35 Burst results for "Heart Disease"

"heart disease" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

05:06 min | 3 weeks ago

"heart disease" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"<Speech_Female> The research <Speech_Female> found there's no <Speech_Female> beneficial effects <Speech_Female> on <Speech_Female> reducing saturated <Speech_Female> fat on cardiovascular <Speech_Female> disease and <Speech_Female> death. <Speech_Female> In fact, the research <Speech_Female> instead found <Speech_Female> protective effects <Speech_Female> against stroke <Speech_Female> when study <Speech_Female> participants ate <Speech_Female> foods that had <Speech_Female> saturated fat. <Speech_Female> And I just <Speech_Female> want to share a <Speech_Female> client story. <Speech_Female> I have a client. <Speech_Female> I've been seeing <Speech_Female> probably <Speech_Female> for a little less <Speech_Female> than a year. <Speech_Female> He had a heart <Speech_Female> attack at age <Speech_Female> 43. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Strong <Speech_Female> family history of <Speech_Female> heart disease. He <Speech_Female> wanted to meet with me though <Speech_Female> in <Speech_Female> terms of just <Speech_Female> revamping his diet <Speech_Female> in <Speech_Female> order to prevent any <Speech_Female> further cardiovascular <Speech_Female> disease. <Speech_Female> He doesn't want obviously want <Speech_Female> to have another heart attack. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Very, <Speech_Female> very reluctant <Speech_Female> to add saturated <Speech_Female> fats into <Speech_Female> his diet. <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> could tell, you know, just <Speech_Female> he was <Speech_Female> kind of fighting me tooth <Speech_Female> and nail. He's like, ah, <Speech_Female> he's like, I just think I'm going to <Speech_Female> contribute to more heart <Speech_Female> disease if I eat these <Speech_Female> saturated fats. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Where do you think <Speech_Female> he got that <Speech_Female> message <Speech_Female> or information? <Speech_Female> Who knows? I mean, <Speech_Female> that's just kind of <Speech_Female> been a long-standing, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> a lot of people <Speech_Female> just think that, <Speech_Female> but right. <Speech_Female> Maybe they don't even <Speech_Female> know where they first heard that. <Speech_Female> No, exactly. <Speech_Female> Or <Speech_Female> maybe cardiologists <Speech_Female> are still saying it. <Speech_Female> It's updated <Speech_Female> information. Right, <Speech_Female> exactly. <Speech_Female> Anyway, <Speech_Female> I talked to <Speech_Female> him. I tried to <Speech_Female> explain to him <Speech_Female> that it's more <Speech_Female> the blood sugar <Speech_Female> piece and <Speech_Female> the jelly beans he was eating <Speech_Female> every day. They'll <Speech_Female> say ultra <Speech_Female> processed sugary foods <Speech_Female> that were irritating <Speech_Female> his vessel linings, <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> it wasn't the saturated <Speech_Female> fat. So <Speech_Female> he <Speech_Female> actually put <Speech_Female> his faith in me <Speech_Female> and he <Speech_Female> started eating the saturated <Speech_Female> fats. <Speech_Female> He started <Speech_Female> doing coconut oil, <Speech_Female> real <Speech_Female> butter, heavy <Speech_Female> whipping cream, <Speech_Female> and I <Speech_Female> said, let's test your <Speech_Female> cholesterol again <Speech_Female> in about three to <Speech_Female> 6 months. Let's <Speech_Female> see where we're sitting. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And <Silence> <Speech_Female> it was great news. <Speech_Female> His cholesterol <Speech_Female> had gone down <Speech_Female> and his bad cholesterol <Speech_Female> are his LDL <Speech_Female> had gone <Speech_Female> down. <Speech_Female> With eating the <Speech_Female> saturated fats. <Speech_Female> That's phenomenal. <Speech_Female> But you <Speech_Female> were confident that <Speech_Female> that would be the outcome. <Speech_Female> Right. He had <Speech_Female> faith in you. Right. <Speech_Female> So kudos. <Speech_Female> To him, I know it <Speech_Female> can be hard to have <Speech_Female> a new way <Speech_Female> of thinking. Right. <Speech_Female> Exactly. <Speech_Female> But that's a <Speech_Female> great story. I thank you so much <Speech_Female> for sharing. <Speech_Female> That brings back <Speech_Female> a memory of, <Silence> <Speech_Female> I think it was in 2014 <Speech_Female> when <Speech_Female> Time Magazine, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> listeners may remember <Speech_Female> this. But Time Magazine <Speech_Female> came out, <Speech_Female> there was a picture <Speech_Female> of butter <Speech_Female> on the cover of <Speech_Female> this magazine. <Speech_Female> And the <Speech_Female> tagline read, <Speech_Female> eat butter, <Speech_Female> scientists <Speech_Female> labeled fat <Speech_Female> the enemy, <Speech_Female> why they <Speech_Female> were wrong. <Speech_Female> And I don't know if you remember <Speech_Female> that Christie, but that <Speech_Female> was <Speech_Female> a real eye opener <Speech_Female> for a lot of people. <Speech_Female> And of course, at <Speech_Female> nutritional weight and wellness, <Speech_Female> I was working here <Speech_Female> in 2014. <Speech_Female> And we were <Speech_Female> already <Silence> <Speech_Female> disseminating that message. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Exactly before it <Speech_Female> even came out in the <Speech_Female> magazine. <SpeakerChange> Yeah. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Yeah, so <Speech_Female> it just kind of brought <Speech_Female> back that memory.

heart disease heart attack Time Magazine Christie
"heart disease" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

05:30 min | 3 weeks ago

"heart disease" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"Any night of the week. Sure. So presto, very similar meal to the fast food meal, but the homemade burger and homemade potatoes were minimally processed. How many ingredients? Well, beef, cheese, potato, butter, and a couple of vegetables on the side. That sounds great. And what I like to tell my clients, too, is when they're cooking at home as well, not only are they feeding their body better, they're also saving money too. By buying those foods. This is going through the drive-through. I didn't do the math on how much everything costs. But a lot less, just for cooking one burger patty at home with a slice of cheese. Exactly. And one potato. Right. Well, and like you said, it doesn't have to be complicated. I've even seen in the grocery store, those pre made hamburger patties. You know, they have those at most grocery stores to speed up the process. You have to open the container, throw it on the grill, put it on the stove top, and then it's done in a few minutes. Super easy. Right, or think about eggs, some people are so busy or maybe they just haven't learned how to cook. And you can go to the store and buy eggs that are even pre boiled. Or what about kid chicken nuggets? Well, I shouldn't say kid chicken nuggets love adults eat chicken nuggets too, but whether they're from a fast food chain or if you're grabbing them out of your freezer, those are considered ultra processed. They have a lot of preservatives, additives, and refined oils. So just not good for the heart. Yep, correct. Personally, I love our recipe for the turkey and the chicken nuggets that are on our website. If you guys want to check that out, it's at weight and wellness dot com. I can tell you the turkey and the chicken nuggets, those are a hit with my two teenagers. I'm sure there's other great recipes for homemade chicken nuggets as well. The key really is just starting with real chicken, real turkey, and adding minimal ingredients to it. So like, for example, that recipe online that I was referring to for our healthy chicken nuggets, the ingredients are chicken and egg, almond meal, salt, and

nuggets
"heart disease" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

04:56 min | 3 weeks ago

"heart disease" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"Even packaged breads, granola bars, and sweetened yogurt, fall into this category of being ultra processed. I know, I mean, I feel like most foods these days is falling into that category. Exactly. And these are the foods heavily marketed, well, to both kids and adults. Did you know that 60% of the calories that Americans are eating come from foods that are in this ultra processed category? That's crazy. 60%. 60%. I am more than half of the foods that most people are eating. Fall into this category. So we need to think about the future health not only of our aging population, but our kids. I mean, if we can steer our kids away from these highly processed foods, we're setting them up for a future to have low risk of heart disease. Not to mention many other chronic diseases that can occur from poor nutrition and lifestyle. Right, exactly. So I can't believe that it's already time for our second break here. It's going the hours going fast. But you are listening to dishing up nutrition. We are talking about heart disease today, which is the number one cause of death in our country. As nutritionists and dietitians, we focus on food first. But additional supplements can be helpful to fill in. I like to call it nutritional gaps. Most Americans are deficient in omega three fatty acids. So taking a high quality omega three fish oil supplement can reduce inflammation and can be supportive for heart health. And so omega three fatty acids, they can be difficult to obtain from food sources. That is one reason that most Americans are deficient. So we will talk more about

heart disease
"heart disease" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

05:35 min | 3 weeks ago

"heart disease" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"And before the break we were talking about a heart disease study. Yeah, so the study just found that ultra processed foods and we're about to talk more about what that definition means. Really are the culprit when it comes to heart disease. So in this study, there were 22,000 participants. So very large study. The group that ate the most highly processed foods had a 32% greater risk of dying from heart disease compared to the group that ate few processed foods. Well, on the other thing that study found was the group eating the most highly processed foods had a 19% greater risk of dying from all causes. So this is really powerful information and I would tell my client with that family history of heart disease that the first thing he or she could do to reduce that risk of developing heart disease is to minimize those highly processed foods in their diet and focus on eating real foods that are in their original form. We have a dietician on staff, Mel. She has the greatest sayings, and I'm not going to get it exactly right, but I've kind of summarized what she has said, and this is what I say to my clients as well in terms of eating real foods. If you can not pick it off of a bush, pluck it off a tree, dig it out of a garden or chase it around a farmyard, you shouldn't be eating it. I mean, we love mal. And we love that phrase. So researchers broke down foods in the study and put them into several categories. Unprocessed or minimally processed. So these are the healthiest foods for our heart. These are the ones that you pick, pluck, chase around, find out a farm, dig out of the ground. Real protein would be eggs, chicken, beef, fish, real carbohydrates, grown in the ground or picking off of a tree. Think about eating a fresh salad with a variety of vegetables. Or a piece of fruit, or maybe some berries, potatoes coming from the ground. And real unprocessed fats and oils, like olive oil, coconut oil, butter, nuts, seeds, and avocados. You know, and I'd add in the unprocessed or minimally processed category that there can be some shortcuts. So I'll give you an example, the protein shake that I make in the morning for breakfast. I use organic frozen blueberries

heart disease Mel bush
"heart disease" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

03:22 min | 3 weeks ago

"heart disease" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"And you were meeting with the client, and he said, you know, I'm in my 40s. My dad had a heart attack when he was 48 years old. Other family members have also had heart conditions. I am afraid that I will have a heart attack in my 40s like my dad and Christie, what can I do to prevent this? Yeah, actually I do see quite a few clients that have either have heart conditions or they want to prevent heart disease from happening based on their genetics. So usually the first thing that I tell these clients is that even with that family history of the heart disease, 90% of the situation is actually in their control. 90%. People have a lot more control over their health than they actually might realize. Really, the only risk factors for heart disease that are not in our control would be the age or our genetic factors, all the other things I listed, a moment ago, like the exercise, the poor diet, the smoking, those are things we actually can control. I'm just going to repeat that because that might be new information, 90% of heart disease is because of eating the wrong foods and poor lifestyle habits. That actually should give our listeners some hope. They do have control over cardiovascular disease. Exactly. So if that client came to me and was concerned about having a heart attack in their 40s, I'd reassure them, you know, give them the right information, you know, establish good nutritional habits. And then at least a 90% chance that he or she could avoid that heart condition. Right, with the correct nutrition and cleaning up some lifestyle habits like smoking as smoker would need to stop smoking. Which sounds kind of obvious, but so I want to share a very recent study that drives this point home. It was published in the British medical journal, August 31st of this year, 2022. And the title of the study out of Italy, it's kind of a mouthful. Had some words, some Italian words that I don't know Italian. So I'm going to summarize the title. Ultra processed foods linked to higher risk of dying from heart disease and higher risk of all cause mortality. So I'm going to simplify that even a little more Kara. What the study found is that people who ate the highest processed foods, which we are going to talk about and define what these highest processed foods are. They were at a higher risk for dying from heart disease and they were also at a higher risk of dying from other causes as well, specifically colon cancer. So Christy, I am just kind of looking at the time and it looks like it's going to be time for a break. So I think let's go to break. And then I really want to dive more into that study a lot when we come back.

heart disease heart attack Christie British medical journal Italy Kara colon cancer Christy
McDonald’s to Face $10B Race Discrimination Suit From Byron Allen

The Officer Tatum Show

01:57 min | 2 months ago

McDonald’s to Face $10B Race Discrimination Suit From Byron Allen

"It says McDonald's will face a $10 billion lawsuit against them for not advertising enough on black owned media. Now, let me just explain who this helps in who this hurts. The fact that the plaintiff are the fact that and I believe it was a black man that did the suing. The fact that we're suing people because you're not advertising junk food enough on black networks. It's asinine to me. Now the people who are making money from advertisement who wants to sell out the black community because they don't care nothing about your health, you know, one of the leading cause of deaths for black people in America is heart disease and diabetes, hypertension, I mean, literally obesity is rampant amongst the black community. However, you get people who want to sue McDonald's because they don't spend enough advertising to black people. That's like saying, why don't you sell us more stuff to kill us? How dare you, not sell things that's going to destroy our community on our network. Why won't you sell destructive things in our community on our network? Why you just sell it on a white people network where black people ain't listening to? But no, it's about money. Says the federal courts this week ruled that McDonald's will have to face a $10 billion lawsuit allegation that is discrimination or discriminates against black owned media channels by refusing to advertise on them. It says media tycoon, Bryant Byron Allen, a company Alan media group, we're bringing the suit against the fast food retailer with the U.S. district judge for Nando, outgoing, all going, I think it's how you say his name. Clearing the way for Allen to attempt to prove his claim in court. So they're

Mcdonald Hypertension Heart Disease Obesity Diabetes U.S. Bryant Byron Allen Alan Media Group Nando Allen
72% of Top Medical Schools Use Racial Politics to Eliminate Candidates

Mark Levin

01:18 min | 3 months ago

72% of Top Medical Schools Use Racial Politics to Eliminate Candidates

"72% of America's top medical schools use racial politics to eliminate applicants Did you know this According to the review 72% of the nation's top 50 schools and 80% of the top ten as quote probing questions to elicit responses from the applicant about his or her views on diversity equity and inclusion topics What is your thought about heart disease Well I believe in equity The duke university school of medicine ranked number 6 in the country boasted it has been nationally recognized I quote for its commitment to equity diversity and inclusion In an essay prompt for applicants to the school admissions asks potential sources of health inequities include race gender education income disability geographic location and sexual orientation But what a country Moments to movement M two M is duke's collective staying against systemic racism and injustice This is in the question The name signifies going beyond passive moments of reflection and becoming more active As we build to make lasting change for our patients their loved ones and each other describe your understanding of race and its relationship to an equities in health and healthcare

Duke University School Of Medi Heart Disease America Duke
US life expectancy plunged again in 2021, down nearly a year

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 3 months ago

US life expectancy plunged again in 2021, down nearly a year

"Life expectancy dropped again in the United States I'm Lisa dwyer with the latest U.S. life expectancy dropped for the second consecutive year in 2021 falling by nearly a year from 2020 That's according to a new government report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention In the first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic the estimated American lifespan shortened by nearly three years the last comparable decrease to that happened in the early 1940s during the height of World War II CDC officials blamed COVID-19 for about half the decline in 2021 a year when vaccinations became widely available but new coronavirus variants caused waves of hospitalizations and deaths Other contributors to the decline are long-standing problems such as drug overdoses heart disease suicide and chronic liver disease I'm Lisa dwyer

Lisa Dwyer Covid Centers For Disease Control An United States Drug Overdoses Heart Disease S Chronic Liver Disease
Michael Easter: Comfort Can Backfire

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:57 min | 3 months ago

Michael Easter: Comfort Can Backfire

"For a long time we as a species didn't have shelter food and comfort. So now that we have it actually makes us unhappy. So talk about diet and then unpack that paradox for us. Yeah, so to talk about diet, first of all, humans evolved so hunger is this discomfort that basically told us, you need food. Right? And when we had the opportunity to eat food, we would often overeat because that provided a survival advantage. It would help us gain fat, we were essentially before we had refrigerators, eating too much, allowed us to have an onboard refrigerator in the form of fat. So now though, we have this ample access to really calorie dense food. And we have ample opportunity to overeat it whenever we want. That's what we're wired to do. But this is obviously backfiring now. And so to your question about how does this play into the larger theme of how comfort has changed over time? In our past, seeking comfort was a good thing. We evolved in these environments of extreme discomfort. It was always too hot, too cold. We didn't have enough food. There was always something we could do to move our life forward. We didn't get to sit on the couch and go through Instagram. We didn't evolve to be active. Like we were our lives forced us to be physically active. But we had no incentive to do any more activity than we needed to, because again, food was scarce. You don't want to burn extra energy. So then you plop us in an environment that we've engineered where everything is easy. Effortless, easy to come by food. We've engineered movement out of our days. We've engineered boredom out of our days and all these drives we have to always do the next most comfortable thing. They start to backfire. So this is associated with everything from heart disease to our mental health crisis in the country. To just people, you know, really sort of missing the boat on life. When you

Instagram Heart Disease
Tea drinkers enjoy possible health benefits, study suggests

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 3 months ago

Tea drinkers enjoy possible health benefits, study suggests

"According to a new large study tea can be part of a healthy diet and people who drink tea may even be a little more likely to live longer than those who do not Scientists from the U.S. national cancer institute have found a higher tea intake to or more cups daily is linked to a modest benefit a 9 to 13% lower risk of death from any cause versus non tea drinkers The study published in annals of internal medicine indicates the association holds up for heart disease deaths but there was no clear trend for cancers Tea contains helpful substances known to reduce inflammation past studies in China and Japan where green tea is popular have suggested health benefits I'm Charles De Ledesma

U.S. National Cancer Institute Heart Disease Deaths Cancers China Japan Charles De Ledesma
Study casts more doubt on use of high-dose vitamin D pills

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 4 months ago

Study casts more doubt on use of high-dose vitamin D pills

"I'm Mike Gracia reporting a study casts more doubt on the use of high dose vitamin D pills According to researchers a new study finds taking high doses of vitamin D does not reduce the risk of broken bones in generally healthy older Americans The study's conclusions mirror other studies that cast doubt on the beneficial effects of vitamin D the same study of nearly 26,000 people had previously found taking high doses of vitamin D does not prevent heart disease cancer or memory loss The study started by doctor Joanne Manson of Brigham and women's hospital is the largest of its type to track a variety of health outcomes in generally healthy Americans in their 50s or older It's estimated that a third of Americans 60 and older take supplements I'm Mike Gracia

Mike Gracia Heart Disease Cancer Joanne Manson Brigham And Women's Hospital
Does Paxlovid Cause COVID Rebound?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:13 min | 4 months ago

Does Paxlovid Cause COVID Rebound?

"And doctor Siegel said 79 years old with heart disease and A-fib, he could have mild symptoms, but it can turn severe pretty quickly. He said, giving him pax lovid. By the way, I keep saying pax Levi, I think the way they, I saw admiral Gerard this morning, he said, pax livid, her pax lovid. Doctor Siegel agrees with that treatment. He said the rebound, there's no point that it's the drug causing the rebound, Doctor Fauci had COVID rebound. After taking pax lovid, so did my friend Joey Hudson, Joey was prescribed pax lovid after he tested positive for COVID. Joey had some pretty, you're not terrible symptoms. Peg had some pretty tough symptoms. She was sick. She was real sick. A couple of weeks ago. They both recovering fine though. Peg is negative. Feeling great. Joey, again, got COVID rebound. And doctor Siegel says, when you get COVID rebound, you get a second round of pax lovid.

Siegel Pax Levi Admiral Gerard Pax Livid Doctor Fauci Covid Joey Hudson Joey Heart Disease
"heart disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

08:17 min | 5 months ago

"heart disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"This on the podcast with doctor Bowman. We might really deep into this. We just should just do a quick refresher. Because the tests that most people get, not the one we get here at the ultra wellness. Remember, the test that most people get is like an antiquated cholesterol test. It doesn't really tell you a whole lot. And I have a patient yesterday who was a classic example of that, right? So tell us about it and I'll tell you about his testimony. But tell us about the new kind of testing that we're doing. It's not so new because we've been doing it for 20 years. And the discovery that allowed for the testing was 50 years ago. So the focus has been on amount of cholesterol, but we want to know the quality of the cholesterol. So we know, for example, LDL that's typically labeled the lousy cholesterol, there's big fluffy puffy pattern a LDL cholesterol, which is less easily made into a plaque in the artery, less prone to inflammation and oxidative stress and rupture. So it's a less risky LDL, whereas somebody could have small dense pattern B, LDL, and that's the really risky LDL. So quality matters. And if you have two people with a calculated LDL of one 30, one of them could all have pattern a low risk LDL, and they're actually fine. Somebody else could have lots of those dense particles that's not captured by the calculated LDL of one 30. So the quality matters, the same is true for HDL. We've historically thought of HDL as being the good healthy cholesterol, besides matters there too, small HDL doesn't seem to be as able to cart out the bad LDL and get rid of it. So we want to know the quality and the size of both the HDL and the LDL and we want to know what other remnant particles are floating around like very low density lipoprotein and intermediate density lipoprotein and those don't show up on a typical panel. Yeah. So practically what you see is people come in with what it looks like a normal cholesterol, like this guy yesterday has early dementia. His cholesterol thing was one 60 something. Sounds good? Yeah, that would be all I think under a hundred. Triglycerides weren't bad. HDL was 39, which is kind of low. But we looked at this particle number, even though his alveoli regular dog, oh, that's a great one 60. That's a great cholesterol. They missed the boat, because his particle number was like 1500. It should be under a thousand. Wow. And his small particles which should be like zero or less than 300 is, you know, you can live with, but anything over that is high, his was 900. Wow. So he was like, and he was a skinny older guy. It was 84 years old. And had lost muscle, belly fat, underweight, over fat. And he was pre diabetic, and that was driving some of his dementia. But they were all your cholesterol spine, not an issue. And we also look at a lot of other things besides that, by the way, in 2021, no one should get their regular cholesterol panel. I mean, you got into this from your doctor. You can get it from LabCorp quest called NMR cardiac, it's so important to do. And I guess the problem is most doctors won't know what to do with it once they find it. There's no drug for it. Like, oh, you're LDL is high. We'll give you a statin. It's like we treat what we can easily test and find necessarily what the right thing is. And so with heart disease, you know, it really is a metabolic issue. They shouldn't be called cardiologists. They should be called cardio Endo immunologists. Right. Because it's all about the hormones, including insulin, all about the inflammation, immune system, and you mentioned earlier that study by Paul Richter and Libby, in which it was sort of the beginning of the conversation, a lot of the follow-up studies like the Jupiter trial they found that if patients had a high LDL, but they didn't have a high CRP, their risk of heart disease was negligible. But if they had a high LDL and a high CRP, that was the problem. So independent of inflammation may not be an issue. And also you can get falsely confused by cholesterol testing. You've seen these patients who were and I don't mean to stereotype people, but it was this kind of cohort of women who were probably in their 70s and 80s, who were thin, who were fit. The ladies we see a Kenya ranch, like exercise, eat well, don't smoke, normal blood pressure, no diabetes. On their cholesterol is 300. And there are HDLs a hundred, and there are LDLs like, I don't know, maybe one 50 or something. And they have no small particles, and they have all these large fluffy things, and they're really no risk for heart disease. And they don't need a statin. I even asked Peter Libby, who's the chair of cardiology at Harvard. Do these women eat a statin and they're like, no, they don't, we don't have any data to say that they do. And I'm like, oh, that's interesting. So we kind of have to be really personalized in our approach. And that's the other feature of functional medicine. It's not like one size fits all. Everybody gets the polypill. Everybody gets a statin aspirin. And blood pressure pill. Like, no, we have to start to think about what's the cause. And the heart disease is a symptom. It's a syndrome. There are many, many causes. So let's talk about this whole idea of metabolic health because we're chatting a little earlier. And it's staggering to me as a physician, just how poor our metabolic health is. So how healthy our Americans metabolically. Yeah, not very. So a recent study was looking at the NHANES data from 2009 to 2016. As government surveys. Government survey our blood tests and health records and everything, right? And trying to say, well, how many people are what we would call metabolically healthy? And if you're not familiar with, for people who may not be familiar with that term, it's sort of meeting the optimal numbers for a blood pressure less than one 20 over 80. HDL levels being in the high range of good range greater than 40 for men and 50 for women. Having triglycerides better low. Having a glucose that's less than a hundred. And they found that 12.12% of Americans shall .2%. 12.2%. Thank you. 12.2% of Americans were metabolically healthy. Which kind of means it almost 88% of Americans are metabolically unhealthy. And since 75% of people are overweight, there's another 13% there. It's like, what's going on with the skinny people? Well, and that's the interesting piece, fewer than one third of so called normal weight people were metabolically healthy. So that's another really important message. Wait, wait, wait, did you just say that two thirds of skinny people are metabolically unhealthy and have pre diabetes like syndrome? Yes. Two thirds. That's mind boggling to me. Okay, so that means that, well, 95% of Americans are metabolic. No, no, no, it's still the ADHD. All right, but we're looking at how strongly a correlated with weight. And so terrible. So just having a body mass index that's less than 25 is not a guarantee that you're metabolically healthy. So if you're a skinny sugar and bagel eater, don't think it's fine because you're skinny. Exactly. Is basically the bottom one. Exactly. Because foods have other impacts besides just what they do with cholesterol anyway. Foods directly impact the elasticity of the arteries, for example, which is another key place. I mean, food is more than calorie syndrome. Food is information, Mark. Is it talks to our genes? It talks to our systems. Yeah. Wow. So you're talking about how the food impacts our metabolic health. And we're not really good at diagnosing metabolic dysfunction. Right. I mean, 90%, okay, one out of two Americans has prediabetes or type two diabetes. And if you look at this new study, I would argue that 9 out of ten Americans have some degree of prediabetes or type two diabetes. Like 90% of Americans. So when you look at that data and you also look at the parallel data that 90% of Americans with pre diabetes are not diagnosed by their doctor. Right. That's terrifying, especially because it is a 100% reversible preventable treatable condition..

heart disease dementia Paul Richter Bowman Peter Libby Libby diabetes Kenya Harvard ADHD syndrome Mark
"heart disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:01 min | 5 months ago

"heart disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"And so we screened in our pantries, and then we're surprised to find that this natural product was actually didn't realize it was an actual product, but found it in extra virgin olive oil, and balsamic vinegar, and grapeseed oil. And so again, there's another aha moment and you say, ah, maybe some of the benefits of a Mediterranean diet may be derived from these kind of compounds that are in a Mediterranean diet at higher level. One of the things that's interesting is the compound that we initially were working on, it's not very potent. You need to take it in large amounts so you need a lot of extra virgin olive oil, but in the Mediterranean countries they do. It's a lot like tablespoon tape. Like four to 8 tablespoons a day, a day, but that's actually approximately what they do. Consume. And the other thing we found is that if you cooked the olive oil, you lost the compound because like alcohol was a small alcohol. It was cooked out. And what's interesting is here in the United States, we often try have this obsession with heating our oil and putting things in it and frying. And so actually using the extra virgin olive oil after the cooking is done and drizzling it on top, like preserved the compound in it. So a typical doctor might measure a glucose and an A1C to look at their blood sugar status, and they would do a standard cholesterol profile, which interestingly enough, calculates your LDL cholesterol, the one we usually think of as being the lousy cholesterol. From a formula, does it even really measure it? And base most of the decisions on that. If they have symptoms, they might send them to a cardiologist for a stress test. They have chest pain. If they have chest pain, right? Or shortness of breath on exercise. It's already kind of down the road. Right. But most doctors don't measure a C reactive protein because as I mentioned before, it's like, well, what are we doing? What do I do with it? What do I do with it? Oh, statin and aspirin. And then they're probably going to treat them with if they are pre diabetic or diabetic. They're going to give them metformin or medications to lower blood sugar and probably a statin to control the cholesterol. How often do they actually talk to them about those root causes such as diet and stress and sleep? Maybe not. Yeah, they're talking about this poly pill. The treatment, which is this combo pill of an aspirin, a statin, and a blood pressure drug. Yes. Put it in the water. Just like give it to everybody. It'll prevent heart disease. I'm like, yeah, okay. Well, why do we have 5 blood pressure? Why do we have an need for aspirin inflammation? Why is our cholesterol all screwed up? Yeah. And you know, it's really interesting. Believe it or not, there's a potential behavioral component for patients who go on a statin and their cholesterol is now normal. It's good. Oh yeah, I can eat my cheeseburger. I can eat my cheeseburger. Chicken. Isn't that interesting that people change their diet in an unhealthy way? When their number is better. One of the worst things ever read was there was a bunch of cardiologists advocating for selling statins over the counter at McDonald's and fast food restaurants. And I think in, I think they do sell even statins over the counter and it's like, it's like those commercials for the acid blockers like take some Pepsi, 'cause don't worry, daddy, you can eat your peppers and sausages. And I'm like, no. Don't eat the peppers and sausage. So, you know, you kind of mentioned they do it sort of a cholesterol profile. But there was a hint of a subtext in that sentence where they really weren't measuring the right thing. So we tend to look at things that we're used to looking at. That are easy to test and measure. But, you know, one of the things that I think people forget. And I think doctor is honestly forget. As we get trained in this panel of tests and it's your blood count, your metabolic profile on your cholesterol. And we measure like a few things. Maybe it's 30 40 things, maybe if it's a super fancy doctoral measure, a hundred things,.

Mediterranean United States diabetic heart disease McDonald Pepsi
"heart disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:39 min | 5 months ago

"heart disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"So this is a big missing area, I think. And I think the other thing about the stress reduction, which links to chronic inflammation, that's the mechanism is that we think now heart disease, these plots that develop these blockages that dynamic processes. So you get some inflammation, you get a platform formation. It then progresses. You can potentially, it seems it seems that you can potentially reverse those blockages or reduce them. But the biggest factor so far, I think that's been ignored is stress reduction through meditation. And as you know, as well, if people incorporate that, then they're also more likely to sustain the lifestyle the other lifestyle factors in terms of dealing to the diet. But their mental health is better Mark. So it's quality of life. It's not just about something potentially being helped within the long term. Within a few weeks when people do this, and some people need more help, you know. I find it difficult to meditate. Just from using an app. I have a Pilates teacher that I started seeing a few months ago that comes to see me once a week. I need to probably do more. It was fascinating. Within and out, even that session of Pilates, one hour, which is also, it's a great exercise, but it's meditative as well. You feel your stress levels. You just feel like a different person. Yeah. It's true. I mean, I think that the mechanisms are interesting. When you look at stress, what it does is the number of things one, as you mentioned, increased inflammation. Two, it increases cortisol, which is a hormone that your body makes that actually causes your blood sugar to go up. Your blood pressure to go causes your lipids to get worse. If you look at a race car drivers, before and after a race, their cholesterol goes up a hundred points. Just from the stress. And not only that, but it actually, it actually causes your fat cells to store more fat. So if you eat under stress, there is nerve endings that innervate your fat cells and the stress response communicates through your nerves and your autonomic nervous system to your fat cells and tells them to store the fat. So it's kind of a big deal. And I agree with you. I think we are under such a barrage of stressors in our lives, whether it's work, family stresses, financial stresses, COVID stresses, climate change. I mean, I mean, I don't watch the news anymore. I was just too stressful for me. And yet, it's so simple. It's free. It's accessible. And I've been proximate patient for years. And it's such a key thing to help regulate your life and your biology. In so many ways, it improves its stem cell production, it is inflammation, improves neuroplasticity, brain connectivity, the data is just so powerful in this. And if anybody is really interested, you can listen to the podcast I did with Daniel goleman about his book altered traits, which studied advanced meditators using very advanced imaging technology, looking at their brain function and their brainwaves and see what happens when you have somebody who's been meditating for a long time. But it really doesn't have to be a professional meditator where you're in a living in a cave for 9 years, just 20 minutes a day or 20 minutes twice a day. It's very powerful. And I personally use a technique. It's called ziva meditation Z IVA meditation. You can look it up online. You can take an online course or how to do it. It's super easy. And you don't need any special equipment except sit on the floor or a chair. And through that technique, you're going to have all kinds of benefits, not just heart disease, but all kinds of benefits. So I encourage you to take heart to what you're saying, because I think it is one of those neglected factors. So diet exercise stress reduction sleep. I think the data you presented on the reverse was quite interesting because most of us don't think we can unless we take aggressive high dose statin. Work show that there may be possibility through lifestyle interventions to change the course. It actually reversed her versatility. And Mark, anecdotally, I'm getting patient, and I will be writing about this soon and hopefully I'll be able to even fund a trial to try and get a bit more definitive in terms of the answers, but I'm seeing patients many of my patients coming back who have either halted the progression of heart disease. So from imaging. And some have even had some reversal. One patient recently contacted me and I had forgotten I was in the said doctor Marjorie I saw you in 2019. She'd suffered a TIA a mini stroke, she'd had a blockage in one of her blood vessels of 75%. And she emailed me back saying I've followed your lifestyle protocol. And I was shocked marked to receive this. I had to read it again, instead of repeated the imaging and now the reduction is gone to less than 50%. Within two years, and I'm just doing what the data, you know, I'm saying the very least that's for GCN risk. I don't give people promises. You know, there is some potential here. But your quality of life is going to be improved. We're going to improve your risk factors. And hopefully, there may be some reversal, but at least we can help stop progression at the very least, according to what would happen normally. And the feedback is extraordinary once people want people follow it..

heart disease chronic inflammation Mark Daniel goleman ziva Marjorie
"heart disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

05:14 min | 5 months ago

"heart disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"The positive side comes from with the best of real gloves we have and things evolve seem to be that there is antioxidant anti inflammatory components with whole fruit and vegetables, extra virgin olive oil, nuts and seeds, you want to be getting obviously enough protein. You want to get all your nutritional requirements as well. So you think about, okay, how am I going to get all my nutrition requirements? So I minimize the need for supplements. I mean, I know supplements have a role, but minimize the need for supplements, right? And also reduce the chances of me developing insulin resistance from the diet. And if you focus on that, so I do with my patients. Then as long as you get the base of the diet right, other things here or there, it doesn't matter so much. So get the basic right, cut out the crappy stuff on my language. And then it's about preference of different cultures, different types of foods in your food, Chinese food, whatever. There's going to be obviously some big differences in a lot of the food that people eat. Yeah, I think that's right. And I think the lifestyle stuff is so huge and you talked about the pia P diet I talked about the pegan diet. This is essentially focusing on quality. So whatever you're eating, the key concept is it should be high quality, meaning nutrient dense, processed, whole real food, and you can kind of go up the chain. You know, eating a feedlot steak is better than eating, for example, you know, a bunch of bread, right? But it's not as good as eating wild Elk or eating a grass fed steak. So you can keep going deeper in the quality chain. The second is to really understand that food is medicine. And then everything you're eating is regulating your biology in real time. And three, it's personal. Everybody's biologically different. And some people may be more carbohydrate tolerant than others. Some people have made me more fat intolerant than others. And there are ways to figure that out, which is really important. Absolutely. So that really covers a lot of the diet side of stuff. And then obviously from a hotness perspective, exercise, I think, with somehow over ended, the most important message is keep moving, do what you enjoy. Be careful of overdoing it. A lot of people get injuries. They overdo it. Especially if you're stressed out and you're doing more than say 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise a day more vigorous side, that can actually worsen your stress level. So the data really says that 30 minutes of moderate activity a day. And you can do different things. You do Pilates, you do yoga, you do recycling, you know, I'm not a particularly big I used to be a runner. I've kind of shifted more cycling now because running on the road generally is not particularly good for your knees. I mean, I do sprints once a week. I do hips. So all these things are there, but do enough, but don't overdo it, right? With the exercise. And then the big thing Mark, something I've discovered in the last few years, which certainly has a big impact in my patients, is stress. Psychological stress. Psychological stress, which, in its own right, and I write about in this book, is the equivalent of another risk factor like high blood pressure type two diabetes in terms of its cardiovascular risk. But a lot of people are managing that, not realizing how important is and of course it links to inflammation. There's a lot of emerging data. There's stuff related to clotting problems, increase in fibrin and the blood, which is involved in as a colleague factor. And what I do with all my heart patients is I asked them, you know, I do a very simple questionnaire kind of on them. And I asked them in nought to ten in the last few years, these are people coming have already got diagnosed hard to do. Some people have had scans done. They've got some fearing of the arteries. And I say to them, you know, where is your stress levels over the last two or three years? I know it's obviously been pandemic time, so it's a bit skewed. But in general, most of them say that they are stress levels are kind of 8, 9 out of ten, right? For the last few years, and they've not done anything about it. And then I write about in the book, you know, we need better quality data and more data, but what's fascinating, the largest study on heart disease reversal. Which was done in India. By a cardio interventional cardiologist strategical Abu healthy heart trial. Basically, it took patients with a significant coronary disease. So well over a hundred patients, moderate to severe, so at least 50 to 70% blockage in their arteries. These are people that didn't want to have a bypass operation. They want to have stents. And he put them through his healthy lifestyle plan. Now in India, there's a lot of vegetarians. So it was a very high fiber vegetarian diet. There wasn't starting there, but it was very high fiber vegetarian diet. It was moderate exercise two, 30 minute brisk walks a day, okay? And then it was somebody called raw geogra meditation. Which also wasn't just about meditating. It was like, there was a bit of counseling because reconnecting with your family and your friends and the social aspect. Only reduced stress levels. Long story short, the end of, you know, after two years of the trial then for 5 years, they found that in the people that it did to the lifestyle program, there was a 20% reduction on average in the stenosis of the arteries, which is unheard of, right? Yes. Yeah. They got better. They reduced from, say, 70%, 50%, 50%, 30%. I mean, extraordinary, right? This is no statin. This is pretty standard. No statins. And then, when they try to look into what was the most important factor by far, of all the lifestyle factors that contributed to the reversal, it was 40 minutes of meditation a day..

high blood pressure diabetes Mark coronary disease India heart disease Abu
Lance Christensen: Politicians Forcing Vaccines Should Be Concerning

The Dan Bongino Show

01:50 min | 6 months ago

Lance Christensen: Politicians Forcing Vaccines Should Be Concerning

"The thing these forms have shown up in parents in parents folders or packets with no warning My kids played sports throughout their younger years I signed all kinds of waivers I never signed a waiver about their heart health And yet we have evidence that the vaccine could affect could affect your child's heart health So these things are obviously connected and yet Lance we have politicians not just here in California but across the country who are still insisting They're just waiting till after November elections to see how it all shakes out They are still insisting that they are going to force our babies to get vaccinated even as a pass out these forms that are basically telling us well you might have coincidentally an increased chance of heart disease in your healthy child by the way post vaccine It's frustrating especially when the duty of a doctor is to first cause no harm or do no harm So if we have the numbers and as we've spent the last year or so trying to figure out what the vaccine does and doesn't do I think that parents can make informed decisions about their own children but if they're being forced basically under penalty of the participating in any kind of sports or education activity unless they do a forced medical procedure it should be concerning And again I'm not opposed to vaccines by wife and I are all vaccinated Our kids are all vaccinated when it comes to all the regular stuff that's been around for decades and generations But to come out all of a sudden and require a shot for something that doesn't impact kids 0.0% of these kids have died Statistically 0.0% then we have to step back and say why are we administering some sort of medication that may or may not be helpful

Lance Heart Disease California
"heart disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:31 min | 6 months ago

"heart disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Of nuts and seeds, but I call the peak and diet. It's something I've been talking about forever. It's the quality of our food matters more than the quantity, what you eat matters more than how much you eat. And so focusing on the quality and upgrading the quality of your diet is so critical. And getting rid of all the junk, getting rid of all the flour and the sugar doesn't mean you can't ever have it, but it's just not a staple in your diet anymore. Exercise also has enormous benefits on your vascular health on function. Saunas, who knew, but sauna is actually increase your vascular health and can produce better vascular resilience and response, increase something called your heart rate variability, which is a sign of the quality of your heartbeat. Is it good or is it bad? Is it more risky for heart disease or less risky for heart disease? There's meditation, which also can affect your blood pressure and inflammation and oxidative stress and all the things that cause your blood vessels to not be happy. And then there's lots of nutrients out there, fish oil is a great one. Curcumin is another one. Vitamin D antioxidants, a whole list of plant derived compounds. We call phytochemicals and also just nutrients, play a huge role in your vascular health. So we design a comprehensive program to upgrade the quality of your vascular system in your blood vessels so you don't get heart disease. You know, with the increasing interest in ketogenic diets and low carb diets, we're seeing a phenomena that's pretty fascinating, which is the variability in individuals response to different diets. Some people do really well on a lower fat diet and other people do really well on a higher fat diet. Some people do better with lower starch and sugar, some people have more ability to manage starch and sugar. So I have a good ability to manage certain sugar, but I've noticed, for example, when I have a high intake of certain types of fat, like saturated fat, my cholesterol goes really high. So there's this phenomenon called lean mass hyper responder, which we're still studying and still learning about, which is people who are fit and healthy when they Jack up certain types of fat in their diet, it doesn't work so well for them. And we can actually do analyses that we do in our clinic here at the ultra wellness center called DNA diet, where we can see how you respond to fat, how you spot a.

heart disease ultra wellness center Jack
"heart disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:55 min | 6 months ago

"heart disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"The prediabetes. You can reverse the insulin resistance and prevent all of these diseases from occurring. So there are several markets of inflammation that we look at. One's called a CRP, one calls the homocysteine. And I say, I certainly can't make a decision or help you make a decision about whether you should come off your statin or take a statin unless I know how much inflammation you have in your body. So that will be two tests that I will get if they are not part of their profile. Then I will perform something called a nuclear magnetic resonance lipid profile. That is when we are able to look at the actual molecular structure of the lipoproteins that go through your bloodstream and determine which ones you have. And when we do that, we're able to find other lipoproteins, and they've been researched and they've been found to actually be more important markers of heart disease or risk for heart disease than LDL total cholesterol and low HDL. One of them is called your low density lipoprotein particle number. And one's called your low density lipoprotein size. The low density lipoprotein particle number is really a measurement of how many LDLs you actually have. Not just a total, but how many individual LDL molecules do you have? The LDL size is how big are those LDLs? So it's not just a total LDL, now we're getting more granular. How many of them do you have and how big are they? And what we found is is that the really small dense LDLs, they're like missiles. They can penetrate into the endothelial lining where there's inflammation and build up very quickly. So you want larger LDL molecules because the big fluffy ones put you at lower risk for heart disease. And if you have big fluffy LDLs, that's going to be a favorable measurement and is going to be one step towards your LDL may be high, but they're big and fluffy and you have lots of them because and you have few of them. You want low, you want to low LDL particle number. The fewer particles you have and the bigger they are, the lower risk you are. So if you have that profile, that's like one reason why you might not need to be on a statin because it doesn't matter if the LDL is high. You have small ones and you have fewer of them. You've got big ones and you have fewer of them. Okay. Then there's another marker. It's HDL size. You want your HDLs to be big. So even if you have a mildly low or low HDL, if we look at the size and they're big, that's really good. Because HDLs are like, we know what they do. They collect cholesterol and they take you to the liver for it to be disposed of. If you have small HDLs, then that's like having small dumb trucks. And they can't really pack on a lot of cholesterol. And they're not very efficient at collecting it and driving it to the liver and getting rid of it. But if you got really big dump trucks, really big HDLs, they can collect more cholesterol, carry to the liver and have it removed. So your HDL size is also important. And finally, there's a really interesting marker that's gaining a lot of ground as being an important marker for heart disease. And it's called lipoprotein a, or LP little a so LP little a is very much genetically programmed. So 90% of the people that have this LP little a, they have a gene for it. And there's some thought that this may have conferred for that population of people, a lower risk of dying from injury because it helps blood clot. So evolutionarily, it may have had a value at some point. But now, because the diets that we have in a lifestyle we have that what used to be an evolutionary advantage may now be a disadvantage when it comes to heart disease. So LPLA actually expresses itself very quickly. So by the time you're two years old, it's fully expressed and you're making a lot of LPA LP little a by the time you're 5, you're making a lot of this lipoprotein a and what it basically is is it an LDL with an additional lipoprotein called apo a it's.

heart disease
"heart disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:11 min | 6 months ago

"heart disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Good if your cholesterol, if your LDL C is a little bit high, we want to ask your physician, let's do some more testing. Let's look at the particle sizes of those LDL cholesterol. I want to see, do I have the small dense or do I have the big fluffy? If you have the big fluffy particles, they're less concerning. And if you have the small dense ones, you know it's time to say, I've got to make a change in my lifestyle. I've got to make some changes in my diet, my exercise program and my sleep. I've got to work to make these LDL particles bigger in size. Because many times we can. Sometimes when somebody's LDL cholesterol comes back very elevated, then it triggers us to look a little bit deeper. There is a subset of our population. It's about one in every 250 people who have something that's called familial hypercholesterolemia. And they have a genetic variation that prevents their body from getting rid of their LDL cholesterol as easily. So for that subset of patients, we might see their total cholesterol be almost 300 or higher. We'll see their LDL cholesterol be greater than a 190. That's very high. That's not very common, but if you have those numbers that are higher like that, you want to ask that question, okay, what's going on? Do I have familial hypercholesterolemia? Because we know that people who have this genetic variation have a much higher risk of heart disease. They have a 20 times increased risk of heart disease and it happens at a much younger age. So they might start to develop heart disease in their 30s or 40s as opposed to in their 60s or 70s or 80s. So if you have a family history of early heart disease, which means less than 55 for a man or less than 65 for a woman, so if you have aunts or uncles or parents or brothers who've had a heart attack at a young age, or if you have any signs of really high cholesterol. So your LDL being greater than a 190, maybe you've got some cholesterol deposits around your eye called xanthi asthmas, you can often see those just by looking in the mirror. You'll see some bumps under the skin around your eye..

heart disease heart attack
"heart disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:41 min | 6 months ago

"heart disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Meaning, purpose, toxins, microbes, from outside, and also in your gut, allergens, and lots more. The good news is we have control over almost all of it. Heart disease is a leading cause of death in the United States and also around the world. About 647,000 Americans die from heart disease every year. That's one in four deaths in America. Now what most people and lots of doctors don't realize is that two thirds of heart disease is caused not by fat or cholesterol, but by sugar and starch in our diet. Causing a condition that's known as insulin resistance. In fact, the central feature of almost all age related disease, whether it's heart disease or cancer or diabetes or dementia, even muscle loss, and what we call sarcopenia, and even hormonal imbalances is something called insulin resistance. And that happens when we consume boatloads of starch like flour, bread, pasta, rice, and refined grains, and sugar. In fact, we eat an average of about a 152 pounds of sugar, per person, and a 133 pounds of flour, per person, every year. This makes up about 60% of our calories and it's killing us, and it's making us age very, very fast. Now the good news is that everything we discuss in this docu series is focused on getting to the root causes of aging and none is more powerful than insulin resistance, and it is something we.

heart disease insulin resistance United States dementia diabetes cancer
"heart disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

06:43 min | 6 months ago

"heart disease" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Doctor Hyman and his team dive into the functional medicine approach to the biggest killer of our time. Heart disease. Is cholesterol the enemy we've made it out to be is fat actually important for our health, what is the true cause of heart disease and how can we address it? You'll learn more in this episode and to get all of doctor Hyman's longevity tips and secrets sign up for the longevity newsletter at doctor Hyman dot com slash longevity. The biggest killer in the world is heart disease. But are a traditional approach is pretty misguided and addresses the symptoms, not the causes. High blood pressure, high blood sugar, high cholesterol. Don't just happen out of the blue, there are signs of imbalance of underlying dysfunction that can be fixed. We've all been told, you know, why are we seeing more cardiovascular disease? The number one killer worldwide is cardiovascular disease. And cardiovascular disease is not just about the heart. It's about the whole vascular system, the whole endothelial system, the heart of the pump, that pumps out to the arteries, goes to the small arterioles, then goes to the veins that goes through the capillaries, and then back through the lymphatic system. And that whole system is intimately tied in with our health. It delivers oxygen, it removes waste, and when we get inflammation in that system or gumming up of the pipes, that's when we get cardiovascular disease. So our endothelium is one cell layer that lines the inside of our arteries, and this endothelial layer is critical for our health. We want that endothelium working really well, and it needs to be able to relax to allow blood to get to all the different tissues in the body. And we know we can impact the endothelium. If the endothelium is not able to relax, that causes our blood pressure to go up. What we know is we start to see endothelial dysfunction and inability for that endothelium to relax even before years before somebody actually goes on to have the diagnosis of hypertension. So it's important for that endothelium to be able to relax. And there's many things we can do that can help with that. We know, for example, that blueberries are an amazing because they're rich in these anthocyanins, these phytonutrients that can contribute to improvement in the endothelium. And we know that when people have what's equivalent to one cup of blueberries twice a day within four weeks, studies have shown that you can drop systolic blood pressure that top number on your blood pressure by as much as a blood pressure medication. There's many things that can be damaging to the endothelium. Oxidative stress, for example, we know can cause damage to that endothelial layer. We definitely know that inflammation is a trigger for damage to that endothelium. We know that that may be coming from the visceral adiposity. When people hold on to too much weight around their belly, that weight around the belly is not just sitting there. It is an active endocrine organ. That means it's secreting inflammatory markers like interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor, which goes on and causes inflammation throughout the whole body. We know this because when men gain too much weight around their belly, they have a higher risk for erectile dysfunction. And erectile dysfunction is definitely caused by endothelial dysfunction. So we need those that endothelial, those blood vessels to be able to relax. And that's really important for everything from prevention of erectile dysfunction to keeping your blood pressure nice and low. And what we see with research is when men are able to lose the belly fat, they have improvements in erectile dysfunction. We see that all the time. The one thing that I need to tell everyone out there is that cardiovascular disease is not about cholesterol. Let me repeat that. Cardiovascular disease is not about cholesterol. Cardiovascular disease is about inflammation in the setting of cholesterol. And the standard cholesterol test that a lot of doctors do is, in my opinion, pretty much worthless. You really need to look at a whole host of different things to look at a person's cardiovascular risk as well. How are they going to potentially develop heart disease or cardiovascular disease down the road? You don't want to wait till you have blocked arteries and all your veins and you can't walk up a flight of stairs and say, oh, you've got heart disease now. What is cholesterol? What's it doing in our body? And housing, how is it involved in heart disease? Well, cholesterol is not water soluble. So it can't move around our body freely. It needs to be carried around. So it's carried around by proteins. They're called lipoproteins. So you've, when you go to the doctor, everybody by now gets through lipid profile done, at least once a year, and they hear the terms total cholesterol. LDL, which is your bad cholesterol or HDL is your good cholesterol. Those are lipoproteins. So there's lipoprotein low density lipoprotein, which is LDL, which is considered a bad protein, a bad lipoprotein. And then there's HDL, which is a high density lipoprotein, which is considered good. LDL carries cholesterol from your liver to parts of your body where the cholesterol is needed to do its work. HDL, the good cholesterol carries cholesterol from the periphery of your body and cells that have used it. Back to the liver for disposal. That's LDLs. That's HDL's job. That's why it's a good cholesterol. It carries cholesterol away once it's been used and gets rid of it. So, where's the problem arise? And why is LDL the bad guy? And it's quite an honestly, it's not the bad guy. And we're going to talk about that in a second. The problem with cholesterol is that it has a affinity for inflammation. And if the endothelial lining of the blood vessel wall, in any part of your body, is inflamed. That creates an opening in that protective lining. The endothelial lining is the inner lining of a blood vessel. The blood vessels like a pipe that's carrying water in your house. Well, your blood vessel carries blood throughout.

heart disease Hyman erectile dysfunction tumor necrosis factor hypertension
What the Left Doesn't Get About Officer Sicknick's Death

Mark Levin

00:51 sec | 7 months ago

What the Left Doesn't Get About Officer Sicknick's Death

"The Democrats On January 26th they make a lot of the death of a Capitol Hill police officer which is a horrible thing He didn't die in the line of duty He died later Of a stroke or a heart attack if my recollection is correct He died of natural causes But the media and the Democrats are desperate to Lincoln To that day in those events As somebody with heart disease I can tell you aggressive heart disease You can get stressed and something can happen and so forth But it's been building and building and building It doesn't just happen in the split of a second

Capitol Hill Police Heart Attack Heart Disease Lincoln
Pizza Hut Teaches Kids America is Built on Slavery and Genocide

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:44 min | 7 months ago

Pizza Hut Teaches Kids America is Built on Slavery and Genocide

"Pizza Hut teaches America, kids America is built on slavery and genocide. A fast food chain claims that America was founded on genocide. From front, front page mag dot com, Pizza Hut unsatisfied with making kids fat also wants to make them racist. They have an empowering educated tool box presented by the Pizza Hut foundation. Urging teachers to tell students that everyone is defined by race, not everyone has racial identity. And that race defines American life. That's what they say. They say race defines American life according to Pizza Hut. They say here, quote, America is a country built on a foundation of slavery, genocide, and white supremacy, a pamphlet for teachers stamped by the Pizza Hut logo declares. They say this is so well written by front page magazine. They say this, they say, challenging conversation says that police force quote is the 6th leading cause of death for black men. Now, of course, they don't talk about how black men are getting killed by police because they're committing crimes and a lot of that is done in self defense, but actually it's front page magazine comes back beautifully. They say, actually, it's diabetes. But it's understandable that Pizza Hut which makes millions of dollars giving black men heart disease strokes and diabetes wants to blame the cops who are the only people keeping underpaid employees of their struggling franchises alive. It's David Horowitz's great website, the great David Horowitz. Having destroyed pizza and its own company, Pizza Hut now wants to destroy America. So every day we have new companies going completely woke, it's happening at a record rate.

Pizza Hut America Pizza Hut Foundation Heart Disease Strokes Diabetes David Horowitz
EXPLAINER: New easy-to-use COVID-19 pills come with a catch

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 11 months ago

EXPLAINER: New easy-to-use COVID-19 pills come with a catch

"New new the the infected infected covered covered nineteen nineteen patients patients now now have have two two treatment treatment options options that that can can be be taken taken at at home home one one from from Fizer Fizer called called packs packs loaded loaded and and one one from from Merck Merck mall mall new new pair pair appear appear both both were were shown shown to to reduce reduce the the chances chances of of hospitalization hospitalization or or death death from from covert covert nineteen nineteen but but the the pills pills have have to to be be taken taken as as soon soon as as possible possible once once symptoms symptoms appear appear within within five five days days of of the the start start of of those those symptoms symptoms that that of of course course presents presents a a challenge challenge to to get get tested tested a a prescription prescription and and start start the the treatment treatment the the pills pills are are intended intended for for those those with with mild mild or or moderate moderate covert covert nineteen nineteen but but who who are are more more likely likely to to become become seriously seriously ill ill that that includes includes older older people people and and those those with with other other health health conditions conditions like like heart heart disease disease cancer cancer or or diabetes diabetes that that make make them them more more vulnerable vulnerable the the antiviral antiviral pills pills are are not not authorized authorized for for people people hospitalized hospitalized with with code code nineteen nineteen I'm I'm Ben Ben Thomas Thomas

Fizer Fizer Merck Merck Mall Mall Heart Heart Disease Disease Ca Diabetes Ben Ben Thomas Thomas
US COVID death toll hits 800,000, a year into vaccine drive

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

US COVID death toll hits 800,000, a year into vaccine drive

"I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker the the U. U. S. S. death death toll toll from from cove cove it it has has topped topped eight eight hundred hundred thousand thousand according according to to the the count count kept kept by by Johns Johns Hopkins Hopkins University University the the once once unimaginable unimaginable milestone milestone is is seen seen as as a a doubly doubly tragic tragic given given that that more more than than two two hundred hundred thousand thousand of of those those lives lives were were lost lost after after the the free free vaccine vaccine became became available available last last spring spring the the death death toll toll is is about about equal equal to to the the population population of of Atlanta Atlanta and and St St Louis Louis combined combined it's it's roughly roughly equivalent equivalent to to how how many many Americans Americans die die each each year year from from heart heart disease disease or or stroke stroke the the US US has has the the highest highest reported reported toll toll of of any any country country and and accounts accounts for for about about fifteen fifteen percent percent of of the the five five point point three three million million known known deaths deaths from from covert covert since since the the outbreak outbreak began began in in China China two two years years ago ago the the true true death death toll toll in in the the U. U. S. S. and and around around the the world world is is believed believed to to be be significantly significantly higher higher because because of of cases cases that that were were overlooked overlooked or or concealed concealed I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker

Julie Julie Walker Walker Cove Cove Johns Johns Hopkins Hopkins Un St St Louis Louis Heart Heart Disease Disease Stroke Stroke Atlanta United States China
Mark Levin: It's Not Team Vaccinated vs. Team Non-Vaccinated

Mark Levin

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Mark Levin: It's Not Team Vaccinated vs. Team Non-Vaccinated

"So it's not team vaccinated in team unvaccinated It's not the kind of myopic thinking of ignoramuses who just wear the same uniform as the Democrat party I have no doubt these vaccines have saved the lives of many people particularly the elderly And it is certainly possible once you're vaccinated the effects of actually getting the virus are lessened A lot of people believe that too But that was my decision I want to live my life I spoke to my doctors This is what they told me to do That's what I did I don't listen to the TV doctors I don't care what they say Other than Mark Siegel that guy's a genius And there's a few others Sapphire and a few other you understand But I mean for my own personal health they don't know anything about me Heart disease asthma all the rest So there you have it

Democrat Party Mark Siegel Heart Disease Asthma
Advice shifting on aspirin use for preventing heart attacks

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Advice shifting on aspirin use for preventing heart attacks

"Advice on aspirin use for preventing heart attacks has changed a bit an influential health guidelines group now says older adults without heart disease should not take daily aspirin to prevent a first heart attack or stroke the draft guidance posted online by the U. S. preventive services task force backtracks a bit and puts the panel more in line with other medical groups the recommendations explained bleeding wrist for adults in their sixties and outweigh any potential prevention benefits from aspirin it's different for adults in their forties though the panel says they may want to consider taking daily aspirin if they have no bleeding risks since there is a potential small benefit I actually out there

Heart Attack U. S. Preventive Services Task Heart Disease
Mark Levin Addresses Two-Day Absence

Mark Levin

01:49 min | 1 year ago

Mark Levin Addresses Two-Day Absence

"One I want to thank Richie and Ben for sitting in I didn't take off because of my birthday I wasn't planning on taking off at all It's too much important stuff going on But I will share with you we'll get into extraordinary detail That last week I wasn't feeling very well And then over the weekend I'm trying to remember which day it was I think it was Sunday There was a little festival out here in Virginia And I went there my wife my mother in law And I dropped them off at a spot and they parked and when I walked from the car about a hundred 120 feet I had tremendous pressure on my chest and I could breathe very well So I kind of knew what it was having had bypass and stents before And then that evening when we came home and I sat down it intensified So I wasn't even doing anything and then I knew it had an issue and I went into the hospital And they implanted another stent So that makes three or four stance three bypasses that is three graphs One bypass procedure And it's unfortunately it's fairly aggressive as the cardiologist told me and it is I think the word he used was dispersed The heart disease is dispersed in a number of areas But the main blockage was 90% blocked that's been addressed There's a few others and we should be able to keep them under control So I'm not going anywhere

Richie BEN Virginia Heart Disease
Trees Could Be a Mental, Physical and Climate Change Antidote

Environment: NPR

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Trees Could Be a Mental, Physical and Climate Change Antidote

"Is well known. The trees help counter climate change by soaking up carbon dioxide. Now there is a growing body of research to point to many ways of dose of trees can improve our mental and physical health. Here's martha bebinger member station. W. b. you are on how and why the tiny sapling robin williams planted thirty years ago towers above her boston home. I raise this tree when i raised my children and look at this look at that. She says there's something about being near this tree. It makes everybody a little bit happy around here when you're looking for strength you can't do better than looking at a tree and there's evidence williams may will be gleaning any number of direct or associated health benefits a longer life. Bitter birth outcomes lower stress levels lower risk of heart disease. Dr howard lumpkin. Is it the university of washington school of public health. Lower risk of diabetes reduced symptoms of adhd proximity to trees is associated with a ridiculously broad range of health benefits. I wish we had pills. That were this good for health. A few countries notably japan and south korea have invested in a practice known as forest bathing which is spending time among trees as a preventive health measure but prescribing time in nature is still pretty far outside mainstream medicine in the. Us from can says that. Maybe because there's a lot we don't know what doses needed. Do you need to walk. Among trees is sufficient just to look at the trees from outside your window. Do you need big trees or do small trees do the trick we you know. We're not able to tease the forest from the trees. Peter james at harvard medical school aims to answer a lot of those questions. He's merging health data captured by phones. Real time surveys about wellbeing and mood and street. View mapping data to dig into. What's exactly within view. Is it trees. Is it flowers and how those things are related to help behaviors and health outcomes.

Martha Bebinger W. B Dr Howard Lumpkin University Of Washington Schoo Robin Williams Boston Heart Disease Williams Adhd South Korea Diabetes Japan Peter James Harvard Medical School United States
Rep. Chip Roy Reacts to Biden Withholding Monoclonal Antibodies From Florida and Texas

Mark Levin

01:52 min | 1 year ago

Rep. Chip Roy Reacts to Biden Withholding Monoclonal Antibodies From Florida and Texas

"Is even more horrifying And we have the Montgomery County judge here in Texas, which is near Houston. Who posted on Facebook yesterday, the day before. I'm not sure if you saw it where he right. He wrote out the 2000 Texans that were benefiting from the treatment that they had put in place to have a clinic or set up there to run these mono monoclonal antibody treatment. And it was successful. And this is where the vaccinated and unvaccinated and then now you've got the Democratic leadership in Washington coming in and saying no, no, no. We're going to step in and interfere with the market and create a problem that didn't really exist. And I look, I wrote a letter to the HHS on Monday, lighting them on fire about this and raising this issue up the flagpole and then load the whole We get 24 hours later, they were gonna have a briefing on Friday. We had that briefing today, Mark And I asked twice. I got cut off. And then I got back in Q asking a second time. Hey, how many, Uh, doses do you currently have a supply? How many can be made per month and what's the demand? You tell me the numbers. You show me how there's some massive national shortage that you've got to interfere, and they would never answer the question. Literally, he said. Well, we'll just have to get back to you. The numbers to wait you're stepping in and rationing care. Rationing what Texas can get, and you can't even tell me what the numbers are its political. They started off of saying seven states have 70% of the demand on this stuff and get never mind in January. It'll be 10 different states Mark because we know how this virus works. And yet that's what they're doing. It's political. It's purposeful and people's lives at stake. And they're doing it because they don't want to talk about treatment. Not just this. But after cork wine back when that was more effective. Let me tell you something about, uh Hattrick chloroquine. I've been taking that for months. Have heart disease and asthma. Has an harm me in any way.

Montgomery County Texans Texas Houston HHS Facebook Mark Washington Heart Disease Asthma
"heart disease" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"heart disease" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Remember that not all the ob floors have telemetry. And it's different an ob floor than an icu. Level of care. Patients may also need a bubble filter in case of shunts. For example in the epsteins patients may have a chance of having a pf. Oh and therefore above fielder will be needed inpatients for example who are having left side destructive nations. We have to be very very clear to avoid excessive volume load and there are other considerations that we should also put into this document including infective. Enter code is prophylaxis the mode of delivery. In what sort of postpartum care this patients will need if they will need telemetry labs echo cardiograms. And also what will be her discharge planning and contraception. Despite a common belief. That section is safer mode of delivery for women with heart disease. It's not widely accepted. The vaginal delivery is preferred in the absence of upset tricks and our fetal indications unfortunately like dr. Warren said maybe many patients have been told in the past that if they were to get pregnant they should have a c. section and this is another common misconception that happens in patients with congenital heart disease the more we know and the more evidence we accrue. We now are able to say that. Vaginal delivery should be considered most patients in the absence of any other potential. Complications indicates of our patient. Bridget assuming her richness are controlled and there are no other major complications. We will specifying delivery plan. That vaginal delivery is recommended in the absence of order. Fetal or obstetric indications and. I think if we don't know if she has a peaceful at this point it will be important to walk her and see if she decides. But even if she doesn't. I think there is still high for how a young mater have a thromboembolic phenomenon through a pf. Oh and therefore it would be safe to use a bubble filter. We would also recommend postpartum echocardiogram and avoidance of excessive volume load. Thank you not in our patients. With adult congenital heart disease may be susceptible to infective undercard ideas because of variety reasons..

congenital heart disease heart disease Warren Bridget
Does an Aspirin a Day Keep the Doctor Away?

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

01:54 min | 1 year ago

Does an Aspirin a Day Keep the Doctor Away?

"Salicylic acid. The active ingredient in aspirin has been used for thousands of years as an anti inflammatory painkiller. In the form of willow tree bark extract. Which pocket is used to treat fever until alleviate pain during childbirth. It became trademarked as drug in eighteen. Ninety nine remains to this day probably the most commonly used drug in the world one of the reasons that remained so popular. Despite the fact that we have better painkillers now is that it also acts as a blood thinner. Millions of people. Now take aspirin. On a daily basis to treat or prevent heart disease it all started back in nineteen fifty three with the publication of this landmark. Study in the new england journal of medicine length of life and cause of death in rheumatoid arthritis paper started out with the sense. It has often been said that the way to live long life is to acquire rheumatism. They found fewer deaths than expected from accidents. Which could be explained by the fact that people with arthritis probably aren't out you know going skiing but also significantly fewer deaths from heart attacks. Maybe it was all the aspirin. They were taking for their joins. Those thinning their blood and preventing clots forming in their coronary arteries in their heart. And so in the nineteen sixties. There were calls to study whether aspirin would help those. At risk for blood clots and the nineteen seventies. We got our wish study suggesting regular aspirin intake protects against heart attacks today. The official recommendations that low dose aspirin is recommended for all patients with heart disease but in the general population for those without a known history of heart disease or stroke dealy. Aspirin is only recommended when the heart disease benefits outweigh the risks of

Heart Disease Fever New England Journal Of Medicin Rheumatoid Arthritis Heart Attacks Arthritis Skiing Stroke
"heart disease" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"heart disease" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"Imagine if you could add years to your life and improve your chances of not dying from heart disease imagine if it only took one small change but first why is heart. Disease important is the cause of nearly eighteen million lives lost each year. The sad fact is that a large number of these deaths are preventable. Why because the development of the majority of risk factors for heart disease can be avoided. The good news is that we can reduce risk for heart disease through our diet. We have found that eating one cup per day or vegetables like lettuce. Beetroot and spinach can significantly reduce the risk of heart disease. We analyze data from over fifty. Three thousand participants of the danish died cancer and health. Study over a twenty three year period. We evaluated the died followed by participants focusing on vegetable nitrate intake against health outcomes related to the hot. We found that participants who followed a nitrate rich vegetable diet. Had about a two and a half millimeter. Mercury lower systolic blood pressure and a twelve to twenty six percent lower risk of heart disease compared to participants consuming less nitrate rich vegetables and other key finding was at one cup of leafy green vegetables was enough to reach the optimal levels of nitrate calculated at fifty nine milligrams per day. We did not see for the benefits in people who ate higher levels of nitrate rich vegetables. So eating just one cup of knighthood rich vegetables can therefore have a valuable impact on the health of your heart

heart disease cancer katherine dbongino edith
"heart disease" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"heart disease" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Health and we should take them as seriously when they come in and not minimize trivialize I've heard so many women tell me that they have felt shamed and blamed. Were not gone to the east. What if they told me. It's just gerd and literally are afraid of what the neighbors were. Think or what the doctors will think so. I think that if we could tell anybody all of us have to be reminded after a long busy day is believing her. Because i have gained so much humility over my career because things that i was taught were not heart disease symptoms or were not heart disease i now know are i know that twenty years ago i told patients. It's not your heart. Good news. Because i did all the tests that i could. We know better now. But we don't know enough so believe her. Let me add some tangential inflammation. There are several studies in the literature. Both from intensive care units and from emergency rooms that the women who are providers the women physicians have better outcomes slow their patients than the men position and these are good studies and they are true. Now i will tell you. We are probably not any smarter than our male colleagues but we do know how to listen and the most important part in getting information from the patient is to let the patients seek and to lists and perhaps if i want to alter some of the healthcare education curriculum it would be to teach people how to listen. Thank you very much. And so what. I'm hearing is empowerment. Women should feel empowered to advocate for themselves. And then hashtag believer really on the flip side. The onus is not on the patient but on the provider to believe and then let the patient speak and listen. Even if you're busy that is the first step of making the right diagnosis. So i'll turn this now over to ellen ellen. would you mind. Sharing us is something that you wish your providers new. Yeah saw when. I had my scabbed. Eleven years ago. I was assigned a cardiologists and i.

heart disease symptoms heart disease ellen ellen