35 Burst results for "Heart Disease Right"

Why Is Obesity Such a Serious Condition?

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

02:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Why Is Obesity Such a Serious Condition?

"Today. We look at a condition that comes with a multitude of serious health issues. Obesity and we start with the best ways to figure out our optimal weight based on our height. We seem to become inured to the mortal threat of obesity. Go back medical issue. A half century or so when obesity wasn't just run of the mill. The descriptions are much more grim. Obesity is always tragic and its hazards are terrify but it's not just obesity of four million deaths every year tribute excess by nearly forty percent of the victim are just overweight or obese. According to two famous. Harvard studies weight gain of as little as eleven pounds from early adulthood through middle age increases risk of major chronic diseases such as diabetes cardiovascular disease and cancer the flip side though is that even modest weight loss can major health benefits. What's the optimal bmi The largest is in the united states and around the world found that having a normal body mass index a bmi from twenty to twenty five associate with the longest lifespan. Put all the best available stays with the longest follow up together and that can be narrowed down even further to a bmi of twenty two twenty two. that'd be about between one hundred and twenty four hundred thirty six pounds for someone who stands five foot six but even with a normal bmi the risk of developing chronic diseases such as type two diabetes heart disease and several types of cancer starts to rise towards the upper end even starting as low as a bmi one a bmi five eighteen point five and twenty four point five or both considered within the normal range but a bmi five maybe shared with twice the heart disease risk compared eighteen point for just as there are gradations risk within a normal bmi range their spectrum with an

Obesity Diabetes Cardiovascular Diseas Harvard Cancer Diabetes Heart Disease United States Heart Disease
Is Alzheimers Reversible? With Dr. Dale Bredesen

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:59 min | 3 weeks ago

Is Alzheimers Reversible? With Dr. Dale Bredesen

"Our guest is extraordinary. Dr a friend of mine. A pioneer in the field of neurodegeneration. Who's broken ground. That few have treaded on. And it's none other than dr dale bredesen's who you may remember from our previous podcast where we discussed his book. The ending alzheimer's. His latest book is called the end of alzheimer's program which is much more robust programmatic insight into how to actually use the protocol that he uses with patients that i use and how can kill her to anybody at any age in any part of the journey along protecting your brain or fixing your brain. He's been on the faculty of ucsf ucla university of california san diego. He's directed the program on aging at the burnham institute before we coming to the buck institute in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight as its founding president and ceo and he's currently a professor at ucla chief science officer at apollo health which is a great online platform for addressing nerd. Degeneracy so welcome dale. Thanks so much for having me on mark. I really appreciate it okay. So so. let's get into this. Because in almost people worry about heart disease diabetes But it doesn't take away who you are. Alzheimer's takes away who you are. Not gender disease takes away your soul in a sense Your memory which is really what we're made of is memories and and i think that it's a terrifying disease for so many it's it's growing and scope it's affecting millions and millions of american thinking about five million now projected to be about fourteen million and a few years the caregiver burden is enormous. That goes along with this The costs are even more than taking care of a patient with cancer. Heart disease And this is an epidemic really Globally it's you know literally hundred of millions of people are going to be affected by this.

Alzheimer Dr Dale Bredesen Ucla University Of California Burnham Institute Buck Institute Apollo Health Heart Disease Diabetes Ucsf DR Ucla San Diego Dale Heart Disease Cancer
Out of Sight But Center Stage, Jurors Weigh Derek Chauvin's Fate

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 3 weeks ago

Out of Sight But Center Stage, Jurors Weigh Derek Chauvin's Fate

"I'm Julie Walker jurors in Minneapolis continue to weigh the fate of former police officer Derek Chauvin charged with the murder of George Floyd what or who killed Floyd that's what both sides argued long closings yesterday defense attorney Eric Nelson told jurors Chauvin was doing what he was trained it was drugs in a bad heart disease heart hypertension all of these things existed before Mr Chauvin rocked prosecutor Jerry Blackwell argued it would show that kneeling on Floyd for nine minutes and twenty nine seconds and not an enlarged heart reason George Lloyd is dead is because Mr Schoen hard was too small jurors are being sequestered as they decide the case which could land show been in prison for up to forty years on the most serious charge audio from court TV I'm Julie Walker

Julie Walker Derek Chauvin George Floyd Chauvin Heart Disease Heart Hypertensi Floyd Mr Chauvin Eric Nelson Jerry Blackwell Minneapolis George Lloyd Mr Schoen
Defense Expert Blames George Floyd's Death on Heart Trouble

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | Last month

Defense Expert Blames George Floyd's Death on Heart Trouble

"At the murder trial of Derek show open in Minneapolis a defense expert blame George Floyd's death on heart trouble prosecution experts testified George Floyd died from a lack of oxygen after being pinned down forensic pathologist Dr David Fowler testified district Lloyd had a sudden cardiac a reasonable cardiac care is mia as a result of his heart disease valor it listed other factors to Sentinel and methamphetamine there it is exposure to a vehicle exhausts financially carbon monoxide poisoning the medical examiner ruled George Floyd's death was a homicide Fowler said there were too many conflicting factors I would fall back to undetermined Tate from court TV prosecutors say Floyd died because Derek show opens me was pressed against Lloyds neck or neck area for nine and a half minutes I'm a Donahue

George Floyd Dr David Fowler Heart Disease Valor Derek Minneapolis Lloyd Fowler Tate Floyd Donahue
Prosecution Rests, Cardiologist Says Police Killed George Floyd

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

01:37 min | Last month

Prosecution Rests, Cardiologist Says Police Killed George Floyd

"Today on day. Eleven just ten miles away. From where more jessica is now on day. Eleven of the trial of derek. Dirk for the murder of george floyd the rested its case after calling three more witnesses. George floyd younger brother described his memories of life with george something that minnesota law allows the victims families to do in murder trials. Defense did not ask any questions of george. Floyd brother cardiologists dr. Jonathan rich testified. That heart disease had nothing to do with the death of george. Floyd he said that. George floyd died because the police crushing his body against the pavement deprived him of oxygen. Toward floyd died from a pulmonary arrest. It was caused by low oxygen levels and those low oxygen levels were induced by the prone restraint and positional a six nations that he was subjected to. I believe that. Mr george floyd death was absolutely preventable where they're critical points in time doing during his subdural and restraint on the ground when you feel measures could have or should have been taken that would have preserved his life. Yes i do. I think there were several junctures. Actually would you tell us about those short. The i of course was to not subject to that initial that initial prone restraint positioning that he was subjected to. I mean that is first and foremost so if that was not the case i don't think he would have died.

George Floyd Jonathan Rich George Floyd Pulmonary Arrest Dirk Derek Mr George Floyd Jessica Minnesota Heart Disease
Medical examiner blames police pressure for Floyd's death

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last month

Medical examiner blames police pressure for Floyd's death

"The chief county medical examiner who ruled George white's death a homicide testified that the way police held him down a compressed his neck was more than Floyd's heart could take Dr Andrew Baker is the chief medical examiner for Hennepin county and the one who wrote the autopsy for George Floyd he experienced a cardio pulmonary arrest in the context of law enforcement to do will restraint and not compression Baker said he did not watch the harrowing video of the arrest before examining Floyd I did not want to bias my exam Baker said that Floyd had heart disease and drugs in his system the law enforcement subdue a restraint on the neck compression was just more than Mister Floyd could take five virtue of that those heart conditions but that significant conditions listed on the autopsy we're not the main cause of Floyd's death Mr Floyd use of fentanyl did not cause the so do our neck restraint idea of the trial was provided by court TV I'm Jennifer king

Floyd Dr Andrew Baker George Floyd Cardio Pulmonary Arrest George White Hennepin County Baker Mister Floyd Heart Disease Mr Floyd Jennifer King
Why Do We Need To Solve the Obesity Epidemic?

Mind Pump

01:38 min | Last month

Why Do We Need To Solve the Obesity Epidemic?

"Why fix the obesity epidemic and it is an epidemic. I know that they named it. Officially an epidemic in the late nineties but obesity been for a couple of decades before that was only really in the nineties. It they said okay. This is an epidemic and it's growing it's been growing ever since so why even solve it. Why even look at this issue and say what are the things we can do to fix this problem. Well there's a there's a some big reasons Number one the health risks associated with obesity alone are tremendous it dramatically increases your risk of all cause mortality. So being means that you're much more likely to die of any reason at all but to be more specific. Your risk of type. Two diabetes goes to the roof heart. Disease goes to the roof. Stroke goes through the roof. Gallbladder disease goes through the roof. Osteoarthritis goes up quite a bit cancer. You know some recent studies atribu consi- literally say that you could just by not being obese. You could reduce the risk of like seventy five percent of cancers okay so just being obese increases your risk of cancer sleep apnea is another one. So is it big problems now. A lot of people might say well. That's personal right. If you're obese. Then it's your your own issue. And i i get part of that. But here's the truth. It literally no joke if you look at obesity and you look at all the things that are connected to obesity. It threatens to bankrupt. Modern

Obesity Gallbladder Disease Cancer Sleep Apnea Cancers Diabetes Stroke
COVID-19 was the third-leading cause of death in the U.S. last year

NPR News Now

00:14 sec | Last month

COVID-19 was the third-leading cause of death in the U.S. last year

"That cova nine hundred was the third leading cause of death in the united states last year. The cdc says provisional data show. Kobe deaths from last year. Follow those from heart disease and cancer. French president emmanuel

Cova CDC United States Kobe Heart Disease French President Emmanuel Cancer
COVID-19 Was the 3rd Leading Cause of Death in Americans in 2020

C-SPAN Programming

00:27 sec | Last month

COVID-19 Was the 3rd Leading Cause of Death in Americans in 2020

"With some new numbers on Corona virus. The pandemic was the third leading cause of death in the U. S last year, contributing to about 16% increase in the national Morty Quality rate from one year earlier. Now the virus was under the underlying or the contributing cause of more than 370,000 deaths in 2020 across the U. S on Lee Heart disease in cancer were more deadly Inco but also displacing suicide as one of the top 10 causes of death in our country. Native

U. Inco Heart Disease Cancer
COVID-19 Was the Third Leading Cause of Death Among Americans in 2020

News, Traffic and Weather

00:22 sec | Last month

COVID-19 Was the Third Leading Cause of Death Among Americans in 2020

"Last year at the third leading cause of underlying underlying cause of death after heart disease and cancer with approximately 378,000 covert 19 deaths. Accounting for roughly 11% of all deaths in the United States. In 2020, CDC director Dr Rochelle Walensky. New data also adds

Heart Disease Cancer Dr Rochelle Walensky CDC United States
Covid was 3rd leading U.S. death cause in 2020

All Things Considered

00:36 sec | Last month

Covid was 3rd leading U.S. death cause in 2020

"Report shows covert 19 death rates were highest among Hispanics and American Indians last year, as well as males and older people, the report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. US death stopped a record 3.3 million last year. CDC director Rochelle Wolinsky coed ranked as the third leading cause of underlying death underlying cause of death. After heart disease and cancer with approximately 378,000 open 19 deaths, accounting for roughly 11% of all deaths in the United States in 2020.

CDC Rochelle Wolinsky United States Heart Disease Cancer
Covid was the third leading cause of death among Americans

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | Last month

Covid was the third leading cause of death among Americans

"The Corona virus pandemic just how devastating hasn't been Well, we've learned that it pushed the number of American deaths last year Beyond 3.3 million. That's the nation's highest ever annual death toll. CDC Director Rochelle will landscape would rank as the third leading cause of underlying death underlying cause of death. After heart disease and cancer with approximately 378,000 covert 19 deaths. 19 display suicide is one of the top 10 causes of death. Death rates overall were highest among black people. Along with American Indian and Alaskan native people. The Koven 19 death rate was highest in the history of Hispanic

Rochelle CDC Heart Disease Cancer Alaskan
COVID-19 pushed total US deaths beyond 3.3 million last year

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

COVID-19 pushed total US deaths beyond 3.3 million last year

"The U. S. death toll hit its highest level ever in twenty twenty with covert nineteen one of the leading causes the centers for disease control and prevention reports some three point three million people died in the U. S. last year this represents a sixteen percent increase in deaths from twenty nineteen CDC director Dr Rochelle Wilensky says heart disease and cancer with the leading causes of death but covert nineteen was next on the list with approximately three hundred seventy eight thousand corporate nineteen deaths accounting for roughly eleven percent of all deaths in the United States in twenty twenty death rates overall were highest among black people and American Indian and Alaska native people the covert nineteen death rate was highest among Hispanic people I'm Ben Thomas

Centers For Disease Control An Dr Rochelle Wilensky U. Heart Disease Cancer United States Alaska Ben Thomas
Covid was the third leading cause of death among Americans in 2020, behind heart disease and cancer,

Mark and Melynda

01:17 min | Last month

Covid was the third leading cause of death among Americans in 2020, behind heart disease and cancer,

"Good morning. I'm saying you guys were just talking about the numbers of covert deaths and how it ranks number three. I think you said heart disease and cancer were number one and two. I don't know what order But I'm just curious If there is any information in that report about the increase the percentage increase, or I don't know if there is an increase in those heart disease and cancer numbers. I know that part of the lockdown Woz that people couldn't get treatment for for the things that they were suffering from, And I'm also curious if there's anything in there about the numbers of deaths from Drug overdoses, of course with the shutdown. You know, mental health and drug use and everything kind of out of control. I'm just curious. How all those numbers square with the coded numbers. Yeah, Those are great questions, and the answers are not in this version of the report. We have, but we will look into that because you're right. People were afraid to go to the emergency room and we heard from the heart doctors and others that they were very worried about that trend. Yes. Oh, that's a great question,

Heart Disease Cancer Drug Overdoses
2 ex-Texas sheriff deputies indicted in Black man's death

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

2 ex-Texas sheriff deputies indicted in Black man's death

"Two former deputies in Texas have been indicted on manslaughter charges after the death of a black man two years ago how do your Ambler a former postal worker who was black was being stopped by police for failure to dim his headlights he allegedly engage them in a chase for twenty two minutes and when police finally caught him he was shocked repeatedly with a stun gun despite his pleas he had heart disease and couldn't breathe the two former Williamson County deputies one black one white we're being filmed by a crew from the reality show live PD at the time both are now charged with second degree manslaughter and released on bond the former sheriff was also indicted for tampering with evidence in the case I am Jackie Quinn

Ambler Texas Williamson County Heart Disease Jackie Quinn
Jurors shown video at ex-officer's trial in Floyd's death

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | Last month

Jurors shown video at ex-officer's trial in Floyd's death

"Video of George Floyd gasping for breath was essentially exhibit a as a trial of the former police officer charged in his death gets under way in Minneapolis what happened in those nine minutes and twenty nine seconds when Mr Derek Jarman was applying this excessive force to the body of Mr George Floyd former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is charged with murder in the second degree murder in the third degree and manslaughter in Hennepin county courthouse prosecutor Jerry Blackwell show jurors footage at the earliest opportunity right Sheldon's defense attorney Eric Nelson so the officer did what he had been trained to do over his nineteen year career arriving to assist other officers struggling to get flood into a squad car there are always two sides to a story Nelson disputed the children was to blame for Boyd's death twenty to heart disease and methamphetamine and fentanyl found in Floyd system the autopsy revealed many other issues I'm Jennifer king

George Floyd Mr Derek Jarman Mr George Floyd Derek Chauvin Minneapolis Jerry Blackwell Hennepin County Eric Nelson Sheldon Nelson Boyd Heart Disease Floyd Jennifer King
The Functional Medicine Approach To Oral Health with Dr. Todd LePine

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:18 min | Last month

The Functional Medicine Approach To Oral Health with Dr. Todd LePine

"People who go to medical school. We don't really learn much about the mouth gum disease or you can have sores in your mouth and we a few things here and there. But it's just amazing. How much of a vacuum and our education or health is but in the turns out it's been linked to everything from alzheimer's to heart disease to cancer and to autoimmune diseases and on and on and on and the question is you know what is going on with abs the connection between our oral health and overall so take us down that pathway. Then we'll talk about you know. Basically how to address dental health a functional medicine perspective. Yeah so mark Just a just a little bit of background. Probably have mentioned this before. But i come from family of dentists so my grandfather was a dentist. He went to the university of maryland in the late eighteen. Hundreds my father went to university of maryland. Nineteen four days. My brother went to u. penn dental school and then his two sons are dentists and my two sisters are dental hygiene. So this is a topic. That's near and dear to me. And i'm sure the black sheep of the family and we know that in functional medicine the gut is sort of where everything starts and it can either lead you down the path of health or can lead you down the path of disease and the beginning of the gut the mouth so as you mentioned you know in in medical school. We didn't learn anything about them out. That was like for the dentist. We'll just ignore that and the dentist just basically stay them out and they don't really realize that there's a whole body connected mild or some of the dentist don't and this is where i think. A lot of even functional medicine physicians and dentists really miss a connection. So unless you're working with a a holistic Smart dentist or a functional medicine doctor. Who's aware of the connection between on the mouth in the gut ends systemic the yoon system You're going to be missing a lot of things and and as you mentioned before You know there are a host of conditions including premature birth obesity diabetes cardiovascular disease rheumatoid arthritis inflammatory bowel disease and even dementia that are directly connected to poor or health.

Alzheimer's Mark Just University Of Maryland Penn Dental School Autoimmune Diseases Heart Disease Cancer Diabetes Cardiovascular Diseas Obesity Dementia
‘How are my kidneys?’: How to be proactive about kidney health

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | Last month

‘How are my kidneys?’: How to be proactive about kidney health

"Or undoubtedly heroes, But for those who do there's a lingering fear about the health of their one remaining kidney when you see your health care provider If they don't do it automatically be proactive and say doctor or her my kidneys. Dr. Griffin Rogers of the National Institutes of Health says people with increased risk should be asking that question if they have, say diabetes, high blood pressure, family history or heart disease. Simple tests can reveal whether there's damage depending upon how extensive it is their measures. That can be instituted that can either reverse or certainly slow the course of that future kidney damage. Christi King wt O Penis Coming up in money

Dr. Griffin Rogers National Institutes Of Health High Blood Pressure Diabetes Heart Disease
"heart disease right" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"heart disease right" Discussed on 710 WOR

"To him he was diagnosed had blood in the stool and rectal bleeding which is always a warning sign and we talk about bleeding a lot as a warning sign well I went to one of the big famous hospitals had been going to one of the big famous hospitals three years he was having medical problems his heart wasn't working well with this normal heart beats it pumps out about let's say sixty five percent of the blood to go out the body his heart was only probably about twenty five percent to was in H. affair relation which means his heart wasn't pumping well of the bad rhythm he also had a sort of being comatose he was in fact it add comma four four years ago I was unable to walk from the calmer it was cared for at this big because but only went to them with rectal bleeding was found of a rectal cancer is from have a cancer blocking his **** so I couldn't defecate any other biopsy that showed added no carcinoma and the ad scans it showed a question of a lesion in the liver and elsewhere India lymph nodes by the **** said a very advanced rectal cancer wasn't walking his legs for weeks and sat home episode with infection for years before Hey whoa this is a man who was in the Air Force you work does life had been incontinent of stool unable to controls to approach from this cancer eating through the **** and I examined him and we talked about all the options it was so proud that he went to this illustrious hospital as well okay she went to this illustrious hospital they found your heart disease right and they found the rectal cancer right and what happened well he said the new so proud of this illustrious house for told me so many times is a majestic hospital he said well they sent me home to die how can you be there talking about this illustrious hospital when they send you home to die the role is to make you better and all of a sudden something clicked in him and he understood that it can be a majestic and wonderful on a lustrous hospital but if it doesn't make the patient batter then what good is it and he said well doctor Lieberman what do you propose I said well let's talk about all the options and I know that you're very weak because of your heart disease and you have that for many years and your fragile and yet you have this cancer in your bleeding I know what the other hospital they didn't want to do surgery because they're afraid you're going to die on the table they want to give you came out because I thought you would die during chemo and they sent you home to die.

cancer Air Force Lieberman India
"heart disease right" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"heart disease right" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"Dot com we're back from the break so let's rejoin dr michael arco so what should you do should you eat saturated fat ignore the data that says eating a high saturated fat diet leads the high cholesterol let's lease the heart disease should you ignore that and say you know what there's data on the other side and it says that there is no correlation and go ahead and eat the butter eat the meat drink the milk eat the cheese don't worry about it one hundred percent full stop go after it what should you do welcome back to let's talk to tradition you decide now i'm gonna from i'll tell you as a researcher that there are studies that show no correlation between eating saturated fat high cholesterol and heart disease right there's something that goes on here a little technical well i think i can explain it in a simple way a lot of those studies are called cross sectional studies what's a cross sectional study a cross sectional study is simply when you collect data on a whole study population at one point in time to examine the relationship between disease and some health related outcome that's what it is it's an observational study some of the issues with those kinds of studies are the sample is not representative it's not a random sample it's a convenience sample another issue the sample size is too small you're going fishing with a net that has big holes in it you're not you're missing a lot of stuff you're not catching the all the fish thirdly the data on exposures outcomes are correlated simultaneously you can how can i explain this how you collect the data let me put it this way how you go about collecting that data the method of collection can influence the kind of data was it a phone survey was it a questionnaire how did you get it from wednesday the data common how did you collect it.

researcher dr michael arco representative one hundred percent milk
"heart disease right" Discussed on Pod Save the People

Pod Save the People

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"heart disease right" Discussed on Pod Save the People

"Of the things that you would expect in terms of mental health problems or substance dependence or other issues but also you know really common chronic diseases like heart disease cancer chronic lung disease asthma diabetes alzheimer's and so that again was the just defied what we thought we knew about the long term impacts of childhood adversity overnight i saw the original study one of the things that concern me and i think this is actually what i it is that i didn't see an analysis of racing income like it wasn't that that didn't seem to be present in the original study but i think that it's an updated sense wanted since you're an expert i wanted to ask you do we know about how trauma impacts communities differently by demographics yes so well we know more than we did when the ace study was originally published two decades ago right so what we now understand that the the the biological mechanism and this is where all of my research and interest has come in is like how does that happen how is it that if you're exposed to adversity in childhood that it you know way increases your risk for heart disease right and what we now understand that the biological mechanism by which this happens is something is is a condition called 'toxic stress which is that when you're exposed to stressful or traumatic situations it activates our bodies biological stress response our fight or flight response and that's good right like that is you know your body releases stress hormones adrenaline and cortisol and and all of this is supposed to you know save your life from a mortal threat right and that's good but if it's activated too frequently then these systems that are supposed to be adaptive or helpful they lose their ability to regulate themselves normally like we lose the normal regulation of that system and it goes from being adaptive or helpful to maladaptive or harmful right so you see too much stress hormones and you.

chronic lung disease cortisol two decades
"heart disease right" Discussed on Freedom 95 Radio

Freedom 95 Radio

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"heart disease right" Discussed on Freedom 95 Radio

"Who have come into the office just to kind of see what we do it is a very high paced fun atmosphere so you will hear kids playing you'll hear adults talking we typically have some sort of good educational video playing just as a whole or music it's just one where you walk in and i've had patients and it really warms my heart when they say it they'll say i walked in and i just knew that this that this was a place of healing and i think that that's amazing you know because that's that's really what the desire is to be and that's when we talk about how people come in often times and they say well you know i don't really think that i need the whole chiropractic aspect i'm really looking for more of the nutrition but what they're telling me is that i have an ailment and i have a problem that i think nutrition will help but i'm uneducated about how chiropractic plays a role in that and that's really when we talk about health because think about all the people who eat right and exercise but then yet for some reason are still stricken with illness whether it be cancer whether it be heart disease right they ate right in the exercise but they had a huge heart attack why and that's really where i think it's it's interesting to talk about health and wear health comes from because you think about that's that's our ultimate search right when you don't have your health health will become the number one most important thing i ask people all the time what is the the number one most important thing in your life and so oftentimes people will say well of course it's my husband and it's my kids in it's my family and it's my job and i've got all of these things that are just the most important in a life thing about it day in and day out think about you yourself the one who's listening right now think about in the last seven days in the last week how many times have you thought about your health so the average person not many you think about your health when you have to take a medication right because you know that your health may be affected if you don't take that medication if you don't have your health you don't think about it.

cancer seven days
"heart disease right" Discussed on Elite Man Podcast

Elite Man Podcast

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"heart disease right" Discussed on Elite Man Podcast

"And your typical alzheimer's patient stays in a nursing home for a number of years mean typical to death is eight years and most alzheimer's patients are in a nursing home being cared for for couple years we can undercut that cost by a lot and we're talking about a one time shot every couple of years so no i think in the long run when i look at this and other age related diseases this is the only advance i can think of medicine ever i you know going back to bacterial to to germ theory and hygiene the only thing i can think of that has such a broad impact and actually promises to cut not raise global health costs the other thing that just came to mind is if you get this approved for treating als timers can the shot the injection wherever you end up using can that be used off label is the fda would they they allow you to use it for other things like heart disease right away or some of the i mean i'm thinking like biohacking we've got a lot of biohacking listeners here would love to like do this shot and you know rejuvenate rejuvenate something recover faster from exercise build muscle that kind of thing would they be able to to go to their doctor to get a prescription for something like this or that be further testing and more years well i mean the quick answer is yes sort of but that that brings up a deep rancher which is yes yes and yes in the sense because the you know the the data that supports the fact that we can go after asia related disease is in some ways even better for the major killer major killing at age really disease which is basketball aging and most people don't buy valves honors although there are cases like the uk last year where they do but most of us as we age end up dying of arterial disease vascular disease in general for example heart attacks strokes aneurysms purple vascular disease congestive heart failure he goes on but they're all basically vascular aging and the data are even better she just that we can improve asking raging and tree angel investor disease likewise we should be able to go after osteoarthritis osteoarthritis osteoporosis skin aging immune aging renal failure a lot of age related diseases which banks.

alzheimer fda uk basketball eight years
"heart disease right" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"heart disease right" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"And they compare in order to see that's how they caught hiv eventually right so they notice like oh these patterns but they gave it the sexy title of surveillance so they could get funding from the defense department because it sounds like a defense expenditure so part of it is just funding right and then part of the hollywood you know what what are you going to be more likely to pay money to watch you're gonna watch movie of someone dying of diabetes or someone dying of this graphic illness were blood is shooting out of their eyes and everything i mean it's sensational it's fun and so people have this idea in their head that he bolla is this very visceral visual things and also i think the other thing that that really happened to people's fear is a lot of times we feel like oh well my behavior is prevent me from getting heart disease right my behavior is to prevent me from getting diabetes my my behavior is going to prevent me from getting an st or whatever and what terrifies people about things like you go is this notion oh my god i could be a good person and i can still get sick i can still die there's nothing that i can do to protect myself there's nowhere that i can go to protect myself and that's why these viruses are so great for the kind of conventional narratives that they really happened for that amount of fear you know that you you there's no way to protect yourself supposedly even though of course there right but you had the case in two thousand fourteen of the doctor in new york that had he bowl and he's gone bowling and they closed down the bowling alley for a week and people were saying oh my god i'm never taking the subway again because he rode the subway and it's like okay settled down it's not that easy to catch you boola but again there's this notion of like i can't protect myself on gomer bowl and so people are going to go to those movies they're going to read the articles and so it's very easy to sensationalize.

hollywood diabetes new york gomer bowl
"heart disease right" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"heart disease right" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"Of of these kinds of things intent talked a little bit about yet so lemme go back to talk about the biomarker consortium which is i think what you're referring to the far marker consortium is ten years old and let's define i don't know if yeah go ahead guest list led by advice let's talk about it not in a very simplistic way what we mean by by market and and frankly it is exactly what it says it's a biological marker the key to up to a the reason a biomarkers important is because it allows you to identify it could be a surrogate of what's happening in your body so let me give you a simple example blood pressure blood pressure is a biological marker for heart disease right so cholesterol is a biological marker that you're going to have something hat bad happening in your veins and that's what we're looking for we're looking for biological markers that actually we'll tell you this is going to be a problem if this goes up it's a problem as it goes down it's fine and so we are looking for markers that tell us different stories it could be is is an indicator of disease or is it an indicator of pain or is this drug working so you need to have a biomarker that has been validated that people can say and that the regulators can say if that biological marker goes down then this drug is working so that's why biomarkers are important because you don't have to wait until the person dies or until the disease progresses you know you're attacking and disease because that biological marker is being affect the probably also allows you to intervene exergen moments before it gets exactly exactly so that's why we check our cholesterol that's why we took our blood pressure because those or biological indicators that you're going to have a problem.

ten years
"heart disease right" Discussed on Minority Korner

Minority Korner

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"heart disease right" Discussed on Minority Korner

"And they say that it we might actually even carry a gene that makes us on sensitive to that so uh sidebar black folks check your blood pressure on the rag now than when i went to a who what you're gonna say ages league i in i'm sure you're going to go into this but it just as lake ironic that wind black people had this gene and then to fucking food deserts yes we will talk about that would've had enough food deserted it became hearing about that right and so then i like these i read some heartbreaking statistics were talked about obesity and overweight and the thing about it is it's at lake cigarettes are not the number one killer heart diseases right so it's like holy fuck and the whole thing that i realised for metering the whole thirty is a lot of it is about realising there are unhealthy relationship with food and a lot of it is through how we've grown up and and we told her body not to smoke and his huge campaigns about that we really need to start looking in to our food and what we're putting into our body healthy fizz this is your vehicle ramp to do all the great an amazing things that you were meant to do right and i think that it's purposely done that black and latino folks have our app some of the or do not have the greatest access to food which we talked about in a moment to right so african americans on seventy neka yeah hold on to something what uh this break seventy five percent of african americans aligarh obese are overweight seventy five per cent now let's compared to now seventy seven percent of all i know sway compared with sixty seven point two percent of whites adult angry miami's over average so yet that already is like everybody not doing you well what about iceland unusal they're not really on these lists and either doing really well i don't know they weren't on the ob no one was really track in them rather.

blood pressure obesity african americans miami iceland seventy seven percent seventy five percent two percent
"heart disease right" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"heart disease right" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"So this guy broken lesbians janitor to awesome categories quote those who fell four when playing the man's part and man man slash women men slashed women were butch looking and quote developed a pair of imperfect mustaches and and would why the watts developed a pair of imperfect mustaches developed up eyebrows no i think what line here in these one somewhere else i'm not sure i don't know how lesbian does he mean what did i say again developed a pair of a perfect mustache and yet you said it right yeah so you've got one up here yeah and the other one the other ones somewhere else connecting mustaches yet they let the mad magazine when you put the posted together back a new shape that was for the older people get i'm i'm straight so i don't know i don't know what happens in this crazy world but a couple of weird mustaches area hanging around somehow in a way imperfect impart yet right the superintendent found lesbian equipment quote y lesbian prior you learn to keep going i've learned that artificial substances mechanically secured to the person formed the substitute for the male oregon mmm so i honest video of sausages so we just found delta yeah early eighteenth century tip wasn't on october they're not allowed to have dildos they can't have sex they can have dildos because that will give them heart disease right sexwale ruin the empire right yet but they're allowed to have to perfect mustaches.

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"heart disease right" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"heart disease right" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"And we're still at twelve percent so we haven't made progress on that um i think the other concept the you know the other we we really begun to rethink hunger and food insecurity is that we begin to realize that a link to obesity us is that that that obesity and food security travel together that the same people who are uh who are at risk of food insecurity or hunger are ironically also but once you tend to be overweight because what they're having to do is resort to lowercost high new high debt high energydense uh that are cheaper more filling and the cycle of of a eating of binging and fasting or one that um and to tend to make people more prone to put down the pounds all right so there there's these systemic entrenched issues of which you know again what we call the hunger obesity paradox uh something that is that is that is um very prevalent in this country and also you know is linked to diaby higher rates of diabetes and other metabolic syndrome disorders such as heart disease right and according to the national survey of children's health thirty percent of wisconsin used aged ten to seventeen are overweight or obese and these centers for disease control and prevention report that thirty percent of wisconsin adults are overweight or obese and as you just said i mean there are all sorts of health conditions related to being overweight or obese so if we are what we we eat what we need to do about what we eat and especially for people who are foodinsecure um you know i think the you know i think people are doing what they can um and you know we all could he'd better including myself we could all dropped out the andy i'm i'm not gonna i'm not going to get at you about what you're eating and i know thank you think okay that um but i think no up i think the point is you know the american diet is is less than ideal um you know and the.

food insecurity wisconsin obesity food security lowercost metabolic syndrome thirty percent twelve percent
"heart disease right" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"heart disease right" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Yeah that's the other point that would walk in glamoc tori respond so at the information that happened is there is no component could correct krone have to really understand that correct wrote a waxy upton it get cramp through the body by the rifle protein lipids and proteins come by one of them hold ldl cholesterol and the other one is cold eco cholesterol and and there's also a word fat and lifted triglycerides so what happened is that if you have a high component of ldl cholesterol ldl cholesterol oxidized it undergo transformations something the body accent graeme hick and it becomes very after tanic atherogenic moon that it does could a world of the endo fealey unwinding of all of our blood vessel we talk about heart disease recalling about heart disease right now but it could and blood that on your body you're a order the arteries going up to your brain the artery got pride blood to your could move your liver so it's everywhere throughout the entire circulatory system when ldl is oxidized and a wall of the artery is a paid up in glamoc tori so that a act it and it christ to sort of quick active from going further but what happens is when the levels up persistently elevated it get further and further it's like a bombardment of of of just go that attack the in aligning of our blood vessel and it opens up an area that cram one now that rao request to move in to the sort of you know layers of the artery of our body and and that's where the inflammatory response at one point is protecting us but at the same time it's also uh if there's a lot of information going on and there's a lot of high levels of cholesterol it gets into that blood vessel and it's start developing in a afro gen a crack on or or and the term is obviously atherosclerosis after it that self in there and then it actually changes on tour our arteries and the ability vied narrows augurs because it fold is out into the woman and that's really what sets you up to a potential to develop a heart attack which is a easier enap crack get then get the tac by platelet then course a caught so you're absolutely right that.

ldl cholesterol graeme hick heart disease glamoc tori rao atherosclerosis
"heart disease right" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"heart disease right" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"Chris meryl show new thongklai 550 cam and play a little bit of this kimmel uh criticism negative legal thing delineated the there are a number of people who are listening we're award burlap to'real dirt burn around burgoa withers burgener dr margaret dongo lug america stuff well look marco jimmy kimmel has a kid who's born with congenital heart disease right and his kid a jewish of time off the show and he comes back with this this tearful explanation what happen in about how is is child was a sitting there watching is tiny newborn child going through heart surgery horrifying for apparent swiss become a real advocate for making sure that there's health care coverage to ensure that people who are not is will office he don't have to worry about whether or not the doctors are going to do the lifesaving surgery if they have a health insurance well listen i know you guys are gonna find is hard to believe but a few months ago after my son had openheart surgery which was something i spoke about an era of politician a center named bill cassidy from louisiana was on my show and he wasn't very honest it seemed like he was being honest he got a lot of credit in attention for coming off like the rare reasonable voice in the republican party when it came to health care for coming up with something he called i didn't aim at this he named it this he the jimmy kimmel test which was in a nutshell no families should be denied medical care emergency or otherwise because they can't afford it he agreed to that he said he would always born a healthcare bill that made sure a childlike mind would get the health coverage he needs no matter how much money his parents make and that did not have annual or lifetime caps these insurance companies they want tabs to limit how much they can pay out so for instance if your son as they have reopened heart surgeries and can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars a peace if he hits his lifetime cab of let's say a million dollars the rest of his life he's on his own our current plan protects americans from these caps and prevents insurance providers from jacking.

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"heart disease right" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"heart disease right" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On a cure are advancements in medicine and so to do think alzheimer's can be prevented i do to an extent so i also think alzheimer's begins with the buildup of a protein called amyloid beta and that and build up can take ten to twenty years before it reaches a tipping point that then causes the disease to become symptomatic ansel like heart disease right like so we know that when you go for your physical and you get your blood pressure taken in your cholesterol checked with an oblige draw your being tested for heart disease and the hope is that if they catch it you can do something about that either through statins diet exercise to prevent you from getting heart attack in ten years or twenty years likewise with alzheimer's there are things that we can do to keep those amway plaque levels from reaching the tipping point and they involve similar things like like so one of the big discoveries in recent years has to do with sleep so in slow wave deep sleep are galil cells rinse cerebralspinal fluid throughout our brains and this clears away a lot of the metabolic waste that accumulated during the business of wien awake and one of the things that can clear away as amyloid beta and so you can imagine that while you're sleeping this is being surf swept away it's like a deep cleanse for the brain but if you're not getting enough sleep you're going to wake up in the morning with amyloid beta levels not cleared away and so it's going to pile up we know that cardiovascular health is so important anything that's good for your heart is also going to be good for your brain and likewise anything that's not good for your heart is probably not going to be good for venting alzheimer's in so you can imagine that if you did nothing you'll reach that tipping point sooner so in terms.

alzheimer blood pressure amway twenty years ten years
"heart disease right" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"heart disease right" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"And so like heart disease right like so we know that when you go for your physical and you get your blood pressure taken in your cholesterol checked with um a blood draw your being tested for heart disease and the hope is that if they catch it you can do something about that either through statins diet exercise to prevent you from getting heart attack in ten years or twenty years likewise with alzheimer's there are things that we can do to keep those amyloid plaques levels from reaching the tipping point and they involve some more things like like so one of the big discoveries in recent years has to do asleep so in slow wave deep sleep our galil cells rinse cerebralspinal fluid throughout our brains and this clears away a lot of the metabolic waste that accumulated during the business of being awake and one of the things that can clear away as amyloid beta and so you can imagine that while you're sleeping this is being sort of swept away it's like a deep cleanse for the brain but if you're not getting enough sleep you're going to wake up in the morning with amyloid beta levels not cleared away and so it's gonna pileup we know that cardiovascular health is so important anything that's good for your heart is also going to be good for your brain and likewise anything that's not good for your heart is probably not going to be good for preventing alzheimer's in so you can imagine that if you do nothing you'll reach that tipping point sooner so in terms of it preventing the disease in a maybe you've bought yourself you know an extra ten fifteen twenty years what after the tipping point what are the uh or the symptoms look like.

heart disease blood pressure alzheimer ten fifteen twenty years twenty years ten years
"heart disease right" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:12 min | 4 years ago

"heart disease right" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"Rejoin dr michael garca turns out that heart disease is the leading chronic cause of death in the united states although i believe the diet is the leading cause of death of all chronic of these chronic diseases and kyle kyle gauge garlic extract can survey wonderful purpose in keeping your cardiovascular system healthy those arteries you know steve boggs things my guest educated for walk of america were talking about you're talking about metabolic syndrome of course that's correlated with heart disease right i think it very quote quick correlated yeah for sure no doubt in fact one of the risk factors for metabolic syndrome is high blood pressure is it not yet it is so you already have more disease when you have metabolic syndrome in most cases in most cases but go ahead met you were talking about dr booed off study by how age garlic extract was able to a break up the soft fatty plaque right well the mud cardiologists are looking at what they call low attenuation plaque now which is what is that what a bottle of all kinds of placards more prone to breaking off and actually causing a heart attack so they're giving it a lot more attention now and will it's really kind of interesting that cardiologists had begun in researching edge garlic extract in a ability to reduce flow attenuation plaque uh this study that dr booed opted had fifty five people so obviously we need to go back and try and do a much larger study but uh the positive result convinced study alone that were published in the journal of nutrition uh hopefully will stimulate that at scientific process down the road some numbers call into the studio if you like to ask these questions may many of you are i know many of you do take cairo gauge garlic extract if you have something to share about your experience with the please call us you could reach eight seven seven eight nine seven eight two five five that's eight seven seven eight nine seven eight two five five.

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"heart disease right" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"heart disease right" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

"That garoppolo it go on the roster a bring all kinds of questions about well tom brady really gonna play tweet 45 in the patriot are there preparing for him to maybe walkaway during her i think at men among the patriots are looking at it as look tom brady is going to be forty years old and um history hurt me again that when he started to decline it's going to happen pretty quickly so uh i think from their vantage point jimmy garoppolo is under contract at a very cheap rape for one more year eat they've spent three and a half years developing and they really like amino them well they don't wanna just farm amount to another team something were to happen to brady this fall uh i think they feel confident that garoppolo could pick up the the team and and continuous super bowl ron and look if if brady still playing great and says i'm i'm playing another or years after the you and then they'll figure something our next off he's whether they can maybe bring jimmy garoppolo back on a shortterm dealer may be franchised agamene trade them but i think are there willing to wait and they don't wanna make it if it until they absolutely happy because uh com brady brawl that he said that he wants to play quarterback is age typically declined pretty quickly yet snatch key point he could say that he wants to plane was mid 40s but once it starts to go south it goes quickly but ben is there part maybe word that's not what he wants to sense that he has wrapped up his op field activities in the world of endorsements knowing that in ways working his brand is heart disease right now is it possible that maybe he's setting this thing up for a surprise retirement either after this season or the year after year the eye and that's what i wrote last week that for all the talk about him wanting to play thirty forty five it it got him like setting up surprise retirement add it if they win the super bowl this year i would not be shocked to see him walk away are you talked.

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"heart disease right" Discussed on Latest in Paleo

Latest in Paleo

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"heart disease right" Discussed on Latest in Paleo

"To wean our kids on twin keys and donuts and white bread and and to say that there's nothing wrong with that her pizza and tacos and what have you so i i think that there's a quality issue here uh that it is important you know you might get hit by a bus tomorrow but at least you had a good life up until that you're okay it gets interesting um you were talking about epidemiological stuff because they're really a better animal right now for studying something like lynch javadi can't really steady some of these heart and points with our ctc can't really put people in a in a clinic tell you giving a certain diet in end wait till they get heart disease right so do we have anything better what you know i i as i mentioned i i was a huge huber through two years and i i taught a research design class before basically the entire time i was there and when you're teaching graduate level course you have to stay up on things and so uh most scientist it took research design when they were taking uh you know they're matthew their their masters of their their doctor level course work and then they forget it and they use a little bit of it and they don't pay much attention to any of the the fundamentals so i can tell you is that uh in epidemiology particularly epidemiology of a healthy diet and disease there are four main techniques that are used to establish causalities.

heart disease scientist lynch two years