if you come in and do it when a person presents and has horrific pneumonia. I don't think anything's going to help those people but yet along when they do that and they publish something like vitamin d. Say oh here we go. We gave a lot of vitamin d and didn't work so vitamin d. Here's worthless which is one possible conclusion. But not the best conclusion what we can conclude is. It didn't work that way in that trial. That's correct now. Dr hollis what our listeners wanna know is should i be taking vitamin d and if i should be taking it how much should i take. And what swarmed should i be taking. Can you give us some advice place. So again i'll come back to the institute of medicine. National academy of medicine now and i've argued and argued with this and their recommendations were eight hundred units a day or four hundred units six hundred units a day to me. Those levels are are of no use except of ill will help you prevent blazes it. The problem again is if you come back. Those recommendations institute of medicine didn't recognize vitamin d. Had any effect on any other systems except bones so they weren't gonna make recommendations based on that again. i think that's gonna change myra. What my recommendation is that. Everybody should take five to five to ten thousand units of vitamin d. A day because people have different abilities to activate. Not everybody's the same. You really need to take those levels and then have a blood You know a blood test my physician here in my physical every year. They measure my vitamin d. And i take six thousand units today because six thousand units a day vitamin d. Furry keeps night my level at sixty nanograms con. I mean that's what it is every year. So six thousand units keeps my level sixty. My wife doesn't need to take much to have her levels the seventy or eighty. Which are you know would seem high to a normal physician but to me. That's a that's really. Were you want to be and again. We have not seen any adverse events for for people taking these amounts. So i mean it's it's it's fairly radical from the standpoint of what's recommended in you know in the general population and physicians but out bring you back to what are common practices because of our research and our obgyn practice here at the medical university. Every woman who comes in in a pregnancy clinic is now given four thousand units of vitamin d per day. And may i assume that you're using vitamin d three rather than d. Three to date. Not too don't you d to shouldn't be used. There's no conditions on which that vitamin d two should be used. It should always be d three. And that's correct my where i get. My vitamin d. Three is at costco. Kirkland the kirkland. Brandt and i. I know it's good because i've been using it for years and it maintains my vitamin d levels it at the right where they should be. You're listening to dr. Bruce hollis professor of pediatrics biochemistry and molecular biology and director of pediatric nutritional sciences at the medical university of south carolina. After the break we'll get some details on how our bodies make the hormone. We call vitamin d. It's a lot more complicated than you might think. Even though they didn't know anything about vitamin d. Scandinavian grandmothers have known for centuries how to harness its power with cod liver. Oil people were about taking too much. Vitamin d. For fear of toxicity. How much is too much. Vitamin d insufficiency is a common problem. Who's at the greatest risk of not having enough vitamin d. Why does skin color make a difference. Dr hollis offers his recommendations for how much to take. You should always check with your healthcare professional about the best amount for your own situation. You're listening to the people's pharmacy. With joe and terry graydon. This podcast is brought to you by the verizon a health club this comprehensive home testing service enables you to track crucial health markers of gut health inflammation metabolism hormones thyroid function and many other organs systems. Regular testing can help detect health imbalances before they lead to sickness online at verizon v. e. r. i s. a. n. a. dot com slash health dash club. Get fifty percent off the first month with the discount. Code people fifty. Welcome back to the people's pharmacy. I'm terry graydon armed joe creighton. The people's pharmacy is brought to you. In part by coco via memory plus a supplement with seven hundred fifty milligrams of coca flavonoids the plant based nutrients from fresh cocoa. That helps support memory. More information at koko via dot com also by verizon an analytical laboratory providing home health tests for hormones gut health and the microbiome now with an annual health club plan online at v. e. r. i s. a. n. a. dot com slash health dash club today. We're talking about the essential role that vitamin d place in protecting us against infections. Were you aware that it acts like a hormone that makes it different from a lot of other vitamins. Our guest is dr. Bruce hollis professor of pediatrics biochemistry and molecular biology and director of pediatric nutritional sciences at the medical university of south carolina. Dr halis. you mentioned that. Vitamin d is actually a hormone. You mentioned that. It has to be activated metabolic activated. That sounds a lot to me like thyroid. So a lot of people take liivo thyroid medicine. The brand name is synthroid. That that's t four but it's inactive. It doesn't do anything or not very much. It has to be converted by the body into something called. T. three and it's t three. That's actually doing the work. It sounds like vitamin d may be a little bit like that. I wonder if you could remembering that. None of us actually are biochemists or a not. Very many of us Could you just walk us through the whole vitamin d chain of events from sun hitting skin to vitamin d hormone in the tissue active sure so the way vitamin d was meant to be gotten by humans or other animals is that you go into sun. Sunlight hits your skin converts. A compound called seventy hydro cholesterol which your skin is loaded with into vitamin d. Three vitamin d. Three then goes from the skin. Capillary beds into the circulation where associates with a carrier protein and then gets distributed around the body. Now that being the case that can be substituted with taken vitamin d orally would come in through your gi tract dot exactly the same but but close enough so once those the vitamin d. I call it. The parent compound enters the bloodstream. Various tissues primarily the liver where a hydro so group and oh group is added onto the vitamin d molecule in. Now you have a compound. Twenty five hydroxy vitamin d that compound is the intermediate form that compound is the one that stays in your blood for weeks. Half life is is two to three weeks. And that's the compound that you have measured when you go to the physician. They that they draw the blood. They measure twenty five hydroxy vitamin d. level. But that's not the act of compound. Vitamin twenty five hydroxy. Vitamin d then is further metabolize onto a component. Call one twenty five die hydroxy vitamin d. And that's made primarily in the kidney and if it's made the kidney that's primarily used to regulate calcium homeostasis stasis which we've we've known about for years for deck. That's how vitamin d i. I came about bone bone metabolism later on. We found out that vitamin d can also be activated and many cells in the body including immune cells. Where the actually. The vitamin d can enter into these cells and be converted all away from vitamin d. Two twenty five vitamin d. Two one twenty five tomorrow. Form within those given cells and immune cells do that and then what that means is that compound can be used right there to regulate my anti microbial peptides or site it kind production or site. A kind In addition in that is what we call inter-krahn character in action so in vitamin d world. You have an endocrine action which means primarily controlling bone and calcium functions. And then you had the peregrine entrant function which controls everything else are two separate systems and they have. As far as i'm concerned has two separate wh- level. I mean the parrot. The endocrine needs very little vitamin d to function. That's where your sticks or eight hundred units do you okay. That's not true for the other. The other functions of patronage gra need much more. And that's where we get into trouble with the recommendations only based on skeleton so those scandinavian grandmothers had no idea what you're talking about. They didn't know anything. About converting twenty five hydroxy to one twenty five die hydroxy in the kidney. All they knew that in the wintertime people got sick and if they gave them cod liver oil they somehow didn't get sick or not as sick. And yes and so they just. They just had experience. That's exactly correct just intuitively. Winter came the stuff seems to help keep people well and also in scandinavia. They the fishermen would eat this meal with they would take the cod and they would have this meal wordy with eat eat the raw insides fish liver and it was absolutely i seen it. It's absolutely discussed but they would. They would eat this. You know and get tens of thousands of units of vitamin d. They they didn't know that that's what they were getting but they did it because they thought it improved their health. And i'm sure that it did so. Let me ask you dr. Haass one of the reasons that Doctors worry about people taking vitamin d supplements in doses higher than six hundred international units. A day. they say vitamin d. it can be toxic. Can you tell us please about the toxicity of vitamin d. It can't be toxic but you need to take a knee fifty thousand. I know people that. Take fifty thousand units today as a normal course of action now. I don't recommend that that's pharmacology. Okay to me. Fizzy physiological intake vitamin d would go up to say ten thousand units day because because humans can generate that much on their own given sunlight so that's normal physiology when you get above that thirty thousand fifty thousand hundred thousand. Those amounts of vitamin d would be used to treat say cancer or other Other diseases that are the like any other high amounts of drugs so all this fear comes from past work that was really bad and people thought they would get hyper calcium your kidney stones and by the way there's no relationship between vitamin d intake and kidney stones. Most kidney stones are are are not calcium carbonate calcium oxalate which have nothing to do with with vitamin d levels. We've actually net in. our studies. Never seen anything like that in you know. And i didn't talk about us. Our studies that have to do with human lactation and vitamin d. And we gave those women between six and ten thousand units so they would have enough vitamin d in their milk to during lactation to pass it out to their infant. And the infant didn't need to have supplemental vitamin d. You know 'cause all breastfeeding infants respond to have a vitamin d supplements. Well if you do that means we spent years publish. That data maybe four or five years ago It has changed the practice of lactation where women can now take six or ten thousand units up to ten thousand and put enough vitamin d and their milked it. Their infants have plenty of vitamin d just from nursing from their mother doctor hall aside like to change gears a little bit and ask you about vitamin d insufficiency and who may be vulnerable and and i'm thinking about people who may get a first of all those people who are in northern climates where they don't get much access to the sun but they're also a lot of people who have clothing you know whether it's A muslim country or whether it's an israel and his acidic juicer are pretty. Well covered are there. Are there vulnerabilities. And what about people who just live in seattle or portland or main They may get some vitamin d during the summer but boy come. November december january february. Probably not much son. Yeah nobody really to be honest. Nobody gets enough vitamin d simply from from the sun in the way that we live now. And you talk about insufficiency in when the coke did stuff started because we have health disparities with minorities. You know i mean this is a a chronic problem In the a cancer beaks you know prostate cancer or other diseases. Minorities always get the short end of the stick affected worse so when covid came out first thing i did is. I started looking for health disparities. A are are the. The african american population being affected worse by this than everybody else. The answer was absolutely it was it was terrible. I saw first day to come out of detroit. Where you know. The african american population constituted twelve percent of the population and forty percent of deaths in our own hospital chain here got a call from intensive est up in middle south carolina primary black well not primary but high black population of forty percent. He walks through his intensive care unit. Everybody in there was black in again. Will i mean those. People are suffering mightily from vitamin d sufficiency or or deficient outright deficiency. So remind us why please. Yeah so so. Here's a all humans be white black. Whatever all have the same capacity to make the same amount of vitamin d. The problem is the darker skin. The more sunlight you're required to make it. So where i liken. Individual could take ten minutes very dark and individual might need hour and a half. Nobody's going to spend an hour and a half in the sunlight it even in summer day. So people with heavy pigmentation tremendous disadvantage. And i think the health disparities in covid beaten in the uk which is now paying attention to this. I mean it was so bad in the uk. The they were pulling minorities off front is treating patients because so many of them were getting sick. And i and i think the uk is now woken up to the fact and they've been using vitamin d in their health workers or an population in general way more than they have in the past so for the average walking around person at this time of year. What would be the likelihood that they would be insufficient deficient in vitamin d. And these days people are not going into their doctor's office to get blood tests. So what would be your recommendation. On average for what percentage of the population is that you may think is is deficient should be getting supplements so again. We'll come back to what i think. Optimum level should be for infections and respiratory infections or warning off cancer or improving birth outcomes and knows levels to me should be between fifty and eighty nanograms per. Aml you're never going to get their wealth. A lifeguard would in the summertime but nobody walking around out. There is gonna is gonna be in those have those kind of levels and so you need to take substantial amounts. I will say the twenty five thousand and ten thousand units today depending on on your bmi heavier people need more for whatever reason to get their twenty five hydroxy vitamin d levels up to a place where they should be so what. Dr faustus is doing at six thousand. International units is not out of line for what you're suggesting. No he's doing exactly what he should be doing. I mean i i don't. I have never met foul. She but he's he's not a very big man and six thousand units to him is probably plenty. I would guess. His vitamin d levels are probably in the sixty nanogram ranger higher. You know. I mean when when when donald trump was in the hospital. If you looked at the medications he was given. One of them was vitamin d. So they're doing this. You know i. It infuriates me that they will make a meaningful recommendation. But they won't do it all right so we are almost out of time. And we are so grateful that you've been willing to share your expertise with our audience in terms of meaningful recommendations. What do you suggest for our listeners. Today i suggest that the children's is small. Children should beginning thousand a two thousand units of vitamin d. A day as all my grandchildren yet. I'm always on on my children to make sure their grandchildren getting enough. And for adults again i would say five to ten thousand units if you have active cancers then. It's a different ball game. I've had you know. I would say twenty thirty thousand units per day and i'll just run a my best friend developed prostate cancer back in two thousand and four. It was bad he was given two years to live. He survived that until about two years ago and he finally succumbed to a he took a lot. He took thirty thousand units of vitamin d a day and when he went back he was under. The he didn't he didn't Not take regular treatments but he would go back to the colleges and the guy says. I just don't understand it you know you're you're responding your and he would say i'm taking vitamin d and the guy would say well that's not it but keep doing it so i'll come back to the recommendations everybody should be taken. Adult should be five to ten thousand units and go into your physician and say look. I want my level measured and after doing taking those levels for say three months. That's where you're levels going to be not gonna go higher. It's not go. It stays right their minds been stable at sixty years taken. The same amount it will stabilize and it will be but it takes about three to four months to get where it's going to be an where it's going to stay. Dr bruce hollis. Thank you so much for talking with us on the people's pharmacy today. You're welcome thanks for having me on. You've been listening to dr. Bruce hollis professor of pediatrics biochemistry and molecular biology and director of pediatric nutritional sciences at the medical university of south carolina the doses of vitamin d three supplements. That doctor hall's describes are outside the range of usual recommendations so we suggest you discuss your recommend with your own healthcare provider. We spoke earlier with dr david. Meltzer the fanny l. Pritzker professor of medicine chief of the section of hospital medicine and director of the center for health and the social sciences at the university of chicago. You'll find a link to his study on our website lynne. Segal produced today show alydar ski engineered dave graydon interviews b. j. liederman composed art theme music. The people's pharmacy is a co production of north carolina. Public radio w. unc. The people's pharmacy is brought to you in part by verizon a- an analytical laboratory providing home health desk for hormones gut health and the microbiome now with an annual health club plan online at v. e. r. i s. a. n. a. dot com slash health dash club owned by cocoa via offering plant based nutrients in the form of coq au flannels for brain and heart health online at koko via dot com. If you would like to buy a cd of today's show or any other people's pharmacy episode. You can call eight hundred seven three two two three three four. Today's show is number one thousand two hundred forty that number again. Eight hundred seven thirty to twenty three thirty four. You can also find it online at people's pharmacy dot com. When you visit the website you can share your thoughts about today's show you'll find r. e. guide vitamin d and optimal health in the healthy guide section. We're making it free to people's pharmacy listeners. This week it discusses the consequences of low vitamin d levels. And how to tell if you are vitamin d deficient. You can subscribe to our podcast through your favorite podcast provider. We posted on our website every monday morning at our website sign up for our free online newsletter to get the latest news about covid nineteen and other important health stories in durham north carolina. I'm joe graydon and terry graydon. Thank you for listening. Please join us again next week. Thank you for listening to the people's pharmacy. Podcast it's an honor and pleasure to bring you our award winning program week in and week out but producing and distributing. This show is a free podcast. Takes time and cost money if you like what we do. And you'd like to help us. Continue to produce high-quality quality independent healthcare journalism. Please consider chipping in all you have to do is go to people's pharmacy dot com slash. Donate whether it's just one time or a monthly donation. 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Dr david meltzer joe graydon terry graydon university of chicago Dr hollis respiratory tract infections viral respiratory tract infect section of hospital medicine center for health and the soci pediatrics biochemistry and mo slash health dash club Fda dr bruce hollis Dr meltzer veterans administration depression heart rate heart
Break the Rules #112: Are You Addicted to Stress? with Dr. Heidi Hanna, CEO of Synergy Brain Fitness

Break The Rules

39:00 min | Last month

Break the Rules #112: Are You Addicted to Stress? with Dr. Heidi Hanna, CEO of Synergy Brain Fitness

"Welcome to break the rules. We dr. Lauren lacks a podcast dedicated. Quieting the noise and the health food and fitness was doctor. Warned is leading nutritious therapist and functional medicine practitioner on a mission to help others thrive in their own lives. Mind body and soul and now your host dr lauren. While hello hello hello. Welcome to another edition of the breakable podcast. Where he's quieting with noise in the health food infants world today and superstock. How dr heidi hannah in hosni is chief. Energy officer of synergy s accompanied writing brain-based hell if performance for instance individuals and organization. She's also a senior researcher with the brain health initiative and fellow an advisory board member of the american institute of stress and today is the episode of stress. We're talking all about obsolete concept Addiction which i never really heard of thought about intel deduct. Heidi hearing a little bit about your take on that. A doctor dr gary. Thanks for coming in and play. Just give us a little bit about crown about who you are. And what got you into doing. Worker in the world around stress neighboring. Yeah well first of all. Thanks for having me. I love that used the word stoked because it's one of my favorite words. We were just talking a little bit before we went on about our backgrounds and where we come from and i actually grew up in portland oregon which i love. I love the pacific northwest. Still feels like home. But i always full actually it with affective disorder pat a lot of anxiety and depression growing up and felt like i needed to live in a sunny. Climate ironically ended up getting rights. Our shift to play softball penn state which was not much better than i moved to orlando for ten years thinking that would give me some sunshine and it really just gives me a lot of like under storms and eventually made my way to san diego and one of the things that i have been doing for the past few years with reef which is a global beach brand looking the benefits of the beach on our brain health and performance. So anytime i hear someone say you can see me. I know people are just listening to this. But i've got my relief hat and it's at palm trees and i just i really feel like we can benefit from taking our brain to the beach even when our bodies stuck at home are second office and there's some strategies you can talk about a little bit later about how Do that so. I'm background my history really. I got into this. Because i had to to survive. I was i was misdiagnosed. Has a child A lot so around the age of ten started having debilitating headaches and stomach aches and panic attacks and panic. Attacks were so extreme. I would actually faint and lose consciousness so my parents you know not knowing what to do about it to say misdiagnosed me with things like kimia food allergies kind of like throwing darts on a dartboard and ultimately they said you know probably just stress so hard. Remember like okay. I'm ten eleven. Twelve how How bad could stress be. Why is it literally like hijacking my brain and the most inconvenient circumstances like on flights on first dates on job interview so i am a life journey. Like trying to figure out how to help myself. Just get through the day and became fascinated with these different topics. So it started. I got a master's degree in psychology. And i wanted to become a therapist. So it's working with a lot of people struggling with different things and just saw. How much nutrition was playing a role in their mental health. So then i got my first in holistic nutrition looking at the different ways that behavior mood and things and then always do not. I got certified and different fitness strategies exercise physiology and then i ended up working for this really awesome company called the human performance institute and it worked for them for ten years where we worked with professional athletes and executives really helping them understand energy management like their physical emotional mental spiritual energy and that was amazing. Except i do. I feared the most every day which was public speaking and flying so i was traveling all around the world kind of teaching people what to do but the not coping well with my own stress and wallo. That was happening. I had my third emperor diagnosed with alzheimer's disease. And i started looking the research about the brain and the nervous system and realized that the number one risk factor for cognitive decline in dementia was actually chronic stress. Live off of wait a second. I'm living with chronic stress. And i know this. Why am i acting us way. And that's actually one of the reasons. I wrote the book stress a holic and started looking at stress addiction was. I know this is good for me by yet. I kinda don't wanna stop. And then the more started talking about that book to my clients. They would all say. Oh my. gosh that's me. i'm addicted distress. But the funny up part and we can. Then they'd say well. But i don't want you to take it away from me. Because like they could relate to effect. It was a problem but actually didn't really want a solution. And i always say i think it's because we all fear that deep down if it really slow down. We're not going to get started again. Wow that's a powerful story. And i'm just really again excited to talk a little bit of addiction. 'cause i think i am in that camp for june let's set the stage of the lavely. That word stresses china can go up the other. Has everyone stress right. Enron usually by like three months into working with appliance. Start getting in a little bit and talk about stress what it is both mental izzy logical stress. And that can be come to super-normal we don't even need labels. I was thinking about an experience. I had a couple of years ago where i was keeping some junior school students about stress. They wanted me to come out and teach them. And i started off by saying now. I know you guys don't really like deal with a lot of stress before it could even get the word out. They were raising their hands. Are like we would have to tell you something. I just remember thinking like really like how stressful is it. And then i had to kind of go back again to my own life and what was going on and i just listened to them vent about all of these things and it was fascinating to me and what i realized is that we've kind of stress a bucket that we just like. Drop everything into that. We don't like about our life so our parents are stressful. Our homework is stressful. Are siblings stressful. If you're looking at like junior high school kids and ultimately as i started to try to understand it a little bit better. I actually reached out to experts in stress research neuroscience clinical work and i had a chance to do actually my fourth year of a global stress. And so i love those discussions with people but when it first started out i would ask these experts like this is their job. Right is to teach about stress. I would say so in just a few words are just a few minutes. Like how would you define stress. And they would take like forty five minutes. So i'm thinking okay well no wonder. We have such a strong problem. We don't even know how to define it. So i did come up with a very simple way that i think has been really helpful for a lot of my clients to understand it and better. Is the Happens in demand exceeds capacity and so we can look at all of the different areas that we have capacity at physical emotional mental spiritual social for example of the fab five of human energy and within all of those there are moments where the demand on our capacity is greater than what we have right now and that is normal natural to be expected Thing when we can adapt to it and make adjustments because that's what causes growth as you know so. I think it's important. I to take the emotion out of the word and say 'cause a lot of people say well i know there's good stress and bad stress. I don't even like that. Because there's positive and negative stimulus that could lead to positive negative outcomes but really. There's good things lady battle comes. There's add things up what we're dealing with right now with covid. Nineteen is a great example of that. Like there's a lot of bad stuff happening but you can also look at how it's bring us closer together here in san diego. Were taking care of our homeless population in a way that we haven't done as successfully before because we're kind of being forced to so there's always this positive adaptability side to stress when we chan navigate effectively. But i think what happens for law people they feel the tension a pressure of the build up of the physiological side of what we might call fighter flight which is adrenaline based high energy output. And they can feel overwhelmed by the sensation of it that actually causes them to not problem solve through it as effectively and then my condition is kind of the flip side which a lot of people don't realize the stress response that we've been taught which most people think of his fighter flight. Those are just two of reaction. Play the shorter term acute reactions to stress. The freezer faint reactions are really the ones that are responsible for the more debilitating impact of stress. Because they're Fueled primarily by a hormone called cortisol which actually causes breakdown in the brain and the body causes inflammation in cortisol is not a bad thing but cortisol is designed to help us to survive long term emerged than so everything that a detroit to help us can actually hurt us if we turn on that freeze or faint system and we stay there for too long semi passing out is actually like an extreme case of a faint response but when we look at kind of human health in general this could also be able bowel syndrome. Autoimmune disease chronic fatigue. I mean anyone that comes up with an illness disease disorder that they say the i would say majority of that is actually being triggered by this kind of manage chronic stress reaction to that was like a forty five minute. Answer to your question just like everybody else. I love you. Bring up the freezer to because that it's not appeared that we see but that's just like the long term a like that cortisol response poop out a little bit when you think about your history of like ten eleven years old twelve years old and think about what stressors exceeding your bought. Your demand at that age is awesome. That you unpacked. Yeah oh gosh. That's like my obsession right now. Because there's a lotta young people really struggling. Anxiety is the leading mental health problem right now in the world and especially college students the population. I'm really focused on right now. With a new program called brain boss were actually teaching college. And how to become bob brown a brain and so it's important that they understand that our relationship with stress is really determined by three primary factors. There's genetic predispositions and fifteen to twenty percent of. The population has a genetic hardwired traits. That makes them more susceptible to straps. There's lot of different frameworks for looking at this right now. Call it stress sensitivity. There's also a fate. Dr aaron has talked about for a long time Highly sensitive person and that is a sensory sensitivity so fifteen to twenty percent of the population has a sensory sensitivity. That when they're born into this world they will actually perceive stress in the home. That is something we might call normal like parents not getting along or siblings. Not getting along. They'll actually perceived that his trauma. I was one of those. So i came in the world. Highly sunday was told that i was too sensitive over sensitive to emotional all that kind of stuff with good intentions because parents tend to want their kids to be resilient so they don't want them to be too soft too sensitive and so i think a lot of parents quick to try to fix that and push kids through that without understanding that the sensitivity is really an important thing to nurture and nourish the children. It's the pushing down. The operas does extremer actions in a lot of the illnesses that we see where you see mental challenges or behavioral challenges starting to manifest as physical physiological challenges so that the early or the genetic predisposition is number one number two early life experiences. So there's something called the aces study. That's a pretty well-known study the books that adverse childhood experiences and again keeping in mind that for a highly sensitive brain quote unquote normal stressful situations as being traumatic. So they give you the trauma or it could just be sensitive type of trauma perception an ongoing lifestyle choices so i can easily look back and say i have a history of mental illness in my family. A history of substance abuse in my family. And i also make the correlation than actually. Not surprising to me that. I've had three grandparents with alzheimer's disease because these are all the brain and the nervous system and again say always that we adopt to try to survive too extreme circumstances but in the long run if every day feels like extreme circumstances. It's it's not a healthy way to be reacting so fortunately just as much as we can adapt to negative. I want everyone to hear me when i say this is not a depressing podcast. This is like a exciting thrilling pot. Our brain our nervous system are plastic. Which means that they're adoptable. Which means that just like. We can adopt a negative ways. We can intentionally choose to focus on different. Things surround ourselves with positive social support. Eat the right things. Move off and get enough sleep all those commonsense things but those will actually allow us to rewire the same reactions in a more positive direction. That's the brain boss idea like you can shape type of burn want and then you can look at life through a different lens. It's actually a lot more enjoyable. I love that. Yeah becoming mastery. Mastermind rob what's unpacked some last distress at it. Tell us when up a than how many people you don fall into that. Yeah so i'll start again with the story. I was traveling and other stressful work. And i know a lot of people will probably do this to you. But we're busy. We've all been taught live like you're dying and you gotta hustle and hack and allocate all those words because i think we need to calm down chill out and like he'll our system and stop trying to hack much but i got in the grind of that just like everyone else does and so i would say like i'm gonna go speak at this really beautiful locations all just stay an extra day and that'll be my vacation but we don't go invasion. We just take our two spot. We keep working usually so here was i was in this beautiful in in my napa valley as like fall really shell and i had done my work and so is gotta spend the day doing spa stuff. I love spot. And i always find like spas a good way for me to unwind because i'm paying money so i'm going to like get everything i can out of it and really try to disconnect so i didn't sit in the hot tub area and there was a sign on the wall and it had like step by step obstructions like sitting ought seven and take the back and then use the exposure and then go to the steamer and oh this is awesome. I'll have to do is follow the steps and then i'll be relaxed. The first one was just to sit. Still and i was like no this sucks. I don't wanna do this anymore. I like you know got my god. A book got my phone. Got something and and my first thought was wow. I am so blessed that i love my work. Be at the spa. And i just remember this almost out of body experience of like who said that. That's ridiculous that's not true. It's my brain telling me to keep hustling and keep hacking and keep on the grand. If if i don't respond right now maybe they won't be there tomorrow. What if nobody needs me. And i think that it's just again realization of. Oh my gosh. The stopping is hard. And i felt this condition. My body as supply were from sugar. Oh this is be uncomfortable so wait what if i actually leave my found in the hotel room next time. Or what if. I actually put my phone on airplane mode. Even when i'm on the ground and that switch gives me something tangible that i can do but the feeling is still the same the feeling is lack it brings up all of these emotions insecurities things we've been taught in the media. It was though i remember thinking. Oh my gosh. I'm addicted to stress. And then i started looking at the research. And there's tons. I mean stress acts on the same reward pathways any other addictive substance if you think about that from a survival perspective so i always kind of go back to that when i look at integrative neuroscience you can also look at like evolutionary neuroscience in the way that the brain is hardwired. And if you experience something that is true gay threats. We need to remember that so that we don't do it again. And so the way that we consolidate memory are a part of that. Is the reward pathways. So we'll have chemicals like dopamine serotonin sometimes oxy toasted which is a bonding chemical and those things actually create a chemical cocktail in our brain to remember a situation. So what's happening. Is that when we experiencing a. Were getting those same phil we say mistake. But then we start to thrive on that sensation. It's kind of like in a way the runner's high you know when we're running. I mean there's a lot of good things that are happening but in some ways we're doing a little bit of damage to our physical body that needs to be repaired so or even i mean this is super extreme but people who cut themselves or harm themselves in some way. There's pain but then you also get the ha's itself had been dorfman's and chemicals to help you get through the difficult situation so that you can heal. Well the problem is we're going at such a fast pace that we don't like get that hit of positive yoga emotion and then go okay. So now i'm going to take a nap. We get the hit of that and then we're like okay. I need it again and needed again. And i think that that that issue that i mentioned the very beginning of like i am so tired. I'm needy in the us to mealy not only feel emotions but also the adrenaline. So i can get some energy. That if i actually were to stop i might not get started on so number one. I'm not gonna feel good number two. I'm not going to get anything done. And that's just not okay with me. So the three things that i always come to mind for me. Why we're so. Addicted to stress are stimulation is most people are just tired. And they're not getting good sleep and they're not feeling themselves while they're not moving often enough so they just go back to what they know. Which is stress Relations Distraction is another one. Like i don't wanna feel what i feel. Just feel stressed because everyone's doing it more comfortable or validation right. I think this is a huge problem. Too is like the busy. You are the more stress. You are the bigger the your now. I'm really a big deal. Sign is that goes in your office. And that's something. I've been working on trying to fix culturally for so long but it's just so like wired into our society right now that it's like well how long hours it's like. Oh you win. Because you're miserable. Are yeah i i used to be the one that said while sleep when debt when i'm dead in around on Thick our something in there in then found seven hours. My magic talk a little bit about what those of us that just like. I can't really sit still. If i'm not working grow. I have a very big growth mindset so i like to continually be learning or like kind of like driving or something and i feel energized However if you say like lauren just chill out like i don't really know what that means or how to do so. Don't feel like i unrest but i thought more unrest by not doing something designer so again. Yeah totally going on there. And then wait. How do you coach people to like propaganda and yang or to be able to become aware where it i think the first thing is just everyone should keep in mind that the human system is designed to oscillate so everything is patterns. Everything is rhythm. Were supposed to have an up and down so if you hook yourself up to any monitor. I don't care what it is blood. Sugar blood pressure heart rate brain. Wade's you know. Even if easing were to give you a fun would be debt so the idea that you should never get up and go until you don't wanna go to mrs. We literally have no oscillation people get up and they rely on caffeine sugar stress to get them going and they go flat line all day and then they can't figure out why they can't fall asleep and you know that were causing this like opposite hormone pattern where cortisol Behind the morning get up and low at night in it's reverse melatonin must be just tired margaret. The end of the day 'cause they have relied on stress hormones to keep going and that's a problem but you bring up a couple of really good points and one is you know it's like when someone says i don't feel good when i so down i'd be like well. You wouldn't feel good either if you were on crack and you stop doing it like still doesn't make it okay right. So there's that but the other thing is that there's active. I'm not stay in. You go like doing nothing. I think this is where a lot of people go wrong with meditation. For example as people think like okay. I'm gonna meditate someone to sit here and think about nothing. And no you're gonna torture yourself if you try that because that's not humanly possible unless you're living in an ostrom angie practicing That's a skill that you develop. It's like trying to run a marathon the first time you ever walk just not gonna happen. But there's active ways to get recovery from who said i was learning and growing and striving and being the best version of myself. I would say awesome. How do you do that in a way. That complements. what you're doing. When's the last time you read a book just for fun. Watch the funny video. Do you go to comedy clubs. What do you like to do. Are you an artist. You do photography do like i could go on and on and on it's it's still creative energy meaning that there's an energy output but it's using a totally different part of your brain in its allow tabuchi breeds. I moved to the beach specifically for that reason a few days ago. Because i live downtown san diego which was great not traveling all the time could strip airport but then when we went on lockdown i was working from there. I was up on the twenty four floor. We've had five earthquakes in last couple of years. It was torture. So i. I don't care what it takes to go. The beach will now. My downtime is never. I'm a layout like that would be. That would be awful. I lay out person. I will do is go for haiku for walk. Go take pictures. I'll go record some video you know. Just look for things that are interesting. Look for things that are using. I love going to the zoo. The san diego zoo sneezing. I've got a membership to the museums right before they closed so hopefully extend that for me but you know so. All of these things are their recovery. But if you think about this as we bad instead of resting it's just another mindset that you can have we you're saying how can i intentionally do something to recharge my battery so that when i go back into taking action i can do so more efficiently more effectively and maybe i can even have more fun as i do that. So i don't feel like. I'm constantly holding my breath and rushing through the day. Look how you talk about that and recharge that got keeps manager so much more than the Orienting but it could be the same same thing with a not a one of the listeners. Listening to this is going to be like very driven individuals. We'll check about strength in penalties concept within the exercise route that brought to mind and alana. Those nerves are very health conscious. They're already getting rebounds regularly Backstory as well driving my body into the ground to the point where. I was basically doing my body more harm than good but when because i was mostly just addiction. It was like i would need that kind of dopamine hit run. How can we use that. Recharge battery on sets for like retraining Just lake to stop. yeah. I've talked to a lot of fitness experts about this is not the played softball in colorado full ride scholarship. I was a horrible runner growing up. I was really overweight. Struggled with an eating disorder for long period of time trying to watch my weight. And that's a lot of what drove me and says studying what i study and where i found that you can have all the information the world and still make horrible decisions because when we get hijacked by our brain. We're not logical mean. I can literally remember moments where i was walking to go get food to binge on and thinking like an alien has taken over like. I can't stop this from happening right now. So that's very addictive behavior and then we tend to then go to the extreme. Thanks is run marathons than iran marathon and a half and i ran half marathon every month. It was like you know this goal setting so so. I get that that said everyone i talk to you. We'll say the same thing that we under emphasized our need for recovery repair so as itcher for example it out that we had. There was a certain number of innings. We could play and still be successful. And i would say the same thing. With our fitness. There is a point where we are just breaking down the system more and more and more and so i think as a trend in the fitness industry and having talked to a lot of professional athletes and other people who really want to optimize their performance. They're now starting to fully grasp things like heart rate variability Ethical diangelo thing that people can actually measuring and you can look at on a daily basis your heart rate variability which is the beat to be changing in your heart rate. It is the best indicator of physical fitness. So what will happen for a lot of people as they'll be training and training and training and then they'll actually start looking rate variability and see like i shouldn't train today. Your body is giving you all the signs and all the signals to say it's time for a day off time to whatever it you need the ice. You need to stretch you dress sheets and hattab get massage to there's ways. I think that still can be actively recovering. Go get a massage. go get stretched or go. Play a sport or go do sa- balancing or flexibility exercises. But you have a limit to how much you can really push yourself an optimize strength growth growth or cardiovascular growth Will find if they start to follow that oscillation strategy and really look under the hood. How they're doing by measuring some of these things whether tarver ability are cortisol the ratios or other things that we can look under the hood. They're going to start noticing. They feel better when they follow an oscillation pattern. They actually get stronger. But i think that's the mindset shift that has to happen is we almost have to trust our own us to let us know what we need. And what's gonna be most helpful for us and become suitable individualizing that for ourselves. Navy work with a coach or someone who can help us understand. What can we look at to kind of determine how well we're doing right now and really measure that instead of chasing after know solution or fad. That's out there. That might be the hot thing for a minute rate non godley mentioned not and in the just taking that recharge mentality to on the days off earlier like intensive workout days of doing something like going on or getting outside and moving. Your body still doesn't be sitting on the couch eating bon-bons on faith off if yes. Yeah and in fact. I say that's people all the time. My suggestion is you do exercise every day. I don't think is an off day in day. Just do something but modified the intensity duration and more with people. That are your loan. There's a lot of ways to mix it up and everything about the human system gaps. Best when we're changing. We know that in our fitness routines. You can't do the same thing everyday and continue to grow so. I think we can be creative about that as well in are you doing it inside or outside or you had a pool or you. You know in a gym. Of course. i'm always going to get outside when you can. Because i think we get extra benefits of being outside. Yeah talk a little bit too off like that yin yang in our relationship with food and the foods or eating so something that i fell into for a long longtime in something i see. Lot of my clients is like maybe five different foods that you're limited to. You're eating the same thing every day and ina doesn't even have to be like i'm craving. I dunno whatever been jerry jerry's just burying the diet and how that can be more beneficial. We can know that mentally at halloween. Break that maybe that addiction. We may have to just like our five dudes are women and not becomes more of a stressor. Yeah you know. I would say i like both of these. I'm ridiculously simple. Eat almost the same thing every day. And i think i do it because i just like simplicity. I actually am not a foodie. I kinda don't care. So am i eat now. More just for the nutrients i need. Thank god i married a man a couple of years ago. Who likes to cook. Because i don't so so. That's great. But i would say that we can vary especially our fruits and vegetables spices. I mean from brain health performance perspective. Those are the things that have the most impact Trying to get things. That are in season so i think some of the staple foods things like you know you're complex. Carbohydrates in cuban wa or even your lean proteins if you eat meat at all you know having san in the fish but really mixing up like their produce like what's in season what's bright. What's colorful a lot of colleagues. I work with health to talk about eating the rainbow so really trying to get as much color on your plate as possible now. He's recommend people that half of their players produce so that will give you a lot of variety right there. Even if you always eat the same. I don't know whole grain bread or the same mana gluten free pasta moist. Careful because there. There's so many or maybe you don't do carbs. Get your carbs in your starches from fruits and vegetables which is fine but i think if you can look for holler experiment with that. I also say the same with people who have kids who are picky eaters. Is that a lot of times. We don't have to be extreme about it but blending thing doing smoothies or g says or sauces. There's some amazing spices out. There like turmeric cinnamon and nutmeg that we can add our dishes. I love a good saracho hot sauce. I don't cook. But i spice makes the super throw everything we possibly can make it really easy as many vegetables as we can. Whatever kind of you know. I go in with all the spices and like heated up. And i think that's a good way to make sure get enough variety as well. Yeah you into not win. We acknowledged that we are discussing. Did and what the what we do not do you have like a step process Yeah i do so. I think that there's a couple of different ways. I think about this so i think the easiest thing for me to tell people is one of the best things we can do is to acknowledge first and then to assess appreciate an adjust our relationship stress so the first thing is like understand. This is a relationship you have with your life. Stress isn't bad. It is simulation it can be used for. Positive negative outcomes so if we can step outside of that take the emotion out of it and just say when we're feeling stressed what's going on in. Why like get to a curiosity framework. That says what am i feeling. Why is there. I think that's really helpful. And then appreciate that. Stresses actually trying to help us. So i think a lot of the addictive component of it a leader selves up was a week. I'm like feeling tired and stressed and then it becomes suspicious cycle instead of just saying hey. I'm tired long day today or hey i'm stressed and looking at a screen for twelve hours or whatever it might be. That's okay and the feelings. I'm having the tension in my neck aker shoulders or the irritability or feeling hungrier. Whatever's going on like that's natural. That's normal to be kind to yourself and just appreciate. This is just information the you can do. And then bake an adjustment i would say especially if you realize. Okay i may be. Addicted distress not willing to totally break up with yet. But i'm willing to do one thing different to recharge my battery a little bit more than maybe i did yesterday take. That's a great start. So what's that thing. What's the adjustment. You're willing to make and i usually if i'm working on clients or if i'm teaching other coaches how to coach people through stress mastery i'll say don't ask is like is most realistic free to do what's worked best for you in the past. What's the smallest thing that you think would impact and people usually actually have an idea of what that is that we can brainstorm different ways like if someone says well you know. I really find that. When i'm out in nature that i i feel at peace you know if i'm hiking and then it's like okay. We can work with that right. Like where could you go. Have you thought about going to the zoo. Maybe go to a garden. There's a lot about tanto guards. Other coachee baha to help people be creative about how net into their life but ultimately it's up to each of us to kind of say what's the thing. What's the thing that's worked for me. And if you can't think of anything i like tinkers people think of what you loved as a child. Would you love to do just for fun before you had to think about paying your bills and do more of that build that in as a priority. So you're not saying like. Oh be nice if i could read this fokker. Watch this movie like when are you can do it. One of the myself as depression was started watching funny movies. Six o'clock in the morning. Because i was waking up anyway and i felt that was such an indulgent when i was like why other people are working in nine. Why can't i watch a movie for two hours. It's funny as i lay here in bed. And maybe i'll think about something positive instead of thinking about the facts that miserable because i'm depressed and about a week later assured feeling like well. Now actually i'm going to get up in journal or nominee get up and go for a walk and Sentences little ges kick defense and just give us a passage now kind of do one more thing and then one more thing to recharge How discontinuing comeback dot net brought to mind needs to wake up. Then just check my email first thing in the morning and then i sent this mayday a rule for myself who will break enroll book to knock check it for the first two hours a weekend to instead like ruling holds a morning routine energizing in so great message that he is and that's one of the best ways to break rules. It's one of the best to break rules. I'm sure you know that is replace it cause if we break it we feel like we're void of something that we have most people by the way. Do that the number one stressor after serving thirty eight thousand people was the feeling that there's not enough time to get it all done and most of the time that happens because we reach for our founds. I so you're breaking this automatic pathway that you had of reaching for your phone and checking your email or what's going on now. I see justice like Action to do something better saddam. Grab your phone. Realize it's an airplane. Listen to a song or journal or look at a funny mean. There's there's other ways to do that. I think it's just another good kind of lesson is look at the things you're already doing. Those are the rules of your life. Like your habits are ruling your life if you break a rule really think about. How am i gonna substitute something. New a new healthier habit. And if you compare to actually make easier to make that pivot mic drop. I love. you're hiding could be we'll find out more about you and you're doing your bank. You people go to my website so it's heidi hannah dot com at the end. It's just a lot of people like to put an h. On the ends like. I have to first names. But how do you hear a dot com and then if people wanna see what were Blow with the brain health initiative that's at brain health initiative dot org. It's actually a longitudinal. Study that we're doing looking at brain health and performance of a lifespan. So really excited to be part of that. His wow i'm definitely be putting linked to show notes to all the good things and your boat while keeping up to do.

alzheimer's disease dr lauren dr heidi hannah american institute of stress a dr gary human performance institute san diego lavely twenty percent bowel syndrome Autoimmune disease chronic fat Dr aaron Mastermind rob softball hosni pacific northwest blood pressure heart rate brai Heidi panic attacks bob brown
Heart Rates

A Moment of Science

01:59 min | 2 years ago

Heart Rates

"The picture new parents cooing their baby on the couch. The baby's quiet and calm and everyone's that wrist so their heart rates are low maybe around sixty or seventy beats a minute for the adults. But what about the baby? How do you think? The baby's heart rate compares to the parents newborns have resting heart rates are on one hundred to one hundred fifty beats per minute way higher than that of adults. In fact, a newborn resting heart rate is in the ballpark of the target heart rate for an adult doing a heavy workout. What gives why do you Bornes hearts beat so much faster than adults part of the answer? Lies in the fact that babies grow so dramatically they burn food in every sell their bodies to fuel that growth. The process requires not only abundance of milk, but also oxygen and it produces large. Amounts of carbon dioxide as waste, maybe. Ours work overtime to keep supplying oxygen and removing carbon dioxide to fuel their amazing growth, but growth isn't the only factor because it's not just baby animals. We're talking about adult chihuahuas have much higher heart rates than adult elephants. Why chihuahuas have a greater surface to volume ratio? In other words, that you wanna has a greater proportion of skin than internal tissue. Which means it loses. More heat to the environment relatively speaking than a larger animal babies hearts be much faster than their parents both to fuel their growth and to make for greater heat loss to the environment. So little hearts maintain a higher metabolic rate pound for pound, then big hearts this moment. Science comes from Indiana University. I'm Don glass.

Don glass Indiana University milk
How to hit your target heart rate: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

Mayo Clinic Radio

00:59 min | 1 year ago

How to hit your target heart rate: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

"With your mayo clinic radio health minute i'm ian rock regular exercise. Make your heart stronger and more efficient and that means we're working hard enough that our heart getting beneficial unofficial activity and beneficial exercise ed lescaut ski co director of mayo clinic sports medicine says you should get about thirty minutes of moderate activity at least five days a week and and modern is something that you're you're breathing kind of hard but you can still hold a conversation that should get your up to that target range and study showed that the level i love exertion. We feel correlates quite well with our heart rate or getting good blood flow or training our heart muscle to work more efficiently and actually strengthening at if we don't do that if we're if we're doing something to light we won't get much of the beneficial effect but dr lous cousy says the actual numbers aren't as important as the effects as long as we feel. We're working moderately heart right and we're getting some good activity. We're doing good things for ourselves. We don't have to worry so much about the monitors of the numbers for more information talk with your healthcare provider or visit mayoclinic dot org.

mayo clinic radio mayo clinic dr lous cousy director thirty minutes five days
A Deep Dive Into HRV: How To Use Heart Rate Variability To Optimize Your Sleep, Stress, Recovery, Performance, Nervous System Balance & Much More!

Ben Greenfield Fitness

1:57:25 hr | 11 months ago

A Deep Dive Into HRV: How To Use Heart Rate Variability To Optimize Your Sleep, Stress, Recovery, Performance, Nervous System Balance & Much More!

"On this episode of the Ben Greenfield Fitness. Podcast I've been working with numerous professional athletes and executives that have found. Hr V. Training to be the most effective behavioral intervention for performance for our survival. We do not want to pump the brakes and give our mind and body the message to relax in that case it is a time where we need all of our resources and faculties to get out of the situation by minute. Resting Baseline of the low frequency. High frequency ratio may not be our best estimate of automatic balance help performance nutrition longevity ancestral living biohacking and much more my name is Ben Greenfield. Welcome to the show. Howdy Ho Everbody. It's Ben and on today's podcast episode. I'm turning over the reins of the PODCAST. Which may or may not be prudent of me to my crazy jolly sidekick J. T. wiles who. You're likely very much familiar with if you're a longtime podcast listener because he's my usual sidekick on my qna episodes but what you may not know about. Dr J. is that he's a big expert in all things heart rate variability testing tracking and interpretation and in this podcast. He's going to deep dive into how to use. Hr V. to optimize your cover your performance your sleep your stress your nervous system. And a whole lot more. He's a clinical psychologist working out of Greenville North Carolina. And he's got his fingers in a lot of parts but he helps people with diabetes chronic pain cardiovascular disease cancer tobacco addiction which ought imagine a big thing down in the southeast not to stereotype but I know they grow a lot of the stuff down there and He includes everything from acupuncture biofeedback anti-inflammatory Protocols Mindfulness Meditation Tai Chi Chi Gong. A whole lot more as clinic. But as I mentioned he also is a real specialist in a lot of more advanced protocols regarding hr V. that you may not be familiar with. And he's take a deep dive into all that on today show Today's show by the way is brought to you by the brand spanking new kion flex we reformulated this stuff. Not that the old formula wasn't good but we decided to take a deep dive into a whole bunch of components for fighting inflammation for optimizing recovery. That really have never before been woven into supplements we spent about a year putting the brand new formulation together and it's got everything from Iraq. Super fruits particularly one called hair talkie which is amazing for whole body joint function that that one alone the human clinical research behind it is incredible but then we took to Murrow Sakarai component of Turmeric. That's totally different than curcumin. And that actually works way better than Curcumin as far as the anti inflammatory response for joints and then combine that with Proto agains. I'm Sarah Pep Day Sarah pep today. So this just breaks up. Fight Bernie Jen and when you take three on an empty stomach before you go to bed at night is absolutely phenomenal. How you feel when you get out of bed the next morning so I pop three these every single night. Now and specially prioritize it when I'm traveling and I'm inflamed or I've had a hard workout that day or if I've got any nagging injury or acre pain the stuff just works. I'm giving you a twenty percent discount on kion flex and all you need to do is go to get kion. Dot Com get K. I. O. N. DOT COM and use Code B G F. Two Zero to get your hands on that discount. This podcast is also brought to you by speaking of Soreness Something that gives you an amazing workout. I travel all over the world with this basically a former podcast a mind Dr John J quiche. He's developed this very unique style of elastic band. That produces high high end variable resistance through an entire range of motion. Then he figured out how to make portable version of almost like an Olympic training. Bar that rotates in your hand. So you feel as though you're literally doing high end heavy barbell workouts but all it is is elastic bands at using conjunction with his patented bar that he created and the whole thing all put together is called the x three training system. You can within just ten minutes getting amazing single. Set the failure full body workout on this thing. So it's a massive time say review on a pack on a bunch of muscle or didn't even better workout. I mean you could work out for twenty thirty minutes on this and it's amazing. I actually combine it with my blood flow restriction bands when I travel. Oh my gosh. I don't even need a gym. So it works really well and he's giving all my listeners. A fifty dollar discount on the same x three system that I use The Discount Code is Ben. And you just use that over X. Three BAR DOT COM. So you use Discount Code Ben x three bar dot Com works absolutely amazingly. So you gotta check this thing out. Oh One last thing everything that you here today. As far as the the show notes all the links all the resources that you get any discount codes from sponsors etc that's all over at Ben. Greenfield fitness dot com slash H. R. V. Podcast that's Ben. Greenville FITNESS DOT com slash. H are the podcast alright. Let's jump in to the PODCAST with J. T. wiles RHIBANI. It's your beloved Sidekick Co host of the Ben Green Fitness podcasts. Or at least that's what I like to tell myself at night to help me sleep better. Dr J. Wiles and been actually decided to fully turn over the podcast in its entirety to me and rename. This podcast Dr J. Wiles Awesome Extravaganza podcast. While I am buying large kidding you are actually stuck with me today as we take a deep dive into all things heart rate variability or HR V. in the health and wellness and longevity sector hr V. has become a metric that has been highly discussed. Blood is still quite misunderstood by many. So I'm here to clear up the air and give you an in depth explanation of HR V. Physiology the metrics and practical implications. Because you know it. Seems like every quantifying device nowadays has an HR V. Measure and because of this and with my background. I'm constantly inundated with questions about this metric and what it means and how we can utilize it and how can actually implement it from a practical standpoint? Just so you know you can find today's show notes at Ben Greenfield fitness dot com slash. Hr V. podcast with all that said. Let me see if I can set the stage as to why you should even listen to me in regards to the science of HIV and its utilization. Let me give you a little. Bit of a background on my clinical experience and personal usage of biofeedback. So when I'm not podcasting my day job is working as a clinical health psychologists with a specialty in complementary and integrative health and namely in psycho physiology or biofeedback. You might already be asking yourself what is biofeedback. Biofeedback is the use of your physiology to enhance self awareness in order to promote self-regulation. Another way of putting this is that we become more mindfully aware of our physiological response via feedback so that we can inherently change our physiology through numerous techniques. My background is doing this with individuals who are suffering from physiological elements such as chronic pain tension type headaches migraines hypertension or other. Systemic problems physiology. I also see a large array of individuals for more psychological problems such as chronic systemic stress anxiety depression ptsd and other symptomology in the more growing body of research and in my own clinical practice. I'm working with individuals who are looking to enhance peak cognitive and physical performance. I've been working with numerous elite professional athletes and executives that have found. Hr V. Training to be the most effective behavioral intervention for enhancing performance. I'm board certified in biofeedback and heart rate variability biofeedback and I have specialty training in the field of psycho physiology. This means that I've procured a specialized knowledge base alongside practical clinical skills and helping my patients through numerous biofeedback techniques as well as an in-depth understanding of the bidirectional relationship between our psychological processes physiological processes. One way or another way to think of biofeedback is to think about it as a learning process learning to play a musical instrument so sport or even a video game we perform an action. Then we observe the results and then repeat this action throughout the day in an effort to continue to attain the positive result or enhanced the result. I've also heard some individuals referred to biofeedback as a psycho physiological mirror that will teach the individual to monitor understand and change their physiology. If I had to boil biofeedback down to its most simple terms. We're trying to teach the concept of self regulation which would be learning how to control behavior efficiently and immediately without the feedback. I'll get back to this and just a bit but I wanted to set the stage for the upcoming talk. One of the key features of any biofeedback clinician will be through the teaching of self regulatory skills and heart rate variability or HR V. Indeed. This is actually the most foundational skill to self-regulation in biofeedback within my company which is called thrive wellness and performance. I work with many different types of individuals ranging from those who are battling with significant stress and fatigue or burnout or those who are looking to optimize peak performance like many elite athletes and executives in this role. I provide comprehensive. Hr V. Consultation and Individual follow-up HR V. Coaching sessions to individuals take back their health and improve overall health outcomes or peak performance. I only have my clients using what I have found to be top. Hr V. Measuring Devices and data collection available. Which I will talk about later. But after this podcast you might consider would a biofeedback coach might look like for you on your own personal journey towards health and wellbeing longevity and peak performance so today. I want to take a deep dive into the field of psycho physiology into the field of metrics of heart rate variability in Resonance Frequency Training Heart Rate Variability and wellbeing performance in recovery. How we interpret data from the wearables that we buy and some of the pitfalls to devices that provide us maybe with some inaccurate measurement and artifact inclusion. I want this to be a one stop shop for all things heart rate variability a podcast that you come back to when you have a question about heart rate variability but I must say that there are entire. Phd programs in the field of psycho physiology so we are going to just barely scratched the surface but for the most part they will actually look like a deep dive so with that said. Let's jump on him. I feel like it is necessary to set the stage for why this even matters in other words. I figured that you would all like some buying from a consumer and a clinician standpoint. I'm normally bought into a topic area when there is vast robust research on that topic area. It's really interesting when you start to peruse the Internet and pubmed for HIV studies as you will see that there were actually minimal studies on this on this topic about twenty to thirty years ago but from the nineties. Until especially the past decade we've seen exponential advancements in how we practically utilize the important metric of HR V. Indeed Research has demonstrated some significant outcomes as to how US HIV and predicting cardiac outcomes especially after a myocardial infarction which is a heart attack HIV. Over the course of a twenty four hour period is actually the greatest predictor for future heart attacks and is one of the if not the most reliable predictors that cardiologists will use we also see in research how HR V. is correlated with increased risk for cerebrovascular accident. Which is a stroke especially. After someone has already had a stroke we can also see a direct link between HIV and sleep HR V. in stress and cortisol production HR V. and depression HIV cognitive performance and in sports performance. All of these links and much more have been identified in Peer Review Journal articles. So this is just not some you know. This is not some unstudied. Woo Woo metric. We have a lot of confounding data to support our use of this metric for many things. However I do not want you to think that this is some panacea metric and can be used for any in every outcome so what we found in research and regarding to how we can use. Hr V. as a metric of our physiology we have found that knowing our HR V. and modifying our HR V. can lead to improve mental health and wellbeing. It optimizes our ability to recover and adapt after exercise. It can lead to improved mental and cognitive performance improved sleep insight into our nervous system in our nervous. System mediated pain. It's insight into increased homeo- stasis of the nervous that leaves that leads to improve stress outcomes and can be detection system of dysregulation in the central and peripheral nervous systems. An example of this is that a group of researchers found that individuals with chronic stress related neck. Pain had significantly lower. Hr V. Scores than the normal population which was found due to automatic. This regulation which I will explain later with that means after ten weeks of HIV biofeedback. These individuals were able to significantly increase their HR V. which resulted in improved perceived health increase vitality alongside reduced pain outcomes and improved social functioning a study performed with physically fit men and women that assessed HR V. in the relationship between anxiety and stress and one's engagement and physical exercise found that both men and women that perceive themselves as a have as having higher stress had lower hr V. scores regardless of their physical activity so while physical activity plays a significant role in hr V. modulation meaning that the more physically fit. You are the higher the HR V. Unless you are overreaching an or overtraining emotional or psychological stress likely plays a more significant role in mediating. Hr v. a Meta analysis was performed in two thousand fourteen demonstrated that anxiety disorders are associated with significant reductions in HR V. From a sports performance perspective. An article in the Journal of Sport Science and medicine in two thousand fourteen indicated that we are able to gain accurate insight into recovery via oprah short-term age. Rv measurements anything as low as sixty seconds. Hr V. has also been found to be associated with aerobic capacity as researchers have identified that those with lower aerobic capacity tend to have lower hr V. scores additionally those who report as more sedentary have lower hr when compared to a more active population and numerous studies have also indicated that a high HIV is associated with better general health due to allowing the person to better adjust to both internal and external stimuli and that a low V. is a predictor of cardiovascular disease and metabolic diseases and increases the overall risk for mortality. This does not even begin to scratch the surface but should go to show you that. This metric is both highly useful and I would argue. It is imperative for us to know our numbers and make necessary modifications. I also want to quickly highlight a few studies that demonstrate how we can use HR V. biofeedback. Which would be the use of strategies to self awareness and self regulation of HR beat in the study of scientific literature on HR V. and more specifically on HIV biofeedback efficacy? We must turn to the most trusted Organization for Determining Advocacy which is the Association for Applied Psycho Physiology and biofeedback or a PB. Nee provide a ranking system for HR V. biofeedback efficacy from an analysis of outcome studies performed on HIV biofeedback for certain symptoms and disorders the ranking system goes from level one which means that it is not empirically supported all the way to level five which means that it is both efficacious and specific and has been statistically shown to be superior a credible sham therapy pill or alternative bonafide treatments in at least two independent study research settings from a clinical standards perspective. You really want to stay within the level three to level five range which which level for being where most effective treatments lie think of level. Five as saying that. There's clear evidence that this is the standard modality for that disorder for treatments. That should always be the first line of Treatment. Therefore this is not seen very frequently. An example of this in the biofeedback world is in neuro feedback for those with adhd. This is considered a level five treatment. Now what does the literature say about? Hr V. Biofeedback for Sore for certain disorders sets well there is robust research to support HIV biofeedback as a level four practice Indicating high efficacy outcomes for depression and anxiety hypertension which is high blood pressure. Pre hypertension pre-clampsia. Ibs or irritable Bowel Syndrome and chronic muscle pain in the performance world we see HIV biofeedback as a level three optimized performance in baseball basketball dance and engulf and this is not to say that it cannot be utilized for other performance avenues. But this is where we have the most robust research another study in the Journal of Applied Soccer Physiology and biofeedback found that. Hr V. biofeedback isn't effective safe and easy to learn and apply method for both athletes and coaches in order to improve sports performance in order to have an understanding of how we utilize HR V. Practically. We must understand the what and the why of our measurement in order to gain an understanding of why. Hr V. is important. We must take a dive into the field of psycho. Physiology like alluded to earlier psycho. Physiology is studying the interrelationship or the bidirectional relationship between psychological and physiological processes. We have to think of this relationship as both dynamic bidirectional in nature this means that it is constantly changing depending on the state of the organism and communicates and both directions. What I mean by this. Is that what happens? Within our psychological processes can influence our physiological processes and vice versa. Let me give you an easy to understand example. Let's think about hypertension or high blood pressure. It has been a long determined that psychological stress can influence hypertension and cardiovascular disease outcomes. This means that somebody psychological stress experience can inherently increase blood pressure which is associated with numerous negative health outcomes The interesting thing about this process though is that it is bidirectional. This means that someone experiences an increase in blood pressure which may not be necessarily due to psychological stressors this physiological change can increase the anxiety or stress response of the individual basically from an ancestral perspective physiological changes in blood pressure sinned communication to the brain that there must be a threat that is resulting in vascular constriction increased heart rate and increased blood pressure therefore our system and more specifically are amid in the brain sends our body and our brain into an action oriented response so that we can either fight or flee from the threat. That's in front of us. This is both a conscious and unconscious response another way that we can view this is through the Lens of what is called. The psycho physiological principle this principle states that every change in the physiological state is accompanied by an appropriate change in the mental emotional state and this is again conscious or unconscious and then conversely every change in our emotional or mental state both conscious or unconscious is accompanied by an appropriate change in the physiological state again these interconnected and bidirectional relationships yet. Another example of this is when we think about the role that facial muscle contraction can have in influencing emotion. How emotion can influence facial muscle contraction? So someone that may get a botox injection. Which would actually paralyze facial muscles to treat? Wrinkles can actually reduce the intensity of a person's emotional experience yes. We have a lot of interesting research. On this topic one thing to remember at the foundation of our physiology is that each and every human being is striving for Homeo- stasis which is the maintenance of the body's internal environment with healthy physiological limits. A state of homeostasis is synonymous synonymous with the body. Striving for a process called ALO STASIS SO ALICE. Stasis is a state of maintenance of stability through change and is a process that complement hostesses. We achieved the state of aloe stasis through different mechanisms that anticipate challenges and adapt through behavior a process of learning and then a physiological. Excuse me a physiological change. You can think of high. Hr V. as evidence of our ability to adapt to stressors and maintain homeo- stasis when we increase our HR v. This provides us with the ability to move in and out of a para sympathetic and sympathetic state as needed and as as a quickly and as efficiently as possible I also referred to this Oughta nommik fortitude the ability to shift in and out of sympathetic in Paris and pathetic state demonstrates hive. Hr V. Resilience are high heart rate variability resilience and is less likely to lead to things like fatigue tr- chronic stress overtraining and will ye yield better recovery. Unfortunately the state of Homeo- Stasis and Alice is combated with what we call a state of Alice. Static LOAD. This is when our physiological psychological and spiritual adaptations have been significantly taxed and now we are experiencing the deleterious effects as a result. You kind of think of this as a balance scale. In a state of Homeo- stasis we are adopting to change and challenge effectively as we experienced stressors and challenges that are too taxing on our physiology such as things like chronic pain stress depression over exertion exercise toxic relationships work stress financial strain and so forth the scales become unbalanced and we can have systemic physiological and psychological problems that will arise. Let's think about this from an ancestral perspective. You may have heard of the comparison of how our ancestors may have experienced rapid acute and transient states of high stress. Such as being chased by a mountain lion while hunting and gathering but when they returned to their homelands their stress response would come back down to baseline therefore there was an activation of the HP access or the hypoth- alantic pituitary adrenal axis and that resulted in an increase. I should say an acute release of rental in and Cortisol and other glucocorticoid these levels which can be highly inflammatory would typically come back down. After the perceived threat was mitigated and an increase of safety was established however in our modern society one that has entrenched and engulfed in our work and our perceived worth we have found ourselves in a constant state of physiological arousal and stress all of which turns on our fight or flight response to perceived threat in a sense it's almost like perceiving that the mountain line is continuously chasing us in our modern society when this Occurs Day After Day Decade. After CADE. This is going to take a tremendous toll on our psychological physiological and spiritual well-being that is why it is imperative for us to be continuously self monitoring and mindful of what we have in our lives. And how we live our lives and the potential detriment that this may be causing over time physiological states of arousal or the state or half of fighter flight is there for our survival and is much needed however at some point in time we begin to experience this imbalance which tells our brain that a threat is always going to occur. Never shutting off or blunting The fight or flight response and this is why we need to take a deep dive into what helps us maintain balance or aloe stasis and homeostasis. I think the best framework of HR V. Training is always through the lens of off balance and psychological and physiological resilience. This turns us to the topic of the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system. We cannot have a conversation. Hr V. Without a conversation on the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system. The simple way to think about the two is that the central nervous system consists of the brain and the spinal cord while the peripheral nervous system consists of all the nerves that run out of the central nervous system. Enervate air every area of our body. You can think of this as all of our organs all of our limbs and the skin therefore these two are interconnected and have a bidirectional relationship. The peripheral nervous system has two distinct branches. These are these somatic nervous system. And the autonomic nervous system you can think of the somatic nervous system as being in control of the skeletal muscles and will transmit sensory information back to the central nervous system. Our autonomic nervous system regulate certain aspects of our physiology. That occur automatically. These would be things like regulating our cardiac and smooth muscle or heart functioning and respiration we can then divide the automatic nervous system into three main systems are three main branches. These are the sympathetic division. The Para sympathetic division and the Enteric Division in the study of biofeedback and specifically heart rate variability we are focused predominantly on the autonomic nervous system and more specifically the Para sympathetic sympathetic branches or divisions. Now let's breakdown. Both of these divisions there tends to be some confusion in this area. I will start by discussing these sympathetic nervous system. This is the division of our nervous system that readies us for action challenge and will regulate the activities that expand or expend energy. The sympathetic nervous system is in direct connection with our current system and regulates certain hormonal responses. This is what helps us to respond to threats to our safety through mobilization the fight or flight response or a process of active avoidance in comparison to the Para sympathetic response which. I'll speak about later. The sympathetic nervous system responds more slowly. And for longer periods of time for instance it takes the Para Sympathetic Vegas system less than a second to respond while the sympathetic nervous system takes about five seconds or greater from a physiological standpoint. Sympathetic nervous system cells are found in the gray matter of the thoracic and lumbar segments of the spinal cord the sympathetic nervous system. Also directly interstates are drama Dula. Which is the central portion of the ADRENAL gland? The adrenal Dula is actually responsible for the release of neurotransmitter neurotransmitters. Epinephrine and when they are stimulated in response this reinforces the sympathetic activation of visceral organs. When we release these neurotransmitters due to a stimulated stress response this will increase muscular blood flow and will convert stored nutrients into glucose to power skeletal muscle contraction. Basically this causes the release of neurotransmitters that can put us into action. When the sympathetic nervous system is activated this can be considered a fight or flight response when this happens on a short term acute or transient state. This can be quite effective in increasing performance. Helping us to escape a threat or helping us to fight a threat. There is common misperception misconception that the sympathetic nervous system is detrimental due to the release of GLUCOCORTICOID and stress hormones. We have to keep in mind that while chronic states of glucocorticoid secretion and stress hormone secretion can be a detriment to the body transient and an acute activation of glucocorticoid stress. Hormones can be quite beneficial. If you haven't done so already I would highly encourage you to check out Dr Craig. Conn Ivers podcast that he did with been on on Cortisol and and read one of the most and I would also encourage you. I should say to read one of the most thorough explanations on stress adaptation in a book called Wise Zebras. Don't get ulcers by Dr Roberts upholstery from a physiological standpoint. There are many things that occur in our biology. When are sympathetic? State is kicked into high gear. In the state we see a dilation of the pupils an increased heartbeat relaxed airways inhibition of activity within the enteric. Nervous which is gut. Of course there is the secretion of Epinephrine norepinephrine and then we also have a relaxed bladder. This is why someone might urinate on themselves. At the sympathetic nervous system is activated extremely quickly intense situation. Think about it this way. When we perceive a threat in our environments are body and brain directly communicate with one another and can shut off certain systems depending on what we need to take on the perceived threat for instance stress response in stress response. We have no use for reproduction so our reproductive organs are shut down. We do not want to expend blood and the guts to break down food because we do not need it and we need it elsewhere like in our lungs in our hearts and in our brain and therefore we deactivate digestive systems now that we have a better understanding of the sympathetic nervous system. Let's talk about the Paris and pathetic nervous system which works in tandem with sympathetic nervous system. I may need to also clarify that when we talk about the concept of automatic balance. We're talking about a balancing the two nervous systems. There's this notion that the sympathetic nervous system is the villain in the Perez and the Para sympathetic nervous system is the hero this indeed is a fallacy and as a misunderstanding the complex inter relationship between both divisions of our autonomic nervous system when in fact it is a balance of these two divisions that is going to increase heart rate variability and demonstrate. Better Overall Health Outcomes. You wouldn't want to have an overly active para sympathetic nervous system. Just like you would not want to have a chronically activated sympathetic nervous system. I will get back to more on this later but for now. Let's discuss the person. Bednets PARA sympathetic nervous system. In division of the autonomic nervous system the Paris empathetic division helps to regulate activities that will naturally increase the body's energy reserves. When you think about this branch of the nervous system we might consider it the the inhibitory reactor whose attendance is to pull us towards Homeo- stasis and when we all that's when we experience that state of Al Static load that was talking about earlier the other thing that you might already be aware of that you want to pair with the Para sympathetic nervous system is with our tenth cranial nerve which is referred to as the Vegas nerve. The person pathetic nervous system cell bodies are found in the nuclei of four of the cranial nerves but also in the sacred region of the spinal cord. We see this in the vagus nerve which integrates many of our primary organs such as our heart or lungs are esophagus. The stomach pancreas liver and the intestines. This means that it has direct communication to effect change in these organ systems. Its Main Chemical Messenger is a neurotransmitter called acetylcholine. Wile Acetylcholine can act as an exciting Tori neurotransmitter certain parts of the brain such as exciting the Basal Ganglia for movement Acetylcholine actually acts predominantly as an inhibitory neurotransmitter within the Para sympathetic division. When I say that it acts as an inhibitory neurotransmitter this means that it results in reduced firing of nerve cells which is going to be in direct opposition to the sympathetic activation that may be occurring the Paris and pathetic. Nervous system is primarily mediated by the vagus nerve and has been referred to as the rest and digest branch of the autonomic nervous system some predominant researchers particularly Dr Steven Porges has found that the vagus nerve is mediated by a sense of safety and security. And I'll talk a lot more about this later. One way I like to think of this is that when we can intentionally create a safe space physically and psychologically we're going to exhibit action in the Vegas nerve another example of this would be how breath work can modulate the Paris empathetic nervous system and increase. Hiv on an acute level. If we take the time and we are able to take an intentional. Slow attic breath. This is communicating to both our mind and body that we are in a safe place and we are able to engage in this behavior. This may not occur. Let's say if we are being chased by mountain lion for survival we do not want pump the brakes and give our mind and body the message to relax in that case. It is a time where we need all of our resources and faculties to get out of the situation. One more thing that I will say about the Para sympathetic nervous system is that it indeed works as a break to the sympathetic nervous system. You can think of it is working similarly to a car. When the car is put in park it will or should say when the park is put into. The car is put into drive. It will automatically accelerate without you. Having to press the gas pedal this natural acceleration is like. You're sympathetic nervous system. It's always on. You're never going to be able to turn it off completely. But that's a good thing. It is scanning the environment for threats which keeps US vigilance and keeps US safe. Now you can floor the gas pedal and that would be like activating the sympathetic nervous system. And this is helpful in the immediate situations but would be detrimental and result in a loss of fuel and they're very long-term period whereas the pair sympathetic nervous system works as that break it slows us down the break. Is Leveraging the Vegas nerve as the primary mediator so stimulating activation of the Vegas ner results in cascade of beneficial psycho physiological? Outcomes when it's done at the right time the last aspects of psycho physiology that is immensely important in the relationship between HR V. Is the process that we refer to as the Barrow reflects mechanism one of the ways? We maintain HOMEO- stasis is through a fully functional Barrow reflects response or Barrow reflects mechanism. This is actually a negative feedback. Loop that helps us to maintain homeo- static or stable blood pressure not only. Is this paramount to our survival as a species but is also one of the primary areas of focus for heart rate variability biofeedback. This is because the aim of HIV biofeedback which again is self regulation of HR V. is to exercise the Barrow receptor reflects to enhance homeopathic regulation and executive functions. The pathway is to modify our physiology by exercising the Barrow reflects an order to restore the dynamic auto nommik balance of our nervous system. So let me break it down. In it's most simplistic formed barrel reflects our barrow receptors. Are these blood pressure. Receptors that are located in the Arctic Arch and the Internal Carotid arteries which contribute to overall HR v. These receptors are referred to as stretch receptors or detection receptors. Win You Inhale. Your heart rate is going to naturally increase. This will result in a rise in blood pressure about five seconds. After this heart rate is increased this increase in blood pressure will cause a stretch in the carotid arteries alongside the Arctic arch causing the barrel receptors to fire action potentials at a very rapid rate. This rapid firing is sent through your tenth kroner. Which is the vagus nerve? And the ninth cranial nerve. Which is the gloss. Oh Farren Gio Nerve. To a part of our hind brain referred to as the MEDALLA and more specifically the nucleus of the solitary tract this area of our brain were received the signaling from the bear receptors and will then subsequently activate the Paris empathetic nervous system. Which is of course our rest and digest branch in the nervous system. This process will also inhibit the sympathetic nervous system from signaling the signaling and the Pearson pathetic nervous system will then result and release of the neurotransmitter Acetylcholine which I said is again. Inhibitory neurotransmitter which inhibits and works on our pacemaker cells found in the. Sino atrial node or the essay note of the heart. This will result in vacillation. Which is the opening of blood vessels to allow the increase of blood flow and will result in subsequent decreased blood pressure because of this mechanism the heart rate will be brought back down to stable functioning so conversely when someone has a sudden drop in blood pressure the decrease blood pressure will then signal the Medusa to inhibit the pair sympathetic nervous system and will initiate action in the sympathetic nervous system. The sympathetic nervous system will begin to release norepinephrine and epinephrine which will act again on that same area the essay note of the heart to increase heart rate and will result in vessel constriction which will increase blood pressure so all in all the barrel reflex response is a sudden response and a response to sudden changes in blood pressure that helps our bodies to regulate the impact of everyday activities and changes in emotional states. If for instance. These things are not well managed and result in hypertension. What the body will do. It will actually adjust and begin to see these elevations as the new normal levels because the body is always looking to adapt and create a new set point in the Thermostat that we call homeostasis. The end result is that yes. You have high blood pressure but you also have lower. Hr V. This is why modulating HR V. by exercising our Beira reflex and signaling the Para sympathetic nervous system is a vast importance all right so now. It's time to link everything that we've discussed into the topic of heart rate variability or HR V. in it's most simplistic form. Hr V. or heart rate variability refers to the beat to beat variation in the time intervals between heart contractions when we think about the oscillations. A healthy heart. They are actually quite complex. They healthy heart is typically seen as one that can rapidly adjust to sudden physical and psychological challenges. Hr V. is absolutely crucial to our overall health resilience and maybe increased Through different behavioral activation and practices like effortless breathing exercise compassion practices and mindfulness practices within the research field of HR v. We define HR V. As the fluctuation in time intervals between each adjacent heartbeat like I mentioned earlier this is referred to as an inter beat interval and is typically measured in milliseconds if you have any device that measured hurry variability. It is probably utilizing a software algorithm. That is probably calculating the Inter beat interval between successive are spikes or the peaks of blood pulse. An our waiver are spike. Would be read. Vian E C G or an electrocardiogram output and this is this spike and electrical activity due to the polarization of the ventricles of the heart from an electrical standpoint. Every heartbeat starts. It's what's called the essay note that I mentioned earlier. The Sino atrial node which is also considered the heart's pacemaker. Interestingly enough the natural pace of the heart without a fully functioning essay note is around two hundred beats per minute which by most standards clinically would be a form of Taqwa Cardia or a fast heartbeat. It is the essay note that helps to keep the heart on pace. The electrical signaling is what results in a cascade of complex events which we call a heartbeat when we are measuring HIV on a majority of wearable devices the algorithm is looking at peaks and blood volume through a device called photo plus Mog raphy or PPG. These typically utilize infrared light sensors that shine through the skin and detect fluctuations in blood volume via the heart changes and pulse. Either measure that. You're examining one of the things that we know about. The heart is that it is not a metronome. Indeed if we see a heart that has consistent times in the inner beat intervals. We know that something is incredibly wrong with us. Individuals OR NERVOUS SYSTEM. This is because at the heart of HIV is resilience. What I mean by this is that the is that. Hr highest representation as a metric is on how resilient physiology is to change. We have to keep in mind that we have trillions yes trillions among trillions of physiological processes occurring every moment within our biology. This means that the heart has a lot to keep up with if the heart starts to regulate itself. Kind of like a metronome it is. It is essentially the heart crying out for help and saying allowed. I have no other choice. But to regulate something amidst chaos. This sounds a little bit counterintuitive. As it would seem like Homeo- stasis would mean that the heart rate or hurry variability would be consistent but this is in fact very far from the truth. What we know from research is that hurry. Variability is one of the most studied in highly accurate measurements and metrics for assessing the stress response cardiovascular related mortality and morbidity and performance recovery. So what are the sources of HR v. So Hr V. is produced by two distinct overlapping processes? I is the concept of off balance which we talked about earlier but to remind you. That is the complex relationship between both the Para sympathetic and sympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system the other regulatory regulatory mechanisms that control heart rate via a few processes these include a process called Respiratory Sinus. Arrhythmia the barrel reflex and rhythmic changes in vascular tone. I've already discussed the barrel reflects so now let's talk about respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia or RSA so RSA is an extremely important concept in HR V. Regulation and and optimization. We can actually use this process to manipulate our overall heart rate variability. You can do this. Anyone can do this respiratory. Sinus Arrhythmia is the speeding and slowing of the heart across the breeding cycle. When we slow are breathing pattern down. We see a couple of things occurring physiologically. I we inhale our heart rate will naturally inclined to its peak and when we exhale and as we excelled heart will lower to its trough point. This makes sense of we think about it. As we are inhaling the body is receiving usable oxygen to be delivered throughout the body into the brain therefore the heart needs to utilize this immediately will increase its cardiac output for the delivery of oxygen and gas exchange throughout the body as we increase our SA rhythm through low and slow breathing. We can actually stimulate Vega tone and which again that's the that's the vegas nerve and we can lower blood pressure through barrow reflex mechanism. Hey I want to interrupt today show to tell you about the laser lights that I showed him my balls. Yeah you've heard me talk about it. 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Then I'm GonNa talk about today. One is the time. Domain measurement and the other is a frequency band or frequency domain measurement. Both of these are looking at different metrics. So now. Let's start with the time domain measurements when I speak about time domain. Hr V. Measurements. I'm talking about a measurement that is calculated based on time intervals between each adjacent heartbeat. Along a little while ago. I mentioned how the heart does not function like a metronome. There are different time. Intervals in between each adjacent heartbeat. Where one heartbeat to another may be eight hundred milliseconds and the next adjacent. Heartbeat may only be seven hundred and fifty milliseconds. This shows variability in the time. Intervals the difference between those two that I just mentioned is fifty milliseconds and so therefore we can say that there was fifty milliseconds of variability between the two sets of heartbeats now as with anything science. We're not going to base our HR V. Score on two sets of intervals as this much too small of a sample size to give us any relevant or usable data. You would never base it on that. This is why we have to assess. Hr Be over a period of time. Intervals the amount of time needed for different calculations is going to vary depending on the type of time domain index. You're interested in examining for instance the two primary usable time to main indices that we see most commonly are sdn and SST. And I'm going to explain the difference in just a minute. These both require different time. Domains TO GET ACCURATE. Measurement or usable data so sdn for example requires a minimum of five minutes. But in reality it's really only clinically relevant if we assessable twenty four hour period and I'll explain more about what I mean about that in the second while the SSD metric has actually been shown to provide valuable interpretations at as low as ten seconds thirty seconds and one hundred eighty seconds however like sdn in our St is most accurate over a five minute period. So it will be important for you to know that to know what you're calculating and what timeframe you need to measure Or to provide or ensure accurate measurement. So let's dive the primary time domains. We will start with what is considered the gold standard of HR V. Measurement which is S. D. N. N. so S. D. N stands for the standard deviation of the Inter beat intervals of normal sinus speeds. Which is measured again and milliseconds remembered that this measuring normal sinus beats and not artifact this is one of the things that really irks me more than others is that we have a lot of devices that use the SDN algorithm but do not remove artifact beats which are essentially like ectopic beats or false or era beats due to things like movement electrical interference or changes in lining. And when that happens you have data. That's fairly void. An unusable and actually. Technically you cannot say that you are calculating. S. D. N. N. If you do not remove artifacts that would actually be another metric called. Sd are are so unfortunately. Many devices that calculate sdn either do not have this artifact built in or it is based on very poor removal resulting in fairly inaccurate. Hov Data. I'd say that I'm quite the HR V. Snob. So it's something that I always look into a similar measurement which I just mentioned earlier is s. t. r. and that calculates all sign speeds even abnormal or false beats the problem with this measurement which ends up in. A lot of our wearables is that you can have admiral beats that reflect cardiac dysfunction or even noise but will masquerade as HR V. So I never use the ESTA data but back to sdn in when we talk about the standard deviation of intervals. What we're talking about is how much on average does each beat differ from the next the reason this is considered the gold standard of HIV measurement is because it has been found to have contributions from both the sympathetic nervous system and Paris and pathetic nervous system. So we can get full insight into our autonomic response with this measurement like. I mentioned before. Sdn is most accurate when it is assessed over twenty four hours than during short periods because the longer periods can provide data about cardiac reactions to a great range of environmental stimulation or lack thereof. In the case of sleep is also the twenty four hour recordings that allow us to assess the sympathetic nervous system contribution to SDN for assessing cardiac risk. Sdn is almost always used can be a valuable predictor of both morbidity and mortality and looking at twenty four hour recordings an sdn in less than fifty milliseconds has been demonstrated in those classified as unhealthy. Those with fifty milliseconds to one hundred milliseconds is a classification for compromised health. And one hundred milliseconds above is considered a healthy individual from cardiac cardiac standpoint. When we look at heart attacks survivors. Those who have had a higher classification had a greater risk of living or sorry I had crater probability of living during a thirty one month. Follow up period. One study demonstrated that individuals with an S. tnn greater than one hundred milliseconds had a five point three times lower risk of mortality at follow up than those with values less than fifty milliseconds. We can actually correlate the SDN metric with other frequency domains. That I will discuss later. Sdn is correlated with ultra low frequency. Band the very low frequency band and the low frequency ban. Now let's turn to another time domain index for HR and for short term time domain. Evaluation is probably my most preferred measure. Which is the ram SSD metric so R. M. S. D? Is the root mean square of successive differences between normal heartbeats and now that? I have sufficed and spinning your head's let me explain it in order to calculate this value. We must calculate each successive time. Difference BETWEEN ADJACENT. Inter beat intervals in terms of milliseconds. Then each of these values is squared and the result is then averaged before the square root of the total is but as obtained who now that is a lot of what we do in research. So I wanted to give you that equation. But for the sake of practicality it may not be necessarily that important the measurement is mediated or provides US insight into the workings of our parent pathetic nervous system and is highly correlated with the high frequency band. We actually know that Aren. Ssd is more influenced by the Paris and pathetic branch then SDN in while a five minute gold standard. Well five minute. Measurement is the gold standard for our MS D you can get usable data. An ultra short term domains. That I mentioned at the beginning of this podcast. This makes it really good as an on the go measurement one thing that I like about. Ssd Is that is not mediated by respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia like SDN is what I mean by this. Is that with. Sdn You can affect change in this number by taking those low and slow diaphragm matic breasts whereas Ram SSD does not appear to be mediated by respiration or slow breathing and may provide more insight into recovery as it is primarily assessing tonic or relaxed or static HR v. So if you want to gain insight into your recovery and remove the effects of respiration to assess non-manipulated our M. SSD is the way to go. So that's the one I use for recovery. This is one of the best measures of Bagel tone due to the lack of manipulation of respiration. This is why I actually like the use of the ordering to assess HR V. at night. While I sleep but more about that later another one that is used quite frequently and is very easy to assess in in the HR V. Time domains is something called HR V. amplitude. This is a very simple measurement that is an average of the difference between the highest and lowest heart rate during each respiratory cycle so remember. Rsa Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia is the fluctuation of heart rate from the start to the finish of a breath cycle. Normal Essay occurs when you inhale and your hurry increases and when you xl your heart rate decreases if you subtract the peak heart rate in the cycle and the lowest heart rate at the end of the cycle this will provide hr V. amplitude so this is not a great index Vegas tone as it can be mediated by respiration. This measure normally depends on both age and fitness level as we age. Hr V. especially amplitude tints to go down the more sedentary. We are the lower the amplitude. We are likely to have in elite athletes. I have seen amplitude as high as fifty to sixty beats per minute. This means that at the start of their exhale their heart rate is at fifty beats per minute and at the peak of their respiratory cycle. The heart rate gets up to about a hundred beats per minute and then comes back down to fifty. Beats per minute on the exhale? Whereas I've seen some patients with cardiovascular disease or chronic pain go from seventy beats per minute to seventy three beats per minute which would only be an amplitude or Hari. Variability of three beats per minute which is extremely low. This is where we would might warrant some HR V. biofeedback. Now that we've talked about some of the predominant time domain indices. Let's move towards frequency domains as these have become quite popular in recent years. Let's I differentiate between time domain and frequency domain measurements of HR V. As a recap when we think about time domain indices. This quantifies the total amount of heart rate variability whereas frequency domain measurements will quantify the diff- distribution of absolute or relative power into different frequency bands. Absolute power can be expressed in terms of millisecond square divided by cycles per second and relative power is expressed as the percentage of total HR V. Or we refer to this. As normal units in frequency domain hov measurement power is expressed in normal units by dividing the absolute power for specific frequency band by the some absolute power of the low frequency and high frequency bands. When we calculate power in normal units. We this will also allow us to directly compare the spectral distribution of HR V. Bands for two different people. Now all of this is referring to the algorithms that constitute frequency domains or power before the sake of our discussion. I want to see if I can now. Simplify all this crazy complex inflammation. Let's thank about an Eeg so this actually measures individual brainwave domains for instance when we have the slowest brainwave which is associated with sleep this is called. Delta waves the next band or wave band would-be data than Alpha and Beta. This is an example of how the process of something called a power. Spectral analysis can separate brainwaves into their own component rhythms. That operate within different frequency ranges can do the same thing. We can do the same thing I should say with. Hr V. A great way to think about this is to think about shining a light through a prism the prison will reflect what white light into its component wavelengths so through a mathematical process called the Fast Foyer Power Spectral Analysis. We can break. Hr V. in time domain into its component wavelengths and into each of these wavelengths. We can give us a little bit more insight into automatic functioning before being talking about each of these wavelength or frequency domains. I want to know that. There is still some controversy regarding the autonomic contributions to some of these domains since these measurements will kind of profoundly vary with testing conditions one thing to note about HIV frequency ban similar to that of eeg bands that we are predominantly concerned with the dominant band. At the time of assessment this is because we have activation of all bands at any given time but we are concerned with what is mostly activated or is considered the dominant domain. Eeg again if you are to hook yourself up to an EEG. You might have one band. That is more dominant than the others. So say for instance data but this does not mean that you are producing Zero Delta Zero Alpha or zero Beta indeed. You are making all of them at once but one may be more predominant as a wavelength. At that time. It's a common mistake for many individuals to believe that we are only making one set of brainwave frequencies within the area of the brain that we are studying so I hope that this helps clarify that. Just because you know like the Brain. The heart is not simply making one frequency to the void of others. Yes it may be presenting with one dominant frequency but we are still able to measure all the others as activated during this period with all. That said there's still a lot of great data that we've gotten from studying frequency domains that I believe are very important for us to cover. Start off with the ultra low frequency band which are oscillations less than point. Zero zero three hurts this frequency band that can be only measured within a twenty four hour period for this band. There is no consensus regarding the mechanisms that generate its power but we do know that is indicative of very slow acting biological processes some researchers believe that circadian rhythms may be the primary driver of the ultra low frequency band. There's also believed that core body temperature metabolism and other bodily systems over a long period of time may contribute to this frequency. There is also disagreement about what branch of the nervous system contributes to the ultra low frequency band. So for the sake of our discussion until we learn more about this unique frequency ban. There's not much. More that I want to say about its utilization so now we moved to the very low frequency band which is the frequency brand that ranges from point zero zero three hurts two point zero four Hertz. In order to record the very low frequency band we must record at least five minutes worth of data. Twenty four hours is actually considered the gold standard their research. We know that any low values on a twenty four clinical HIV recording can predict greater risk of adverse outcomes. However what we have found that is the very low power frequency is more strongly associated with all cause mortality than the low frequency or high domains therefore as we gain more research on this band we are finding that the very low frequency bands may be quite fundamental to health when researchers have studied very low frequency bands band power. They have found that. Low power in this domain has been associated with with with with rhythmic death high levels of inflammation and lower levels of testosterone. They've also found that para sympathetic nervous system activity may contribute to very low frequency band power since since para sympathetic blockade almost completely abolishes it when researchers have blockaded the sympathetic nervous system this does not appear to affect the very low frequency power so from a practical standpoint especially when measuring over twenty four hours. This is not a band of the frequency domains that we want to have low. This brings us to some of the more well-known frequency bands and the first one I want to discuss is the low frequency band which ranges from point. Zero four hurts all the way up. Two point one five hurts. This band requires a minimum recording of two minutes while this is one of the more commonly used in many phone based applications and biohacking wearables. Interestingly enough there is actually disagreements regarding the sources of activity within the span formally the region this region frequency band was called the Barrow Receptor Range because it does mainly respect. A barrel receptor activity under resting conditions. It appears that low frequency band power may be produced from both the pairs and pathetic and sympathetic nervous system and is regulated via the bear bear receptors. That regulate blood pressure one of the things that we know about the low frequency band. Is that the sympathetic. Nervous system does not appear to produce rhythms much above point. One hurts while the Paris empathetic nervous system can be observed to affect heart rhythms down. Two point zero five hurts when we engage in slow respiration rates and slow breathing. Bagel activity can easily generate oscillations within the low frequency band. This is why you hear a lot of individual say to train within the low frequency band. Indeed this can actually be quite simple for most individuals breathing at a rate of six breaths per minute has been found to put most people within this low frequency domain. We might even say that. This domain can be representative of autonomic balance. There's a process of breathing which we call resonance frequency which is a common biofeedback tool that places the individual within this range. This is something that I'm going to talk about in a little bit when I get into common. Modalities for enhancing. Hr V. But from now know that this is a common range to train autonomic balance inveigle tone within the Institute of Heart Math They actually identified. The single high amplitude peak within this low frequency domain and more specifically at the point one hurts mark to indicate what they call a state of high coherence from this model standpoint. Coherence is when the heart mind and emotions are energetically alignment and in cooperation. They identified coherence as when we increase synchronization and harmony between the cognitive emotional and physiological symptoms which results inefficient an F. or efficient and harmonious functioning the idea of the heart math institute and they're wearable technology such as they're in way m-wave to in the inner balance is to increase heart rate variability coherence through paste breathing and visualization. The last frequency band and domain. That I wanted to discuss. Today is the high frequency band. This is found between the point. One five two point four zero Hertz and requires a recording of at least one minute the high frequency band can reflect para sympathetic activity and we also refer to this as the respiratory banned because it corresponds to the heart rate variations related to the respiratory cycle as you may recall these phases heart rate changes are known as RSA and maybe a pure index of cardiac vaghul control again. I should say to When you inhale Heart rate's GonNa accelerate when you excel. The heart rate is going to go into slow. So when we inhale cardiovascular centers will inhibit bagel outflow resulting in the speeding of the heart and when we X. hailed this will restore the Bagel outflow and slow the heart due to the release of Acetylcholine. When there is total Vega blockage? This will virtually eliminate all of the oscillations found in the high frequency bands and will reduce the power range and the low frequency band. We see a high correlation between the High Frequency Band and the Ram SSD time domain band when individuals have lower High Frequency Band power. It's correlated with an increase in stress and panic and anxiety and worry and is still important for us to remember that high frequency power and RSA does not represent vaguely tone. Keep in mind that high frequency power and RSA is very easy for us to manipulate by slowing our respiration rates. A study done in two thousand seventeen demonstrated that if you slow your breathing to six breaths per minute. You should observe increased heart rate fluctuations compared with fifteen breaths per minute which is the average human breath rate. It is during this time that the mean heart rate should not appreciably change because vaguely tone did not decrease. This is an example of how high frequency power can index vaguely modulation of our heart rate. But it does not represent Vega L- tone another common index for frequency domain measurement and power. Is something called? The low frequency to high frequency ratio. The intent here is to estimate the ratio between sympathetic nervous system and para sympathetic nervous system activity. This measurement is seen typically wearables like the polar chest strap and the elite HR V. APP The assumption. Here for the low frequency to high frequency ratio. Is that low? Frequency power may be generated by the parasol pathetic nervous system sympathetic nervous system and Barrow reflects mechanisms while the high power band is produced by the parent nervous system so in this model alot low frequency to high frequency ratio will reflect para sympathetic dominance. This might not. This might be seen when we conserve. Energy and engage in the tend and befriend behaviors. You might consider yourself to have low autonomic arousal and be quite relaxed when this ratio is low so the contrast this when we have a high low frequency to high frequency ratio this may indicate sympathetic dominance which occurs when we engage in the fight or flight behaviors or form of para sympathetic rebel withdrawal. One thing to keep in mind about this from a research perspective is that brief recordings of the low frequency to high frequency ratio are a little controversial as short-term measurements tend to be poorly correlated with twenty four hour values. So it's in my opinion that examining the research that a five minute resting baseline of the low frequency to high frequency ratio may not be our best estimate of auto nommik balance so with all of this information on the different frequency bands. How might I use them both personally? And clinically well first. You must assess your intent on measuring the frequency domains. So for instance M I doing more meditative or resonance frequency training to in a sense manipulate. Hr so that I can experience an increase inveigle toner relaxation response or am. I using it for examining recovery. Depending on my needs for the assessment I may be examining these numbers for Or from different lenses let's take the first example and break it down again. I'm going to talk about the concept of Resonance Frequency Training in a few minutes but if I were utilizing heart rate variability for relaxation reducing distress or a way to enhance meditative practices I would be looking to increase the low frequency band and integrate what we refer to as coherence increase. Low Frequency Band will indicate enhanced vegas activity and activation of the Paralympic nervous system and on balance whereas I would not want to manipulate breathing and respiration such as breathing at my resonance frequency rate if I were assessing overall recovery. This is because manipulating breath. Rate will almost certainly change your. Hr Be scores. One of the things that I'm most consistently asked about our norms. So this makes it makes sense to ask this question as we want to be able to provide a basis for comparison for HR V. Numbers if you look at any website where there is HIV discussion. They're always individuals posting their data. And asking is this low. Is this normal and so forth. I WanNa to be able to answer some of these questions here but please know that we never utilize HIV scores as a means to diagnose also as you have also inferred hr V. changes quite frequently and should not be a metric that you take once and then tried to make any type of conclusion also like many other biometrics that we quantify HR V. is one that we that it's great to have a consistent baseline and then work on training that number in an upward direction. Well many questions come my way regarding low. H RBM also ask questions about high. Hr V. in whether or not this can be problematic. And I'm going to speak about this as well. Let's turn to HR V. to see if I can dispel some myths and highlight some potential goals. I've already mentioned before. Then when at the marker that is considered the gold standard which is S. D. N. N. From a cardiac functioning standpoint. We see that happening with a twenty four hour recording those with less than fifty milliseconds of HR V. are considered unhealthy and those with an hr be from fifty to one hundred milliseconds are considered to have compromised health. While those with one hundred or hr be over. One hundred milliseconds are considered healthy from cardiac standpoint. A couple of things on this first police. Remember that these are just standards for cardiac outcomes and are not made to be used from a diagnostic standpoint. There are plenty of other pieces of information that we need in order to not whether someone has a hardy or healthy cardiovascular system or unhealthy one not just hr v. alone while this is the gold standard metric. We are all about integrating data. So second if you already heard me mention these numbers and you're freaking out because your oral ring is telling you that you're in the thirties or twenties. You're actually freaking out for no reason. The oral ring uses the SSD data and not SDN. Lastly I don't know. Many individuals are recording twenty four hours with the SDN marker other than those who are wearing a holter monitors for a long period of time. So from a quantification standpoint such as the utilization of wearables. You know many of us are just really not collecting. The data and and this is predominantly clinical. So I just wanted to provide these numbers. Initially you know as again. These numbers are the gold standard for cardiovascular outcomes. Well there are many different types of time two main measurements that we mentioned before like the SDN in an SDR. Our in our St there are also other ones like the SDS a an index There's the in n fifty that pnn fifty and so on but these are not typically that you're going to cross paths with unless you're doing clinical biofeedback with a specialist like myself a majority of these wearables or technology that you would utilize from a consumer standpoint are either going to be via. Sdn in Orem SSD. That is why I'm going to vote Much more time to these. There have been numerous studies looking at identifying norms but the largest study ever done a normalizing data was done compiling forty four selected studies which examined over twenty one thousand adult participants. Some things to keep in mind I. This analysis included three large populations with a minimum age of forty which may actually end up explaining their comparatively low HR V. Scores and can't be generalized to yourself if you're under forty because that's the mini- minimum age and they also didn't factor in other types of variables. Things like age gender socioeconomic socioeconomic status and so forth. But here's what they found. The researchers of this large comparative study found the average mean. Sdn Score and milliseconds to be fifty milliseconds with a standard deviation of sixteen they found the average arm SSD to be forty two milliseconds with an average standard deviation of fifteen they found the low frequency to high frequency ratio in terms of millisecond squared to be two point eight with a standard deviation of two point six another interesting study that was done in two thousand fifteen looked at two thousand subjects between the ages of twenty five to seventy four now. These were noted as healthy adults as they included anyone with cardiac arrhythmia diseases. Those were who are on a significant medications or pregnant however I tend to utilize this information as a basis for my own norm charting. I want to break it down in terms of age and gender and look at two distinctive time domains both sdn R. M. SSD. I'm about to spit out a lot of data so just bear with me and make sure that you listen for your own age norms. So let's start with ages twenty five to thirty four. The study found that males in this age range has an average our SSD of thirty nine point seven milliseconds with a standard deviation of nineteen point nine milliseconds and an S. D. N. N. A. Fifty milliseconds with a standard deviation of twenty point nine milliseconds. They found that women had an average arm. Ssd Of Forty two point nine milliseconds with a standard deviation of twenty two point eight milliseconds and a standard deviation or should say sdn of forty eight point seven milliseconds with a standard deviation of nineteen point zero milliseconds in examining men and women in the category of thirty five to forty four. They found that men and men had an average or MS SD of thirty two point. Zero milliseconds with standard deviation of sixteen point five milliseconds and an SDN of fourteen. Sorry forty four point six milliseconds with a standard deviation of sixteen point eight milliseconds. They found that women in this age category had a standard deviation. Sorry an arm. Ssd OF THIRTY five point. Four milliseconds with a standardization of Eighteen. Point five milliseconds and SDN of forty four point five milliseconds with a standard deviation of twenty point five milliseconds in examining the age category of those forty five to fifty four. They found that men. In this age category had an average of twenty three point zero milliseconds with a standard deviation of ten point nine milliseconds and sdn of thirty six point eight milliseconds with a standard deviation of fourteen point six milliseconds. They found women in this category to have an average. Ram SSD of Twenty six point. Three milliseconds with a standard deviation of thirteen point six milliseconds and an estimate of thirty six point nine milliseconds with a standard deviation of thirteen point eight milliseconds the next category were males and females ranging from fifty five to sixty four years of age for males in this category. They found an average arm. Ssd Of nineteen point nine milliseconds with the Standardization of eleven point one milliseconds and an SDN end of thirty two point eight milliseconds with a standard aviation of fourteen point seven milliseconds for women in this category they found an average or SSD of twenty one point four milliseconds with an average standard deviation of eleven point nine milliseconds and sdn of thirty point six milliseconds with a standardization of twelve point four milliseconds lastly and the oldest category that they studied which were those age sixty five to seventy four. They found that males in his age category had an SSD of nineteen point one milliseconds with a standard deviation of ten point seven seconds and standard deviation or S. Tnn Of twenty nine point six seconds with a standard deviation of thirteen point two milliseconds. Lastly they found that women in this age category had an SSD of nineteen point one milliseconds and a standard deviation. Eleven point eight milliseconds an Sdn of twenty seven point eight milliseconds with a standard deviation of eleven point eight milliseconds so while there is a lot of information. I hope that this puts people at ease as questions all the time about ordering measurements and whether they are too high or too low and now highly. Encourage you to check out these numbers again if you have questions about how you compare with those within your age category and for your gender as well what is great about. The studies is that they do also show comparisons in the low frequency and high frequency bands. And then the low frequency and high frequency ratio this was a study performed by Vaas and their colleagues in two thousand fifteen the last thing that I want to say about. Hov Nine something that. I get a lot of questions about is in regards to high. Hr V. Scores as I noted before while it is important to monitor. Hr V. from a norm standpoint. It is equally if not more important to self quantify in an effort to compare scores to yourself this means establishing a baseline and then making comparisons not just to norms but making comparisons to your own baseline. Now the research is not clear on whether or not there's a ceiling to hr be scores in other words. There's no definitive research to demonstrate that having a high hr V. score compared to a low score or compared to the norm has negative effects however it has been proposed that individuals with significantly high HIV. Scores may not be pushing themselves as hard as they could again. This is quite a subjective statement but is something to note some theorized that high. Hiv scores may be an indication that you could put your push yourself a little bit harder on your workouts. And I'm not sure quite by ended us but it's worth miss further exploring my opinion conclusion. Though is I would still even from a personal standpoint and clinical standpoint would like to see higher h. RV's when compared to lower hr scores the only time that a high hr V. score can be extremely problematic is if we find. There is Arrhythmia or some other cardiovascular problem that is contributing to long durations of time between the heartbeats so for example if someone is having some a rhythmic heartbeats they may end up skipping beats which will result in what looks like an elevated HR V. When in fact this is more representative of dysfunction in disorder. So in instances like this a high hr V. can be problematic normally with me as they are going to be additional symptoms that the individual is experiencing that would warrant a stress test or an echocardiogram to determine dysfunction. So now that we've taken a deep dive into the HR V. metrics norms. I think that it's time for us to discuss specific techniques and tactics for HIV training. I like to split this into two sections. I would be specific. Hiv biofeedback techniques. And the second would be HIV hacks. Some people believe that the most important metric to change is there resting. Hr V. Score. Which I would argue is highly important but something that I would argue. That is much more important than your resting. Hr V. would be your ability to quickly and efficiently tap into your para sympathetic response the ability to modulate HR V. quickly hold substantial benefits for the individual especially when compared to resting HR V. While resting HR can be a great representation of overall health recovery. And well being. I'm not nearly as concerned with making substantial changes in that area as I am with para sympathetic efficiency. One thing I must say and honestly the her is no easy way around this in order to truly know what changes are taking place from an HR perspective. You need to be quantifying it with some form of wearable device however all the techniques that I'm going to share with you do not require HIV measuring devices in order for them to be effective. The greatest thing about biofeedback is that it's not a piece of equipment that is the change agent indeed. The change agent is inherently in the ways that we change our physiology. I think that it's important for us to remember this because we get so caught up in all these really cool. Inexpensive biohacking wearables but in the end. This is just information and not the mediator of change itself. So if you have some experience if you have some expendable income I'm GonNa talk about a few devices that I really like in how I utilize them. Practically many of these are fairly reasonable in price. I don't expect you to go out and buy a fifteen thousand dollar piece of biofeedback equipment is this is something. I would use like clinically. So you wouldn't WanNa go out and do that for yourself. Necessarily you would have no clue what you're doing unless you had that training would I use on a day-to-day basis for my own personal? Hiv training are much less expensive devices. Though I must say it is really nice to have the ability to practice on clinical biofeedback whenever I want but trying to carry around all that commitment is a hassle when I can just throw on my own ring so the first tactics who hr re-training an HR V. biofeedback that I want to discuss is what is considered You know the most important or something that I believe each and every person who was doing HIV training should learn and this is something called a resonance frequency training which is an assessment tool and technique created by. Dr Paul Lehrer this entails you determining the exact resonance frequency of your cardiovascular system. This frequency is a manipulation of your respiration rate which has a significant impact. We talked earlier on your heart rate. Due to the stimulation of the barrel reflects at this respiration rate there is significant effects due to maximize respiratory science resume. Arrhythmia and barrel reflects gain the idea behind resonance frequency. Training is to breathe. At a rate that causes the heart rate to go up and down in phase with your own respiration rate at this rate respiratory gas exchange is efficiently maximized and what Researchers have determined. Is that when you engage? In regular practice of resonance frequency techniques it has been shown to provide clinically significant significant improvements in a variety of symptoms and disorders such as chronic pain asthma depression copd food cravings and hypertension just to name a few. What doctor Polaris his colleagues found? Is that when a person breeze at the resonance frequency rate which is typically between four and a half and six and a half breaths per minute the cardiovascular system will resonate much like the sound of a vibrating string in a box above the violin. Creating this big reverberating sound again. When breeding at this resonance frequency rate the barrel reflects system stimulated and strengthen strengthened again. This is that blood control blood and emotional regulation control mechanism and we find this To to be at its most efficient rate when we're breathing at the resonance frequency rate. Remember too when our blood pressure goes up. The barrel reflects causes the hurry to go down. And this is what causes that rhythm and that heart rate fluctuation from a clinical standpoint. There are a couple of things that we are looking at in assessing resonance frequency. I we are looking at something called face phase covert with breathing and what this means is that we want to see that the heart rate and respiration rate are in phase are in agreement with one another basically. Do the lines trace the same pattern? Where where you start breathing. Heart rate follows the breath all the way to the peak. And as you exhale. The heart rate should decline with this line pattern. The next thing is looking at heart rate amplitude. We're going to choose resonance frequency rate. That has the highest amplitude. Which reminds to remind you is the highest heart rate minus the lowest heart rate within a respiratory cycle. Then we want to see which breath rate maximizes. The low frequency amplitude peak basically which breath rate has the most power in the low frequency domain? Given all these factors we then calculate our own resonance frequency. Now you're only going to really be able to do this if you have a more advanced. Hr V. measuring device such as a polar chest strapped with the elite HR V. or clinical biofeedback. The most accurate results are going to be by going to see a biofeedback practitioner. The good thing though is that we know through research that we all have probably all have a resonance frequency in between four and a half to six and a half breaths per minute as a safe bet. I will typically tell people to be that around six breaths per minute if they do not have access to this testing metric research has indicated that this is the strongest way to coach and train Vega tone increase. Hr V. The idea behind this is that the more frequently when we train using a resonance frequency training the more easily. We can tap into the low frequency band. Something interesting about this type of training is that elite athletes have utilized this in order to get into the zone before a serve like in tennis or golf. Swing or before a pitches thrown in major league baseball if we train the style of breathing and pace of our breathing on a daily basis. Our body is going to most easily adapt and we are going to be able to tap into the state and maximum maximize. Hr V. Within two to three breaths again like anything. This is GonNa take consistent practice. Am I also mention now? There are a few ways to practice the style of reading. Of course we need to be able to pace are breathing. But also there are some suggestions on how we breathe. Mechanically I is for us to exercise a diaphragm matic breath. This is where we inhale through our nose and allow our lungs and stomach to expand so that it can push the diaphragm towards the pelvic floor. I like to use some visual imagery to demonstrate this when we inhale I want you to think of your lungs and stomach like operating like a balloon. Would as you bring air in through your inhalation. You will imagine that you are filling the balloon with air allowing it to expand to about eighty percent. Don't over inflate the balloon once once you're at this point we'll then exhales slowly and quietly and deflate the balloon sometimes. I like to think about myself gently pulling my my belly button towards my spine. I'm not tugging or trying to allow the air to be pushed out. I wanted to be to allow this to feel as effortlessly as possible. When this occurs we are able to stimulate the vagus nerve that enervate the post earier section of your lungs this will also help to maximize respiratory gas exchange for increased oxygen and nutrient delivery. Then depending on who you ask you can either exhale through pursed lips like you're blowing through a straw or you can simply just you know breath back through knows. That's typically my my suggestion as imperative to breathe or inhale through your nose as actually maximize nitric oxide delivery in vessel dilation which are very important in increasing. Hr V. One of the biggest training tools. That I that I will use and that I find to be best has to breathe as quietly and as gently as you can. I do not want to try to see or I should say yeah. Do Not WanNa try to see if I can inhale as much air as as I can as possible. I actually wanted to focus more on the slow quiet diaphragm matic breaths. And sometimes I'll even create what feels more like a hypoxia environment and in my body and this is similar to the work of Patrick mcallen who wrote the oxygen advantage. If you're breathing this way and training this way. The research suggests that you need to perform this for about twenty minutes two times a day and I like to utilize the strategy when I'm engaging in meditation or just as a separate health strategy so that's resonant frequency training now of course there are many other breath work techniques that you could utilize but I found this one to be quite effective both personally and clinically the key features to the celebrating. Remember to breathe. Low to breathe slow and to breathe quietly again. Patrick mcallen who like I mentioned earlier? The author of the oxygen advantage recommends to breathe so quietly as if you were to As if you're not trying to move any hairs within your nostrils. So have that visualization as you take a breath in another way to maximize HR V. US through the process of meditation. Indeed numerous research studies have indicated that engaging in different meditative techniques such as visualization or guided imagery. Meditation and. Mindfulness Meditation can significantly improve overall. Hr V. This is likely due to the fact and correlation of slow respiratory patterns when engaging in these exercises but also that mediation or meditation say brings about a sense of calm and safety which is likely due to Vegas Toner Bagel nerve stimulation. I tend to like to pair breath work and meditation as I'm always looking to maximize efficiency in time. In my day these techniques combined with my utilization Mueller. Excuse me these techniques that when I combine them with utilization of biofeedback wearables has been to has been found to be the most effective way for me to enhance. Hr Be if you're looking in the wearables and self quantification seen you likely already know of many wearables for determining HR V. I have found some to be really good and I have found some. That have left me quite disappointed. I like checking. Hr V. in different ways So I I liked Checking the resting or that static. Hr State this is going to give me an HIV that is not manipulated by respiration and is a better representation of my overall nervous system recovery. Remember it's actually quite easily is actually quite easy to manipulate. Hr V. Breathing slowly in dire from adequately adds such due to measure HR v. When I don't have the opportunity to manipulate the results in the perfect place in time for that asleep now. I know that I've already mentioned the use of my oral ring which I found to be one of the most accurate ways to measure. Hr V. Noninvasive -Ly there are also other devices such as the band and the bio strap that can provide results. I tend to like something. That's a little less invasive physically. I'm such a rain over a risk. Strap however you need to go with your own preference also whatever device that you end up getting. You need to make sure that you're basing your norms on the metrics of the device that you're using for instance if you use your apple. Watch WHICH APPLE. Watch does calculate HR v. Their measurement is S. D. N. While the ring uses the arm. Ssd metric so each morning. I take off my ring and put it on or put it on the charger to get it off airplane mode and I'll check a few metrics in regard to sleep. I'll look at body temperature. And then I'll look at heart rate variability. I'll always look at my HIV numbers in comparison to both my own as well as the normative population. The great thing about self mortification is that we can establish a baseline for ourselves and then make general comparisons to that baseline while it's important for you to compare yourself to norms it is equally or maybe more important for you to have a baseline comparison for yourself. I utilize this number for my ring to give me a good representation as to my overall level of recovery. You're nervous system's not going to lie if YOU'RE HIV SIGNIFICANT LOW. Say One to two standard deviations below your average then that may give you the information about whether or not you should train that day or how hard you should train. Let me give you a personal example of how I've utilized this. I typically play tennis two to three days a week. My average rings score is about one hundred ten to one hundred and fifteen milliseconds if my hr V. score the following morning is eighty or below. I will typically take it a little bit easier on physical exertion that day. Interestingly enough automatic nervous system recovers fairly quickly but research has also indicated that HR can be a great measurement of recovery in order to prevent injury or re injury. I have used this as a reliable means to avoid injury and also found that win. I have overreached or over trained and my HR V. Measurements. Told me I was already doing that. Then this has resulted in me engaging in more injury or being more prone to injury one thing to also keep in mind is that decreased. Hr V. is highly associated and correlated with increased heart rate for instance. We know that a heavy night of drinking alcohol can cause the heart rate to go up and in turn This will end up resulting in decreased. Hr V. So if you noticed that your age are significantly lower on nights that you consumed alcohol. That is why now if I'm doing more HIV biofeedback training into increase my HIV from an emotional or psychological or stress based standpoint. Then there are numerous devices that you can use for feedback for in the moment. Hr V. Scores some popular ones include the EM wave to an inner balanced by the institute or the Heart Heart Math Institute and as I indicated earlier the intent behind these devices from math is increased. Coherence which is very similarly associated to resonance frequency both of these devices utilize. Pg or photo plus Magara fee which I mentioned earlier and our devices that typically go on the ear lobe or on the finger and look at overall blood volume fluctuations through infrared lights that shine in the muscular tissue. This is a great and accurate means of measurement as well as easy inefficient to defer to determine HR V. The only way I should say the other way is through e CG or electrocardiogram which is a little more complicated but in my opinion is the most reliable due to the minimization of or effect. You can use these devices to help coach you in different breeding techniques meditative techniques to increase. Hr V. You can see HIV way forms begin to establish after just a few minutes of breathing in a coached pattern. And what's going on? Here is a strengthening of your overall autonomic nervous system and enhancement in automatic balance and Vegas stimulation that is increasing Acetylcholine acetylcholine production. That helps to regulate the speed of your heart. Most people will say that they feel the effects of this. Hr V. Training within a matter of minutes. And because I trained on these types of devices for so long I can enhance my own. Hr V. Within a matter of about two or three breaths and this demonstrates strong and specific efficient control my autonomic nervous system something that you can do as well with training and I liked these devices because they are very accurate and user friendly there are other training devices such as the Bio strep in whoop that can be paired with their own APP but there are also devices that I found to be the most accurate and effective devices for HIV biofeedback. One of them is the highly popular and well known elite. Hr V. APP and the polar chest. Strap this isn't actually an H. E. device that instead of measuring the blood flow in the blood volume pulse such as devices. I mentioned earlier. This is actually a measure the electrical output of the heart. Now there are these are a little bit more invasive. Something that you then you know then something that you can clip on your finger your ear. But I liked them because their accuracy and ability to reduce artifacts. And as you remember artifact like those false beats many of the wearables do not remove false beats which can lead to very inaccurate data. The Puller h seven chest strap With with either the nature beats or the elite. Hiv APP is a great way to go but actually have one APP that is one device that is not as well known. But I've found it to be without a doubt my favorite device that I've ever worn for heart rate variability training. The device that I'm talking about is by a company called Leaf Therapeutics L. E. F. Therapeutics. This is a wearable. E sieg device that attaches to two separate electrodes and is placed right below the left chest similar to the position where you would place a full. E C g this device is very lightweight and we'll track HR V. Throughout the day the great thing about this device is that it will help you to establish your own baseline and then throughout the day it will detect when your hr v. has fallen significantly below your baseline you will then receive haptic vibrating feedback in vibrating. Pattern to let you know that your hr V. is low and once you fill this haptic feedback. It will then provide you with different vibrating patterns consistent with whatever breathing pattern you have indicated to the APP that is your preferred respiratory rate so for instance my resonant frequency is five breaths per minute which might actually is on the phone application. I can tell I can tell it when my HIV V. has fallen significantly lower than my baseline to start a breathing pattern. At that rate. There will then be two distinct feedbacks from the haptic engine that I will experience at this time when there is no vibration on the device. This is telling me to start my inhalation when the device begins to vibrate I will exhale until the vibration is complete. I will do this until I've gotten my HR V. back up to baseline after a period of time wearing the leaf device. I have found that I am able to increase my level of self awareness and also my ability to more Qu My two more quickly regulate myself. Hr V. I have known Have multiple benefits with this thing. This is so much so that I'm able to pinpoint now. When might vice will begin to vibrate even before it begins vibrating? My level of self awareness regarding my stress response in Asia has become so heightened. Do to this device that I don't even need it anymore but I still use it because well I've found that it's just the best. Hr biofeedback divisive ever used. The application also has multiple multiple guided meditations abilities to track. Hr being on a daily and weekly basis the ability to change a train with paste breathing the ability to feel your own heartbeat from the feedback. Engine and much more. You can find more out about this company if you go to get leaf dot COM l. e. f. but I cannot stress. You know how much I've used. This device found benefit as well as how many of my patients have utilized this device and found significant benefit as well. This is the device that I have all of my personal clients by for coaching. And the one that I personally use my last comment on. Hr V. wearables is to gain or sources say to again. Remind you to be aware of the potential inclusion of artifact data. This is something that can significantly screw skew results and should be assessed and taking into consideration before assessing HR V. One way to help mitigate the effects of artifact collection is to make sure that you are sitting at a table or sending in a stable position. And that you are that you are just completely still during readings especially during short-term readings. I generally also check my HIV at the same time each day even in the same place each day to get readings that are as reliable and it's consistent as possible. There are plenty of other ways to increase your overall hr v. one of the ways that I found to be the most effective increasing the resting HIV is through the use of cold exposure. So cold exposure has maybe knows a hormetic stressor that results in acute sympathetic state. Arousal as such. This is the perfect time for us to induce a para sympathetic state during the cold exposure and during cold recovery when you may notice initially is a significant decrease in HR V. immediately Following the cold exposure and this of course is common however because our body wants to re enter. A STATE OF HOMEO- STASIS. The repair process will result in higher. Hr V. I have found that through the use of either coal plunges or hot to cold contrast showers and been able to modulate my hr V. Pretty significantly with these techniques. I also like the idea of cold exposure nights a quality sleep is also a way to increase HIV and tracking HIV alongside. Sleep is a valuable system of this quantification. What you'll find is that lower. Is that the lower. Your heart rate goes do some more deep restorative sleep the higher hr V. will be and as I mentioned before one of the things that helps me sleep immensely from a recovery standpoint and overall quality of sleep standpoint is by using a mechanism to cool my bed such as the Euler system or the chilly pad I've noticed significant enhancements and overall hr be when cooling my core temperature down with a cold shower as well before Before bed and then I use the chilly pad system at night when I sleep hands down the most robust research for increasing overall. Hr V. Aside from HIV biofeedback for stress reduction is physical exercise now given the audience. I knew I do not need to go into the benefits of exercise but many research studies have looked at how exercise can enhance each. Hr V. Both from a cardiac standpoint and from an automatic balanced point. If you haven't already gathered we have to remember that. There is a dose response curve with exercise as been always says. We're looking for the minimum effective dose of exercise and this is true for exercise affects. Hr V. We indeed know that if we continually and constant or consistently overtrained. This is going to lead to increased chance for injury and has a highly predictable. Correlation with low. Hr V. We can use both a low HIV to demonstrate overall recovery or lack thereof. But we also know that continued. Overtraining will result in the continued lowering of HR V. For instance one study looking at the effects of moderate exercise versus heavy endurance exercise on nocturnal. Hr V. that's the resting HR V. researchers found that heavy endurance athletes such as marathon. Runners had significant low-frequency power during heavy training. And after a marathon in this study we actually see decreased. Hr V. During the nocturnal our hours after both moderate exercise and marathon completion but we see a statistically significant reductions in HR V. for those who are engaging in heavy endurance exercise when compared to those engaging in moderate exercise. This isn't surprising that we would see a reduction in HR V. for those engaging in moderate exercise but it does go to show that there is significant hr V. reduction after heavy or intense exercising when strategy that I utilize personally is the use of hit training or high intensity interval training and tobacco sets because these are types of workouts That are more effective in stimulating. Our bodies Need to adapt. They can also increase. Hr V. in the long run now as a general rule of thumb if my HIV is significantly lower on the day. I will never utilize this type of training. Almost always avoid doing so in an effort to avoid overtaxing my nervous system. When they examined the the usage of high intensity interval training this is researchers versus moderate intensity continuous training on hr be the individuals should say on individuals who are considered physically inactive. They found that hit training was significantly superior to moderate intensity. Continuous training in improving. Hr V. One study. That really stood out to me. I was examining the effects of physical exercise on HR V. in patients with cancer diagnoses. They found that these individuals with cancer diagnoses that engaged in exercise actually enhanced their overall. Hr Cardio Cardiac Autonomic Regulation and it was concluded that because of the Association of Higher Hr V. Parameters and prolonged survival in cancer patients exercise to increase HIV and these individuals can be highly effective treatment strategy. So it's my guess that we're going to see more studies on the Casino exercise on HR V. As time goes by another tactic that I utilize on a daily basis for increasing hr V. is compassion and Meditative Practices. So numerous studies have indicated that engaging in a meditation practice can increase hr by reducing the fighter flight response an increasing our safety response. I have found this to be highly useful as a highly useful strategy for myself and for my patients and have seen demonstrable effects increasing. Hr V. With this type of practice one study examined the use of gratitude journaling on HR V. and other inflammatory biomarkers and individuals with heart failure. They found that these individuals participants participated in gratitude interventions had reduced inflammation inflammatory biomarkers and increased para sympathetic. Hr V. Responses when they were engaging in the gratitude task while the results do not indicate a significant difference in HR V. after journaling there were notable benefits during the time of journaling and inflammation biomarkers. Were significantly changed and maintained after intervention. Which is really cool. This is why I believe that. It's important for us to engage in. Mindfulness exercises and gratitude exercises each and every day as this can have valuable benefits to our sense of safety and wellbeing. The last thing that I will say this could be a podcast in and of itself is that there are plenty of dietary considerations. Now I could get into one died over a over the other whether it's carnivore versus and I'm never die on. Hr V. and there's really not a lot of great data to support one or the other specifically for HR v. However we do know that a whole foods anti inflammatory dietary pattern is going to reap significant benefit on hr v. when compared to the standard American Diet as we know there is a significant reduction in inflammatory markers and stress that can significantly enhance hr v. so the takeaway from this which you may already know is to find what dietary patterns work best for you and watch. Hr V. Scores as you manipulate what you're eating one thing to note about fasting as mini individuals. Ask about fasting dust. Hr V. Interestingly enough we have data to demonstrate that short-term faster time restricted eating can significantly enhance HIV in the long run however do not surprised if you see significant reductions in HR V. When you are engaging in an extended fast you have to remember a fast as a form of hormetic stress and therefore in the temporary can reduce. Hiv scores however as the body repairs and returns to Homeo- status we tend to see HR V. Increase in the end if we break. Hr V. optimization down in it's most simplistic form we are truly looking to tell our brain in our body that we are safe one of the most famous researchers on HR V. Modulation is Dr Steven Porteous. That I mentioned earlier. Who created the polly Vega theory in this theory? Dr porridges proposes competing roles for the annihilated fibers in the vegas nerve and the newly more evolved mylan aided nerves now he theorized that the evolution of the autonomic nervous system was central to the development of emotional experience and effective processes involved in our social behavior as human beings. We are not limited to fight flight or freezing behavioral responses we can self regulate and initiate pro social behaviors which may be referred to as those tend to be friend behaviors when we do encounter stressors. This is what Dr Porges calls. The social engagement system and the theory suggests that the system depends on the healthy functioning of the mile. Unaided VEGAS NERVE which works like that. Vaghul break from this perspective we can only act activate the mile naked. Vegas when our nervous system perceives that we are safe. When we engage in social safety we perceive this as a mutual process one that involves eye contact close proximity and trust this Mylan. Aided VEGAS ENABLES US to self regulate calm ourselves and inhibits the sympathetic outflow. The heart the Vegas also allows us to engage the prefrontal cortex text and executive functions where we can be attentive in mindful when we encounter daily stressors. This one hit the MILE UNAIDED VEGAS and produce. What is called Vega withdrawal? This will then interfere with attentiveness and our level of social engagement. According to this theory quality communication in pro social behaviors can only be effectively engaged when our defense circuits are inhibited? So how do we increase? Hiv and the most consistent and effective manner we must have a perceived sense of psychological and physiological safety. We are constantly evaluating our environment for threats as a way to maintain our safety both physically and psychologically when this occurs for days weeks years or decades. This this can result in an overarching scheme of continued concerns of our lack of safety or lack of trust and others and ultimately social disengagement or withdrawal. These isolated behaviors and distortions in our cognition have significant impact on our stress physiology heart rate variability and can directly play a role in our perceive sense of meaning and purpose in life. This brings it altogether when our nervous system perceived safety we activate the mylan aided vegas nerve system and this is a way to conserve and rebuild energy stores to socially bond with others and engage in executive functioning like self regulation and planning when our nervous system perceives danger. We activate the sympathetic nervous system. And inhibit the UNMITIGATED VEGAS resulting in the fight flight. Response or active avoidance if we proceed that our life is at threat and that the fight flight or active avoided Avoidance Response System. Will Not succeed them. We'll actually activate our UNMITIGATED VEGAS. Which will result in passive avoidance through behaviors like immobilization? Feigning Death Fainting or shutting down completely. This threat to our survival is what Dr Steven porges believes activates the UNMEDIATED VEGAS and results in subsequent disorders. Ptsd this again is why safety security and trust is needed to maximize health outcomes from a mind body and spiritual perspective. So there you go man. We have taken a deep dive into all things. Hr V. But we've only scratched the surface. My hope is that the information was useful resulted in you learning the INS and outs of why. Hr V. and the self regulation of HR V. is of vast importance for physical and mental health. If this metric of quantification has not been of importance to you in the past. I sure hope that you now see why why it should be and my guess like anything in the field of science. We're going to learn more and more about this metric and the usefulness of it as we expand the field of research. I hope that this podcast is highlighted. How important this metric of HIV is and why it should be important for us to consider finding a coach that can help you. Increase your pathetic efficiency quickly. As this is one of the strongest ways to mitigate stress to improve recovery and enhanced performance and longevity. Thank you been for providing me with your platform to share my passion on heart rate variability self-regulation like I mentioned earlier. You can also find all the show notes. I've been green fitness dot com slash. Hr podcasts and you can check me out at Dr J. Wiles Dot Com or at my practice which is thrive dash wellness dot com. Take care everybody in have an awesome day. Thanks for listening to today's show. You can grab all the show notes resources pretty much everything that I mentioned over at Ben. Greenfield fitness dot com along with plenty of other goodies from me including the highly helpful. Ben Recommends Page which is a list of pretty much everything that I've ever recommended for hormone sleep digestion fat loss performance and plenty more. Please also know that all the links all the promo codes that I mentioned during this an every episode helped to make this podcast happen and to generate income that tells me to keep bringing you this content every single week so when you listen in be sure to use the links in the show notes. Use the Promo Code lead generate because that helps to float this thing and keep it coming to you each and every week.

sympathetic nervous system Homeo- Stasis Ben HIV psychological stress Ben Greenfield Cortisol Epinephrine J. T. wiles hypertension Ben Greenfield Fitness diabetes Greenville North Carolina Paris Paris GLUCOCORTICOID
EPISODE 16 WEB RADIO TODAY

WEB RADIO TODAY

26:43 min | 5 months ago

EPISODE 16 WEB RADIO TODAY

"Hi everybody I'm skip Orem and I'm Interrupting Episode Sixteen of the Web Radio Today podcast for a special web radio today workout episode. That is right. Everybody. This is Web Radio Today Episode Sixteen and Today's episode is an end zone interval training workout using plan B that means that today you're going to be exercising in all four of your heart rate training zones your easy warm up heart zone you're healthy heart zone you're aerobic cartridge zone and you're all out. Heart. Rate. Training Zone. So right now start walking peddling. Rowing very slowly just getting ready to get warm dough. Right now we're we're just moving very slowly in heart rate zone one and easy warm up at fifty sixty percent of your maximum heart rate. Remember now your maximum it's computed by taking the number to twenty minus your age, and right now you should only be fifty to sixty percent of your maximum break. This workout today, it's GonNa be short, but it's going to be a very intense workout. That's what interval training is all about. You're gonNA complete and total twenty three animals and during some of the intervals today. You will be moving fast running hard rolling hard cycling hard. Going as hard as you can getting attleboro. The good news though you're going to be burning calories, you're going to be burning fat at a very intense level during this workout. And even more importantly you will be burning calories and fat at a higher rate later tonight will you're while you're maybe reading a book listening to music or watching TV? This plan B. Workout is designed specifically for Web Radio today listeners who have had some experience with Andrew Training. I don't want you to attempt this workout unless you're comfortable running cycling rowing spinning whatever other kind of aerobic exercises you do unless you're comfortable already exercising at a fairly intense level. This workout is is difficult and you may not be able to complete. The intervals or even finish the workout the first or second time that you try them. That's okay. Just just keep coming back to it, drawing it again and again. And each time you try it you're continue to build cardio. Strength. Burning fat and calories no matter how many intervals you're able to complete. Let's continue to warm up but now I want you to kick it up into your healthy heart zone that's zone to sixty to seventy per cent of your maximum heartbreak. End to your healthy heart rate zone, you should still be able to carry on a conversation, but perhaps with some minor difficulty. We are still warming up your healthy heart rate zone. And? One should a slow back down just a little bit. Now, bring your heart rate down about ten percent back into that comfortable warm up and recovery zone zone one, fifty to sixty percent of your maximum heart rate. As I mentioned earlier and this workout, you will be doing twenty three intervals. Nine of those intervals will be and your healthy heart rate zone just a little faster than we're moving right now. Seven intervals will be in the aerobic heart rate zone seventy to eighty percents of your maximum heart rate. And you'll also do seven intervals and your anaerobic zone if you can. That's ninety percent of your maximum heart rate going all out. Most of those anaerobic. Andrew Vols. Zone four will well the only last for about fifteen seconds but two of them will challenge you to to go all out thirty seconds. Those will be the most difficult intervals of a workout. Starting to. Move Your pace backup into your healthy heart rate on for another forty five seconds, and after that after forty five seconds, we're going to do your first aerobic android. That interval last for thirty seconds with your heart rate at seventy to eighty percent of its maximum. Savings. Remember in your aerobic zone, which is coming up next. Will be difficult to carry on a conversation although you could probably sing if you wanted to. Listen to your body's. You, know whether or not you're in your aerobic heart rate zone. This is not the fastest that you'll go today, but it's a fast zone. It's perfect for developing stamina, increasing your aerobic fitness level and burning calories a much more intense level. The start of that first aerobics zone zone three is coming up in ten seconds. Thanks. Slowdowns or your healthy heart rate zone to recover here for about thirty seconds, and then we will do your first anaerobic interval of the workout. Going all out for a very difficult fifteen seconds. Standby for the tone, which will start your first anaerobic interval, ninety percents of your maximum heart rate try to finish as fast as you can. You have sixty seconds to recover here in your healthy heart rate zone, and then we'll do forty five seconds and the aerobic zone followed by another fifteen second answerable in your anaerobic cartwright zone. Forty. Five seconds in zone three followed by fifteen seconds zone. Standby to move zone three the aerobic heart rates on seventy to eighty percent of your maximum heart rate number. In zone three, you're developing stamina you're increasing aerobic fitness and you're burning calories and fat. against. Say. We followed. John. The tone is coming up in ten seconds. Thanks. Her. Back at all the way down to your healthy heart rate zones zone one rest and recover here at sixty to seventy percent of your maximum heart rate. How y'all doing with the ANAEROBIC interval so far? Are you able to complete them go the entire fifteen seconds if you can't finish those anaerobic Andhra vols yet I don't want you to worry because well, you get better each time that you do the workout and by the way. If. These zone four intervals are easy for you. You can want him grow him, cycle them and they seen easy. Here's a newsflash you're not working hard enough. This is important. You should have nothing left when that sound ends the zone for intervals because you should be going all out at ninety percent of your maximum heart rate. Let's speed up to zone three, the aerobics zone for the next forty, five seconds. This upcoming aerobics zone will be followed by another fifteen seconds zone for going all out, pick up your pace zone three for the next forty, five seconds. Yet ready to go all out of fifteen second anaerobic zone interval began right now. It's always cheating. Slowdown all the way down to your healthy heart rate zone you have ninety seconds here to recover. Made a mess a made a mess to make you impress stab you suggest this suggest itself. But it's not gonNA be right it could be wrong and I couldn't get off I can't believe I can't believe. Let's go over the heart rate training zones one more time, and then from this point on in the workout I'm just going to refer to them as zone one, two, three or four zone to is your healthy heart rate zone back we are in that zone right now sixty to seventy percent of your maximum heartbreak. We're expanding some energy, but this zone is easy. You could probably stay in this zone all day if you wanted. Zone three, which will move to in a minute or so. Your aerobic heart rate zones seventy to eighty per cent of your maximum heart rate. You're moving pretty fast in zone three. It's a solid fast pace, but of course, it's just not going to trash you. Like zone four and zone four, it's your anaerobic training zone ninety percent of your maximum heart rate. It's like the final kick in a big race nothing left when you finish end zone four gives you maximum fat and Calorie Burn. Okay. So everybody clear I want you to begin to memorize what's your body feels like in each of these zones, listen to your body and that way you won't have to worry about counting or measuring heartbeats. Oh. I forgot zone one. And Zone, one year job just barely moving and will relax in zone one at the end of the workout. Another interval in zone three will be coming up in about thirty seconds that zone three interval will be followed by the longest zone for interval of the workout thirty seconds. Grind. This case. Talk. Slowdown, everybody all the way down to zone two. were. You able to complete all thirty seconds of that last interval in your anaerobic cartwright? Zone Congratulations if you did. But if not, it's no big deal, just keep trying because each time you attempt one of those anaerobic intervals, your heart will get stronger. By the way if it's difficult to recover here in zone two, you can slow down even more if you want to get ready for the. Series Of. Intervals. And more congratulations you've completed fourteen intervals so far only eight more to go. The next to short intervals are going to start in about thirty seconds beginning with zone three interval followed by zone four interval. Both intervals will last for fifteen seconds. It's time to move your pays off to zone three. Second. Back down to zone to to recover here for the next sixty seconds. I. Hope You're enjoying the music selected for the workout today. Newsweek. It's cool how it can motivate you to go fast music. It's one of the elements of the web radio today fitness model whose elements bay. Exercise Diet, attitude, positive imagery, knowledge, and music. On next week's episode episode seventeen comes out on Friday. August twenty. First. We're going to discuss in detail how music Can help you. Improve Your overall fitness and health. And how it can make exercising more effective and more enjoyable. Coming up right now probably, the most difficult minute of today's workout thirty seconds in zone three. Followed by thirty seconds in zone four. Ready set. Go. Two. Sixty seconds to recover here in sewn to, and then we will do the last two. Intervals of the workout thirty. Seconds in zone. Three. Followed by fifteen seconds of very hard all out effort in your last zone for anaerobic interval of the. Workout. Are you ready everybody. Here we go. Ray Job everybody bring it down to zone to your healthy heart rate zone sixteen the seventy percent of your maximum heart rate and congratulations you have completed all of the speed intervals of the web radio today and the zone workout plan B. You should be really proud of yourself today the workouts not over yet though you need to cool your body down before we can stop. So keep cooling down and I'll be back in a minute or so to talk about how you did today. Let's talk about how you did. Were you able to complete all of the zone three and zone four intervals? If you did. That's just great. If, not if you had trouble with any of the zone three and especially the zone for intervals don't worry. As I said earlier in the workout, you will get better each time you do this workout, just come back and do it off. Low down even more now, bring your activity level down to zone warn. Very. Little effort regular breathing. You're in the final sixty seconds of your cool down period. And I want you to feel really good about yourself doing this workout today and you know what? You've set yourself up for success during the rest of the day. You'll be surprised how much extra energy that you're going to have today. You've burned off significant calories. You burn a lot of fat and you've strengthens your heart and you will continue to burn calories and fat at an increased rate during the rest of the day. If you enjoyed this workout today, he felt that it was beneficial for you. Please, tell your friends about web radio today and this workout. It's available free wherever you get podcast. This is episode sixteen, the Web Radio Today in the zone workout plan B. Also available free of Web Radio. Today, DOT com. Just click on the show notes and podcast link. Next week web radio today episode seventeen how music can help you stay healthy and fight disease. and. And for the web radio today, podcast EIMSKIP or by everybody.

Orem Rowing Andrew Training Andrew Vols John Ray Job thirty seconds fifteen seconds forty five seconds seventy percent sixty seconds eighty percent fifteen second ninety percent sixty percent five seconds ten seconds
133| Insights: My Meditation Practice Is Stressing Me Out!

Remove the Guesswork: Health, Fitness and Wellbeing for Busy Professionals

10:05 min | 1 year ago

133| Insights: My Meditation Practice Is Stressing Me Out!

"I'm Leon Spencer, founder of body, shop formats, limited bestselling, author, Ted speaker, and your host. This is remove the guesswork podcast, the show interview. Influential people in the health fitness and wellbeing space to bring you the latest ideas on how to optimize your mind, body and Welby share is brought by my company, forty show performance. We create total solutions to optimize your health by focusing on sleep mental health, energy, forty composition, gestion, fitness, we weren't with busy professionals on a one-to-one basis for six or twelve months using the latest science and technology. And what is your also work with businesses want to create a culture of energy, quite Taliban, performance position wellbeing this competitive advantage? Find out more at BodyShop forest dot com and enjoy the show. Hello, welcome to the insights episodes, remove the guesswork podcast. I'm Leon spenc- your host this week talking about some of the data I've got from the era ring. Now, many of you will know that I wear the ring that a finished technology. This is a ring as the name suggests that can be worn on any finger of either hand. It looks like a fairly thick wedding band, basically can get it in silver in rose gold in gold silver one, but it's a fantastic bit of kit. Very briefly, what it does. Is it tracks some of your key biomarkers so resting heart rate, which is the number of times your heart beats per minute. When you're at rest and the lower the number generally the healthier, you are it trucks body temperature so you can actually see your menstrual cycles. Come and go through body temperature changes. But you can also see if you're getting ill. I had a huge block of elevated body temperature last year, which was massively hot summer, we had because it's quite useful tool in terms of tracking body temperature. And if. I'm feeling slightly off color slightly peaky check during. And sure enough, almost always my body temperature would have been steadily increasing of the past couple of days. But the other metric causes heart rate variability who HIV is all refer to it from now on an HIV is a really good indicator of how rested and recovered your nervous system is. So those are the three main markers that it tracks. But it's also tracking your sleep to an extremely high level of detail, and it's tracking your activity or inactivity, and it costs correlates those two data points to give you a readiness or recovery score. And that's the real selling point, I think of the ring it transfers stated to the app every morning and throughout the day, and you can see your readiness score. So I think mine was eighty two percents morning. Anything eighty and above I'm happy with, and that's because my job is pretty good. My resting heart rate is pretty low. My body temperature didn't fluctuate massively from the last twenty four hours. So it saying based on that my nervous system is fairly. Well, we're covered. And I'm pretty good to go. Today, and I use it as a way of pacing myself throughout the day, they've just released a feature could moment. And this is a meditational breathing feature. So you activate the moment and it will, it'll track your heart rate variability in your resting heart rate worst, you're having that moment. So the moment for me is a ten minute meditation session was using the app com dot com, but I've now moved and soon as I activated, I do my ten minutes of breathing and my meditations the same session, so I will sit there for ten minutes. Breathing deeply inhaling deeply holding the breath for a second, exhaling, even more slowly than I inhaled and I just keep doing that. And trying to quiet and enclose off my mind for ten minutes. Varying degrees of success. Now, I've been doing this for about three years using the head space dot com or com dot com to really good meditation apps. And I thought I was doing pretty well meditation. I felt quite chilled afterwards was motivated enough to continue it pretty much if we days, one of. Non-negotiables but using the moment is really interesting because for the first time I've been able to track live, what the effect of this meditation session is on my resting heart rate, and my heart rate variability. So here's how it should look, if you had a successful session, you should come out of it of asleep feeling chilled, or meditators, whatever it is trying to feel at the end of the session, but your heart rate, variability should increase and your resting heart rates should decrease. Because you're in a more of a rested, meditative state. What I'm finding over the last week that I've been using the moment up is that my HR V is actually, in generally increasing, but I'm sorry, decreasing, and my resting heart rate is generally been increasing, so the complete opposite of how I think it should be and how it should be really I'm getting into a meditative state. So that was a really interesting insight in and of itself. No, I'm actually becoming essentially more stressed in terms of my nervous system. A maneuver system's responding in by sending the numbers going the wrong way during a meditation session. So I wonder why that can be this is something I'm going to need to mellow but it's a curious yesterday. I spent nineteen minutes watching a YouTube video watching an actor how I like talk about a program. She's currently, featuring in. And I was on a Sunland sunlight in the garden watching that my era up actually registered that nineteen minutes is a restful period. And it does that by looking at the effect of your HIV and resting heart rate. It just doesn't publish that data unless you're doing in the moments app or mobile part of the app, but it still looked a restful period, which means it's notice changes in my physiology. Positive changes on HOV and positive changes in resting heart rate. So it got me thinking, because I have a lot of conversations with people about meditation as to whether or not I should change the form of meditation that I do. I don't know. I'm necessarily going. I think my media response to that is, I'm just going through the motions in those ten minutes and I might feel a bit better for it. So it's still worth doing. But if I'm really meaningfully trying to also the dial on my nervous system. I need to start. We thinking I'm doing this because it's not having the impact that I'm expecting, but could also be that other kind of activities can be just as good. If not better for some people than a conventional sitting down breathing. I shot meditation session because for me I got more rest and more nervous system benefits. What you're nineteen minute YouTube video, then I did for my actual ten minute meditation session. Now, there's also reasons why I wouldn't say that was the best advocating that as a better thing for you to do, because you're looking at technology or been exposed to blue light your is looking at something in the very near-term. You haven't got any of these? There's lots of reasons why is not necessarily great thing to do. But it does open up the idea that meditation can be lots of different things to people, I had somebody, I work with who found that. Painting was very meditative. She also found that knitting was very meditative. I find walking being in nature and being with my animals and loved ones. Very meditative. So it does come in lots of different ways. So for anyone who's feeling guilty around meditation. I have heard this quite a lot. I feel bad that it's not working for me. Should I be meditating? I'm not meditating. I feel like auto everyone's enjoying it if on Saint semi things about it, it isn't necessarily for everyone, but certainly it can be different things. So find something that you really love. And how do you feel at the end of that? And it might just be sitting still and not even trying to meditate. It may be being in the garden listening to birth saw, whatever it is find something that is meditative for you. And you might find you just get more benefit from it. The sitting there, trying to force yourself to do a conventional meditation session, whether you're using an or not, and that's the main message in this podcast rarely find something meditative for you. Don't have any guilt around this. If you can't make it work in, you know, using an app in the convention. Channel ways. Maybe there's just not for you. For now, I'm gonna try and change over system response to conventional meditation, because I believe it can work for me. I'm just not allowing my mind to slow down or calm down effect on the country. I may be using it's an opportunity to close. My eyes and think things through so to catch myself doing that. And I'm going to report back to you on that as to whether or not been able to get my HIV data up resting heart rate down, when I meditating instead of fluctuating generally going in the opposite direction. So if you're going to need thoughts on any of this, let me know we really interested to hear from you. You can Email me at leeann BodyShop performance dot com. Alternatively if your picking this up through social media droppers comment, we've posted this on Instagram on Facebook and share your ideas as well. What's meta to defeat you, what do you do that gets your nervous system? Relaxed helps you to recover from the rigors of daily life. That's it from me. If you're interested in looking at the erring we will publish a link in the show notes. The era ring, we have a discount code as well. Which will also post in the show notes. But I think body shot but what posts are shown? It's a check that up. You're interested in European fantastic. Bitter kits arm huge fan of have been buried for about three years, and that's is just getting better, and better does it for me? I'll talk to you next week. And of course, thanks for listening. Interested in finding out what your health, like curious, jump on our website, WWW dot body shorts performance dot com and click on take the test. It'll take you to a short two to three minutes test. And at the end of that you'll get a school card and a free thirty nine patriot pool based on signals sleep mental health, energy, body, composition, digestion and fitness. And if even joy this episode please think of someone you could really benefit from the content and hit that share button and send it across to them. And of course, don't forget subscribe and leave us a rating and review. Thank you very much for listening.

HIV YouTube Leon Spencer Leon spenc Welby Sunland founder Ted speaker Facebook leeann BodyShop ten minutes nineteen minutes three years ten minute twenty four hours nineteen minute
How Beauty Sleep Boosts Beauty, Plants Talk to Worms for Self-Defense, and Fighting Deepfakes with Heart Rate

Curiosity Daily

09:56 min | 11 months ago

How Beauty Sleep Boosts Beauty, Plants Talk to Worms for Self-Defense, and Fighting Deepfakes with Heart Rate

"Hi you're about to get smarter just a few minutes with curiosity daily from curiosity dot com. I'm cody golf and I'm actually Hamer today. You learn about why beauty sleep has real benefits for your skin. How plants learned the chemical language of pests to used for self defense and New Algorithm? That's fighting deep fakes. By looking at heart rate would satisfy some curiosity. Scientists just discovered why beauty sleep is a thing new research suggests that while you sleep your body refreshes its supply of Collagen so like beauty. Sleep IS REAL BEAUTY SLEEP ISRAEL. Tell the world so this contradicts the scientific consensus around Collagen. And I'll explain what that is in a second for a long time. Scientists believe that our supplies of the protein were fixed. We developed all the Collagen. We'd ever have by age seventeen and then it slowly deteriorated as we aged this sense on the surface our skin does get less supple as we get older however. Collagen isn't just the key to youthful skin. It actually makes up about a third of the average human's body weight and it plays a million different roles in our bodies. This protein cushions our joints and give structure to our bones including our teeth. It's also woven into our attendance. And our tendons can bounce back after hard workouts that swift recovery doesn't fit with the whole theory of Collagen being fixed resource so to get to the bottom of this conundrum. Researchers studied mice since their Collagen works in a similar way to ours. They used mass spectrometers and electron microscopes to check in on the animals. Collagen supplies six times a day and they found something interesting. There are not one but two types of Collagen. The original consensus was right in a way. Some of our Collagen cannot regenerate this collagen forms thicker fibers or rope like strands in our bodies and it slowly breaks down over the course of our lives. However it's interwoven with thinner temporary fibers which researchers call our sacrificial pool of Collagen. These breakdown during the day and regenerate at night you know when we sleep in other words beauty sleep is no joke. Get enough sleep and you'll help keep your body strong and youthful from your skin to your tendons teeth. Get ready for this next sentence. Plants talk to worms as a form of self defense. I know that was extraordinary. Facility unpack a little bit. Plants have been involving new ways to ward off harmful pests pathogens for a very very long time and now it turns out that some have learned to speak the chemical language of one such past which they're using send a pretty straightforward message. Go Away so nematodes are tiny worm LAKE INSECTS? That live pretty much everywhere. A handful of soil contains thousands of these microscopic creatures and they're constantly trying to infect the roots of plants in fact they cause more than one hundred billion dollars in agricultural damage every year but according to new research plants have evolved a powerful tool for keeping nematodes away the parasites communicate with each other by releasing incensing a group of chemicals called scare asides. Biologists have known for a few years. That PLANTS EAVESDROP ON NEMATODES and bolster. Their anti parasite defenses when they detect a scare sites in the soil. Now there is experimental evidence that the plants have also figured out how to talk back. The researchers took a few plant species and treated the soil within scarce I'd that nematodes commonly secrete later. They went back to see what the plant had done with the chemical and what they found was stunning. The plants had taken the original nematode compound from the soil and used their own chemical factories to convert it into three other compounds. Most of it had been turned into a particular scare side that repels nematodes. How well the researchers think the NEMATODE repelling compound is a signal that nematodes usually used to call dibs on a tasty route and prevent overcrowding when the plant releases this compound into the soil hungry nematodes interpreted as a message from other nematodes saying. Pay Nothing to see here. Keep on moving. Frank Schroeder a professor of chemistry and chemical biology at Cornell. He led the research and explained the findings this way quote. The plant learns a Foreign Language then broadcasts something in that language to spread propaganda that this is a bad place and quote even cooler. The discovery might help. Scientists develop new insights to help farmers protect their crops against the tiny parasites plants. They are much smarter than you think. Today's episode is sponsored by Purple Mattress. Here's a question. How did you sleep last night? Yeah did you get enough beauty sleep. Perhaps or did you toss it turn all night because if you didn't get enough beauty sleep to keep your skin a super beautiful unhealthy. Then you've got to try purple mattress. The purple mattress will probably feel different than anything you've ever experienced because it uses this brand new material that was developed by an actual rocket scientists. It's not like the memory foam. You're probably used to the purple material. Feels unique. Because it's both ferment. Soft at the same time so it keeps everything supported while still feeling really comfortable. Plus it's beautiful so it sleeps cool. You get one hundred nights risk-free trial and if you're not fully satisfied you can return your mattress for a full refund. It's backed by a ten year warranty and you also get free shipping and returns. You're going to love purple and right now. Our listeners will get a free purple pillow with the purchase of a mattress. That's in addition to the great free gifts. They're offering site-wide just text curious to eighty four eight. The only way to get this free pillow text curious to eighty four eight. That's Cu R. I o U S. Two eight four eight message and data rates may apply. It's now possible to create phony videos that look extremely realistic experts. Call these deep fakes and they threatened to make it even harder to tell the difference between what's real and what isn't online. Luckily to Italian researchers have found a clever way spot. The difference look for the heartbeat. The researchers were trying to solve straightforward problem. How can you tell the difference between a real video of someone talking and a photo realistic computer animation of someone talking? It sounds like a simple task but it isn't because deep fakes are good and they're only getting better. The best are indistinguishable from real footage and fraudsters are already using the technology to cause all kinds of mischief deep. Fakes are designed to trick. Human is so the researchers decided to capitalize on an aspect of the videos that humans can't see when your heart beats it pushes blood through your blood vessels in waves as the blood moves through your body. It reveals your pulse via small variations of the color of your skin. We'RE TALKING SUPER SUBTLE CHANGES. That are almost always invisible to the human eye but they aren't invisible to computers. The researchers algorithm can tell whether a video shows a real person by looking for evidence of their heartbeat. It identifies areas on the face. That should be changing color and analyzes the new miracle color values of individual pixels to determine the heart rate then it runs that data through statistical analysis to determine whether the video is real the researchers tested their creation by showing the algorithm one hundred and four video clips. They found on Youtube fifty. Two were real clips mostly excerpts from interviews and fifty two were clips from Computer Games with realistic graphics and presentations of Advanced Digital renderings. They did choose. Clips played to the algorithm strengths. But the results were impressive nonetheless. The Algorithm correctly identified the clip more than ninety six percent of the time. So watch out deep fakes. Engineers are fighting fire with fire. Well that was a whirlwind of an episode. Let's do a quick recap of what we learned today. So first off beauty sleep is a real thing. Your skin will be better if you get enough sleep. Who Knew I feel like my mother always told me this and have never it and now I can see that it's real you know you don't have to question it? Yeah you know I just feel like I look more like a Zombie when they haven't slept and this must be. Why no offense zombies Zombie. Who's listening Zombie listeners? Out there to all of our Zombie listeners. I WANNA say Ooh you know you know. What did you learn about plants? Well I learned that plants can actually send out like fake news to wrap. Yeah to nematodes to tell them. Hey I'm all full up nematodes. Keep on moving. No roots to eat here. If you're a journalist and a tree comes in for a job interview remember probably don't hire that Sri also for the plant story special shadow too at Miller lab and it's J. Multiple on twitter. I tweeted at them to ask how to pronounce a scare side. Nice literally one of the hardest birds of producing. This podcast is figuring out exactly how to pronounce a lot of these words. There is not a single source to just go to yeah frustrating. Yeah so there's that and algorithms can create deep fakes but other algorithms can measure the heart rate of the people in the deep fakes to see if they're really deep. Fix deep fake exception to the stories were written by. May Race and grants current and edited by Ashley Humor. Who's the managing editor for curiosity daily? Today's episode was produced and edited by. Cody Gov journos against tomorrow to learn something new in just a few minutes and until then stay curious.

Purple Mattress ISRAEL Hamer Frank Schroeder Cody Gov Cornell Youtube twitter Ashley Humor managing editor Miller lab professor of chemistry one hundred billion dollars ninety six percent ten year
Heart Rate Training with Giff Walters

Seek Outside Podcast

45:29 min | 7 months ago

Heart Rate Training with Giff Walters

"Hello everyone and welcome back to another episode of the outside podcast. My name is Dennis today. We will be recording in the park across from my house. This'll be our first in-person podcast with actual podcast equipment, so you might notice a slight bump in audio quality today we are joined by gift walters a running coach, and a friend of mine, who I worked with a few years ago to get in shape for September cut. It was the fittest. I've ever felt and I continue to incorporate his coaching in my preparation for each fall, I wanted to get gift on the podcast to talk about training in more specifically heart rate training. You can find more. About Gif at COACHING DOT COM. That's our N., N. A. N., coaching, dot, com, or you can track them down on instagram. At GIF. Walters, that's G. I. F.. W. A. L. T. e.. R. S. on Instagram I. Hope You enjoyed our conversation today. Walters were non running or coach, our non running. Hey, it's going really good. Thanks for having me on the PODCAST Dennis. To recently you were down climbing mountains. can you tell tell me a little bit about so it's is called. The needles traverse is. Officially what it's called Yeah I don't really it hasn't been done yet so i. don't have a name for. The idea that I dreamed up along with rob. His a climber and a person I teach with. Is Down in the women each wilderness in the San Juans there's a bunch of thirteen years, and they ran out of good mountain name, so they just named peak one two three all the way through peak eighteen. So. There's eighteen of them. And most of them you can't access on trails off trail travel above twelve thousand feet. Some of them are technical Dad just looks like. Not necessarily natural line, but they're nicely grouped and clustered. Some of them are on the same ridge line so needles. Eighteen project might be my working title. Okay, okay, in in. Your trying to climb all kind of in one shot. Yeah, so it'd be unsupported. There's no good way to get resupplied. She got to carry everything in. Carry it out. And in when people think you know you hear it all the time we're going to a wilderness area in its twenty miles, one way, or it's you know or fifteen miles deep It's not super doable on a lot of places, but but this part of the women's March is doable. Right like it's. It's ten fifty mile. Just approach, maybe even maybe even a longer approach in. It's also fairly famous of an area that you can get on a train. At. Certain Times of the year in the training will drop you off. In, the middle of it or Kinda halfway through or whatnot, so you can access some of the fourteen years pretty pretty common for people to use it. Use the train as an access to this wilderness area. It's like true wilderness. It's deep yet for sure the minute you drop like over one of the ridges beyond the Chicago based on where the fourteen is are. You're not gonNA see people. Yeah, yeah, it's it's deep. It's out there. Cool spot in the world for sure. In a little bit of a Hiccup this time I know rob and not thrown under the bus. Rob had a little bit altitude sickness going on I gotta a couple of pictures of them. Hold up in a SILEX Hanging out. Trying to rest it up and and not So I? Wanted to get into a little bit about kind of training or prepping for something like that you know in in Kinda how would pertain to man if you wanted to hunt that part of the world right where the approaches you know, maybe fifteen twenty miles in right for for some people You know what kind of training would would look like you know for somebody trying to do that. Yeah for sure I think that's a great question. So I. Think when you're looking to train for anything. Specificity and being specific as possible ideal, so if you have the luxury of just going out on super long hikes and hunting all year long and outgoing shed hunting in the offseason. Spending time out there doing exactly what you're GONNA do. That would be the best thing for most people. That's not a reality. You can't meet other commitments in life and spend all day just playing in the woods. Sure Yeah Yeah, because because it is different September I'M GONNA spend. All Day in the woods a borough in a backpack around doing that I! Don't really do that outside of September right like. It's hard to figure that stuff out so. I mean that makes sense to me I can't. If I could hike fifteen miles a day. Man. That'd be Great Dad. And so I. Think the next best thing. Is Running. Or some other sort of cardiovascular training where you're getting. Similar effort to what you're. GonNa, be doing. And as similar as possible better. And then also maintaining strength so making you're strong enough to carry whatever pack you're gonNA. Have wire out there. But even running itself is a load bearing activity, so it's going to maintain and build a lot of that. I think the trick for a lot of people. Is. They see running as this really hard brutal thing like you just got a got through it. And it's because most people are running too hard most or all of the time, okay? Yeah and so are you biased a little bit because you're a running coach? is like towards the running. Could you you kind of touched on a little bit? You still have the same impact for similar impact forces I guess when you're running. Versus if I trained all year on a bike in then wouldn't carry a backpack for fifteen miles. They don't. They don't Mesh well or as well as maybe running would yeah for sure. I think running's the Best Bang for your buck in that. Gets a bad rap for destroying knees, but really. Done well at the right effort, and with good form it should make your knees stronger to really reinforce those joints and help with stability. BIKING's great. It just takes more time. Hiking's good. It takes even more time and then the minute you get on a machine in the gym. You're just losing all those little stabiliser muscles and reacting to the landscape. so yeah, ellipticals are good. But, they just work you in one very specific motion pattern got got it. Touch on a to a little bit People are running to. Right and what does that mean to you as a coach? You know as a running coach. Yeah. You can put a lot of numbers and stats. Part rate power all kinds of stuff. physiologically very. There is some benefit of running hard. But it takes so much to recover. That most people are grinding themselves down rather building themselves up. So you lift something heavy, or you go for a run. Your body takes some time to recover, and then it comes back stronger and more prepared. You're limited. If you're running too hard, you're limited to how much you can run and how frequently? And a lot of people are running too much or too frequently. Too Hard. And so you might see games for a couple of weeks on feeling good. I'm feeling better. I'm getting faster. And you hit a plateau and you just start feeling Kinda like crap, and it's hard to get out the door. Okay? And what you know like in full disclosure for everybody to like I have worked with Gif in the past, and we would talk about the black hole right when I was training we talk about the black hole, and you don't ever want to be in the black hole and and I remember going out those first couple have probably not the first couple probably a month, plus or so we would get in internal running's a little bit different because you have hills and rocks and obstacles and stuff bit how we get out on the trails in. We had certain heart rate zones that I was looking for. Monitoring those with heart rate strap on a in a watch but man. If my heart rate anywhere close to a certain level I would have to start walking. Imagine I was walking all I was walking way more than I was running for sure when I first started. In in trying to stay out of that black hole where? I think in previously if if I had gone for a running and I, still do it now. We're all go for a run. If I'm not paying attention, I'll get into that black hole. Right and I'll stay there and I'll run, and it'll be like if you I'm trying real hard today like this is great But the kind of bring it back full circle like. Walking in really paying attention to that heart rate those zones. One after a month month and a half or so I got. Way Faster I was running more things at a lower heart rate in all of those sets I. Think! That's very important for people to understand like that black hole kind of where that is in their life. You know or whether they're running or they're training I. Guess Data for sure and like to put a name on it. It's that. Aerobic versus ANAEROBIC and there's very complex different energy systems. Your body's actually recruiting to do that. And, you can manage to keep it easy and aerobic. You'RE GONNA use fat as fuel source. And you can just run more duration more volume like more miles and continue to feel better and improve over time. Again for people listening to try to put a number on. That may mean like nine minute miles. Or ten minute miles for. You know For a few weeks or months or or whatnot, and just really paying attention to that, when when maybe you're used to run seven minute miles right like you're backing off a lot to get out to get back into that kind of aerobic zone In again walking I, spent a lot of time. Walking was supposed to be going for runs. Yeah, especially, if you're trail running like you're going to walk the hills. And it's like if you want some now like you can hop on a treadmill and set it to fifteen percent grade. And then play around. Look at like your heart rate. and run it at like a certain speed and then walk it at a certain speed. And you'll find this point where it definitely becomes more efficient and easier on your body to just walk it. Even at the same speed. Is there a way for people to check that without a heart rate monitor? You know without I. Mean you know besides trying to put their hands on their wrists? In count, those numbers out in their head has has the running. Yeah, for sure, that's a great question. So the Golden Standard is just the talk test, and if you're out on a run, or if you're hiking with a heavy pack, like Arun my working too hard. If you can comfortably carry on a conversation. Like maybe not as comfortable as we're talking right now. Sure, but we still chat then you're good. If you're like no I, couldn't. I would need to slow down or catch my breath. Then you're beyond that. You're out of that aerobic zone. Okay and I know one of the one of the examples that you had given me in I've definitely done on the trail. Anybody's seen me. You know this is. This is what I'm doing. is you can say the pledge of allegiance right? You can say especially running alone right? It's hard to have a conversation unless you really enjoy talking to yourself but you can say the pledge of allegiance out loud if you struggle if you're struggling or. Thinking to yourself like Oh like having to take big breaths in between words and stuff. You're probably trying too hard, right? You're probably go into harder Yeah, you're you're just trying to go too fast or too much maybe up that hill or or or whatnot, and that's not to say that you don't WanNa do that sometimes. For sure so if I'm working with running client and we're looking to really maximize in Pique their performance in running. will spend eighty percent of our time roughly. In that super easy zone. Comfortable, you can talk your high. You're hiking up the hills and then twenty percent will be very specific. I want you to work this hard for this long with this much rest. And you can look up. Any training. Plan will have whatever they call repeats. Intervals tempos. That sort of stuff. And there's definitely a place for that in terms of maximizing your performance. But most people hang out there like the sexy workouts. High Mile Repeats. But the magic is just inconsistent. Easy mileage Yeah, and sometimes you don't once you kind of get used to that or when you find those zones read that easy. Those aerobic more aerobic diseases zones You, sometimes she'll. You're not working. You know they you really don't feel like you're doing a whole lot. your heart rate's maybe not as elevated as You know enough to make you just run sweat off to your body. But given the time. It's very very beneficial very beneficial. I remember a couple years ago. you and I were a training pretty hard, and I went into September. man I could do I was going in and out of areas. You know six seven miles deep here in the mountains in the eminent was nothing you know I was so used to be in that zone. Trekking Poles were another big benefit in their coming from Canada running into the speed, walking I guess but I could cover ground like nobody's business. You know it was. I could see it Tran. Go into hunting into that hunting kind of entire September. Was, I was on a whole `nother level, and I could just feel it everyday refreshed. And was going going further deeper. It didn't matter like over that hill shirt by now. Let's go check it out. You know I wasn't running over the hill, but you know I could get there, so yeah, it's. Super Important for people If you're planning, you know coming out west. If you want to mountains that kind of thing where you do have to go, you know. Maybe six miles deep Maybe ten miles deep to really. Think about that aerobic training that you're doing that. You don't necessarily have to push it that hard all the time for definitely yeah, and I think. For coming out West especially. If you're coming from somewhere, that isn't at altitude. One of the best ways to guard against feeling the effects of altitude in the mountains here. is to have a really good aerobic base of training. Maximizing how your body processes and uses the oxygen that it has available can really help and offset the chances of having really bad mountain sickness. When you, I would imagine. Maybe this isn't true, but you might have clients read that. Don't live at altitude, but maybe WANNA. Do A race right? They WANNA do to leadville one hundred in the LEADVILLE. One hundred folks in in you know more than I do is in Leadville Colorado It's super high like twelve thousand thirteen thousand feet. Yes, you go over hope. Pass over twelve thousand, but the course never drops below ten thousand. Never okay, so you're just Alpi the entire time. Yeah, and people can start experiencing Cana that acute martin. Or acute altitude acute mountain sickness. At about eight thousand feet, so if you're running above ten thousand feet like there's a good chance Do you have any acclamation strategies for for people like that? Yeah, there's two schools of thought actually have a friend that works in the. Physiology lab over at western state and. There's still a lot of science going into it. It can affect. People vary individually in weird ways, but there's two schools at that. Either you fully commit to letting your body adjust. And ideally of three extra week, and you just come up and you hang out and you do a Lotta easy hiking an easy running and just let your body build the extra red blood cells so that it can process it. or You just straight up. Trick your body. You come up and you have like three days. Your body really knows what's happening to it. And like you just go straight into the things you've got hunt. You fly in that morning and you start hiking that afternoon or evening. You're out there. It might not feel great. But there's kind of this inbetween phase after like a week or two where you're just feeling like crap and your performance really does take a dip before you adjust really start thriving up there So I'd ideally. If you were coming out for? Ten days right at ten to eight hunt ideal you would try to. Try to get your early. If you could write. Most people can't do that, so you Kinda. You almost have to trick your body into thinking. Everything's Fine Yeah In by doing that, you mean like deep. As quickly as possible I'm not as going deep dislike doing the thing. You'RE GONNA do like it to say like if you're GONNA. Climb a fourteen year coming from sea level. If. You come up and dislike dilly dally in Denver for a while where you're at decent altitude and then go up. It's not gonna be any better than just going straight up. To it, Got It It's interesting because it does affect. People just kind of randomly right. You can be in good shape. Instill get at eight thousand feet and feel terrible. Yeah, And I think hydration may be factors in there may be a little bit is will. Dafur I. Just anything you can do to take care of your body to not stress it. Does that altitude stressors? Blair. The better you're going to be so sleep well. Try to get sleep. Yeah? Is there anything to that to sleeping high Because, we're in Colorado. You can pretty much drive i. mean if you want to drive up to the top of pikes peak. You could totally do that right you get drive the fourteen thousand feet. In maybe sleeping your car or something like. Is there benefit to that to the sleeping at altitude you know? I guess not having to work right to get to fourteen thousand feet, but you like drive up there like take a nap. Or something yeah, no, there's definitely. There's like three main modes. If you're looking at and their artificial altitude, ten companies that people can spend a lot of money on and do this if you live at sea level. The main benefit from altitude is spending a lot of time there, so sleep is like this easy time where you can just bank a lot of altitude hours. You can train high Ansley, Pie But your training's going to be affected a bit because it's harder, you're not gonna be able to go as hard. You're gonNA feel like crap for a little bit. Then there's the idea where you just train high and sleep blows. You sleep really really well. You're still stressing your body with altitude, which is what like most lawyers Colorado are doing sleeping low then maybe they're training up high during the day or the weekends. And, then there's the flip of that where you sleep high and train low, which realistically for most people only works. If live on a plateau, and like go down to train. People in Flagstaff that live at seven thousand and go down to the desert train at like two or three or a lot of like pro runners in Mill Valley. California They'll set up a hypoxia altitude tent working at during the day. And then they'll leave their little altitude chamber and go run superfast at sea level, and then they'll sleep in their altitude chamber, so it's like they're living high. And the jury's out on like which one's the best so all of them are going to help. You adapt at some point. And just thinking about. At least in running lands right before an event. Should I be running really fast and fresh. Or is it still worth it to go out to? Interesting to where you're saying, is I. Need to get one of those crazy plastic chamber said we get the hang out in all day, or you could just get really fit by doing easy aerobic work Dot spent like ten grand. Yeah Yeah Yeah If. In there they make the tents to read that you can sleep in I wonder if anybody if there's anybody out there, that's tried that for hunting. I would be very interested in you. Know for for people coming from low elevation in trying to hunt at Heil avation. Maybe even she punts. Going to spend some time especially here in Colorado up there above twelve thousand thirteen thousand feet for significant amounts of time You know if that would be worse. It right Obviously, we're not buying a ten thousand dollars ten to hang out in but but it would be interesting. Yeah, yeah, if you could spend three four weeks in that ahead of time. Feel pretty good going in. Primarily high altitude mountaineers that are using it. But with really good success. Interesting. Let's can commit dive into maybe a little bit for folks, so they can in. We can use use me as an example or yourself as an example of something in talk. Maybe like specific numbers. You know for people. You know there's this kind of saying out there, right? My heart rate is or Max. Reiter would not. To twenty minus my age right for me. I just had a birthday, so I wanNA feel old or anything but that'd be like. Somewhere around. One, eighty, six or something somewhere around those lines. Does that. Does that make sense in the world where you're actually tracking your heart rate? That's a great question so. Unfortunately, humans are way more complex and unique so. That equation is a rough approximate. But in my experience working with people. It can be off by as much as twenty to forty beats per minute. So, depending on your body size and your heart size, and just all of your geology, it can be all over the place. There's like a thousand different. Equations out there every. Exercise researchers come up with. I think one of the easiest ways to do it. Is, to. Try and tie where that talk test points for you to a heart rate number. And just getting that one point like. Where does it go from being aerobic? To anaerobic. In just knowing where that number is got it to. Like if I didn't have a heart rate monitor, but I had access to a gym. They have like the little groupies right on on the treadmill or something. would that help with that? Give me an idea. Yeah, so? There's a ton of ways to measure it to like the grips. Everybody like fitbit's and garments and. Wear ables. The issue at least with the watch ones. It's very fit dependent on how it actually mold to your wrist so. Take those with a grain of salt, okay, and those are going to be like the the watches sensors in. The Autumn Oh heart rate. Little obstacles so chess, drop or an arm strap are usually much more reliable. But it's really like you're looking for this. BALLPARK number. Temperature hydration sleep. Everything can like. Tweak your heart rate a little bit. So you don't WanNa. Just. Have this hard that I have to be at one forty nine or else. But just going out. Hop on a treadmill start super-duper easy? Speed it up like a half mile an hour every two to three minutes. Do the talk test. Each time can carry on a conversation. Say the pledge of allegiance and just kind of find that point where. Who It's Kinda hard. Whom really struggling? I can't actually carry on the conversation. Where's your heart that? and. That's the number that you wanna be below most of the time eighty two, maybe one hundred percent of the time, okay? Okay so this is like the speed of the treadmill or like the Geezer Away De. Like give you. Can you walk destined instead a run it like? Can I put it? Put it at an incline and just walk up a hill until I get to those points other ways to kind of. Mix that up. Yes, yeah, so it could be. You can do it on a bike. You can do it running. Whatever training method you're GONNA do. oftentimes, if you're already in pretty good shape, it can be hard to get there just hiking necessarily. Be You could like set the treadmill if it goes up to fifteen or more, if you one of the super incline trainers that goes to forty percent I. Yeah, you could definitely get there, so that's great you just want to. Increase it slowly and then give yourself enough time that your body kind of adjusts to that workload. If, you just wait thirty seconds. Your body's not GonNa know what happens and actually takes your. There's some heart rate lag, so it takes your heart rate awhile to catch up and kind of figure it out. That like if you just go sprint up a hill. I can get away with it for thirty seconds, and then your body's like Oh, by Gosh. What are we doing and all of your systems kind of kick in and catch up? Okay, so You had mentioned like one forty nine. You know in I'm just trying to try to be a little specific for people. I feel like when I was doing it. That was a number that was pretty close. anyways was one forty nine, and so any runs that I would go on You know we'll be wearing a chest strap. along those lines chest rapper RESP- Ace kinda monitor Mo-, most of the time chester up. Just because they are way more accurate in that could kind of feel more comfortable with those numbers. But I would always try right to be under under that. Is there a point at which like I'm too far under. Not Not in the same sense that you're worried about going over it. There is like. The closer you are to that number. The. MORE AEROBIC Games we're. Going to get. So if you're really just doing purely aerobic stuff. You can get close to that number as you want. But even if you just go for like. A two our dog walk in. It's super chill in your heart. Rate's like below one hundred. They're still aerobic benefit to just get in that bulk time on your feet. With an S. slightly elevated heart rate got it, but I get way more bang for my buck, if I can get close to one forty nine. Yeah, ever really go over one four eight nine, so say you got like four hours to train during the week. That's what your schedule allows. If. You spend four hours like right in like the one forties. Versus four hours in the one thirties. You'RE GONNA see aerobic development more quickly. got. Kind of treading that fine line sure. Got It. Yeah, you WanNa stay in the. If you go over that kind of going back to our kind of black hole, conversation if you if if say my discover that it's one forty nine. Right is my number that I. don't really want to go over anytime. You go over that number. You're in that quote kind of black hole. That kind of place for it feels like you're working really hard. It feels as if you're doing your body some good But most of the time you're just stuck there in. You're not making a lot of progress ray. You're in one year. You're running the heart rate of one fifty four in the new. Just kinda there forever, and it feels terrible. Yeah doesn't feel fun and then it's really hard. You know days You know if you're trying to run or train every day, It's really hard to motivate yourself to go back to. A hurry to one fifty four. Versus when you're running, maybe everyday with a heart rate of one forty five, you know in just change in that ten beats in honestly people sounds crazy. but I've done it. Right it it. It works so well. You know yeah, then super impressed. With that heart rate. KINDA, strategy! There is a black hole, but then there's also something above the black hole correct. Yeah, so if you break it down into running training zones. At a certain point in your training it's okay to spend a bit of time in the black hole, but usually it's GonNa be. Five minute sets or maybe like a twenty minute push and I refer to him. Temple runs. There's a bunch of other names you can idea. But. We're really working on that lactate threshold. You're training your ability to tolerate that and a process. Lactic byproduct in your system. Then beyond that. You might be going. Like really hard again eight out of ten on an effort scale for between. Two and five minutes. Now it'd be interval training targeting sort of your view to Max. The idea of the analogy like is. Trying to increase like from a visa to a V. Eight engines like just how much pure oxygen uptake you can train your body to us. There's definitely a place for that. And then beyond that is just fade. Running or biking is just pure speed so going super fast so anything two minutes. Maybe it's. Twenty second thirty second one minute repeats. On attract I might be a two hundred, four hundred eight hundred kinds of stuff, and that's great for super specific running muscle recruitment. Neurological dislike processing. And Training your body to go fast. If you're just GONNA hump a huge pack and like carrying animal out of the woods. There's not necessarily a lot of benefit out of that. I'd take that time in that energy. Go to the gym work on your weaknesses. Really just make sure you're a well rounded strong human. And then focus on that purely aerobic stuff most of the time. IN JUST WANNA! Bring it back to you like we were saying. Hiking if you could just carry a pack and go for a hike, it's probably the best thing you can do right yet. Because that is ultimately what we're trying to do in September October November. Even were just. We're trying to go for a long hikes with pack on at elevation sometimes, maybe not. Just That's what we're trying to do. Now the reason why I really Wanna about the heart rate stuff in the running side of things is that. We don't have all that time. to do I don't have time to hike ten hours a day. As much as I would like to So. I can I can get close to that right in an improving my aerobic base by spending way less time. Closer. To that. You know black. I like black hole. It makes me think that. I never want to be there and it does definitely suck you But the more time or the you know I can spend some time closer to that black hole. In them talking maybe a half hour day, right is GonNa do more for me. More closer to spending ten hours a day hiking. Does that make sense. Yeah, for sure. Okay. Yeah, I just want to. Get that across everybody that that's kind of what I was thinking Kumon what type of what type of strength Steph I know there's A. a little bit of a warm up that we used to do. you know for people that were running or hiking for that matter I think it makes a lot of sense. But like what kind of strength steph would people be. You know a you know a couple things anyways that you would recommend for people. Yeah, that's a great question As we're doing right now. We're sitting down and a lot of us spent a lot of our time sitting down and as a result. There are a lot of muscles that we just don't use very often and in running. Primarily the gluten so getting your, but to actually fire and engage. So oftentimes before run. The super simple classic. Warm up where you just do a series of lunges. And? She'll do forward line ges. They'll do sideline ges. Reverse lunges and like lines with. Torso twist. And it is really helps. Wake up those muscles, and it forces you to engage that glued in use those muscles. So then you carry that fresh reminder and priming into your run. And, then you can also do some leg swings just to loosen things up. Get your hips really nice and open so like grab a tree or pole do some forward and back legs, wings, and then some side to side leg swings. And then. Easy like you're ready to go. And then I always recommend just easing into the run. Like the transition from not running to running. Is a stressful transition for your body so. Really like even if it's an easy run. Warm up into it. Take five ten minutes to just Kinda let your body like okay. We're running now. Surely like, let let everything wake up to the idea that. We're trying hard now. We're not sitting yeah more. We're done sitting for at least the half hour or so and I. Think that part is very important to. Those. Simple lunges in the leg. The the lake swings man that makes such a difference in my day I really credited. Those types of things with letting me run every day. you know Just it it does that like I get up. Maybe maybe I get up I have a two year old now likes waking up. Release were pretty early We'll go for runs. I push her in her stroller, but Just like coming from waking up, maybe run around the house, a little bit, and then doing those simple lunges in those leg swings. Again, like you said like. Those muscles firing. in places that maybe I haven't used yet today. in allow me to than you know. Run at it at a decent pace. You know definitely blow my. Like trying to stay out of that black hole But made me feel good to do it again the next day right and and actually really take the edge off of that first five minutes of running I noticed that all the time in if I if for whatever reason I forget, which seems weird that you would forget to do your warm up, but I do sometimes I'll just start running and mike away didn't do that. Let's. Go back. Let's go back. Start over start over the reset button In the end it might take five minutes like those kind of those lunches and stuff maybe take five minutes but really I mean I notice it in in. Maybe it's in my head, too. I feel like I'm faster when I do those little Little warm ups and stuff, said Yeah. I think that's Uber Important. Well I'll try to put some links out there for people to that can kind of see what we're talking about. in those just so simple. Simple lunges in that lake swings and stuff, so no I think that's important. Is there anything like in the gym? Or laying in the house. Like do you use a foam roller? Do do stuff like that. Yeah I'm a huge fan. For runners, they're just classically kind of posed to strength training in general, so most of the stuff that I design and prescribe is. Low equipment heavy mostly bodyweight. Lot of just core and hip pelvis work. Those are main areas that Reuters a weekend. And then I do I'm a huge fan of rolling out. Doing a lot of mobility staff Kelly stare at supple leopard style stuff if people are familiar. I think Kevin just sent me a link to that the other day. Actually couple Leopard that make that rings a bell will ask Kevin Kevin is in here. If you haven't noticed it either Yeah so. Almost more as a tool of just self-awareness to really kind of feel like oh! Spots Kinda weird like what's going on over there. And itself massage you look at the research on recovery. There's probably nothing physiologically happening with massage my facial release. Is there is really a thing. But it feels good, and if you think it works, it makes you feel good than it works. So. Going in, and just like hammering your it band over and over, and it hurts so bad. It hurts like. Maybe isn't actually doing much for you. In you're talking about maybe. Like a big foam roller in your just rolling your it and out. which if you haven't done? It is not the most fun thing in the world. It's horrible. The it ban is. It's basically just like an indestructible section of fiber in your body. And really if you're having issues, it's probably a tight. Gluten me like. Glued or group mad somewhere up in the hip where it actually connects, that's tight, which is pulling it tight making your knee cranky or the it inflamed itself. So yeah, foam is not always super pleasant, but often the feeling afterwards. If you release, it is super satisfying pleasant for people, so it's something to experiment with. Okay For sure. But I think. Doing a dynamic warm up. Running easy. Is probably more beneficial for your time. Kumon I don't know how long been hanging out here, but anything else We WanNa talk about as far as training for people You know anything you wanted to touch on or. I think the biggest thing is just. Trying to have fun with it I think people often get so wrapped up in certain numbers or mileage you're. Like Be Kind to yourself. Follow Fun like if you're feeling motivated to do something else that day. That's not necessarily on your training plan like awesome. Go for it follow that fun might be playful with it. Because that long term commitment. is where the Games are. Doing! One hard work out of the really didn't want to. On one day. That then Burns you out for a whole week. Is GonNa do more damage than just skip that entirely and went for dog walking in like kept up with everything going forward so I think just. Keep it fun. Keep it light. and. long-term consistency is the magic really happens. Yeah, you had you had told the story. I think before we were recording You kind of brought up the Kenyans in ten years I'm GONNA put your. Second, but that's sometimes. That's not what people like to hear it. As it's GONNA, take ten years to create an aerobic base or or whatnot, but putting that consistent low low grade work. IS GONNA pay off. In the long term right and you had mentioned a story about the Kenyan runners. Yeah, it's it's huge and we live in an era where everybody wants like now. If I just eat one superfood that I'm healthy if i. just do this one new crazy move at the gym like I'll get Jack. Shoulders. What like? And none of none of that's going to work. It's just about that long term consistency so Kenyans have this concept of building your house and really just refers to. Kind of setting the foundation for athletics. And does idea the up to spend ten years building your aerobic engine. Before you can really see like what that potential is. And one of the reasons. People, going steady it all the time. You're like wire Kenyan so amazing running one of the reasons that. Is Been posited? Is that most of them run to school, so they're running my maybe ten to twelve miles a day five to six days a week. with, books, in their arms. But they're little kids like they're not running super hard. They don't WanNa be sweaty when they show up. They don't WanNa be worked when they get there, so they're running easy as their mode of transportation and they're logging sixty mile weeks. Super Easy for ten years. Fifteen years. And then they might actually start their formal training like okay now I'm going to start mile. Training or I'm going to go for the fifteen hundred meter. And Yeah. It's no wonder like way more Kenyans or running into sub four miles year, then American highschoolers. They've just put in that. Non Sexy easier aerobic time to get ready yeah. Cool will I think we'll leave? Everybody was out. Go Go Build Your House. As were in stay out of that black hole, so thanksgiving. Thanks for doing this yet. Thanks. Hey everyone real. Quick before you go I just wanted to say. Thanks for listening and if you've been enjoying our conversations, please leave us review on Apple podcast. Also. If you have any questions, comments or concerns, please email podcasts at seek outside dot com. Thanks and have a great day.

Hiking W. A. L. T. Chicago Walters rob Dennis San Juans N. A. N. R. S. LEADVILLE pikes peak Denver Colorado California fitbit ANAEROBIC chester
#195 - Ketones, Insulin Resistance, Measuring Insulin, Alcohol, Resting Heart Rate, Heart Rate Variability, And More!

The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

57:13 min | Last week

#195 - Ketones, Insulin Resistance, Measuring Insulin, Alcohol, Resting Heart Rate, Heart Rate Variability, And More!

"Welcome to episode one hundred ninety five the intermittent fasting todd cast burn fat gain energy and enhance your health by changing win. You eat what you eat with. No calorie counting than this show is for you. I known avalon author of what win. Why lose weight and feel great with carrier. Style meals intermittent fasting and why and i'm here with my co host jin stevens author of delay. Don't deny living an intermittent fasting lifestyle for more on us. Check out the podcast dot com melanie avalon dot com jin stevens dot com. Please remember the thoughts and opinions on this podcast not constitute medical advice or treatment so for yourself a cup of black coffee a mug of tea or even a glass of wine infants time and get ready for the intermittent fasting. Podcast hi friends. Are you struggling to lose weight despite fast and clean. Maybe you're even making healthy food choices. Fasting more shortening or eating window ramping up your exercise and yet the weights won't budge while we actually just found a major reason for why that may be as it turns out there compounds and our environment called endocrine-disruptors meaning they mess with your hormones and studies. Show that a lot of these endocrine. Disrupters are actually jains. Meaning they literally make you gain weight. They also make it hard to lose weight. These toxic agents are naturally stored in fat. So when they enter your body your body creates fat to store them in to protect you. Want there in that fat. They've been changed the genes in your fat stores. So that you are more likely to store more fat and less likely to burn it. They can also affect your insulin signaling and boost your appetite so you want to eat more and store more fat and most of us are actually exposed to these obese genetic endocrine disrupters daily and our skin care and makeup that is actually one of the largest sources of these compounds. Yup as it turns out when you're washing your face putting on makeup using lotion or even putting on sunscreen. You are likely putting one of up to thirteen hundred compounds banned in europe for their toxic city and obesity causing potential. But they're completely fine for use in us. Skincare when you put them on your skin making it that much harder to burn fat and that much easier to store fat so if you're struggling to lose weight you definitely definitely want to clean up your skincare asap. You can do that easily with a company called beauty counter. they make safe. Skincare and make products that are extensively tested to be free of endocrine disrupters obese jains and other toxic compounds are truly safe and supportive of your health. You can shop with us at melanie. Avalon dot com slash beauty counter. any use. That link something really special and magical might happen after you place your first order. If you'd also like exclusive discounts giveaways and the latest on the science of skincare. Definitely get on my queen. Beauty email list. That's at melanie. Avalon dot com slash. Clean beauty fasting. Clean inside and out will now. You can all right now back to the show. Hi everybody welcome. This is episode number one hundred and ninety five of the intermittent fasting podcast. Melanie avalon. And i'm here john stevens. Hi everybody how are you today jin. I'm good how about you. I am great. You sound super great. What's super grade. That was like a more emphatic. Great than usual and really really fantastic. Are you aware of what happened this past weekend. Well no. I'm not aware what's it taylor. Swift released a surprise album. Yeah definitely not aware of that. This is the second time she's done this in quarantine where she doesn't say anything and then she release is an entire to defend myself. Being taylor swift ban but her first album is the best selling album of twenty twenty and i am obsessed lyrically with taylor and do use spotify. No okay you know what it is do what it is now. I'm i have apple music silas and apple music. I'm apple girl. So i'll listen to apple music and i listened to my podcast through the apple music app. You know so well so spotify they give you a year year and review thing and they show you like your top artists and your top. You know song and everything. Well obviously mine was taylor but the shocking thing was told me i was in the point. Five percent of her listeners. I feel like you have to listen to a lot of taylor swift to the point five. I'm probably in a ninety five point five or ninety nine point five. I should say i can't i don't know i mean there's one song i know that i've heard that i liked which one i don't know the name of it but i know i liked it. If you like saying all of them. I be like yeah. That's the one i've heard all too. Well no okay. Sorry very few things just like light me up with the amount of excitement. That was lit up with while. I'm so glad to hear it so you don't listen to apple music. You listen to spotify. No yeah spotify spotify person since since it came out really. I remember when it first came out and i was like. Wow how is this even possible. The idea of just listening to louis. Whatever you wanted yup yup. I was like the rest catch here. Yeah there wasn't book. I'm old enough to remember the days of napster when everyone was just giving away their music for free and illegally and always wondering if like you're going to infect your computer with napster you could get anything you want and it was all free anything. Yeah and it was all terrible. It was now that. I understand how we were all stealing music. It was bad very bad. But i did know the actually started suing people who had it to remember that no. I was probably off of them. Because i'm such a rules follower that as soon as i realized. Oh gosh this is not just like listening to the radio. Because i remember. They brought the scare tactics locked up. Like a few. I don't know they sued some kind of like my age. Who were using it for like immediately grew in their life. Basically well you know now that we are producers of content books. I completely understand if all of the books we ever wrote were now available for free illegally and people were just able to share them. That would be terrible if people paid for this show and then it was right. As soon as i realized it was wrong i was like. Oh my god. I breaking the law. Get it off the computer exactly. I like to follow the law anyway but it was fun while it lasted now that we have apple music everything really is. There are spotify or whichever you like. It really is amazing because you used to have to buy them one by one. I mean you don't even remember the day of driving to the music store. I'm sure listening to forty. Fives did you have a record player. Oh well i do now for my taylor swift albums on record player okay final. That's so funny. We vinyl everything. But we had little forty fives. Have you ever seen a forty five. I think i have. My dad has some. Yeah that was the way to do it. You'd go get the one little single and there was always something on the other side and you'd flip it over then you would play them over and over again good. Tom's a good times. Remember cassettes yes. That's when i was like 'cause chick-fil-a had the we talked about this before the. What is it the virtues. The big head cassettes that you could get remember that the the freedom with music now is just remarkable though so. I'm glad that there's another album. She's been very productive at sounds. I have one more really exciting announcement actually related to the content of today's show while awesome. What is that. it's so exciting. You know it is though. I think it's really exciting. We'll share the excitement so friends listeners. I can't believe i'm saying this. But i'm about to give away completely free electrolyte supplements. That's not even what i'm so excited about. Even though that is very exciting mostly. It's because we are partnering with rob wolves company element and as you guys know. Rob wolf is my hero. I mean he is the reason. That i m end the whole paleo world like i read paleo solution and then that's that's what happened and i think he is an amazing figure of information. I don't wanna say authority figure. But i i really get the sense that he doesn't cherry pick that he's open to the science the information and i really trust his information and he recently started a company called element l. m. in t- tailored towards listeners. Who may be following specifically kito diets. Because as you guys know gin. And i are not kito. I go through times of kito. Jan had her kito phases in the past but they two thousand fourteen. She is no longer akito. I'm not currently ghetto. I flirt with it occasionally. But in any case if you've heard of something called the kito flew it is often posited that the kito flu is not actually a condition but it may be for a lot of people due to electrolyte issues. And that is because when you gonna look diet your insulin levels drop and we insulin levels. Drop all fasting but when you're doing low carb they're significantly jobs all the time and that lowers the production of a hormone called dos dos. Jonas made in the kidneys. And i'll dasa and helps you retain sodium so when you have chronically. Low cost around on akito diet. You are losing sodium at a rapid rate and that is a lot of people may experience symptoms of kito flu. So that's things like headaches. Fatigue muscle cramps insomnia all the stuff and to address this gin. Are you familiar with kito gains. Okay so keith. Gains is probably. I would say it is the biggest community out there so the founder is louise and i can ever say last name is like villas senor. He and rob developed. I don't know if he would like actually develop rob worked with him to develop to have the exact electrolyte balance that you need to support your electrolyte status especially if you're on akito diet. Some people. Having carbs in eating window and fasting might also benefit from the electrolyte supplements but it. It really varies by individual. But in any case they made element and it has no sugar. No coloring no artificial ingredients no junk. They have flavored and unflavored versions. So the reason. I'm also excited the flavored versions. Those are not cleaned fast friendly. Obviously because they have a flavor so there is a raspberry a citrus and orange flavor but the raw an flavored wine is clean fast friendly. it's literally just electrolytes. So if you feel like you are on the electric struggle bus you can have the wrong flavored version during your clean fast. I didn't realize this is not just like some small company. Like they're doing really big things. They work with three navy. Seal teams there. The official hydrogen partner for the usa weightlifting team in the olympics with really cool. They've worked with a lot of other people like five or more i think. Nfl teams so basically. It's a really cool way to go. And i'm so excited because you can get it listeners. Completely free they weren't going to do this. They were just going to like have spots educational and tell you about them. But i begged them for something and so it's not even a discount. It's free so you can get their sample back in. That will include to raw unflavored again. Those are the clean fast friendly ones to citrus to raspberry into orange again the flavor winds. You'd wanna have eating window. Apparently the citrus one is a really great. Mix for margarita word on the street so i have friends who do that. It was actually in the information they gave us. This makes sense but you can just go to drink. L. m. n. t. dot com forward slash podcast. So that's d. r. i. n. k. l. m. n. t. dot com forward slash podcast. I will cost five dollars for shipping. Only that's the only thing you'll pay if you don't like it. They will refund you five dollars for shipping. So don't even worry about that. This free giveaway is only for january. So guys get it. I'm just so excited. Because we're like working with raw wolf. And i love this product and i'm just this is so exciting to me and free things. I'm am so happy. Happy that you're happy and free things for listeners. Well free things are always good. Yes so everybody go get it now. I think people on the key to a diet who are experiencing these issues like this could be a game changer for them. So and even if you're not get it for the flavors and get the citrus wanna make margaritas and report back eating window. Margaritas eating window margaritas. It's like i heard you say that you could have margaritas during the fast. No that is not what we said clarification eating window. Margarita with all clean ingredients fasting with margarita's. That's a joke to not fast margaritas. Yes so all right. That's that shall we jump into our questions for today. Yes to start things off. We have a super short question but the subject is question for jen from sally and sally says hi. Jim want made you keep going at your second attempt at af. When did you start seeing results. And what results did you see. So maybe you can tell us a little bit about your first versus second attempt and really i did not keep going at my second attempt nor my third it was multiple multiple. I mean at first. Kurt about intermittent fasting in two thousand nine. And i've talked about this many times over the course that this podcast and intermittent fasting stories and even in in my books and in the mindset chapter vast repeat and i tried it multiple times many times over those years from two thousand nine to two thousand fourteen and for anyone who has fast paced. Repeat i really get into to why it didn't work for me. In the all those attempts in the mindset chapter there were several things that were the problem first of all. I didn't understand clean fasting in fact no-one did because everyone really thought that intermittent fasting was only something that helps you quote. Eat fewer calories so you know. We thought that anything that was zero calorie was going to be fine. And even if you had just a little bit of calories that was probably also fine and so fasting was really really hard white. Knuckling it all the time. Because i was not fast in clean second of all. I didn't understand about the adjustment period in that your body needed to get fat adapted and so i would start and stop and then so i i feel like i was constantly trapped in the adjustment period. My body never got fat adapted. I just kept living in the part. Never got through to where it was easier plus. I wasn't fast in clean. Put all that together you know. It was doomed to fail and third. I expected weight loss to be linear days. It would be hard. I wouldn't lose any weight. And then i would quit so the time that it finally stock. I still wasn't fast in clean yet because remember this was two thousand fourteen. It was well before the obesity code. It was before we understood the hormonal things that go in on our bodies while. We're fasting. But i had been doing keita that that we just talked about that kito summer that i had the summer of two thousand fourteen. I didn't lose any weight. But i wasn't ketosis. I had a ten breath monitor. It was one of the early Tonics models and. I was doing chemo. And i and i would get read so i was making turns but the way i was eating. And you know. I wasn't tapping into my stored body fat. I think it was just all the fat. It was consuming putting into ketosis but it was at that time that i shifted intermittent fasting because i was like you know. I'm not losing weight. I don't feel good. Kita is not working. Well for me. I am going to do intermittent fasting at this time. It's going to work for me. Darn it an amazingly. That was the time. I never did quit. I think that doing kito for that whole summer. Obviously my body was making ketones. I was fat adapted and so suddenly intermittent fasting was easier than it had been before. I also remember melanie. This is how little i understood at the time. I remember a post that i had made on an intermittent fasting group. I was in. it wasn't one of my groups. Obviously i hadn't started one yet. But i remember i had like a cheeseburger and fries and an hour later was blowing on the catan eggs and registering a read on like. I'm already backing ketosis. This is amazing. That's not what was happening. There's ricky tones that i had made during the fast and i believe that obviously excreting them through my breath even though i had just had a cheeseburger and fries i i thought i was back in ketosis. It'd be amazing. I didn't know what i was talking about. It was before we understood that or before. I understood that fasting. Got you into ketosis as well and the whole now that we understand about liver glycogen glycogen depletion and all of that. So fasting was easier because i was fat adapted. Thanks to the kito also immediately started losing weight finally after that whole summer of not losing weight with kito and also i was weighing daily calculating my weekly average so i saw the weight loss. Even though. My weight fluctuated day to day. I saw week to week. My weekly average was going down. And so finally i saw success. So that was rottweiler. When i write fast f-a-s-t repeat i'm emphatic. About not expecting weight loss during your first twenty eight days and even when you do have weight loss. Don't expect it to be linear first of all your body has to adapt and then you have to be aware of how it fluctuates. And it's only the overall trend that matters once i made that shift and understood. It was the overall trend. Then i could stick with it. I wasn't looking for down down down down down because that's not weight loss. Looks like and. I just felt so much better after not feeling good during kita for that whole summer reintroducing carbs and intermittent fasting at the same time feeling better seeing the results i was looking for. That was when it truly time turned into a lifestyle. And i didn't understand it was a lifestyle still you know as i was losing the weight. It wasn't until later. When i started to understand the health benefits. Intermittent fasting is more than just weight loss. It took me becoming educated. The more educated. I got the more i realize. This is something. I'll do forever so there. It is anything to add our experiences. Were we complete opposite. I was like. I'm going to do this for a week. And then i never stopped. You were eating paleo before you started low. Carb your local see again. That we both transitioned from low carb and started doing it. And i never quit again see. That's the thing at one. When i started in twenty fourteen he. I never quit again. So mine was low. Car- i f and then paleo that was like the the transition yep awesome. Hi friends. I wanted to tell you about one of the most incredible resources for taking charge of your blood tests and lab work ever. I am a huge fan of a company called inside tracker. They're actually davidson. Claire partner company. And what they do is they provide access to the blood test that you need to be testing as well as interpretations so that you can figure out what that all means basically. We often go to our doctor. We get blood tests. We test things but is it what we need to testing. What does it even mean. That's what inside trackers here for. They've done extensive testing to figure out which bloodmarkers can tell you the most about your actual health and these aren't necessarily all the tests that you might expect they provide personalized interpretations of those results along with dietary and lifestyle recommendations so that you can truly take charge of your health. Their age for example analyzes your bloodwork to determine your true quote inner age and how to lower it. I did it recently and thankfully my inner age was lower than my actual chronological age. But there were still some things that i could work on so inside. Tracker has really helped me meet my goals in that way. They've also got dna testing as well as one of my favorite things which is their online portal guys. This online portal is a game changer. Includes your results from anti tracker within you can upload all of your own data from any other blood results that you've had through your doctor so helpful you just go into the portal job in your lab results and then you have all your lab result all in one place. It's so easy to see how things have changed over time. And they interpret these lab results from other companies by their standards. It is so helpful. I cannot even describe how much i use this platform. If you'd like to learn more about them as well as all about blood work testing definitely check out my interview with the founder. Gil blander. That's at melanie. Avalon dot com slash inside tracker and insight. Tracker also has an amazing offer it just from my audience. It was twenty percent. I asked if it could be thirty percent. And they said yes are so amazing. So if you go to melanie. Avalon dot com slash. Get ends tracker. You can use the coupon code. Melanie thirty to get thirty percent off. Sitewide yes thirty percent off sitewide melanie. Avalon dot com slash kit inside tracker with the coupon code melanie. Thirty that's emi l. a. n. e. three zero and put all of this information and the show notes. All right now back to the show. Are we have a question from michelle and the subject is in search of lower insulin. She says dear jenin melanie. Thank you for changing lives. Jen's advice about not chasing keaton readings make sense to me as your body uses key tones more efficiently. your blood kitone level may drop. I'm wondering if i can use my blood. Kitaen levels for a different purpose said please bear with me. I would love to be able to directly test my insulin levels at home but alas as i understand it a higher key reading should indicate a lower insulin level for example. If key tones were point five to one point oh. Insulin would have to be fairly low. Is this true. Do we know if a certain kitaen level corresponds to a certain range of insulin level. I accept that the converse doesn't indicate anything so could have lower insulin. Without having heike times. I tend to have pretty high key. Tones fasting around twenty four to twenty two to with the occasional longer fast. I'd love to take my ketone readings as a good insulin sign. I am not diabetic or pre diabetic. A one c four point nine but. I do wonder if. I have some insulin resistance and i'd love to have gauge on. How certain foods affect my insulin. Best wishes to you both michelle all right michelle so thank you so much for your question. So my initial thoughts are that there is most likely the correlation with the exception of i was just thinking this follows up pretty appropriately to what you were just saying jen because you had that experience remeasured key towns but it was right after eating a cheeseburger so it really would depend on where the key tones are coming from. I don't think this is the case for michelle but especially if you're following like a key genyk diet you could in theory always measure key tones but there would still be enslin release when you're in the fed state so you can be producing key tones ambi producing insulin. But if you're in the fasted state. Ainu measure key towns probably. Your insulin is below but the whole issue is with insulin resistance. People can experience base line levels of insulin and not realize it if you're generating tones though imply that hopefully your body is fat. Adopted and insulin is working correctly. But i can't really make blanket statements about it especially after reading for people who want the deepest dive into insulin. Ever check out. Dr benjamin beckman's get sick. I also interviewed him on the melania avalon. Biohacking podcast that episode might be out when this show comes out so if so the league to it and the show notes i think in the quote. I don't want to say correctly working body but if things are working the way they should be there should be a correlation but then there could also be lots of other factors. That might like the nagel it. What are your thoughts jim. We don't have a gauge. I mean she said she'd love to have a gauge about. How certain foods effector insulin. I wish we could measure at home like that. But we can't minute to minute you can't know what your insulin's doing so like for example. A friend of mine is using a company called walk in lab. I mean i don't know anything about that company. She just mentioned that she was using it. And they're able to like order the tests forty. I i'm imagining that. They have physicians on staff. They look at your request and then they approve it or not but you can actually get that through companies like walking lab. I'm not endorsing walk lab. Anything about them like said other than a friend of mine just used them in mention their name to me. So that would give you an idea of what your fasted insulin level is. Obviously you can't do that all day. I wish we had an insulin test or away to know exactly what it was doing. Know if you're interested in going down that rabbit hole of key tones and what's going on. There's somebody named marty kendall of optimizing nutrition s. Because he's from australia he is. He's got some really great stuff. I've learned a lot from reading his blog over the years. In fact some of his stuff on ketone levels actually is what taught me that are key. Ten levels went down every time. So chasing high. I actually learned that from mardi kendall so optimizing nutrition with an s. optimizing ing and digging through. There he's a big proponent of measuring. Your blood glucose before you eat to give you an idea of what's going on. That's just something there to check out. I wish we did to. Have you know we could see how certain foods affected your insulin because you know proteins there. It's not just carbs that affect insulin. Thanks to the insulin index. We know that proteins also affect your insulin levels and even fats due to a degree the whole idea. That fat has zero effect on. Insulin is not true. Dr beckmann actually talks about all of that and why we get sick and actually protein. I believe it releases comparable or even more insulin than carbs. But it also releases glucose gone which has the opposite effect so it doesn't have the same effect on your overall like blood sugar levels and state as far as the connection to insulin as straight up carb steel. It's pretty complicated. It's also complicated. Ireland's one really epoc study. Because i'm i'm really fascinated by protein. And i found this one study that was looking at protein and diabetics and it was theorizing or going through all of the research on protein diabetics because protein can be turned into blood sugar or sugar carbs Genesis and it does that does happen but for some reason it doesn't really seem to affect blood sugar levels and they don't really know why like there's all these theories like that. The blood sugar that gets produced from protein gets used faster than it would enter the bloodstream. There is. I don't know there was like three different theories but i find it so interesting that we know so much about the body but then we still don't know really seemingly basic things like we can't figure that out which is why to me that helps me to be like. Why worry so much about it. then you know. If you're if you're healthy i mean. Look you're a one. C is four point nine. So i don't know what matters if you're healthy you've got a healthy ones see. You're wondering if you have insulin. Resistance will do you have signs that you do. I wouldn't. I wouldn't worry about what i'm saying. You know if you're healthy and your health are good. You don't have to know what your levels are. I know it's interesting but a- and sometimes some of the things we don't even like melnea just said we don't even really understand all of it. Yeah when i found that study it was so long it was the review is like this is the best thing i've ever read about like like eating protein and diabetic patients. Actually i'm glad you said that because i was just thinking good enough proxy if she's measuring blood key towns as she measuring blood. Sugar though doesn't look like it so michelle. I think that's what you could measure at home. There's a ratio that you can figure out what your key. Ten reading in your blood glucose reading a lot of people are using. I think mardi kindles for a toffee. I'm not sold on that. I won't get into that but with to measure your fat burning basically. They're using it. he's i think he calls it. Data driven fasting and there are a lot of people following his protocol where they are measuring their blood glucose and measuring their key tones and then doing some sort of ratio of that to determine. Your fat burning state and people are finding great success with that. I don't measure all and some people do. I actually interviewed someone recently on intermittent fasting stories. The episode won't come out until february. I believe but she talked about how she's using his ratio and it's really been helpful for her. The last thing was. I did just release the episode with care call. You're the founder of neutra sense. Cgm's i don't. I didn't know anything about this. Michelle if this is like what. You're looking to ascertain your level of insulin. Resistance wearing a cgm doing a round of cgm's. Could i mean that for me has been the most eye opening thing as far as our foods affecting me you see. How foods affect you you see like is your blood sugar level. How is it rising. How long does it take to get back to normal so rather than focusing on insulin and we talk in that episode all about the implications of how it relates to insulin. But i think that would be the thing you'd wanna do. I'm writing a guest blog. Post for son leighton which is really fun. They wanted me to write a blog post on health and wellness transfer twenty twenty one so i had to decide what what did i think would be the biggest health and wellness transferred twenty twenty one and one of them is c. jams. Oh i hope so. Because there's such a useful tool. They're not a toy. There are a powerful tool for figuring out how your body responds but really michelle. I would go get a fasted insulin level and if your morning fasted and level you'll have an idea i mean if it's like five or something really low like that or below five then chances are you're not insulin resistant. If it's like ten okay. That's a good signal that you're going to need to do some work. You don't need to know how it responds all day long fast insulin level. That will really give you a good picture. And the good thing about that. Is i feel like it's not as finicky. As 'cause wearing a cg am the one thing i've realized is. Oh here blood. Sugar could be changing a lot more than you realize. But i think for insulin facet insulin. Pretty telling and i'll give you the ranges. That dr benjamin bic men goose so according to dr beckmann. Ideal your blood. Insulin levels should be less than six micro units per milliliter. Eight to nine is average for men and women but he says it's not good to be average you you would prefer it to be lower person with eight actually has double the risk of developing type two diabetes as a person with five so anything over nine is above average in a way that you don't want to be above average right and you don't even he says you don't even want to be average which is eight to nine so he preferred that you are below six fast at insulin and then on top of that. There's a secondary value that you can calculate if you want the score in that would actually considers both fasting glucose and fasting insulin and it is even more telling for your levels of insulin resistance. At the time you got your insulin measure would also have to have had your fasted blood sugar measured as well and if you have those two. There's a mathematical formula that you can do. That will give your home score. Which is a number it's complicated. It's basically glucose times. Insulin divided by four hundred and five so rando for the united states or glucose times insulin divided by twenty two point five for other countries. That is so. I don't know. I feel like we have provided all the potential data. We can on this. I think so too. That's a lot of data. Yup yup don't have coffee before you go. The coffee can cause you know your liver. Glycogen your blood glucose can go up and therefore you can have a little influence urge to go completely with nothing but water could call one more last resource for you michelle. So i'll put in the show notes. The link to the episode that i did with caracol your new sense. And then if you'd like to get your own see. Gm or any listeners. Would you can get fifteen percent off. And the link for that is melanie. Avalon dot com slash neutra sense. Cgm and i will also put that in the show notes listeners. There will be a transcript of this episode in the show notes. So that will be podcasts. Dot com slash episode. One nine thousand five. Which also i do need to plug. I don't know if any episodes aired yet where we asked for questions for episode two hundred because we haven't received any questions. I'm guessing not but listen our code. Two hundred random plug. It's going to be had asked me anything episode. So you can submit any questions you want for that. Don't have to be health or fasting related. They just be like questions for engine awesome. I look forward to the questions. Like what is my favorite taylor. Swift song don't ask me. What my favorite taylor swift song. I'd be like that's the one i heard that time. I wanna take a minute to tell you about one of our sponsors by optimizing. There's never a bad time to boost your immune system. But i don't need to tell you about how important strong immune system is right now given the global health crisis that's spreading across the planet p three. 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You'll also get ten percent off your next order. So two things to remember to misers dot com slash podcast and promo code. I f podcast ten. There's never been a more important time to boost your immune system banned today and now back to the show. Shall we go onto the next question. Yes so the next question comes from sarah. The subject is angry still sometimes. Sarah says hygienic melanie. I'm a solid three weeks in of doing i. F daily eighteen six to twenty two to eating to society. And i am still having days where i'm hungry in the morning and for listeners. Eighteen six is where you fast eighteen hours and eat for six and twenty two is where you fast. Twenty two hours any for two hours. She says. I've done one meal a day and i for years without knowing it was a thing just because i don't seem to digest well and i feel better eating one meal a day. I've gone months and years not listening to my body and creating issues for myself. This is now my everyday life. And i won't go back. Can the hang -gree be from eating late in the evening. It's weird and maybe a coincidence that it's worse on days that we ate late the night before. Thanks for all the product recommendations. Can't wait to see. If i can be headache free which i farm wines and all that you do i just found out my aunt and uncle following. You have read your books and are in love with af and losing weight and having tons of non scale victories. Someone told my aunt she is aging and reverse haha and then was worried about her when my aunt told her about. Imf thanks for helping people live their best life. Sarah so jen. What are your thoughts for sarah. First of all. I love that your aunt an uncle or following intermittent fasting and aging in reverse so as people around her watch. Her continued to look fabulous. That won't look crazy anymore. That's how it seems to work once you're successful in your show. It people are like suddenly believers all rights. Your question is can hang be from eating late in the evening. Let's think about this first of all your three weeks in so even though you've in intermittent fasting here and there doesn't sound like he's like consistently done it so you're still probably in the adjustment period and henry is more likely during the adjustment period than it is once your adjusted but the question. Can you be more hungry in the morning if you eat late in the evening. Let's think about this. Why do we feel great and have lots of energy during the fast well. it's because tapping into our fat stores as we go through the fast. I actually feel better. You know i might have a little wave of hunger right around our. i dunno fourteen. Sixteen something like that. And then on the other side of that. I feel fabulous so if you eat late in the evening to start counting from then you're not going to be as far into the fast by the morning so depending on what time you stopped eating a few stayed up really late and eight till like midnight and now it's morning you're only maybe seven eight hours into the fast. So you're really not in the fasted state yet so yeah you'd be more likely to be angry to think about count back and see how far you are into the fast. That could really play a role in it. What do you think about that. Not only two main thoughts one. Was that that exactly that. You're not you know you're not quite into the fastest date yet. That said i really associate the hungry feeling with pled trigger regulation issues. Because i find people who if they are eating and they don't have blood sugar regulation issues the they don't tend to ever get the hankering feeling. It's really the people who have sort of difficulty transitioning into the fat burning state. The bodies a little bit like hesitant to do it for whatever reason i think that's when the handlery feeling comes in yeah i think so too which is why the fact that she's only three weeks in is also very important. It could be that the context of when she's eating late. It could correlate to meals not bow. She says she has digestion issues. So maybe meals not digesting as well. Maybe macronutrients not really working for her. It could be a combination of things but it could possibly be something about the actual meal itself like the contents of the meal itself rather than the timing are like those together the factors together. If i'm eating really late at night. It's probably because i'm out off my schedule and i'm eating different things than i would normally be eating so that plays in plus the fact that it's not as many hours since i stopped eating. It's just a lot of factors. Exactly that's what i was trying to say. So i'm glad you said that like it often correlates to a like a slight disruption in your normal eating patterns that might be something more suitable to your blood sugar regulation and your digestion and everything. Let us know. The dry far wind makes you headache. Free i my mom. A box of whites. Am i giving my data fox reds for for the holidays. I'm so excited by the time this comes out the holidays will be over. But that's what. I'm giving chad making sure he's not like listening. The box of reds. That's right for listeners. If you'd like to get a bottle for a penny our link for that is dry from winds dot com slash podcast awesome. I highly recommend it speaking of the next question. I did not plan this. That's funny okay. Oh i could definitely answer this one for with some data of my own. All right to this is from kelley. The subject is alcohol effects on resting heart rate. Hello ladies i've been listening to you and following af slash day since january down ten pounds. I'm loving this lifestyle. So thankful that my co workers introduced me to this way of life before quarantine hit in march. I have a question regarding alcohol and resting heart rate. I noticed when. I go for more than a week without alcohol. My fit bit says that my resting heart rate can be as low as fifty six. But when i go away to the beach on the weekends and have a good amount of wine and white claws but all within good limits. Of course my resting. Heart rate can skyrocket sixty four. I also notice on the beach weekends when we are less physically active with alcohol. That also makes our hr go just wanted to know your thoughts on this. Thank you for always having great insight and topics to discuss on the podcast. I truly learn so much from you both and it makes keeping this lifestyle maintainable and achievable that much easier. Alright kelly so thank you for your question. Oh my goodness this is one of my recent obsessions the resting heart rate. So i talked about this before. But i actually did just interview the ceo of or ring. Which i've been wearing for. I don't know like a month now or so. It's so so cool. During the night time it measures your resting heart rate measures your heart rate variability. It measures your body temperature. It measures your activity levels. During the day it measures your respiratory rate and it gives you a really good idea of if you're recovering from your activities how your body is doing because basically for some terminology here so are resting. Heart rate is consistent rate of our heartbeat and lower is typically considered to be better. It does go up when you're exercising though. So that's why they call it resting heart rate is what you're looking at. heart rate. Variability is the amount of time measured in milliseconds between heartbeats. And what's really interesting. Is you would think that you want your heart. Rate to be. Very consistent like intuitively. What i would think but what you actually want is it to be more erratic because it shows that your body is adapting and reacting to stressors so like a constant thumping on a pattern. That's actually signifies the stress state 'cause if you think about when you really stressed what happens. It's kind of like you're on alert and it's like but bum bum bum bump sound effects by gen. Think you did not changing compared to being more fluid and reacting to everything that comes at you. there's a time lag time difference in between heartbeats and that's heart rate variability so you actually want more heart rate variability. That was just some information for listeners. So things that affect resting heart rate the cool thing about aura. I'm just pulling were app. Is it gives you so much information and a lot of education as wall surrounding. Everything was really cool. When you wake up it tells you based on how you slept because it measures your your sleep cycles and era restfulness and your sleep efficiency and all these things. So based on how you slap based onto your resting heart rate during the night. Which is what. Kelly is referring to based on your activity the previous day and some other factors it gives your readiness score and it tells you like. How ready are you to tackle the day. And it really makes it personal to you. So i'll say like you're great. You're arrested you know. Go hard today or it might say like you know you. You're resting heart. Rate was raised last night. You didn't sleep maybe sleep as well. Maybe you should take it easy today. It makes it very very specific. Like i thought it was going to be kind of like a generic. Maybe one of five options that it gives you. But i mean like literally gives you very very specific like mind today said i had readiness score of eighty four and it said you're resting heart rate lowered late last night because it should lower or raise at certain times during the night so i guess the fact that it lowered late night wasn't as good because it says you're resting heart rate lowered late last night but your overall readiness is still good. If you feel tired how about taking your day relaxing activity can help you get back on track so things that affects resting heart rate. What did she say that hers was. She said as low as fifty six but it skyrockets to sixty four. Which doesn't seem that high. That's pretty low. That's pretty low. I think like mine is normally low. Fifty s to mid sixties like sixty five is normally the highest. That mind goes. But i don't consider that skyrocketing at all and their app. They say that the normal average is anywhere from forty to one hundred and slightly below. Your average is a good sign of readiness and exceptionally high or low resting heart rate in the cates. An easier day. Maybe an order says intense training day a late night workout elevated body temperature or heavy meal just before bed can keep your resting heart rate elevated during the night an alcohol can also affect which kelly is asking about so my thoughts on it. Kelly that yes rest. Alcohol affects resting heart rate. But i don't perceive yours. Skyrocketing right sixty four is still a really good number like can i give an example from mine. I have not been drinking. I feel much better. But i looked way back when i was doing my predict study and wearing the cgm. I had a night where i drank. A good deal of. It was dry farm wine and champagne. But i wanted to see how it affected me through the to predict three study but i went back to that night on my bed. I have a sleep number bed in it. Measures things like heart rate heart rate variability breath rate while you're sleeping my heart rate skyrocketed to eighty one while i was sleeping from alcohol so and my heart rate variability went down so i do think mine skyrocketed but alcohol one hundred percent made my heart rate skyrocket and then. I didn't get a restful sleep that right. There was such important data. When i realized when i got the sleep number bed and started tracking. That was when i realized. Gosh my body really has a different sleep. When i drink alcohol you know now. I know that my body does not metabolize alcohol. Well i'm a slow alcohol metabolize or so. That makes more sense why that happens for me. So yes if you think that it's alcohol yet i mean and you're seeing it from the data you're drinking. It's up when you drink. But i wouldn't say sixty four skyrocketed either. Yeah like. I'm just looking back through my data. Because i usually have half glass to glass. Probably a glass. Every night now. And if i do that. I don't see appreciable effect on anything. But if i have night where i did drink a lot which i've had a few of those in the past month i do see it majorly. I think the only time. I woke up to readiness score of sixty. Something was after that. I was like he knows who's so. It was really exciting to interview the of the thing that i really liked about it. The most was. I was so hesitant to actually use or ring. Because you know who. I am like i was like so i'm going to over analyze and there's going to be so much data and i'm gonna like wake up and get my score and i'm gonna it's going ruin my day. 'cause i'm going to be like i'm gonna like judge everything by the score but the app is so and we talked about this in the interview. They really don't want you to have that response. So it really never makes you feel like you're failing and it's very gentle and how it talks to you and it always makes me feel like oh. This is the steps. I can take to make it. Actionable my favorite thing about. It is how it determines your ideal bedtime and it does it based on how you're sleeping in how you react based on different things and guess what. It's not going to say so if you're going to bed at like one. Am it's not going to say your bedtime is seven pm like it's not going to say that it's going to say like mine. Right now says my ideal bedtime is between it was saying between one into am now it saying like between twelve forty five and one forty five so i think. He's trying to like nudge me earlier. But he said it's never gonna like give you something you can't do and if it doesn't think need to be early it's like slowly get you there. It's not going to like it's not going to try to force early bird on late night. Owls so for janet would like it's nine pm time to go to bed. Why are you still awake. What i asked him was because my sleep score to determine your your sleep like while you're doing it sleep it looks at your total sleep. Your efficiency arrests witness your ram your deep sleep latency in your timing and your timing is the one where that doesn't involve circadian rhythms. So like you can only have a good timing score if if the middle midpoint ever sleep this between midnight and three am. I'll have nights where. I actually get like really really good scores on everything except timing which is just like a zero because i go to bed to and i asked him. It was like does that mean. It's impossible for me to get you know a really really incredible sleep score because the timing is off and he said i can still get still get like a crowd in an optimal score. But i won't be. I won't ever get like a nine going to bed that late. I would love for you to get jen and see what it says about your your sleep. While sharing my co host on the life lessons podcast has won. She's had one for a while and she loves it. It's so great. But i love my bed. The does that so. I don't know i don't if i would like the ring itself on my finger i schwab would like to try one. I guess but i love it will have to get you on. If i had one i would wear it but getting one. I just don't know we'll say so. That was a lot of information. Any other thoughts. No i think that's it. I did take my heart rate while i was in the sauna. Because it doesn't measure your heart rate during the day only while you're sleeping unless you do have has this moment option where you can take a restful moment and not move and check it so i did it while i was in the sauna and got up till like ninety nine or something. Oh that's interesting. That's like i'm just laying here. One day. my son will be put together. I know i was going to say it. We didn't arrive tear in the boxes. All right 'cause you're redoing the garage. I don't get me started. okay never mind. This is out of control. I will put good vibes. I'm patient girl. I'm really excited for you. Yeah me too. I hope it happens while it's called me to well suspend actually wonderful a few things for listeners before we go if you'd like to submit your own questions for the podcast you can directly email questions. That i- podcast dot com or you can go to iowa. Podcasts dot com. You can submit questions there remember. You can submit questions for episode two hundred. Ask me anything. Episode can follow us on instagram. Gen house instagram going. Well i'm doing it here and there are you enjoying it. Yeah when i think about it. I just don't remember it. I have to remind myself now. I'm looking at yours and looking at your freezer from daily hervas gap love the daily harvest. It's a lot of daily harvests. Well it is. Is that a mini freezer. Now that's a regular freezer. It's actually a big fraser. It's a old kitchenaid side-by-side bilton freezer fridge. We just ordered my mom chest freezer and then she said she has wanted. So we're returning. She doesn't want it she yeah. She said she wants one that you can open so she can reach him. I think she doesn't want to reach down. That makes sense into it but yeah this is just one side of my freezer not out of the freezer but one side of my bilton who it was outta. It's really old. They redid the kitchen. I don't know when they did it but the the appliances. They're nice but they've they've been around since i don't know some point in the early two thousand era just from looking at the back splash. That's when they redid the kitchen. But i love my kitchen so everybody is going to go to your instagram. And look and look at my freezer good times so yes you can follow us. I'm melanie avalon stevens. Think that is all of the thinks. Yeah all right well. This has been absolutely wonderful anything from utan before we go. I don't think so. Nothing not a thing like i you know. I always have so much to say. Well i will talk next week. All right bye bye bye. Thank you so much for listening to the intimate and fasting podcasts. Please remember that everything discussed on the show is not medical advice. We're not doctors. You can also check out our other. Podcasts intermittent fasting story and the melanie avalon biohacking. Podcast theme music was composed by leeann cox to you next week.

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The Heart: Emotional

Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

03:26 min | 1 year ago

The Heart: Emotional

"<hes> them back fans. Yesterday we spoke about the physical heart and today we move forward with the second heart which most people don't talk about looking at the heart as seat of emotions we know that emotions affect our heartbeat and there is a very sensitive measure of that heartbeat called heart-rate trait <unk> ability so heart rate variability doesn't mean an irregular heart which would be unhealthy. It just means that there there is they reation in the beat to beat interval the beat to beat interval is the pause us between every heartbeat and the more variable it is and that's called hundred very ability the healthier you you are in fact hundred visibility is the most sensitive measure in the opinion of a lot of people not tony of physical health but of emotional health so if you're stressed and there is what we call sympathetic overdrive which means means you're sympathetic. Nervous system is over active as a result of stress then heart rate variability decreases which means means that it is more fixed as less variation. There's less flexibility is like an army marching to war boom boom boom boom with no variation. If you have an argument with your spouse if you didn't sleep breath if you feel anxious if you feel angry feel still if you feel guilt or shame or <hes> depression fear then your heart rate berry ability will go down and that's why you're emotional. Heart is is actually your physical heart responding to your emotions if you're relaxed if you're adaptable <hes> if you're flexible if you go with the flow then your heart rate variability will be increased and this by the way can be measured through instruments and through bio feedback devices so that's your emotional heart or are your physical heart. You can say in response to emotions as you consider your emotional hot today. Something in this episode connected with you. Please leave a comment so i can hear from you and join me tomorrow as we delve into our spiritual heart <music>.

EPISODE 13 WEB RADIO TODAY

WEB RADIO TODAY

33:57 min | 6 months ago

EPISODE 13 WEB RADIO TODAY

"It is a hot summer morning here on the Nashville Tennessee area, and hey, everybody I'm skip Oram, welcoming you to the July twenty four twenty twenty edition of Web Radio Today. This is episode number thirteen and I am recording a podcast today on my back porch here Nolansville Tennessee. I hope you'll excuse any background noises in airplanes flying by any birds singing cars going by hopefully, no lawnmowers, her or grasp lowers. I wanted to come outside and and do the show this morning just to get out of the studio for a little while. Get some fresh air. It's cool and comfortable right now out here this morning, but it's going to be a scorcher a little later on today here in the Middle Tennessee Area I. Hope that it's a nice day wherever you are listening from today because on. On today's episode. WE'RE GONNA be talking briefly about heart rate monitors, which which can help you. You know tracking your different training zones when you're doing heart rate training as part of your exercise program, and then we'll begin to discuss the the importance of making sure that that you've included strength training as part of your exercise program, and of course this episode will contain a mini workout. And a pretty cool featured song a little later in what should come in at about a thirty minute podcast. I know that our listeners are living very full and an active life and the Jew probably have a lot of stuff. You need to do so i. don't want this podcast to take up too much of your valuable time today. You know that phrase. In the blink of an eye. I think that. Perhaps! There are some life lessons in that phrase in the blink of an eye and I want to see if you agree with me about that, so we'll talk a little later about the phrase in the blink of an eye. I had a situation that that came up last week that that brought it home to me that. A lot of us are trying to deal with with things that. Just seem so well so out of our control. Personally. I consider it a gift from God that that I don't have this need to. Control well. This needs to control everything. I like to be in control in certain situations, and and when a situation needs to be controlled and nobody's taken control. I'd be the first to jump in and in Toronto run things. But for the most part. I'm not what you'd call a control freak. There are people out there. Maybe you're one of them. Who just feel the need to. Control everything? Here's the thing though. Whether. You're like me or whether you feel that need to control everything well, the thing is there are just so many situations that are totally out of our control. Well. You can drive yourself nuts trying to figure out how to get some some of these situations under control. And then there are those times when. Someone we know or someone close to us is going through a rough time. Maybe an illness. And we just we just want to help them in any way that we can, but but we don't know what to do or or maybe we don't have the means to go to them and help them. And then of course most of us. We worry about tomorrow. We worry about the future. We. Don't really have any control over that, but we should try to control it. All of this worry. All of this need. To control things that we can't control. This need to do something or help. When we don't know how to help, we don't have the means to help. This constant worry about tomorrow. It's not good for us. It's certainly not good for our health. It's not good in helping us. Try to fight off diseases. Because if we're trying to stay healthy. And prevent disease. Eradication disease that might be inside of us. We need to do all that we can to lower Austria level. How do we do that? Well, we need to look to God. Jesus says in Matthew Nineteen Twenty, six and I think this applies. To this worrying control stuff. Jesus looked at them and said. With man, this is impossible. With God, all things are possible, so take hard everybody. Isaiah, forty, one ten. Here, not for I am with you. Be Not dismayed for I. Am Your God? I will strengthen you. I will help you. I would have holds you with my righteous hand. That is strength right there to help you with your worries. Because we don't have the strength to live each day. Handle all these worries on our own. Research don't have the strength plan out and control every aspect of our lives of our children's lives of everybody else's lives. When we give that power to God. Then we're able to find relief. Matthew Eleven twenty eight. Come to me. All who labor and are heavy Laden and I'll give you rest. Wow! What are we like less than ten minutes into the podcast today in already out here on the Porch Middle Tennessee, the temperature gone up about ten more degrees season. And the skies getting even a little cloudier right now, so I don't know of will be finishing this entire podcast on the porch today, but I'm sure going to tried. So before it gets even hotter I think we'd better do a web radio today many workout. This is where you and I. We get up and move, and in any way that we can. Our goal is to. To get our heart rates up to little, burn a couple of calories maybe and and gained some energy. Actually gained some energy by expanding some energy. Can't get up move in any way that you safely can while you're sitting down. The object here is movement. It's your heart beating a little faster. Walking running dancing cycling whatever you WANNA do. If, you're doing a workout right now as you as you listen to the web radio today podcast doing a workout right now. Rank it up during this many work down. Starts moving everybody. Bring it down and cool down for just a couple of minutes before you stop. It moving but at a much slower pace. Received positive comments about our heart rate training many workout which we featured on last week's episode. If you didn't listen to that episode, and if you WanNa try that very simple, many sample interval training workout. Go to web radio, today DOT COM and then. Click on the audio bursts page. And then click on the button for the mini workout and it'll be right there for you to download. I'll also linked to it in the show notes page for this episode and show notes are at Web Radio Today, Dot Com. Just click on the podcast and show notes page. Okay, let's bring the cool down part of our many workout. For episode number thirteen to an end right now. On next week's web radio today episode. That'll be episode fourteen. You'll be out on. Friday. July thirty first next Friday. That entire episode all twenty five minutes of it. will be a stand alone. Heart rate training workout. And that'll be designed for. Our listeners who are using the interval training heart rate training plan A. This is important if you're not familiar with heartbreak training, I'd suggest that you listen to web. Radio Today Episode Number Twelve. That's last week's episode. It'll give you give you a lot of good background information. That'll help you get started with heart rates rainy. That's episode twelve last week's episode of the Web Radio Today podcast the combination of that many workout. If you try that that. That many workout that was part of episode twelve, and then the the PDF that I wrote on heart rate training, and by the way that PDF that'll also be in the show notes for this episode with those two things I think that we've given you a well a pretty good under understanding an introduction and a heart rate training and the different heart rate training zones. And I've also tried to show you. How by listening to your body. That you'll sort of know which heart rate training zone you're exercising in. But, if you want to have a more specific and concise measurement of your heart rate, making sure that you're correctly and each one of those trainings zones. One very simple way to do that is to stop and find your pulse on your wrist, or or on your neck. Measure Your Paul's count, your heart heartbeats for ten seconds, and then multiply that number by six. That will give you your heart rate right there at that second. And if you know what heart rate training zone you should be in, and you've counted your heartbeats like that. You'll be able to know if you're exercising at the correct heartbeat for that training zone. Of course, the problem there is that you have to stop your workout for a few seconds to take those measurements. The other way you can measure your heart. Rate is to wear a heart rate monitor I do that by wearing my watch, which is constantly measuring? My heartbeat is a Duma workout. That's a little more expensive of a way to do all that especially, if you don't currently own an iphone or an Apple Watch. Another standalone less expensive device is the fit bit charge for A. Fitness, tracker! You wear that device on your wrist, and then it'll track your heartbeat. It'll display that it will also track your workout and also then store the data. Those are the the two devices that I know enough about to recommend? Amazon has the fit bit charged four for about a hundred and thirty dollars, and I'll also linked to to that in the show notes. There are other devices out there. Some may be a little more accurate than the apple. Watch the fitbit because they are actually with those devices. You're actually wearing a a band around your chest as you exercise, and then your heart rate then displays on a device on your wrist, and then, of course you can still get deeper into the weeds with a ton of other devices to measure your heart rate. My recommendation at least for now especially, if you're just starting out with heart rate interval training. Listen to your body. And you'll do fine. And now it is time for the featured song for today's episode. And then after we listen to the featured song, we're GONNA to move into the strength training part of our exercise helmet, and then still later in the podcast, and we will look at what can happen in the blink of an eye. Joy with me now the fire apes for a day and see the acids Ri-. Let's. You Feel full you. Can read. Love, Oh. Love? De! You. I can be. An. A. Oh? Yeah, Savin Hill. Bye. She always. Fill. Yes. Instead. Saving. The fire apes a little bit of a Beatles. Web Radio Today. Regular listeners know that the web radio today fitness model has seven elements, faith, diet, exercise, attitude, positive, imagery, music, and knowledge and the past few weeks. We've been talking about the exercise elements specifically heart rate training. I want to spend a little time today. Talking about the other part of the Exercise Element Strength Training. My neighbor's dogs are are now deciding that they want to be part of the PODCAST. To tell our listeners that the human body changes as we get older and sometimes well, we don't particularly like those changes are metabolism. It gets slower. Our strength, and and in particular are muscle. Mass begins to decrease. We, lose quite a bit of our bone density and our body fat increases. We get stiffer joints well. By the time we reach our seventies, the average person loses. About twenty five percent of their muscle mass. Those changes. Sad is they? Are there normal and we definitely are all going to experience them in our sixties in our seventies, but they don't need to be extreme, and we can do some things to to slow and minimize those changes. Were already working to two key bar, heart healthy, but by doing heart rate training. However, we also need to strengthen. Our muscles are other muscles our bones? We need to keep our joints in shape and we do that by doing strength training. Most of the changes due to aging. There simply a result of not using our muscles and inactivity my prescription for correcting all that or at least trying to minimize a lot of it. Strength, training doing strength training as part of your exercise, your overall exercise plan it allows us to build muscles build up those muscles that are going away and those stronger muscles. Those built up muscles. Or what they do is they? Burn off fat. Strength Training gives us a lot more mobility, and it helps us to never have to need those those canes and those walkers. Improve our bodies with strength training everything improves. And it helps us to make these senior years easier. The have more fun. It helps US fight off diseases if you WANNA do that. Here's your homework. I'M GONNA post two articles in the show notes for this episode at Web, Radio Today Dot, com, the first article strength training, get stronger, leaner and healthier. It's an article written by the Mayo Clinic Staff. And then the second article is everything you need to know about strength training. That article comes from. Silver sneakers. Remember Abul Post. Links to those two articles in the show notes for this episode Web Radio Today, Dot Com in the next two weeks plan to to read those two articles and begin to think about how you can add strength training, and to your exercise routine, and then on Web Radio Today Episode Fifteen. That's two weeks from today on that episode. We'll introduce you to the Web Radio Today's Strength Training Program designed specifically for folks in their sixties seventies. Don't forget though next week's episode will be a special workout episode. That workout. The plan a heart rate training interval training workout coached by me, plus we'll have some good music on that episode to work out with. Just a reminder, all of our episodes. All the episodes of Web Radio today are available wherever you get your podcast us. We're on every major podcasting platform and ended this in all of the web radio today. Episodes are also right there at the web radio today DOT COM website. I'm undercover on porch out here, but the rain has started to come down, but it's not gonNA. Stop me! It's not gonNA. Stop US everybody. Episode Thirteen of Web Radio Today continues on. A red just an amazing article. Today I was turned onto the article by listening to one of my favorite podcasts, the Spielman and and Hooghly we tackled life podcast. They talk a lot about Ohio state sports, but they also talk a lot about faith. And this article that Chris Spielman was reading from an alluded to and that I subsequently read later talks a lot about this cove nineteen. Stop in and what we're going through right now is a nation from a faith perspective. I have recorded me reading this article and I've posted it at web radio today, DOT COM it'll be in the show notes for this episode, and it'll also be on the audio burst page their Web radio today DOT COM. I don't WanNa get into all this kkob stuff on our podcast. But I. Think if if you want some more information about it, if you WANNA think about it from a faith perspective that articles Kinda cool. You have two choices you can. You can push the play button there and you can listen to me. Read the article, or you can read the transcript of the article. That's also there as part of the link on WEB RADIO TODAY DOT COM Quite a bit of background ambience on the Web Radio Today podcast today we started out with dogs barking now we have rain coming down and I. Think at some point we might even get a little bit of thunder in the background, but it's all good and I think it especially. ADDS some background. To what we're going to talk about next. When I was getting ready to be wheeled into the operating room for my prostate, surgery and March just before I was due to roll out of that pre op room and head for the operating room. The Senior Deacon at my church, he showed up. It was kind of funny, because in addition to being a deacon at my church. His job was that he was a nurse at Vanderbilt. Hospital a member of their heart transplant team. So he shows up there into the pre op room with this special heart transplant team scrubs on heart transplant team written route there on his shirt I thought. Wait a minute. I'm not getting a heart transplant. Actually he was there to pray with my wife. Terry and I just before the surgery. I appreciated so much immense just so much to me. And I remember that he was saying that. Terry just after we finish star prayer. Sand to her that she needed to go downstairs to the family, waiting room and wait there for about six hours or more, while while my surgery was taking place. But for me. That time would go by. Just in the blink of an eye. Blink of an eye. I've been thinking and an actually. Rain. Talking with God about what that phrase means to me in the blink of an arm. As it's now thunder in the background. That phrase it helps me to understand how really fragile and short. Our Life on earth here is compared to spending eternity with Jesus. That's what our life here on earth. It is according to God's total plan for us. Our, time here on earth, it's just like the blink of an eye. All the goes on in our lives here on earth, the beginning to the end, and all those things that we experience in between. It's just the blink of an eye. Such short time compared to eternity. Here's one way. You can live that short time that that we have on earth. Yet the most you can out of this live live for today because tomorrow, Redone. Acquire Possessions Fun. Live the good life. There is a problem with that kind of thinking. We. Don't just die. Their is an afterlife. And where we spend that afterlife, which is all of eternity where we spend eternity. Depends on how we live our lives today. Is Jesus at the center of your life because he needs to be. Living a life centered on Jesus. It begins with realizing that well God is the author of our story. Everything that we have. was given to us by God. Our blessings are talents. All the good things all the bad things. Everything comes from God. Believing in Jesus and then believing in his life, his death. His resurrection. That's more than just a ticket to heaven. Although it is, but this is important. Are Christ centered life? GIVES US hope and joy? that. We can experience in the here and now in this life. Because Jesus he's. He's promised us his presence in our life here on earth until he calls his home. It isn't wrong. Everybody to pursue our personal goals here on earth but but Jesus. He needs to be our anchor our guide our true compass on how we live our life on earth. If you haven't done so already, I urge you. Come on home to Jesus. Make him the center of Your Life. You'll see an immediate change in everything. And that gift. It's out there for the taking. Accept it and walk with Jesus. It's so simple. You don't need you. Don't need the plan the Jesus into your life. You don't need to tie up any loose ends. You don't need to be real good for a few days. You can come to Jesus. Read now just as you are. Like the verse of the old him says. Just as I am though tossed about. With many a conflict and many a doubt. Fighting fears with Ihnen without. A lamb of God. Won't you come home to cheese today? He's waiting for you just as you are. Whatever bad things you may have done. He knows about them already. He doesn't care. He wants to forgive you. I'll Satan. He's suggesting that you might WanNa think about this for a little while before jumping into this Jesus thing. Satan! He's telling you. Don't make any rash decisions. You have all the time in the world. That's a lie. No, you don't. Tomorrow's not guaranteed. It could all be gone in the blink of an eye. If you haven't done so already. Accept Jesus today. Let them. Walk with you. Guide you through this life. He'll bring you joy in this line. And then. He's going to welcome you home in the next life. Walk into any church. And the first person that you see. Tell them you want to accept Jesus now today. You're put a smile on their face. And they will. Welcome you.

DOT COM Jesus Tennessee Toronto Middle Tennessee Nashville Austria Isaiah Porch Middle Tennessee Oram Matthew Nineteen Twenty Matthew Eleven Savin Hill Laden Ohio Dot Chris Spielman center of Your Life
EPISODE 14 WEB RADIO TODAY

WEB RADIO TODAY

20:56 min | 6 months ago

EPISODE 14 WEB RADIO TODAY

"Hey everybody, EIMSKIP Orem welcoming you to episode number fourteen of the Web radio. Today podcast. Today we are interrupting this. July thirty first episode for a Special Wahab Radio today workout episode. Next Friday August seventh back with a regular web radio today episode. But for today, we're doing a web radio today in the zone interval training workout skin last, just short of twenty five minutes everybody right now I want you to strap on your workout gear plug in your ear pods or or put on your headphones, turn up the volume. and welcome again everybody to a Web. Radio today. Workout episode. Blue. Post. All right. Now, we have started your warm up interval for the next three minutes you should be moving at a warm pace. This warm up pays will be at fifty to sixty percent of your maximum heart rate. Just warming up, so you're breathing should still be regular and you should feel like you could probably. Move at this pace for a fairly long period of time as you start warming up and burning some extra calories. To. This workout you are doing today is the web radio today in the zone interval training workout plan. Which means you'll be moving in three different heart rate training zones as you do this work. You will be doing fifteen intervals during this workout today as well as this warm up period, and then a cool down period at the end of the workout keep warming up. Asked. Spring. Were still warming up however now, I want you to move your pace to heart rate training zone. You'll be expanding a little more energy readings going to become slightly more difficult might be difficult to carry on a conversation, but you could sing if you want. So move your pace now to training zone to. It's now time to short interval fifteen seconds interning zone three your aerobic heart rate training zone seventy to eighty percent of your maximum heart rates. Ready set. Go. BRING DOWN HEART RATE Zone to recover just a bit for the next thirty seconds and then when you hear the tone, move it up zone three for thirty seconds. Back Down to your recovery zone, you have sixty seconds to recover here, and then we'll do one of the longest zone three intervals of the workout going to last for sixty seconds and wants you to try as hard as you can the stand zone three for the entire sixty seconds bats at seventy to eighty percent of your maximum heart rate developing stamina, increasing your aerobic fitness and burning calories and fat at a much more intense level. Doc. All right everybody bring it down to your recovery. You have two. Minutes to recovery. What have we really got to do today. Let's Combat Bruin. Stretching to the win, let's on drizzle. Tomorrow we'll. Wake Up. Be The Sun. So. Were you able to complete the entire sixty seconds of lasts speed interval now if not, don't worry, just try to stay in the interval as long as you can, you'll get better with these zone three intervals the more you do this workout. And Stop. Get, ready. Now, to spend another forty, five seconds in zone three, try to go as hard as you can however it it's okay to slow down or stop if you need to. BACK DOWN TO HEART, rate training zone, to you'll have one hundred and twenty seconds here to recover and reenergized before we do another law speed interval. Just a reminder you are listening to Web Radio Today episode Fourteen, and this special episode is a workout episode designed to help. You spend close to twenty five minutes today strengthening your heart with interval training. We are using plan a today, which has US exercising and three different heart rate training zones, and we're recovering here in your healthy heart rate zone sixty. Percents of your maximum heart rate, and then our speed intervals are in the aerobics zone using seventy that eighty percent of our maximum heart rate. Even in this recovery zone, you're burning calories at a higher rate, and then when we do those speed intervals, you're burning even more calories as you develop stamina, increase your aerobic fitness and burn fat. The next speed intervals coming right up it's going to last for sixty seconds. This one will be difficult. Get ready to start moving in your aerobic training point. One I. Ask Is. No. Well. But she's got this. All right. Everybody, you have ninety seconds to recover here in zone two and then only three more speed and triples to go. I hope you're enjoying this web radio today workout episode just a reminder. Again, this is a plan. Interval training hearts on workout. Plan a meaning that we are training in three different heart rate training zone. This a workout is designed specifically for beginners folks just beginning to do heart rate training. If you're enjoying today's workout, I hope that you'll tell your friends about it. This. Workout episode of Web Radio Today. It's episode fourteen and it's available on all the major podcast platforms you can search either on Web radio today or on my name's oral. Coming up of speed interval and dome three, that interval will last for forty five. Acu. Me when she does, you know turn. Those. The. Star. Lease. From Out. Good job everybody bring down recover and heart rate training zone to we're nearing the end of the workout. Today. Remember. It's not important to stay and the speed intervals zone three for the entire time you can. You could stop and slow down if you want. And, it's really not important that you complete the entire workout especially the first time that you do it. Just. Keep coming back to it again, and again who continued up strengthen your heart and that strong heart of yours is going to help you stay healthy and fight off disease. As a special treat you're going to be inspired to go fast in this next interval by the wonderful bands he'll play of Ryan soup and the rubber band. Standby for the tone. Slowdown moved zone to sixty seconds of recovery and engle. The last speed interval the last zone three interval of the workout. When you hear that tone start moving fast I want you to try to finish a strong as you can. Back to the recovery zone everybody, you have completed all of the intervals of the web radio today in the zone heart rate training workout congratulations. The workout is not actually over, yet you need to cool down but at a much slower pace. So start walking at well almost strolling place like perhaps at the mall downtown just walking around. This cool down period is a very important part of the workout. Cooling down, starting to relax and I'll be back in a minute or so to end the workout. We are coming to the end of today's workout and thank you so much everybody for giving it a try and I hope that you'll come back to it often. After you do this work out a few times, you'll began to learn the sequence and the timing of the intervals. It'll all come natural to you and you won't have to listen to me. You can even add your own music if you want, and you will improve each time that you do the workout you'll also continue tip build your heart strength, burn calories, and burn fat and another added bonus. Even as you're sitting on your couch tonight because you did interval training today, you will continue to burn calories at a faster rate. Next week Friday August. Seventh a regular new episode of Web Radio Today as we continue to use faith and fitness to stay healthy and fight off disease. For the Web Radio Today podcast, I'm skip or. God bless you and goodbye everybody.

EIMSKIP Orem US Ryan soup engle sixty seconds eighty percent twenty five minutes thirty seconds fifteen seconds ninety seconds twenty seconds sixty percent three minutes five seconds