20 Episode results for "Hearst corporation"

John Chachas 6-28-20

CATS Roundtable

09:49 min | 1 year ago

John Chachas 6-28-20

"Hi, this is Jay Farner. CEO Rocket Mortgage, making the right financial decisions has never been more important. We can help guide you to those right decisions now when they matter most mortgage rates are near historic lows so when you call eight three three eight rocket, or visit us at rocket mortgage dot com to start your refinance. You'll be well on your way to saving money every month. The rate today and our thirty year fixed rate mortgage is three point three seven five percents APR three point five nine percent right now could be a great time for you to take some positive financial steps forward with a cash-out refinance from rocket. Rocket Mortgage which could give you the boost that you're looking for. In addition, we may be able to help you refinance with little or no out of pocket costs at rocket mortgage were committed to every client every time, no exceptions, no excuses giving you the best mortgage experience. Call us today at eight, three, three eight rocket, or go to rocketmortgage DOT COM to learn more rates subject to change at one point eight seven five percents, he this discounted rate call for cost information and conditions equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states and MLS number thirty thirty morning. America the cantabile catching sitting here the main topic for the last. Four months five months has been the bias. With us this morning. Good friend Metron. CHACHA's a former partner at lazard current partner mansion principal. Medusa advisors at blinds, if the media industry advised welcome. The hearst corporation and clear channel communications, and he is concerned away to numbers of being reported on the. The vibes. Good Mornings on taxes. How are you this morning? Good? Morning John Thanks for having me. Now we had a discussion the other day, and you were very much concern and the treatment is is very much concerned, not being real numbers or current numbers on how many people are dying from cardiac problems versus the regular flu versus the virus. Etcetera Etcetera! Have you done your studies on that? Well I'm at the moment at a team of people seeking to consolidate all the data. Available state by states to see what we really have. And what's interesting is the difference between the impression of the American people and the actual data that we are finding the impression of the American. People do particularly New Yorker cities. You walk outside. Everybody's got masks on and gloves and I think he talked to the average person. They think if they get this there. You know it's the plague. They're gonNA. Die The data completely different. We've had two point. Four million known cases of this virus probably millions more people who had it didn't even feel sick or didn't have any symptoms, millions and millions more. We have right now. Now thirty one thousand five hundred people hospitalized in America everybody who listens to the national press. Has this impression that hospitals are at capacity? You know if you get sick. You can't find hospital bed. That's completely wrong. There's about a third of ICU beds in the country, and even in states like California New York Texas where you have more cases than anywhere a third MT ICU beds. That's not even talking about the rest of hospital based, so there's this gigantic disconnect between how it's reported, and what the average American thinks their risk is, and that's really troubling. Really troubling well. There was alive troubles in New York on getting the. Numbers because what was happening in New York no matter which she died from people being told put down as the virus. Because well I had heard that government was paying more. To the hospitals for the virus versus Darning, it wouldn't. On proper if you heard I look I I've heard the same thing. I've heard the same thing. In other states where the statistical data for two thousand and twenty is going to be a year where in the past, America would lose forty fifty thousand people from the Flu Somehow in two thousand twenty. We're not gonNA. Have anybody died from the flu? They're all going to be categorized as COVID. What's really most amazing though is if you look at the death statistics, not the transmission statistics, not the number of people that have covert. That's not really the relevant question, but. But the statistics, eighty one percent of the hundred and twenty thousand people that have died in this country are over the age of sixty five sixty percent, or over the age of seventy five, and about ninety percent of those deaths had other conditions, which means the inverse of the hundred twenty thousand people that have died th- remaining nineteen percent who aren't sixty five is about twenty three thousand people so even we've lost twenty three thousand people of the country well. We lost thirty eight thousand people in car accidents last year. I mean so the notion of what people. People think the numbers are compared to numbers. Really are in terms of WHO's dying or never being reported, and we have a comparatively small number of people I mean the likelihood of somebody who's healthy, or even if they're sixty five and have no condition of dying of this, they probably have a higher chance of being struck by lightning than dying Kovic so, but for some reason, the National Discussion, the national conversation of these statistics has completely been turned to transmission as opposed to really has to be hospitalized and more importantly who parishes because of the virus and in. In the process. What have we done? We have created fear. Fear is a very powerful thing, so people are so fearful now that entire industries are going to cease to exist based on fear, and if the fear is grounded in the wrong statistical data I would love to put the question to Dr Fallacy and to the. You know the people that are running our task force into the administration. When are we gonNA talk about this disease with the right set of statistics. PHYSI- statistics that are being kicked around are literally terrifying people that need not be for. I was so frustrated. I asked my system and secondly producer. Matt wanting I, said well just give me the total debts. Of the first five months of twenty, eighteen, twenty, nineteen and twenty twenty. And we weren't able to ascertain total total. Gus, because there's a total dessus, it always work backwards. I used to Naples that those numbers. no, i. mean you know again. The the numbers the data so. So difficult you have to go on a state by state basis and build up, and even when you build it up on a state by state basis, it doesn't always come in the same consistent package. An example I asked the team of people that are working for me to track co Morbid. Conditions, obesity, hypertension, and diabetes, the three main items, which are showing up over and over and over again for those who are dying and interestingly across the United States fifty different you know. Know State Departments of health. Not Everybody is reporting the statistics in that way, which is really quite shocking in a way I mean we should know now that we know that those things are happening with great regularity. You would think that it wouldn't take a whole lot of phone calls to tell each state you know commissioner of Health. Please make sure you report this data into the database, so we can track this and we're not even finding that's consistent. We're we're getting. A fair number of the data and there really isn't a great national source that can look backward from. From total death in the country and come to an answer about how many are dying from this, but what is clear is that if you look at one hundred twenty thousand deaths in this country? The vast vast majority, eighty percent or people that are older and have co Morbid conditions. They should be very careful if if you were heavy. You have hypertension. You have diabetes and you're older. You get this virus. It's a really bad virus. If you're not in those categories, frankly I I'm sort of perplexed about why we've shut down the national economy and created thirty five million unemployed people. While, we shut down the economy and Perot country in a bad position and I really really love to see the real numbers sometime. How far down the road do you think we'll be able to get the numbers? You said you have a team working on it, so I think I think in a matter of a week or so. We will have pulled together certainly the numbers that we can get out. Out of every one of the fifty states, we will be able to show how many deaths how many people went into the hospital? What was their age? Because there are certain basic statistics when someone dies, that are of course, reported into the state health departments. I'm not sure we'll have perfect comparability across all fifty states, and we're GONNA put that up on a website of some kind, so people can actually see. See it start to track it because the national narrative, the national conversation about this disease I was recently at the Mayo Clinic with one of my family, members and doctors at the Mayo Clinic commented to me. They have far more people at this point that are sick for other reasons because they haven't gone to the hospitals, they haven't gone a check on their heart or to take care of their their other. Other, medical condition than their risk of dying because of this and yet everyone in this country has been put into you know essentially a perilous lockdown a fear when in fact me, I think the data's going to reveal that the people that are truly at risk or a much more identifiable and much more narrow universe of our population, and the deaths that are happening outside of that identified number, really quite small. John Treasures I live so w back on our show again. When we get the real numbers in the, thank you for bringing to every America's attention and we'll catch up again, so thanks for having me John. This is the trunk boat will be right back.

America Rocket Mortgage flu New York diabetes Jay Farner State Departments of health hearst corporation John Treasures CEO partner Mayo Clinic United States Mayo Clinic Naples Texas
Hearst President and CEO Steve Swartz on Helming a 132 Year-Old, Family-Owned Media Powerhouse

KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

44:30 min | 2 years ago

Hearst President and CEO Steve Swartz on Helming a 132 Year-Old, Family-Owned Media Powerhouse

"Hi. I'm Viva Ramani. And welcome to episode fifty four of kindred cast a biweekly podcast featuring insights from dealmakers and thought leaders from the world of tech media, and everything in between kindred cast is a production of kindred media, powered by lion Trie on today's show. Steve swertz, the president and CEO of Hearst corporation, sits with lion. Tree CO are able or cough to discuss his unique perspectives at the helm of the hundred thirty two year old family run media powerhouse conversation ranges from Hearst, prescient move into business media, and services to swertz, his well, regarded personal style, which she describes as IBM salesman. Circa, nineteen sixty tune into here how Steve and his colleagues are writing the next chapter of this multi generational juggernaut. It is my pleasure to be sitting here with the president and CEO of the Hearst corporation. Mr. Stephen source, thank you very much for being here. Thanks for having me. It is one hundred thirty year history hearse has grown to own conic print and digital brands like bizarre. L cosmopolitan, the San Francisco, Chronicle and more. They also have steaks and Amy ESPN and owned companies in the business information sector like Fitch Ratings was Steve at its two thousand thirteen and in senior positions for decades prior Hearst, which starred as a newspaper business now trousers, all areas of media, finance and business. Steve has one of the more unique executive this in the world as a leader of a very influential mass media company that controls acids of legacy and new media as well. Leading business information conglomerate and doing it as a private company. Steve, welcome. Thank you for being here with us on Kidger cast, thank you hearses one of those companies that I've talked internally about being. Model like it'd be so bold for how to really build a proper family. Run business. Let me just say that. I hope you and I can get together. When we celebrate the hundred and thirty second birthday of Lyon, tree. Thank you very much. If we get to the thirty second birthday lines of you happy to start. You know, we're only seven years in the making so far, but Hearst is a unique company. So tell me why, or how it is to work at a private family owned business. That's generational nature. I think every company is unique in their own way. I think some of the things that said as part I mean, we are a hundred and thirty two years old. We had a very dynamic founder William Randolph Hearst to was constantly challenging the business side to look for the next thing that made sense in the context of a media company, you know, here's someone who was born fabulously wealthy, because his father was one of the most successful miners in the great gold and silver, rush. Senator George Hearst. So he didn't really even have to work, but he went right into the newspaper business because he wanted to make a difference. He bought afternoon newspapers because he wanted to serve. The common man, and that the working man's paper was the afternoon paper, but he pushed us into magazines. He pushed us into radio before he died. He lived a very long life. He bought one of the first television stations and nineteen forty eight so he established our culture at our place of pushing beyond your comfort zone to look for new areas of growth and innovation. And then we had another icon, ick leader, my predecessor Frank Vanik ran the company for almost thirty years, and he pushed us much more into broadcast television and into cable television and got us going in what we call business media, which are companies like fetch. And so, yes, we're privately held we're actually owned by trust. The fact is, they're both management trustees and family trustees that trustees tend to be lifetime appointments. So we have people who keep a long relationship with the company it reinforces, the culture, reinforces the history, I think all of that. Makes it a relatively unique place to work, but there's something about the culture or maybe the charter, or even the trustees that encourage hurston the company and yourself as chief executive to put more money into the company for growth and innovation and not just to manage the assets of old. I really think it starts with the founder and I think that again, because we've had this trustee system, the keeps executives and family members with a long direct relationship with the company, I think that's how these things get passed on, and they don't get lost one of the shame of public companies, people reach a certain age. And then they're out there not only out as CEO or chairman, but they go off the board. One of the things that I think, helps us is that we just have this history that we're supposed to keep pushing we're not just building the company for today's colleagues and today's dividend recipients, but for future colleagues future dividend recipients, and that's just been passed on. I think it's in our DNA when I became CEO, I didn't have to change anything that was already in the culture, and of course, Frank still right down. The hall is our executive vice chairman make ensure that I don't screw things up hardly. But not. Only did you know the mandate when he became executive. But you also knew that the part of the role is to innovate is to change is to diversify the business again. A new business lines which you've done beautifully somewhat say her may not even be described as a media company. I mean, how would you describe? I will we like to think of ourselves as entertainment information and services company, but I would argue that a hundred and thirty two years ago, we were the same thing because when William Randolph Hurst, persuaded his father to let him take over a newspaper that his father, owned as part of a wide diverse holdings of Senator Hearst, the San Francisco Examiner in eighteen eighty seven I would argue at that time and still to some degree today that newspaper, particularly back then was a principal source of entertainment, a principal source of information and provided all kinds of services to the community hundred and thirty two years later. Would argue that we are obviously entertainment through. Yes. PIN through the history and lifetime channels principally in our local stations information. Yes, is still news, but has also morphed over time into financial credit information through Fitch aviation and information through a company called camp that we own fabulous company, and then the services have become more software services camp as an aviation data and software company, we have a couple of medical software company. So I would argue that while the actual execution elements have evolved. We've stayed in three broad areas of entertainment information, and services because one of the reasons why actually start doing this podcast is because of the storytelling opportunity around this industry, and really not only where we're going, but where we've come from, and that's why. By looking forward to this conversation with Steve because you have a sense of media, and information services is not being a static concept, but where we came from and where we're going very much still in growth mode, and innovation mode. And that is a hallmark for the industry. Most times these are public companies and very hard to transition into these new models, as a public company Bentley, when you have a traditional beat ABI business, which is media in most cases now to beat ac- to consumer business, also very difficult the skill set. So everyone says, I wish I was just a private company doing this, but you have the luxury of doing so there's a give you a different way of taking risk of being bold, as a private family, controlled business versus being public whichever wanna Republic ever is a long time. We have no current need or plans to be public one of the great things about our portfolio. Is it generates a very significant amount of free cash that allows us to keep invest? Sting in the kind of businesses that we want invest in without going to the public markets for equity capital and actually using very little debt as well. So, I think, though that it's not so much public versus private. It's a legacy and its credibility. So whether we were public or private, we would not have been able to pull off the expansion that we had over the last several years into more and more business data medical data or business or medical software. If we hadn't had a legacy of doing that which came out of trade publishing, so you go back forty or fifty years through various acquisitions. I don't think trade publishing was ever a top of mind strategy for the company, but through various acquisitions, we got some trade publications some of which we still publish we still publish Lor covering weekly. And if you wanna know what? That's about the name says it all, but it's still a profitable industry publication. So we continue to do that. But back forty fifty years ago, we were publishing magazines called American druggist. We republishing magazine called motor, which was for people who repair cars for living, fortunately, for us, the publishers of those to trade magazines, again, forty fifty years ago decided that as good or better business would be to be collecting data in their industry. And of course, at the time they had the publish this date in big books, because there was no internet, but American druggist spawned, a company called first databank, which we own one hundred percent of, and it is the largest source in this country of drug dosing information, drug interaction information that is relied on by hospitals and pharmacies across this country. And in some other countries that came out of American druggist motor more from a magazine about how to fix cars into a database as to how to fix cars and repair times and, and repair cost estimates. And is now a fabulous data business that is put together. I think it's in the realm of twenty seven or twenty eight straight years of revenue and profit growth, so we did more aggressively decide Frank Bennett, and I when I was fortunate enough to become his chief operating officer in two thousand eleven we jointly decided with the tremendous support of our board, and particularly our chairman will Hearst to push more aggressively into business data and business off wear, and since that decision we've made nine billion dollars of backwards issues in that area alone, including, including Fitch, we own a smaller piece of fish, we now one hundred percent. A fish and what is forever one's audience and sort of a rating agency component kids, one of the global ratings agencies clearly along with SNP and Moody's and Fitch itself has a long history. And I think Paul Taylor and his team are CEO there do a fabulous job, and it's global rating agency and then it has other non raidings financial information product. So it is a large global financial data provider. Now when you say ratings obviously, this is not media ratings. No, you're talking about bond rating. Right. But the debt markets and the financial markets, so you start off as a Wall Street Journal. Reporter, I believe way back when take us through how that skill set and being very well read gives you the qualifications to be overseeing this conglomerate and building this company. Most of us have had any success in life. And if it from just having head great mentors in from the time I joined the Wall Street Journal, I got to work with such giants in the businesses. Norm perlstein and James b Stewart who writes a famous column now for the New York Times. And I think that what you learn as a financial journalist, is how to analyze things you have to some things up quickly. You have to master a number of different industries. So I was fortunate enough to both cover Wall Street than I was an editor on the front page desk, and then you had work on Cynthia. Sizing these big stories that could've come from the farm bureau's or the Washington bureau. So I think it was at still a very young age. Still in my twenties, a great learning experience. And then when I hit expressed to my bosses at the time a long-term desire to be on the business when a chance the Wall Street Journal, and her started talking about publishing the financial magazine. They said to me, my bosses at the journal so, well, this would be a good opportunity for you on Choubey our lead Representative on this project, and that led to the push into the business, interestingly enough that project, which was called thus mart money magazine, which we brought out in nineteen ninety one I think Hearst person that was put on that project. David carey. And he did a fabulous podcast with you, and David went on to run our magazine division in a fabulous way. And we've been good personal and business friends over since. Now, his graduated to becoming a student at Harvard. Now he is on the Harvard campus and advanced leadership program, and I have a son, who's on the Harvard campus as sophomore great from journalists to business person, and then obviously in chief executive senior executive Hertz corporation along the way. What could you point to for your ascendancy, that was an accolade, or sort of a bold Beth that you've made that got everyone's attention saying, well, this person really could lead this company. I don't know that it was anyone thing. And I think most of aside from the way you dress. The. Look, a lot of things in live his lock in being in the right place at the right time as long as you're working hard and trying hard and, you know, I think smart money, the fact that smart money ended up being a successful launch with myself, as the launch editor in David as the launch publisher. I think another thing that actually kinda helped me in an odd way, David decided after we were up and running a couple years to move on. And he joined nother fabulous media company at Conde nast when he moved on Frank Bennett, who has been my principal mentor in life. And I've been very fortunate in that Frank said to me, would you be interested in taking over David's business, I'd responsibilities, and I guess I was around thirty one at the time and I very much was so that was my first time with that. I was fully on the business, and it was really a lucky turn of events both the David decided to move on. And that Frank decided to give me a chance while it's worked very well. And now as the CEO, would you say that the most innovative moves that you've made or the boldest move may have been in the businesses area way from media? I think the biggest decision that Frank and myself and our board med was to push harder in to what we call business media, which is the Fitch and the medical and the transportation data off where businesses because I think it was relatively clear back, then this was early two thousand eleven that the entire consumer media sector some of which were still growing at a rapid rate. Certainly ESPN was knocking the cover off the ball and an e was blowing through their numbers every year PA positively. Yes. But I think it was clear what we were seeing happening with newspapers getting disrupted by technology and magazines getting disrupted by technology and yellow pages. Getting disrupt that the same thing was inevitably going to happen to the television business. Maybe not as dramatically because television, is it self digital business, but was going to happen. Something was going to happen to the model and we were getting at that time, roughly ninety percent of our profits from consumer media. So we decided in our board and our management team. It really is in many respects, like a partnership at Hearst of all of various division heads, and senior executives and our board, and certainly Frank. We decided that let's push more aggressively into an area that was already working for a so we had the credibility. We just weren't as big as we felt we needed to be. And now in two thousand nineteen we expect almost forty percent of our profits to come from these e to be businesses. Meanwhile, what we thought would happen has happened, not in a dramatic way. But clearly we're seeing some changes in the business model of. Television that has not in any way. Made it a bad business. It is still a very good business, but it's growth pattern has clearly been altered by the changing technology and media landscape. Could you give us a sense of speaking out, how big hurston, what the diversification, as well as a private company, we reserve, the right not to talk about our profits? We did about eleven and a half billion dollars of revenue and we run at a very respectable margin and about forty percent of that you'd think is you said as businesses in two thousand eighteen it was thirty three percent of our profits came from the business media. It's business media sits tend to have a higher margin. So they're not as big a percentage of our revenue. But of our profits thirty three and because our business media portfolio is growing at a double digit clip while the consumer media side. Is not growing anywhere near that fast. This year we think it'll be about forty percent of our profits. And obviously, if those patterns continue, and we're pragmatist so we don't know. But obviously, we will move and I think we would be in better shape, if we move more toward a fifty fifty balance or even just given the prevailing climate north of fifty fifty in favor of the BBC stuff. So this is what I'm really impressed with, because we all love the media business, and obviously, you have your tentacles, a lot of places in that business, and that's been a legacy part of the company, but to really plot out a diversified model that gives you hand growth and business diversification. The same time, I think if I could be bold is the beginning of your legacy the long way to go. We both fans of writer. David brooks. I've been studying his concept, even off the New York Times up ED's of what he calls his second mountain. We this is a personal development, but even from a business perspective. We all climb. Our first mountain, we've spoken about it a lot, which you reach your core competency, hopefully around our age groups and then you start to hit a valley of thought about what you really wanna be in the future versus where you came from. And that valley is a very self-aware process of what the business looks like and where you wanna go, and then you start climbing your second mountain, which is kind of a scary place to be because not where you came from. But it could be a very joyful productive exuberant experience because it's really taking on a new chapter. Once you have a purpose about that, then it can be transcended. That's how I think about you. But how you're working with hurston transforming the business in your direction? Well, first of all, David Brooks is fabulous and perhaps the best columnist writing today, and like you on excited to hear about his new book, and to read it at hers. I've already read it. Area. You're nothing if not flunked doesn't surprise me at all. I think that it hurts. At least it really is a partnership. I don't look at this as in any way my legacy, again, we're building on William Randolph Hearst, did. And Frank bin ich did, and he still with it. We still have this fabulous group of trustees who are both some retired members of senior management who are still very actively involved, some daily, we're just very blessed all of the divisions of hers, whether it would be Jordan were LeBron Hearst television are thirty three stations or David. And now Troy young running magazines Mark all them who's now our chief operating officer at the corporation, but he ran newspapers for many years. Now. Jeff Johnson neared Kim Lonnie who helps us oversee our entertained before we just have fabulous group of folks, Paul Taylor at Fitch or can great camper. We just have a fabulous group. Of really CEO's of their own business eve, Burton Burton, our chief, legal officer and matures CFL, I'm going to leave somebody out some purpose about this. But, you know, we just have a fabulous group of folks in its collective partnership again. We got a great board. Very supportive will Hearst in the hers family. So it's a collective and really what we've done is really a continuum that starts with the founder. So we're just building off of that to some respects in it. See David Brooks thing on YouTube, so I guess I'm a little familiar to some degree. I think what he could also be talking about, is what people do outside of work, and we all work most of the time. But obviously, there's also can be another leg that doesn't necessarily have to interfere with what you're doing businesswise. But, you know making more of giving back more of a philanthropic commitment, more of the civic commitment. And there again, you know, working at hers, that's just. Baked into the DNA. We are all expected. We've got David carry now up at Harvard in this advanced program, trying to learn more about the not for profit sector that will influence what he does either in his business life or in his private life going forward. Certainly, many of our trustees will is very Finland. Thraw bec- Frank Bennett spin on the New York Presbyterian hospital board for forty years and has served as its chairman served as chairman Lincoln center. So we learned that Franken regard because the chairman of the center, yet for Germany into the center, so trying to follow in his footsteps, there's well and, and, you know, work on things like Lincoln center. I'm also pleased to be on the board at New York Presbyterian, a very a privilege to be on that Boorda, chairman of the Associated Press. So some of that is what one does to make a contribution in areas that are not directly, but can be related to what you. Do in the workplace for sure. I want to talk about the area of partnerships because Hurst has been known over long time with one very notable example, which we're going to bring up of being just a phenomenal partner, contributing partner investor, but one that's very easy to work with, and obviously very productive to work alongside and these referred to ESPN. So Hearst for longtime at a twenty percent owners reviews peon in partnership with Disney, which has been the majority holder, take us through how that came to be, and why that parts of it works so beautifully relation with Disney overall. Well, yeah, I mean we're just so fortunate to be tied. Disney is innovating on so many levels when you're thinking about the great CEO's in general, or particularly great CEO's in the media business. You've gotta start with Bob Eiger. So the history of it is hurston ABC, when it was a stand alone company back in. The early eighties Leonard Goldensohn the phenomenal men who build ABC and Frank Bennett came together and decided to have television partnership, that would aim at this new thing called cable television and out of that partnership came the lifetime channels, and eventually the history channel Leonard also bought for ABC ESPN, then capital cities, the fabulous team of Murphy, and Burke with Warren Buffett as their biggest shareholder came in and quired ABC. So our partner became cap cities ABC during that time twenty percent of ESPN that was not owned by cap cities ABC came up for sale that twenty percent had been owned by the RJR, Nabisco company, and after the famous takeover by KTAR that spawned the book and movie barbarians at the gate. They decided that they needed to sell down some non-core assets to pay down dead. And so they put their twenty percent and Frank and his colleagues at the time acquired that twenty percent aided by the fact that there was a comfort level at cap cities, that we would be a good twenty percent holder to their eighty. I know they regret not actually buying it themselves. But we benefited from that, and then in the mid nineties, Disney acquired cap cities, and they have been our partner ever since and the relationship is really fabulous. And it's really across a huge swath of our media portfolio. So clearly Disney owns and controls ESPN. They own eighty percent. We own twenty percent. We like to think that we're very supportive and been good board members. But they're calling the shots and Jimmy Petar the relatively new head of ESPN is just doing phenomenal job. He fifty fifty we and Disney own. On eighty history in lifetime and some of their other channels together, and we have a relatively new CEO there. Paul Bucci hairy who once against just doing a phenomenal job running any, and then we own fifteen ABC affiliate television station. So we're really all in, in the television business as a partner of Disney, you look at what Bob has done, first of all, you know, realizing I think before just about anybody did that cable had carried the game for a long time. And while cable wasn't going away. New growth needed to be put in place and Bob position. Disney to have that new growth from blockbuster brands and his acquisitions of Star Wars, and marvel and picks are just totally put them in place for a new era of growth, and certainly inspired us for us. We couldn't go into the movie business. William Randolph Hearst had tried that decided that wasn't for us and move. Moved on. But for us that new Lega growth was business media, I was very inspired by what Bob had done at Disney. And now he's positioning Disney as the leader in going direct to consumer with the great brands and we're already benefiting. Yes. Bien pluses, off to a great start as a relatively new streaming brand. So we couldn't have a better or more important partner than Disney. Yeah. But that partial continues to evolve mean the eighty twenty partnership peon that's clear. They call the shots your reporter and you probably obviously very involved in what's happening even though Disney's and. A fifty fifty partnership is not easy because usually a fifty one forty nine or someone has to call their shot, but fifty fifty you coming together making decisions together is wherever an issue like who has a hand when there's a I mean it's really been great over many decades. This is one of those partnerships where the contract never comes out of the drawer. We've always been able to jointly make decisions and keep things going. And any has just had phenomenal growth over the last thirty years. What do you think now that the Disney FOX deal is closing or just closed, or set the close, depending on, when we actually released this podcast? It's a obviously very much imminent that is now going to be a content drug or not with direct consumer offering and getting bigger and bigger in his own. Right. How does that change your with Disney? And is there some sense of the partnership is kind of left behind, or will that ultimately be part of that whole contents? Edgy. Well, I can't speak for Bob or Kevin mayor or any of our great partners there. They'll have to and do a great job of laying out their own strategy. All I can say about it, and he is it, it's a big company. It's a significant company on its own. It's a significant part of our significant part of Disney's earning. So you can't imagine anything of that size and quality. I mean right now, and he has pretty much any way you slice it three networks in the top twenty so they don't think you get everything in terms of an e being left behind as significant s but we are in a scale moment for media. Right. Which is evidenced by the Disney FOX deal eight to two Time Warner. Comcast sky other notable examples as well. Do you get concerned about being subscale orders? You're partial Disney, make you feel more comfortable. You're either to one of the scale players, but we'll see. I mean, obviously, as you say the landscape keeps changing I wouldn't single any outlook every. Media business regardless of its size is evaluating change and trying to figure out what the future is. And it's hard to say if you wanna look out five ten years, where we'll be where the traditional bundle will be where new bundles will be how big affect your will streaming be what will be the relative consumption patterns traditional brands, versus more, Netflix, or Amazon, of course, Disney will now control fabulous, Brandon Hulu. And so I just think for all consumer media brands what the future holds is hard to predict, but all I'll say about an e is three channels in the top twenty I feel pretty good about the top twenty on the cable dial. Yeah, but how do you think about from direct consumer perspective, but we'll have to see, I mean, I think everything in the direct to consumer world is relatively nascent except for Amazon, and if you other players, so, yeah, Netflix, of course. So we'll see. Yeah. And broader topic on technology mean technology has to be brought into any businesses days, not just about the consumer video places even software companies and business services and even this podcast. Right. This is a new technology, even though it sounds like an old technology and the audio business. Your first podcast, I'm happy to be welcoming you into the new frontier here, but tell me about how Hearst, incorporates technology know-how in partnerships United together, the Microsoft CEO summit. So I know that you're in the game and involved, but how do you think about as a business leader? Well, obviously, there are many layers of technology. I think what we're most excited about is what we think, is the dawning of phenomenal new age of productivity across businesses across the world in, you know, much is been written. Professor Gordon wrote the seminal book about how what has happened in the modern era. Has not produced the same level of dramatic leaps in productivity, as we had with the dawning of electricity. Refrigeration aviation would have you kind of thing that so far, the digital revolution of the streaming revolution or whatever kind of hasn't really produced that level of change. And there's been a lot written about Larry Summers in particular about a level of stagnation, and the economy. I think, though that we're on the cost with artificial intelligence machine learning opportunities for automation. I think we're on the cusp of a great leap in productivity, and we're excited about it, and trying to use it across every Hearst business mostly from the notion that armed with insights pattern recognition in what have you from the computational power? That's out there today. That no individual has the time or resources to do. I just think our folks across the creative side, the business. I defined scan be making better decisions, and I think that's going to be pushed across so a big focus for us that Mark all the Marci fop rating officer is leading is just to make sure that we are integrating machine learning. And there aspects of artificial intelligence in every business operation using fabulous off the shelf, tools, hiring, some fabulous, statea, scientists, and mathematicians. And what have you to make sure that we're constantly trying to take our data put it into better forms, and then run some learning against it and make better decisions, so projecting or speaking for our audience here, and listen to you talk, you sound like a very sophisticated Stewart of capital and business executive, but there's also a very funny. And warm and inspirational side to Steve sports, because I know that side of you and you could let it out a little bit here. It's safe because we do share with each other are year and letters that we send up to our people, and I'm grateful that you haven't trusted me to read your and get a sense of your leadership style. And I appreciate your taking a look at mine, and giving me your feedback as well. But give me a sense of how you lead. It's a big company obviously, you have company of a deep bench, you have Frank as inspirational executive vice chair and leader, but really, it's kind of a lonely job. So leadership is really there to serve the people and the company and you do a great job of that. And I saw that really through, you're writing your letter. So what does your style who I, I love the concept of any annual letter because hopefully our colleagues benefit from it because we're relatively diversified company. And we want them to have a full appreciation of everything that's going on the opportunities the challenges, and where each of our may. Divisions is headed your letter is notable for a lot of business insight, but you also have book recommendations, which takes it, one step farther than mine, or even Warren Buffett's. And I think all of us are inspired by Warren's letters. I've read them all and commend anybody who hasn't read them, all they are phenomenal forty plus years of business history. And maybe going on fifty years of business history and insight and wisdom. And it's just amazing to read them. So I think many of us who write letters, Jamie Dimon, of course, rights phenomena letter are inspired by Warren, and his ladder riding at that, Microsoft, comatose able to tell war, and, and then typical and he immediately turned around and recommended two or three letters that I should read that I hadn't read before just a fabulous. That was a great time to warn we got to go to Bill, Gates's house and see the library and in, you know, Saudi and the Dow's doing such a fabulous job running Microsoft. So that was. Great to be able to be that conference leadership. I think today not just for Hearst. But for most businesses is about collaboration. It's about working through differences to come up with a shared vision. Everybody's going to have different perspectives. Not all of our senior team gonna gre- on everything, but getting people comfortable, and with a path, and working through and building consensus for it working with our management team. Our trustees are bored. I think it's a lot about that. And I think things like an annual letter can add clarity because it's a very fast moving world and sometimes you gotta step back at Hearst. I think, again, we're fortunate that whoever is in the ios spot is supported by group, trustees and board members and again, fabulous senior folks, and I said, I know it leaves somebody out, but did wanna mention you know, rich Malik who are executive vice president for business media Willie was integral to. Building that portfolio that we have of businesses today. So tell something interesting about Stephen Schwartz. Most people don't know. Well, interesting is a loaded word, and what do you do for fun? I love to read loved to read history. I think the one volume biography of Churchill that came out that the New York Times pushed hard is just really. I mean what a life what an amazing lie that rob. Andrew Roberts, just phenomenal. And like to be current and reading about policy in thinking, and you've recommended the trilogy the sapiens and. To home dad. So those are great by the Israeli he's fabulous. And so I've read all of those I like to read a lot, I like to watch a lot of ESPN. My wife says, you know, I hope you don't think this is actually counts. His business sitting there watching, you know, basketball game or football game and lacrosse games and travel or your wife likes travel. My wife is always planning something, and thank goodness because we get to see the world to her, and then finally, I'm trying to learn how to play golf, I think after a year and a half of lessons, making a little bit of progress. It's great because it concentrates the mind, there's a little ball, sitting on a nice piece of grass. The ball doesn't move and it's just so confounding the inability to hit it squarely is quite a challenge, but making progress my one recommendation for you on that topic of golf is, I would suggest you pick a ping pong. Instead, it's a lot, more efficient fifteen minutes, you're done you can go back home. Go back to your office, and you get the same kind of rush to say this about pink pie. I was a good ping pong player when I was a kid, we had a table in our basement, and a sister who was two years younger, and she would got invited to all the parties when we were in high school, and I wouldn't. So I would be in the basement playing with another guy who didn't get invited to the parties either we got very good at ping pong, but I had a humbling experience. And I think all of us do as we get older, and particularly as our kids get older ones, almost twenty one and one's about to turn seventeen and they became such great ping pong players. I taught them to play. And now I don't think they'll play with me, and if they would I wouldn't enjoy it, so we have much retired after seeing how far you can play it into your older ages. I pride ourselves that we have a ping pong table here in the office from day one, and even as grown, we've kept it in a flushed out all the best ping pong players media because they come over here to play some with a change of clothes because they're so. Serious about it. And they're so good at it that they come in, and they wanna make sure they don't get to work up. Steve. I appreciate your being here finished with us on the book that you're reading today that we should all take advice from, I'm reading so many at the same time right now and what I've really been trying to do. I'm reading about two or three all in the realm of machine learning or artificial intelligence, and I can't for the life of me. Remember the names of any of the three but I think all of this needs to really educate ourselves in that area and be on the cutting edge. And, you know, one last anecdote from the Churchill book, he wasn't just a visionary in terms of where he saw the menace of Hitler and Nazism. He was incredibly knowledgeable about the technology of the day. He had this quirky professor, who would come. Visit him all the time and make sure that he was totally current on military technology. Aviation technology. So when he took over he really was ready to lead the British war effort. I'm trying to learn from that all of his can learn from that none of us is innate -ly as knowledgeable 's, we should be about these areas, but we all have to both read as much as we can, but also find the people either inside our company or outside who really know about this, and make sure we're constantly talking this through because I think the implications are very great indeed side note, because you're gonna talk about golf, all the things are interested in, but really from my perspective where you thrive is in your style, and how you dress and I have that whenever I got up in the morning knowing on a C you it changes the way that I dress because I feel like after Brandt because they're one of the more impeccably-dressed executives out, not the fed anyone else out there. But you just adopt above. Well, let me just respond to that by saying since people can't see the two of us on this podcast as I sit here. I am in my usual uniform, which is kind. Kind of IBM salesman. Circa, nineteen sixty I have a navy blue suit on a white shirt, a blue tie and black high socks. I'm looking over there a bore cough, who looked like he just stepped out of a plug one of our publications Esquire. I mean, there is a subtle check shirt, there's a striped tie that goes exactly what the colors of the check. There's a very interesting, shall we say, I know he spent some time in London. There's a very British looking kind of cardigan and the sued has a lot of subtle texture to it. I mean this man is really well dressed, and he knows it. So the last time area came and visited Hearst he was as turned out as he is today, and he insisted that we take a picture. So my sister took a picture. And then area had the picture framed and he sent it to the house, and we're not sure who did it may have been one of the boys may been somebody's who here's a picture. So in our family room, we have pictures of all of our family members, you know, the kids cousins, nephews nieces, whatever and one day, I'm looking at it with my wife and we're both looking. We says, how did bore cough getting our family collection? So there is the picture of area at me right in the middle of the sports family election. So that just for me underscores the ubiquity of area, bore cough, he is truly these elig of modern New York life. Live ratio, many ways to cover a client, and this is one of our. Coach. Well, I'm glad that were on audio and not being visualized. We look nothing like the way. Okay. Well, thank you for being with us on kindred cast. And I look forward to the continuing to learn from you and our collaboration. And watching you thrive both in giving back as well as in your sheep executive rollovers. Well, thank you area agree, pleasure. Thank you very much. I hope you enjoyed our show today. If you wanna check out any prior episodes, you can find us on apple podcasts, Spotify or wherever, you listen feel free to leave a review there. As it helps people find the show. You can also follow us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook at kindred cast for behind the scenes photos, and info, keep listening and see you next time. Shen.

Hearst corporation William Randolph Hearst CEO Disney Frank hurston ABC executive Steve Senator George Hearst president and CEO David ESPN chairman New York Times founder Frank Bennett Fitch Ratings David Brooks
AI Today Podcast: Are Legal Digital Assistants the future? Interview with Rick McFarland, Chief Data Officer at LexisNexis

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

30:18 min | Last month

AI Today Podcast: Are Legal Digital Assistants the future? Interview with Rick McFarland, Chief Data Officer at LexisNexis

"The today podcast produced by called melinda cuts through the hype and noise to identify. What is really happening now. In the world of artificial intelligence learn about emerging trends technologies and use cases from cotonou lyrica analysts and guests experts. Hello and welcome to the ai today. Podcast i'm your host kathleen welsh and my co host. Ron smells is actually out on a much needed and well deserved vacation. So it will just be me on this podcast interview today. If you're listening to the today podcast for the first time. Welcome we've been doing this for four years now and this is the podcast to go with. You wanna hear interviews with thought leaders also insight into our ai market trends and adoption and both the public and private sector and also conversations around key topics focusing on. What's happening really with ai today. So if you haven't listened to any of our previous podcasts. Check them out. We have tons of interviews. And we also as i mentioned have different podcasts where we go into various use cases. We also have podcasts around a education as well but some of the best podcasts that we have are with guests. Because we get to hear what's happening with ai today at various organizations so. I'm excited to have with us here. Today rick mcfarland. Who is the chief data officer at lexus. Nexus hi rick and thanks for joining us today. Thanks for having me. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners and tell them a little bit about your background and your current role at lexus. Nexus and maybe for folks. that aren't familiar with lexis. Nexis let them know what it is here. Serve as you mentioned. I am the chief chief data officer for lexus. Nexus and so this usually leads to the question of what you do and most parties i man and so basically i oversee the data governments governance data management data science data strategy. For all of lexis nexis manage. I manage the teams responsible for machine learning and ai development in most of our products and For those of you who those listeners. Don't know of lexis-nexis we actually Provide legal and analytical data all all around the world hundred and sixty two countries. So what else. Can i tell you why i'm also a phd statistician before joining lexus. In two thousand. And seventeen i was the chief data scientist at the hearst corporation. And before that. I was actually i worked for amazon. I manage the retail data warehouse teams and after that the kindle team so i've had kind of a diverse background before i found my way over here to the legal data space. Yeah i was gonna say that's a really. That's a really great and diverse background. So you can bring a lot of your past experiences into what you're doing today and for folks that are listening if you're not familiar with our data for ai event. We actually have rick speaking at our august twenty twenty one event so we encourage you to check that out you can go to data. Ai com dot com. That's data a c. o. n. f. dot com to check it out. I know a lot of our listeners. As always it's free so just register and make sure that you get the link And we're looking forward to diving a little bit deeper into conversations and topics there but you know i want to ask about You know with natural language processing and digital assistants in general. How you guys are using that. What do you see as primary challenges for a adoption especially with regards to those digital assistants and natural language technology natural language processing technology. That's a very interesting question. And i and i actually See digital assistance. And i'm sure you do all over the place. Nowadays in in fact my home alone. I think we have to alexes. And every one of our devices has syria autumn nowadays But what's interesting if you walk into a law firm or doctor's office you probably don't see any digital assistance and i guess the question i always ask myself. I wonder why the where are they at lexus. We think hard about this and so We the real reason that. I think that it really boils down to the difference between what i call consumer grade and professional grade. Ai so let me let me flesh a little bit here. So a consumer data. I is is what i what i would say. Delivers you your daily horoscope or review horrible a headline or you can ask a factual question about in this case. In this case the the digital assistant Alexa can be wrong. And you may not even know it. I mean if it's your horoscope and it's wrong. How you to know and you just kind of go about your day right. So i call that consumer grading i and then So in a professional setting though where where you're dealing with a persons health or their freedom being correct matters and this is where i what i call at least alexis. We refer to as professional grade. Ai space and this is primarily where we operate so so i think Another while i can stop ever second that a make sense the professional versus consumer grade stuff. Yeah you know. That's a great breakdown. Because i think that you're right and we talk about a cognitive with the seven patterns of ai and so we say you know when you're doing a conversational system for example. Well you know in some situations you're right if if we're talking about horoscopes or we're talking about giving me the weather the you know being wrong Okay maybe i get caught in the rain or you. Maybe it's a sunny day. And i forgot to put on sunblock but me being wrong is in. You know the the system being wrong. Isn't that big of a deal but you're right when it comes to more You know life threatening situations or where it really matters or where seconds can matter being wrong is much more serious can have much bigger impacts so when we think about it we go okay. Well maybe in this situation also with recommendation systems. You know if if i recommend a product to you that you end up not buying and it was kind of like out in left field. Then whatever right i mean. Yeah maybe the business. The bottom line is going to suffer but at the end of the day really didn't make much impact on my life that i was buying socks and you recommended a snowblower to me. It was like okay whatever But if i in a healthcare situation then yes it can have major impacts if what you recommend. Is you know a wrong course of treatment or i'm allergic to that medicine. That's exactly very well. So so i think that's. That's one of the key challenges that's why we don't see a lot of the digital systems there. There's another problem though that we face on the legal side that maybe some other Professional situations don't so in another challenge on the voice bay swab. Divide your digital assistance into voice and text based in the voice based assists the assistance. One of the challenges they have is they have to be able to transcribe the spoken query or question into a textual form and this is actually creates a huge problem in the legal space. I don't probably don't know this a lot. But i think it's one of the few places where we have actually two languages in play english and latin one one alive language and went dead language. And there's not a lot of people walking around speaking latin these days maybe the vatican city but So one of the tests. You can always that. I love to try on my alexa. As i always. I throw it a couple of legal questions. Like what can court do. What can court a court do so spontaneous. Or what is the definition of pro se so these are just very typical legal. Legal one questions and as you can see. They have a english sentence with a latin phrase. And if you ask these of alexa that she she tends to get confused or doesn't realize you're switching languages and then here's an even harder. Let me give you heart problems. So a typical lawyer asks very complex questions. Like here's a typical citation. Or here's a funky citation. That i i wrote down that. We came across whatever databases. So this is an actual question asked of our system. It is what was the decision made in batman versus the commissioner. One eight nine f to d what. Oh seven thousand nine hundred fifty one from the. Us court of appeals for the fifth circuit. That's a mouthful right. Can you imagine what alexa siri would do with that question. It would probably just say i give up so I mean quite frankly because it's a it's a consumer grade gadget. It'll probably pivot off of the comic book response. But batman v commissioner is actually a real court case. Nineteen fifty one. So i think it's a adds another another layer of complexity for the legal space on the voice based assistance. Yeah you know and also following up with that. Have you seen issues with getting that legal. Ease terminology in there as well. And how good are these assistance at being able to you. Know really understand enhance. I know you said well. We have english and latin. Which you're right is actually a really really interesting. That i think most people don't think about where it's like. Well yes it's it's kind of all in english what we're talking about here but really we need to be dealing with two languages but then even more specifically just you know lawyer terminology and that legally specifically. How good are these assistance at being able to handle that. Well i've been to lots of. I've been actually a speak on several panels. I've been to several law firms and quite frankly these these digital assistance are sitting industrials in the lawyer's offices They just don't they don't they. Don't respond. they don't actually pick up the context the legal context. They're they're programmed to work in the consumer space and a lawyer is very highly specific came into measurement. A doctor's office would be like And so and then addition one more little thing is the imagine if you have our example earlier where we said you can the horoscope wrong or you can be out in the weather and you may have you know you got a little wet. You've forgotten really you're still gonna use alexa right with a lawyer if if you're in a case or you're getting information and you ask a question of device and it gives you the wrong answer once even once it is unplugged and put away And so i think I think that's the that's the real issue here. Is that the bar. The bars really high and these are these. Things have not been trained. They haven't actually gone to law school as guess what we use around lexis nexis lexis so you know. We talked about some of the challenges but what about opportunities. What do you see as opportunities around this domain specific. Ai driven qna platforms. I actually think. I do think the domain specific spaces the next big leap. I think right now. I think where we've we've invested a lot of time and i think the is shown itself to be very effective in the generic question answering tool right. So you know a lot of times you can say. Hey what's the weather today. And in fact some of the systems today are actually doing what we call turns where the cuny system will actually ask a clarifying question which is turn saying. Did you mean in new york city and if that and if you answered yes ill then give you. the weather. New york actually helps to get to the right answer. That helps remind your answer. Set is very very hopeful. But it's really very few places you can go today for and a. on on complex or domain specific content. So i think a lot of times if you do ask alexa a technical question. And she doesn't know the answer you'll hear her on with I found this on wikipedia. Probably understanding a lot. I don't know if i mean if you're if you're if you're a professional and you go to wikipedia for your information i don't i'm not sure that's the most highly sought out technical resource And so The faulting wikipedia as one of the other challenges. Here it should really you know we. We would want these tools to to a more curated by experts. Source such as you know wendy's curated by doctors lexis-nexis obviously curated by thousands of lawyers and science direct These are all recognize domain. Experts Places of domain expertise that I think the qna platforms should be able to recognize. Hey that's a legal question. I would like to default to a legal expert domain and maybe default to lexus nexus. For example or so. I think there's a lot of opportunities around the days. I think that's the place where we've got to go to next. We're currently a high school high school level. By at least that's the way i refer to it as we need to get moving to the more advanced capabilities and sometimes i think high school is even a structure. These are at cognitively. We have done for the past few years. We did a voice assistant benchmarks and we took four popular A digital systems. We took the alexa siri. Google home and microsoft cortana and we just asked at a series of questions and we found that all of them at the end of the day got a failing grade. Because they're not able to you know they they don't have commonsense. They don't have emotional. Iq they don't understand colloquialisms and even you know with Terminologies with common phrases that people say so There's a lot of issues with it and you're right for certain things. It's okay to be wrong but you know we asked it. How long does does it take to cook a fifteen pound turkey and the first year. None of them got it correct. When you think about well when would i be using these voices systems like well. I probably would be using them. When i'm in the kitchen cooking and my hands are dirty and i can't get access to my phone or computer and so if they're not able to answer simple questions like that. I think about what it could mean. When you're asking the more complex questions that actually have more significant consequences than maybe i. Just kinda burned. my turkey or undercooked. It you know which could have medical consequences right there. That was good. Example of what could go bad right. So you know when we're when we're looking at these digital assistants. What do we need. How do we get to these professional grade digital assistance. So i think. I alluded to this but i think for for really great. I are actually to move to the next level. You need to be able to the i. Assistant has to be able to answer the question. What i would say in one turn with no clarifying questions. So what's really needed here. Is you need to be able to really interpret the context of the question. Really well so where it gets wrong. In my earlier example. It gets the context wrong of batman versus the commissioner at. I had a illegal illegal reference in their the context around that should indicate to the tool that. It's a legal question. Not a question about batman the comic book and so the cuna took a really big lead forward with the direction of what i would call our call. The trans goater technologies. which is the most famous one. Perhaps right now is being called bert. The ert which was introduced by google. Two thousand eighteen. And i think is now being used by google for all of its searches to understand the search queries but This bird methodology has the ability to actually interpret the context of the query in a more clear way than associate the context of the query with a context. The context of answers answers also have context and so this connection of context is really i think. Been the big leap forward at least In in terms of being able to associate create better question answer connections and being able to understand your question and not give you a non sequitur to something. That's not related to your question. And then the other step that we've taken his. The google actually provide this burst. Burt technology off the shelf. And it's been trained to understand the context of a bunch of a generic legal spat. It's basically read the internet. And it's been it can understand generic questions and understand the context of generic questions. That's why you've probably seen an improvement in these The the tools recently in in terms of your generic questions but what you can do with these tools and which would a lexus. We've actually taken the bird model and we've we can find tuna we can. Actually we've taken our. We have about a pet abide historical legal case law data and we have fine tuned. The bird model with the legal data so that it can we take in the context of all the legal documents we have in plugged it into the brain so to speak so basically we took burton in what we say took to law school so now we have a specialized bird model at lexus. We call it illegal bird and so when you ask a legal question it's it puts on its legal brain and it tries to answer as a lawyer would or as because it's brain has been programmed to think like a lawyer and so i think this is the this is the kind of the key areas if as we get to more specialized areas of of of the assistance. They have to really be trained. Or i'm not getting taken to either. Medical school or law. School is really what you have to do to. You have to feed it the everything that the doctors and lawyers read and these these these contextual models will be able to absorb those the language of that profession and then be able to interpret the questions and answers in a better way not perfectly but definitely can tell the example. I gave above the legal question. Not a comic book question. Exactly that is very important. Now i know that you know we we do run into issues still with authentication and you're right. That defaulting to wikipedia or basic searches isn't always helpful. You know for from a professional standpoint and sometimes even from a personal standpoint as well but there's issues especially as you get into more confidential situations or where you need to authenticate. It's a person there's passwords. Maybe it's behind a paywall so you know how are you guys addressing that or are you not yet. Well obviously our information is is obviously behind a log in and a password and a paywall. I guess and i think the way we're currently the that's the way our model is but we are. We are working on ways to open up our data in our qna to be more open to connect to these digital assistance in a more direct way. But that's kind of the challenge. Here is a the the data that's needed train. These things is collected over time. And it's and it's curated by professionals and it has cost companies millions and millions of dollars to enrich this data and and prep it and it is. It is the crown jewels of the company and other companies. I've mentioned before that are data providers so naturally we protected very well and so i think what we're looking for our partnerships with some of these digital assistance and to create pipes between our companies mutual agreed upon secure piping between our companies so that the digital assistants can interact with our data in our intelligence. But again we don't want it to get out of because it is our is our our asset exactly. Yeah i mean. Data is obviously important to organizations in. Its helps make you unique and differentiate you from your competitors because your data is your own so i think that You know that is a struggle. And how do you give people what they need. How do you train your systems without giving away too much so that it can still be You know a good system and you can have everything that you need. But you're not giving it away and spending all of this time resources money In doing so. And i think that you know as as we continue to see adoption especially in specific industries. It'll be interesting to see. How the industry's do progress. There's going to have to be a partnership between the domain data expert. The in order for a company like amazon to create the domain the data asset that we have take many many years and billions of dollars to recreate a data resource as riches legal content that lexus. Nexus has done likewise with medical stuff. I can't even imagine like google has a lot of data. But it hasn't been enriched and and you know thousands of lawyer lawyer hours of spent you know summarizing the data and enriching it and identifying legal precedents and correcting things so there's a lot of investment into it and i think i think what's going to happen for these digital assistance to get smarter and to connect with these resources there's partnerships between the data the data providers are the data experts and the machines the system machines. Yes we will definitely be interesting to see how things you know. Eventually do shakeout in of the industry progresses with that and You know how adoption of that works as well. 'cause you're right at the end of the day you know you can. You can do this. And and data is going to be the company asset but it's only as good as the users that use it right if nobody's using it and you've built something that's incredible than You know hopefully. It wasn't all for not you hope that people are using it so you have to make sure that there's adoption as well and so you're right. It needs to be good. Otherwise people won't use it so This was such a great conversation. And i'm looking forward to your talk at the the data for event. That's coming up so listeners. If you're interested please go to data a icon dot com to register and check that out. But we always like to end our podcasts with our podcast interviews with the same question because we get you know no matter how many times we've asked this question. We always get a different response from guests. So i love to hear what they have to say as a final note. What do you believe. The future of a is in general and its application to organizations and beyond good one So i'll have to make a confession. I grew up in the seventies watching a show called star trek. And captain kirk was my hero and i I always. I always loved it. When captain kirkwood would ask the ship. You know some kind of question and the ship a she would always answer him perfectly. No no clarifying question. Didn't say did you mean this. The ship always provided an awesome answer and Captain kirk and spock. Save the day. I actually think. I actually have that vision in mind as our ultimate end game here as if we could create something like that but i think gerald smith question there was interesting. It's i think. I think it took place. In the twenty second century that was was the sixties so twenty second century. They had this all knowing computer right that was sought for advice. And you would think that you know with all the fear we have of ai. Taking over the computers would just run everything but still in the twenty second century. Captain kirk and spock used all the super advanced technology for advice and they still. They still own the final decision. They still flew the ship. They still did all the all the stuff. So i think I think the future The future of ai is really to really help us make. It's kind of like another analogy would be kind of like an iron man suit. It's really designed to in my head to make a smarter and faster and better at what we do but the human inside is still in control and making the decisions but the decisions are just better more informed so yeah that's a. That's what my fond memories. So like to keep that in mind as i move forward and try to set a vision for lexus. Is well yeah. That's a great answer. You know we we call that idea augmented intelligence where you're taking the best of what the human can do in the best of what the machine can do and combining them together so you're never removing the human from the loop. You're just making. You're just allowing them to do their job or their roller their task better And so that's kind of you know. Sounds like what your vision of the future is where we have this idea of augmented intelligence. Where we're able to just make humans better but we're never going to replace humans through the twenty second century was going to happen after this right after that who knows maybe. The takeover aright reckless. Thanks so much. This was such an incredible podcast. And as i mentioned for really looking forward to upcoming talks so hopefully our listeners will register for that event. And if you've enjoyed listening to this podcast. Please make sure to rate us on itunes google spotify or your favorite podcast platform as always will post any articles in concepts discussed in the show notes including a link for the upcoming data for a event. Thanks for listening. And we'll catch the next podcast and that's a wrap for today to download this episode. Find additional episodes transcripts subscribe to our newsletter and more. Please visit our website at cognreznick dot com. Join the discussion in between podcasts. On the ai. Today facebook group and make sure to join the cardinal facebook page for updates on this and future podcasts. Also subscribe to our podcast. And itunes google play and elsewhere to get notified a future episodes. Want to support this podcast and get your message out to our listeners. Then become a sponsor we offer significant benefits for a today sponsors including promotion in the podcast and landing page an opportunity to be a guest on the today show for more information on sponsorship visit the cog delivered a website and click on the podcast link. This sound recording and its contents is copyright by cog melissa. All rights reserved music by matsu. Grab us as always. Thanks for listening to a us today. Ammo catchy at the next podcast.

alexa siri cotonou lyrica kathleen welsh rick mcfarland alexa ai rick Us court of appeals hearst corporation google melinda lexus vatican city amazon Alexa alexis syria Ron wendy
1936, Landon vs. Roosevelt: New Deal on Trial

American Elections: Wicked Game

45:21 min | 1 year ago

1936, Landon vs. Roosevelt: New Deal on Trial

"It's November Fifteenth Nineteen, twenty four on a luxury yacht in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California. The two hundred five foot yacht called. The ONEIDA is owned by Media Mogul William Randolph Hurst. C. is smooth and the night bombing Hurston. His guests mingle on the deck of the sipping cocktails eating d'oeuvres. The guest list is made up of largely Hollywood celebrities, producers, directors, and actors among them is Charlie. Chaplin, the famous star of the silent film era. He silent tonight to watching from afar as William Randolph hearst converses with a group of actresses who hang on his every word. You know why they left. The church is opening Cleveland during this year's Republican convention dunk. You know why so the delegates could hear some excitement. Not, all the ladies pretend to laugh screen actress Marion Davies rolls her eyes chaplain is all struck by her beauty, and has hearst tells another joke Davies cuts. Her is a chaplain. Why don't believe the progressives are here to stay after all a progressive is just a conservative who hasn't been mugged yet? Davies silently gestures for chaplain. Follow her, but she's in a relationship with William. Randolph hearst an open secret common knowledge in Hollywood and hearst is a powerful film producer, so chaplain doesn't want to burn a bridge still Davies offers to enticing to turn down. Chaplain follows her below deck. It doesn't take too long for her. To Notice Davies absence, he searches every inch of the deck, but his lover is nowhere to be found. Have you seen Marian? yeah, sorry, go below deck with Charlie. Hearst's face flushes red with anger and jealousy. Makes a beeline for the stairs. Low deck in his private quarters, hearst finds chaplain and Davies in the throes of passion. Caught red-handed, there's little the actress can say. Chaplain tries his best to defuse the situation. Mr. I I'm sorry. But hearst isn't in the mood for forgiveness. He's in the mood for revenge. Furious. He opens up a nearby drawer and withdrawals. A diamond studded revolver. Davies cries out as hearst raises the revolver and squeezes the trigger. But the bullet didn't hit chaplain or Davies. It hit a famous film director named Thomas Ins-, instances, Davies cry and came running right into the path of hearst's revolver, or so the story goes. It's ironic. The William Randolph hearst pioneer of sensationalist yellow journalism became the victim of fake news. The Story of hearst catching Charlie Chaplin in bed with Marion Davies is to use the slang of hearst Sarah Poppycock. The director Thomas Ins did die, but not from a gunshot wound. He had a heart attack on board, the ONEIDA and was promptly taken to a doctor in San Diego where he passed away. Hurst, did try to suppress the story and hide it from the police, but not because he was covering up a murder, his boozy party was in direct violation of the eighteenth amendment. Constitutional Prohibition of Alcohol. Story of hearst shutting INS was patently untrue with that didn't stop many in the press from amplifying the room, and it didn't stop the legend from persisting throughout generations, though the scandalous rumor was a constant source of irritation in might be said that from the Bockel William Randolph hearst learned a valuable lesson. A good story is often more powerful than the truth. I'm Lindsey Graham and this is American elections we gain. William Randolph hearst, or the chief, as he was often called with perhaps the most influential media mogul, Zahra his sensationalist style of journalism helped catapult him to tremendous wealth, power and prestige. His Media Empire hearst communications was the country's largest newspaper chain in its day, but hearst was more than just a newspaper man. He was a business leader, a film, producer and politician, mostly a loyal Democrat hearst. A California native had served as a New York Congressman from nineteen, ninety three to nineteen seven. And in the nineteen twenties, hers tried for the US. Senate, his path was blocked by the charismatic and controversial governor of New York Democrat. Al Smith in retaliation hearst in his many newspapers, shunned Al Smith in the nineteen twenty eight presidential election and supported Republican Herbert Hoover instead then in the nineteen thirty two contest, his distaste for Al Smith was in part the reason why I chose to support Franklin Delano Roosevelt at the Democratic convention, but William Randolph. Hearst was never a fan of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in hearst's mind FDR was to progressive and too much of an internationalist in the tradition of one of his least favourite presidents Woodrow Wilson. Wilson had campaigned on a promise to keep America out of World War One, but once in the White House German aggression, had forced Wilson's hand. Hearst feared that as president. Roosevelt would be too eager to push America into international conflicts. Still of the available options at the nineteen thirty two democratic convention, her said ultimately decided that FDR was the lesser of. During FDR's first term in office as his new deal expanded the role of government and society, tenuous political alliance between hearst and FDR would break. Would mobilize his media empire against FDR's presidency and ignite a few that would shape the landscape of the upcoming presidential contest. This is episode thirty? Nineteen thirty six landon versus Roosevelt the commander and chief. William Randolph. Hearst was not the type of man to do anything half heartedly once he committed FDR candidacy I went all in after the Democratic convention lies his expansive. Media Empire to help FDR beat hoover in the general election late in the nineteen thirty two campaign hers personally contributed twenty five thousand dollars to the Democratic Party, the equivalent of nearly half a million dollars today, but I didn't donate the money out of the kindness of his heart. He expected something in return. He expected influence. In January of Nineteen, thirty, three, her sent his right hand, man, New York editor Ed Cobb coblence to meet with FDR at his town home, and discussed the future of the country at their. Sit down. FDR TOLD ED he would love to have her come to visit him in person, and told FDR he would pass along the message, but had left the meeting unimpressed. He wrote to hearst encouraging him to take FDR up on his offer. Unquestionably, you'd be able to crystallize many of his policies, which to me at present seem rather vague and nebulous state. You could give direction and forced many of his ideas I think he needs your advice and I think the country would benefit by your personal contact with him. And hearst had plenty of advice to give including specific cabinet recommendations and a multi point plan to pull America out of the Great Depression in the early part of nineteen, thirty two, though I was recovering from surgery in California so instead of accepting FDR's investigation and making the journey east hearse rotate FDR. I've been following your course very closely and think I have a good general idea of your plans and I can assure you that I am in hearty accord with those plans as I. Understand them to be I shall ask Mr Coblets to discuss with you the effect of course for the papers to pursue. Hearst's interest in F ers plans and his desire for access to the president was more than politics as usual. I had a financial motive. The Great Depression affected every American even media moguls like William Randolph hearst by the time FDR took the presidency. Harsh economic realities were forcing her to contemplate a difficult decision, reduced salaries or lay off staff, though hearst had initially said he'd rather go broke than cut his people pay. The alternative was bankruptcy, so hurst did what he had to do, and cut salaries across the board, but even after slashing seven million dollars from the payroll NPR was still teetering on the brink. Ed- combines an FDR did continue their discussions, but they struggle to get on the same page. Hearst had a clear vision of how to save. America is multi point plan was driven by the private sector with the government in a support role. The plan centered around infrastructure projects, lower tariffs, and by American spend American approach, but after you are had a vision to his new deal was driven by the federal government through public works, projects, federal programs, financial reforms and sweeping relations, though these plans aligned envision, they are often in conflict in execution. So in early, nineteen, thirty, four, her set out to convince the American people at his plan was the better one. Not long after the election. Mgm Pictures Approached Hearst's film company cosmopolitan productions with an opportunity though many of hearst's Hollywood. Endeavors have been vanity projects for a starlet lover Marion Davies. He had also made a powerful propaganda films called. Patria in the lead up to world. War, one M Jams, new project also peaked hearst's interest. The film Gabriel the White. House was based on a book by the same name. Anatole the fictitious story of a president who rescues America from the clutches of depression. Hearst find the project and took a hands on approach to the creative process, giving notes, and making sure the script was on message in the final draft of the screenplay, hearst's by American plan was nearly identical. The plan created by the lead character president. Hammond Hollywood Self Censorship Agency. The Hays Office caught this immediately and wrote to hearst expressing their concern, the motion picture, production, code or Hays Code, as it was often known stipulated several. Several. Don't and be careful. Number twelve on the list of be careful was attitude toward public characters and institutions. The New York Times summarized the problem saying that MGM. Executives and the Hays Office felt that because of economic and political conditions, it was unwise to show a film which might be regarded by the nation at large as subversive and by foreign countries as invidious. Roosevelt's house staff was concerned to when FDR's press secretary called will. Will Hays the namesake of the Censorship Office. Hayes assured the White House that he was handling. The Hays Office leaned on MGM. The studio ordered rewrites to address the White House's concerns hearst was furious in his mind. The MGM President, a committed Republican had been a little too eager to soften the film's liberal message in March of Nineteen, thirty, three her throat to the head of MGM. I want to recommend to you the words of Of the English prayer book with reference to the picture, Gabriel, we have left on Don does things which we ought to have done, and we have done those things which we ought not to have done I can realize the necessity of complying with the President's request. Still there were a lot of alterations in the picture which were not requested by the government, and which in my humble opinion, detract from the dramatic value of the picture. When the film was finally released in the spring of Nineteen, thirty, three, Gabriel was a modest box office success, but it certainly helped FDR the film paints a romantic picture of a progressive president, a hero who pulls the country out of a depression with a bold new plan, but the plan was not hearst's plan and the media mogul was not happy. I wanted to help after succeed, but at achieving hearst vision for recovery I had donated to the Democrats with the understanding that FDR would adopt hearst's plan and in return, hearst would support FDR through his vast media empire. But. This quid pro quo was not as well understood as hearst imagined. No risked. Enemy of hearst. He would set his own course. was unwilling to submit to fear. It's March fourth nineteen thirty three noggin ration- day in Washington DC President Franklin. Delano Roosevelt has just been sworn in as America's thirty second president, though this hardly feels like a celebration. The air is frigid, the sky, overcast and Gloomy Roosevelt Son James helped him to the rostrum on the East Portico of the Capitol building, where he recited the oath of office now President Roosevelt readies himself to deliver his inaugural speech to the crowd of over two hundred fifty thousand. Three. Five friends. National. pre-eminently the time. The. The whole three frankly and both. The new president addresses the nation crippled by the greatest economic depression in its history. Roosevelt offer the American people comfort and reassurance. Willing your. Passing. By and we'll. Let me, let. ME. That's the only thing we have to ban. Nameless unreasoning, on justified Tara. Paralyzing needed it. We've been. and. The fear of which FDR speaks not a mystery to the crowd, his supporters and detractors alike know exactly what he means. It's the fear of the government taking on an expanded role in the current crisis. This. Is asking Bar Act. Now. Off Greatest Primary task. What. This no unsolvable problem as we take wise, we just lay. It can be accomplished. By Rick booting by the government. Printing the. Premium Williams Wall. But at the same time rule this employment. Accomplishing greatly needed projects to stimulate reorganize, but US walk, great. FDR explains to the crowd, but he won't wait on Congress. If the legislative body drags its feet FDR we'll take matters into his own hands. The Congress failed fake one of them who? May Have that the national emergency medical. Ninety clear parts of. That will confront me. I? took the Congress while the one remaining in. Meet the price. Run. Executive power. The Way James Warrick. Much of As. As Paul would be given to me. Back in food it by far fall. FDR wraps up his speech by reminding all those listening that by his very election on the question of expanded federal government. The people had spoken. The United States. Have not paid. They have stood up. What. Wreck. Finger US back. Discipline. And Direction. On leadership. Then you may be the president in. Again With his inaugural speech FDR set the tone for his presidency. The tasks before him were monumental, he needed to pull the country out of the Great Depression and restore the people's faith in the American system of government FDR try to make good on his promise to be the instrument of the People's wishes. During his first one hundred days in office, FDR pushed through Congress, the most bold and sweeping legislation in the history of America. The Great Depression wasn't unprecedented economic disaster by the time FDR took office. Nearly ten thousand banks had closed their doors and more were closing every day. Millions of Americans had lost everything in an effort to stop the growing onslaught of bank runs. FDR declared a four day bank holiday to curb the problem Roosevelt needed a way to calm the people, and to clearly communicate his vision for the future in the nineteen thirties over ninety percent of American households owned a radio, so on March twelfth, Nineteen, thirty three, FDR gave the first of his fireside chats millions of Americans tuned in to hear his informal radio address from the White House the first of its kind in American history. I want to talk for a few minutes with the people of the United States about banking in this chat FDR laid out for the American people, a clear explanation of what was happening birth the ball. Let me state but simple fact. That when you deposit money in a bank. Bank does not put the money into a safe deposit twelve. It invest your money and many different forms of pretty. The cars are undermined confidence on the part of the public. was a general rush by a large portion of our population to term bank deposits into currency our goal. A rush so great that the soundest banks couldn't get enough currency to meet the demand. It was then that I issued the proclamation. providing. Bank Holiday. And this was the first step in the government's reconstruction of financial and economic fabric. FDR Then explained his actions. He had asked Congress to broaden his power, so he could rehabilitate the banking industry he had put forward. A series of banking regulations designed to help people make ends meet, and lastly FDR his plan to reopen the banks. I can assure you my friend that it is faith but to keep your money in a reopen bank. Than it is to keep it under the mattress. The success of our whole national program depends of course on the cooperation of the public on its intelligence apart and use of a reliable system. You must have faith. You'll must not be stampeded by rumors are guessing. Let us unite in banishing fear. We have provided the machinery through star off financial system, and it is up to you to support and make it worth. It is your problem. My friend your problem, no less than it is mind. Together we cannot faith. In the election of nineteen, thirty, six FDR's new deal would be on trial. The man who had prosecute or defend him was media mogul William Randolph hearst in spite of their disagreements over the film Gabriel. Hearst's newspapers continued to support FDR throughout much of his first term. Both men were in favor of public works projects, and both believed the budget deficits were necessary to economic recovery, but there was one major area where the two men did not see eye to eye, the intersection of the government and the press. In the run up to the nineteen thirty six contests FDR's new deal would collide with hearst's media empire, hitting hearst against the president and setting the stage for a vicious war of words the press. By the summer of Nineteen thirty. Three William Randolph. Hearst was deeply concerned by the actions of the Roosevelt Administration with every passing day. The government was expanding Roosevelt's powers expanding with it. In the summer of Nineteen thirty three hearse, right hand man Ed. Cobb lions telephone Louis how an advisor to president. Roosevelt hearst articulated his concerns to add in a message that read. Please tell the President I consider his proposal to license the press under the national. Recovery Administration in direct violation of the bill of rights I will fight his proposal even if it cost me every Nikolai possess. The National Recovery Administration was recently established by the national industry recovery. Act, the centerpiece of FDR's new deal intended to rescue America from the Great Depression as part of the National Industrial Recovery Act, after are committed over three billion dollars to saving the economy Hurston take issue with the Price Tag Tessa -sarily, but he did fear. FDR would use the national recovery administration to slap his media empire with undue regulation. After hearing her concerns, Louis, how sent for the president who got on the line with Ed Cobb NHS FDR short comments that he had no intention of stifling the freedom of the press or stepping on Mr Hearst's toes. FDR Did have one request though that hearst joined the rest of his colleagues in the newspaper industry in creating an industry wide code of regulations. After his conversation with the president, cobblers relayed the message to hearst comforted by Roosevelt's promise. Hurst did join with his colleagues and help create a code for the newspaper industry aimed at protecting free speech, establishing more equitable working conditions in August one, thousand, nine, thirty, three, her. Stephen began including the National Recovery Administration logo a Blue Eagle on the front page wall, his papers, her trusted knows about and talk the president at his word. You would soon come to believe that politicians word as the saying goes isn't worth a nickel. In the fall of nineteen, thirty, three as FDR expanded the role of the Federal Government, hearst vented his concerns in the press, calling the national recovery administration, a measure of absolute state socialism, but FDR didn't go on the defensive in an effort to keep the peace. The White House continued to invite hearst for regular visits and to seek his counsel and cooperation. Things turned poorly, though after hearst and other industry leaders submitted their code for FDR's review heard a rumor that FDR might reject the code and tried to restrict the freedom of the press so response in February of Nineteen thirty four hearst wrote an article, stating that FDR was behaving like the Mussalini he's the Hitler's the Lennon's and all of those who seek to establish a dictatorial form of government by repressing the press. FDR was outraged, but after letting it sit on his desk for five weeks, he eventually accepted the newspaper industry's code, which included a proviso that reiterated the First Amendment's guarantee to freedom of speech with FDR signature, though also came an executive order and a defiant one. Insofar as Article Seven is not required by the act, it is pure surplus edge while it has no meaning, it is permitted to stand because it has been requested, and because it could have no such legal effect as would bars inclusion, nobody waves any constitutional rights by sending to a code, the recitation of the freedom of press clause, and the code has no more place here than would the recitation of the whole constitution or of the Ten Commandments. FDR's testing US outrage many in the press newspaper. Men like hearst hope the president would apologize. He never did and with a nineteen thirty four midterms coming up, antagonizing the press might not have been wise in what would be FDR's first political tests. Since taking office, the new deal was on the ballot and for Roosevelt. It was critical that the Democrats maintain control of the House and Senate, but FDR's plan was constantly under siege from William Randolph hearst's media empire, but in the fall of nineteen, thirty four with a midterm election just weeks away FDR would fight back. It September eleventh, nineteen, thirty four and Franklin Roosevelt's private office at his home in Hyde Park Roosevelt sits at his desk across from him, is Henry Morgenthau the secretary of the Treasury? Two men are in the middle of a dreary budget meeting Jeff. Morgenthau Slides FDR DOCUMENT THE TAX BRIEFING REQUEST MR president. Yes of course. As FDR's is, can the document Morgan thousand senses that FDR has something else on his mind, besides the budget is everything all right Mr President. This looks fine to me. Mr Sectarian keeping posted yesser. MIDMORNING FAIRWAY, wave! And restocked with door I'm told when hearse returns from his European tour. He's going to attack the administration. Yes, Sir I'm afraid that might be the case. Hearst is overseas on his annual motor tour of Europe. He's been immersed in European affairs keeping a watchful eye on Adolf Hitler's recent rise to power in Germany. Hurst has also instructed his editors to use Hitler's ascendancy as a cautionary tale about the dangers of authoritarianism. Dangerous hearst sees in FDR's new deal. Mister Secretary if her is going to attack us in the press I'd like to be prepared. What exactly do you have in mind? Sir, his his income tax. If there's something there I'd like to know about. Yes Ms Raza Mine Way. After his meeting with President Roosevelt Henry Morgenthau wrote in his diary. I did subsequently look up his income tax and found that there was plenty there, but as he dug up dirt on William Randolph. Hearst Morgenthau found something else to dirt on the actress Marion Davies Hearst's longtime lover. Morgenthau Express some reservations in his diary writing that he didn't know which was worse, disclosing hearst financial impropriety or disclosing the name Mary Still. He took the information to Roosevelt Morgenthau's own words. It would be much better to proceed at once on hearst and Marion Davies before hirst attacked if we stated something. After he attacked, he would say that we were doing it to revenge, and spite, according to Morgenthau Roosevelt agreed told Morgenthau to start at once. It's unclear. What if anything FDR did to with a hearse? Davies information once he had it, nor is it clear what Morgenthau uncovered when he looked into their finances? What is clear? Is that in the lead up to the nineteen thirty four midterms? FDR didn't put the screws to hearst. He extended him an olive branch. In late, September, one of hearst's friends suggested to Roosevelt a cable could be sent to him by you expressing your interest in the fact that he had spent the summer studying conditions in Europe. An invitation to visit you at the White House on his return would probably adjust the present difficulty. FDR advice and invited her to dine at the White. House, if I knew FDR was looking into his tax returns, he didn't act like it. He accepted the invitation and the two men sat down not long after her returned home. At, their meeting FDR one back hearst's loyalty, if only momentarily in the final weeks of the midterm campaign, hearst's papers stopped attacking, but the d'attente would last long. In January of Nineteen thirty five Roosevelt went to the Senate with a big ask, he wanted America to join the world court illegal arm of the League of Nations, a post World War One global coalition that America had long refused to be a part of after the horror of world. War One. America had adopted the position that it had no business in the League of Nations. Europe was Europe's problem. For Isolationists like William Randolph, hearst FDR's request was the straw that broke the camel's back. I had long feared that FDR was at his core, an internationalist in a tradition of Woodrow Wilson, a president who staked his career on getting America into the League of Nations FDR's request. The US joined. The World Court was proved to hearst that his fears were well founded. In. April of Nineteen thirty, five Hurst ordered his media empire to settle down to a consistent policy in opposition to this administration hearst also officially cut ties with FDR declaring. We have to depend on the Republican Party to rescue the country from experimental socialism. And hearst had just the Republican in mind. The chief wrote his candidate. He is a fine war. Record is clean business record. He has balanced. His State's budget is reduced taxation I figure that the Republican Party will have to depend on Governor Landon of Kansas. The chief had done his homework on governor Alf Landon in the summer of Nineteen thirty, five Hurst ordered private investigators to look into the governor to make sure he didn't have any skeletons in his closet. Landon was clean, so in December of nineteen thirty five hearst took a train to Topeka Kansas to meet land and face to face. After a private luncheon, hearst told The New York Times I think he is marvelous to say I am favourably impressed. Puts it very mildly. By the early spring of Nineteen, thirty six chief was calling the shots for the land campaign, he informed the editors of his vast media empire, all recommendations to the governor or his managers, regarding general policies or particular acts shall be sent to me as a clearing house so that I can prevent confusing and contradictory advices, and also that I can make sure that I agree with the policies recommended. Hearst wanted his newspapers to speak in a unified voice. His voice hearst ordered his editors to mercilessly attack FDR's new deal as a communist enterprise, but Hurst's full voice, Supportive Landon made some in the Republican campaign nervous in May of nineteen, thirty six, an article in Newsweek claimed that Alf landon managers were secretly plotting away to throw hearst off. The Land and Bandwagon Lennon's managers understood that hearst's attacks were potentially a political liability because the new deal seemed to be working, landon in his managers knew better than to brazenly attacked the new deal when the economy was starting to turn around. Land and understood that while many conservatives might be nervous about FDR's big government approach. He also understood that many Americans were sick and tired of the old guard leadership of the Republican Party so in the run-up to the Republican National Convention. In nineteen thirty six, while hers tried to paint FDR Communist land and was far more careful with his words. He criticized the new deal on procedural, not ideological grounds Landon proclaimed that the Jeffersonian theory that the best government is the one that governs the least was an outdated idea. A civilization becomes more complex land and explained government power must increase. Landon was a bull. Moose Republican a progressive in the tradition of Teddy Roosevelt, when land and ran for reelection in the Kansas Governor's race of nineteen, thirty four, a reporter had called him a sort of new dealer. The reporter explained I. Read an account of one of his campaign speeches, the other night and I'll swear. I'd have thought it was the Democrat talking the Democratic candidate. They tell me is having a tough time of it because the Republican has grabbed all his campaign material. And in fact, landon was not against the principles of the new deal. Only the price tack under FDR the. National debt had grown from nineteen billion dollars in the summer of nineteen, thirty, two to almost thirty four billion dollars in just four years, so land, and mounted his opposition to FDR on the battleground of fiscal conservatism. He pledged to support federal programs aimed help. In the unemployed, but unlike FDR land in would respect business, he would hold the constitution and he would balance the budget. His message resonated with Republican Party. In June of nineteen thirty six at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland Republicans officially selected. Alf Landon as their presidential nominee, but landen's managers had failed to throw hearst off of the bandwagon as they had hoped to do. So for their vice presidential nominee Republican selected another booster newspaper editor frank knocks the former general manager of hearst's empire. As hearse prepared to launch a media offensive in support of the new land in Knox. Ticket. The Democrats kept faith with FDR. In late June of nineteen, thirty six at the Democratic National Convention. The Democrats again nominate President Roosevelt and his vice president. John Nance Garner of Texas. The party gave the new deal. It's full-throated support in the convention. Hall in Philadelphia Roosevelt reiterated a familiar theme. Calmly. At one mall. We have to fear is. Considering public duty. For qualification. Bad. I will not ten. That I find this? On. Many Democrats were confident in the Roosevelt garnered. Many in the press had their doubts in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, six, a popular weekly magazine, the Literary Digest conducted a survey of over two million Americans and ask them to predict the winner of the nineteen thirty six election, forty three percent said Roosevelt fifty seven percent said Landon. Throughout the final months of the campaign poll after poll showed Alf Landon either gaining ground or holding a comfortable lead over FDR. William Randolph hearst was confident to what in the end the polls would be wrong. In the final stretch of the Campaign William Randolph hearst was becoming a political liability for Republicans in the summer of Nineteen thirty, six, three separate tell all biographies raked hearst over coals and aired his dirty laundry in August one of FDR supporters wrote that there was more widespread anti hurst feeling among the people, and there has been ever I am told that when his name appears on the screen and some movie theaters, he is hissed and there are anti her clubs being organized in some parts of the country. Landen's managers tried their best to distance their candidate from hearst, but hearst simply refuse to go away. He doubled down on his attacks on the new deal. And he frantically searched for ways to weaken Roosevelt campaign in September of Nineteen, thirty six, her thought. He found a chink in FDR's armor with a controversial Russian document according to Ed Cobb. The document outlined the official policy of the Communists of America in support of Mr Roosevelt. The document was damning and her seized upon the opportunity. He used his vast media empire to slack FDR with the label. Communist put a knife in the heart of the president's prospects for a second term. It's fall. Nineteen, thirty six at four Seventy Park Avenue in New York New York Ed coblence William Randolph. Hearst man in New York sits across his desk from one of the most powerful players in all of Washington politics, now as MRS coblets. She's swell. Thanks for asking Mr Hoover. That's J., Edgar Hoover. The director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and he's eyeing the cigarette between complexes fingers to mine. If I try one of those. No help yourself. I believe this is the mile a cigarette I've ever had. When you get back to Washington now. Be Sure to send you some well. Thank you Mr Collins. That's very thoughtful. And knows this visit isn't strictly pleasure with J. Edgar Hoover there's always business to discuss and it doesn't take hoover long to get down to it. Mr Collins! I thought you might like to know the president sent for me. At immediately perks up. Yes, regarding Mr Roosevelt was enquiring about the seriousness of the Communist movement. What did you tell him? I told him it was extremely serious under the president respond. He hedged. We're trying to. Luckily I was able to impress upon him the seriousness of the matter. I thought Mr Hurst my life to know that the president ordered me to start an investigation immediately. We'll thank you for passing this information along Mr who've and that's not all I was also sent four by Mister Cummings. That's attorney. General homer Cummings FDR's biggest defender coming sent for me just before you printed. That Russian document seems Communist support of Mr Roosevelt. Is unsettling unsettling. What did the Attorney General want? He claimed that the document was a forgery threatened to put out a statement saying as much, will he no. I prevailed upon his better judgment. How did you manage that? who are puts out his cigarette in an ashtray on its task? Properly explained that it was not a forgery. I told the Attorney General that if he put out a statement that effect, he'd have his fingers burnt. With thank you for this information to Mr Director. Be Sure to give my best wishes to Mr Hurst. Ed was clearly grateful for the information. He received from hoover. Conversation New York Ed sent him an entire carton of cigarettes not long after their conversation had passed Hoover's information along to William. Randolph hearst throughout the fall her had been attacking Roosevelt in the press and trying to paint him as the Communist candidate, Hoover's conversations with FDR and Attorney General Cummings. reprove that President Roosevelt the starting to sweat. In her mind. If FDR wasn't a communist, he was guilty by association on October, First Nineteen thirty six about a month before the election, her published a scathing front-page Editorial Mr Roosevelt declares that he is not a communist, but the communist say he is one communist sought. Every cow knows its own calf. Hearst was confident that Al Franken was going to be FDR and he was convinced that his attacks on the press were helping Landen's 'cause, but I was wrong for most Americans the suggestion that FDR was the candidate of the Soviet. Union was deeply offensive and the fall of nineteen thirty six. The PELHAM Parkway Democratic Club in new. York sent FDR telegram, stating that thousands of its members by unanimous accord refrain from purchasing any hearst publication. It's our thought that this attitude will be followed by democratic clubs and communities in the state and the entire country, and indeed thousands upon thousands of Americans all. All across the country united in a boycott of the hearst corporation for his part on the campaign trail in nineteen, thirty, six after yard took the high road. He never even mentioned his opponent Alf Landon by name. Instead he let his progress speak for itself by nineteen. Thirty six unemployment was down from twenty five to seventeen percent farm income increased nearly seventy percent. Many of America's corporations turned a healthy profit for the first time in years, and by the end of nineteen thirty six. The Dow Jones Industrial Average would be three times what it was on the final day of the Hoover Administration. Things were looking up and on Election Day Roosevelt won with sixty point eight percent of the popular vote, the largest victory in American history in its time FDR won the electoral vote five twenty three to eight, he won every state, but to Vermont and Maine Maine had voted for the winning candidate in every election since eighteen sixty, leading to the popular expression as mangoes, so goes the nation, but after the nineteen thirty six election, the chairman of the Democratic National Committee changed the slogan as Maine Goes, so goes Vermont Democrats. Not only maintained the White House. Of Congress, gaining ground in both houses. On election night, the phone rang Roosevelt's home in Hyde. Park after our son in law John was the one who took the call, a woman on the other end of the line. said this Marion Davies. I. Just wanted to tell you that I love you. We know that a steamroller has flattened us out, but there are no hard feelings at this end I just wanted you to know that. Few moments later William Randolph. Hearst came on the line and reiterated I. Just wanted to repeat when Marion said that we have been run over by a steamroller, but that there are no hard feelings in the end. The nineteen thirty six contest was a referendum on the new deal. The Great Depression was far from over, but FDR's presidency had given the people something they hadn't felt for many years hope the election signaled a massive shift in voters attitudes about the role in government in their lives, and it also illustrated massive ideological shift between the two major parties. For over a hundred years, the Democratic Party had largely stood for individual liberty states' rights and limited federal government by embracing the Democratic Party of FDR and his new deal. Americans were embracing an expanded role for the federal government by contrast. The Republican Party had for decades followed the principle of a strong central government whose primary function was to stimulate economic growth by standing against FDR's new deal. The Republican Party was turning away from one of its core values. America's party realignments have largely occurred in tandem with the election of transformational candidates. The first party system between the federalists and the Democratic Republicans had lasted from the country's inception until president. Andrew Jackson ushered in the second party system, pitting the Democrats against the whigs. The third party system, which saw the birth of the Republican Party was solidified with the election of Abraham Lincoln in nineteen sixty president McKinley assassination gave the country teddy. Roosevelt who helped bring about the fourth party system and the era of progressivism and President Franklin Roosevelt's ascendancy again. The Fifth Party system period of time largely dominated by the Democratic Party, but this new era of American politics would not solely defined by domestic affairs. William Randolph hearst had predicted that FDR like President Wilson before him would likely pull America into international conflicts and during FDR. second-term hearst's theory would be put to the test. War would break out in Europe and FDR stated position of neutrality would be threatened by foreign aggression. The conflict overseas would create a political battle in Washington. The dogs of war howling outside America's gates, FDR would break political tradition fight to become the first American president to serve a third tournament. On the next episode of wicked game, the election of one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty against the backdrop of a European, war FDR seeks to become the first president to serve three terms in office, but to win the White House. FDR must reach across the aisle and get the best of a political outsider with an ax to grind. Don't miss a single week of our. Our march from seventeen, thousand nine to twenty twenty hit the subscribe button in your podcast now. This show is supported by you. Our listeners please give us a rating. Leave a review, but the single best way to help the show grow is to tell others share with your friends and family, and find us on social media at wicked Game Pot and I'm at. At grant another way to support this show is to go to wicked game podcast. Dot Com members there get early access to add free episodes as well as bonus content, only available to members find out more at wicked game podcast, dot com, and about our reenactments. In most cases we can't know exactly what was said, but everything in our show is heavily researched and. And based on surviving historical documents, wicked game is an airship production created hosted and executive produced by me Lindsey Graham sounds sign by Derek Pairs how executive produced by Stephen Walters in association with ritual productions. This episode written and researched by Stephen Walters fact checking by Greg Jackson Seattle Salazar from the podcast history that doesn't suck music by Lindsey cramped distributed by wondering.

William Randolph Hurst FDR hearst corporation hearst FDR president Franklin Delano Roosevelt hearst William Randolph America hearst hearst FDR White House Marion Davies US Governor Landon hearst Federal Government President Roosevelt Henry Morg
The First Time | Legalize Drugs | The Toasty Podcast Ep 22 Part 2

The Toasty Podcast

16:37 min | 11 months ago

The First Time | Legalize Drugs | The Toasty Podcast Ep 22 Part 2

"Toasty. Have you ever smoked weed me? Yeah. And and it wasn't like A. Breath taking moment. You can't. Always like. Just. Let me tell you the first time. Smoke Pot we it was my buddies addict Ron High School, and we went to his win to his attic and. Is. Parents were literally directly below us like directly below. So stupid. Just looking back. It's like how could you just try to get caught and so? Easier to frigging like in. The attic ventilation it's GonNa Smell, and everything. In. We had this little office Max Payne we. Emptied all stuff out and just had this hollow tube and then. Tr- drove a hole in it, and then put this foil for like a little. You know like bowl thing and then and then sealed it with Plato's was unhealthy thing. You could possibly smell because those guy. Stick. I'm not sure if it was like the weed that got me stone or like all the or all. Those the first on news. Watch Mad Max. Group like five of us we wash Mad Max. I have no idea what's going on I? Feel I have a feeling of I'm sober Sobhraj. Not What's going on? I never seen that movie before so. Weird Yeah we're times. But Anyway I, think we're going with this is the legal age no one of the start. Yeah. Wanted to get into it. Talk about like first time for me was you know Like a few years ago right and. where I still don't like dude a lot at all actually really it's. For the job obviously, you know what I mean you can't but. It wasn't what I was getting at when I asked you it wasn't really a breathtaking moment where. You grow up thinking that it's some like. Just out of this world thing. When you get up to it when you step up to bat. The Normal Baseball, right? Yeah. But make sense. Cigarettes. Now that I know the differences and I know what they consist of cigarettes are definitely worse. Oh God hands down worse now going with that. Based on this stuff I started doing research on you know different. Drugs and you know obviously you eat on netflixing you watch the freaking PABLO ESCOBAR DOT Argue Watch narcos not even undocumented to freak show but does. Does follow his life pretty well. And Interesting Guy Realize That it was never about a you or me. Wasn't about your safety ish out think. people are not stupid I. think that people know when they see someone die of something, they may not necessarily want that. Right. So you WanNa talk about people that dude anyway, we have it. There's. Anyway, they know they're going to die well, I don't think. So where did this all start and I started doing all his freaking research like why would anyone ever want this you know and and? You know. I. Get down this road. I'm finally at the end and I'm seeing. What the government has done and I think that. They did it for. Money And politics. Politics. And Definitely international politics and I feel like. Now they may be the ones keeping it going. and. This I came to this conclusion before we even before even hit this year this is conclusions I've had forever I've been able to local forever this year just awesome up upright. 'cause I keep hitting these points where it's like, why is this the weight is government? Why is this the way? It is government wise this the way it is governments all these things piling on piling on piling on and here I am doing a podcast about it. GOING WITH THAT Legal Substances? I think should be. Universal Universal there should be a legal substance. Yeah. Yeah I think. I think if arsenic is legal I don't see why like heroin me. So you're telling you can't get addicted arsenic I, get that and in my thing is I don't believe in. Government giving you clean needles and stuff like that. That's Their addicted to heroin anyway Muslim make it safe. It's like no, it's not the government's responsibility at all healthcare's. That it's it's it's an individual's responsibility not to do heroin and you're making it easier on purpose. Yeah. I'm no longer under the impression that it's for safety I'm tired of believing that in. Were really comes down to his. Games they tired of bleeding conspiratorial but it it's big. Pharma Big Pharma suppressing the suppressing the medicinal use of marijuana. sounds crazy when I say it out loud but the medicinal use of cocaine. It was used as a medicine for one hundred years. Hundreds of years before it was outlaw people are crazy. It was in coca-cola is still isn't Coca Cola. True. Facts still includes we're not. Sit cocaine that's unlikely. Dumping kilos into the coca vats or anything but the COA leaf is. I think. That Gif I want to say, it's New York. To See some Colombian guy like that guys that But. The. New York. Go Straight from Columbia to this one only one location in the entire. US never special federal exemption to produce. To produce a by product of the coca leaf in its is a main ingredient in coca. Why Coke? Is the way it is there's no substitute for coke. Coca Cola. Yeah. Yeah. Okay Wow. Dr Pepper Right. Great. I'm a I'm a Texan, but doctors know my favorite. Flavors Bro and none of them include. Kane weird drink. Well not. On. Drugs. Caffeine's drug, Milk Jug. Do you WanNa talk about frigging drugs being illegal. Addiction Mental. Yeah it's not. It's whole. Today's at all I would say at all but it's not substance based at all it can be genetic. That's about all I believe is more. Genes that are the contract addiction. Or Yeah. The rest of it's definitely just. It's all mental yet. For. Sure. A lot of his mental, a lot of environmental. If everybody around US doing it, you're going to do to that's still meant, right? Yeah. It comes back but everyone wants to blame these substances for being addictive. It's a is it? No No but how did they market cigarettes when they came out? Well. There have a smoke everybody was doing tobacco I mean tobacco became popular in the. Yeah you're. Right everybody. I've also done like June tobacco tastes totally different. Right. Closure was was smoking tobacco. Smoking pipe tobacco that was the common method, and then they started rolling it into cigars on eventually cigars became cigarettes because they were mass produced in inject with all these crazy crazy. Now now, people have finally had enough research money to research. Different types of different types of weed or what's in marijuana and been able to separate it out. Now have CBD oil this D. Cream that you know CBD pills or whatever the heck they are and thc this and whatever and. I've got I know people that are given CBD to their to their dogs. Yeah. Let me see. It's a pretty benign substance. It's whatever my my. My point is it always seems the track that. We learn. That what's been illegal? Or something that's crazy to people turns out has good things in it. Yeah absolutely and there's never. Why can't we? Why? When are we gonNA learn that and just be like. Whole on before we just stop and say it's all bad. Let's. Let's research this a little bit more. It's just like we were talking about emotionally emotionally stopping. In reacting and making the Patriot Act. Let me rephrase being reactionary and making the Patriot Act with emotions is not good. Stop think look back. When we when did we even when did we even make all the substances legal? So. In the those huge scare campaign in a lot of people say it's from William Randolph hearst because he owned of timber companies in Hamp was replacing timber as the main source of fiber for paper and for cardboard and all that stuff rope. Was it actually? How much of a competition was that huge? For Real. Absolutely. Yeah. Hemp is way more useful than than timber. Okay I guess there's more efficient. Safe. For, the environment. I know I know that they already had such a big. Like Timber Company and they had a big like you know. The first expert of the of the colonies. Okay expert. So I'm saying, how was how did it catch the hip art catch up to the to the manufacturing status timber because hinders way easier to manufacture than timber? Oh, don't grow old tree you're growing plants you grow. Your about you chop it down and the methodologies. Super Easy. You just like whack it until until the. Iraq. The stock until the fibers break apart and you eat the fibers together whatever you want you can compress him into you can. You can make plastics out of it give me plastic side of him I've heard about that too. You can make close you plastics you make rope. See My my thing is too is that Did they make growing hemp illegal. the only place legally us for was legal in the US it's still is is Kentucky. Because they've had vast fields of hemp to grow hand on, but you can't grow him California list for. I think you will hemp is totally different than it's not the same thing. No. Of Cannabis but. So, him has a very low THC or tetrahydrocannabinol. Level I've heard that you have to smoke a joint the size of a telephone pole to get high off of him. Which is Saying why did so why did they all of a sudden be umbrella under cannabis in illegal because? Of William Randolph hearst supposedly, he owned newspapers right in the Nineteen Thirties and early and late twentieth. How do you own all of newspapers? Her Snooze heard of the hearst corporation. Monopoly on newspapers it wasn't a monopoly. There's thousands of newspapers across the US. They weren't having been since the US around the printing printing presses have been around for forever. As as early as the eighteen. Seventeen eighty and seventeen seventies. Seventeen sixties. Printing press was becoming more popular and more available to printers. All these little like microbreweries breweries like after Jimmy Carter League is `boring. Is like all these different Small newspapers sprung up everywhere and so people were getting information like that. It was like the Internet of time. and. Of course, the post offices delivering these newspapers. So that's how they're making money. Everybody reads newspapers back. Then everybody who could read which wasn't everybody. Probably like forty percent of the population at the most holy cow where he presented, I should say forty percent of the white population. Yeah. Probably one percent of slaves were literate I mean obviously they weren't gonNA allow them to be and so it. Was Illegal. So in the Nineteen Thirties William, Randolph hearst owns these newspapers will because he's a smart businessman, he also owns the timber companies that he buys the paper from. Yeah. So he doesn't want those I don't know why didn't just by all the him companies that's the thing. That's why this whole thing all a lot of sense I've heard it from other places but. Essentially, there's there's this huge push by the Herr's corporation and others to basically make campaign marijuana the same thing horrible. There was a movie called Gosh. What was it called something. Madness like. Kosh Madness Herbert Marijuana. Or something Let me look. Reefer madness. So reefer madness was as movie in the thirties one say thirty. Thirty Mattis what reefer madness and it was just the most racist vile piece of garbage movie. I mean, it's got like thirty nine percent rotten tomatoes. So yeah is this is raises basically said that like all these white women were being raped by by these black men that were high on cannabis you know. All. This garbage. Racist Garbage total miss being perpetrated by. This movie. And popular sentiment. Popular movie back in the day you're you're talking about movie. Who thinks that movies are controlled by the government now? The knock I don't think they are at all I don't think they are no nothing Hollywood has anything China has more to do with it. They absolutely haven't wanted. I'm just saying you seen them about this movie that was basically designed to scare people into not wanting yet. We'll hers probably owned I mean he does newspapers you think you might own movie studio or two yeah. So you make sense. Okay. He had already invested all along those money in in timber timber industry. So he's like I don't need this hemp stuff getting popular. Manufactured so easily. So he ran a campaign against it eventually got lumped in the same category and they outlawed everything completely Late thirties or forties. Yup and then it was like it's bad for you. We gotTA outlaw if it's bad for you in addicted, we've got outlaw. And then they started doing with every substance. That's how the Eighteenth Amendment came into being the prohibition Seventeenth Amendment Seventeenth. Amendment Prohibition Eighteenth Repeal of Prohibition I think I might be eight, hundred, seventy on well. Yeah. So they realize how bad of an idea prohibition was. Franca. Hall I think they're starting to realize how bad it is. We're just married. Things are starting to realize how silly it is to to. Outlaw marijuana like thirteen or fifteen states have legalized. It completely know why I mean like straight up you revenue. Well not not only that but you're talking about how we're realizing this stuff all of a sudden and you know. I'm going to say it has to do with with our generation. You know even you said that our generation is gonNA, change things. Yeah for sure. Yeah. We're not. We're not gloating. Are they saying that we're looking at crowd is crap and we're like, what? Why why is this been going on? So long toasty.

US marijuana. William Randolph hearst Cannabis Nineteen Thirties Coca Cola heroin Max Payne Plato Ron High School Coke Tr Sobhraj cocaine New York hearst corporation coca-cola Baseball Timber Company PABLO ESCOBAR
Ken Korach Checks In

A's Plus

39:40 min | 1 year ago

Ken Korach Checks In

"What will life in the bay area be like in the wake of pandemic, and maybe the biggest protest movement in American history were exploring that question in the through line. It's a print section, every. Sunday. In the San Francisco Chronicle and online anytime from limited access to go to SF CHRONICLE DOT COM slash pod. Hello and welcome to as plus the San Francisco Chronicle's podcast on the Oakland, A.'s and Major League Baseball I'm your host chronicle as beat writer Susan's lesser, and today we're delighted to be joined by as radio broadcaster Ken. CORETEC. We'll talk about the difficulties of calling baseball during a pandemic especially when the team is on the road and the broadcasters are at home plus we'll talk about grand slams. He seuss Lizardo and much much more coming up on as I. Can. Let's start off with last night because. Two, Grand Slams in the space of eleven games, the wind up as walk-offs. Obviously. We we have not seen that as history before what's that like for broadcaster? Will it was unique because when the ball left the bat, everybody knew that the game was going to be over because it was going to be a sacked fly at the worst Susan. So the Grand Slam was a bonus from that standpoint and it was a cool night. You know and it was damp and it was the marine layer was in. So I didn't know if the ball was going to go out so. But. It really was a special moment in the fact that they've. Had to walk off grand. Slams in the first eleven. Games is a pretty historic accomplishment. Yeah. I that for a broadcaster, I would have thought that that fly off because I. Thought. It was good. Just GonNa fall on the track and pass Scottie. Thought it was just going. The Trat. Roy. And it just kept carrying how tricky a call. For radio it is, it's tricky. It's a little dark in the the outfield you get to the wall at the Coliseum, and I just kinda edge it a little bit by. The to win the game? How far will it go and then I could hear Fossey Fossey was with us in. He jumped in there a little bit before me itself from his reaction I, had a pretty good idea with the ball was going to leave the ballpark. You hit the Fosse. Gauge, you can always kind of go with. Emotion, given play. Well, he's done that a few times. Shall we say over the years? To love the passion. That is one thing you know as as. As totally an aside. But now that with the corona virus and the fact that the hearst corporation which owns a chronicle. Is discouraged. Air Travel. So we're covering road games for now. At least from home, I am listening to a lot more rate and I I usually do and I am reminded what a delight it is Ken. That was also hey seuss. Leonardo's first major league start last night, I keep calling it a debut, which is what it feels like. But of course, it wasn't as majorly. Tapia. was his debut as a starter. What did you think five scoreless kind of what we've grown to expect from? Hey, sues. Yes, and especially because the expectations were so high going into the store, and now we know that nobody. Fans can't go there as his family couldn't come out and watch him start. But still through all that he has a remarkable. Combination for me, Susan of great, poise in incredible talent. Now, we knew that was there and he's only twenty two, but he pitches like he's a lot older than that, and then you have to factor in then his time in the minor leagues, the number of starts in the innings that he's fished in the minors. Has Been Very Limited I because he had Tommy John Surgery when he was. A senior in high school than last year, the is the shoulder issue. The kind of curtailed a lot of his activities in the minor. Leagues. Last year. So he's really a special kid and I think he embraces those expectations in. You've heard some of the things that have been said about him like Chris. Bassett on one of the. Zoom calls said that he has a chance to be one of the top three elite pitchers in the game. So I think that would be a lot of put on a young Pitcher, but he doesn't seem phased by that at all. Yeah I. The. poises amazing. One of the things I liked he said after the game last night as we are taping this on Wednesday was. A. Terrific play on a little tapper behind the mound kind of. Race to grab it fell as he was throwing gets run first inning. He said, you know what I wanted to make up for the mistake I made the previous game and had a little bit of a defensive gap. So he's always working and the fact that he's working on all areas is really impressive at twenty two. But man, the poise just really stands out to me and. I thought he was a little hard on himself too because that was the ball, the Charlie black in the night setting last Wednesday in the ball was sizzle back to the boss. Any knock it down either way. This glove risk body, I think he was a little disoriented. For, a second, he did lob the ball, the first face, and I learned a little bit of a lesson from that. Yeah, it's it's interesting and you know what? He's been picking the brains of all the older starters he's been paddling around with US Merrill, petite? which for a young Pitcher I'm not sure that there's a better role model than petite with how steady and calm and reliable. He is. So i. i. just he is just going get better, which is Kinda. Mind Boggling when when you think about it. Scott. Peterson compared him to Johan Santana the other day, which I think is pretty good comparison and. The, other thing too that was interesting was with a young battery with Sean Murphy Behind the plate is a rookie is Yuna Susan. They made the adjustment they got away from his slider as the game went along because he didn't feel like you had a great slider last night. So but he can pitch. He's one of those guys. He can win and pitch great with fastball changeup because the that's those pitches are such plus pitches for him. Yeah Murphy to very a just an outstanding game from him behind the plate a little bit slow to get going offensively which I think the as new is going to be the case. But man, you know he, he makes the throw to third. With a runner, trying to go on a ball of the dirt and terrific throw. And eliminates You know a runner in scoring position kind of early in an inning. In the third and that Lazar said he, he said afterwards Murphy. Safe me. You know he said he's done it before he. He'll do it again, but he but he made sure to thank him for that. Play you in Chavan made a play to get over there because he plays deep and it got related sags down it. was you know Murphy really is. Is Six three in about two, twenty five and he walks in tunnel balls in the dirties really agile. He has a phenomenal arm, so he can contain the running game. So the serious the Fossey comment of the day, forget the hitting for Murphy Right. Now, just handle the pitchers, that's your job, and so he's really been shining from that standpoint so far. Yeah. Let's texting with a big league executive during the game asking him his thoughts on Lazaros kind of going back and forth any to ending one. We're free made made that throw. He said that's the best. Throw the game you keep asking about Lazardo, but that's the best throw seen loose game so. That's some good stuff. We've got to talk about. Some really good news for as baseball as baseball fans, and for the broadcasters. This past week the as announced that they now have a radio station in the bay area. The initially the plan going back February was to be streaming only and I. Know that's something that's that's taken people a while to adjust to but. During the pandemic and the quarantine in the shut down I. Think there was a huge effort made to to make sure that fans who are listening from home stuck at home, have a radio option people either who have older models of cars and can't listen to streaming in their car or maybe just don't have big data plants. All as fans are now taking care of in the bay area whether they like streaming or whether they want traditional radio and you like I kind of. Grew up working on radio stations, listening to radio stations, which your reaction to to the as ace. Yeah everything you just said is true Susan in your explained it very well, and it's really important especially now, when people sheltering in place haven't been able to get out. Especially old people in I've said this for years that I've always the people I, think the most into the game, the shut ins and people that really rely on baseball, and of course, everybody is in that category now because no one can go to the game. So to reach as many people as possible right now I think is a great thing for us and let's face it. There were people that for whatever reason, the not having the knowledge or the wherewithal or the technology, and especially when you're driving in your car and I've experienced to there have been times when I wanted to listen to the post game show. But I I'd already gotten in my car and I started. To drive and I don't WanNA fumble around with my iphone. I don't want people do that try to you know get. In Chris. Johnson does a great job where they is cast and we should also mention that the IHEART platform I think really has broadened the base in the opportunity to reach even more people with a twenty four hour nature of of the coverage that. Chris and everybody is giving on as cast. But we're thrilled with the movie get back on am radio, and that's the main thing for me right now, I mean the biggest motivation for me in doing these Games is to try to if we can provide a little some joy to some people at diversion. A sense of normalcy for people who've looked forward to having a baseball everyday. Yeah. That's that's I should've mentioned the the new IHEART partnership I don't WanNa make this. Sound like I'm schilling for our heart. But man, the, the reach is substantially more than tune-in and there's there are a number of IHEART radio stations in the bay area that now can cross promote some as games and you know what you guys are doing on the radio. WHOA. They're doing on streaming It's terrific. I mean I, think you know four or five times as many listeners as tune in. So that's just wonderful. I heart rate that that that move is really just. A real credit to Matt Pearl. and his people there with all the as sort of broadcast front office business people really really excellent. Great Marketing Opportunity, and I know we're going to talk a little bit about doing the remotely and mad and and so many seafood. Behind the scenes. A tremendous amount of Simon hours have been put in over the last month several months to try to pull out of this off. Yeah. Really impressive I as I got wind of it. Three or four weeks ago that there there were attempts being made to go back on radio and I thought, wow, I am going to be kind of tough to do and what they pulled it off. That's a lot of work and Dave. Told me like flexible, nimble thinking, very creative and I I really really liked that at one affected Susan theft tune in got out of the business baseball actually ironically kinda turned out to be. Beneficial for the as as far as the the radio, also the screaming opportunities. Absolutely. Yeah. s really just good news like there's nothing bad about this news today. Terrific all the way around. Now, you mentioned doing the broadcasts first of all Let's just talk in general what it's like for you at the Coliseum on your level, you guys are. Now you've worked side by side with your fellow broadcasters, your whole life. Now, you guys are separated into your own boost I've been up there once. When I was a guest with Vince Before this first Sunday game and I was like basically in my whole sect, own section up on the broadcast level, and you guys are in your own boost. That must be very strange. So what was that like for you? Because you are actually sitting 'cause Fosse? As we said, he was with us last night, it was his first game on radio and this. Truncated regular season. So you were actually sitting in the Fossey radio area down there. So what was that like for you? If you feel like you were detached, feel kind of semi normal, I felt safe which you know right now is kind of a always the parent. Paramount. So I always try to take that into account I but yeah, it was weird. Is Busy kind of wave at you and your booth, and then beyond that Vincent his booth that it does feel very remote. Michael, Bertie of phenomenal producer wandered over to say, Hi from a safe distance and it was wonderful to see him. But yeah, it's. It's really strange how how spaced out everybody is, and I thank you for you guys even though you're an audio medium of course, I, think there's probably some visual things that you guys typically do during the course of the of a broadcast communicate with each other little little nuance things I. wonder if that kind of goes out the window and just along with a little bit more of a sense of camaraderie. I have to say this is not to be contrary to me. It has not been a transition at all. It has been seamless to me. I've heard from people who say they can't sell that we're not in the same booth. So from a chemistry stamp white, I don't think we've missed anything I. feel very comfortable with it ran. I spent twenty five years together Vincent I for fifteen and so And so last night for the first Games. It was just Vincent. and. We're not that far away now. Yeah. He's in the home radio with with Mike who sits up top as you know invincible down below and I'm next door in the business TV boosts or there is just a pane of glass. It's clear that we can. We can see through to make eye contact with each other. I haven't honestly found it to be a hindrance at all and then facia to my left, and so he's really we're separated again by the by the glass that separates the booth from that auxiliary press area where race sets up, but I really haven't. I haven't found it to be an issue. Now, maybe a little more difficult for instance, ray like when Vincent's doing. They by play because now raised to boosts away some stationed in the middle size against the my right in on my left. So I've really been okay with it so far. Yeah, it it. It seems weird. But I'm guessing even weirder other road broadcasts. Tell us tell us how you guys are managing that in what you're doing. It has been weirder for sure. It's been a transition in effing said I I. Don't think it's anything that. We can't overcome I. It's not that unusual analysis for people to. Games remotely especially on television that's proliferated quite a bit around the country. ESPN. is done it here locally, the PAC twelve network, a lot of their games are done from. Your studio. With the announcers watching the TV monitors, which is what we're doing. So, again, Vince is over in the radio booth and I'm where I am normally in the in the visiting TV booths and we have. A monitor that I put right in front of me, which is the program feed is pretty much what everybody would see at home watching the NBC. California. Broadcast and have a larger TV screened in my left, which I can refer to that. So far has been broken up into four quadrants in the main one. That's important is. Calling all nine, which is the high home camera shot. It's pretty far away. But what it does, it gives you all the defenders. So especially with all the shifting and again, that was a big concern of mine. Susan going into. Going into. This was to know where the players playing. So if I can glance over there before the pitch. then. You know the free infielders on the right side and just the third basement on the left or if the center fielder shaded toward right-center. So that has been really helpful. So. I knew going in that we were going to miss, stuff? When you're doing a game, live your at divall for you are. The is in the years of the audience. Now. You're still using your eyes but. The director and the producer. In this case this past weekend up in Seattle, they become your eyes. So you have to follow along with what they're showing. You kind of have to put your ego aside because I think our our fans. Will be very understanding and knowing that we're not trying to fool anybody were in the coliseum in the ISR up in Seattle Eight, hundred miles away. I mean even doing these games for so long I. It was. It was strange for me. I kept thinking things throughout the week like, Oh, be so nice to see Dave sims the mariners broadcaster alike, I can get over and say hi to candle great and then I I go. No I'm not going to be there. You know it's just a thing that you kind of take for granted I'm sure you're doing that to just Such a strange completely backwards way of of. Covering, baseball these day. Especially, Seattle, which is my favorite stop on the tour in the American League, and so I just Kinda imagined myself rolling out of the hotel and walk down the street to the starbucks. Like at this favorite Chinese restaurant I. Love going to this not that far away. I know you have your. Favorite places there, the public markets suffer couple of seconds when I was doing my homework for the Games and watching some video actually drifted back to thinking that I almost felt like I. was there. But you're not, and so we all have to we all have to adjust in. So our issues honestly are minor Susan compared to what everybody most people are going through in the country. So we should be able to. Deal with all this stuff. We'll be back with more. In just a moment, but a reminder I, you can read much more about the Oakland. A.'S AT SF CHRONICLE DOT COM and for subscriptions. Good. SF. Chronicle Dot com slash pot. Does the anticipation of another desk lunch of baby carrots and ranch dressing. Keep you up at night. Here's a cure extra spicy and New San Francisco Chronicle podcast by me. So Leho. Justin Phillips. Look I thought I was going to have to go defend ranch wholeheartedly right now. But. I see what's happening. I'll chill. I'll be leave it for next time. You'll hear that and more slander every week. Subscribe to extra spicy now on apple spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. Just in general from a safety standpoint, especially, with all we we've been hearing about some of the teams that have had multiple positive tests and. Even potentially some transmission between teams which had always kind of been like the the biggest fear, what are your thoughts on baseball playing right now in the midst of pandemic and potentially could we see this experiment come to a halt at some point? It's a very complex question and there's so many layers to it and I think everything. And even from my standpoint and I'm sure you feel this way and a lot of people do that everything we do is still framed by the pandemic. I'm a little anxious to going into the market I. Don't do that that often. So most of my trips to the market in. Curbside pickup. So I think from from my sample and I think that the isn't baseball are doing everything they can. They've done a good job to try to create a safe? Environment as possible for us. So but I think the biggest win for me and especially hit really hard. When the season began was. Whether it was a symbolic thing or metaphorically that there was this sense that when baseball came back. It would signal a return to normalcy in the country. It would symbolize that this was the comeback of the country and in baseball could serve. In, that role that it hasn't happened and we're still in the midst of the pandemic, we have not done a good job in the country of dealing with it, and so who knows how long? It's GONNA go on. So. Playing baseball in the midst of this with. The pandemic framing all that has been a very difficult thing. Might my hope is, is that because of the outbreaks with the Marlins, the cardinals that that's been a real wake-up call for everybody involved in a Geek and I'm still hopeful that we can finish the season I think baseball. Susan is GonNa do whatever. They can possibly do at this season finished, and that brings up questions regarding the integrity of the game. In the Marlins were, they wanNA came last night, they had played for almost. A week and a half, and he had to put thirteen players. I L, I thought that was pretty remarkable. What do you do with the schedule? Teams are only playing fifty three or fifty, four games and. Other, get to finish the season. So there are a lot of questions in a lot of unknowns and I think we all kind of. The taking the things day by day. I kind of go back and forth. I you know the thing I do love is that resuming the season meant that a lot of normal people regular people who work in baseball were brought back from furloughs. people are working. You know scouts have been brought back. Some of the amateur scouts been brought back at a certainly a lot of pro scouts who are still furloughed, which I would like to see. I but that's the best part for me. I you know, I. Do Understand Baseball can provide some comfort and entertainment during a dark time for people in. That's great But I'm also in favor of all these people who are had families and mortgages getting getting some paychecks if this can be done safely, but I'm not entirely convinced that that's the case I would really just, Hey, ya anyone left very sick or incapacitated. We don't know how that's GonNa go, but it's a great point. You. I'm glad you mentioned that because even people that work security that people that we see coming into the ballpark and. Maintenance, and electrician's in people who work on the grounds crew and the many people that are involved with baseball that go beyond and they're really important to the came. We tend to focus on the players and the coaches and the manager. So I'm really glad you mentioned that for sure. Yet and I think it the wakeup call. As you said, I think that has had an effect, we more and more players wearing. Masks on the bases. You know metal since two wearing a mask when there's a runner at first and the as W- second walk-off celebration was a little bit different from the first one. They got a little bit of mild criticism after that I won the opener. By complete touring social distancing in. Kind of metal. It's a lifetime of baseball instincts. That's what you do, and there's excitement and you just forget that last night. Don't you think those Susan and not to interrupt interrupted when when people on television see medals in other players wearing a mask while they're playing, that has to be a good thing. Yeah. Because we all I think you and I agree the importance of wearing a mask and social distancing in all the things that we need to do to try to. Get past that. So if baseball conserve a have a service positive. Is an example for other people. That's another kind of. Ancillary development that could be a good thing, one, hundred percent and and they're learning you know The walk-off celebration after pescadores. Grand Slam was a a little more restrained. There was a little more space. Yeah far more guys in masks and a lot more elbow bumping. So wasn't perfect. I'm not saying that but it was significantly better from a distancing and mask wearing standpoint. You know there's going to be glitches with that. Guys are fighting a lot of lifetime things that they've in ways. They've done things. So you know I think none of us wants to be kind of like the bad cop and always pointing out that guy's spitting or that guy's wearing his mask wrong or. Or anything like that. They're trying. That's the main thing. But I think the real, there's a realization from good teams that they have. If they follow all the safety protocols, there's a lot to play for and they should. You just hope it's the teams that kind of don't have a lot to play for and don't have high expectations that don't wind up. You know ruining things for for everybody else. What are you? What, what a? Huge task for the managers in someone like Bob Melvin who is so incredibly detailed and diligent. because. You have to manage your club, but you also have to, he's a great leader and very well respected that you have to lead. As far as all the off, the field issues are concerned to use Oregon SMS sample because everything takes longer right. Susan I, mean, the travel everything is more difficult, but you have embraced the difficulty. If you don't embrace that, this isn't going to happen and the really fortunate to have. Bob Melvin Cana leading. So many things on the field off right now. Yeah, absolutely. The. As and containing, we've talked many many times about what a good team this is. Very, well, put together, good balanced lineup, terrific defense, excellent rotation, and wow that I think the bullpen has been better than you expect you. It's it's so hard to project bullpens from from year to year. Last year, we thought the bullpen would be strengthen wobbled a think a little bit more than than. We figured until the Hendrix came in and settle things down but. At the bullpen so far has really been the most impressive unit, what are your thoughts just in general and what we're seeing on the field? They played really well so far, and they've weathered a storm because they haven't hit much at all and even. Last night, they were not real robust. They had scored just one run going into the night bidding Scotty, turn all that around. So they're fishing has been incredible, and now you're getting to see a little bit more normalcy and I think the offense is starting to pick up around baseball. The defense has been picked up in. That has to be a strength of their as because it was last year. You're getting starting pitchers deeper into ballgames over this four game winning streak, their starters have been grazed, so they're starting to put it all together here. So, it's really been fun to watch and I would ask you this to I. Don't know if we have a difference of. Because a lot of people have opinions on this that I think. The team that wins the world series should be celebrated as the world series champions. Anyone to. I, I wouldn't even want an asterisk in the record book because I think history will frame everybody's GonNa. Know this was the endemic Europe. But if you can get through this and all the tears of play offs and you win it all I think you deserve to be. To be celebrators, world series. Champs I don't know how you feel about. You might have different offense. Yeah, and The asterisk isn't really I don't even know where there's so few instances of it's not a thing really and it can't imagine it would be people. Ask me a lot are is, is the BWI still going to award postseason awards? Well, yeah. Of course, you know what, why wouldn't we somebody will be the top player? Somebody will be the top rookie you the even if it's a condense season even if it's a strange playoff structure, this is a season and you're right. There are a lot of things that everybody's going to have to go through that nobody know teams ever dealt with before. It's hard. So, it's not A. You know it's not a normal season. It's probably not a representative season from what we think of you know hundred and sixty two games and all that. But Yeah. It's whoever wins. This will still have achieved something and people were remember where you don't need NASCAR's. We will go twenty, twenty one. Well, it looks like they didn't play very many games that year. Why was that? Everybody will know it's GonNa. Be You know a long long time before people forget what happened in twenty, twenty? Do you think the can win the world series I. Do yeah. I think they're set up for it with a with the Russian and with the bullpen if the bullpen keeps performing. As they do I, think they're they're in very good shape. I'd like I'd like to see a little bit more consistent offense but. For an as team, you know chronologically early in season they're doing pretty well. They are. They are they have a series coming up against the Astros, which isn't important series from the context of the season because it's so short thickly after get Sean Mnaya going and obviously Africa. Some of their vast going. But this is there. It's time at this. I'm sure you agree this is their window. This year in the next couple of years would be the best opportunity to win a world series. I think since two thousand want even though they went to the playoffs. Four straight years beginning at two, thousand, two, thousand, one seems to me. Had the best chance of all those seems to win a world series. Yeah. That's two thousand and one team was amazing. They've had a lot of really good teams. But this one is I think potentially the best well rounded team and might have the best defense out of all of this those clubs. So there's a lot to like the window. I don't you know. I'm not sure how long the window is if you're looking at Marcus Simeon leaving after the season is a free agent who knows what this free agent market looks like by the way. This off season if there's a time to take a qualifying offer I'm not one hundred percent sure given the financial hits. Every team has taken that the as would offer a qualifying offer. But if they did have to think, he would consider it. So maybe that extensive another year and you've got some young, very good young shortstops come a long in the as minor league system. They're all in San Jose right now at the alternate site working with Bobby Crosby But if you're talking about Nick Allen a shortstop next year I, don't know if that is as strong club because markets has kind of the heart. Of the team I would say at this point. So maybe another year you give him a qualifying for. McGowan never played above able, right. Would be, it'd be a big jump. The other thing about. Marcus I. Think it's important to mention, and we mentioned assigned broadcast the other day. I have no idea that's contributed is slow start. But. He has a lot on his plate. The players who are player reps are not just focusing on baseball. Every day you know they're they can get up and just kinda get their mind cured into the game that night. But there, there's a lot going on with the players association and the talks. I think probably still even ongoing with baseball with management. So and I think he's done. A really good job of balancing that and I. Think the as are pretty lucky to have him as their play a rapid. I would think you would agree with that. He's been very conscientious in very diligent in in understanding that that the the responsibilities that he has in that role. Yeah. Yeah. He's so steady. He's local. He's a I've never seen a player work harder in any sport and I've covered a lot of them I just he's just an absolutely top notch representative of the goonies organization. In every way I would love to see them extend him. I think everybody would but this word kind of branching out the whole completely different territories. But you know people say like of the three Chapman Olsen. Simeon. Who Do you extend? Do you WANNA keep. For me. If you can only choose one of the three I'm going metals all the way. I. Was Talking to a national baseball writer who lives in new. York couple weeks ago. Before right before the season started and he said hey who among the. WHO BETWEEN SYMINGTON CHAPMAN? Do you think? I. Should Pick as MVP pick. One of the ACE Matt Olsen. He did he always kind of gets left APPs. These things think for me. A. Great. Great Young Player. He hasn't been hitting much, but he's taking his walks. With I, think is a positive side because it shows the saying the ball well and. Tracking the volunteers not over anxious up there. But see these are the same conversation that we had twenty years ago, right? Yeah. Who are you going to keep Giambi to Honda or Chevelle or the Big Three? So it's a, it's a difficult dilemma. but it's kind of a good problem. Now, because it, it shows that you have a lot of talented young players on your club. It's. Definitely. Good problem to have until one two or all three leaf. then. That that'd be a little tough but. The phone conversations to have right now I. Guess. You mentioned the Astros series coming up this weekend. It's still big the road through the Al West still goes through Houston. No matter what I know they're they're having some downtimes and of course, the scandal Lou still looms over everything even in the midst of a pandemic are they may be getting off a little light this year with no fans in the stands, they are not being greeted by throngs of booze and creative derogatory signs and things like that is this is their punishment enough flow. What's terrier gentle look at the at the Astros. In. Throngs of media too because we're not allowed in the clubhouse. Done virtually. So. Yes, I think the off light I, think that their second series of Europe there have been a regular year would have been at the coliseum which I think would have. Begun on a Monday night, a weekday series. So I do think that's the case I have no idea what's going to happen. Over, this weekend I think the game should be great. There's really. A really struggling to find. Healthy starting fishing especially among their veterans, but I think to answer your question it dusty Baker I think is the right guy to lead their club and I was thrilled that they picked up. His option already for next year. So they made a great choice with. Dusty. So but I don't know how this is going to go this weekend, i. kind of I think that. Like, will the as throw it? Somebody will that happen I. Don't know. I can't. I can't predict the future on that Bob. MILLWOOD's not the kind of manager. Really. Is a big proponent of that not that it hasn't happened in the past. We'll have to wait and see how that goes. Yeah. I'd be a little surprise. You know talking all the as the last few days about this upcoming. Series because as you know, we get a very small handful of players available for interviews via video call. So you Kinda have to plan things out early So we've been asking way ahead of time about this astro series, and they've all basically said, you know what? We just have to worry about our own business right now, we kind of got bigger things. Things on our minds. So I think you know even Shamanee who was very very critical of the the astros understandably during the spring said like, yeah, you know what? I I don't love it. They're kind of the are kind of getting off lightly here. We just got to win this series and not really worry about too much other stuff. So still. Still. Funds still awful lot talk about because well as a bad blood with the Astros and pretty much everyone else in baseball at this point. Mike. Fires isn't pitching in the series He told me during the spring look I wanna make restart possible I. Don't care who I'm facing. So I'm not sure that was especially with no fans in the crowds how much of a difference that was gonna make the Astros already didn't like fires. So nothing has changed there. They they knew he had been telling all his subsequent teams that they were cheating. So but but interesting, own little extra I think with the Astros now, no doubt there'll be a lot of focus on it, but this is again. Kind of diverting off the path. But when you cover a game when you're down in the stance, what's that like for you? Do you feel like you're in the game? How much you miss the fans? What's that experience been like for you? Yeah, it's surreal. It really is You know it's a handful of reporters. Usually, there would be far more reporters there The visiting team's typically are except for the very opening series. Don't have reporters with them. I do think the Houston Chronicle will be in town for for the Astra series. So that'll be nice to see at least one visiting reporter. But yeah, it's it's very it Kinda lonely, but the as were very thoughtful about their setup. Outside which is safer. We have our own individual table with power and Wifi and all of that good stuff for more than six feet away from each other. So I, think we all feel safe and again, that's the main thing. But. It is really, you know we're staring at a bat bunch of backs of cardboard cutouts and the you know the overflow players sitting in the stands, which that's weird. Until the crowd noise starts, it can hear everything which is kind of funny and. It's Yeah. I'll be glad when this was all over, but in ten years, it'll be interesting for us all to look back and say like remember that that was crazy. It's weird during the Games because Mike, Barrett. We I. I should give Kudos to him and I've tried to do it in every interview that I've done because. This has been a major technical challenge from an audio standpoint Mike and especially. Getting the audio to come down from Seattle for the Games last weekend. But it's the strangest thing for me Susan, to look at an empty stadium in here, crowd noise in my headset. So because in the as a really trying to do as good a job as they can create kind of a normal atmosphere with the crowd noise and you hear the drummer as did you hear it Tom, hanks on occasion. With the concessions and stuff so. That's been really became and I've been asked a lot of questions about that. I think listening to Games on the radio to me. Sounds. Pretty much like like normal because the crowd noise even though it's fake is recorded. Real crowd noise. And I would hate to have had to do the Games in total silence like calling like a golf match. So I feel like it's up for give me a little more energy into allow my voice to project more because I can hear. I can hear the crowd noise in my head said, yeah. Well. Can you were one of the first guests wants baseball won't started its hiatus and we really appreciate you joining us now to kind of explain the INS and outs of what you're dealing with, and hopefully, we'll check back again. During the stretch run and get your thoughts than at Cancun. Thanks as always for joining us as month. That's it's been fun Susan. Thanks for you've done an incredible job with all your coverage to like. Burger. Book, we should pay wrote a book. Came out last year, but others, I'm sure there's plenty of you that haven't read it. If you're looking for something to do if you're stuck at home, if these walls could talk Oakland A.'s stories on the Oakland, a's dugout locker room and press box me and Ken Korac. We had a blast writing. It absolutely loved it. But more about a lot of people who were. Around in and around the as not just us and some really amazing stories trump from you can which I love and we have we have boxes of books sitting at the Coliseum to. Think about what we're going to do is. Contact us if you would like us to send you an autographed copy. It's list price. Sure. But you we would both be happy to autograph it for. You will figure out some sort of safe way for us to do that exchanging books on cinema. Contact us. We're both on twitter I'm at Susan's lesser. What's your are? You just can crack? I am at. Ken. Core. Radio. So there you go. That's that's how to reach. US. Can't thanks again for joining us and we will catch up against you. Big. Thanks again. For joining us on as plus our producers. Today were G Allen Johnson and King Kaufman. We'll be back again later in the week. With more as plus thanks for listening.

Baseball Yuna Susan Coliseum San Francisco Chronicle Oakland Mike Astros producer Seattle Ken Korac Vincent Chris Trat hearst corporation G Allen Johnson Fossey Fossey Vince Europe first Games Oakland A.
Fulfilling Your Dreams At Any Age

Duct Tape Marketing

20:23 min | Last week

Fulfilling Your Dreams At Any Age

"This episode of the duck tape marketing podcast is brought to you by fiber business. Fiber connects your team with expert freelancers and provides a powerful workspace to manage all of your projects and budgets more efficiently old welcome good other episode of the duct. Tape marketing podcast. This is john chance to my guest. Today is michael clinton. He's the former president and publishing director of hearst magazines and currently serves as special media advisor to the ceo of the her corporation. He's also the author of a book. We're gonna talk about today. Roar into the second half of your life before it's too late. So michael Welcome to the show. John thank you so much great to be with you today. So the first obvious question ask you is how old are you. I am a proud sixty seven. All right so i wish to baseline that you've at least entered. Perhaps what is the second half of your life but another question. I had to ask is. What's your favorite hearst. Publication says. i'm a male esquires. Always been one of my magazines. But i have had twenty two children. So it's very hard to pick the best oprah magazine which up launched which was most successful magazine launch history. I love runner. Runner's world. Because i'm on and on but i love them all equally. John i understand that. I as an unfair question. But i i've been in esquire subscriber. I started subscribing. Maybe right when. I got out of college. So it's been it's been a few years and my wife got the inaugural. Oh magazine that was about that. Go back to press on that one. It's crazy so let's get into the book a little bit or topics of the book. What is there anything that led you to say i. I need to write a book about or at least explore this idea of making the second half of your life something that you would roar into yet no thank you i think one of the great. Inspirations actually the book was conceptualized. Because as i was leaving the day to day about eighteen months ago i wanted to give up if you well alaska my management team. I had a couple hundred people in the room. And i had conceptualized this idea because it's really about not just work but about lights lifestyle relationships and everyone loved it and someone said to read a book on this topic of course game so i went through the process. But here's a gist of it. If you're forty five in your healthy today is more than likely that you're gonna live another forty five years and if you're sixty once upon a time you would start thinking about what was called retirement and you would maybe get a ten year stretch today at six day i like to call it rewiring you can rewire and have another thirty years of life and have a second career or even third career separate lifestyle distinct new lifestyles future relationships. It's going to be a long stretch. So the traditional definition of what was sixty kloss. Let's call it. A fifty plus is being blown up every day. it's just not as relevant as it once was for our fathers far grandfather. So i wanted to shed some light on that and i interviewed forty incredible people who all have had major hits in their life post forty five. Let's call it really inspirational stories. And i told a few of my own own experiences but it was really a labor law but lots of tools and resources in the book to is to how one can do it and there. I think this is been going on for a few years. But they're sort of an intention to like this second stage as opposed to. I do think you talked about our fathers and grandfathers. You just ambled into retirement here. I am and i think that there's an intentional idea of no. I'm going to plan this next thing. And i'm guessing you're you're saying it could maybe be better than the first half. It doesn't have to be like giving up exactly one of the things that i found with all these people that really transform this as i call them the reimagined ears among us is. They're very curious very passionate about life in general out lifelong learners and my did something very people say to you. I can't even imagine doing it. But i went back to school at Sixty five sixty four to get a masters degree at columbia university. It was twelve courses. I just graduated some new graduate people when you tell them. If they're in the sixties going back to school and take writing papers doing exams they start sweating. I can't even imagine but it was a phenomenal journey. And i learned a lot and i think we shut ourselves. We shut off possibilities for ourselves itself imposed. Because i like to say forget about age appropriate and focus on person appropriate. There are there are a lot of people who are having the first child fifty but there are evil going back to school at six t starting businesses at seven. Who said that. You can't do something simply because you're fifty. Let's say. I must admit having a child at fifty scares me more than college. What but the fastest growing demographic of starting businesses is the fifth year old. And i think that a lot of people instead of saying as you said the traditional career path i retire at sixty five or whatever you know. The age is a lot of people are saying. It's almost like now's the time i've got. Maybe the savings. I've got the the windfall or that i can lean on and so i think that that idea of being an entrepreneur regardless of age i think is has really taken root but certainly with that age group. I'm wondering i hate asking this but it's still going to be around for a few more months. This question about the pandemic. Like i saw a whole lot of career change like now's the time sort of energy that that was probably always there. But just got magnified. Didn't it so funny. You say this because everyone keeps telling me. Boy is your book. Well-timed it's true. I think it was always in our minds. But it got amplified because we all went through an existential moment where we were hunkered down with our selves. Our families are audit pause and a lot of time to reflect and a lotta people had a lot of experiences in being at home that they question. Do i wanna do that. Two hour commute anymore. Do i really wanna live in the city or town anymore. So i think a lot of people were creating their thoughts and i predicted the next couple of years. It'll be an enormous amount of change. You're seeing it already in this phenomenon cult the bit quit eating while we're checking out of jobs. Not just not just leaving their first career early but people in their thirties and forties. Who were saying. I'm gonna. I'm gonna quit and i'm gonna go regroup and do something else. I think there was a lot of application around this article so again you. You don't necessarily right about this. But i'm sure you've encountered people that just can't pull the trigger. And now they want to. They know they should. What does in your experience. What does stop people from owning. What their next chapter should be. It's a great question. I it's all to your head Completely in their head in south imposed post and marathon runner. So i like to. When i'm talking to new runners and they say how do i start running. Why did you buy a pair of shoes over your local high school track and walk around the track once and then twice and then start jogging and then start running. You have to take the first step and so many people are fearful taking the first step. What i like to say is if you've lived twenty five years and you're forty five is an adult and you're forty five or fifty. Don't call it a midlife crisis. Call it a life away you've had you've learned a lot about yourself and if you know that you're a procrastinator then you'd have to embrace that down about you and break through it in order to take that first step whatever that first step is and the first step is was always the hardest because but once you get on a path you start getting momentum than before he'll go back to school thing. I took that first class. And i was like. Do i really want to do this but that first class. I got into the excitement of it. Twelve classes later. So it's really. It's a self imposed barrier that we all put on ourselves so just take that first step. They go back to school. It'd be a really interesting experience for a lot of people. And i'm sure you had some reflection on how much your life experience brought to the classroom. When you're eighteen to twenty was definitely the oldest person there were a few of us. You're over fifty. But most of the people were. I'll take mid-career so they were probably thirty five to forty but yes i did. I had to bite my tongue times. Because i didn't wanna come off as the season Guy who been there done that. But i learned a lot from them and they learned a lot for me. It speak up so yeah it was. It was great and also. I didn't work out sweating a great. And let's hear word from our sponsor. Fiver business fiber connects your team with freelancers high quality services on a budget. These are curated. Top providers over five hunter categories. That have already been vetted for quality and experience. You've got tools to create projects approved budgets manager freelancers. There's payment protection you can count on transparent pricing and payment approval. It gives you the last word every time. And when you sign up you get a designated business success manager to make sure that you are getting your projects matched with the right talent. Sign up for free. Today at fiber dot com. Did the roar in top of being an active word really is an acronym for your four part process you. Have you found a good easy way to unpack that for people. I think that that was one of the book to be understandable to people democratized so that it covered a lot of different types of people that it was easy to read accessible show the acronym the is to reimagined yourself before others do it for you because you you get displaced at work you you get your spouse comes home and says i wanted the boris. God forbid you is a natural disaster in your community. Things happened to you that you have to be equipped to think about but running simultaneous to that. What's your favorite future. What you want. What's important to you so the tools the stories about that. I love the second part. Which is oh own who you are. You really have to own where you are. At the moment we're came from. We've all made mistakes. What are your numbers. Your health numbers or lumper's woody as strengths your weaknesses your failures own it before you can as you asked earlier before you can take that first step you have to embrace all that the a is the action plan and there's a chapter called life flaring which life formula for building a rich life and then the last ours reassess all your relationships work community family. Because they're the ones who were going to be your tried to get you to where you wanna go there going to be your posse of friends and family to to make it all happen silicate you those four parties i in listening to you unpack that i would guess that second are is probably the harder one for some people. Wh what if you'd make that assessment or reassessment and you decide. I'm on the wrong team. Funny you bring this up. Because i'm in. I was in the publishing business from my whole career. And what is it. What is it critical. Word publishing editing matt or editing process that we should use in our lives because think about those that friend you had when you were twenty five and fifty five and that friendship is pretty toxic. Let go you gotta edit. It is hard and you also have to their family members that you have to. You can't repair a relationship. You have to edit out or marginalized for your own well being your own else and i think a lot of people hang onto relationships even work relationships working for a boss that is really a terrible human being. And you can't get out of it or a company or living in a place that you just don't feel that you're those are tough decisions to be able to acknowledge that and step away from it but that reassessment process has to happen and now let's hear a word from our sponsor when your agency partners wicks you unlock an entire digital ecosystem for creating managing and growing your business online so you can run your agency the way you've always wanted to get the full coating designed freedom to create anything. Your clients need along with the tools to manage and collaborate with your team seamlessly from anywhere. And when it comes to growing your business you can get matched with new leads every day and earn revenue sheriff for every website you create. They're all backed with his industry leading security and site performance. You'll also have dedicated account managers on standby twenty four seven. So you can reach your goals and start setting new ones. See for yourself head on over to wicks dot com slash partners and re imagine what your agency can accomplish. Is there an aspect of clean break so to speak. that really helps people turn the page. And i don't mean a clean break like from rome relationship or something but even just even moving to a new location in some ways of forces you to re satellite things is that would you say that's a common step in in the folks you talk to. I think the thing that i talked to that was most impressive with the folks in the book is that they all put in the time for. They made the leap so they put in. I would say it takes two years and it took two years on average when i talked to them to make a major work change to make a major lifestyle change move to another city and relationships start a new relationship in their lot examples of how they went through that process. And speaking of oprah oprah have this great phrase that there's a little voice in the back of your head and it gets louder and louder and it gets louder and you you can ignore it that ultimately it's going to be in front of your head and you've got to when something's not working in your life that you've got to focus onto to change and i think that's the key and so it takes time you have to put in the equity to to help you get there as opposed to just flippantly saying i'm gonna move from new york city to a small town in montana but you gotta take about that because benson time there. So let's shift a little gear in the world. The world marketing a lot of listeners that our marketers obviously or marketing their businesses. And if you look at this demographic that we're talking about their starting businesses that typically have a much higher rate of savings. Investments 401k expendable income. And yet if you were to watch most advertising even in some of the hearst publications even that you would believe that eighteen to twenty five year olds have all the money. So why are people tuning out to this demographic when i think it's probably for certain industries probably their their best. I could do an hour or two on this john. I think the you're absolutely right. The baby boomer generation late bloomers and the the early boomers have redefined. Everything historically joke. They are not brand loyal. It will jump in remember. The old story were chevrolet family. Who's buying tesla's a sixty year old. Who's got the money they're not brent oil. At all they have the income as you mentioned they. There are one hundred and three million americans who are between the ages of forty sixty four. They have the largest wealth but in the end of the first quarter. This is in the wall street journal last week. The end of the first quarter americans ages americans aged seventy and above at a network that nearly thirty five trillion dollars and that is twenty seven percent of all us wealth and marketers have completely missed the point day live in an old world where television the television media construct defined the eighteen to twenty four. You know war and they've not evolved and it. It's more than it's rampant throughout the advertising media world. The images are atrocious. There augist they are talk about inclusiveness that should be part of diversity. Strategy for any marketer is to show dynamic vibrant tech savvy. People over fifty four engaged iran the antarctica marathon to celebrate my sixtieth birthday and to finish seven marathons on seven continents. And people say wow. That's amazing and i said yeah. But when i ran the toronto marathon i so i one hundred year old man crossed the finish line. First hundred old to run a marathon so like we're those images of neutral sixty two hundred doing all these amazing dynamic things so there needs to be a major rethink and professionally. I've reached out to the american association of advertising agencies the association of national advertisers. To say you need to bring images into the world that show what this cohorts all about three weeks. They've got a lotta money and they've got a lot of desire and they've got no brand. Loyalty is a radically different market than it was just ten fifteen years ago and certainly as you've alluded to a very active lifestyle as part of to large degree. Part of that package isn't it. Yeah completely out. Look at all those skiers out there who are getting in colorado where you are seventy some things. I see them them eighty something. You're skiing not whole new definition of noon. One hundred thousand dollar Sprinter van jack. I like to say instead of saying we're getting older. I'd like to say we're living longer and we're doing amazing things. That's absolutely so michael. Tell people where they can find out more about your work and pick up a copy of roar us thank you roar launches on september seven on all the platforms can buy. I'm about to go do the audiobook next week. So it will be hardcover. It'll be kindle. It'll be audio roar. By michael clinton dot com is the website. You can order the book fair. You can sign up for newsletter which is gonna come can follow me on social media linked in facebook or michael clinton about. Have you ever done sat to read an audiobook. I've never done it. It's going to be experienced eight outrage. You've done it. I'm sure i've done. I've done seven times. Yes god breathing is the most important thing focus. If you do any meditation at all really start holding your breath the whole time while you're trying to read you'll get the presents new won't have any energy left so it's literally breathing's the most important element. That's my two cents. I will be thinking of you as awesome. My goes great catching up with you and hopefully we. We're all getting back out there on the road again. We'll run into you in person someday. Tastic appreciate it. Thanks for inviting me all right. That wraps up another episode of the duct. Tape marketing podcast. I wanna thank you so much for tuning in feel free to share this. Show feel free to give us reviews. You know we love those things also. Did you know that we had created training marketing training for your team if you've got employees if you've got a staff member that wants to learn a marketing system how to install that marketing system in your business. Check it out. It's called the certified marketing manager program from duct tape marketing. You could find it. Duct tape marketing dot com. Just scroll down a little and find that tab that says training for your team.

michael clinton hearst Oh magazine John columbia university alaska michael john oprah oprah boris american association of advert rome benson montana tesla van jack new york city
The O'Reilly Update, March 5, 2020

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

13:00 min | 1 year ago

The O'Reilly Update, March 5, 2020

"Bill O'Reilly here Thursday march fifth. Two Thousand Twenty. You are listening to the O'Reilly update. Here's what's happening. Across our nation Mike Bloomberg drops out of the presidential campaign chief justice of the Supreme Court Schools Senator Schumer healthcare stocks surge after Bernie Sanders Super Tuesday debacle. Italy shuts its universities and schools to stop the corona virus. Kim Kardashian makes another visit to the White House to discuss criminal justice also ahead listeners. Sound off on Super Tuesday but first Mike Bloomberg ending his run for the White House after his poor performance on Tuesday the New York billionaire spent upwards of five hundred million dollars of his own money when he a total of forty four delegates and a handful of places. That's more than eleven million bucks per delegate Bloomberg has now endorsed Joe by Chief Justice John Roberts very angry publicly rebuking Senator Chuck Schumer after Schumer said Supreme Court judges should quote pay the price for their awful decisions. Roberts Cohen comments and dangerous. Adding the court will continue to do. Its job without fear or favor. The controversy is over abortion rulings healthcare stocks surging following Bernie Sanders Super Tuesday. Hammering some companies jumping more than ten percent after the senators lack luster. Vote tally in Texas. And Massachusetts analysts. Predict Bernie's Medicare for all plan would eliminate five million jobs in those states and others from the healthcare sector alone schools and universities across Italy closing their doors assistants for the next two weeks. Due to the corona virus countries aside of the worst outbreak in Europe Levin towns under total quarantine residents prohibited from leaving. There are two thousand five hundred confirmed cases of Corona virus. In Italy. Seventy-nine people have died. There Kim Kardashian visiting the White House Talk Criminal Justice with the President. Celebrity calling for the release of more prisoners incarcerated for quote low level drug crimes and nonviolent offenses good publicity for her and for president trump just saying in a moment the real story. Joe Biden is surging ahead of Bernie Sanders. It doesn't really have to do with the vote so much it has to do with those dreaded corporations right back. Do you have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep when Simon go to bed are racing thoughts keeping you awake. That happens to me if so it's time for you to try. Eb Eb is the first and only wearable drug-free solution that targets the root cause of sleeplessness. Those thoughts at applies precise and continuous cooling to the forehead. Calming Your Mind Ed is clinically validated. And four out of five users report falling asleep faster and improving overall sleep quality. If you tried everything from pills to pillows with little success is time for you to try to get to sleep you need so you have more energy to do the things you love right now. My listeners can try abrous free sixty nights. You even get free shipping. Call eight seven seven seven seven seven eight thousand nine hundred six or go to try EB DOT com. That's eight seven seven seven seven seven eight nine zero six or go to try. Eb. Dot Com T. R. Y. E. B. dot com for free shipping and a risk-free sixty nights time now for the O'Reilly update message of the day. Bernie Sanders versus the media. Corporations Old Bernie is really up against it. Now after the Super Tuesday vote which went. Joe Biden's way generally speaking Bernie Sanders carrying his home state of Vermont. Colorado Utah and California but Biden sweeping all. The other states and many pundits were surprised. It wasn't anything. Joe Biden actually. Did that helped him garner the vote? It was the point of view of the media corporations. Now let me explain Bernie. Sanders has demonized corporate America. He feels that big companies are evil. Don't pay their fair. Share are exploiting the workers and on and and on and off well. Ninety percent of the national news flow in America is controlled by corporations Disney owns. Abc News Viacom. Cbs News Comcast NBC News. At and T. CNN The associated. Press run by the hearst corporation Washington Post Amazon's. Jeff bezos. Owns that Wall Street Journal. Fox News are owned by News Corporation. All of those corporations do not like Bernie Sanders for a very simple reason. The people who run them often get paid in stock. Their fortunes are built on paper and they can sell the stock when they want. But it's a stock price keeps going up. So does their wealth if Bernie Sanders is ever elected president. The stock market will tank you saw. What the Corona virus has done to the market? That's a pinprick to what Bernie Sanders would do. So all of the corporate moguls would lose a bloody fortune should Bernie Sanders get elected. Therefore they make it clear to their lieutenants and this is called top down strategies that Bernie Sanders can't win. Who's the alternative Joe Biden? Let me give you a very specific example. Msnbc is the most liberal television news agency in history. No one has ever come close to promoting left Wayne causes like MSNBC does every day all day yet MSNBC has not gotten behind Bernie Sanders. It doesn't make any sense. Sanders is by far the most liberal candidate. Yet the NBC. People do not boost him. They are in the Biden camp. That is because they know those people on television that their bosses don't want Bernie Sanders therefore sanders is not only running now against Joe Biden. He's running against Corporate America which controls ninety percent of the news flow so it will be almost impossible for old Bernie to win. His supporters are not going to be happy when the Democratic convention walls around July to see Joe Biden onstage. I'm Bill O'Reilly and I approve that message by actually writing it for more news analysis. Please visit Bill O'Reilly Dot Com where you will get the real story in a moment something you might not know. You've heard me talk about urchins. You know the kids. They're obsessed with the machines. Irael about though cell phones and computers. They stare at into day and night frittering their youth away but there are times. Those machines can be quite valuable if you are seventy five or older and you WANNA live insurance policy worth one hundred thousand dollars or more we by seventy five will appraise it free and help you convert it to cash but you must pick up your cell phone and call eight four four. We buy seventy five or visit. We buy seventy five one DOT COM. That'S WE BUY SEVENTY-FIVE DOT com. Imagine never having to pay life insurance premium again. There's no better feeling than having the cash you need for all your necessities you've seen. We buy seventy-five on TV her them on the radio. So use those machines to get a free appraisal of your policy by calling eight. Four four we buy seventy five or visiting. We buy seventy five DOT com. Now the O'Reilly update breeze. You something you might not know. A survey last year showed sixty eight percent of US households own a pet and while all kinds of animals involved. There's no denying Americans are dog. People more than sixty million. Us households own lease one. Canine compare that to forty seven million. That have cats and thirteen percent that have fish there are more than three hundred dog breeds in the USA. But which are the smartest interesting question so with the border? Collie they are the fastest. Learners of all liberates picking up new commands and five seconds or less one famous colleague. Even memorize the unique names of the thousand individual toys next poodles. Don't let the silly haircuts full you used. Odds are incredible hunters. They were originally bred in Germany. To grab geese out of the water the third smartest breed is number one with American families. The Golden Retriever as the name implies. Goldies are great at fetch. They're gentle bite is ideal for carrying ducks without damaging the meat they can even hold in egg in their mouth without cracking the shell. I can't even do that. Some dogs are so smart. They're given pretty unique jobs. Doberman pinschers were originally bred to protect tax collectors from angry people. Labradors are experts in detecting narcotics and also certain kinds of cancers. Within the body Springer Spaniels help hunters find truffles. Some of the brightest canines take their smarts to Hollywood for big paydays. The first lassie for example may two hundred thousand dollars a year. That was way. Back in the fifties Terry the terrier that are known as toto in the wizard of. Oz made one hundred and twenty five dollars a week just for following Dorothy down the yellow brick road. Eddie from Frazier. Earn ten thousand dollars an episode way to go Eddie. And here's something else you might not know. Every year. The top animal actors are honored with their own award ceremony. We'll be back with more of the O'Reilly update in a moment. There are thousands of abandoned animals in the USA. That need our help. I am partnering with Delta Rescue. The largest no kill care for life. Animal Sanctuary in the world founded by actor Leo Grillo who left Hollywood to devote his life to saving abandoned animals. Delta animal sanctuary is a one of a kind rescue unit. They are staffed by trained attendants who look after each animal providing them water treats toys and affection support dealt rescue and put your legacy to work each lifesaving gift helps Delta fulfill their mandate to rescue and care for animals request a free estate planning package at Delta Rescue Dot Org forward slash bill for a limited time. Please watch the rescuer for free. Only at Delta rescue dot org forward slash built. The rescuer is an award winning documentary about Grillo two year. Rescue of a family of twenty-one dogs abandoned in the Wilderness Delta rescue dot org forward slash bill. Thank you for listening to the O'Reilly update. I am Bill O'Reilly no spin just facts and always looking out for you.

Bernie Sanders Joe Biden O'Reilly Bill O'Reilly Kim Kardashian Mike Bloomberg Italy President Senator Chuck Schumer Chief Justice John Roberts Texas Biden camp Corporate America Supreme Court Roberts Cohen Delta USA. White House New York Delta Rescue
Congressman Peter King 9-27-20

CATS Roundtable

09:40 min | 11 months ago

Congressman Peter King 9-27-20

"Create your story with Pandora and receive a free bracelet. The choice is yours Explorer over 80 bracelet Styles. It's our gift to you when you spend $125 or more than a September 24th through the 28th at Pandora Jewelry free bracelet up to $65 value upgrades available. No substitutions restrictions apply see store for details get your free bracelet from the Pandora store at Town Center. Boston Street or Jackson Heights from September 24th through September 28th. Good morning America. This is the cats round table trying to get some keys here. Send me morning. What is this morning is Thursday a good friend retiring at the end of the year Congressman Peter King a member of the homeland security committee and one smart guy. Good morning, Smith. How are you this morning. I'm doing great anytime a spot guy like who calls me smart. I really feel good. So thank you. Thank you very much. Well, you you have served America for almost 30 years and you you know your stuff off. You know instead about being a democrat or a republican you have common sense, which is even more important in than titles. Give us an update. What's going on in Washington. We have riots against things are happening. We only have almost less than 40 days for the election. What's going on? Well, first of all not very much is going on in Washington. Both parties are stalemated. I think I do need for instance 8 to be going to the city and state governments and Republicans don't want to move on that. I think we have to be much more to be to protect and defend the police the Democrats off the opposite direction on that. They either put aside the police or stay silent when there's violence against the cops. I mean, this is a really a breakdown in society, especially this whole Law and Order issue. I've been in Congress out almost 28 years. I've been in public life one way or the other for almost fifty years and this is the first time I've seen such a breakdown. In civil order even during the sixties and seventies during the dark days of the eighties when crime was getting out of control in New York. There was always a certain stability. That was that now we fight almost except for this way when things were bad people acknowledge. They were bad today. It's considered part of the cost out of people don't like it decision by a grand jury. They're giving a lot and Ryan nothing to lose. They're going to shoot cops. This is somehow able to rid of it and spots and for instance the the undertale a case in Kentucky in that case the grand jury member. I got the Attorney General laid out the findings of the injury very clearly why two police officers were not indicted in the tragic feeling of being on his head and I I agree with the decision, but even if I didn't actually it was a well-thought-out decision or was a all the facts were there showing that the police were fired job. They fired back. The only Taylor was with the person who was shooting at the cops and it's not the police fault that she was caught in the fire. She was there with the guy who was shooting at the cops. She had a prior involvement with a drug deal in Louisville, which is why her apartment was raided. So all this was done the right way tragically. She was killed was not the police officers. And it said, you know, you see right and accept that or rather than try to find a legal way to disagree with that is riots in the streets. And this is what we saw after Georgia Floyd we had weeks and weeks of random violence and riots and where people like the governor and the mayor calling a peaceful process. I was the 74th Precinct nice New York the other day and the commanding officer that a deputy inspector nationality. He's just become he got hit in the face with a brick that night and when they put him in the ambulance the rioters try to prevent the ambulance or taking Into the Dead. And so because the guy was lucky he's alive and I don't remember anybody talking about that instead they if they find that some a millennial got pushed to the ground somewhere that becomes a major case against the Car Fax and copy the face of the brick somehow that's just considered another day at work. So it's really it's a larger issue of society breaking down and people at law enforcement having your hands off and it also is you and I have discussed in the past the fact that what went on during the Obama Administration the why it's happening of a presidential campaign and attempt to really undermine wage campaign using the FBI and CIA people like John Brennan and John called me being involved FBI agents actually altering documents being submitted to the secret Court we have off and to get a yeah why it's not permit. I mean, this is again a dramatic change in in our government you go backwards kennedy-nixon or next Thursday. Country even Reagan and Jimmy Carter one can they be slightly right-of-center the other slightly left-of-center what the differences were all within the American debate now, it's almost like if you have it like a hate America crowd is driving the Democratic party Congressman. I mean, I'm pretty much convinced that there's a force behind some of these people that are that are pushing the peaceful demonstrators and it seems like the FBI has come out and said yes, there are there is a group of people that going from state-to-state home and and they show up where they think that's going to be a protest. I think it was it in Louisville to be a U-Haul truck showed up and they had all kinds of banners in there and and writing material and we find out that U-Haul truck was rented by a Hearst Corporation. Have you heard about that job? I don't know if it's accurate or not. But I've heard that and I've seen enough evidence though around the country where these demonstrations just start over night. I mean, you know, I've been in politics a long time to organize peaceful demonstrations to get people to show up at a certain location that's difficult to put a lot of time and effort into it. But in this case even with the judge voice yelling like within days you had these violent demonstration is appearing all over the country going back to President Trump was elected suddenly had riots and streets you had violence. I was in Philadelphia of Republican media memory in January of 2017 and the writers and demonstrates around to the hotel. I mean, this is really dangerous stuff and and to see the way it was done this time in Washington DC New York City of Portland Seattle all these places around the country and our Louisville the other night or even in New York City where you had demonstrated suddenly out in the street after the decision in the brown dog. Case that has reorganized it has the organizers violent and it's out there and if this was the right wing it was being done. Everybody was screaming their heads off about how terrible and dangerous it was I'm scratching my head would be I direct the re the other day says this achiever people are not organized. Okay, maybe you don't call them and T4, but somebody is organized because that's what they're doing is they're going around and putting out what you call remember them word streak money, you put our tag and one of my friends there was an actor. They tried to hire him and he wanted me to act like a a terrorist, you know, do whatever he has to do in the payment $1,000 a day. Now what I said to some US senators had dinner last week, is that if somebody a source type I'm not saying it's Soros. It might be China and might be Russia. I don't know who it is puts out a hundred thousand dollars a month. And Street money to get these demonstrators because it looks like the politicians only listening to demonstrators which had a hundred thousand dollars in Street money for demonstrations wage millions of dollars in advertising on all the cable channels because that's all the cable channels play is is the rioting they play it over and over and they don't call it riding. They call them peaceful protests a peaceful protest with maybe a few people acting violently. That's the way they described it. Meanwhile the cops are ducking Molotov cocktails and Bricks or the other night as usual in Louisville. Cops being shot. Now. The box is organized. You can't do something this quickly overnight with the force they have with the weapons. They have it's definitely organized. You know, who's behind it? That's what the FBI am looking into and investigating and to me there's no doubt in my mind and keep it is a terrorist organization so violent organization and the way they can spring up all over the place. Scream and Carry Out acts of violence to me. It's the say that that's not a domestic terrorism. I don't know what you call maybe we should change definitions that but no there is a definitely a progressive left-wing violent move this country and we have to do something to stop it and some of them are just actors trying to create the the scene. Well Congressman Peter King, thank you for everything you do for our country you have done for our country continue to do for our country and I'm sure you'll be fighting again in the future and looking forward to talking to you real soon. Thank you John lets you and I always will do stand with the men and women. I agree. This is the cash Round Table will be right back.

Louisville FBI America Congressman Peter King Pandora Washington John Brennan New York City New York U-Haul Town Center homeland security committee Kentucky Smith Philadelphia Congress US Ryan Taylor Attorney
#90: Preventing Physician Burnout through Improved EHRs with Dr. Scott Weingarten

Health Care Rounds

31:52 min | 1 year ago

#90: Preventing Physician Burnout through Improved EHRs with Dr. Scott Weingarten

"Welcome to healthcare rounds. The podcast serving the INS and outs of health policy and business topics as well as on the rapidly evolving healthcare delivery ecosystem. I'm your host John Chica. Ceo of Darwin Research Group and faculty associate at the WTO Carey School of Business and the College of Health Solutions at Arizona State University. I guess this week is Dr Scott Winegarden Senior Vice President and Chief Clinical Transformation Officer at Cedar Sinai. Dr Weingartner is a professor of Medicine at Cedars Sinai and a clinical professor of medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at Ucla. Dr Weingarten is the chief executive officer of stance and health a Premier Company. Dr Winegarden was also the CO founder President and Chief Executive Officer of Zinc's health which is the leader for order sets in care plans for electronic health records zinc's health was sold to turn a corporation and later to the Hearst Corporation board certified in internal medicine and a fellow of the American College of Physicians. Dr Weingarten has published one hundred articles and editorials on Health Care Quality Improvement Clinical decision support and related topics and has authored numerous chapters on improving the quality of patient. Care in some of the leading internal medicine textbooks. Dr Winegarden has held positions on myriad national committees dedicated to improving patient outcomes including those of the Institute for Medical Quality and the American heart. Association's get with the guidelines program and the Quality Improvement Committee of the Board of Directors of Saint Joseph's health system at cedars-sinai he has been awarded both the President's Award and the Golden Apple Teaching Award and was alumnus of the year for two thousand nine after graduating from Ucla. Medical School Dr Winegarden completed his internship residency and fellowship in Internal Medicine at Cedars Sinai. He later participated in a National Center for Health Services Research Fellowship at the rand. Ucla Center for Health Policy Study during the fellowship. He also earned a masters of public health degree at the UCLA. Feeling School of Public Health. So Scott just to kick us off one. Aren't you Orient Our listeners in and tell us a little bit about your background thank you John. I'm a internist by training and worked at Cedars Sinai Health System in Los Angeles for many years. Most recently up until a year ago is senior vice president chief clinical transformation officer. I remain on the medical staff Cedar Sinai Professor Medicine at Cedars Sinai and also have founded a couple of clinical decision support companies. The first one called zing cells which is in order set and Care Plan Company which sold to Turner and later to the hearst corporation and then founded a second clinical decision support company called stance and health which we recently sold to premier two of those startups offended. Not Mistaken if I remember from pre interview that those kind of come out of Cedar Sinai is that correct Yes to startups in both have come out of Cedar Sinai. So at cedars-sinai my job has been to come up with systematic strategies to improve the quality of care safety care and improved clinical efficiency and along the way we thought if we could use oh strategies to improve fishing cared cedars-sinai we may be able to export some of the knowledge to other health systems across the country to try and improve the value of those systems and hence we developed a couple of companies along the way to export what we learned in cedars-sinai organizations is that is that common within the culture at Cedars Sinai in other words. Do they encourage this kind of startup? Innovation they do Cedar. Sinai is a entrepreneurial highly innovative organization and actually has enabled to recruit and retain a number of highly innovative individuals throughout the health system for many decades. The Swan Ganz. Catheter was invented at Cedar Sinai. Both Dr Swan and Dr Ganz worked at Cedars Sinai which measured pulmonary artery pressures across the world. I could share with you. Dozens and dozens of other examples. So it's really part of the culture when you come up with that either. Invention strategy software that CAN IMPROVE CARE AT CEDARS Sinai. Could whatever was invented at Cedars Sinai also improve care across the United States in many cases across the world so as a fellow serial entrepreneur. I'm curious what was that process like when a larger organizations. So how did you get started? Have the funding work. Tell me a little bit more about that. I mean we're GONNA get into clinical decision support tools here in a minute but I'm just curious about that whole process. Yes so cedars-sinai has eight fairly well-developed pathway for doing this. Both through technology transfer and also has established a venture fund and so related proceeded like many entrepreneurial ventures someone has an idea cases thanks health and stance in hell that someone was me along with some collaborators and developed a business plan and had a number of meetings discussing the business plan and before renew it. We had funding and off we went. That's exciting the having that even that you have that within that culture that you have the ability to go out there and pursue a dream so to speak and then to do it twice over. That's remarkable will. Thank you I give all credit to Cedar Sinai and the Culture The CEO of Cedars Gentlemen by the name. Thom lack is really encouraged innovation throughout his long more than two decade tenure as CEO Cedar Sinai in his really encouraged many of the faculty and administrators to think up ideas and those ideas that might have commercial merit to try to encourage people to develop business plans further discussed the potential for commercializing the IP. And then also a lot of creative people at Cedar Sinai by the opportunity to work to grow up with an idea into software and software. That eventually was found to improve. Patient care outstanding. So we're GONNA get to that in just a minute but I wanted kind of. T- things up with a recent article that I came across in Mayo Clinic proceedings. They surveyed about remember correctly about twelve hundred. Docs related to e HR a usability and and they also measured Physician burn out and so the ultimately the conclusion of the study was that the usability of HR systems today. So this is recent. This is I think in last month's issue received an F grade by physician users and there was a strong dose response relationship between HR USABILITY and the odds of burnt out so the more favorable the score the lower the burnout Having some expertise in this area with the certainly with decision support what. What's your reaction to that city? Well that's striking on. The service enough grade is not good. No one Ever strives to get enough grade however I provide some context but before I do that. I strongly believe that. Ehr's will get better and get significantly better in terms of USABILITY and we're very far from achieving an end point for context. I let's go to the past and see where we were before. Ehr's in. Let's go to the future when I believe they're likely to be better in terms of usability so if we say by. Gosh they get an F grade today. You have to really compare with something. Let's go to the past for a second in the past. We use paper paper charts paper medical records but if we look at the care we were providing even though it's somewhat easy to scribble notes on a paper medical records the care. We're providing left a lot to be desired. So there were studies showing that care was consistent with the evidence or evidence based care about fifty percent of the time somewhere in the neighborhood of two hundred fifty thousand people were dying each year from medical errors so medical errors or of the leading causes of death in the United States studies in Jama showing about thirty percent of all costs were waste in healthcare and given some of the challenges with healthcare affordability. It's a real shame when thirty percent of our thirty cents on the dollar going to what people view as waste or early says was studied and reported in Jama article in about ten percent of care over treatment where the harm exceeds the benefit or there was no benefit so if we look to the past the four electric health records lots of opportunities that we can do better and we should do better so I do not look to the past before electronic health records glowingly and thinking gee we had achieved an endpoint before electronic health records. Clearly we were letting patients down with the number of medical records your medical errors and the deaths from medical errors and opportunity to be much more efficient and less wasteful. Inner delivery care so here. We are today with electrons health records but clearly physicians are not satisfied with where we are and where we should be and I certainly understand that. I have my iphone and I actually like it. I think it's usable. I like the APPs on it and I understand when I compare my iphone to. Hr How My iphone or other smartphone might be viewed more favorably. But then if we say gee were somewhere towards the beginning or the middle of our journey with electronic health records. Let's take a glimpse into the future and there's a lot of effort underway looking at how ambient listening devices could be used to make. Ehr's more usable and to get higher grades among physicians in the future. So just like we might Alexa at home or Google home and We find them useful. There are a lot of people experimenting with putting Ambien listening devices into the examination room. So in that case that when a doctor or healthcare providers speaks to a patient the ambient listening device understand in many cases through natural language processing natural language understanding a machine learning some or much of the conversation and which allows the doctor to talk directly to the patient rather than typing the whole time and Shins for the patients which is important in the patient and Gordon to the doctor the healthcare provider and then provide guidance to both the provider Mrs Jones is overdue for her mammogram and would benefit from a cholesterol test. And to the patient when the patient goes home so I think the future looks bright. Aren't quite bullish on the future. But I certainly understand the sentiment that you just reported in the mail seedings article that we can and I strongly believe. We'll do much much better in the future. What is the source just as a clinician in talking to other doctors? What is the source of so much dissatisfaction? Is it that they feel like it gets in the way of the patient? Interaction is too many pop. Ups is like because I'm not a doctor and I'm not using these on a daily basis. I don't know so I'm just curious from your perspective on why they're so much disatisfaction. Well I think it's multi factory others a lot of reasons why I think in the past. You sat down with a patient. You look the patients in the eyes and said Mr Jones. Mrs Brown when seems The matter how can I help you today? And now in many cases the doctor or the healthcare provider is typing on a computer and looking at the computer rather than the patient. And that's in many cases less satisfying for both the patient and for the healthcare provider when doctors go home there in baskets are full of reminders. Information that have to do with the care of the patients. They took care of either that day. Or in the recent past. In some cases there are a number of alerts so an example drunk. Driving alerts so drug a interact. Dry Be those alerts. In many cases used to go to pharmacists now. In many cases they go to healthcare providers. So there's a whole host of reasons why physicians are burnt out something to do with the electronic health record reasons Well beyond the electronic health record where a physician burnout which is a very very important subject and extremely concerning. We're hearing a lot more about it today than we did in the past just as an outsider. It seems to me that a lot of a lot of the administrative burden that falls on physicians. It seems like a management problem like a physician's office. It could be organized in a different way or that a lot of the tasks that end up falling on the physician or nurse practitioner could be handled by someone else. My naive in thinking that or is it. Some of the things just have to be by their nature handled by the provider. No I I think you're absolutely right. And there's a lot of efforts underway at health systems throughout the country to have the administrative tasks or data entry task removed from physicians and allocated to others who could perform the same data entry your ministry functions as well as the physician and freeing up more time for the physician to interact with the patient so absolutely when more administrative task fall on physicians. Lades burn out less time for physicians and other healthcare providers suspend interacting with patients entering Enter responding to patients responding to their questions and it's an opportunity to make things better. Let me give you one example higher authorization so prior authorization is a really important concern. The average physician here she spends about eighty three thousand dollars per year according to a health of various article in interactions with health plans and a lot of times a physician will document something in the. Dr where it's absolutely imperative for a patient to get let's see Mariah in the brain or an MRI in the back. Medical necessity criteria clearly been met and for the patients and not have that scheduled at that. Time is just is just wrong in many cases. Let me give you an example. Let's say a sixty five year old woman with a history of lung. Cancer comes the end to her physician's office and now has a headache. And right sided weakness. Will the physicians going to be concerned about a metastases to the brain that patient needs an MRI or some imaging procedure in the brain? To make sure it is not a lung metastasis. So the way that it works today. The patient comes in as she comes. Ab with some family members. Everybody's worried everybody's concerned and the doctor who knows that. Mri were some other imaging. Study it's required now tells her submitted a request. Your Insurance Company. We should within two or three days. Whether approved not patient goes home. Frustrated family members are concerned and the healthcare providers concern and then the physician or his or her staff than need to interact with the insurance company and relay much of the information that the physician is already typed into the electronic health record either by facts or by entering information into a standalone portal. Or over the phone calling eight hundred number to try and convince someone at the emory is justified. So that's just administrative burden administrative waste. That's bad for patients. It's bad for patients family members and has bad for providers. Were you in thank in two thousand eighteen. When the provider is already documented all of the information and the electronic health record medical necessity criterias that that the imaging procedure could be instantly approved and then scheduled before the patient goes home. So how do you fix that? I mean that's very starting example. Is that through legislation or just wondering how you fix that problem now. I think there are a lot of people working on it today and we have the technology to fix that if it is fixable a some of it is standards and interoperability by. I think you're GonNa see this fixed. In the next couple of years. A lot of pilots underway because it makes no sense in two thousand nineteen for when a doctor documents something electronic health record that they have to document the exact same information in a standalone portal. Yachts redundancy that frustrates providers so it can be fixed with technology. The technology exists affixing today. And I think within the next couple of years. I think you'll see that it has been fast but there many many opportunities like that to reduce administrative burden reduce provider burnout and frustration with healthcare as it exists today so tell me about Stanford. Health clinical decision support tools. Maybe some of the players out there today but maybe also some specifics on what you developed. It's now I guess. Premier around clinical decision support sure so the first company created in Seoul Recalls Zinc's and that company we created order sets in care plans and actually those are almost like checklists to improve care reduce under-use improve quality care so largely for hospitalized patients but not exclusively if a patient comes into the hospital and asks community acquired pneumonia. What treatments will lead to the best outcomes the lowest mortality and Lois Morbidity we were fortunate that product ended up in about two thousand hospitals in the US and a lot hospitals outside the US? We thought the next generation of clinical decision support was really across the continuum which would be patient specific analyzing much of the information available on a specific patient to provide specific guides to the provider for that patient. In this case patients are complicated. They have a lot of things going on with them. Many patients they have In when I say things going on with them we're all a little bit different and as we get more information about patients were really entering into world of precision medicine so many elderly patients today. We'll have more than one chronic condition. They might have diabetes hypertension. They might have depression. Their social determinants to health that are important for treating patients. Patient preferences are important. John If you develop high blood pressure and I developed high blood pressure we might think about it a little bit differently. About how quickly would go on medications versus trying exercise and Diet there other things we all might think about it a little bit differently as we enter world of Health of precision medicine. We have different genetics. We have different PROTONIX. We have different microbiome probe by also we developed. Stanton which is the latest clinical decisions for company to try and survey all of the information that we could in any hr both what we call discreet. Data elements like lab values but also free tax that a doctor or healthcare provider has written into any HR tried to interpret that information and provide guidelines that specific for you John or for me and so we thought at the time it was really the next generation of clinical decision support. So in practice. What does what does that look like. In maybe give me an example of how how your system can have a demonstrable effect on quality as well as reducing costs. Sure shirt so what we do right now. We have a product for advanced imaging procedures. So there was a law passed in two thousand fourteen called the protecting access to Medicare act a requires health care providers to consult with clinical decisions. Or if they are going to be reimbursed for advanced imaging procedures for Medicare beneficiaries by January. First Two thousand twenty one. So what does that mean? That means that a- doctor orders a MRI of the brain of a Medicare beneficiary in two thousand twenty one if the doctor does not console with clinical decision support the imaging center will not be reimbursed for the MRI and therefore the advanced imaging centers likely to perform the memory of not being reimbursed were so it's a requirement for clinical decisions or for Reimbursement in Medicare around a clinical priority areas which a mini people believe. It'll be expanded from there. So as part of it we review information in the electronic health record to see whether in a imaging procedure is appropriate or not according to evidence based guidelines. So let's from lower back paid we might look asked Information such as diagnoses. This patient have. How old is the patient we look at? How long is the patient had lower back pain and nowhere in the HR in many cases interational low back pain being specific field so we have to read the doctor's notes insieme? The doctor thought along. This patients have low back. Pain also conservative treatment has failed conservative treatments such as like physical therapy and we need to read the electronic health record in terms of quality of CARE. We do have many examples. Some published studies in the peer reviewed literature. The impact on quality care. We did a study. Actually was the advisory board the Advisory Board asked us for our data which they had from cedars-sinai on about twenty six thousand patients. So they had our data on each patients Whether they lived or died length of stay whether they had complications and they asked us to ship our data on whether doctors followed clinical decision support or not and they had their data scientists math. All Twenty six thousand patients to see whether there was who was not any impact on quality of care when doctors followed the clinical decision support recommendations in this study published about a year ago or so a little over a year ago in the American journal Managed Care with the advisory board found. Is that when doctors follow the clinical decisions or recommendations the outcomes for better actually? The complication rate was significantly lower. The length of stay was lower in the cost of care was about nine hundred. Forty four dollars per patient lower so that would be one eight sample of Correlating quality care with providers following clinical decisions origin that has been published in the Peer Review Richer. So I read somewhere that these kinds of tools can potentially make healthcare more personalized and even foster relationships between the patient and provider at seemed like a stretch. But it's not my field. So what can you comment on that? What are your thoughts? Well I am a proponent of clinical decision support is much as you've probably gathered by now but I actually have cared for a lot of patience in my lifetime and when I think leads to the best patient provider relationship is when I really listened to the patient understood. Their concerns really got to the patients responded to the patients questions. The patient felt spent enough time listening to them that I care about the patients that was accessible. That's if the patient felt that they had Some type of question Emergency that they could get a hold of me when they needed me and it was really trust between the patient and myself that led to the best possible relationship so is much as I believe that clinical decision support could improve care. It was really the person interaction that I think led to the best doctor patient relationship so I would say. Let's focus for the patient experience in the interaction on clinical decision support but really more on the trust and are you there and available for the patient when he or she needs you. I'd say that spot on and that sounds like like my doctor. Okay good I really. I really appreciate it. He uses obviously. Hr's younger doctor. But I always get spends enough time with me. That he's not rushed and I know he's very busy. But it's the listening. It's that level of trust and for me like I don't see the. Hr getting in the way he seems to be very attentive to whatever's going on with me at the time so yeah I would. I would agree with that so that just kind of put a bow on it. Scott what do you see a looking into the future? You touched on this a little bit about hr but what do you see as the future for clinical decision support? Yes I did touch on briefly but I see it becoming less obtrusive. I really very excited about the potential for Ambien. Listening devices and listening in with appropriate consents. Sure so when I'd go into the doctor's office in the future by Dr I also think is very good. I actually got a physical exam a couple of weeks ago and he listens to me will not have to spend typing in the future and then when I go home my ambient listening device reminds me that I need to go out running your Viking. I guess my weaknesses. I eat too much chocolate and eat less chocolate in the future. So I think both provider and patient clinical decision support. That's less intrusive more tailored towards me and who I am and one day I have not done whole. Xm Genomic sequencing on myself yet. But my my guess is that one day the advice that my provider Dr shares with me will be influenced by a genetic proteome microbiome results. Yeah I could see that. I haven't done it myself either and I've thought about it especially as a the prices has gone down. I'm sure it's probably under a thousand dollars at this point to have that full workup. So Scott I wanNA thank you. We've touched on a lot of things today but I appreciate your spending some time with me and sharing your entrepreneurial experiences and eloquence staying in touch. Thank you very much. John appreciate the opportunity to chat with us this morning. Thanks again. That's all for this week from all of us at Darwin Research Group. Thanks for listening if you haven't yet done so please. Rate and review healthcare rounds wherever you listen to podcasts. Healthcare rounds is produced by Deanna Nicola and engineered by Andrew. Rowe check the music by John. Murcia Darn Group provides advanced market intelligence and in-depth customer insights to healthcare executives are strategic focus is on healthcare delivery systems and the global shift toward value based care to learn more about us go to Darwin research dot COM or send an email to insights at Darwin Research Dot Com. Or if you'd like to get right to it. Cost Eight eight eight four zero two three four six five. So you're next round.

Cedars Sinai John Chica Cedars Sinai Health System cedars-sinai United States Dr Scott Winegarden Cedar Sinai School of Public Health Senior Vice President and Chie Cedar Sinai Professor Medicine Ehr Dr Winegarden National Center for Health Ser Darwin Research Group Dr Weingarten clinical professor of medicine
Oprah Winfrey read by Gayle King

Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls

22:06 min | 1 year ago

Oprah Winfrey read by Gayle King

"This episode of good night stories for rebel girls is based on the bestselling books by the same name. If you like today's episode, you can find Oprah story on page one thirty, six of volume to. Get your copy today at rebel girls dot, com or wherever you buy your favorite books. Once upon a time there was a girl who's little voice grew to make a big difference. Her name was oprah. Oprah lived in a wooden house on a small farm in Mississippi. When she was a child, her grandparents took care of her after her mother went north to look for a better job. Unlike wealthier families in the nineteen fifties, Oprah's grandparents didn't have a radio television or even indoor plumbing. Every Sunday Oprah and her grandparents walked down a dirt road to a small church. Although Oprah went barefoot most of the week on Sundays. She wore shiny, hot leather shoes and address made by her grandmother had he may. Inside the church, beautiful harmonies rose around Oprah. She sang along her voice, rising with the other congregants or hands clapping in time to the music. Howdy may taught oprah to read and to write when she was very young. And they often read the Bible together. One Easter when Oprah was just three years old Heidi may sent her to the front of the church. The church fell silent. Is Oprah recited a Bible Verse Allowed Clear Voice. The way people paid attention made Oprah. Feel like she. Was Worth listening. To I'm Gayle King and this is good night stories for rebel girls. A tale podcast about the rebel women who inspire us. This Week Oprah Winfrey. Oprah was six her mother. VERNITA finally set for Oprah to join her in Wisconsin. Mississippi! Oprah had been surrounded by trees and birds and fields, and the only sounds at night or the crickets chirping. But Milwaukee was a big city. Her mother rented a room in a boarding house and when Oprah looked out the window. All she saw were buildings and houses in the sky, was filled with clouds of smoke from factories when Oprah tried to go to bed. The sounds of cars honking kept her. Oprah hopes to spend more time with her mother. But for NITA was gone a lot for work, and then there was Vernita in Baby Patricia. Oprah help take care of. Being a single mother, raising two kids was very difficult, so when Oprah was eight, Bernita sent over Tennessee to live with her dad vernon his wife Selma. Oprah love her life in Tennessee. ZELMA and burn and didn't have any other children, so oprah room all to herself. They applied for a library card in every week. Oprah piled up on shoot stack of books to carry home. Each book she read transported her to a world far beyond her own. The next! Summer Oprah visited her mother in Wisconsin. But when her dad came to pick her up in the fall. Bernita said Oprah was not going back. Vernon cried, but BERNITA was oprah's legal guardian. He had no choice. But to respect her wishes. In middle, school while other kids were rowdy in the cafeteria. Oprah read all by herself in a corner. High School, she was even more distant. Oprah often skip. School stole from her mom's purse and even ran away from home. No one understood why she was acting this way. What they didn't know was that Oprah did not feel safe at home. Some of the relatives she was supposed to trust were actually hurting her. Oprah was afraid. Other adults would not believe her and keeping it. A secret made her feel very alone. When she got older. Oprah finally talked about what happened and said that kids should tell a trusted adult if someone is hurting them. If they don't believe you. She said You keep telling until somebody does. But when Oprah was young. Know what to do, so she acted out. Tired of Oprah's behavior. Bernita sent her back to her father in Tennessee when she was fourteen. Oprah struggled with everything that had happened to her and her heart hurt. But Vernon new. His daughter was smart and headstrong, and he was determined to help her succeed. Vernon gave oprah new rules to live by. She was to be home by a certain time every night. She was to learn twenty new vocabulary words every week, and she was to read five books every two weeks and write reports on them. When Oprah came home from school was seized. Vernon told her it was unacceptable. But see is average over protested. If you were a child, who could only get sees then. That's all I expect of you. Vernon said, but you're not. In this House sees are not acceptable over thought. Her father was too strict, but she followed these new rules. Her Life Begin to change. With her new focus on schoolwork over became an honor student joined a public speaking club and participated in student council. She entered speaking competitions and beauty pageants to. At one pageant when oprah was seventeen, a judge, the contestants what they wanted to do with their lives when I turn came, she said I want to be a broadcast journalist. Because I believe in the truth, I'm interested in proclaiming the truth to the world. Oprah ultimately won that pageant and when she went to a local radio station to pick up her prize, one of the employees let over record herself reading a new story. A few days later, the radio station W. B.. O. L. offer her a job after that every day after school, she rushed to the station to read the afternoon news for Nashville's listeners. In Nineteen seventy-two Oprah was still working at the radio station when she started college at Tennessee State University. One day, a local television station called to see if Oprah wanted to audition to become a TV news anchor. Oprah had never been on TV. She watched the news a lot. Though so when she sat at the audition, she channeled one of her favorite broadcast journalist Barbara Walters. Oprah look straight into the camera. Read her line seriously and clearly. They offered her the job and eight nineteen. Oprah became the first black woman to be a news anchor in Nashville. Oprah loved working on camera, so she studied other shows and practiced her timing and delivery. With in a few years. She set her sights on new opportunities in bigger cities. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy six, she got the call she had been hoping for. She was offered a position as a news reporter and anchor at a station in Baltimore Maryland. Oprah wanted to say yes immediately, but to take the job. She'd have to move away. That meant leaving school without graduating. Oprah new opportunity like this was rare. It was a risk she had to take. So, she packed up a burning and Zelma goodbye. Set Off. Oprah was excited to be on her own in a new city. She rented her first department bought some new clothes and showed up for her. I live broadcasts sporting an Afro. Oprah's bosses. Her to a fancy hair salon in New York City to straighten her natural hair. She needed a makeover. They insist it, but the stylists left harsh chemicals in for too long and Oprah's hair turn brittle, and all of it fell out. She had to cover her head with scarves for weeks. The network didn't like Oprah's approach to reading the news either. She read using the style. She developed a Nashville with warmth, radiating from her voice. If she was reporting on a house fire, and the homeowner was distraught. She didn't think it was right to interview them. Or when someone told her about something terrible that it happened sometimes, Oprah was so moved that she'd cry on air every day. When she went home, she carried the pain of those stories with her. Her bosses criticized her for being too sensitive, arguing it was inappropriate behavior or a newscaster. Eventually, one of her bosses called her into a meeting. We think you're so talented. We want to have your spot in the morning, he said. He tried to make it sound positive, but oper new. She had been demoted. Oprah was devastated up until this point in her career success at come pretty easily to her. Something good did come of it though, but it wasn't what Oprah had expected. One of the production, Assistance Gayle King that would be me was worried about getting home safely during a big snowstorm. Why don't you stay at my place tonight? Oprah set. And I did and we stayed up all night, talking and laughing and talking. We found out we had similar philosophies. People we had the same taste in music. And we even wore the same size close. Within weeks, we were the best of friends. A few months after her demotion, a new station manager arrived. To help boost the station's ratings. He decided to make a new morning. Talk show called. People are talking. He'd seen Oprah's work and he thought she would be the perfect co host. If you're successful. You can make more of an impact on the community. Then you would have in TV news, he said. Oprah reluctantly agreed. In her new position, Oprah and her co host interviewed people famous people regular people on this show. It didn't matter if she cried or laughed. That was what she was supposed to do. It came so naturally to her. It felt like breathing. The show's ratings soared. Oprah always wanted to challenge herself. In several years later in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, another new opportunity arose. An old co worker told Oprah that a struggling morning show in Chicago had lost its host and was looking for someone new. Oprah state of all night, her audition tape. She wanted to show them her best. And when the station manager met Oprah in person, he was so impressed. He offered her the job. Right away. Upper was surprised, there weren't any solo talk show host on the air. Who looked her? On Black, she said Oh I know he answered an overweight. He laughed at that. Well, so am I and so were many Americans. He told Oprah he didn't want her to change anything about herself. Encouraged by her new boss, Oprah bought her warmth empathy and outspokenness to her new show in Chicago, and decided to never be anything but her authentic self. People who watched Oprah's show am shadow connected with her openness? She often reveal personal stories like her struggles with weight and her difficult childhood. She was not afraid to show her emotions. Within Months Oprah had more viewers in Chicago than the most popular talk show in the whole country. When Oprah walked to work in the mornings. People would say hi to her on the street. High Oprah, some asked for autographs. Others just wanted hugs. Once a city bus pulled over the driver jumped out and shook Oprah's hand. Oprah thought the passengers would be mad because of the delay, but she was surprised when they applauded instead. By the show second year, the station gave it a new name. The Oprah Winfrey show and in Nineteen eighty-six. Signed a contract that would send her show to television stations across the country. I'm Oprah Winfrey and welcome to the very first National Oprah Winfrey show, and just like that Oprah appeared on the television screens in ten million households across America. Oprah soon was a household name nine, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty six, she became the first black woman to own a production company. One, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven. She finally got her college degree then that same year she won a daytime Emmy for outstanding talk. Show host highest award in her field. Despite her success Oprah, wonder about the direction. Her show was taking. She wanted her work to bring light to the world, so she started implementing a rule, her show would only highlight people who made the world a better place. Oprah brought on experts who gave advice about money relationships and personal health. She spoke to heroes and interviewed spiritual teachers. At first the show's ratings slipped, but in the long run her followers and her influence only grew. When Oprah started a book club. People ran to the local bookstore to buy what she recommended. When she started asking questions about the meaning of life, people export their own values. And when she wanted to talk about difficult topics, the world joined in. By nineteen, Ninety Eight, Oprah had won seven Emmy Awards for best talk show host then that year. She received an Emmy Award for lifetime achievement. Better yet. The award was handed to her by her. Journalists Role Model Barbara Walters. She and I remain the best of Friends Baltimore. Days never left us talking on the phone every single day. And although we lived apart, actually, we've never lived in the same city. We talked on the phone several times a day and saw each other often. And when hearst corporation launched, O the Oprah magazine into thousand. They hired me as editor at large. Our friendship has been better than a marriage. Oprah said something about this relationship feels other-worldly to me. And being supportive of that important friendship was one reason that Oprah was drawn to her partner Stedman Graham. Oprah in seven met in the late eighties, and they've been together for thirty four years. Over the years. We've all been there for each other. And when I was divorced, and with spending my first New Year's eve alone oprah instead Ms. surprise me by showing up at my front door to cook dinner and celebrate the New Year together. Now What's interesting about that is my doorstep was in Connecticut and they lived in Chicago in I'd been talking to Oprah that morning on the phone and she said. What are you doing, new? Year's Eve nothing just sitting here. For hours later, the doorbell rang. And I opened the door instead and oprah standing there with bags of groceries, pots and pans because I didn't even have pots and pans and we cook dinner. It was one of the best New Year's Eve. Ever? In two thousand, three Oprah became the first black female billionaire in the world, and Oprah grew in fame and fortune. She used her influence and privilege to take care of others she built libraries, started scholarships and founded schools. She encouraged her viewers to send in their spare change, and she used those donations to build houses and support underprivileged students. Though, her popularity show, no signs of stopping Oprah finally decided it was time to move on to other adventures. After twenty five years of hosting the Oprah Winfrey Show Oprah had fell more than four thousand five hundred episodes and interviewed around forty. Thousand People. And in two thousand eleven oprah film the shows last tearful episode. But that didn't mean. She slowed down instead. She turned her focus to running Oprah magazine and leading her own television channel called the Oprah Winfrey Network or own. She also continues to run her studio. HARPO productions. Through these and other projects Oprah uses her own life. Experiences envision to highlight important issues and amplify the voices of people whose stories have gone unheard. Or example when Oprah realized how many friends and family members she had struggled with mental illness, she devoted a whole issue of Zine to mental health. So many people living in shame hiding their struggles over wrote the only real shame on us for not being willing to speak openly. We need to start talking and we need to start talking now. Oprah's film and TV projects often focus on stories by and about women and people of Color. It is through the stories of other African American women that I felt my own sense of identity and came into my own power over said. So Oprah's movies and shows often feature black voices and tell stories at Oprah hopes will empower. In two thousand eighteen. The Smithsonian's National Museum of African. American history and culture in Washington DC, opened an exhibit about Oprah's life and career. When Oprah visited the exhibit, the thing that moved her most was a note scribbled in the guestbook. It read watching Oprah. Every day is the reason I love myself so fiercely. Through Oprah's courage to be herself, she inspires millions of people to be themselves to and to proclaim their own truce. She often says. What I know for sure, said speaking her truth is the most powerful tool. We all have. Hello? I'm from Nashville Tennessee. Today's episode was hosted by award winning journalist Gayle King. Gail is co host of CBS. And didn't accomplish television journalists delivering original reporting to all CBS, news broadcasts and platforms. She is also editor at large of the award winning. O, the Oprah, magazine. This podcast is a production of rebel girls and boom integrated a division of John Marshall Media. It's based on the book series. Good night's stories forever, girls. visit www dot, rebel girls dot com and use the Promo Code rebel. COD CAST to get fifteen percent off. Are Executive Producers Are L. Enough and Danny on. This season list produced by John Marshall Cherry, Sarah Storm and Robin Lie, Karen Peterson is our production manager. This episode was written by Alexis Stratton and edited by Mighty View proof-read by Danielle over near original theme music was composed performed by of our jockey who is also sounded I'm this episode Matia Marchelli was the sound mixer until next time. Stay tuned and stay rebel.

Oprah Oprah Winfrey Oprah Oprah Winfrey Network oprah Oprah magazine Gayle King Vernon Nashville Mississippi Wisconsin Barbara Walters Chicago Tennessee New York City Baltimore Bernita editor Milwaukee
Deal or no deal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

27:09 min | 2 years ago

Deal or no deal

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by McDermott will and emory helping clients transform healthcare and life sciences with partnerships joint ventures and emanate deals more information at M. W. E. DOT com slash transform healthcare and the Michigan Economic Development Inc John Romanelli founder and C._E._o.. Of airspace experienced technology says in Michigan Revolution is in the air. I know what planet is doing to help. Businesses make that possible at Planet Emma Dot Com. That's P. L. A. N. E. T. M. dot com. Raise your hand. If you think the national debt is something you know we ought to be paying attention to at least you congress not so fast from American public media. This is marketplace in Los Angeles. I'm Rozelle his Tuesday today twenty three July always to have your long everybody. We have as you've heard by now. I'm sure a budget deal. The debt limit gets raised until after the election of course government spending goes up the next to fiscal years then yes there is some degree of political maneuvering to come before all is said and done on this thing but here is the bottom line if you will the four letter word that debt used to be the halls of Congress isn't anymore and as marketplace's Kimberly Adams reports there is not a whole lot of upset about it to those trying to rain in in government spending this budget deal is kind of a disaster relatively little of the new money is offset by cuts in other areas and it cancels out budget caps that were supposed to hold federal spending and check the fiscal hawks have flown away and there's not even any semblance of fiscal responsibility left in Washington remain Abacha's with the Heritage Foundation. She says the budget caps put in place during the Obama years put pressure on lawmakers to keep spending down by offsetting getting some increases with cuts elsewhere but since president trump came into office there has been very little attempt made at actually paying for these budget deals now. It's a given Congress will keep raising the debt limit to accommodate higher spending bill gail at the Brookings Institution says this deal was never going to fix the debt but it seems to me this is just not the right venue to be going after the longterm fiscal problem gail points out the budget only covers a small portion of government spending which doesn't include big ticket items like social security or interest on the debt Seth Hamlin at the Center for American progress argues budget cuts are only one side of the equation I would argue that the biggest cause of the deficits that we have now and the biggest driver of the deficits over the long term is just the inadequate amounts of revenue that we raise Hanlin points to the revenue loss from the G._O._p.. Tax cuts with seemingly few consequences sequences for unlimited spending and election coming up. It's pretty easy for Congress to just keep writing checks in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace so if as Kimberly reported and as the evidence suggests it's more debt doesn't bother congress too much. Should it seems logical question to ask marketplace's refinish or has that one. There's only so much extra money saved up in the world we all by route from the same Kula savings for our home alone business loan in car loans. Brian Riedel is with the Manhattan Institute but if the Government has to borrow twenty thirty forty trillion dollars in order to finance debt then there's less money for everyone else to borrow the government has to lure that money away from the private sector by raising the interest rates that pays which can push up interest rates for everybody else and dragged down economic growth Kent's matters directs the Pen Wharton Budget Model. We we projected by mid century G._D._p.. Will be about sixty seven percent smaller otherwise would have been also the interest on that debt it adds up next year will spend more an interest payment than we do on children by twenty twenty six. We'll spend worn interest payment than we do on all of national defense. My McGinnis is president of the Committee for Responsible Federal Budget. She says there may be a time in the future like during a recession when the government needs to go into more debt to stimulate the economy borrowing so much now what makes that harder it will be more difficult to borrow but at all so even means a politician maybe less willing to borrow when we should be a lot of the consequences of high debt are hidden right now. Interest rates are low. The economy is pretty good those things it will eventually change and when they do McGinnis says we could see the real cost of debt in New York. I'm Sabrina sure for Marketplace Wall Street on this Tuesday in late. Ish July optimistic might be the word on news that a U._S.. Delegation is going to Shanghai next week for trade talks who knows might be another word. We'll have the details when we do. The numbers and British pound slipped live just a bit against the dollar today on the possibility or the likelihood the increased odds. Perhaps that Brexit is going to happen without a deal. That's what incoming Prime Minister Boris Johnson has promised if need be Joe's announced as the new head of the ruling Conservative Party this morning facing an end of October Britain in or out of the E._U.. Deadline we took a trip over the London at the last deadline and of March to see what Brits and British Business People Thought of the whole thing. Here's some of that tape so if I see bricks at the you yeah he see my face. It's finished I've got my answer is something it's on my mind. Every day. It is quite a stressful situation glossy and I've been here twenty years kind of a little bit field zoned from the country spent most of my time working and building business. I believe in world trade. I don't believe that we should be stuck with just the E._U.. Five words or less how do you feel about brexit. It's A. The US we'll give you six. That was four months ago a Cabbie there through the speaker thing if you couldn't figure that out that last bit tape today marketplace's Stephen Beard went to the English Midland's for an update on the politics of the British economy. The boss of this small successful engineering company in the English Midland's Steve Hardiman supports brexit wants to be free of what he calls excessive E._U.. Regulation I feel very very happy authorises one after three years of dithering by Theresa May he says the new prime minister will deliver brexit all think Boris has the Chutzpah to do it and it will happen it will be done aw he thinks Johnson will break Britain's parliamentary deadlock by calling a snap election which with his charisma he'll win but I suggested to Harlan Johnson is not universally admired in fact some people have all the low opinion opinion of him lemon. Becoming the Prime Minister of this country is this bumbling Juki chaotic figure at untrustworthy to people are saying Britain's gone mad but he's a fighter and he's got good people around him and he will find a way through he'll eventually secure a good free trade agreement with the block says Hardiman because unlike Theresa May he's prepared to leave without a deal. You've got to be willing to walk away and that's exactly what I think. Policy saying but Hardiman doesn't do a lot of business with the E._U.. Many companies that do rather alarmed by the rise of Boris Johnson making noises about accepting a no deal brexit which would be damaging from our business and philosophers that Starin- price he and his wife run a small clothing company some fifty miles to the north of Harman's factory they get some of their fabrics from continental the NFL Europe and export finished products to the E._U.. That up to now has been a simple process with no tariffs and no complication over customs and you know we're very concerned. The small business about the implications of of that act situation changing and since the new prime minister wants dismissed the concerns of business about brexit with an exploitive price just doesn't trust him. Somebody who infamously said during a referendum debate F- business I we're not doesn't give us as a business much confidence in him really but the owner of this small manufacturing firm in the center of Birmingham Jewels Morgan says Johnson has been misunderstood. What's what's he really meant was F- big business? It was those businesses that were trying to derail the brexit process so you don't feel he was insulting you personally as a small medium-sized business man no no because I think he understands small and medium-sized science business Morgan makes pumps and other highly engineered equipment for boats. He says businesses like his with an annual turnover of less than six million dollars are the real engines of British innovation growth and prosperity prosperity. He says these companies will adapt swiftly to Brexit and benefit most from it but that's not why he voted to leave the E._U.. Brexit was more than just the trade. Why did you support Brexit exit? Democracy about controlling our own laws democracy proper direct democracy as Prime Minister Johnson will encounter some daunting democratic obstacles parliamentary majority you too while up to thirty of his own lawmakers oppose him in London. I'm Steven Beard for marketplace. Go back and forth around here on the whole has the economy thing consumers seem pretty happy businesses less so so we decided to call one of our regulars who lives and works at the intersection of people and businesses Atlanta Turco is the manager of the Beauty Plaza Mall in butte Montana Hi. How's everything on your end well? I'm fine but you know I'm here every day. The receiver got you on the phone because we want to know what's going on in the Plaza Mall. Oh my goodness things are better things are better things are buying. Yes wow tell me more well the Call Center F._C.. Our is our newest business. They're calling technical and Customer Support Center. It's just a great atmosphere. I mean they've got over one hundred employees on site. They have moved into their location. They were out here in some of our temporary spaces while they're space was being refreshed. I miss him. You Miss Your your the folks in the department store right who used Oh my goodness yeah I understand but I missed the call center people being out here in these temporary spaces it was lively and yeah now they're in their their location which is a little bit rebuked removed from me. We still make time to visit has that let me ask you a foot traffic question. I mean do you think the call center and the other businesses that you're hoping to get in to that mall are going to do anything for foot traffic which is of course the lifeblood of the retailers tomb you rent space. Yes well employees. Actually they go out and visit the other businesses. People are not just to shop there to eat to socialize to <hes> go to a movie but <hes> you make friends here and you build routines. We've got our my walkers that walk every day I yeah I know we've talked about them. Tell me what happens. When you walk through the mall? Do you see what do you see. Are there like empty storefronts in for rent signs or is it. Is it reasonably almond. What is it like the plaza malls? You take like a lap around which I'm sure you do all the time I just came in from from being outside and inside. There's a glaring reality. We do have vacancies but <hes> let's calm. Opportunities hopefully hopefully at at some point people are going to see the potential and now having the call center in their own environment. We can show people that this out of the box thinking brings more opportunities than just retail. Opportunities have you been in malls and retail your whole life your whole career. Yes pretty much so yes thirty years over thirty years <hes> this is if I remember our previous calls correctly. This is going to be the first back to school season without a department store in the Buke laws him all all right. Yes yeah we're already feeling it was going to say tell me about that. Actually right now Kyw we do not have families shoes or a lot of clothing options but we've got a lot of boutique stores popping up so this you know the the change in retail may bring opportunity for a little entrepreneur who has always thought to open up petite. Maybe now's the time to fill that need D- at the Mall N._p._R.. Montana thank you so much appreciate your time. We'll talk to you. They have twenty newspapers and literally hundreds of magazines around the world also a ratings agency and a medical data company the C._E._o.. Of hearst straight ahead but first let's do the numbers Dow industrials picked up six tenths percent today. One hundred seventy seven points out works how to twenty seven thousand three forty nine Nasdaq added six tenths percent forty seven points eighty two fifty one the S&P five hundred game just about seven tenths percent twenty points three thousand five there coke in a smile on Wall Street's Dafter Physi- earnings report from Coca Cola this morning the company reported higher demand in higher revenue and projected even higher revenue to calm shares and coke bubbled up six percent the trump administration's proposed new rules for snap. That's better known as food stamps that could end eligibility for roughly three million people people that that a number on a couple of discount retailer dollar tree ended the session down one point nine percent dollar general off nearly six tenths percent rough day for the billboard company Clear Channel Outdoor Holdings as well slid more than twelve percent after announcing plans issue one hundred million dollar one hundred million rather additional shares bonds down the yield on the tenure Tino rose two point zero eight percent. You're listening to marketplace. That's marketplace. PODCAST is brought to you by Kronos. Cronos knows that hiring and retaining a modern workforce of salaried hourly full and part-time workers can be challenging especially in today's competitive job market. That's why Kronos puts H._R.. Payroll talent and time in one place so H._R.. Professionals supporting a blended workforce have all the tools they need to engage and motivate motivate people every step of the way learn more at Kronos dot com slash H._r.. Swagger cronos workforce innovation that works and by keeps the easiest and most affordable way to keep the hair you have keeps offers generic versions of the only to F._D._A.. Approved hair loss products out there some of you have probably tried them before but now thanks to keeps they're finally inexpensive and easy to get starting at just ten dollars per month. You'll never have to worry about hair. Loss again and getting started with keeps is so easy sign up takes him five minutes. Just answer a few questions and snap some photos of your hair then a licensed physician will review your information online recommend the right treatment for you and have it shipped right to your door. Every three months to receive of your first month of treatment for Free GonNA keeps dot com slash marketplace. That's K. E. E. P. S. dot com slash marketplace. That's a free month of treatment at keeps dot com slash marketplace keeps hair today hair tomorrow this this is marketplace. I'm Kai Rozelle. Housing is where we go next and street to the bottom line too because we get housing numbers all the time right usually of these sales variety new or used home sales were up or down by such and such percent last month today though the number that arguably really matters from the National Association of Realtors this line item the median price nationwide of an existing home in this economy hit its highest level ever in June two hundred eighty five thousand seven hundred dollars and it's up a bit more than four percent from June a year ago marketplace's Mitchell Hartman explains what's going on home. Prices have been shooting up for the past several years much faster than the inflation rate and that's led to an affordability crunch especially in coastal cities cities and hot urban markets U._S._C. Public Policy Professor Jerry Painter says after the housing crash a decade ago builders stopped building the population has grown faster than the building and simple supply and demand predicts predicts prices would go up faster than people's incomes. If that's the case look at Nevada's major cities for example young people keep flocking to Vegas and Reno for jobs in hotels ECOMMERCE and high end manufacturing which drives up demand but says Brian Bonifant at the University of Nevada was a lot of constraints on the builder to build inventory expensive land really hard getting construction labor force you know the banks are still squeamish on overbuilding residential home home. Prices aren't going up as fast as they were a year ago. Meanwhile wages have been rising and mortgage rates falling says Joel Con at the Mortgage Bankers Association that working to help you affordability challenges in many parts of the country okay now keep in mind that median home price means half of houses are more expensive and half are less expensive all over the country but prices vary allot according to Adam data solutions. The median home price in Cleveland is one hundred forty five thousand dollars. It's five hundred seventy five thousand in San Diego. I'm Mitchell Hartman for marketplace well. Let's see this next. Piece is firmly in the apparently strange corporate bedfellows department you take Fitch the bond ratings agency could housekeeping and cosmopolitan magazines newspapers the San Francisco Chronicle among them a health data company and television stations and you end up with a hearst corporation founded eighteen eighty seven buy yes William Randolph hearst now one of the biggest media companies in the world. Stephen Schwartz is the president and C._E._O.. Of Hers Welcome to the Program Thank. Thank you. I don't know that you probably go many dinner parties where people don't know who you are but if you're out about and somebody says Steven Nice to meet you how are you what do you say well. I usually don't feel the need to define fine hearst as a company but interestingly enough as the conversation would go on. I think for most people <hes> we are thought of as predominantly a newspaper magazine company which is fine because we I love those businesses but I think after a while the fact that we're in a lot of other things comes out and actually tends to take people by surprise so tick him off former the other things just company because I'll be honest with you. I was a little surprised we're predominantly television company. We we own twenty percent of E._S._P._N.. Are Fabulous partners at the Walt Disney on the rest <hes> we in Disney co own the networks largely the channel the history channel and the lifetime. If time channel that's a fifty fifty partnership with Disney and then we own thirty three local televisions <hes> stations across the country in Boston Sacramento Orlando Florida and roughly half of those are A._B._C. so that's also woah strong at Disney partnership now often do talk to buy buy. That's this is a sideways question. I find it's easier to email me very busy and I must say you get an email back from Bob. <hes> with lightning speed <hes> television Asian yes but also <hes> newspapers magazines right yeah. Well you know the original business going back to eighteen eighty seven was the San Francisco Examiner we we ended up owning the chronicle over time there and so yeah we have twenty newspapers and and literally hundreds of magazines around the world and some of the Great <hes> Brands Cosmopolitan Harper's bazaar good housekeeping so you're a guy who gets vote in the media that American end and worldwide consumers have at their disposal. How are you thinking about that environment the day when it is fractured there are various segments of audience that want different things as you sit at the top of this tower? What's your approach well? The the I think the business model has certainly become more difficult <hes> it's better for consumer. I mean this is an absolutely phenomenal time to be a consumer of of media of of any kind. I think the business models harder harder and there's a premium on uniqueness. I think unique content whether it's television content or newspaper Journalism or magazine Journalism unique content can still can still cut through. I don't want to go down the newspaper rabbit hole but near times in the Washington Post of the easy winners this Houston Chronicle is a sizable newspaper and sizable city. There is a gap though in local journalism in this country and what's being covered literally at the town level well. I do think a number of newspaper companies unease regrettably back in the day made too many acquisitions got caught in a debt situation so there are publications struggling and the fact is advertisers want more digital solutions. It's an and less than so there is a need for newspapers across the spectrum from really small to medium size to <hes> to advance digitally and some have done it and some are a little behind in that talk talk me for a second about running this company <hes> you're doing well businesswise and bottom line. You're making lots of acquisitions. How do you go about now? Growing an increasing the footprint of the Hers Corporation I said before that were predominantly television Asian company today but increasingly the acquisitions that were making our business information or medical information or financial information and the services were providing are increasingly software services explained that to a layperson right business date information and well <hes> <hes> the biggest business that we own in that field is the Fitch Bond rating business that <hes> that competes around the world with Moody's and S._N._p.. To a pine on the safety of of bonds that are issued around the world and is is a vital part of the capital markets process and then we own a software business called home care home base which is the <hes> leading operating system for the homecare and hospice industry so from a starting trade publishing back fifty a years or so ago a few of those businesses got into gathering data about their industry and now we have a thriving set of businesses that will generate this year about forty percent of the company's total prophets and also so in that diversification protect you from the ups and downs well we think so because <hes> you know these businesses are growing it. Largely double digit rates. There is a tremendous market for really unique data sets or really a unique software sets that are helping businesses grow. Let me try one less thing and we'll <hes> we'll see how do I do this every now and then with C._e._O.'s some of them get it honestly in some of them. Don't <hes> what is your job in five words or less. Take create an environment for talented people to sixty nine but I'll get sports. Thanks a lot for your time. Thank you very much guy part of anything by the way that five words are less thing the rest of my interview Steve Source I can be had on our corner off his podcast. We talked about newspaper profitability at his start in newspaper and actually can find it at marketplace. That'll this one on the way out today in which the other shoe if not actually dropping at least gets ready to drop on the tech industry word came late this afternoon that the Justice Department is going to launch an antitrust investigation. Here's the money quote whether and how market leading online platforms platforms have achieved market power and engaging in practices that have reduced competition stifled innovation or otherwise harmed consumers so there you go all right. That's all we got down. Dust shows up six tenths percent today about one hundred seventy seven points the Nasdaq back also six tenths percent to the good forty seven points s and p five hundred gained about seven tenths percent twenty points or digital and on-demand team includes carry barber Steve Beyond Doing Griffith Etiquette Houston Been Heff coat and Sarah Menendez Serramonte is the executive director.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson Brexit president Kimberly Adams Steve Hardiman Plaza Mall Congress Prime Minister prime minister Planet Emma Dot Com Montana Government Los Angeles Mitchell Hartman Obama Britain Brexit gail
Patty Hearst Pt. 2: Girl on the Run

Hostage

50:15 min | 3 years ago

Patty Hearst Pt. 2: Girl on the Run

"This episode features, discussion of kidnapping, rape and violence, that some people may find offensive. Listener discretion is advised, especially for children under thirteen. Her captors seem nicer every day. They don't kill her. It's been fifty days. Fifty times Patricia was spared. We'll spare is an overstatement considering she's locked in a closet or old life feels like a daydream playing with her sisters at Hearst castle studying art history in Europe, family vacations to the remote. Fairy tale cottage in wind tune her favorite place in the world. But now family and the FBI have abandoned her from the limited TV news. Her captors let her listen to. It appears Patricia parents have given up. She's down eighty seven pounds. She sleeps more every day. It would be so easy to die. But Patricia Campbell, Hearst is a fighter. She won't let the symbionese Liberation Army destroy her. The closet door opens it sin. The leader. He has a proposal, quote, the war council has decided that you can join us if you want, or you can be released and go home. Again in quote, Patricia knows what this really means join or die. It's a test and she has to give him an answer. This is hostage. The new park cast podcast, telling the stories behind the most captivating hostage situations and the people inside them. We'll also cover the psychological tactics used in hostage negotiations and what the human brain does. When held captive. I'm Irma Blanco, nine. I'm Carter ROY. You can listen to all of par cast podcast on your favorite podcast directory. New episodes come out every Thursday. We're also on Facebook and Instagram at par, cast in Twitter at par cast network. This is our second episode on the kidnapping of Patricia Campbell. Hearst, the symbionese Liberation Army and FBI operation her nap on February fourth nineteen, seventy four. The symbionese Liberation Army more s. l. a. kidnapped Patricia Hearst from her Berkeley apartment last week, we've covered the events surrounding the kidnapping. This. Week in part two will track the first seven weeks Patricia spent as a hostage. We'll dive into the psychological change, Patricia underwent as a captive and analyze how the hearse and the FBI attempted to negotiate for Patricia freedom through the historic people in need program after two months as a hostage, Patricia. Join the group that kidnapped her and went on the run. On the next episode, we'll examine how she was held hostage, not by force, but by fear alongside the SLA Patricia robbed banks built bombs and shot at innocence. She was a rebel and a terrorist, but did she have a choice. After Patricia Hearst, kidnapping on February fourth, nineteen, seventy four. The police were alerted almost immediately. They didn't try to track the cars, but instead focused on making sure the men who'd been attacked, Patricia, fiance, Stephen weed and her neighbors. Steve Suenaga were okay. The authorities learned everything they could from witnesses and notified. The Hearst family, the put a person Bargo on the situation which seems impossible now, but was common and breaking crime stories in the nineteen seventies the police wanted to get ahead of it. Randy Hearst told the reporters at the family paper. The examiner quote don't do anything that could get Patty hurt since kidnapping is a federal crime. The FBI special agent in charge of San Francisco. Charley Bates visited the Hearst mansion in Hillsborough, California on February fifth. He brought agent Monty hall who he put in charge of the case. The authorities realized the SLA committed the crime after finding their signature cyanide bullets at the scene and deduced that Patricia had probably been taken hostage. So she could be traded for the SLA members in prison. Joe Ramiro and Russ little hall arrange to have an agent at the Hearst home. At all times in case the SLA tried to contact them. They named the operation her nap and began interviewing people who knew Patricia, they learned everything about her own. Fortunately, it was hard to learn anything about the SLA. The people who had information young members of the counterculture wouldn't give the FBI the time of day compounding that the bureau's abuse of power under j Edgar Hoover had recently come to light and the FBI was unpopular with the general public. So even those who weren't. Pathetic to the SLA didn't help all of this hindered the investigation and left the FBI in the dark. They had no leads on the SLA's location. No idea where Patricia Hearst might be all they could do now was wait for a ransom. Note, waiting around sounds counter intuitive but veteran hostage negotiator. Gary Ness, ner has stressed that negotiations go smoothest when negotiators weight and talk instead of reacting and retaliating letting time elapse is often the best way to save lives for three days the Hearst's and the FBI waited. On Patricia first day locked in a closet. A member of the SLA put a portable radio in there with her and turned up the volume. So she wouldn't over here their conversations, blindfolded, all Patricia could sense. Was loud noise and a rotten smell. She soon realized the smell was coming from the old mattress. They'd given her to sleep on. She tried to stop herself from crying, but every time she calmed down, someone would yank open the door to check on her. Then they'd close it and leave her alone. Again, after some time the door opened and it stayed open Donald. The freeze introduced himself as the general field marshal sin of the symbionese Liberation Army, he informed her. She'd been arrested by one of many SLA field units and asked if she knew what the SLA was. Patricia realized they were the people responsible for Marcus Foster's murder. She'd seen it in the news, worried for her life, Patricia quickly decided to play dumb. It'd be safer if she said anything. She might anger them and she did not want to anger her captors. Unfortunately, to freeze was obsessed with gaining notoriety. So hearing that someone hadn't heard of him set him off on an angry rant where he proudly explained that the SLA had murdered Marcus foster with cyanide bullets and that they'd kidnapped Patricia as an act of war to freeze told Patricia, he'd releaser after negotiation with her family and made it clear that her fate was tied to that of Joe Romero and Russ little. If they died, she die. Patricia described a freeze has angry during this time angry that she didn't know who he was an angry that no news outlet was covering the kidnapping. As we mentioned last week to freeze was the terrorist groups opportunist, according to former FBI hostage negotiator Thomas trends, the opportunist is an ambitious felon with strong NAR. Cystic traits, they use the terrorist group to fulfil their personal agenda and gain power. That's what we see into freeze venting. His frustration. He went off on Patricia bragging about the SLA's worldwide influence in their armies. Both of which were non-existent to freeze was posturing trying to make himself sound important after a while. Patricia worked up the courage to ask when she would go home, oh, you want to get home for your birthday. He grinned at her. He knew her birthday was in two weeks. What else could do freeze know about her psychologist? Robert Lifton who examined Patricia and testified at her trial noted quote, they not only controlled all communication going in and out and especially during the first few months, but also gave her the sense that they were initially and they. Knew everything all the details about her family, their holdings about her past life, and she began to get the sense that they knew she said to me, I confessed to anything because they seem to know everything about me anyhow and quote. Defrays use the knowledge. The SLA had dug up about Patricia as power. He gave her the impression that he'd know if she was lying and punisher. If she did, he proceeded to interrogate Patricia asking questions about her family and their assets, but she had no idea how much money her relatives made if they held stocks or even what they did at work every day when she couldn't answer defrays, verbally abused her. He accused her of withholding information. He claimed Randy Hearst and the Hearst family were enemies of the people and that the police and anyone on their side where boo, doi- pigs. He said Patricia was one of these enemy pigs herself insisting anyone outside the group is the enemy is a common tactic. Dangerous personalities used to control people according to former FBI profiler, Joe Navarro, the pa-. Police, the FBI the Hearst's. Those were the real enemies. If Patricia was on their side, she too was despicable and deserved punishment. No, this is nonsense, but the SLA believed it and quickly began drilling the if you aren't with us, you're against us mentality into Patricia 's head through this first day, Patricia refused to eat worried about what poisons her food might be spiked with. But the SLA explained they didn't actually want to kill her. Only the FBI would do that SLA member. Angela Atwood finally convinced Patricia to drink water by sipping at herself first, where the freeze was all about revolution and violence, Atwood Blanchard on about her boyfriend arrested SLA member, Joe Ramiro, and what a hero he was. She was the girl in love friendly and a little silly at gave the SLA a huge. Human face, laying the groundwork for Stockholm syndrome. On Tuesday, February fifth, nineteen, seventy four, not quite twenty four hours after kidnapping, Patricia. The SLA sin to communicate a k. p. f. a. a local radio station. The communique included a letter to be read on air in prove the SLA really had Patricia in the form of her credit card. Notably defrays only sent this communicate because he felt the story wasn't getting attention. He had no idea about the press embargo and the lack of news coverage angered him. However, the mailing wasn't received and opened until February. Seventh as a result, the Hearst family waited for nearly three days with no word from Patricia kidnappers. During this time, the Hearst's were desperate and devastated. Patricia father, Randy Hearst, hired three secretaries to answer the phones around the clock. He. Consulted psychics Swami's whoever claim they could help. Randy believe that anyone could be an SLA informant or messenger in disguise. So he opened his door for who ever knocked when the SLA's message was read over the radio. Randy was at the ready. He do whatever it took to rescue Patty. The message didn't tell him how to get his daughter back. There was no attempt at negotiations yet the message was filled with information. The FBI already knew the SLA had Patricia, and we're keeping her alive. The letter assured her safety so long as no one attempted to rescue her from s. l. a.'s headquarters and all communications by the SLA were published in the newspaper in full. It ended like every communique from the SLA refers insect that pays upon the life of the people. The s. l. a.'s goal. Was apparent. They weren't holding Patricia hostage for money. They were holding her hostage for a platform. Then Randy Hearst gave them that platform. He had the full communicate published in the examiner off the Hearst q.. Every newspaper in America did the same. The SLA is message was everywhere. Defrays had what he wanted. Now, all Randy Hearst's could do was returned to hoping Patti was still alive. Next, we'll continue tracking the negotiations between the Hearst's and the SLA. Now back to the story. After the February, seventh nineteen seventy four publication of the SLA communicate. The next few days were quiet to the outside world, but they were loud to Patricia Hearst, still blindfolded and locked in the closet. Patricia could hear her captors running military style drills at all hours of the day and night. They kept the radio running so she wouldn't overhear conversations turning it off when they wanted to talk to her or rather indoctrinate her. Donald to freeze and his followers. Willie Wolfe, spent hours sitting outside the closet reading, leftist literature to Patricia if they didn't feel like reading from the likes of marks or Mao, they'd rant through this Patricia learned of their grand plans to use terrorism to spur violent anti-capitalist revolution. She paid close attention not because she had any interest in politics, but to learn how her captors thought and use that information to stay out of trouble. Of course, the SLA was onto this and tried to keep both Patricia 's contact with the SLA and any way for her to identify them to a minimum. At the beginning to freeze decided that only he Angela Atwood, Nancy, Ling Perry and Willie Wolfe were allowed to interact with Patricia Ling. Perry was charged with keeping Atwood from talking too much and wolf was chosen because his upper class background was closest to Patricia who's so Patricia was trapped tied up unable to see anything and only allowed to talk to certain people about certain subjects. This set up an environment for what Dr Margaret Thaler singer who later analyzed, Patricia called coercive persuasion. That's a more technical term for brainwashing. Dr singer listed six conditions that create an atmosphere for coercive. Persuasion. Number one, keep the person unaware that there is an agenda to control or change the person and their thoughts. Patricia believe these readings in rantings. Freeze in wolf bragging and entertaining themselves. Not an attempt to change your views on politics condition to control time and physical environment. A study published in the American journal of psychology found that sensory deprivation like being kept blindfolded in a dark closet increases suggest ability. That's certainly what happened here. The longer she went without seeing the more Patricia believed what the SLA told her condition. Three create a sense of powerlessness. Fear and dependency. Patricia was only given to small meals a day and was constantly monitored when she had to use the bathroom. She had to wait for them to lead her to it. And when they did SLA members watched Patricia later recalled that she had never felt so degraded and Volna Rable. She feared for her life. By February, eighth only four days into the kidnapping, the SLA fully achieved this sense of powerlessness in their captive, they realized she was too scared of their guns to try to run away. So they untidier even with her hands free Patricia, kept her blindfold on because the SLA told her to will point out the other conditions of coercive persuasion that Patricia was subjected to when we get to them in the story. The point here is the quote unquote. Brainwashing had started. From February eighth through twelfth, the SLA worked on their next communicate. They didn't think they could get there in prison members Ross little Jo Ramiro in a hostage exchange right off the bat. So they decided to ask for a gesture of good faith. If it worked, then they'd negotiate to trade Patricia. As long as the symbionese Liberation Army had Patricia, they had America's attention and they were going to take advantage of that. Bill Hare is one of the many actors in the group who fancied himself more of a Robin Hood than a check of our came up with a gesture of good faith. It was a food giveaway, seventy dollars worth of food for any person on any form of welfare in California, the others agreed to it and determine that instead of a written message, they'd send a tape recording and they'd put Patricia on the recording to assure. It was played on every TV and radio station. Two free recorded a twenty minute diatribe about the SLA's intentions and demands. Here's a clip and picking personally for myself and has a father of two children. I wish to say to Mr. and MRs hers that I as well as the forces under my command through the polity of the core, the people I'm not avid killers and madmen. And we do hold a high moral value to life. We value life very deeply and with all the spirit that we as human beings can bring forth in our hearts. But speaking of the father, I am quite willing to lose both of my children. If by that action, I could save thousands of white black, yellow and rich Sheldon from a life of suffering expert patient and murder. And I am therefore quite willing to carry up execution of your daughter to save the life of stopping men, women and children of every race. In addition to threatening Patricia 's life. He assured that the symbionese Liberation Army was willing to die for their cause. The tape of difference in Patricia a copy of the SLA constitution as sixteen point overview of the SLA's goals and written instructions for the food giveaway where anonymously delivered to the KPFA radio station. When they told her about the good faith, gesture food giveaway Patricia pointed out that it might not go very well. She thought people might not want to take charity or might not accept the food because it was the result of extortion when she voiced this MS moon, salty sick, who was newly allowed to talk to Patricia yelled at her later that night to freeze came into the closet and sexually abused, Patricia. This was the first time he touched her and he made it clear that this was punishment for. Disrespecting her SLA sister, Patricia, learn quickly that if she said anything the SLA didn't like to freeze would hurt her. This exemplified condition number four of Dr. Singers list suppress old behavior and attitudes. When she expressed an opinion, they didn't like they punished her. On February twelfth. This tape recorded message from the SLA went public with Patricia Hearst's voice loud and clear quote, mom, dad, I'm okay. And quote when Randy Hearst hurt his daughter's voice on the tape, his heart, both left and sank. Yes, she was alive or at least had been alive on February eighth as proved by Patricia is reference to current events in Kuwait. However, the good faith. Gesture demanded was impossible. The deadline for the food giveaway was February nineteenth that gave them just one week to organize food for all California welfare recipients, approximately five million people at seventy dollars per person. The total projected cost came out to four hundred million dollars, and that's a nineteen seventy four dollars. Sure. The Hearst family had money. But Randy didn't have access to most of it. He and his siblings lived on allowances from the hearse trust which was managed by professionals. He'd have to figure out an alternate plan. Randy knew his daughter and the SLA were waiting on his response in the communique tape. Patricia said, quote, the SLA is very interested in seeing how you're taking this dad, and they want to make sure that you are are really serious and listening to what they are saying. And they think that you've been taking this thing a lot more seriously than the FBI. It's really up to you to make sure that these people don't jeopardize my life and quote note that while Patricia spoke the words in the communiques, she didn't write them to freeze and the others told her what to say and then made her put their messages in her own words, Patricia comment about her life being in jeopardy was really freezes, shielded warning. On February, thirteenth, nineteen, seventy four, Randy and Cathy. Hearst had a press conference in front of their mansion quote, Patty, I hope you're listening. He began by addressing his daughter directly, then moved on to a careful explanation. The type fathers often give to their children when the kids ask for something impossible like a pony for Christmas or four hundred million dollars worth of perishable food. He explained that he'd get back to the SLA in twenty four to forty eight hours with a counter offer and decried how difficult it was to communicate over delayed letters. He ended his statement by swearing that no one would come after the SLA with guns, which was an attempt to assure his daughter safety by addressing her directly, calling her Patti and asking to speak to her on the phone instead of by recorded messages. Randy did exactly what hostage negotiator. Thomas strengths wreck. Commends humanizing, the hostage, by talking about Patty as a person, not an asset. Randy could slowly influence the SLA to consider her in the same light strand states that this humanizing elicits a reverse form of Stockholm syndrome wherein the captors bond with their hostages and begin to like them if the captors, no, and like the hostages, they're much less likely to kill them via for to humanize Patricia worked shortly after Randy's first press conference. Patricia noted that the freeze walked into the closet and called her Patty instead of the demeaning nicknames he'd been using. Unfortunately, Patty was only used by her family and closest friends and hearing special nickname used by a hostile stranger tormented, Patricia. But it was still the beginning of the change in her relationship with her captors. A few hours after the initial conference. Randy still thinking only of his daughter's safety realized that his statement came off as haggling which was not the intent. He got back in front of the cameras and assured the world. He do everything in his power to set up the type of program. They're talking about despite not having four hundred million dollars or even a full week to set things up. Rooney Hirsch may not have had four hundred million dollars, but he did have upper-class connections. He looked for America's best food Bank and found a Seattle food Bank called neighbors in need within three days, Peggy maze. The woman who ran neighbors in need and a lead low Kramer. The Washington Secretary of state were sitting at the Hearst dining room table cooking up a few distribution plan. They called people in need that same day, February sixteenth, the SLA put out another commune. Okay, including another message spoken by Patricia quote, I about the good faith gesture. There was some misunderstanding about that. It was never intended that you feed the whole state. So whatever you come up with basically is okay and just do it as fast as you can and everything will be fine and quote, she went on repeating political propaganda which was obviously scripted by the freeze and link Perry, the tone of the recorded communiques is an odd mix of passionate, radical end board, rich girl. There are a lot of OEMs and awkward pauses. Amid the propaganda though the tiniest bit of Patricia frustration and spirit shown through when she berated her mom for wearing black on TV because it made it look like Patricia died. But Randy and Cathy, Hearst took the tape as a positive sign. They could make the good faith. Gesture donate food and. Save their daughter after terse calls with his bankers in the Hearst foundation, Randy was able to rustle up two million dollars which would be over ten million today. He personally contributed half a million and the Hearst foundation donated one point, five million to mitigate the fact that this was less than ten percent of what was asked. Randy retained. William Koblenz atop lawyer to represent Russ little Joe Ramiro. He announced this all to the press hiring a lawyer for little and Ramiro was the best move to assure Patricia safety. The SLA had made it clear that Patricia would only be harmed if little and Ramiro were harmed. Even though the SLA had asked for food to be distributed on February nineteenth. The first distribution of several was planned for February twenty-second Bjorg's ation led by Peggy maze and Ludlow Kramer set up shop in a warehouse decorated with pictures of Patricia people in need attempted to coordinate with groups. The SLA had listed as their contemporaries, including the Black Panthers who said, no, the United prisoners movement who said yes and the nation of Islam who sold them eggs. They found volunteers and Patricia Berkeley classmates. Even though ironically, none of them actually knew her. They rejected an offer of help from Jim Jones and the peoples temple who attempted to Griff the money. But they did find a volunteer bookkeeper in Sara Jane Moore who less than two years later tried to shoot president Ford. It was a diverse crowd, but the program was coming together. Patricia. Twentieth birthday passed on February twentieth nineteen, seventy four. She spent it in a closet. At this point she wished you'd been taken by normal kidnappers. Those who just wanted to trade her for money with no absurd demands. She'd reflect on happy times her early life and tried to stifle her cravings for pizza should never loved pizza. But on a diet of mung beans, rice and peppermint tea, Patricia, craved hearty meals. The peppermint tea was the worst smell made her sick. She lost count of the day. She spent in the closet sleeping more and more and still perpetually exhausted. She dropped down to under a hundred pounds even with her slim, five foot three figure. She was too skinny at this point. Patricia survived only because she was dedicated to doing just that she couldn't. Alike this. She wouldn't let herself they'd let her go soon. Right. Not quite on February twenty. First the day before the first people in need donation was set to run to freeze issued another communique. Tempted to mislead the people and to deceive them by claiming to put forth a good face jetty of two million dollars. Listen out is not at all a good faith gesture, but rather is active throwing few crumbs to the people forcing them to fight over it amongst themselves. He demeaned that the food be given to anyone who asked not just welfare recipients and that the program be funded with another four million dollars on top of the two million in place. If this demand wasn't answered, all communications regarding Patricia release would stop until little and Ramiro walked free. Oh, and the additional four million had to be donated within the next month. Defrays ended his prerecorded communicate with a powerful tirade, a speech. So full of slurs we won't repeat it here. There was still no word of an actual hostage trade. At this point, California governor Ronald Reagan had made it clear that Ramiro and little would not be traded. Pardon or released early. The Hurst's had no more. Money to offer the FBI had no real leads. One could Randy Hearst. Do. Up. Next, we'll hear Randy's response now back to the Hearst kidnapping. On February twenty-second nineteen four, Patricia. Hearst had been held hostage for eighteen days. Her captor said, made impossible demands the press camped out in front of the Hearst's mansion, nailing their phones to trees in the front yard, the f. b. i. remained publicly silent. Everyone was waiting on Randy Hearst. He stepped outside his house in front of the microphones, lights and cameras, and spoke to the symbionese Liberation Army who said, quote, the size of the latest demand is far beyond my financial capability. Therefore, the matter is out of my hands and quote, Randy stepped away from the podium and Charles Gould. A Representative of the Hearst foundation. A charity organization stepped in Gould said that the Hearst foundation would provide an additional four million in funding for people in need, if and. Only if Patricia was released. The group offered two million upon Patricia safe release and another two million. The following January Gould made a point to remind everyone that the Hearst foundation and Hearst corporation where not controlled by the Hearst family and then said that quote, no more funds will be committed by the foundation or corporation under any circumstance. End quote. Inside their headquarters, Daly city the SLA cruelly made Patricia Hearst, listen to the whole press conference to freeze, said quote, I told you your father didn't give a damn for your life. Now you can hear it for yourself and see. We've been telling the truth and quote they wanted her to feel abandoned and alone. The daughter of a father who wouldn't save her in Patricia mind. Her family had given up. This is another example of the fourth point in coercive, persuasion, repressing old attitudes. The SLA was determined to break the bond between Patricia and her family. If she thought they'd abandoned her, she'd be more likely to abandon them. At this point. Patricia said she could foresee no hope of rescue. It didn't help that the freeze decry the latest offer as a trick. He didn't trust the Hearst foundation to actually. Donate the second two million once Patricia has returned to freeze new all his power lay in having a hostage and the publicity around it. He wasn't going to give it up yet in psychological aspects of crisis. Negotiation strands writes quote, the most unique aspect of the extremist. Hostage-taker is his or her interest in favourable media coverage and quote, defrays believed that the SLA would get all the credit for people in need feeding thousands. After all each box of food bore the seven, headed Cobra logo. Each person who received free food was a new person who might think positively of the SLA's cause and those who saw it on the news might think the same. It's twisted since his way of getting people. The food was kidnapping, raping and terrorizing teenage girl, but that was his logic, Patricia described the. SLA as quote, absolutely publicity, crazy sin came to believe he was all powerful and his followers. All seven of them lived in the same fantasy world. They were following their leader to glory or to death and quote. Since it would be days before the SLA replied, Randy's only choice was to move forward with people in need as planned. He had to show them. He was committed to doing everything he could. He wasn't able to add more money to the giveaway, but he did make it clear that the food boxes would be available to anyone who showed up at a distribution location, regardless of their income people in need was unprecedented. No one had ever given away food on such a large scale and so quickly. However, the first distribution was a disaster at noon on February twenty second nineteen. Seventy. Four people in need was set to distribute boxes of food from nation of Islam, properties in east Oakland, East Palo Alto, San Francisco and Richmond, California outside your black Muslim bakery in Oakland about five thousand people lined up hours in advance. Delay trucks and immense. Crowds resulted in a riot with hundreds of pounds of food, wasted thousands of people left unfed and Twenty-one hospitalizations. All of it aired on national news distribution went much more smoothly in the other three locations, but the failure in Oakland and the ensuing, lawsuits jeopardize the entire plan. That night. The Hearst were sick with worry, had they lost their chance to get Patty back hoping there might be some way to salvage people in need. Randy Hearst called his lawyer, William Koblenz Copeland's did some thinking and called David FEC Heimer a PI who had been helping with security at the people in need warehouse Koblenz wanted a new security plan to prevent another riot. Fixmer suggested they enlist Delancey street Delancey street was an unconventional rehab program helping former prisoners gang members and addicts, turn their lives around. Randy Hearst met with the Delancey streets, founder. John Maher mar was committed to making a difference in the world and like the idea of people in need. He was more than happy to lend the services of three hundred Delancey street residents and thirty trucks. You just had. Two conditions Maher said, quote, we will not accept any payment and we will not accept any publicity and quote the next week, three hundred bald addicts and ex cons helped keep the peace during the people in need food distributions. They all went much more smoothly. Randy Hearst had given all that he could, but he didn't hear a word from the SLA February twenty-second through March third nineteen. Seventy four, saw a nine day gap in communications in Randy, her smile smiletrain the ball was in is court, but to freeze didn't have a plan beyond people in need. He remained silent to the public. He was busy talking to Patricia through their conversations. Patricia grew closer to her captors. She learned what they cared about acted like she agreed with their political statements and even made jokes at the expense of her. Fiancee, Stephen, we'd at would link Perry and wolf soon saw that Patricia was feisty and charming. They like that she was a rebel herself who had an illicit teacher student relationship gone to Berkeley against her parents wishes and indulged in marijuana. She was more like them than they thought. On March third one day before the one month anniversary of the kidnapping, Randy and Catherine. Hearst got on TV with a request for the SLA Randy asked, if Patricia could write to her parents referencing the Geneva Convention which allowed for that. He was flattering the SLA. They had mentioned the Geneva Convention multiple times in their communications and insisted they were obliged to follow it as if they were a country and not just eight. Well, armed twentysomethings ignoring her daughter's request, Catherine war, all black again. Well, Randy, Hearst was willing to bend to demands and flatter the hostage-takers Catherine remained resolute when he saw the news to freeze responded by amping up the SLA's military drills and reiterating the dangers of the FBI. He took Randy's latest overture to mean that the FBI was planning. Raid soon. And the SLA had to prepare for a showdown much like his rivalry with Marcus foster. This was all into freezes head. The FBI still had no clue where the SLA was. The freeze was so convinced they were in danger. He gave Patricia an unloaded gun so she could defend herself from the FBI pigs. This was the next step in coercive. Persuasion put forth a closed system of logic, the SLA convinced Patricia. The FBI would kill her if given the opportunity and if she didn't obey them, the SLA would kill her to. They didn't tell her the second part directly. But as she recalls in her memoir, she understood the threats. Amid the training, the SLA worked on a new communique, though this one with a different voice, Angela Atwood's on the tape which was released. March ninth at would reiterated how disappointed the SLA was with the Hearst empire. She criticized their deceit, corporate trickery media, censorship. And oddly Randy, Hearst's investments in Safeway at would continued. Motion, mind, intelligence, and analysis by sending these World Council. It became clear that the facets clinic state in its piece, domestic police agency, the FBI and other police state agencies and institutions intended to set up Patrice hers execution in order to discredit an isolate, the people's forces. This is shown by the liberal disregard for the health life and safety of Jensen for meal and little and the lands of police state agencies to see to it that the tree should host is killed communication between POW Patricia husband. Her family will come only after the immediate creation of the necessary mechanisms whereby restaurant rentals and Justice male can communicate via arrived national TV with the people. And the s. l. a. concerning the full scope of their physical health and all the conditions of their confinement. Of course, nothing would be done unless this tape was published in. Later in the tape, Patricia speaks with markedly increased confidence and clarity from her earlier communications. Her board disinterest is replaced with not passion, but a new firmness amid SLA demands and derision of the FBI. She berates her parents saying, quote, what you had to say, sounded like you don't care if I ever get out of here and quote over time. The tape show Patricia getting more comfortable spouting SLA propaganda. The group had been teaching her their values in forcing her to repeat them into a tape recorder for nearly a month. Now, this fulfil Dr Thaler singers, final condition for coercive, persuasion instill new behaviors and attitudes every day. They pulled her away from being a Hurst and pushed her towards being a member of the SLA. They pulled her into their ranks in a sick twisted way. Way as a policy, all members of the SLA were sleeping with each other, and it hit a point where they didn't see Patricia as different. Willie, Wolfe, and Donald defrays began raping Patricia. She was horrified, but she was worried that fighting back would result in her death. The solely members always insisted it was consensual that Patricia even initiated the encounters. They said, patrician wolf or even a couple. But obviously Patricia didn't have a choice. She was held captive. There was nowhere for her to go. She was raped agreed. But it's interesting to note that the SA members saw her more and more as a member of the group. Someone they could have a relationship with someone they could convert. On March, thirteenth, nineteen, seventy four, Catherine, Hearst accepted her reappointment as a regent of the university of California. The same region position, the SLA had repeatedly taken her to task for since she advocated for cracking down on student activists, the SA believed her work as a regent, exemplified the worst aspects of the ruling class. And everyone knew this in fact, governor Ronald Reagan offered to hold the position for Katherine until Patricia was safely returned to avoid a scandal. Catherine refused to wait, which appalled her husband, her daughter and the SLA Catherine saw this as a stand against the hoodlums who took her daughter, a show of strength into refusal to bow to their demands. Randy Hearst, head washed his hands of the situation. And now Catherine was ignoring it. Hearing this news, Patricia felt complete. Lately abandoned. There wasn't another press conference. There was no more money given to people in need. There were effectively no more negotiations according to Patricia count. Sin came into the claws at one night. Soon after this, he whispered to her as if he had a secret quote, it may be coming down to a decision about you pretty soon. I was thinking, maybe I could go to the war council and convinced them to let you join us that would be better than getting killed. You can join us and fight with us. And that would mean you can never go home or ever see your folks or your old friends or you can die and quote, he left Patricia to consider it. To freeze had a bigger immediate concern. He was even more convinced that an FBI raid on the Daly city house was imminent. It wasn't the FBI still had a disturbing lack of leads on the s. l. SLA's location. It's not clear how to freeze became so convinced they were endanger on March twenty first nineteen, seventy four. The s. l. a. stuffed Patricia in a garbage. Can they cut to air holes in the lead and tied up with ropes as she stepped in Seoul to sick reminded Patricia. She had a machine gun and Patricia made any noise. There'd be a lot more holes in the garbage can. They threw the garbage can in the back of a car and drove her to the new safe house at eighteen forty seven, Golden Gate avenue in San Francisco. Only a mile away from the local FBI headquarters. Patricia was locked in a new. Ause it. And for a few days, things went back to normal. She was trapped with no way out, but the freeze hadn't forgotten his new plan. The ultimate coup getting Hearst to join the SLA. He imagined it as an incredible way to bring attention to their cause and sway the public opinion in favor of the symbionese liberation armies ideals. He sat outside her closet and made her an offer quote, well, the war council has decided you can join us if you want to, or you can be released and go home again and quote, Patricia took this in, would these mad men really let her go, no chance. She was convinced that reality matched to freezes original offer, join or die. She hated the SLA what they done to her what they stood for. But in the words of strengths, quote, the victims need to survive is stronger than his need to hate the person who has created this dilemma. In quote, she answered, quote, I want to join you. I want to fight for the people and cloth. Next time on hostage. We will cover Patricia year on the run. What happens when a hostage robs a Bank shoots at people or kidnaps someone else? What does the FBI do when the Goshi ations breakdown? And how do you rescue a hostage? Who doesn't want to be found? You can listen to hostage and all of par casts other podcasts on apple podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, Google, play, cast box or your favorite podcast directory. We'll be back next week. In the meantime, don't take your freedom for granted. Hostage was created by max Cutler is a production of Cutler media and is part of the park cast network. It is produced by Maxon Ron Cutler sound designed by Ron Shapiro with production assistance by Paul, Muller additional production assistance by megi ad admire and car carlee Madden hostages written by megi ad mar and stars Irma Blanco. And Carter ROY.

Patricia Hearst Patricia symbionese Liberation Army Randy Hearst Hearst FBI kidnapping Hearst foundation Patricia Campbell Patricia quote Hearst castle Patty Donald defrays Patricia count Patricia Berkeley Patricia father Patricia frustration Hearst Patricia Ling California
Ep. 214 | DeepFake Fears & Abortion Debacles | Guest: Jason Howerton

The News & Why It Matters

42:32 min | 2 years ago

Ep. 214 | DeepFake Fears & Abortion Debacles | Guest: Jason Howerton

"Welcome to the news. And why it matters. I am Sara Gonzalez joined today by Mr. Glenn Beck himself. Are you going to say, I'm Glenn Beck or not have to you just said it, but I'm confused which ones. Okay. You are introduced you yet. Hold on Jason Howard zinn special gust part of a blaze TV crew, thanks for being. Hi. I don't have to work on. Watch him. He's going to be good at this and Andrew he from something's off with injure Hedin own. Hello. That was a little creepy. That was less called the bar. Wasn't it that was that was I. Now just want here so choice. The top three. I would say the most important story of possibly my lifetime is beginning to develop in that's abortion. But I know we're going to talk about that. Because somebody else has that I want to add to that the deep fakes Jason definitely abortion in how the left has taken me from being a moderate pro-life guy to basically pro-life activist. That's how far they're pushing me on this issue. All right, Andrew, I'm gonna talk about football, my favorite conversational topic, though doesn't have anything to do with the big game. It does the Super Bowl don't say that. You're not supposed to say that that's NFL license plate relate to call. It the big game. And that's the only thing about deny just bring down the blaze. Guys. I didn't lead the dads. Ridiculous hate that. You can't even comment on it. No Ulan comment on it. But you're not allowed to call that the SP you have to call it the big, wait a minute. Where did we lose the free speech thing with football? We was that like when he said that's a trademark. Okay. You are not allowed to call anything. That's why you'll see watch star watching commercials. You'll see them all say, hey, you're gonna be watching the big game. That's why I will add this to my tirane this this will be incorporated into my rant. Learn something new here every day at blaze TV before we get into today's stories wanna think our sponsor radio on. So I know this is kind of a delicate subject talking about it all the time all the time. A lot of Americans a lot of Americans have a lot of way to lose not naming any names. Oh, well, wait a minute. Wait. All of all of a sudden, this is just got very personal. Personal state fair and me I hear it hear it. I got it. Okay. Talking about. There is nothing worse than a reformed smoker reform fat person. Okay. Very hard to that. Former person with you. I'm right, I together show my picture police. There was a skinny guy inside. It'd be clogged to get out. You. Before and after right here. So that was me before the number ten. This is me after I've been there people to do. Joy. I wait. Like two hundred and fifteen pounds two hundred fifteen pounds. That is his a dream come true. Stone gotten way off track already. It's the beginning of the show. How ever let me tell you about radius own it works for me. It can work work for you. It helps me maintain. So I lost the weight. But I it's hard because you do the yo diets, and you go up and down and food taste good. Right. And we have a lot of bad food here in America, so radio taken all the good stuff in all popped into a capsule. So it helps your metabolism helps you feel full reduces your appetite. So you're not just craving all of the bad things Taco Bell. All that junk, go to radio dot com right now and save thirty percent off of three months supply using promo code the bolaise Dolor thirty nine a day. You can invest that much in your health. If you've got weight to lose our and eat dot com every time she says, yo yo diet, Tommy smothers skits, another ten cents. Nice. I thought she was referring supposed to say that. I just assumed it was like a yo-yo Ma thing. U2. together separate. The teacher right now. And I'm gonna need to separate yard. Okay. All right. I wanna get to Jason your topic. The all of the abortion laws what's going on their first? So Jason the Virginia law. I assume is is what you're talking about. Just so I know yes. And Vermont and was at Rhode Island or New Hampshire. There's another one. I think it's Rhode Island. There's there's four of them. It'll be a domino is the bottom line. The Virginia governor commented on this Bill, but as proposed right now, very similar to the one that's already passed in New York, and Vermont, and the others that you were talking about and he made those controversial comments that we have if you wanna play them. And then today believe one of the Democrats that was backing the Bill came out and was challenged and said, okay, wait a second. I'm I didn't actually read this Bill, and I don't actually support it anymore. And she is pro-life pro-choice. I want you to know. Because this is the thing online people are all saying that's not true. It's not in the Bill. I want you to watch the video if we play it, you watch the video he's reading it. He's reading from notes on what this Bill means. You see him the governor's looking down, and he's reading notes, so he's other either got the Bill or he's reading bullet points that we're prepared for him. And matter of fact, before we get into this discussion jas Jason I know you have a lot to say, let's go ahead. And play the governor talking about abortion Bill in Virginia right now talk about third trimester abortions. These are done with the consent of the mother with the consent of the physicians more than one physician, by the way. And it's done in cases where there may be severe deformities. There may be a fetus that's non bible. So in this, particular example, if a mothers in labor, I can tell you exactly what would happen. The infant would be delivered. The infant would be kept comfortable the infant would be resuscitate. If if that's what the mother and the family desired, and then a discussion would ensue between the physicians and the mothers. Evil part of that is that he's he says infant. They're not even pretending. Is referring to non info because it was like an infant without a brain. Or something that changed the? The decision viable there are children that are born that. And they the doctors know, they're only gonna live for a couple of minutes. Okay. Great keep the child comfortable keep put the child in the hands of the mother and comfort that child as it slips away with. No, no, they're saying, it's it's we keep it comfortable. And then we talk about what are we going to do you want to kill it? Not kill it up to you. You want to kill it not kill it. You don't kill it. It's no longer part of her body. The court has been cut that is an individual that has rights. Now, you don't talk to the mother any more about killing the child. It's borne it's a child and as an area as doctor. They have every responsibility to do everything. Even if they have a five percent chance to live if you do everything to keep that baby alive. So we're talking about babies who are born who may. Maybe they do have a defect or they have abnormalities required. It's not even even required to help. Yes. They can help with a full grown a full infant born. That's healthy. Keep it comfortable for a while. If you want to assure you wanna kill it. You sure you wanna kill it. I can't handle the mental stress of baby. I've just lost my job and my husband isn't around. I can't do it. They would say that extreme. And then what I would say in response would be. But that's what the word sailing words matter that could happen. So that that's the point. It's not that would be rare that it maybe maybe it never had. Differently. So that it wouldn't include that ROY. And if he didn't want wanna talk about rare, you know, it'd be rare a child that is born grossly deformed, and you had no idea that there's all kinds of tests that are running. You have no idea that that child is grossly deformed before him. So it's just the same. It's really the same. Yeah. That's an extreme way for that to happen. That's probably rarely rarely going to happen. And maybe it would rarely rarely happen that she has a full baby that she just everybody else would love and would love to have it as adopted and she decides to kill it. I don't care. How rare it is on either case, it's wrong rights murder? You know, where this is going this. It's very obvious. We're going the path of Iceland. They have they have cured down syndrome. Yes. Cured it right by the same way. Hitler tried to cure the Jews right by murdering them. So we're getting into this weird after they're born abnormality talk that he's really horrifying. And it feels like we're like like a hair away really from like losing touch with reality of how the sanctity of life. Really like, I feel like we're that close because if you can do that after a child is born because they're abnormal or they're not the way you think they should be defined act defined who gets to define that is that one they one doctor to define it had a problem of always had this doubt in my mind. My daughter was born with cerebral palsy, she had several strokes at birth. Okay. If there was a test that said, she's going to have strokes, and this winter life is going to be like, they told me she would never feed herself. She would never walk. She would never understand language. She would never talk Kate. She would be a vegetable. In a bed. That's what they told me after she was alive. And I always was so grateful that nobody said that to me when it when I'm eighteen years old. I haven't really formulated who I am if the doctor would have said that to me in the first trimester, I might have said, you know, what this trial is going to have zero life. We should abort this child. Well, you know, my child, you know, her she's fine here. She works here. How dare you? How dare you? So now, we're giving people these these the right? Even even if I was freaking out, but my daughter was born and having strokes, and they told me what they told me, then I still wouldn't have killed her then abortion in the first trimester. Maybe as an eighteen year old I might have been so scared and the doctor could have talked me into it. But no, doc. Would say, you know, what should we just make her comfortable and killer? No wonder you some sort of a monster. You couldn't do that who could do that. But a monster Andrew back a little bit. I on the spot. I'll push back a little bit. I clearly haven't follow this closely as you guys what I've looked at from what I can tell us the policy ramifications of this Bill, which won't happen. It had like two two cosponsors in the Senate didn't get out of committee. But my understanding is that infanticide is already against the law and Virginia. You can't you can't do partial birth abortions. Nor can you kill any infants post birth. That's not it's not up for discussion. It's not it's not part of the Bill either would seem to be distinctive about the Bill was it removed a requirement to get an ultrasound. If you're going to have an abortion, which is on the books in Virginia it made it. So that if you were going to have a third trimester abortion as of now, you can get a third trimester abortion in Virginia. That's already legal. What it did? Was it made it so that you didn't have to get three doctors to sign off on it? You had to get one doctor signing off on it. But I. I don't think it's really fundamentally changing the nature of abortion in Virginia. It seems to me to be in New York. Okay. It has definitely in New York. I mean when you can kill a baby. Third trimester as your dilating. And you're the doctor's like, okay push. No last chance he'll it would add a curiosity. Like, if there were a if there was a very high chance of the the woman dying in the scenario. Nope. You still because you can't you can't do partial birth abortion. So they what they have to do. Now is at that age. They have to inject poison into the child then you have to vaginal birth the child. Anyway. So you have to kill the child and then give birth to a child. Tell me how that works. If there's a problem you have to at that point. You just have to do a Syrian section. You take that baby out save the baby save the mother. It's too late. You're getting either a Serian or you're delivering vaginal at that time. You can't do anything else. So this mothers, the mothers, physical health is bullcrap. It's absolute bullcrap at that point. Okay. There's only there what they did is they added mental familial health. What the hell is familiar health? Well, my husband isn't around. And I just don't know my mental health. It's too much of a stress on me. I can't. So it's better for you. If we go in poison child, and then you have to push through birth and you'll see a dead body of a baby come out of you. Oh my gosh. That sounds healthy. And I think enter the show here is that the way that the way that the wording has been changed is that it's not in the event that might. There was. My bigger issues is where the conversation is heading. It's heading really scary direction. And I feel like with progressives away. They do this. They'll come out a little too far. They're not quite ready for as enlightened as we are yet on abortion and pull it back. And then it'll rear its head. Again. I don't think that the average democrat wants this. I really don't this is this is so far in western Washington's to be a pretty consistent thing. American electric. It's a baby at that point. If you're pretty portraits. Truly frightening to me is on the right and the left. Talk to Bill o'riley today. He watches ratings like a hawk. He said Glen every time anybody's doing anything on abortion, the ratings go down. Nobody wants to watch it on either side, this is beyond abortion, talk K this infanticide. And when this started happening in Germany, the German people stood up to Hitler, the people who voted for Hitler said. No, you can't do that. So he started doing it in secret. He went to went to the public and said, you are right. We're compassionate. We don't wanna do that keep killing them in the basement and the doctors and the nurses killed them in the t four project and no one knew about it. But when they did find out about it early on when they did it in the open, the people rose up where the Heller we. Akron. Get into deep takes one. Thank our sponsor. Cosmo Perth kid. If you actually have children, and the government doesn't propose that you'd kill them after you have them growing up in this world is much different feel than when we were children and were exposed our children are exposed to a lot of disgusting things all around us that we were not exposed to one of them being caused impolitic magazine, you go to the checkout stand and just on the cover just on the cover. My six year old starts to read it. And I'm like, no, no, no, no, Honey. No, you don't need to know that that you don't need to know that till you're forty five he needs to know nineteen ways to please guy. No surprising. Okay. You're making my point for me. Andrew thank you, Phil Victoria, Hearst who is a member of the family member of the Hearst, Hearst, family, Hearst, corporation, actually owned cosmopolitan magazine. So this is getting to be awkward rate. She's a member of the family, and she is even saying this is enough. She doesn't want to censor their free speech. She doesn't want them to change what they're doing except that she wants the government to apply the law that they have to state that their magazine is harmful to minors. They used to keep them underneath the counter when I was growing up you'd have to ask for a playboy you had to be an adult. Yes. For a playboy, and it came from underneath the counter. Now, they wrap it in plastic. Yeah. That's what they do. And they put it up, and then they're all torn because. All that. She's asking for to me. It's very very very just like, yes. There's no reason why this should not already be happening. She's on a campaign to do it. Help her out Goto Cozma hurts kids dot com. Right. Glenn deep fakes. This is something I started talking about few years ago because I'm way into technology, and I cannot impress upon people. How you will not some crazy today. But in twenty twenty five you will not recognize your country the way life is the things around you. You just will not in the next six to ten years. It's going to be crazy and good lots of good stuff coming to. But we have to have conversations because we're about to hit this new world blind. Unprepared. Deep fakes deface. We started showing them on this network. I don't even know four years ago, and they looked ridiculously bad. And I said, I'm telling you this is going to be a problem, and it's going to cause wars it will lose or win elections. And and in the end truth will be gone. I just to talk into Stu this morning in like nineteen ninety seven. I said they're going to get so good at manipulating video that Hugh. There is going to come time around twenty twenty where you will not believe your eyes. You will not be able to trust your eyes. I know that because I followed Ray kurzweil for a long time. It's here. Now three years ago. It looked bad a year ago. We had the studio crew I brought some fake videos down, and I said which ones the deep fake, and we couldn't tell in real time, but they could not get faces. Right. This is the latest released yesterday. Now, watch this our favorite and least favorite house Jennifer Lawrence body with the deep fake probably face. My least favorite or just when I didn't think. I don't wanna have to say. People. You know, look at it. We're here too. You're right. I hope I don't I hope I'm never in that situation. All the housewives are here. Anyway. That stays with family on there. So it's so clear, you know, that's not Jennifer as he doesn't quite resemble Jennifer Lawrence blue dresses. This is Steve shimmy thing he does not wear on. Because it's such a cavern in between those do that. You know, you know, however, if you didn't know Steve Shemeit's face, and you didn't know if that was just somebody with a different background behind it talking. I believe all of us would say, wow. That is fortunate. Unfortunate looking woman. Right. You would not know that that's a deep fake. It's not even primetime yet. The Intel community is freaked out right now because deep fakes this at a private level. They release this algorithm on read it. So now anybody can do this. It's nut doesn't take a genius. And it doesn't take Google services servers, this is not something from Google servers. So imagine what a state could do imagine. What Russia could do imagine? What China could do it could will they could completely alter how steep shamming, we will not know when Steve Chevy's truthful on do you think they could expand to other people? I no digital like signature that's on there. That's absolutely that. You can professionals will be able to tell. But that doesn't matter thinking about how quickly fake news goes viral now like just in an instant look at the kid on the steps. Yeah. Okay. We had all the video that that wasn't true. But once it's dropped so imagine China Russia decides to affect the election, they drop something just before the voting begins. Well, my take a day to sort of people to figure it out. But once that's been seen, you can't unsee think of this. If in the day of deep fakes which will happen by twenty twenty I promise you by the election in twenty twenty deep fake, which is a word now that most people don't even know only people who really pay attention. No deep fake you ask people now ninety nine percent. Don't know what it is. You ask the week of the election. What a deep fake is. And. Every single voter and every single person in America will know that term it's going to happen. And imagine a world where they're not doing something crazy like Steve Bouche EMMY on Jennifer Lawrence, but you're taking somebody who everybody assumes is corrupt Hillary Clinton, and you're just leaning it you're not making a crazy, for instance, access Hollywood in the world of deep fakes we didn't even see him say that and we know and when he said that was a fake tape. We all knew it wasn't a fake tape. So it works both ways you can release something and people could say it's deep fake, and it's not a debate truth almost become so obscure that guys. What's as there is no truth? It is the end of truth. It's the end of believing your eyes, and we're already we're already almost there. Yes, we are. Attic on. We gotta take a break. I'm steve. Thinking. We're going to continue this conversation in overtime. But if you have not already done so go to blaze, TV dot com. Sign up you can use promo code news for ten dollars off of a yearlong subscription. Not all the big names so much great content chat. Pray there debuted his show mazing blaze TV dot com, and we will see you and overtime. Up next and joy, bonus overtime content. From the news in wide matters. Available exclusively for podcast listeners and blaze TV subscribers. Not a subscriber. Start your free trial at blaze, TV dot com. All right. We were talking about the faith. And I know you guys were in the middle of conversation. But I want to know before we get back into it Glenn. So something let's say some sort of big bombshell video comes out right before the twenty twenty election. Do you put any stock into it? I mean what what are we supposed to do? Move slowly make no judgment, but what do before like right before election day, and you don't have to wait, it won't even put any adult that you'll be right before the election because the election happened so early, you know, now we're month of voting and that should make more of an impact. But it could it could you the problem's going to be is it won't be obvious. It will be something that you already believe that just condemns them. So Hillary Clinton it shows her meeting with some foreign countries saying, okay? Yes, we'll move the ships. I'll talk to the president will move the ships. But you've got to donate to the Clinton foundation saying the N word something like that. Like that that everybody who's against they want to believe that. And it's going to be believable. And it's going to. Will change the effect of elections. Here's the worst one. Somebody wants and somebody always wants to do this. Somebody wants to start a global war. Deep fake deep fake of president, gee, or President Trump doing something against another country, and it goes out, and it could start a war. What about affecting the markets? That's what I was thinking about something. So immediately can engine imagine if nine eleven happened. We know how that was. So that's hit the day the markets open. It was on a Monday. So it was closed for a week the day the markets open. There's a release of George Bush talking to his cabinet going. We are so screwed. We are so screwed. There's no chance of America making it and that it's just cut off. And it was smuggled on some cell phone and the markets had just opened up. That's a one two punch. We may not have been able to survive this. This might be kind of pollyanna question here. But this would seem like a good role for legacy Mead. To step in and. We have an expert that looks at these. And this video of Donald Trump punching donkey that one's real Arstide blue Shelvin. Yeah. And by the way, deep impact, very underrated film. I worked very hard. I've had a very storied career watched boardwalk empire. No. I mean, I do think that that the other the other side of that is that once deep fake becomes a known term, right? Then people like let's say President Trump. There's a there is a video of him doing something that he actually did do and everyone knows what defects. Are you can just be like? Yeah. That was a deeply also that most of the stuff has been deep faked the last two years. I would explain a lot. I'd like to he's actually going what I didn't say the say that I would never say that Twitter cruzi O'Donnell. She's wonderful. How how does this play out? How does when you don't have truth when you have socialism rearing its ugly head with which is full of pon pollyanna lies. Okay. I mean, you want to believe it. Let's say the economy starts to go south. You want to believe that there's somebody in the government that could help us out. Of this mess. Okay. Then you have deep fakes you have more. You have a society that can't recognize truth doesn't even care about the truth. You have a media that is pushing falsehoods. There's no way for the Republic to survive you have to we have to come back to ourselves. It's like the the the righteous among the nations told me longtime ago, we didn't suddenly become righteous when we went out and save Jews. We didn't suddenly become super righteous. We just refuse to go over the cliff with everyone else. So what that means to me is we all know, what's right and wrong. We all know how to treat each other. We all know how most of our parents treated people, and if your parents didn't treat you that way, you know, that was wrong. Okay. We just have to reset into those basic. Fundamental ten commandments. Golden rule kind of stuff and be cool with each other with social media though. Is that possible I feel like with social media? It's like it's put the veil between what what we were. And the way we treat each other and view each other. Now, it's like this different lands. If we Jim this then Stephen hawking his right in by twenty fifty. Humans will not be. They will be extinct. I just had a son. Thank you. I think that's true. I really don't think that's true ivory of optimism. I wanna shine bring solit- let's say we cross this bridge. And we don't know any any video is suspect. Right. It's possible that we could almost retro for a little bit in terms of immediate consumption, where we're like, you know, I just don't watch videos of presidential candidates because I don't trust him. I just read their campaign statements. I would love if we could move back. It's text voting. I thought this. I thought this through today on that particular thing, but it's going to require us in the turmoil of the shift to not react. Okay. But I thought how can how can people do this with all this fake stuff? Well, what we did it before we didn't know the truth about someone. We didn't know we had to believe the slogan of honest, Abe. We didn't know for sure we had to read somebody else's writing about it. We just had to raise good wholesome people. We had to be good righteous people. And then hope out of that the people that would go to Washington would be the same because they are a representation of us the only way to fix this is to go back to the principles that we all know in the Judeo Christian world work, and right and be a tight knit community. We've done it before this is just going to take all of the things I have this book from from Edison, he used it on the for the release of the motion picture, and so he was introducing the motion picture and the last line in this like forty page booklet that he put out said from here on out. We don't have to take anybody's word for it. We vote have to we'll know because someone with film will be there. And we will see exactly what happened, and I've always laughed at that. And thought of at at Tom it didn't work out that way, did it. But now, we're just destroying that. That's one hundred twenty years old. That's all that is we've done it before Andro come here going to lighten this thing up with talk of a big game. My Andrew again, let's say we don't know where. We're all your okay, I'm Andrew back to back. I'm back to regular Indra. He'd and that's why look slightly more handsome than I did about eight minutes ago. I would like to talk about something that is going to be on display at the forthcoming big game. You are going to watch on Sunday with friends, family neighbors. And that is crony capitalism, and I this it makes my blood boil it absolutely makes my blood boil anytime, someone is using the state to suck money out of you, and you and me to empower themselves. That's theft. It's corruption and that happens with so many stadiums and the stadium. They're going to be playing at is no exception to this rule. It's going to be in Atlanta at the Marseille's been stadium this Sunday, and that cost the taxpayers of Georgia about seven hundred million dollars hate that seven hundred million dollars to build a stadium for a billionaire who has seven hundred million dollars. And I don't know the exact scenario that happened with Arthur blank. Although I imagine it's probably pretty bad my opinion. But normally what happens is. These billionaires go to the city council, and they go I'm gonna take my team to another another city, and unless you bilk all of your tax payers, and I'm gonna hold this team hostage. Gimme money rhyme, leaving and the city council goes I twist my arm because now go to all the people in the city and go look I gave money to football. And they take it from all of the other people there. It's not a good economic vestment. We have thirty years worth of data on this thirty years worth of date on it, all the communists agreed that you don't actually make the money back from this. Because there's a concept of the scene in the unseen. It's like if I if I if I went, and I broke the windows in here. We're not actually making money, we're not generating money because some guys getting money from broken windows repairing. We would have spent that on something it's the same thing with stadiums. But the the main thing that happens there is that it's it's not it's not that. It's if you want to build your own stadium. That's absolutely fine. It's there's no purpose to this from government perspective. There's absolutely no reason for it. It's just stealing from citizens. And it's absolute theft and corruption it is. It's like the the. The Texas stadium for the Dallas is the ranger Rangers. Yes. The rangers. Those trooper confidence the Dallas whenever they play the manatees that was beautiful Stabia stadium beautiful stadium. It's not like it's a stadium that is old and falling apart. It's hot because they didn't close in close. It. It's texas. And it's Texas. I mean, you know, the first time I walked into that beautiful stadium. I went this is stupid design. It's Texas, and it's a sport in the summer thought of that. Well, we have to pay for it. We have to pay for it. So they built this beautiful stadium. It didn't get any of it's real life out of it in my opinion. It's not run now run out, and they got to build a new one we have like an eight hundred million dollar lawn. But somebody's want to build a new one. That is absolutely outrageous. Outrageous. I don't mind if somebody wants to do this. Gets the money from the naming rights. Yeah. I'll bet you. I'll bet you. It's the billionaire. Arthur blank is like the best villain. Name. Mike's pretty good. Looks like lex Luther. There's there's there's a few things his brother Mel, but. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Just find it peculiar that the two men at the table who are anti sports are hating on. Going giving you government guy. And me and Glenn. We we go to those football games together. A lot of people don't know this. Yeah, hands we see because we were we wear the face paint. Here's. Deep fakes. Here's the thing. Here's the thing. I think Andrew would agree. One of the greatest things about Dallas, Texas is the art museums the opera house here not a single dime from the government all of it private. And I absolutely love that you wanna museum. Great build a museum. I agree. Andrew playing do you. Remember gave her call his playing sports moaning should do. That's the national tents and also the Wales Ted's versus the whales. Ted's? We allowed to say the names though like on with. It's just not the the game. Wow. Do they bleep better now? Okay. For anybody's wondering the patriots Rams playing in the big game. That's cool. They let animals do it. And I think the patriots Gordon. Planning to be on your show tomorrow. I've got I've got like a whole bunch of ideas to improve football. Then I'm one of involves forces. I think. Oh boy. Wow. Jason fellow sports fan. Who are you rooting for? I, you know, I don't know. I'm kind of rooting for Tom Brady at this point in. I know I don't really know this man, she. The other two teams simultaneously on a team. Or how's that? Author against him quarterback of the patriots. But I if I don't care about if I'm going to have to root for somebody. I wanna see history happened. So Brady wins another one he's he has the record for most Super Bowl. So i'd. Like it Obama's. Wait. See this happen. Look at work down. Okay. Who are you? Other team that's playing against the patriots. Span. Go Bill Gunn. They've ever had eight fact that Tom Brady Brady. Did that to the footling played it? Football. I don't like that. Yeah. Allegedly allegedly crafts. He allegedly a defense. You weren't here. The day that we. Get your old one his science fair project because he proved that Tom Brady is a jeeter. I don't wanna go on record on this of defending Tom Brady so race. Back ship. Pick me, right. Yesterday's poll. Was how many news sources, do you? Check before you generally believe a story. I think some of you guys are lying lawyers for shires because forty two percent of you said you check four or more sources are lying right now Turkey's retreat. What you check. Yes. I thought for. One. You might say I see a story on I check four different websites. But I'm not going to say who else reported on that. And what story I need another one? Let's see no one my for different websites. But you're generally, I don't believe in for second guys. I don't know if you know, we don't actually know who you are when you enter these polls. On is not going to find out who you are. It's free. I heard fifteen percent of our viewers receive shimmy is what I heard and today's poll does this does the past week of radical new abortion legislation surprise you. Let us know. At the blazes Twitter's later, you scare the hell out of you is an option for that. I mean, and it's sad because we know who the left is. We follow them every day. And I still when I heard the words being uttered, I touted that guy. Of being the guy holding the sign at the abortion clinic before I I didn't really I was kind of like a I don't want to get involved in it. But like, I'm pro-life twenty weeks. It's kind of like where I say, that's unreasonable. And now, I'm like because you see this Lipari slope the slope of seeing it for the they have they have so made the media and the left have made a walk through fire voters for Donald Trump. I think so too because they've gone so crazy that there is just all lanes. There's no way I don't care who it is. That is running against the left. I will vote for them because they have demonstrated. A lot of people. I don't believe the average democrat is with this stuff at all. But the average democrat is not willing to say the party leadership has gone insane. And many of those people because they're Uber. Uber marxists leftists. They do believe this stuff. They will do the here's a question. What the Democrats have tea party moment where you're now. It's kind of been hijacked by that far far left will will it ever happen where the Democrats have that moment? I think he'll out for a minute. We're not killing babies after they're more. I think Howard Schultz is the beginning of that. Now it made end there now, but he's the beginning of that gentleman for being here tomorrow. I can't believe. Thanks for listening to the news and white matters. We hope you enjoyed the podcast if you'd like to watch the program become a blaze TV subscriber. And start your free trial now at blaze, TV dot com.

Andrew Virginia Glenn Beck football Tom Brady Brady Jason Howard zinn America President Trump patriots Jennifer Lawrence New York Twitter Dallas Hitler Arthur blank president Bill NFL Rhode Island
#98 Government by Blackmail: Jeffrey Epstein, Trumps Mentor and the Dark Secrets of the Reagan Era

Verum Tota: The Whole Truth

38:07 min | 11 months ago

#98 Government by Blackmail: Jeffrey Epstein, Trumps Mentor and the Dark Secrets of the Reagan Era

"You can't handle the truth this report part two of this series titled the Jeffrey Epstein Scandal too-big-to-fail will delve into cones close ties to the Reagan Administration, which was also took mostly tied to the same organized crime Network led by the infamous Mobb figure Meyer Lansky, which was discussed in part. One of particular importance is the Iran-Contra Network a group of Reagan officials and Associates who played key roles in the Iran-Contra scandal though. It has remained relatively unknown for years many key figures in that same network and several fronts for the CIA that were involved in funneling money to the Central American Contra paramilitaries were also trafficking minors for their sexual exploitation and used in sexual blackmail Rings several of these rings made headlines at one point or another over the years from the Callback run by Washington lobbyists Craig Spence to the Franklin child sex and murder ring run by Republican operative Larry King to the Scandal that envelop the Catholic charity Covenant House in the late 1980s yet. Yep. This report will show all of these rings and more were connected to the same network that involved key figures linked to the Reagan White House and link to Roy Cohn revealing the true scope of the sordid sexual blackmail operation sex rings that involved the trafficking of children within the US and even in Central America for their exploitation by dangerous and Powerful pedophiles in the United States appalling for both the villainous abuse of children itself and the chilling implications of government by blackmail. This tangled web of unsavory alliances cast salut red light on the political History of the United States from the prohibition era right up to the present day in the age of trump a fact made increasingly clear as more and more information comes to light in relation to the Jeffrey Epstein case Roy could fix anyone in the city since Donald Trump burst onto the political scene in 2015 off the legacy of his mentor Roy Cohn as well as Combs influence on his most famous Protege have begun to Garner renewed media attention many of the profiles on Cone following Trump's rise have focused so long Uncertain shadowy aspects of cones history particularly his association with major figures in New York organized crime his corrupt dealings and his eventual disbarment. Some of these poor Trails even went so far as to label cone is politically impotent while cone was known to deal with a sizable amount of sleaze in his career such depictions of the man failed to note that he had created an influence machine of unrivaled power package that included some of the most prominent people in media and politics as well. As a Cadre of celebrities cone was closely associated with numerous celebrities famous politicians and political operatives many of his birthday parties over the years attracted such famous figures such as artist Andy Warhol fashion designer Calvin Klein and comedian Joey Adams's as well as notable political figures including former mayor of New York a break beam and then assemblyman from Brooklyn and future Senator Chuck Schumer among others in nineteen seventy-nine Margaret Trudeau mother of current prime minister of Canada. Justin Trudeau attended Combs birthday party. Yep. You famously toppled his custom birthday cake. And of course Donald Trump who became cones Protege in the mid-1970s was a frequent fixture at social events held in cones honor the politicians journalists Liberties invited to cones exclusive parties were said to be those who had opened accounts and Cones favor Bank his nickname for his unofficial balance sheet of political favors and debts that was surely informed and influenced by his extensive involvement in sexual blackmail operations from the 1950s. Well into the nineteen eighty s many of cones celebrity friendships were cultivated through his relationship with and frequent appearances at the famous and famously about yours New York nightclub Studio fifty-four which was described by Vanity Fair as the giddy epicenter of seventies Hedonism a disco Hot House of beautiful people endless cocaine and every kind of sex cone was awful long time lawyer of the club's owners Steve rubell and Ian Schrager among cones closest friends were Barbara Walters to whom cone often referred as his fiance in public and whom he later introduced to the head of the US information. an agency Chadwick and other high rollers in the Reagan white house yet Walters was just one of cones powerful friends in the media a group that also included Abe Rosenthal executive editor of the New York Times. A fire longtime New York Times columnist and New York Magazine contributor and George sakolsky of the New York Herald Tribune NBC and ABC sakolsky was a particularly close friend of both, a former FBI director J Edgar Hoover whose involvement and Cones sexual blackmail operation is described in part one of this investigative series sakolsky ran the American Jewish League against communism with comb several years and the organization later named its Medal of Honor after sakolsky cone was also the attorney and friend of media Mogul Rupert Murdoch and according to New York Magazine whenever Roy wanted a story stopped dead item put in more story exploited Roy called Murdoch and after Murdock bought the New York Post cone wielded the paper as his personal shift according to the late journalist, Robert Parry the friendship between Mirage And Cone first began thanks to their Mutual support for Israel comb also leaned on his lifelong friends since high school sign new house Junior to exert media influence new house oversaw the media Empire that now includes Vanity Fair Vogue GQ the New Yorker and numerous local newspapers throughout the United States as well as major interests in cable television, New York Magazine also noted that cone used his thousands in the early eighties to secure favours for himself and his mob clients and new house Publications. In addition to new house cones other High School Pals generoso Pope Jr. And Richard Berlin later became the owners of The National Enquirer and the Hearst Corporation respectively cone was also a close friend of another media Mogul Mort Zuckerman who along with Rupert Murdoch would go on to befriend Jeffrey Epstein Combs me confidence like journalist William Buckley of the National Review and Firing Line often attacked cones political enemies. Particularly long time Manhattan district attorney Robert morgenthau in their columns, you suck. Cohn is an anonymous source Buckley whom historian George Nash one's called the preeminent voice of American conservatism and its first grade ecumenical figure received the George sakolsky metal alongside Combs blinked client and Supreme Commander Louis Rosenstiel from the cone run American Jewish League against communism in nineteen. Sixty-six. Buckley later. Got a heavily discounted $65,000 loan to buy a luxury boat a bank where cone held influence and who's President Cowen had handpicked according to a 1969 article in Life Magazine Buckley along with Barbara Walters Alan dershowitz and Donald Trump Woodlake serve as character Witnesses for calling during his 1986 disbarment hearings and all but Buckley would later draw controversy for their relationships with Jeffrey Epstein with connections like this. It's no wonder that Stan Friedman a law partner of Comb who was later imprisoned over a kickback and bribery Scandal while serving as New York's Deputy Mayor told journalists, Marie Brenner in nineteen, eighty that Roy could fix anyone in the city dead. Politically ubiquitous and polygamous Roy cones favor bank and his unique position as a liaison between the criminal Underworld the Rich and Famous and top Media influencers made him a force to be reckoned with them yet. It was his political connections to leadership figures in both the Republican and Democratic parties and his close relationship to longtime FBI director J. Edgar Hoover among other figures that made him and his dark secret touchable for much of his life though. Most of his political influence was forged in the 1950s cone became even more powerful with the rise of Ronald Reagan, even though he nominally maintained his affiliation with the Democratic party throughout his life cone was a well-known fixer for Republican candidates. And this is clearly seen in his outsized roles during the 1976 and 1980 presidential campaigns of Ronald Reagan took during the latter that cone would meet another of his Protege Rodger Stone whom he infamously instructed to leave a hefty bribe tucked in a suitcase at the doorstep of the liberal party's headquarters during the nineteen eighty campaign director. This campaign cone would also meet Paul manafort an associate of stone and later Trump's 2016 campaign manager and introduce both to Donald Trump Combs law partner. Tom Boland was also an influential force in the Reagan campaign and later chaired Reagan's transition team in nineteen. Eighty Reagan then named Bolen whom he considered a friend a director of the overseas private Investment corporation, the governments development financial institution. And he was also the New York Finance co-chairman in the Reagan campaign in both nineteen. Eighty and Nineteen Eighty-Four Bolen was also close to others in cone Circle such as William F Buckley Jr. Donald Trump and Rupert Murdoch. Furthermore. Bolen was instrumental in securing Federal judgeships for several individuals who would later become influential including future FBI director Louis. Freeh cone was also able get friends of clients appointed as federal judges including Donald Trump's sister Maryanne Trump Barry after Barry was appointed as a federal judge Trump called cone to thank him for pulling strings on his sister's behalf. The cone was not given a public position in the Reagan Administration. He was not nearly a dirty trickster who worked in the shadows during the Reagan campaigns. In fact, he worked closely with some of the more visible faces of the campaign including the then communications director for Reagan's nineteen eighty campaign and later CIA director William Casey according to Christine. See more cones longtime switchboard operator from the late nineteen sixty Gene up until his death in 1986 who listened in on his calls Casey and Cone were close friends and during the nineteen eighty campaign. Casey called Roy almost daily Seymour also noted that one of cones off most frequent phone Pals and closest friends was Nancy Reagan, and she was also one of his clients Reagan whose influence over her husband was well-known was so close to Cone that it was largely his death from AIDS took her to encourage her husband to seek more funding for AIDS research prior to cones death Nancy and her husband Ronald secured his spot on an exclusive experimental AIDS treatment program. Despite the Reagan Administration. As well documented non response to the AIDS crisis of the era. Ronald Reagan was also a friend of cones and according to late journalist, Robert Parry lavished favors on Cone including invitations to White House events personal thank you notes and friendly birthday wishes over the course of his presidency given that Reagan heavily courted the Evangelical right and promoted family values as president. The close ties between not only himself but his inner circle with cone may seem odd. However, Reagan light cone had deep ties to the same organized crime factions that were among cones clients and Affiliates of the same Mafia figures close to Cone Zone or Louis Rosenstiel see part one not unlike cone Reagan's own Mentor Lew Wasserman had close ties to the Mob Wasserman the longtime president of MCA and the well-known Hollywood Mogul is known for not only making Reagan's film and television career, but also supporting his successful push to become president of the Screen Actors Guild which later launched Reagan's political career in addition m c e Was a major financier of Reagan's successful gubernatorial bid in nineteen sixty-six and not long after Reagan became president his administration controversially shut down a massive Department of Justice doj wage probe into MCAS ties to organized crime according to Sean swords a documentary filmmaker who explored Reagan's ties to MCA in wages of spin to bring down that wall. Ronald Reagan was an opportunist. His whole career was Guided by MCA by Wasserman and MCA founder Jule styne who bragged that Reagan was malleable that they could do what they wanted with him that thing about Reagan being tough on organized crime. That's a fallacy swords characterization of this relationship is supported by an unnamed Hollywood Source cited in a Declassified doj document who called Regan a complete slave of amca who would do their bidding on anything what elements of organized crime were connected to Wasserman has a young man Lew Wasserman joined the Mayfield Road gang, which was run by Moe dalitz a close friend of mine wage. Lansky Hooper the FBI was a powerful figure in Lansky's criminal Enterprise second only to Lansky himself among members of the Jewish mob Lew Wasserman would later married with Beckerman whose father was Dallas is lawyer wasserman's closest friend and lawyer. Sydney korshak also had close ties to dalits and once partnered with Lansky in the Acapulco Towers Hotel. Notably. The magazine New West stage in nineteen Seventy-Six. That korshak was The Logical successor to Meyer Lansky korshak as a lawyer fit a niche similar to Roy Cohn and gained a reputation as the bridge between organized crime and respectable Society in addition the doj probe into MCA that the Reagan Administration quashed was reportedly spurred after the justice department learned that an influential member of the gambino crime family Salvador pisillo was doing business with the massive entertainment company at that time the boss of the gambino crime family Paul Castellano was a client of Roy Kone Kone Murdoch and the contras though cones influence in the rain. Administration and his friendship with the Reagan family and their Inner Circle has been acknowledged less well-known is how cone aided the cia's covert propaganda efforts that were part of the larger Scandal known as Iran-Contra took whose influence over the Press has already been detailed forged close ties with the director of the US information agency Chadwick even hosting a luncheon and Wicks honor that was widely attended by influential figures in the conservative press as well as senators and representatives soon after then CIA director and Cone friend William Casey was spearheading an extensive PR campaign aimed at Shoring up public support for Reagan's Latin American policies, including support of the Contra paramilitaries. This domestic propaganda effort was technically illegal and required the the CIA Outsource the job to the private sector to minimize the risk of Fallout has Robert Peary reported in 2015, which took the lead in obtaining private funding for the effort and just a few days after which promised to find private support cone brought his close friend the medium. Oh God. Rupert Murdoch to the White House Perry later noted that after this meeting documents released during the Iran-Contra scandal in nineteen-eighty-seven and later from the Reagan Library indicate that Murdock was soon viewing a source for the private funding for the propaganda campaign after that initial meeting Murdock became the top media Ally of this Casey directed propaganda effort and also became increasingly close to the Reagan White House Murdock as a consequence benefited greatly from Reagan's policies and his friendship with the administration which allowed Murdoch to increase his Us Media Holdings and to create the fox Broadcasting Corporation in nineteen-eighty-seven. The man in the black tuxedo Roy Cohn was not the only one close to the Reagan Administration who was simultaneously running sexual blackmail operations that abused and exploited children. In fact, there were several figures all of whom shared direct connections to CIA director William Casey and other close friends and confidants of cone. One of these individuals was Robert Keith Gray the former chairman and CEO. The powerful washington-based public relations firm of Hill and Knowlton which sixty minutes once called an unelected Shadow government do to its influence in the capital. According to the Washington Post gray himself with one of the most sought-after lobbyists in Washington and a post reporter once called him a kind of Legend in this town the man in the black tuxedo with Snow White hair and a smile like a diamond yet gray was much more of a powerful PR executive. Hello everyone. We want to thank you for listening to our podcast and remind you that while it is free, there are ads so that we can keep it free bringing you the whole truth costs money in the form of the time are people used to bring you all this honest information. All you have to do is subscribe and listen then the advertisers will help support us. Our current sponsor is Anchor. FM. If you haven't heard about anchor it's the easiest way to make a podcast. Let me explain it's free. There's creation tools that allow you to record and edit your podcast right from your phone or computer birth. Her will distribute your podcast for you. So it can be heard on Spotify Apple podcast and many more you can make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership. It's everything you need to make a podcast took one place download the free anchor app or go to Anchor FM to get started today. If you support our work, please feel free to donate now back to the cast gray who had previously been a close adviser to both Dwight D Eisenhower and Richard Nixon was a very successful Republican fundraiser who collects money in six-figure Globs according to a 1974 report in the Washingtonian. He first came into close contact with what would become Ronald Reagan's Inner Circle during Reagan's unsuccessful 1976 presidential campaign and later his deputy director of communications during Reagan's campaign in nineteen. The latter position would see him work directly under William Casey who later became CIA director grey would go on to coach are Reagan's inauguration committee and afterwards would return to the pr business job. Taking on several clients including Saudi arms dealer Adnan khashoggi and hedge fund manager Marc Rich both khashoggi and Rich will be discussed more in detail in part three of this report. Particularly Rich who's in a set of Israeli intelligence outfit Mossad and who's later criminal. Pardon by Bill Clinton was largely orchestrated by members of the mega group like Michael steinhardt and Israeli politicians like a who'd Barak with the connection between gray and Casey is particularly telling as it was later revealed by former Nebraska state senator turned investigator, John de camp that gray was a specialist in homosexual blackmail operations for the situation and was reported to have collaborated with Roy Cohn in those activities Conan gray were likely to have known each other. Well as during Reagan's nineteen eighty presidential campaign Casey then grazed boss was calling Roy Cohn every day. According to cones former switchboard operator Christine. See more gray was a known associate of CIA agent and Naval intelligence officer Edwin Wilson having served in the 1970s on the birth. Consultants International an organization that Wilson had founded and that the CIA used as a front company though gray attempted to distance himself from Wilson after the latter was caught illegally selling weapons to Libya in nineteen eighty-three and AV review of Wilson's intelligence career on Earth by journalist, Peter Maas stated that gray described Wilson as a man of unqualified trust and that gray and Wilson had been in professional contact two or three times a month as early as 1963 though Wilson's main specialty was front companies used to covertly ship and smuggle Goods on behalf of us intelligence. He also ran sexual blackmail operations Thursday, I a particularly around the time of the Watergate scandal according to his former partner and fellow agent at the CIA Frank terpil turple later told author and investigative journalist. Jim Hogan took Eric Lee. One of Wilson's agency jobs was to subvert members of both houses of Congress by any means necessary certain people could be easily coerced by living out their sexual fantasy In the Flesh a ROM. Terms of these occasions was permanently recorded via selected cameras. The technicians in charge of filming were TSD Technical Services Division of the CIA, the unwitting pornos Stars advanced in their political careers some of whom may still be in office according to turple Wilson ran his operation out of the Georgetown Club owned by lobbyists and Korean intelligence asset Thompson Park according to the Washington Post Park set up the club on behalf of the Korean Central Intelligence Agency as a primary means in an illegal effort to influence us politicians and officials the president of the Georgetown Club at the time of Wilson's alleged activities at the site was Robert Keith Gray DeCamp later reported that Wilson's activities were a spin-off of the same sexual blackmail operation in which cone became involved during the McCarthy ERA with Louis Rosenstiel injector Hoover father Ritter and his favorite youths the operation allegedly ran by grey and Wilson was not the only sexual blackmail operation connected to cones Network or two influential American politicians job. The era another pedophile Network that was connected to a close associate of former President George HW Bush in the early 1990s was run as an affiliate of the Catholic charity Covenant House, which was founded and run by father Bruce Ritter in nineteen. Sixty-eight Ritter asked his Superior Cardinal Francis Spellman of the Archdiocese of New York for permission to take homeless teenagers boys and girls into his home in Manhattan as was noted in part. One of this series Spelman was accused of pedophilia and ordained known pedophiles while serving as the highest-ranking Catholic priest in the United States Spelman was also a close associate client and friend of Roy Cohn as well as of his law partner Tom Boland and Spellman was alleged to have been seen at at least one of cones blackmail parties in addition. Spellman's nephew said Spelman worked for Roy Cohn according to Life Magazine Ritter like Spelman and other priests who served under Spelman was eventually accused of having sexual relationships with many of the underaged boys. He had taken in a name. Bending Covenant House funds on lavish gifts and payments to the vulnerable teenagers. He exploited one of Ritter's victims Daryl Bassel wrote an open letter to him a year after the priests praying on teenage boys was exposed by the Press you were wrong for inflicting your desires on a fourteen-year-old. I know that someday you will stand before the one who judges all of us and at that time there will be no more denial just a truth notably wage when Ritter's activities at covenant House were exposed in nineteen eighty-nine by the New York Post Charles M Senate the post reporter who wrote the story would later state that the secular Powers more than the Archdiocese or the Francisco protected him Ritter Senate's report was attacked viciously by columnists and other New York media Outlets powerful politicians, including then governor of New York Mario Cuomo as well as by Cardinal Spellman successful or Cardinal John O'Connor the likely reason these secular Powers came to the aid of the embattled Ritter who was never charged for having sexual relationships with minors and was merely forced to resign from his post. Is that coveted job. House and Ritter himself were deeply tied to Robert McCauley Bush senior's roommate at Yale and a long time friend of the Bush family. Macaulay was described by the New York Times as instrumental to Covenant House fundraising after he joined its board in nineteen eighty-five and brought on several other wealthy or well-connected people including former government officials and investment bankers, mccolley's organization. The americares foundation choice later accused of funneling money to the contras in Central America was one of the main sources of funding of Covenant House. One of the members of americares Advisory Board was William E Simon former US Secretary of the Treasury under the Nixon and Ford administrations who also ran the Nicaraguan Freedom fund which sent Aid to the contras americares was also known to work directly with us intelligence has the Hartford Courant know back in nineteen. Ninety one knowledgeable former Federal officials many with backgrounds in intelligence work help americares maneuver in delicate International political environments. Furthermore. Ritter was known to have thought Mccolley's Connecticut estate and served as Vice President of America cares until he was forced to resign from Covenant House. Notably George HW Bush's brother Prescott was also on the Americas Advisory board after George HW Bush died last year americares stated that he had been instrumental in founding the hell focussed relief and development organization years before Ritter was outed as a pedophile who played on the disadvantaged and vulnerable teenagers who sought Refuge at his charity Covenant House was praised heavily by President Ronald Reagan even earning a mention in his 1984 State of the Union Address, which called rid of one of the country's unsung heroes from 1985 to 1989 Covenant House is operating budget Grew From $27 to ninety million dollars and it's board came to include powerful individuals including top Executives at IBM Chase Manhattan bank and bear Stearns. It was during this time that Covenant House grew into an international organization opening branches in several countries including Canada, Mexico. And elsewhere in Central America its first branch in Central America was opened in Guatemala and was headed by Roberto elezar a CIA asset whose Plantation was used to train the troops used in the CIA. The failed Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba. Alisara was also an associate of the former us back dictator of Nicaragua, Anastasio Somoza and a member of the Knights of Malta a Catholic order to which former CIA director William Casey and Roy Combs law partner Tomball and also belonged a less arzu. Also worked for americares. Hen was tied to several Central American paramilitary groups intelligence Community sources cited by DeCamp assert that the stars who led branch of Covenant House procured children for a pedophile ring based in the United States years later micasa and other us run charity and wash all of the George HW Bush had personally toured with his wife Barbara in Nineteen. Ninety Four was accused of rampant pediphilia and child abuse the downfall of Washington's Jay Gatsby after having left his job as a nabob. C News correspondent in the 1980s Craig spends found success as a prominent conservative Washington lobbyists spends would soon find his fortunes shift dramatically. When in June nineteen eighty-nine, it was revealed. He had been pimping out children to the power elite in the nation's capital throughout the nineteen-eighties in apartments that were bugged with video and audio recording equipment much like Jeffrey Epstein who ran a similar operation spends often likened to Jay Gatsby the mysterious wealthy figure from the well-known Fitzgerald novel The Great Gatsby a 1982 New York Times article written about Spence said that his personal phone book and party guest list constitute a who's who in Congress government and journalism and stated that Spence was hired by his clients as much for whom he knows as what he knows. Spence was also known to throw lavish parties, which the time described as glittered with notables from ambassador's to television stars from Senators to senior State Department officials Roy Cohn William, Casey Android cones journalist friend, William safire were just some of the page Attendees at Spencer's festivities according to mister Spence the Times article continues Richard Nixon is a friend. So his former Attorney General under Nixon John Mitchell CBS journalist. Eric's every is termed an old dear friend Senator. John Glenn is a good friend and Peter Austin of British actor and journalists is an old old friend notably Austin of wrote for the European newspaper soon after it was founded in nineteen ninety by Robert Maxwell, the father of Epstein's alleged Madam Glenn Maxwell and a known Mossad agent. It was revealed just seven years after the times published its doting profile of Spence that glittery parties for key officials of the Reagan and Bush administrations media stars and top Military Officers had been bugged in order to compromise guests according to the explosive report published by the Washington Times. Spence was linked to a homosexual prostitution ring whose clients include a government officials. Locally-based US Military Officers businessmen lawyers Bankers Congressional aides media Representatives down. Other professionals Spence also offered cocaine to his guests as another means of acquiring blackmail according to the report spends. His home was bugged and had a secret two-way mirror and he attempted to ensnare visitors into compromising sexual encounters that he could then use as leverage one man. Who spoke to the Washington Times said that spends sent a limousine to his home which took him to a party where several young men tried to become friends with him. According to DeCamp Spence was known to offer young children for sex to attend. He's at his blackmail parties along with illegal drugs, like cocaine several other sources including a Reagan White House official and an Air Force Sergeant who had attended Spence hosted parties confirmed that Spence's house was filled with recording equipment, which he regularly used to spy on and record guests and his house also included a two-way mirror used for eavesdropping the report also documented Spence's connections to us intelligence particularly the CIA according to the Washington Times report Spence often boasted that he was working for the job. And on one occasion said he was going to disappear for a while because he had an important CIA assignment. He was also quite paranoid about his alleged work for the agency has he expressed concern that the CIA to double-cross him and kill him instead and then make it look like a suicide not long after the Washington Times report on his activities was published Spence was found dead in the Boston Ritz-Carlton and his death was quickly off the suicide the Washington Times report also offers a clue as to what spends may have done for the CIA as it's cited sources that had claimed that spends had spoken of smuggling cocaine into the US from El Salvador home and operation that he claimed had involved US military personnel given the timing of these comments from Spence Spence his powerful connections and the cia's involvement in the exchange of cocaine for weapons in the Iran-Contra scandal. His comments may have been much more than just boasts intended to impress his party guests one of the most critical parts of the Scandal surrounding spends. However was the fact that he had been able to enter the White House life. At night during the George HW Bush Administration with young men whom the Washington Times described as call boys spends later stated that his contacts within the White House which allowed him and his call boys access were off level officials and he specifically singled out George HW Bush's then National Security advisor, Donald Greg Greg had worked at the CIA since 1951 before he resigned in nineteen eighty-two to become National Security advisor to Bush who was then vice president prior to resigning from his post at the CIA. Greg had worked directly under William Casey and in the late 1970s alongside a young William barg stonewalling the Congressional Pike committee and church committee which investigated the CIA beginning in nineteen seventy-five among the things that they were tasked with investigating where the cia's love traps or sexual blackmail operations used to lure foreign diplomats to bug departments complete with recording equipment and two-way mirrors bar would later become Bush's attorney general rising to that post yet again under Trump furthermore wage. Bars father worked for the precursor to the CIA the office of strategic Services OSS and recruited a young Jeffrey Epstein then a high school dropout to teach at the elite Dalton school from which Epstein was later fired a year prior to hiring Epstein Donald bar published a science fiction fantasy novel about sex slavery. Notably the same year Donald bar hired Epstein. His son was working for the CIA. The bill bar has refused calls to recuse himself from the Epstein case, even though he worked at the same Law Firm that has represented Epstein in the past. Donald Gregg is also connected to Roy Combs influence machine took his daughter's marriage to Christopher Buckley the son of conservative journalist William Buckley close Confidant and friend of both Roy Cohn & cones law partner Tom Boland the Washington Times reports on Spence's child sex ring also revealed his close ties to none other than the ubiquitous Roy Cohn one of the times sources for its first story on the Scandal alleged that he had attended a birthday party for Roy Cohn that spends at home. His home and that CIA director William Casey was also in attendance Spence was also said in the report too often brag about his social Companions and regularly mentioned cone and claim to have hosted Coney Waffle House on occasions other than the aforementioned birthday party bodies by God. The revelation of Craig Spence is call Boy ring soon led to the discovery of the infamous Franklin child sex abuse and ritual murder scan that sorted operation was run out of Omaha, Nebraska by Larry King a prominent local Republican activist and lobbyist who ran the Franklin Community Federal Credit Union until it was shut down by federal authorities buried in am a 1989 article in the Omaha World-Herald probe into Kings Credit Union and sex ring is a telling Revelation in the six and a half months since Federal authorities closed Franklin rumors home listed that money from the credit union somehow found its way to the Nicaraguan Contra Rebels the possibility that Kings fraudulent Credit Union was covertly funding the contras was supported by subsequent reporting by the huge. Post Pete Brewton who discovered that the CIA in conjunction with organized crime had secretly borrowed money from various Savings and Loans S&L institutions to fund covert operations. One of SNL's had Neil Bush George HW Bush's son on its board and it had done business with Kings organization another link between king and the Iran-Contra team is the fact that King had co-founded and subsequently donated over $25,000 to an organization affiliated with the Reagan Administration citizens for America which sponsored speaking trips for lieutenant colonel Oliver North and Contra leaders, the director of citizens for America at the time was David Carmen who simultaneously ran a public relations firm with the former head of covert operations at the case. He led CIA his father Gerald who had also been appointed by Reagan had the general Services Administration and to a subsequent ambassadorship one of the investigative journalists who researched the Craig Spence ring later told DeCamp that Spence's ring was connected to King the way we discussed wage. Larry King and his nebraska-based call Boy ring was by looking through the credit card sheets of Spencer's ring where we found Kings name. It was later revealed that King and Spence were essentially business partners as their child trafficking Rings were operated under a larger group. That was nicknamed bodies by God exactly. How many groups operated under this umbrella group bodies by God is unknown yet. What is known is that the Rings Wrong by both King and Spence were connected to each other and both were also connected to prominent officials in the Reagan and subsequent George HW Bush administration's including officials with ties to the CIA and Roy comb his Network indeed Spence just months before his alleged suicide in the Boston Ritz-Carlton had hinted to Washington Times reporters, Michael Hedges and Jerry super who had originally broken the story that they had merely scratched the surface of something much darker all the stuff you've uncovered involving call boys bribery and the White House tours. To be honest with you is insignificant compared to other things I've done but I'm not going Tell you those things and somehow the world will carry on. It is also worth noting the role of the FBI in all of this particularly in the Franklin child sex abuse Scandal indeed. Larry King's child abuse ring was quickly and aggressively covered up by the FBI which used a variety of underhanded tactics to bury the reality of King sorted operation here. It is important to recall the key role former FBI director J Edgar Hoover played in similar sexual blackmail operations that abused children see part I and the close relationship between Hoover Roy Cohn and Louis Rosenstiel who later employed Hoover's former right off hand man at the FBI Louis Nichols years later documents released by the FBI would show that Epstein became an FBI informant in 2008. When Robert Mueller was the bureau's director in exchange for immunity from then pending federal charges a deal that fell through with Epstein's recent arrests on new federal charges. In addition former. FBI director Louis. Freeh would be hired by Alan dershowitz who is accused. Of raping girls at Epstein's homes and was once a character witness for Roy Cohn to intimidate Epstein's victims has previously mentioned freeze past appointment as a judge for the United States district court for the southern district of New York was orchestrated by cones law partner Tom Boland. Thus the FBI's cover-up of the Franklin case is just one example of the bureau's long-standing practice of protecting these pedophile ring when they involve members of the American political Elite and provide the bureau with a steady supply of blackmail had also makes it worth questioning the impartiality of one of the main prosecutors in the Jeffrey Epstein case Maureen, who is the daughter of former FBI director James Comey the rod at the top while there were several sexual trafficking operations connected to both Roy Cohn and the halls of power under the Reagan Administration in a matter of months after cones death. It appears that another individual became a central figure in the powerful Network that cone had cultivated that individual Jeffrey Epstein would be recruited after his firing from the Dalton School. By Alan Greenberg a close friend of cone to work at Bear Stearns after leaving bear Stearns and working as an alleged Financial Bounty Hunter for clients that are said to have included the Iran-Contra linked arms dealer Adnan khashoggi Epstein would come into contact with Leslie Wexner a billionaire close to the Meyer Lansky link bronfman family who himself was tied to members of organized crime syndicates once represented by kolin off the same year that Wexner would begin his decades-long association with Epstein and other cone friend with ties to the Reagan White House and the Trump family Ronald Lauder would provide Epstein with an Austrian passport containing jeans picture, but a false name Lauder Wexner and the bronfman's are members of an elite organization known as the mega Group, which also includes other Meyer Lansky connected philanthropists, like hedge fund manager Michael steinhardt wage while Epstein shares considerable overlap with the network described in this report and part one of the series he is also deeply connected to the mega group as well as its associates including ghislaine Maxwell's father dead. Maxwell part three of the series will focus on the mega group and its ties to the network that has been described in Parts one and two in addition the role of the state of Israel the Mossad and several Globe a pro-israel Lobby organizations will also be discussed in relation to this network of sexual blackmail operations. And Jeffrey Epstein it is here that the full breadth of the Epstein Scandal comes into view. It is a criminal and unconscionable blackmail operation that has been run by influential figures hidden in plain sight for over half-a-century exploiting and destroying the lives of Untold numbers of children in the process over the years. It has grown many branches and spread well beyond the United States has seen by the activity of Covenant House in Latin America and Epstein's own International effort to recruit more girls to be abused and exploited all this has taken place with the full knowledge and blessing of top figures in the world of philanthropy and in the US government and intelligence communities with great influence over several presidential administrations, particularly since birth. eyes of Ronald Reagan and continuing through to Donald Trump

Ronald Reagan CIA Roy Cohn director Reagan Administration United States FBI President George HW Bush Craig Spence William Casey Adnan khashoggi Epstein cone Donald Trump Reagan White House Roy New York partner Tom Boland Meyer Lansky New York Times
The Bilderberg Group Pt. 1

Secret Societies

41:08 min | 1 year ago

The Bilderberg Group Pt. 1

"Something to note of the groups covered on this show operate in secret. The details included in this episode or based on extensive research, but ultimately can never be one hundred percent verified except by society members themselves. Journalist Jon Ronson had come to Portugal to track down the Bilderberg Group. The people he interviewed insisted that this group of corporate suits ruled the world from the shadows Ronson was skeptical, but he was curious to more CEO's presidents and members of royal families, really gathering in hotels every year to scheme about achieving global domination in June nineteen, ninety nine Ronson curiosity led him to climb into a car with a man who called himself big Jim Tucker Big Jim had agreed to act as Ronson skied to all things build your Burgh, but now they were being followed after leaving the Caesar Park Hotel the rumored location of the Bilderberg group meetings. A Dark Green Lancia started tailing them. So Ronson called the British embassy. He explained that he was a satirical journalist who had somehow fallen foul of the Bilderberg group in response. The woman on the other end of the line gasped then in an urgent voice. She said listen Bilderberg is much bigger than we are. We're just a little embassy. Do you understand their way out of our league? Chill went up Bronson. Spine? What kind of group could strike fear in the heart of a representative of the British Empire. He considered the nefarious tales of the Bilderberg group to be overwrought humorous even. But as the green car followed them down, the deserted road, Ronson wasn't laughing anymore. Hi. I'm Vanessa Richardson and I'm Greg Poulsen and this is secret societies of podcast original every Thursday we examine history's most exclusive organizations from around the world, and try to shine a light on the truth behind these mysterious groups from the illuminating to the black hand to the order of nine angles will explore how much impact each secret society actually had on the world around them. This is our first of two episodes on the Bilderberg Group, an international conference that meets annually the purported. Purported goal of these meetings is to encourage dialogue between the most influential powerbrokers from Europe and North America however, but actually happens behind their closed doors is unknown. All their conversations and activities remain a secret. This week will explore how the carnage wrought by two world wars inspired Polish intellectual Yussef redinger to convene the first Bilderberg group meeting in nineteen, fifty four will also cover how journalist Jon. Ronson began looking into the group and detail how his investigation put him in the Bilderberg crosshairs. Next week will track Jon Ronson confrontation with the Bilderberg Group. Then we'll explore some of the wildest theories about the group's supposedly dastardly aims like how they hand, pick world leaders and destabilise entire countries at a whim. The BILDERBERG group refers to a rotating roster of international elites who meet in different luxury hotels around the world for an annual three day conference. The first of these meetings took place in nineteen, fifty four at the Hotel de Bilderberg in the Netherlands since then there have been sixty four others and counting. According to the Bilderberg Group Steering Committee Their goal is to foster dialogue between Europe and North America. The subject matter of their discussions allegedly ranges from climate change to capitalism. To that end every year around one hundred and thirty political leaders and experts from quote. Industry Finance Labor academia and the media are invited to take part in the conference in the early years of Bilderberg, the guest list was jealously guarded. However, the group established a website in two thousand fourteen, and have maintained a public list of participants ever since in two thousand Nineteen Bilderberg attendees included senior adviser to President Trump Jared Kushner former. Former US Secretary of state, Henry Kissinger former Google CEO Eric Schmidt and Goldman Sachs CEO, Richard Naughty among others due to the esteemed attendees, and the supposedly dry discussions, the group's defenders have likened Bilderberg to the G. Seven summit g seven is an annual meeting with the leaders of seven of the world's most powerful countries discuss global issues. However, there is one major difference. The organizers of the Bilderberg meetings insist on total privacy. Unlike the G., seven summit, which is covered ad Nauseam by the media. Journalists aren't granted access to build Burg. There's no official media coverage. The meetings organizers insist privacy fosters honest discussion, allowing attendees to gather more useful insights. The group's detractors however accused him of having a culture of secrecy. They insist the Bilderberg group is hiding their true evil from the world. According to these critics, the group's crimes range from creating new infectious diseases, crafting devices to mind control the masses. But before we delve further into the claims level against the Bilderberg group, it's important. Understand the group's founder. The mysterious man called Yousef Register. A close friend once said to render Yussef, my friend. They say you're a freemason. An agent of the Intelligence Service of the. The Vatican and that you collaborate with Communists, what is the truth about you to that? Retin your coyly. Tell them. That's not even a half of it. So. Here's what we do know about redinger. He was born the youngest of four children in Krakow Poland on April seventeenth, Eighteenth, eight, according to his memoirs, use father. Redinger senior was the legal advisor and friend to Count Wladyslaw, Zamojsk, eighty, an enormously wealthy, eccentric with vast estates in both North West and southern Poland when retinas father died, suddenly, it was the count to took charge of the young boys education Zamojsk as money was well spent. Even as a child Renner was very bright as a result, he soon discovered the range of issues plaguing his country. During Retinas Childhood. Poland wasn't a sovereign state. It was partitioned between Prussia. Austria and Russia. Their lack of statehood made polls desperate to maintain a sense of national consciousness, the indoctrinated their children with patriotism for a country that didn't technically exist, and this permeated everything as a child Retton was told Time and time again about his grandfather's adventures in the Polish rebellions against the Russians, these stories filled him with a hatred for war, and a staunch love of his homeland. Poland in reference to this dichotomy retinas your once allegedly claimed to his schoolmates I wish Poland would soon be independent again so I would not have to be a damn patriot. Fortunately Ferretti. JETER war had yet to be put on his agenda. The eighteen year old graduated from secondary school in nineteen o six by then he was brilliant at math and fluent in at least four languages, so read Injures Benefactor Council Moise sent him to study at the prestigious. Sorbonne University in Paris, France. After enrolling rancher said about getting acquainted with his new city. Thanks to council, Mois connections. Redinger was granted access to the city's aristocracy. He soon rubbed elbows with princes, consciousnesses and world revered statesman. However, redinger didn't let his networking get in the way of his studies in Nineteen O eight. The twenty year old became the youngest person ever to graduate from the Sorbonne with a PhD in French literature from their rancher decided. decided to pursue a career in politics in inactive foresight, he opted to get another degree in psychology, relieving an understanding of the human mind might later eight him as a politician. So in one thousand, nine hundred eight redinger traveled to Munich where he studied comparative psychology after graduating the twenty four year old return to his native Poland and got married, but as he settled into his new life. World War One was brewing. In one thousand, nine, hundred twelve polling was still divided a part of the Russian German and austro-hungarian Empires. Should war break out between these countries? Polls would have to serve in all three armies, leaning Polish officers would inevitably have to fight against their countrymen. This reality prompted group of Polish. Independence activists called the Supreme National. Council to ask rancher to lead their group. It's likely they recruited him. Because of his unique background renders knowledge of politics, his staunch Polish patriotism, and his penchant for befriending the rich and influential made him the perfect advocate for Polish independence. By nineteen thirteen twenty-five-year-old five year, old retin Scher had accepted their offer and moved to London where he be well positioned to negotiate international relations bear he cultivated relationships with prime minister H H, Asquith and future prime minister Winston Churchill. One year later in nineteen fourteen world war, one broke out and retina attempted to use the political relationships. He nurtured in London to push for Polish independence, however, over the course of a long brutal war retinal saw his clan's fall to pieces, though Poland did gain independence historian h Paul Jeffers writes that retinas. Political machinations caused him to be declared persona non grata by Austria branded an enemy with the death penalty by Germany and barred from England. Penniless and exiled from Europe thirty year old Renton. Jer fled to Mexico, but it wasn't long before Renton share returned to his usual penchant of leveraging relationships to influence politics, according to one of his close friends, K. Alinsky during his time, a Mexico retin your offer, the Mexican government a plan to nationalize oil for its implementation. He began secret negotiations with Washington So by the Nineteen Thirties, retinas influence stretched from Europe through South America and all the way into the United States. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine, Germany invaded Poland, beginning the deadliest military conflict in History World War Two. Shortly after Poland's prime-minister-in-exile General Vladislav Sikorsky prompted fifty one year old ranchers return to Europe retinue was hired as courses chief of staff in London. For the next three years, the two men were rarely apart and soon redden jer began confiding in Sikorsky. He told him about his new dream of United Europe one that would replace warfare with diplomatic conversation as a means to settle disputes and Sikorsky clearly liked what he heard due to Renton influence in nineteen, forty, one Sikorsky created a consortium of fellow exiled European government officials. Their goal was to figure out how to unify. You're up at the conclusion of the war. Redinger was highly involved in these discussions yet despite his ability to. To, influence powerful leaders. He insisted upon remaining in the background. It was important to him that he always wielded his powers of persuasion from the sidelines. Perhaps there's no better depiction of this than a story related by Polish author, Yon Palm Yan in Renton gers Memoirs Palm, Yan recounted an episode in which Sikorsky retinue were on their way to an award ceremony. However, the minute rancher discovered that he was the one to be honored at the event. He Yanked Open the door of the taxi and jumped out of the moving car. A shocked and bemused Sikorsky proceeded onto the ceremony on his own retinue could not be persuaded to attend. Unfortunately the surprising and fruitful friendship between Renton Jersey course came to an end shortly after on the night of July fourth nineteen forty-three. That evening Prime Minister Winston Churchill summoned 55-year-old written jer to ten Downing Street. Upon his arrival, Churchill in tears, told redinger that General Sikorsky's plane had crashed. The accident had occurred as he was on route to inspect Polish forces stationed in the Middle East. The flight was purely in support of the war. Had there not been a world war written. Good friend wouldn't have died. Sikorsky's death cemented retinas resolved to see Europe united. Four years later. Renters dreams or even bigger as a boy, he longed for an independent Poland as a young man, he'd seen the limitations of his dream, and the bloodshed and destruction of the first world war as an older man, he'd seen American decisively. End the Second World War with that written became an avowed atlanticists. He believed that the only way to end the incessant cycle of war and destruction was to create a group one that brought together the decision makers of Europe with their counterparts across the Atlantic in the United States. To that and fifty nine year, old Renton Chirp began ruminating in the possible creation of such a group is motivations for creating the group were honest, even noble. He had no idea that the alliance he would create wouldn't reflect his best intentions. It would leverage. To bring together the world's most powerful people, but like Renton your himself, the resulting group would operate deep within the shadows at all costs. Coming up, Renton your calls to order the first meeting of the Bilderberg Group. Through the Hustle and bustle and stresses of life, finding the path to positively has never been more crucial at the more fulfilled you feel the more grounded. You become well podcast as a wonderful new series that can help you with this quest. It's called daily quote, and it's a quick two to three minute daily podcast for you to get inspired by. Every day on daily quote you'll be given. A quote meant to motivate uplift and renew your outlook on life. You'll also dive deeper into the context surrounding the quote learning more about its origin and the meaning behind it. They've already been so many inspirational quotes featured so far, but hands down. My favorite has been by singer. Songwriter Leonard Cohen. So whether you're jumpstarting the morning searching for that mid day, pick me up or trying to finish the evening off. Strong daily quote offer some of history's most inspirational quotes whenever you need them. Three hundred sixty five days, a year followed daily quote free on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. Now back to the store. Sixty four year old use of written chair spent his live cultivating relationships with the elite so that he could influence politics, but after initially striving for a united Europe Retina decided he hadn't been ambitious enough. He realized that in order to escape the endless cycle of war and destruction, he would have to create a group that brought together powerful people from both sides of the Atlantic, with that in mind in early nineteen, fifty to render consulted his friend Paul. Ryan's the chairman of Unilever a European consumer goods company. Reagan's shared his views about the importance of such. Such a group. However, he believed that retina will have to pick someone to lead his group who wouldn't appear partial to any one country's aims ultimately wrench your decided that the perfect candidate was prince Bernhard of the Netherlands since Prince Bernhard had married into his title, his position in the Netherlands as the Queens, consort was largely symbolic. This meant he was unlikely to inspire suspicion in the minds of world leaders secondly retinas your new prince Bernhard was very popular in America after conveying his choice to Reich ins. An appointment was arranged between Renton Sugar and the Prince. Injures meeting with Prince Bernard was a success afterwards. They jointly reached out to the United States. As rent you're headed dissipated President Eisenhower, and his advisors knew and liked Prince Bernard. With Eisenhower's approval, more American statesman agreed to attend this meeting, which as of yet had no name. Name aside. The conference was set for May nineteen, fifty four in the Hotel de Bilderberg in Oester beak. Never Lund's even before it began, its organizers decided that the press would be excluded and no meeting minutes would be taken. There were around eighty participants at that first meeting retinue wrote in his memoirs that he was a very high powered gathering of prominent politicians, industrialists, bankers and eminent public figures. Unfortunately, the participants names have never been published despite the presence of so many supposed titans of Industry Industry and leaders of nations, the atmosphere inside the conference was allegedly tense, but Prince. Barnard's good humor apparently eased some of the nervous tension. The specificities discussion are unclear. However, we know each speaker was allowed. Only five minutes at a time read injured later wrote that this fostered lively and stimulating debate with several attendees, jumping in at the conclusion of each block of five minutes to interject their opinions at asides after three days at the hotel, several hours of meetings and many much-needed interludes of. Drinking together, the group's first meeting came to a close. The attendees were so pleased with the proceedings they decided to make it an annual event. In short order prince Bernhard of the Netherlands, was appointed the Chairman or the Organization and Yousef Register accepted the role of secretary. It's important to note that bear nerd and Redinger weren't chosen in a political election. They weren't the end result of any sort of democratic process day were elites handpicked by other elites, and of course they had the advantage of inviting every man who chose them to lead together retina and Prince Bernard made up the group's first steering committee, deciding who, among the world's elite would be invited to future meetings, and who would shape the direction of the world. Choosing the steering committee wasn't the only decision. The attendees made according to Bilderberg Group. What don't you know by William Myron Price, the group's desire to maintain secrecy was so great that they didn't even give themselves a name, although they never again met in Oester, beak, all subsequent meetings were simply referred to as Bilderberg meetings. There's been a lot of speculation about this initial insistence on secrecy, some people claim that the CIA was heavily involved in establishing and even funding the Bilderberg group. However, it's important to note that this rumor has never been corroborated. A point that is without dispute is the fact that during the first Bilderberg meeting redinger insisted it's strictly adhere to the Chatham. House rule. This code of conduct was established in one, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty, seven by the UK's Royal Institute of International Affairs. It was often utilized in meetings in which sensitive information was discussed. The rules stipulated that meeting attendees were allowed to disclose what was said during meetings so long as they didn't divulge the identity of the speaker, the rule was designed so that public officials could speak honestly behind closed doors. The rationale was that if they didn't fear that their words might later be used against them, they'd be more forthcoming. The decision to utilize the Chatham House rule was one of the last retin jer made as secretary in nineteen sixty after a lifetime of adventures in politics. The seventy two year old died of lung cancer. After, Retinas Death, subsequent Bilderberg meetings were run largely like the first author, Myron price wrote that venues changed, but the meetings were always hosted at upmarket hotels and resorts in Europe or North America. The organizers also continued to insist on high level security to that end the hotels that hosted the conferences were always entirely cleared out of all other guests before the three day proceedings. As that didn't ensure their privacy enough. Security guards were posted at the entrance of each conference to make sure that no outsiders were allowed entry. This was likely because even in subsequent Bilderberg meetings, the attendees were as impressive as ever. Though the invite list fluctuated, they included royalty heads of state, industry, Titans and famous academics. Finally the meetings continue to utilize the Chatham. House rule. However over the years. The behavior of Bilderberg attendees began to exceed even that code of conduct the Chatham House rule stipulated that what was discussed in meetings could be shared so long as the identity of the speaker was kept a secret, however after the first Bilderberg meeting, attendees of subsequent conferences refuse to divulge anything at all. They kept both the content of these meetings as well as the identities of its attendees completely hidden. In addition meeting minutes. We're still strictly prohibited. This meant that though the rich and powerful gathered upscale heavily guarded hotels around the world once a year. No ordinary citizen had any idea what they were discussing. These were meetings where corporate executives were encouraged to discuss issues of great importance with world leaders further, the Chatham House rule guaranteed the content of these talks would never be disclosed. What then was to stop these industry representatives from pushing their special interests and specific agendas. What was to stop a CEO? Who's prophets were based on an inexpensive workforce from utilizing a Bilderberg meeting to push an anti labor agenda or an executive who's revenue stem from exploitation of natural resources from pressuring ahead of state to ease environmental laws. The possibilities for corruption and the prioritization of special interests over the public good were endless, and this cult of silence allowed Bilderberg attendees to hide a plethora of sins, if they so desired, but in nineteen fifty-six after three years of Bilderberg meetings, nobody in the media reported on these novel events. This media blackout sustained despite the fact that several Bilderberg attendees were heads of state and high ranking corporate executives underlaw. The have meant that they owed both constituents and shareholders alike some modicum of transparency by their actions. Arguably. These members were acting in their capacity as private citizens when they attended the conferences, but they likely wouldn't have been invited to the meetings at all. If not for their esteemed positions yet somehow build Berg's rule seemed to suggest that these potential compromises were necessary to ensure open dialogue. However even that suggestion raised questions, namely, why did Bilderberg attendees need absolute privacy to speak openly and honestly? Where people to assume that these CEOS and heads of state were dishonest in public. Regardless of the implications, one thing remains clear. The BILDERBERG steering committee has no intention of lifting the veil. It wasn't until four years after the first meeting that one journalist finally attempted to uncover what all Bilderberg attendees worked so hard to hide. In nineteen fifty seven Pulitzer winning columnist, Westbrook paddler wrote a little distributed article about the Bilderberg meeting in it, he said something very mysterious is going on when a strange assortment of arbiters of the economic and political fate of our Western world go into a secret huddle on an island of Brunswick, Georgia, and not a word gets into the popular press. Peddler disclosed that he learned about the meeting from a woman, who happen to accidentally stumble upon the hotel where it was taking place, the woman told him that the hotel had seen deserted at first class. However, when she commented upon the strange emptiness of the place, the hotels clerk responded that it had been alive with mysterious characters a few days earlier, and with the Secret Service and FBI to. According to conspiracy theorist mark dice in the Bilderberg group backs fiction. After peddler published his article, the Pulitzer Prize, winning journalist began criticizing executives of the powerful hearst corporation, which owned and controlled almost thirty different newspapers in America at the time. Di suggested the peddler founded outrageous that no hearst publications were covering the meetings for his trouble. Peddler was fired. Perhaps peg dismissal is my several decades. After his article, it was still rare to find any mention of the Bilderberg meetings in newspapers. Perhaps, other journalists filled that they too would suffer the same fate. Things changed in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, five. When big Jim Tucker a journalist who worked for fringe right publication. The spotlight discovered the group. After some digging? Tucker Group SAST with the annual secret meetings. He wrote numerous articles about them for the spotlight. In, one such article Tucker wrote if one hundred forty of the world's best known baseball, players or movie stars gathered secretly under armed, guard every major newspaper and magazine would be demanding to know what was going on behind closed doors, but when one hundred forty of the world's richest `financiers, industrialists, media, Titans, and political figures get together under such circumstances, none of the journalists who posture as cynics dares to mention a word. Despite his passion for the subject matter, Tucker's articles didn't push awareness of the Bilderberg group into the mainstream. However, readers of his niche publication began asking the same questions he was lamely. What were these people discussing? And why did they insist on absolute secrecy? The dearth of information about the secret of group of elites caused rumors and conspiracy theories to abound. People on the political left accused the Bilderberg group of plotting to create an evil capitalist empire. People on the right suspected them of scheming towards a controlling socialist nanny state, these partisan hypotheses might have made up the sum total of Bilderberg Literature, but in nineteen ninety nine journalist Jon Ronson jumped into the Fray Ronson decided to look into the Bilderberg conference after several of the people you interviewed brought it up. He had no idea that in pursuit for the truth, he would fall under the gaze of the mysterious and possibly dangerous. Coming up Ronson the Bilderberg. Group's hired goons now back to the story. After, several years of what seemed like a coordinated lack of coverage of few journalists started writing about the Bilderberg meetings and big Jim Tucker a writer at a small conservative publication called the spotlight garnered wider attention in nineteen, seventy five. This was essentially how the Bilderberg meetings came onto the radar of thirty two year old British journalist Jon. Ronson in the course of his work. People who were familiar with Tucker's articles kept bringing up the Bilderberg group. In his book them adventures with extremists Ronson wrote that he was skeptical, a tiny band of insidious and clandestine power mongers who met in a secret room from which they ruled the world. Despite his doubts. Ronson was curious in nineteen, ninety, nine big Jim Tucker was the closest thing to an authority on the subject so Ronson decided to pay him a visit. In May Ronson met sixty five year old Tucker for the first time at the National Press Club in Washington DC big. Jim was a chain smoking gravel voiced mountain of a man during the meeting as Ronson watched big Jim picked up the phone and said mother. Your dutiful son is playing. Kick the can on Pennsylvania Avenue Tuesday morning. Ten thirty am thank you. When Ronson asked about the strange call. Big Jim explained that he needed to place the call to a friend on a daily basis to prove that he was still alive, after all he'd been on the trail of the Bilderberg group for two decades. There was no telling when they kill him for his trouble making his death look like a run of the mill DC mugging. After that alarming statement big Jim, cheerfully suggested they take a break. Over drinks big Jim told Ronson that he knew exactly where that year's Bilderberg group meeting set to take place even more exciting. He planned to infiltrate the proceedings and Ronson was more than welcome to tag along. His plan was as follows. He and Ronson would travel to Portugal on arrival. They'd patrol the hotel resort until they figured out a way to break in. When a skeptical Ronson, asked exactly how they were supposed to break into a famously penetrable meeting big. Jim gave a vague answer about looking for the short wall and shimmying up drainpipes. He seemed to think that the specificities didn't matter. They figure it out once. They got center Portugal that June. Upon arriving in Sintra Bing Jim told Ronson that. The BILDERBERG group had sent their security guards ahead of them. According to him, these guards were already at the Caesar. Park Hotel where over one hundred of the world's most powerful elites would soon descend. Then big Jim told Ronson that Bilderberg private security had a shoot to kill policy for all interlopers. After that disclosure, he immediately suggested they head over to the Caesar. Park Hotel to scope it out, he posited that getting the lay of the land they could return later and break into the hotel to that end Ronson rented a car from budget and the to set off down a mountain road their destination this Caesar Park Hotel. The way to the hotel. They came up with cover stories. In case, they were found out. Big Jim suggested they pretend to be holiday. Goers bear to take in the fresh air. Though Ronson didn't think the Holiday Gore. Gambit seemed plausible. Couldn't come up with anything better, so he agreed. Soon the to pulled up outside the Caesar Park Hotels Formidable Peach. Gates at the site of the dense undergrowth and imposing mountain, surrounding the structure Ronson was struck with how impossible there are called midnight penetration was going to be. However it appeared that the Bilderberg group had yet to set up their security barricade. The two were able to drive into the hotel. Once they were within the Caesar Park Compound Big Jim took one look at all the happy hotel goers milling around and said the civilians haven't been shifted out yet. He took a picture of the oblivious tourists then big. Jim suggested the to grab lunch at the hotel's restaurant. They're big. Jim Tried to pump away transfer information about the supposed upcoming Bilderberg meeting, but the waitress seemed to have no clue what he was talking about Ronson was likely skeptical that enough various meeting was set to take place in such an innocuous setting. Setting regardless, he didn't resist when big Jim suggested. They split up to see what Intel they could separately gleam from inside the hotel itself after walking around on his own for a little bit. Ronson realized he wasn't on his own. A man in a tweet jacket was following him the minute Ronson noticed him. The man approached and introduced himself as the hotel. He'd noticed Ronson and big Jim together taking pictures and attempting to interrogate a waitress, then his voices hard as steel. The manager demanded to know who Ronson was. The only thing Ronson could think of to save himself was that he was British. The hotel manager pressed on demanding to know what Ronson was doing at the hotel before Ronson could respond. A different man walked up. The newcomer was an older man. He had a tan and a distinct European accent. As Ronson watched, the European man gave a little laugh and squeeze the hotel manager shoulder. Then he reassured the manager that everything was fine, and there was no problem after essentially telling the hotel manager to stand down the European man turned to Ronson without prompting. He said think of this hotel as your home. If I can be of any service to you. Don't hesitate to ask I mean. What could you possibly be doing here? That could cause any harm to anybody. Though the words said with a smile, they was something distinctly threatening about the delivery nervous, but trying not to show. It Ronson asked the European man if he worked for the hotel. The European said no, I'm not with the hotel. I'm with another organization. Ronson read the entire exchange as an implicit threat. He felt as though the Bilderberg group was signalling to him that he wasn't welcome. Duly intimidated. Ronson fled the hotel moments later he met back up with big. Jim Outside before you could tell the other man what had transpired the to noticed commotion. A. Dozen police motorcycles were lining up in the car park. Big Jim leaned in and whispered. The shutdown is beginning. Then they climbed into their car and drove out of the hotel, aware that the shutdown meant the Bilderberg attendees were about to arrive. Ronson and big. Jim Returned to the Caesar Park Hotel the next day, though the expected to see the Bilderberg attendees, there were none visible and the prior days barricades gone. Making the situation, even more confusing than expected the hotel to be shut down, but when they drove up to the gates, the security guards simply waved them in. Big Jim turned to Ronson and said we saw the shutdown begin yesterday we saw it with our own eyes and now no shutdown. This is not what's supposed to happen. The to had expected to drive up confirmed the presence of the barricades and get turned away from the gate, then big Jim would document the proceedings for the spotlight, instead big Jim, and Ronson incomprehensibly themselves inside the Caesar Park, hotel once again. On the other side of the gates, Ronson and big Jim made another alarming discovery, the hotel, the grounds the pool, the onsite restaurant. They were all deserted. This terrifying realization beg the question. Why had they been allowed inside its gates, but it had plainly been cleared of all the other guests. At a loss for what to do, the to grabbed lunch in the empty restaurant. Then they hopped back into their car and drove fast towards the deserted hotels gates. That's when Ronson noticed the green. Lancia steadily trailing their car for the first time. He told big Jim that they were being followed in response. Big Jim assured him that the Bilderberg group was clearly just trying to scare them. The car surely wouldn't follow them onto the deserted road. However, as Ronson turned onto the road, the Green Lancia turned to. When Ronson slowed, the Lancia slowed when he turned. It turned three hours later. The car was still following them. Ronson even tried pulling over certain. That would be enough to shake his tail instead. The Green Lancia also pulled over its occupants settling in to wait. With. Their tail parked behind him. Ronson was spooked enough to call the British embassy, but if he had hoped for reassurance from Great Britain soul outpost in Portugal, he was quickly disappointed. The woman on the other end of the line told Ronson that the Bilderberg group was way out of the embassies league. Then she cautioned that terrified journalist to go back to his hotel and sit tight. She continued whatever happens, don't incite them in any way. Don't fan the flames in line with her advice. Ronson and big Jim Jordan back to their hotel as they pulled into the parking lot the green Lancia remained other tale. Ronson stopped the car then he and big Jim waited frozen in anticipation. And then the door to the Green Lancia clicked open, and a man in a dark suit climbed out. As for his identity. That's next time on secret societies. Thanks again for tuning in to secret societies will be back next week with part. Two of the Bilderberg group will see the conclusion of Ron sins. Run in with the club. Then we'll investigate the conspiracy theories surrounding the group you can find all episodes of secret societies and all of the podcast originals for free on spotify not only does spotify already have all of your favorite music, but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals like secret societies for free from your phone, desktop or speaker, just dream secret societies on spotify, just the APP and type secret societies in the search bar. We'll see you next time. Secret societies was created by Max Cutler at his apart casts studios original. It's executive produced by Max. Cutler sound designed by Nick Johnson with production assistance by Ron Shapiro Carly Madden and Joshua Kern this episode of secret societies, was written by Abby Geli Audie Magoo with writing assistance by Maggie Admire and stars, Greg Poulsen and Vanessa Richardson.

Bilderberg Group Fray Ronson Jim Jon Ronson Hotel de Bilderberg Redinger Europe United States Ronson Caesar Park Hotel Bilderberg Group Steering Comm Jim Tucker Portugal Bilderberg Titans Renton Prince Bernhard Austria
Ep. 212 | Ultimate Panel w/ Jon Miller, Graham Allen, Chad Prather & Eric Bolling

The News & Why It Matters

37:31 min | 2 years ago

Ep. 212 | Ultimate Panel w/ Jon Miller, Graham Allen, Chad Prather & Eric Bolling

"Welcome to the news. And why it matters. I am Sara Gonzalez joined by something faces but never in the same place. We've got Mr John Miller straight in from the swamp. Congratulations on fiving live. Yes. Good. Good job. Good work. We've got Graham Allen a new chair today. You are. This is weird angle. It's like a whole different place. You have to look at me. We've got Mr. Chad Prater who what this is. It is. Stole my chair for me. My my little bit nervous about these two sitting right next to each other. The teacher come sit in between you to travel all over the country. Been around each other way too much that is that is that is very true to many of the same hotel rooms. Onto top stories. John. What is your top story? I want to talk about George. Conway Kellyanne Conway's husband once again coming out and saying the president stupidity knows no bounds. Just wanna know. What that household is like when they get home. What is that relationship? Like it. Can't be good good grant. What's your what is about California again proving that it just needs to be taken out of the United States? Now, another university saying that the pledge of allegiance these to be gone because it represents white nationalism obvious, obviously, obviously I've been trying to say. And finally. Right. Twenty twenty presidential far leftist hopeful Kamala Harris has now made everybody scratch their heads as she says that all private insurance should be abolished. It's going to be a going to be an interesting show. But first we want to thank our sponsor, Cosmo hurts kids. So I don't know if you guys have noticed, but cosmopolitan magazine is quite risk Gade these days. John. Okay. I'm saying. The checkout stand and I'm looking at all of the magazines in their headlines, and I'm like the what the what sex. I mean, it's got some real things that we don't want our children reading. So the Hearst corporation actually owns the hearse family owns Napolitan magazine, Victoria, Hearst, a member of the family has actually gone out on her own campaign and said, you know, what I don't want to censor their free speech. But I think that this magazine is harmful to children, and it should be labeled as so it should fall under the category of it states that it's harmful to minors under eighteen that's all that she's asking for personally, I agree. My son is starting to read. I don't want him reading that. Rapper something like they did the playboy magazine. Yeah. Yeah. And not have it. Just right there in front of your children as your checking out with your orange, juice and doughnuts kinds of tips and tricks that you can use in things that they don't know about. That's why my daughter's only read teen vogue. Keep it clean around my house. So if you want to hear more about this campaign, which I think you should it's a it's a really it's a really big issue right now, the morals of society and how we protect our children. You can go to Cosmo hurts kids dot com to learn more. All right, John. I would imagine that is a very very awkward. Interesting. Household. Well, it was interesting because it was actually in response to cliff SIMS old White House staffer left the White House. He has a new tell all book out and in the book, the book actually accuses Kellyanne Conway of being the big leaker in the White House. So Trump bash the book on Twitter sent a tweet out saying this book is boring full allies. And then. Twin? Which is that's the new story right there. So the interesting part is that this that he bashed on Twitter. And then Conway came out, husband Conway, Mr. Conway came out and said Trump, you're stupid. So the book that is accusing Kellyanne of leaking Trump calling that book stupid, George Conway, saying Trump, you're stupid in response. So what is going on? In that household is let me take my wife works in a medical clinic. She's a nurse practitioner. If all of a sudden, I started going online in bashing all of the doctors and the nurse practitioners and the PA's that worked in her clinic that she loves very much in that she supported my wife would cut my theory. I don't understand how it works. I'm really curious to find out how it works and how long they'll be together for. I mean, do you think at this point because they have children, right? So maybe it's I. Either more. We just have to get through this point in our lives with the long Trump is in office, and then we will quietly divorce behind the wooden healthy relationship. You would think maybe he's like Honey can I send out this tweet? Or are you going to be pissed at me? He just doing it just like or how about like Honeywell talk about this on the internet and throw it out there and see what happens. This is the hidden being Georgia Kellyanne Conway, which with all due respect to Kellyanne Conway. I mean, obviously, she's got some pretty thick skin to do what she's done say. I have to give a lot of admirations Kellyanne Conway. But this is what I would call the pit of swamp marriage. This is so imagine with me if Donald Trump had never been elected all the things, you wouldn't know or realize about one the media or Hollywood or the Washington DC elite in the way, these people interact with each other. If anything Trump presidents is exposed how crazy and what little why light zone. We're living in it was very smart on his part. I think he knew from day one. I think this is his exposure of what goes on in the media putting everything on the table. I think he knew the day. He decided he was going to be president. I think he knew he was gonna win. And he knew I'm gonna do something. No other president has done, and I'm going to take the fight straight to them, and expose them for the liars, and cheats, and phonies that right there is why the mainstream media Hollywood you name. It anyone with a platform that pantheon. On of people that sit around with public voices. They will not stop because they know that as long as Trump is in power and has any place with voice, he's going to continue to expose that every other president we've ever had. They would have means go this president. You can't say it like this president he hit you can't do that. Because if you do this the media is gonna take Trump goes, I don't care. Why why do you have a job? Why are we don't need your John? Look at me. Tell all books are coming out. Now people who worked in the Trump White House, and it's because of that very thing. And you read them a lot of times, you're like that kind of sounds about right? Get with him. I mean, it's not some of it's believable. But then parts are just outright lies, and you have to wonder why they're doing it. And it's because he's completely dismantling everything that that town of Washington accepted as reality. And you said it completely pity is is swamped marriage. That's absolutely true in Washington. You talk about these people on there, you bad mouth them. And then you go to the bar after for most Americans. It's the most disgusting awkward thing ever. But that's how that town thrives. I you bring up an interesting point because during the cavenaugh confirmation hearings things got so heated Lindsey Graham gave his Lindsey Graham two point. Oh speech and everyone loved him in that moment. And he made a comment about these are my friends, and I was like. Guys are friends after this. Fascinating. Because in the press briefings, even the conservative outlets in the in the White House press corps. They'll be like Jim Acosta. He's not that bad. He's just trying to his job because they all have to stick up for one another always. And so I'm like, he's a terrible hang I hate him. And then I go to the press briefing. The next thing I'm gonna this is kind of. That's just but that's what he had all these same terrible stories. That's why you have even on the conservative side because at the end of the day in that town, everyone has to be friends, our friend WWE's to undertaker, very good friends with with the undertaker undertaker. I was with him last week. And he was telling me about when he got both his oxypan bones broken in his eyes caved in and he had to have the surgery of reconstruct his face, and he said, yeah, wrestling, my buddy, you know. That's the way it is. That's what you feel like in Hollywood. It's these wrestlers that that go at each other. It's a cage match and then now they're happy hour on Capitol Hill. I mean, there's deal. So I have to I don't think Jordan Kelly and are going to be. Say so what is his motivation? What is Georgia's motivation point question? I think it looks like he's just there to embarrass his wife, which is why can't the good thing. No one knows like most of the things that happen on Capitol Hill. I love to be a fly on the wall. All I know is happy wife, happy happy life. I think George maybe could could use that advice right now. All right Graham, so California just needs to be sought off. I don't know if you know, this would America's racist. The only reason that John is here is because we white people allowed him. Thank you. I don't know if you know that. Yeah. So Santa Barbara City College board of trustees President Robert Miller, basically said we don't need to pledge of allegiance anymore because it is riddled with undertones of white nationalism. Basically saying that the guy who wrote it to Francis. Bellamy wrote the pledge in eighteen ninety when he was concerned with the influx of immigrants. So that's what this is really about yet. Another attack on basic principles of being an American. How hard is it to pledge your allegiance to the very country that this the only reason that you're allowed to have such an asinine conversation of should we pledge allegiance to our country in the first the paradox of stupid in that entire argument is just it's incredible. I mean what we kneel? The anthem. God is offensive boys and girls can literally be whatever they want now. And now the pledge of say, otherwise, you big it. Yeah. We we kneel for the anthem, but don't you kneel in the end zone if it's to pray. Don't Neil that. Exactly. It's just another attack. There's something in the pledge of allegiance at something about indivisible. I think one nation under God indivisible that whole line in there while it sounds awful oppressive to me in that thing. So I I don't know. I think it's just we're we're we're I think this one hundred percent it has to do with with more just immigration sympathy right now. Right. I don't think this guy could give a teetotal Graham. I'm not gonna say. But but this guy could probably care less. This is just another way to get in the tabloids have some exposure for your mediocre college at nobody really cares about in the first place. How can we do this who have immigration sympathy? And we'll talk about the fact that we can't do this because it's you know. They they hated immigrants to I'm a little slow. But I'm still not seeing the connection between immigrant the whole thing. I've I've read it multiple out. You're not a real black person. There you go. I'm not revenue. Keep reminding everyone tells us all. You don't exist. You do bring up an interesting point about everyone being immigration sympathizers right now, which by the way, no one at the table. I think no one here would say we don't like immigrants. We all can recognize. We are a nation of immigrants legal immigration is awesome. We love it legal immigration illegal immigration, keyword there. Illegal. That's a problem. And I to the story, Tom Brokaw. I believe it was was in hot water just recently for his comments on saying he said that Hispanics should be trying to assimilate shouldn't be trying to as wrong with that. That is the point you come to the country. You learn our laws. You learn it love for our constitution. And that's what immigration is and to say that Hispanics to do more of that because they're not teaching Spanish and schools, and especially in California, they are all these measures to make it. So you don't have to speak English. And that's the exact opposite of how people should immigrate to the country. We had a video posted a video on social media this morning where I did a spoof of pretending to be Jim Acosta down at the border touching the thing. And then we have cross is pretty funny. So it's going viral today. So I encourage people it's not a terrible video. It's really good. So here's the thing. I had someone who commented on there. And they said because I do a thirty second summary at the end of typical video me and the truck, you know, and sitting there, and I said, I don't know a conservative that is opposed to or pro American person who believes in liberty opposed to legal immigration. We encourage it we want it. We want you here via lived in one of these countries. I'd try to get my family up here. That's what I'd want to do. And I made the comment I said, but we don't want people who come here illegally and undermined the foundation and the structure of our country. What we're built on it, and I had someone who commented on there. And they said why can't people bring their culture here? What do you have a problem with their culture nowhere in that video? Did I say anything about their culture, I respect their culture, they said, well, then what are you talking about the foundation of our country? It's very simple the constitution the constitution, the United States of America. If you come in you adhere to it, you believe in it and you abide by it. You bide by our traditions. You buy. By pledge of allegiance to the flag. That says you are one nation under God, indivisible with liberty and Justice for all you abide by a declaration. That says we're independent look you wanna come in here. And you wanna buy those things. I will I will throw my arms open for you. There's also there's also something to be said to about. Okay. Why do they want to come here because they want to participate in the American dream? How are you supposed to participate in the American dream? If you can't speak the language, you know, say that we're you're coming from is so amazing. So great. Then why are you coming here? Here's a reason why you're trying to come here. And it's because of everything that we've worked to preserve in this country. It should be. But it's not you are racist. The main argument to me all the time. How can you be against illegal immigration? When we in fact ourselves are illegal immigrants, and my response to that is first of all there were no laws back, then, you know, this wasn't an established country, and I myself in the president did not illegally cross into a country that had laws in place. So it's a it's an irrational argument that people use we came over here we stole it the country Christopher Columbus. However, you want to do it. But now right now in two thousand nineteen this is the United States of America. The United States of America has laws in place on how to become a citizen legally. And that's how arguments that really good people that really good people in California get such a bad rap because of the. That's a great point. There's like two of them. All two of them are George and Sherry are really good, folks. This year. To get into Carmela gum. In. All right. We just said the most awesome magic trick of all time. Although love John Miller. He was awesome. He had to run though, he was in the middle of something. And we are now joined by Mr. Eric bullying. The men's room. Yeah. I think he was he was too. Says in America's racist. And then he left the pledge of allegiance is racist. Nationalist, white nationalist, where you know, why you wouldn't know because it's privilege, California. All right. But before we get into KOMO comma, comma here, I'm just going to call you come Allah. We are going to thank our sponsor radius own. So it's still January, right? Yeah. It's still January, and perhaps some of us had some New Year's resolutions to lose a couple of pounds. Maybe that we gained the following year. Don't be embarrassed. I was also you I lost one hundred pounds about eleven years ago or so, and so I know the struggle personally. Yes, there's me that's me. The giant number ten. And so I know you lose weight, and then you go on these yoyo diets, and then you gain the weight back, and you can't find anything to help support you losing weight and maintaining might I suggest that you try ribs own the folks that readies own have they have this this little capsule that's full of the good mall. Ulan olive oil. And it helps you boost your metabolism and it helps reduce your appetite. So you feel full longer. You're not constantly craving. The things that you should not be eating. I use it. I swear by it. It can work for you. Go to radio dot com. That's Z O N E dot com. You can get thirty percent off of a three-month supply by using promo code the bolaise. We done the math for you. It's like a dollar thirty nine a day. You can afford that much to invest in your health radio own dot com. All right, Eric you missed quite a lively a lively. That used to be a number ten and now you're the one of ten and seeing next us really round. I was more offending team. You were you're supporting. I married into roll tide. News. Carolina that would be. Okay. So Chad your top story is comma, comma, Malla Harris, she's said some pretty controversial things about private health insurance and Medicare for all. Did you catch Eric? Okay. I think that we have that clip. Let's go ahead and play it if we can. Follow up on that. Correct me if I'm wrong to reiterate, you support the Medicare for all Bill. I initially co sponsored by Senator Bernie Sanders. You're also co-sponsor onto I believe it will totally eliminate private insurance. So for people out there who like their insurance. They don't get to keep it. Well, listen, the idea is that everyone gets access to medical care, and you don't have to go through the process of going through an insurance company having them give you approval going through the paperwork, all of the delay. That may require who of us have has not had that situation where you gotta wait for approval and the doctor says, well, I don't know if your your insurance company's gonna cover this. Let's eliminate all of that. Let's move on. Let's let's eliminate filling out applications and buying things. You know, that's crazy. It's amazing to me whenever the Democrats. These days are throwing their hat into the ring. And they say they're going to run for president that they have to start either with a Bala Shing something or with an apology. I used to believe in guns. But I was not in thank enough on that. So now. Yeah. So this is reminiscent of Barack Obama saying you can keep your doctor. You can keep your plan. If you like it now, the left realizes that being democrat isn't left enough. You gotta go crazy left. So we have to abolish things we gotta get away from everything private everything privatized. It doesn't matter if you can afford it or you like it you don't need to go through all that. We're going to save you from the time and the energy of waiting on approval for a health insurance plan. And even if you're gonna Ford it, even if you like it now, what's the point? You can't keep it. Eric two thousand eight if you like your plan, you can keep your plan two thousand nineteen now let's there's a big difference. So Kamala Harris wants to be president. So let's say she wins. Okay. So now. Does. You always, you know, I come from the business world, you always do the worst case exam. What's worse that could possibly happen? Kamala Harris wins it's a different supreme court now because of Donald Trump, and it was in two thousand eight when you had John Roberts who's frankly, probably liberal making the final decision that ObamaCare wasn't fat constitutional as long as you call it a fee out attacks. It's insanity. What who the jump through to make ObamaCare legal then it will never happen again in our lifetime. That's the good news. I think what really is happening though, is it's not people need to go left. It's young people believe in socialism, they believe because they've millennials that have never had a struggle. They've never had a may. They've never had depression. There had really a major recession that lasted what a year and a half. So so yes, we can borrow. Yes. We can tack on debt. Oh, don't worry. It'll be okay. They don't know history that there could be the mother of all downturns if we're forty trillion dollars in debt under. To her plan in four eight years. You could really literally sink the Republic instead right now, it's never happened in my lifetime. So I think free stuff sounds pretty darn good. The exact thing that they accuse President Trump doing right now, they accuse Trump of, you know, saying, well, I won't be around here when it comes back to bite me in the end. But that's what they base their entire campaigns on anyway, doing these plans actions actually taking freedoms away from America's we're going to make this decision for you. And we're going to get it passed to where. Now, you have no choice, even if you want to go get private insurance. You can't do it. Because we've got Medicare for all this is what you gotta do is it that in and of itself the exact opposite of freedom. Well, yeah. But I mean, the left the far left is not concerned with with freedom. But you know, what's interesting to me. Also is that they if they were to look at socialized healthcare in the UK or in Canada or any place that it's been tried and true for a while there. You'll see that the people who really need care are forced to go to the private doctors and the private hospitals because. They can't get quality care there. So just accept twenty US Senator name rand, Paul. Face goes, the candidate a procedure. What we is a friend of mine, by the way. Why do you think kids stay here? You know, we're in the middle of major healthcare fight and really. Listen, you need surgery. Okay. But I mean, he's a doctor too. Context states. Do you know Philip Mountbatten Prince Philip he flipped his Range Rover what couple of weeks ago? Okay. He wrecked into a young lady. Forty six years old injured her arm broker wrist. She's upset because one the police haven't followed up properly. Yes. To queens, center, warmest, regards. But the biggest issue she has she's not been treated properly by medical professionals because she can't get into see anybody. Now, this is Britain, which supposedly has this type of healthcare, which she is which by the way, comma, Harris's ideal healthcare goes further they need to Britain because if you have money in Britain, you can still get private health care. She wants to do away with all of that. So this idea that we have this pie-in-the-sky because you're right there. I don't wake up every day. Most most young people don't wake up every day thinking, hey, we're twenty three million dollars twenty three trillion dollars in debt. I still go to the mall. Still buy new shoes. I can still turn the heat on in my house. My iphone still still works. I'm still plugged into the WI fi. They don't think about that. So, you know, hey. Three means freedom. Right. Well, I'm telling you there's gonna be consequences of that. Eventually, amen. All right. We gotta take a break. We'll be back. Prime example. All right before we go. I want to make sure to which are very good, friend Graham. A happy birthday a little something here for you. Your your wife told us that you really enjoy brownies. And let the candle lit so that you can blow for this borough. Yeah. Thanks for being here. Very much. Thank you falling as hosting tonight. Blaze TV, special media meltdown? You can tweet US Senate on Facebook. Hashtag delays. Lazy live what's trending tonight. Live to. Up next enjoy bonus overtime content from the news in wide matters. Available exclusively for podcast listeners and blaze TV subscribers. Not a subscriber. Start your free trial at blaze, TV dot com. All right. Just talking about how far left we've gone I want to get back into that. With some other some other issues going on. But before we do that one of our sponsor mercury real estate. So I think you guys would all agree that there are a lot of real estate agents out there who like dabble in real estate, and maybe do it part time. And maybe their face is on a bench at a bus stop that people sit on and you're like who should I pick. I want to to sell my house. Yep. Probably not the guy with his face where people sit there rear ends down. Maybe not the guy on a billboard smiling. Really creepy might I suggest that you use real estate agents. I trust dot com. So Glenn actually founded the company for this reason that there are ten million real estate agents out there, and you have no idea what they know if they know your area if they do this full-time, so Glenn. Has formed a team that have they've vetted these people they've vetted these real estate agents. They do it fulltime. They know the area they've been doing it a really long time. They know their stuff they're going to get you the best value the best thing for your money. So if you're looking to buy or sell your home, you can go to real estate agents, I trust dot com. We did the work. So you did not have to. All right. So talking about how far left they're going on, you know, health insurance, and they haven't learned from the UK's mistakes. They wanna take it even further. I wanna talk about the Kate Hudson. So Kate Hudson came out awhile ago, and we covered this on the show, but she got a little bit of heat for saying that she was raising her daughter to be genderless. And now she saying, no, I wasn't. I'm not raising her generalists. I'm just no trouble for herself in the same state Lawrence. Trouble usage, she controlling. That's what she said. Raising raising our daughter genderless. We don't know what she's going to be see the whole thing doesn't make any sense. We stay out said you're not allowed us those pronouns anymore. There's no he or she in California state. So what do you set you even worse if your police department it's going to you can't say a male per per female perp. You certainly can't say black white now have you heard these police scanners? It's male perp six feet tall with. Dark hair. We could be anybody literally how how stupid is that? That is the dumbest thing I've heard today. That is the dumbest thing I've heard day Terry that was the award. That is well, yeah, there's more. That is. How are you going to solve crime? If you listen the police scanners now, and you know, you're some of these police chases there is no no attribution to race whatsoever. What so ever so African American guy or Spanich woman, it's got to be a male or female about six feet or female about five. We're airing in a society that is so offended. It is insanity. I was at the student acid summit for turning point USA last month. And there was this gentleman from London there, and we got into a conversation. They said it's so crazy in London right now that we could be sitting here having a conversation and at the table back there, somebody else could hear us say something that they find offended, and they can press charges against us for offending them from across the room. I and we want you walk in you, Donald Trump, Donald Trump down. The patriot go in the bar, and he's like God, save the Queen or something, right? Throws of. Yeah. Kind of similar snap. I mean, it is crazy. High chicks are losing their mind. I will always be the voice of offense. I promise you. I will not apologize. Forget what Kevin Hart. Did I make a living mocking people? I make a living if you're black. If you're white if you're straight if you're gay I don't care, I'm gonna make fun of you. That's all that matters. And these people have lost their minds now. I can't get over this whole idea that that people are just really trying to make this a norm because it's not that. Oh, well, that's a wacko person out there that lives in Hollywood. But this is becoming they want our children genderless. They won't our daughter's thinnest. They won't our son's neutered. They won't are men a effeminate. They want Christianity. Abolished the list babies dead old people are irrelevant veterans don't matter. And this is this is the leftist known. It's not democrat anymore. It's gone full blown left. It's beyond. It's out on the tips of the wing, which I hope to God. Those feathers get shed off into the dust bent of history because this has become absolutely as you say ludicrous. It's gone crazy. The idea that you want to normalize this beyond just a trend. Mentioned babies Jad. And I think that that does bring up. An interesting point, Eric what what was going through your mind when you saw the state of New York gearing on their feet cheering applauding for the fact that women can kill their baby back to the the the ultimate example of hypocrisy on the left. So a pregnant woman is on her way to the abortion clinic with the intent of aborting her child drunk driver. T-bone Zor kills her and the baby double homicide. Yep. On her. But if she made it to the abortion clinic everything's okay now. Which one is it listen. I'm a firm believer in letting the states decide what the hell each state wants to do with it. I just don't get involved in the abortion or the or the I don't care who you marry who you kiss you sleep with. I really don't care what you care what you smoke at night or drink at night. It doesn't those things don't matter, but fiscal responsibility. I really give a crap about lot. But the hip hop. Hypocrisy of that example, is she doesn't want the baby she's on her way to boarding. And then someone kills both. It's double homicide just blows my mind. I I'm lost for me for me. And I agree what you're saying. And there are some things, you know. Hey, Mary who you wanna marry religiously I don't agree with it? But who am I to pitch force steaks and go after people, but if we don't value human life, and for the people that can't speak for themselves, which are babies if we don't hold that that that sovereign principle there, I think we are already did as a society, and I think it's not sustainable, we're going to tear each other apart. And it's all going to if the most basic understanding of human decency is not there that we don't respect life. You can have these conversations of racism, and sexism, and all that why do you have those conversations because you respect in value life and everybody should. Have this value of equality in life, right or no one would care? Really? Then why does it not matter here? I get a little bit concerned because I feel like this younger generation, that's maybe millennials and probably the generation underneath them. They're growing up where they have heard. It's been ingrained in them women's rights women's rights women's rights that they forget that it's actually a life. And we're we're teaching these kids that are growing up that it's not anything to be respected. For instance. You know, I saw a lot of people saying, well, you know, what if the woman was depressed or had anxiety or whatever. And they wanted to abort the baby I'm all for a women. If a woman is depressed, and she wants to get rid of the baby calling it a baby which I found to be ironic, then up to woman, and these are the types of things that I'm hearing from that younger generation, and it's just very frightening to me that okay? If you wanna make that argument. Six weeks into the pregnancy. Make that argument, but at nine months into the pregnancy and they're saying a Williams. Twenty four weeks months. The survival rate is up to seventy percent if you board at twenty four weeks, that's six months you've been to the doctor multiple times, you know, what the gender is which whole different conversation of it. So. Itself. You have been pregnant a while. So why wait so long, and what you just said, they're the biggest argument people have about this new law is oh, you Republicans and conservative overreacting. It's only if the mother's life is at risk or somebody that no that was the old law. The way the new law reads is if their life or health is at risk and the companion case of Roe versus Wade. Yeah. Yeah. Dove versus Bolton it lays out what actual health is. That's mental state. That's their age. So literally if you find the right physician, you can argue the case of the day before those be here. I can't do this. I can't do. This my boyfriend just left me. I don't have any money. I can't raise his kid. Get rid of it. I mean, it is a huge dark precedent that. I think New York has unfortunately, started a potential domino effect that could could impact the. The entire country here, Eric we're so excited that you're here. We're so excited for the special. Can you just tell us a little bit about media meltdown with the the recent story about BuzzFeed putting out a story into being refuted aggressively by the special counsel's office? And then the Covington kids, the choline Catholic kids when you saw the original idea that everyone ran within the media when you find out what it was really all about is completely different story when you had context we're all going to be here talking about the absolute meltdown of the media right now. But we have one question to answer tonight. Chad decide pop that collar on purpose or not. Playing to the beauty of this. Was not ready for that. At all. I was sitting here waiting for this and educate you on fashioned. Okay. Doesn't lay down. He's stove. Oh, this is like a Hugh, Hefner smoking jacket, baby. And you know, why because I'm smoking. You can see we've got a lively panel. On some philosophical answer the world problems. I was not ready. That was a good answer. You're not missing. L down by Eric Bolling. You can find it on blaze TV six to eight eastern. You can also watch it on YouTube. I believe we're also streaming on Facebook. But you are a subscriber. That's why you're watching this right now. So you should watch it on blaze TV dot com. Encourage all of your friends and family to watch it as well. We have got a whole lot of fun for you guys. And remember to tweet us using hashtag, blaze TV live. I will be monitoring the all the social media and getting all of the the comments over to Eric and the guys to discuss. So make sure to tweet us is blaze TV live. I think we have a poll question really quickly before we go Kamala Harris thinks we should get rid of privatized healthcare. What do you think? Your answer is anything other than hell. No don't participate in this poll. Subscribe Twitter that is at the blaze. Thank you gentlemen for joining us today, and we will see you guys later tonight. Tune in. Want? Thanks for listening to the news wide matters. We hope you enjoyed the podcast if you'd like to watch the program become a blaze TV subscriber. And start your free trial now at blaze, TV dot com.

president President Trump Kamala Harris United States California Mr John Miller America Conway Kellyanne Conway Mr. Eric Graham Allen George Hollywood White House Jim Acosta Mr. Chad Prater Eric Bolling Facebook Medicare
The Amityville Horror

Citation Needed

36:11 min | 1 year ago

The Amityville Horror

"Where? Where are we my my head? What? What happened? Hey, guys few. For a second y'all, we're going to move on without me. What the fuck. happened. Man. So why do you look Paler than usual just be hard to do about that. So ally, what did you do? So technically, it is because I'm a ghost, but before you get freaked out, you guys goes to so. Yeah. Yes. Sure told that cashier fuck yourself. So my firebomb prank didn't quite have the hilarious. Zing I was hoping for it turns out now we're all ghosts and now I'll never be able to say it I can't go. Up Ghosts. Hunting our old podcast studio heat. So now we get record together for all eternity. What? We're going to be here making podcasts. Together. For Eternity. That's that that is the rule. Yeah. So we're go stand season in hell great correct. Yes. That's how it works. Yeah Have Changed for a five when you're a cashier. Exactly. Hello and welcome citation needed podcast where we choose a subject read a single article about it on Wikipedia and pretend we're experts because this is the Internet and boy Audi is that how it works? Bosnich Bee Pollen your ear buds for the next few minutes but I'll need someone to join us in the spirited discussion. I up to men who got confused for ghosts every time they go to the Beach Keith and Tom. To reenact the scene from ghost with the pottery? The. Joke. Is On you Eli I don't go to the beach anymore because I'm fat. Joining. There's not A. And also joining me tonight guys go snake movies and stories about no end salt. Rental. fucking change. Well, I'm trying to sleep. We will always say I ruined their fun. What super easy to ruin everything when you're not fun to begin and. Begin tonight. I'd like to tell you a scary story once upon a time, there was a podcast or who having no marketable skills had a baby during the worst financial crisis. Recorded History Realize, stupid I. Think it's Pretty Spooky. House. Condemns read I mean, yeah who's counting right? But if you'd like to learn how that story has a happy end. Just stick around till the end of the show. With that out of the way, tell us heath what person place thing concept phenomenon. We'd be talking about today we're going to be talking about the amityville horror and Noah. You've given this story the up and down are you ready to it? Is the truth at least ready to later claims that I did Eli and that's what matters. So. Why. Did you choose this subject Oh we'll do reasons First of all, I find it fascinating that such a readily refutable nothing burger of acclaim can hold the imagination of dumb people for so long. And, secondly we are Q.. Of Maybe, next week. And secondly, a very generous donor suggested it and a certain level of generosity. I will do an essay about how delicious your genitals are array. We're sure we'll know we sure will. So tell us what is the AMITYVILLE horror? Okay. So the AMITYVILLE horror was a book series and a bunch of movies but the thing that we're going to be talking about today is the bullshit true story that those properties or at least the first would've each were supposedly based on the haunting of the House on Ocean Avenue in Amityville New York and unlike virtually everything written about this any wherever we're not going to do the but was it really haunted thing because of course it wasn't and Not. Just, because it isn't true that doesn't mean it's necessarily a hoax. You could also be profiteering off of a mental illness I. Generally, that would still be a hoax. So yeah, it's definitely so. Profiteering of mental illness was this House owned by Kim Card? We'll get to it. All right. So before we the I've got to talk about a particularly grisly mass murderer and I have to go into a bit of detail not because it's pertinent to the story. But because it we we aim for at least thirty minutes on this show. There's no way. that. Without getting into detail on everything with us when okay. So we're GONNA. Start on November thirteenth of Nineteen Seventy four with a twenty three year old named Ronald Butch Defeo junior you're trying to figure out what to do with six dead bodies. Andy was like an amateur magician. So they weirdly wound up behind other people's ears. Are No. Okay. Hang on. Odds are one in six this. People. All. Right now, the bodies in question belong to his family Ronald had shot his mother, his bothering his four siblings ages nine to eighteen for reasons known only to him. If anyone around three o'clock in the morning, and then he sat around for twelve or thirteen hours thinking fuck man somebody is bound to notice that. After he cooks up this half ass planet taking a bath, changing his clothes, hide the evidence, and then running into a bar and going holy fuck somebody's shot my family I. Bet it was the MA. WHO ONCE? It took him thirteen hours to come up with that, right. I hope to hear what he came up with a couple of men. Are I what do I do what do I do I'm thinking murder all the other people who? Feels like a whole thing. Right couch snack. Right, so his a mob Hitman, did it excuse lasted for most of that evening because when you say the mob go by family, the cops tend to hold onto you for protective reasons right and cops did to be interested in white people murders in general but all the more. So when you're led to believe that the mafia is involved, right so they start asking Ronald for details and wild inconsistencies in his story lead to a real quick change a suspect. He confesses to the murder the following day. How does it to be consistent with that? Very simple fucking story. Sorry. Officer did I say they came through the door and shot him? No no no I mean they swim through the skylight and I killed my family. Okay. But to be fair, he broke under intense interrogation pressures such as really. Jonathan. Swan. Twice I. got. Answer the. Family bought same every time every time. All right. So was the confession despite the confession Ronald still fought the charge in court, and this is where we meet William Weber attorney at law Weber's going to loop back into the story and a crazy fucking way. But for right now, all he's doing is mounting an affirmative defense of insanity which will prove unsuccessful Ronald Defeo junior is convicted on six counts of second degree murder and sentenced to six concurrent sentences of twenty five to life. And as near as I can tell, they're leaning towards life because he's been in jail for forty five years now, and he still is apparently I've never understood concurrent sentencing thing like I want. You concur it bill paying like. Right my mortgage payment so can you also apply that to my car and my credit cards to that'd be an ex I killed six people. Ripping executive order about that last. All right. So on December nineteenth of nineteen, seventy, five, fifteen days after Ronald sentence was handed down George and Kathy Lutz move into the house where the murders had taken place. Apparently, they got a hell of a deal on it. They bought it for eighty thousand dollars, which is damn near four, hundred grand in today's money and that's a lot of money. Yes. But it's also a lot of fucking house. It's a five bedroom house on a canal with the boathouse. No Pool we were in the same house was sold in two thousand, sixteen it was listed at eight, hundred, fifty thousand. And if the price of the house was an awesome enough, they also picked up the murdered families furniture sell for a whopping four. Hundred dollars deal. All right. Great for a young couple. Little breakfast nook sounds perfect and it says Jackson pollock Motif on the poster. Eighth Eighty thousand dollars the ghosts are still worth it. All right. So the lots were newlyweds they'd been married for about five months and Cathy was bringing along three kids from her previous marriage, two sons and a daughter ranging from five to nine, and in one of the most useless pieces of information that I have ever seen in a wikipedia article I also learned they owned a crossbreed Malamute Labrador named hairy. And there was a link. To, breed in case I needed to know more about that is there. Is there a link to let us know if he was a good boy I very was. No matter. How many times he edits the wikipedia article? No, there is. Back again. All right. So this family moves in and because people are stupid they're a little worried about the heck's triple homicide that happened there a year earlier. So they decided to get the house blessed, and because we as a society continue to turn a blind eye to the ramp con artistry and Unapologetic Bet Shiri that has religion. There are plenty of people available to magically cleanse one's home of murdering in the phone book mob hit Mass Murderer Home blessing company can I can help you. please. So harsh about this whole thing though they're just looking for some sage advice. Question is, how do you shop around for that service? Is it an Angie's list? Father Tony He. Blessed our house. An hasn't been haunted for years. Yeah. What? So I should point out by the way that we have now entered into the realm of questionable bullshit up until now, shit was relatively uncontroversial. Because the murderer got much national attention. There actually are people that dispute the conviction and believe the Defeo family really was killed by a Mafia hitman. then. Dressed Ronald and force them to confess decribe up to and including telling the cassette not killed by Oxfam's razor. That's. But other than those astles we can all agree about the murder and the subsequent purchase of the House that is the last thing that we're going to be able to agree with the Sol's on even that they call the priest to bless the House will be suspect before this is interesting. I think we can all agree that Noah. Has. What You seem really hung up on the bathing partner if I came home in the Mafia had murdered my whole family I. Think a little time with Mr Bubble might be warranted. That's. That's fair. Yeah. Right. Right. So anyway, they they call a priest to bless the House and they wind up with Father Ralph J Pecoraro in the subsequent book and movie based on these events this guy is renamed men so and extensively that's for privacy reasons but it's also because of all the shit, they were later going to happen to the sky. It's fucking nonsense naming the guy had supposedly happened to makes that way easier to disprove yeah. We're gotTA protect this guy's identity. She call him Father Bobby Bucher Pizza. Man coucilman Chris. It's so according to the story. By story I mean both the book and the later claims lots of Pecoraro comes over to bless the House while their unpacking and apparently that presses involves going from room to room mumbling Harry, potter, spells and magic water running. and. He's in of the bedrooms when suddenly something mystifying happens he hears a mysterious voice say good. And he feels an invisible hand smack him in the face which I mean he's a Catholic per probably deserve that. A later, he allegedly developed blisters on his hands that were similar to STIGMATA. If only cameras that existed. Or. Even just yelp. for Mr Pecoraro like misprint grow arrived on time brought his own magic water. That was nice. But he did get easily beat up by the ghost of a trial. Terrible blessing. Of course, this is where the haunting starts in earnest, and one of the things that I really love about this story is that the claims of supernatural occurrences always seemed to mix in just mundane shit happens in houses with the ramblings of an UNMEDICATED, psychopaths? Here. Are Two examples both from the Click Beatty website biography dot com quote. The let's family claim to smell strange odours see green slime oozing out of the walls and. and. Experience. In certain areas. One of these things is not like the other. Yeah. I mean the key when buying houses to get a good in. Specter. Shit. Walk into your house like is it drafty and here just me this it is slimy though it's slimy works right subjects. Toast I felt toes. Wait, wait I haven't even better example I loved the so-called damage quote a this is more examples of the hunting. A nearby garage door opening and closing. This is the two things you can do. Garage door did would be it's a nine. Closed. Quote goes here by garage door opening and closing Unin visible spirit knocking down in the kitchen rabbit. Pig like creature with red eyes storing down at Georgia and his son Daniel from the. Ocean. Pig Demon I will be with you in a second of cooking knife just fellow. I told you the knife thing was going to be a distraction for my pig demon thing now. Dumb. squally. But yeah, a lot of phenomenon were stuff like it smelled weird and it was cold in the foyer. No matter how high we cranked up the Thermostat but there are also a few things slightly less believable George claim that his wife would suddenly transform into a ninety year old woman from time to time. Yeah. His kids beds with leap around like chattering teeth and doors would violently ripped themselves off of their hinges even when they were locked. Okay. At. One Point George and Kathy claim that they found cloven hoof prints in the snow leading a wink from there. If you follow them, it leads to a really sad little pig person. Why? I have to wonder if George Kathy didn't have different feelings about that whole haunting situation now. Jesus you see the door flap, the fuck it hinges. Now I missed that. You missed you missed the door tearing itself violently from the frame of the House and fleeing itself about under it's over how did you miss that? Yeah. Like paying canny crash in united just kind of get in the zone and playing candy crush digi lock the door you should try locking door lock the door the door to walk the God. Damn. It look the fucking doorframes ripped apart saying. If. You'd lock the door. This probably wouldn't happen so. You suddenly ninety years old. What is Yeah I noticed that that's the thing I'm thinking of getting some bow tax, maybe a fraction laser treatment or seventy. Should Ocean this bed is vibrating like crazy we have got to get out of here. Yeah. You go I timothy if anything else happens. You take off your pants I thought you were leaving remember to lock the door. So let's split in the House on January fourteenth of Nineteen Seventy six, twenty, eight days after they moved in they left their belongings behind never step foot back in the house though they did eventually pay movers to come back and back up all their shit they sold the house a year later for about two thirds would they paid for it and while a ton of doubt was cast on their story both George and Kathy would go to their graves insisting that the haunting was real. But but they were lying. All right well, if but I super duper lying isn't gonNA hold up around here I need some new alibis. Apropos of nothing. Minions come forth. Belle are the unforgiven. Dave Walnut from paramus new. Jersey low. How goes are Amityville project quite well evilness as you know, the young boy opened a portal of power when he murdered his family. Use that to appear to them in my darkest four that's of greed in Carnet. The very same lord no better way to shake them to their very souls. Oh. You're going again. I thought we take turns. Know you go ahead. Art I'll go. Oh, that's fine. Yeah I. I moved a knife around. In their kitchen. Perhaps toward the open hand of the father and station, but perhaps over the gentle throat of a newborn. Know. What's Kinda tipped it over? spooked him something awful. Let me tell you spook them all away. Not Get over it. It spooked him. Yeah Bailiff Flam it's. Balare right. Bar Yeah spook them real good. I think did a good job, right? Right right Dave. Yeah. We're not really going for spooky here. Right we're aiming for the eternal damnation of their souls, a loss of their faith in God you're something. Poker. All right. How about this? I'm. GonNa, make their. Like real drafty. Real drag. Yeah. Yeah. Like like Whoa. drafty in here in this foyer. Right. Evil drafty. Why don't you open the garage door loser? And we're back. No we left off a man was mentally ill and then so where some other people maybe I'm sure everyone treated that story with respect and dignity deserved, right? Okay. All right. Thanks. No. We're GONNA, find out no profiteering bastards so Now. You're talking about the aftermath of the horror, but but let me just say first of all this wikipedia article has been the site of more major battles than the Assan. So River Oh wow. Yeah. We all know how that those. Battles there went. All of us know apples comparison. APT Nice socities river. Fabulous. Listen Dan Carlin got. David Okay. So The criticism, I, she the criticisms and controversy segment of this article is one thousand words lots and it has no fewer than twelve citation needed tags and a half dozen other clarification needed and dubious disgust tags littered in with all of those dog wasn't good whatever. Some of these are very sensible. Many of them also aren't like at one point. One editor wrote in like neighbors didn't report anything unusual and somebody. Who has delivered gonNA site the neighbors. Thing. So almost immediately after the lots just move out of the house in Amityville they started negotiating. Rights to their story with publishers because you know what better way to follow up in the most terrifying moment in your life than by voluntarily reliving it for hours and hours at a stretch right away. So eventually, they settled on the publisher and this is where Jay Anson enters the picture. He's a writer whose entire Canon of work at this point consisted of writing the promotional shorts for movies. Right. Like the the making of docu shorts for Clint Eastwood Flex that they would play on NBC and Shit. That's what he wrote. The AMITYVILLE horror would be as I novel as well as his penultimate. I get it Ralph Ellison's Sylvia Plath, the Amityville Guy. WHO ARE AUTHORS BAN BY PUBLIC SCHOOLS? Full of Christian. People at the school board. Or the book comes out in September of Nineteen seventy seven and the movie comes out in July of Nineteen seventy-nine, a mere three and a half years after the events those are I'm sorry. The first movie came out of the twenty one movies that allegedly stemming from this story that's not counting documentaries by the way. and. If all this entertainment industry turnaround sounds insanely fast that's because it is. It's almost like all of this was planned out in advance even before they bought the fucking house, which was the allegation of a lawsuit of around that time by one William Weber, remember him was the lawyer that unsuccessfully defended Ronald Defeo will according to Weber's lawsuit he and the lots cooked up the whole haunting story over a couple of bottles of wine and agreed to split the profits when they sold the story it was in fact, their failure to split said profits that led to the lawsuit bottle the red bottle of fright. Okay we're GONNA make a fortune on this story guys. We'll just need to murder six people to create the ghosts. Or? So in Weber's defense, his lawsuit was actually a countersuit. He'd gone public already admitting that the whole thing was a hoax and the lots of sued him along with good housekeeping, the New York, Sunday News in the hearst corporation, all of whom had printed his claims. So of course, the suits against dues companies are thrown out but Weber countersuits breach of contract. So, he basically argued like, all right your honor we were supposed to split the ghost money after my defendant murdered those six people supposed to split it. I am still a lawyer. Giuliani it's not hard. So yeah. So this lawsuit is hurting someone of Nineteen seventy-nine. The movie is still in theaters at that point and in the conclusion of the Lawsuit Judge Jack B Weinstein dismisses the let's claims altogether and said quote based on what I have heard. It appears to me to a large extent. The book is a work of fiction relying in large part upon the suggestions of Mr Weber and quote. He added after that and Sir Ma'am dressing in a sheet and going did not help. especially. The second time because I already told you anyway. But that leads to this fascinating question right? Why the fuck is the defense attorney for the murderer cooking up stories with the people that bought his house. There's been some speculation that he was planning on using the claims to somehow get a new trial for a client but. Nothing I've Seen Presents A. Bucket. And I think one myself who white sheets no, that didn't work before. There were ghosts of these murder people here before I'm murdered. No if you can't imagine that argument, you've never had a conversation with someone who thinks Adnan didn't do it. So I. Got Some forums story genuinely has turned a corner though we're inside believable stuff like immoral attorneys. That's Good? All right. So the most likely story though about why Weber's involved is just he saw that there was money to be made the exorcist came out in nineteen seventy-three. It was crazy successful and it wouldn't have taken a genius to figure out that another based on true events horror story would be worth a fortune to the people who controlled those rights. He winds up connected to this gruesome crime that already had a ton of press. Right? People were already talking about it and then either he recruits to lots of or he reaches out to them. When they buy the house, it's knocks on the door. Hi William Weather congrats on the house. Chance you guys are immoral frogs. Great. Great. All right. So long story short. rock beats scissors. I already created the ghosts so. You guys need to get haunted for a little bit I guess. Running. Of course so not everybody is convinced that Weber's claims of a hoax are legitimate. It was literally adjudicated in a court of God Day of law and while it's true that there's no way to prove his claims or at least no way I. Know of that doesn't mean we can't prove that the lutzes our full of shit about their claims and not just in a beds don't jump up and down and latest don't float kind way. Literally every single thing that could feasibly be checked up on was checked up on and even the mundane details turned out to be lying. Will little baby pig person in the bushes quietly sobbing because no one takes him. seriously. So. Sad. Hey don't worry. Baby pig person. Someday you're going to be the president. Chill. Let's start with the pre sky. Father. Pecoraro up. Now he had never gave any interviews about this to the media, but he did testify by phone in this aforementioned trial and not only did he disavow every single thing they said about him he says, he actually never went to the fucking house. He just talked to George Lots on the phone once about a claim of supernatural shit going on at his house and I was like Oh yes. Somebody was violently killed and then return from the dead with a message for the living. Eighty, do you take me? Disclosure I should point out. Claim that Pecoraro did do an on camera interview about the incident in which he corroborated the entire story but he did show with his identity disguised because he was afraid of the professional repercussions. If he was directly connected to this horror movie stuff the guy who works for the Child Rape Kabbah was worried about it. And and an interview does exist with a priest whose identity has been obscured who says that? Yes, I went to the house and all this shit happened but it was on that's incredible and. Shows anything at all about show basically knows that that means it was definitely bullshit. Really. Hope this represents the only time that that's incredible is cited as WICCA. PD. Yeah I feel like we need day better citation needed tag on we. Got One. Yeah. The DOLLOP, which is. That was a compliment to you guys the capital. Of course, there's much more urine to spray on this story still because there's also physical evidence that it's bullshit remember the claims about doors that would rip themselves off their hinges and tear through their locks. We did a skit about in everything well, according to Barbara Cromartie lady who eventually bought the house post haunting all of the locks and hinges in the house were still original material, right? The original hardware and this was backed up by a film crew from the show. That's incredible. You can literally see that the painting Shit hadn't been retouched around any of the hinges or anything. Yeah. We're actually renaming our show. That's mundane. Also, there's fucking meteorological data to refute their claims which I absolutely love. Yeah the. Claim that at one point they found the hoof prints in the snow one morning leading away from the house well. We. Keep records of when it snows and it hadn't snowed around that time. So either will brought snow with more. Definitively Bullshit. Just Satan stubborn around in the backyard. Okay. This this isn't working. I feel stupid. We Miss Know Guy. This is one of those like knock down one domino kind of situations right? Unless we believe that they actually did see a red eyed pig demon and floating beds and Shit, and they were like you know without some hoof prints to sell this thing nobody's GonNa. If citation needed has taught us anything it's that if anyone ever remotely competent decides to be a fraud, they will never ever Beca-. Current Congress. Yeah who? Of course, all of that evidence just proves the claims to be wrong not racist, wrong. So I want to add one more little refutation, which is a bit of a minor when the legend around the House that's presented in both the book, and the movie is that the reason the house is haunted is because it sits on the place with a Shinnecock Indians Vanden. They're mentally ill and dying and unless random white people from long island know more about the shinnecock history than the actual local native American leaders in historians. That's also bullshit. I feel like this isn't a throw stones moment either it's like hard to find a place in America where we don't abandon are mentally ill and die. That's true. And No. If you had to summarize what you've learned in one sentence, what would it be? My House is haunted. Pay Me. A. podcast bullshit. You live in Georgia give it a second. Are you ready for the quiz? Sure. Why not? All right. No was the nineteen seventy-nine movie about this filmed in Tom's river New Jersey. Instead of Amityville. In Long Island New York. Hey the long island highways were jammed with broken heroes on a last chance power drive. See that's born to run everybody, fuck. Dinner. I Said thank you for your forty five zero. I appreciate it. So. Yeah. It was born forty five years ago. I. Was listening to fucking the boss forty five years ago. Concerns obscure reference that's my. I. Fuck. Okay. Well this no. This is. Billy Joel reference. Here's a hope so. The Fuck is Billy Joel Women Twenty five years old. So moving on to be everybody. Again, why was movie filmed in Tom's river New Jersey is The question earlier. Option B. Location in new, Jersey Tom's river. New Jersey did a better job of capturing the true nature of the garbage human beings involved story. See Local Government of Amityville New York refused to allow filming because they didn't want to be associated with the garbage human beings involve. The above e answers A. and B. Only F- answers errands. Jeez answers, B and C only album. This. Obviously. A can't be a or anything about who the fuck is ever even heard that reference. Answers. Be NCO. That's actually correct. Yeah. We're also jammed with broken heroes and Alaska. All Right No. What was the favored drink of the amityville murderer? Hey, shooters. Being a bloody Mary. See Anything, made with Red Rum. All, right. Well, I could tell I can tell Tom. We were really hard on see. So we're GONNA go see. I know what's the best name for pig person? Connery the. Goes by Hamlet, but his real name is Francis Bacon. B. C E smalls. Neal's bore or e Sarah Huckabee Sanders. All right. Well I'll tell you what you're really trying to get me with either but obviously it's the one that's going to Piss Eli. Is GonNa have to be be. It is be hit as P. All right. Well, I didn't have to do the PUN slash wordplay play part of the show this week. So I'm the winner. And I choose to do the next essay, right? Right. Well for no Tom. I'm alive thanking you for hanging out with us today. We'll be back next week, and by then will be an expert on something else between now and then you can check out heath and Noah at their spooky new show how and where I live respectively. Some new show ghost hunters with guns, and you check out my blog just been dead for twenty. And if you'd like to help keep this show going and my baby, not to starve make. Donations Patriot dot com slash citation pot or a five star review. Everywhere you can. Get DARVA fucking baby. Choices is Yo- seeker. To get in touch with us. Check. Out. Connect with us on social media or check the show notes be sure to check out citation pod, dot com, and remember nowhere haunted because nothing happens when you die. Christine Hi. Belong rise from your bed and kill your parents in the name of the Dock Lor. Man. Also puts who's in the drawer. seriously. Dave. seriously. Sorry. Do your thing. Your's is pretty good.

Amityville murder William Weber Ronald George Kathy Tom Noah Eli Ronald Defeo Father Ralph J Pecoraro New York Audi Dave Walnut Georgia Ronald Butch Defeo Beach Keith Tony He Alaska
206 - The Strange Kidnapping of Patty Hearst

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

2:07:55 hr | 1 year ago

206 - The Strange Kidnapping of Patty Hearst

"Today we dissect the OH. So strange kidnapping and subsequent criminal activities committed along with her captors of Patty Hearst Aka Patricia Hearst Aka the daughter of Randolph Hearst Aka the granddaughter of one of the richest men on Earth when he was alive William Randolph hearst. Patty came from so much privilege. She was someone who knew from the moment you could comprehend what money was and what it can do for you that she would personally never want for cash that her financial needs would always be taken care of things to immense family wealth. She lived a sheltered life free from worries and struggles most of the world faces and have always faced at least she did until she was kidnapped at the age of nineteen by these Symbionese Liberation Army a group of Berkeley radicals led by Donald to freeze born into almost opposite circumstances Patricia in Donald's lives would collide when Donald had formed a group of radical militants with some friends. He met in prison decided to kidnap Patty in an attempt to make her wealthy family feed. The hungry of San Francisco a step towards the destruction of what he saw as an evil oppressive American society built on capitalistic greed. Donald wanted to start a revolution and he saw kidnapping the air to a media empire is being a big step towards kick in that shit off and while the revolution. Ever came, it wasn't due to lack of effort. There was no joke. They executed hearst kidnapping with ruthless efficiency and carried out murders, robberies and bombings and Patty hearst not long after her kidnapping began to help commit some of these crimes people around the world watched in awe as the strange story unfolded after patties kidnapping his days turn to weeks and weeks turned into months. They washed his patty. Transition from pleading for her family to bring her home to blaming her family for many of society's ills and telling the world that the La was a noble organization. She was proud to be a soldier within this organization Patricia denounced her family and multiple recorded messages that were played for all of America over the radio claim that she had evolved into comrade of the Revolutionary Force to fight fascists. Why did you do this a psychological condition known as Stockholm Syndrome May, be to blame. It Patty truly enjoy being a member of the SA a sheltered rich girl living life on the wild side is many acclaimed or had her captors truly truly brainwashed her this week we're gonNA talk about some socially turbulent times. The seventies when a bunch of young people cross America outdid themselves to prove who could be the most radical the most militant the most shocking. We're GONNA talk about bombs and FBI raids will detail who patty hearst was who her kidnappers were and will follow her kidnapping and following crimes free as leads into the first trial of the century windy stop being a hostage and start being a member of the gang. Trying to answer this question and more on today's radical militant communist is shit easy bojangles addition of time times. This is Michael McDonald and you're listening to time suck. was. Happy Monday mates sex. Welcome to the cult of the curious you beautiful bastards. He'll Nimrod I'll see my dreams lives Athena. Praise bojangles glory be to triple. M. May yacht rock tour soon, be allowed to once more sailed to sonic season bring their live music to the people. I'm Dan coming suck nasty the masters sucker owner proprietor of skywalker ranch. anti-cull. Coca leader and you're listening to time suck a quick couple messages for stand up comedy fans. I have a new standard. Everywhere you get albums these days, Pandora spotify Itunes, Amazon. It's CETERA. It's called live in Denver afresh recording from right before covid shutdown stand up There's a lot of my favorite bids perform was zero profanity hundred percent safe for everyone. No matter how prudish. WanNa play something some some mixed company of mine worry a lot less about offending anyone. This is the album to play as opposed to say the fish suck or or any other standup album I have showbiz no peanut butter on this one bimbos back hats. So there's that excited to have at least one album to prove to people that I can be funny. If I you know one clean I don't have to be dirty as you just enjoyed. some bad news following my agents advise all of my remaining twenty twenty toxic dot stand up tour dates have been moved to next year. Please, contact venues directly for refunding transfer policies it just simply too hard in the current environment, not knowing what areas are going to be locked down and win things keep changing so fast and I don't want to go out on the road be stuck away from my family stuck away from the podcast studio here start missing episodes I, struggle to get home I don't WanNa end up stuck across the country for two weeks because my temperature spikes at the airport and now I, can't catch my flight back to Court Elaine back to spokane and then and then driving over recoiling you get an A. and I. also just You know I don't WanNa perform in a room full of masks I WANNA see your faces I wanna know if you're smiling or scowling. You know a lot of lot of standard for me is Kinda. You know reading the room and engaging the cadence and the tempo a little bit based on that. Shift, my content, but you know I, feed off of what I see body language is not just laughs. Come back and I. I. Just I don't know. It just sounds like a nightmare and I've talked a bunch of comic friends and they say not fun. Not Not. Fun To do stand up in the current Club environment. Some hoping shit clears up by two, thousand, twenty one and the tour. All the dates are already lined up. Our everything's been moved there should be replacement as for all the dates I was going to do in twenty twenty and really really fingers crossed hoping it's going to happen optimistic. It will sorry again, if this messed up your plans and thanks for continuing to listen to me podcast 'cause I do love this as well. Okay. So also got some new hats in the store bad magic MERCH DOT COM check those out. No Frankenstein sized hats. That will fit like a giant headline at the moment but has the will fit nine percent. Thanks to Logan. Keith art warlock for make him look Oh so good. And and last thing before diving in today's story is set mainly in central California and heart goes out that thousands of people recently displaced by so many crazy fucking fires going on. Man's crazy storms out in the midwest crazy fires on top of everything else this year I'm recording this on Thursday August twentieth. Hopefully, by the time you hear it, these fires are contained. Now, let's get to suck in one hell of a tail. Not, a ton of setup needed for this one, but but decent amount info we're going to go over before we get into the time line we will jump at the time line to get You know feel for cultural events that that lead to SLA's creation kidnapping a hearse demo follow the group's exploits right up to the eventual deaths, a members and incarceration of others will cover patties life and timeline from the time she was kidnapped up until the present day I though I want to feel for hearst family's fortune right? The her family and in who donald the freeze was and why he formed the SLA. It's important to know the M-. The kind of money the Patricia hearst came from on February Twentieth Nineteen Fifty Four Patricia Campbell hearst was born in San Francisco the third of five daughters of Randolph appleton hearst and Catherine Wood Campbell. and. Her and I basically did have the exact same childhood in so many ways while most parents, the nineteen fifties read the newspaper attended the movies, visit museums, patio parents printed the newspapers, created movies and established museums. Normal families voted for or against politicians patio those politicians over for dinner. So same. Her parents were in charge of a media empire. My Mom were two grocery store that did sell some magazines she grew up in a mansion. mainly. Trailers in apartments tomato tomato. She grew up in the bay area full of museums and concerts and culture, and the Hustle and bustle of a major metropolis and I grew up in a small town in Idaho. County. There was the butt of jokes for most people living and other small Idaho County talents because we were even smaller and more backwards than they were She had hired help serving her five course meals I had either whatever my grandparents were cooking at night or had to make my own ham and cheese hot pockets or readers cheese burritos. We both had pools. So okay, that's pretty cool. Sure. Hers was in grounds and heated an enormous and cleaned by professionals in mine came in a box and k. mart and was literally never cleaned not even one time until the garden hose. Then last long because me and my friends ripped to fucking hole thin plastic wall and water poured out and turn part of the art into a swamp real met basically though we live the same life separated only by time just socioeconomic status. I can't relate to her childhood on any level she grew up in so much wealth patty the grew up in just about the highest level of privilege one could grow up in. Northern California's is saying a lot for an area that consistently ranks as one of the top three most expensive city to live in an entire night like like if you grow up part of the elite class of San Francisco, you're going to be part of the elite class pretty much fucking anywhere. You know it's very different than be like one of the wealthiest families in elko Nevada which might not mean shit in in the bay area looking back patty would describe her childhood as really pretty. Perfect. To quote really pretty perfect How many can say that she grew up primarily in the suburb of Hillsborough attended it's crystal Spring School for Girls in the Santa Catalina School in Monterey. Sure both of schools were very similar December high school and junior high right and in school. Teachers you know. she didn't briefly attended the tiny private Menlo College in Atherton California, thirty miles south of San Francisco Atherton known for being one of the wealthiest towns per capita. If not, the wealthiest in America it has the most expensive zip code an entire us. If you WanNa go to Menlo College, it has less than eight hundred total undergraduates. You need a lot of don't. Orlando loans and scholarships tuition alone is forty-five grade of the year. And increasing by couple of thousand every year and you're not gonNA find a cheap place to rent in that area about it is about six grand cheaper than Harvard Nyu if you're looking for a deal. I transferred to the University of California Berkeley, a school her family had very deep connections with several buildings on campus named after various hers family members because they've given so much damn money to the school over the years. There's the hearst memorial mining building the hearst field annex the hearst Jim Pool hearst tennis courts, the Phoebe, a hearst museum of anthropology. phoebe is Patties great-grandma will meet her in a bit. So let's let's examine. How wealthy Patty's family is in was. Short answer superwealthy like unbelievably wealthy like I'm proud of driving around a nice not fully loaded but not a base model two, thousand, sixteen, F one, fifty, a little bit of window tinting. leveling kit custom wheels. I. Like it at very much. The heirs to the hearst family could each pay someone to buy brand new fully loaded F one, fifty right drive it off the lot straight to a fucking junkyard and just have destroyed. They could do that every single day for an entire year and just not noticed a difference in the lifestyle. As of two thousand sixteen the most recent year we could find the list we were looking for the hearst family was the ninth richest family in the US with around twenty, eight, billion dollars worth of assets. Fully loaded new GONNA. Set you back about seventy five grant. If the hers family used their fortune to buy nothing but loaded F. One fifties, they could by roughly four, hundred, thousand of them. Or. Eight, thousand, ten, million dollar homes where did all this money come from the used to be even more wealthy than this actually the hearst corporation traces, its roots to one of the richest men of his era William. Randolph hearst, Patty's grandfather but the money didn't start with a Willie Randy. Willie Randy. was born rich son of another very wealthy man named George Hirst phoebe husband. A Patricia Great Grandpa George was a very successful American businessmen minor and politician born in eighteen twenty. And, George was not born into money. He's really where it starts. He was born very much a part of America's working class George Hirst was born near Present Day Sullivan Missouri, just under seventy miles southeast of Saint Louis. Children of Scots, Irish immigrants is grandfather was taken off a boat and onto American soil as a small child in seventeen, sixty, six numerous family members were granted farmland in the colony of south. Carolina. George grew up on a farm. One of three children grow up in a log cabin in Franklin County. No AC no central see no heat other than the law though with the stove. His education consisted of some some elementary school. nothing else not quite like a Menlo college or UC Berkeley level of education. George like his parents before him became Missouri farmer but he wasn't content with just farming. He wanted gold as gold in them hills, kind of gold. On eighteen twenty, nine, hundred was nine years old. There was a huge gold rush and Appalachian Mountains, of Georgia, by the way, and that word is to prevent emails I I did a little extra deep dive in on Appalachian Appalachian both totally acceptable people who live in the Appalachian or Appalachian Mountains say the word both ways. by eighteen, forty, most of the gold to be. In Georgia at least with eighteen forty mining tools was gone by eight and forty eight prospectors were flooding to California. They're heading West for some major strikes two years earlier. Eighteen, forty, six, Georgia's father died at age twenty, six became the head of the family interested in mining since he was a kid, he did a little bit of money locally not enough to improve his fortune and some substantial way. But enough to get a taste for how much the right strike could increase your fortune and enough to realize he was good at it. He had a knack for it. He was a man with a nose for valuable minerals. He did take off for California in eighteen fifty once the family was nice and set Missouri arriving near Sutter's mill on the American river over forty miles east of Sacramento he didn't find much his first winter west. He moved forty miles north after that to the grass valley and made a decent living run courts, mines ranching, and running a general store for decade wasn't wealthy yet but doing well. Then in the summer of eighteen, fifty nine, he buys a one six interest in the Oh for silver mine near Virginia City. Nevada. Super Cool. Little western town if you ever can swing through it. I love that little town and then the following winter thirty, eight tons of silver or are taken out of that mine. It produced a profit of ninety one thousand dollars close to three million in today's dollars just at first winner, which means I made the equivalent of half a million in any made that you know quick and you use that money to buy more shares of claims in mind such as the Ontario Silver Mine in Park, City, Utah the Anaconda mine in Butte Montana. He didn't just take that initial money and walkaway hoard it like some would have done. I could have done that but if he did, he would have never become wealthy you might have been well off but now wealthy instead of wealthy people do he invested his first big score in in chances to hit more big scores calculated risks and he did hit more and more big scores. Then in eighteen sixty two, he returned to Missouri at the age of forty two to be with his dying mother, and while back at home, he married nineteen year old phoebe Anderson, a local teacher known to have the nicest ass and all of Franklin county she was known by more people as sweet cheeks than she was by her birth name phoebe was a pagan nudist which was unusual for that part of Missouri at that time and many things she put a witch spell on George to convince him to marry her. and. Of course stuff I said after local teacher was true I know nothing. About notoriety or lack there of phoebe budgets I'm I'm guessing she would be shocked an appalled disgusted. If you heard me say that Georgia probably challenged me to do you know defender on her Eighteen sixty to the nation was engulfed in civil war and George decided to skip it. He Sweet Jake's kidding phoebe turn their eyes away from the strife of north versus south and just headed back West to continue building his fortune. They settled in San Francisco had their only child William Randolph hearst a Willa Randy in eighteen sixty three George continued to reinvest his money. He found a number of mining operation including the highly successful homestake mine in the Black Hills a South Dakota that mind didn't stop producing golden till two, thousand, one this this one mine. One of many George would own at least a large percentage of produce more than forty million troy ounces of gold during his lifetime. Gold was just over two thousand dollars an ounce, the other day forty, million ounces times two, thousand that's eighty billion dollars. George also began a career in politics shortly after returning west, he was elected to the California state assembly in eighteen, sixty, four one of a dozen men represent San Francisco in eighteen eighty he bought the San Francisco Examiner or if you believe the legend, he wanted gambling. So it was given to him to cover some gambling debts. This'll become the flagship of the hearst media empire, George himself never really care about it never really be a a big newspaper, Guy His. Son Oh, Shit. Georgia's appointed to be a US senator in eighteen, eighty six to fill a vacancy, and later that year is elected as a Democrat have remained a senator until his death in eighteen, ninety one and also puts on Willie Randolph in charge of the examiner in eighteen, eighty, seven, four years before his death and what's phoebe doing during all this living luxuriously she's traveled around Europe trouble on numerous times beginning eighteen, seventy three she's split time between a variety of lavish hearst homes in the bay area he's spoiled Little Willie Randy. George would say about his son, there's only one thing that's sure about my boy when wants cake he wants cake and he wants it now and I noticed that after a while it gets the cake. Nice noise who doesn't want that kind of childhood kind. We always get the fucking cake. Phoebe all sorts of buildings for various educational uses. As you already know, she became a major benefactor to the university of California Berkeley. She served as its first female regent, remaining on the board from eighteen ninety seven until her death in nineteen nineteen. Now, let's look and see how Paddy's GRANDPA Willie Randy took the hearst fortune to even greater heights than his father. first before he started building fourteen party is ass off at Harvard and waste of his parents money young really hurts was expelled after two years of college for antics ranging from sponsoring massive beer parties in Harvard Square. Descending Chamber Pots Aka Turbbach it's to his professors with their images drawn into the bottom of the bowls. Pretty sweet spoiled asshole rich kid or American hero maybe both. I love to go into great detail regarding how he transformed his father's newspaper into national media empire. But that would. Require, a second Willie himself, which probably do one of these days This particular hearst also played a large part in the criminalization of marijuana in America. Is a bit of a Belen using his vast media empire to publish a lot of reefer madness propaganda bullshit that's for another day. the short version of how he grew. His money further is by nineteen twenties after taking control of the examiner in eighteen eighty seven, which was actually struggling when he took it over Willie Randy own the first nationwide media chain which included Harper's Bazaar The New York Morning Journal good housekeeping. His Empire became notorious for its quote unquote yellow journalism talked about this a bit in my Ted Talk Yellow. Journalism is sensationalist lurid style of reporting the kind that were just used to. Now the majority of journalism now is I would say yellow journalism less emphasis on fact more emphasis on opinion spin extreme you know eye-catching headlines. Because this new more entertaining style of presenting the news hearst publications attained an unprecedented amount of circulation at its height is estimated that one in five Americans were reading hers papers, every Fucking Day. William would also invest in radio movies and television in Nineteen Zero three to thirty, four year old Hurst Mary. The twenty year old millicent Veronica Wilson millicent will give birth to five sons George Randolph hearst William Randolph Hurst. Junior John Randolph I just love rotate in the same names. He's Eagle Maniacs and then the twins randolph another end up at Persson hearst and David Whitmire hearst. Randolph Appleton is patty hearst father was born in Nineteen fifty. Let's talk about his dad more the by nine hundred, twenty-five, her album required newspapers in every section of the United States as well as several magazines. He published books produced movies. Then in the nineteen twenties, he built a grandiose castle on a two hundred and forty thousand acre. Ranch. On the California coast in San San Simone California, two hundred and forty miles south of San Francisco. He furnished his residential complex with a vast collection of antiques and art objects. The bought in Europe a playwright, George Bernard Shaw famously described Castle as the place God would have built. If he'd had the money, it is not one hundred, fifteen rooms thirty eight bedrooms over forty bathrooms a theater, a beauty salon, a giant indoor Rome until giant outdoor pools, and it originally sat on three hundred, seventy, five square miles of private land. Everything was made custom for it. Now, this isn't fucking particle board. This is like exotic marble. Crazy expensive materials at the peak of his fortune in nineteen thirty, five Willie fucking Randy owned twenty eight major newspapers, eighteen magazines, several radio stations, movie companies. New Services. The Great Depression of the Nineteen Thirties would seriously weaken his financial position, but he would rebound you know in the in the forties and then he died in one, thousand, nine, fifty, one to age eighty, eight and Patricia's father Randolph. I was the last surviving of his five boys and the one that would inherit his father's vast fortune when Randolph died in two thousand and his estate was. Valued at one point, eight, billion dollars. So you know I, it wasn't as big as it was at one time but still billionaires the Modern Day corporation which owns forty-six newspapers three hundred and forty magazines around the globe as valuable stakes and cable channels like ESPN lifetime a-a-any it's currently chaired by William Randolph hearst the third guy love to keep the name, his family. Patty second cousin. Her father's cousin's son. The hearst corporation is the rare private corporation with over ten billion dollars in annual revenue. Okay. So sorry for the detour there. But an important part of the story is why the SLA chose to kidnapped Patty hearst they chose her because in the bay area, her name was synonymous with extreme wealth old money. If you're a communist revolutionary type living in the bay area, you know all about the her family and they represent to you the worst of capitalistic greed. Now let's talk about these people who oppose capitalism especially, the kind of capitalism I practice and when I say posed I mean committed to committing serious fucking violence and what law enforcement deemed domestic terrorism easy bojangles easy. So now as we talk about communism, all right, you know that good what calm calm down. Painting the decade of the seventies with broad strokes. Yes. Mentioned an economic depression, an oil crisis. the end of the flower child era, and for many of those former flower children a descent into drugs and various colts for many. The seventies wasn't nonstop late night disco parties fuelled by Coke in quotes for some was, they must've had fucking blast great but for many with an uncertain, even exceedingly pessimistic time. Tim Finley. San Francisco Chronicle and rolling, stone. the man who discovered the identities of the Simbi. Symbionese there you. Take me second few times that word the semi's liberation. Army said this of the Nineteen Seventies in San? Francisco. The mid seventy s the antiwar movement beginning to climb simply because Vietnam War was ending. There was less and less the mass movement going on in Berkeley and more concentrated sales people within Berkeley, who live in adult lifestyle. In order to be part of this past and Berkeley you gain status by being more revolutionary than the other guy by having that superior compassion motivated a lot of people. There had been a change in direction the civil rights movement because identified more with empowering racial differences rather than melting them rather than integrating society. And there was developing at that time as well as far more ideological slant. Relatively innocent movement. If. You look back to such things as the weather underground in nineteen, sixty eight. They did not attack the tuition's in order to kill people around people or what have you. They attacked institutions as Sabah tour's. As a resistance against the war and against the power of the establishment to had. It's awesome fun behind that. Some good feedback and last week sound bits. Makes a little stories little more entertaining a moment he'll. whereas the ethos of the sixties counterculture in San Francisco had been about civic participation marching for civil rights protesting at citizens that sort of thing seventies was all about who could be the most radical this attitude was held partly due to political motivations probably to stave off the existential dread of confronting the country that had just come out of a war with no victors and it come into an economic depression and partly you know just to just look Cooman can you dig it? Has Everything copacetic with you. With Me Jive. Turkey. A revolution coming. It's going to be Donald Mike out of sites. So do me a salad and get a right right on right on right on. Catch on the flip side you know that kind of thing. And race to see who could be the most revolutionary one of the stars of today's Suck Donald. David freeze was a front runner. Let's meet this crazy son of a bitch. To freeze was the founder of the radical group that would go on a big crime bender nineteen, seventy-three, nineteen, seventy, five, he committed plenty of crimes before that time well. Wasn't stranger to crime a man not afraid to commit crime and a man when he kidnapped Patty hearst surrounded by Bay area well educated young. Marxist. Flavored revolutionaries who had never themselves committed crimes. But one of some of that grit and excitement made him feel edgy and they fed his delusions of grandeur. Fifteenth Nineteen, forty three to free was born in Cleveland, Ohio birthplace of my Polish wife city with lots of Polish people that. Long history kicking out monsters net part of the world you get. His parents were Louise Mary decrease and he was not born into wealth and privilege like Patty hearst and I were. A freeze was the eldest of eight children his mother Mary was a registered nurse at a nursing home his father although there isn't much info on him apparently wasn't as carrying as to freeze his mother according to some reports. He disciplined Donald as boy by breaking both of his arms not once not twice but three separate fucking time. So clearly Donald was a bad kid who started off being about listening and ended up being bad at thrown baseball the stop right now you. Know this is true. His father was clearly extremely physically abusive to freeze. We grow up to become a very angry and violent man and if my dad had broke both my arms three times. Yeah I probably would have been angry and violent my twenties as well. and. In my teens at the age of Fourteen Donald David freeze dropped out of school ran away from home ran away from his dad losing yet another arm match semi come on he can now. He did really run away though unless that's not funny. You understand he and he ended up in buffalo new. York. where he lives in, he lives in foster care eventually lived with the man named Reverend William L. Foster fundamentalist minister is family while living with pastor foster. He joined a gang called D. cracks skulls. I'm guessing pastor foster was unaware of this. And how was Your Day Young Donald goodpastor foster me and somebody who cracks skulls carjacked woman in Allentown Liquor. Store Broadway Elm. Well, glad to hear you've made some friends in Buffalo Donald breakout. To freeze was quickly arrested for stealing from parking meters. Then for stealing a car, the state of New York decided to give the kid a shot or rehabilitation and send him to a state reformatory in L. Myron York the Almira Correctional Facility was a unique and innovative prisoners time it rejected theories of reform the developed the nineteenth century theories at inmates should be silent obedient spend all their time You know when they're not reflecting on their crimes in single occupation cells, they suspended working elmira different. They believed that approaching reform from a psychological perspective rather than a physical perspective yielded better chances for true reform. Almira used a lot of what we think is of as a fairly logical. Now, like techniques like encouraging inmates with rewards, variable senses according to the criminals background history education. But that mean that everything was candy and sunshine about his time in prison to freeze would say life in the prison as we called it now because it was a juvenile correction facility. Oh, it was nothing but fear and hate day in and day out I would not be part of any of the gangs black or white I didn't hate anyone black or white and they hated me for that. Upon his release nineteen, sixty, three, the now nineteen twenty year old to freeze relocated to the Newark New Jersey area. There he met and married a woman named Gloria Thomas who had three children from a previous marriage. The couple of quick they have three more children and then struggle financially Weird Weird. How strange a dude who kicked out three kids right after being released from prison dude who jumped into relationship Where they you know the lady already had three kids would then struggle with money if only birth control pills would've been around in the sixties. They were actually. that's when they first showed up all that sixty s you know hippie sex was fueled partly by great music and counterculture revolution Tiberius and most by the first reliable and affordable birth control pill to be widely used. Owa. the freeze did not use it and the ended up damn near homeless with Donald only able to find sporadic employment as a short order cook or laborer, and then Donald came up with a great plan to fix everything for himself at least like so many super cool dudes have done that we've covered on time he decided to completely abandon this family. Later he would write, I just couldn't take it anymore. I was slowly becoming a nothing. I would define someone who abandoned their their families being nothing to freeze thaw doing that turn him into something I. Guess. He he he made it clear across the country before getting arrested in nineteen, sixty four, and then returning to his family in. New Jersey. Police stopped him while he was hitch-hiking on San Bernardino freeway near West. COVINA. California on him. They found a tear-gas Pencil bomb. A sharpened butter knife and he sought off Reiffel had all that suitcase sources? Don't say what he was officially charged with I can't figure out why he was charged with anything I really didn't seem like he did anything wrong I mean he's regular dude hitchhiking with a suitcase at a knife, a gun and a pinball. What do not bring with him checking his dangerous you never know what kind of fucking wack job you're run to. You might need a tear gas bomb I need a sharp butter knife. Seems to me like trying to be prepared for getting picked up by some kind of psycho, but the police saw differently. headed. Back to new. Jersey Jackie with his family he'd get arrested for shooting off a gun inside his basement and for having a bomb. Oh I'm sorry officer am I not allowed in the land of the free to shoot off my own gun in a house full of children and make some fucking bombs sorry I forgot I was living in North Korea. Donald later, right. I started playing with guns and fireworks just anything to get away from life and how unhappy I was. He was sentenced to two years of probation nineteen, sixty five he has back out to California makes Los Angeles. Be Grudgingly. He brings us. Would family the change of scenery would only intensify his financial worries in his run INS with law enforcement on June ninth nine, hundred, Sixty, seven, two, please stop to freeze for running a red light. Is Weird on his bike. Runs a red light in his bicycle. They asked for his name he gives them a fake one. Then when they search him, they find a homemade bomb in his pocket and then in the basket of the bicycle defined another bomb and pistol. defrays tells them this I love this it doesn't. He'd found the two bombs and the pistol just laying around and he's just trying to sell them to feed his family, and for some reason, the crazy cops didn't believe him. Oh. Oh, you're arresting me seriously. I I'm sorry that I just leave North Korea for mother. Russia is it illegal to find bombs and guns laying around and? Put them in my bicycle basket and try to make some side cash sell them a little bit it. Oh, it is. Oh, it is illegal to sell bombs to people on the street Okay. Well, sorry. I don't have every single memorized. Is Given three more years probation. The probation officer interviews to freeze writes that he's deeply troubled. By this case, I bet they keep finding you find bombs this guy. Earlier probation report describes to freeze as schizoid per se schizoid personality with strong schizophrenic potential who has a fascination with firearms explosives psychiatric officials of the prison testing center where he's briefly sent after his arrest recommend that he be jailed because his fascination with firearms and explosives makes him dangerous. He sounds dangerous. And then while this case is going to court, MR freeze is arrested again on December second nineteen, sixty seven. I WANNA kind of bullshit trumped up charge. He'll have thrown at him this time. A prostitute complains a threatened her with a pistol and demanded money according to the police report arriving at the motel to investigate the police say they found a pistol stolen from a store in nearby torrents and then other stolen weapons in the trunk of Donald Carr and how do they get their? You know what he fucking found. Them is illegal to be really good at finding guns and bombs laying around you would think in a good. They'd give him a medal for finding that style before kids founded in hurt themselves. But no in the United States of Fascist motherfuckers you get arrested for doing good deeds. Everyone knows being absurd right also. To freeze initially avoided rest by jumping from a second story bedroom window, he's captured four days later, and then to avoid serious prison time he rats on an accomplice and leads the police to Ronald Colman's house where they find nearly two hundred weapons stolen from a surplus surplus store. and then. Donald doesn't get any trouble doesn't get any further troubles gives me for a long time. He's not arrested again for another four months. On March tenth nineteen, Sixty Eight, he's charged with burglary in Inglewood on August sixteenth. Nine hundred sixty eight HR still motorcycle on March Twentieth Nineteen Sixty nine he gets in trouble for finding on the ground, a loaded nine millimeter rifle with thirty two rounds in a magazine. Probation had been modified months earlier in December thirteenth nineteen, sixty eight to forbid possession of firearms or bombs but still doesn't go to jail for any of these crimes. Why? Because the police finally woke up and realized it's not illegal to be good at finding stuff. No. As to why he wasn't picked up immediately put in jail for these crimes many have speculated. The freeze wasn't informant for either the LAPD who in the sixties were beefing up their surveillance or surveillance on radical groups particularly. Marxist and black aligned organizations or even CIA or FBI who also had interest in these organizations and Donald being both black and Marxist did run in these circles according to author Brad Schreiber who wrote revolutions end the Patty hearst kidnapping mind control, and the secret history of Donald to freeze and the SA to freeze was a former lapd informant running guns to setup. Black. Panthers. Not, everyone thinks to freeze was an informant though legal analyst, an author Jeffrey Tobin who wrote the account on the O. J. Simpson case that was adapted into the first season of fx is nine emmy winning American crime season disputes, aspartame. Riding, the Donald, freeze was to bit incompetent criminal who in Los Angeles tried to work off a beef like a lot of criminals do by telling the cops he knew about other criminals the idea that he was some sort of secret agent for the government is just absurd. So was he or was he not some kind of informant? We don't know nobody does for sure. Seems Weird that he just keeps getting. You know nothing more than parole even though he's arrested just continually. By the late spring of nineteen sixty nine to freeze has abandoned his family once again finally, weight off his back. He's sick. He's sick. He's taking them holding them back from committing crimes on May nine, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, nine, the Newark Police report the freezing, a companion Ralph Cobb have kidnapped and threatened. Alfred Witter's caretaker of the Temple of. Banana. Abraham. The police said the to a driven Mr Witter's around with a shotgun to his head claim to be Black Panthers and demanding five thousand dollars from the rabbi of the synagogue that they felt that they needed to secure the release of another Black Panther. Ralph COBB was tried and acquitted, and then a memorandum from the prosecutor's Office. Memorandum decided to drop charges against Mr Free. Since they believed he'd soon be incarcerated in California for other crimes anyway. So he gets away with another crime and he doesn't get thrown in prison in California for these other crimes but he does get arrested again on October Eleventh Nineteen sixty-nine, some police officers in Cleveland spot to freeze on the roof of a bank building he's carrying two pistols and an age dagger that he has found. Dangerous weapons he found while taking a leisurely stroll the happen to be on the roof of bank thinking about how he was getting his act together and GonNa do right by his family. So the police of course, give him a key to the city. No after he's caught, the police find a burglar's tool kit and a hand grenade nearby Weird Donald claimed he didn't know anything about these things. He definitely didn't know how someone who put his fingerprints over. He puts a five thousand dollar bond and leaves for Los Angeles. Again, it gets away with this. It's way with doing some Super Shady Shit doesn't get arrested for this or you don't track him down. On November seventeenth nineteen, sixty nine to freeze is wounded in a gunbattle outside a bank. Of America, branch in La finally gets in some real trouble he's arrested convicted of having stolen a thousand dollars cashier's check sent to the California. State prison in Vacaville fifty, four miles northeast of San Francisco Hearst Country Kiss, Ya ya about to connect to freezes story to her family. In this prison, he joins an inmate organization called one hundred percent innocent guys who can't help being super good defining bullshit. Nas Not right. Now the group called Black Cultural Association, which stresses African Heritage and pride at its weekly meetings. It's here that the intellectual seeds of what would become the Symbionese Liberation Army are planted into freezes might be. At, Vacaville was a group that would take black prisoners, introduce them to liberal white college students who didn't talk about the black prison experience in their university work and many of these college students happened to be very, very Marxist. To Members Program are William, Wolf, and Russell. Little members of a radical political group called the Vince Ramos Spanish for we will overcome or they'll a term closely associated with the Chilean Socialist Movement. These two Yahoos later become members of two freezes, SLA Future SLA members, Angela Atwood Nancy Ling Perry also visit Vacaville to meet with radical prison groups while to freezes imprisoned in is these young radicals these black prisoners no matter what they were actually incarcerated for political prisoners oppressed by racist and corrupt American society and a lot of black Americans were being oppressed by racist and corrupt White American majority culture that doesn't mean that Donald to freeze specifically wasn't fucking Durbeck. He didn't get framed and thrown onto death row he got away with doing a lot of dumb shit. It was a family abandoning violent looney toon who couldn't stop making bumps. Before leaving Vacaville prison to freeze broke away from the black cultural. Association started his own Program called Yuna site who stated purpose was a study of the black family. The recent family abandoned her is now a family advocate this motherfuckers too much. December of nineteen seventy, two degrees was transferred to the dead prison until the day California he won't stay long. He escapes just months later on March Fifth Nineteen, seventy three. So he can return to his family. No, he doesn't do that, but he does escape. Very easily, he basically just walked away. To freeze had a good prison record had learned the trade of boiler repair. He was able to fool the authorities into giving him minimum security status and then one day while he was unsupervised supposed to be just working on the boiler and some stuff. Is Walkout slept just didn't come back. After escaping to freeze made his way to Oakland California where he was hidden in house by two anti-capitalist college kids, Willie Wolfe and Russell Litter little those people who had visited in prison They took him to the House of Twenty Three Year Old Patricia. Ms Moon. Soil stick or sold sold a sick a Berkley student daughter of pharmacist and self. Radical feminist and revolutionary dedicated to subverting the dominant capitalist pig paradigm of America. For the next several months Donald. Family man to freeze and Ms Moon Faulk just go at it like rabbits and also sometimes work on Symbionese Liberation Army Literature Donald Lives with Ms Moon for several months through her he meets Camilla Hall twenty-eight-year-old Berkeley Artists and communist and a deep dive into Marxist revolutionary thinking ensues. The semi's Liberation Army is now officially formed. So let me give a quick overview of this group who they became then it'll be timeline time. The symbionese Liberation Army also called United Federated. Forces of the Symbionese Liberation Army was a small group of multiracial militants who consider themselves members of a vanguard army basically small army that would force her lead. America's masses to revolt and overthrow their corporate overlords. Logo was a seven headed Cobra pretty sweet. And the group's motto was death to the fascist insect that preys upon the life of the people. Fuck Yeah. You know someone got a real solid high five coming up with that one I would love to hear snippets of the brainstorm that came up with that motto like what what didn't accept it. Is Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. I got I got it. I got how about Her male. Harm comes to the fascist baby who sucks upon the teat of the poor more than a baby should suck therefore, not leaving enough milk for other less fascist babies who an ideal communist society would all get an equal and satisfying amount of breast milk. Mill you jive Turkey Lemus Fuck Peter. Way. More. Powerful. Less wordy. Okay. Okay. Hold on. How about? Death to the capitalist spider fascists who spin their web and catch weak helpless commie flies what? No it's terrible. That makes us look really bad Peter. Who wants to join a revolution led by weak helpless Commie semi's liberation. Army, flies you're right. You're right. Can we five minutes? Let me just keep working this bug angle? Let me just keep working this bug angle. If you're wondering what Symbionese means. I didn't mean a damn thing nineteen, seventy two. Because Donald hadn't made it up until nineteen, seventy three according to the group's Manifesto Symbionese was taken from the word symbiosis, a body of dissimilar bodies and organisms living in deep and loving harmony. But really never about love and harmony a freeze not only came up with the name for his new group of radicals yellow came up with a new name for himself is about to be referred to as general field. Marshal Sin Q. He named himself after an African Mindy chief who took over a slave ship eighteen thirty s and freed himself and others. Pretty Sweet. the original Josephson Cue. was actually pronounced a sink. A rumored to himself had become a trader in Africa after winning his own freedom. Maybe. Could have picked a better name. I don't know there were initially eight members of the SLA the freeze being the only black member and the only member who came from a low income household or had a criminal record the seven. Were Caucasian middle class or upper middle class men and women raised in. You know nice households most of them fresh out of college who then adopted Swahili names and took up arms for the self-styled Symbionese Federation Nancy. Ling Perry went by the name Fayza Patricia Socialistic Call Herself Zoya. Bill. Harris decided to call himself tico Emily Harris went by you llandough Angela Atwood wet by Galina Russell Little Swahili name was. OSCEOLA. Joe Ramiro renamed himself Bo. William. Wolf. Called Himself Cujo, and Camilla Hall went by Gabby. So the SLA quickly routed having eighteen members along with a handful of associates and sympathizers, and they were they were prepared to bring America to its knees. Listen up capitalist pigs. We don't want to wage war. Fall you. All your senators and Congressmen. Don't leave Capitol Hill tonight. If the White House is now vacated by midnight. Tonight. If the Pentagon doesn't send work for the entire U. S. military industrial complex to stand down immediately, we will find so many guns laying around on the ground. We will use them to bait this nation in the blood of the revolution. CAN YOU DIG it? We have almost twenty mostly misguided, well, intentioned young suburbanite hip cats who may have never even been a fist fight let alone gun but they are prepared to pupil. All Day and all night until the new of groovy natural nation is born and incite came you dig. You get. Is Group. Boy. I. Just I just can't imagine what it's like to be around their meetings. Right? It's like all these frankly really soft like. Middle class way kids. Still fucking hard you know the SLA did really WANNA change my shit big way they wanted to close all prisons monogamy destroy all other institutions that have made an sustained capitalism. They went big pretty lofty goals for small group. There were dedicated to Marxism into revolution and as much as I mock them they were actually pretty organized they would come up with and carry out a plan to take not only an heiress to a massive fortune hostage, but they would take much of American media hostage well. Okay. I think we know enough about the hearst Family Patty Hers Donald Jeffries escalate in the general vibe with the counterculture in the Bayer in seventies now. So we can get into timeline. Let's jump into the time line starting off in nineteen, seventy three with the formation of the SLA. But before we do, it is sponsored time question meet sex. When we multivitamins do we actually know what we're taking. We all deserve the truth about what we put into our bodies. That's where ritual comes in the health brand created by skeptics for skeptics ritual is obsessively researched and you know I love research from d three to a mega three magnesium vitamin A. Rituals essential multi vitamins are formulated with key nutrients. You need which can difficult to get enough of from our food ritual essentials or Vegan friendly, sugar-free non GMO gluten free and major allergen free and their sources are open for the whole wide world to see ritual always delivers. The subscription based supplement is easy to start an easy to snooze. It's around a dollar a day and delivered right to your door I started taking the essential for men eighteen plus love. That I can see the little vitamin and mineral components inside the capsule led to the result will be feeling soon or backed by clinical trials also, like there's not a giant horse pill, there's going to choke me and I really like that I can go to ritual dot com and read about where they get their vitamins and minerals omega three from micro algae in Saskatoon Canada Zinc and magnesium from Ogden UTAH. Valley e from Argentina on and on and on. So helpful nutrient gaps in your diet to help support foundational health rituals offering time suckers a ten percent off their first three months visit ritual dot com slash time suck to start your ritual today. That's ten percent off your first three months at ritual dot com slash time suck I used to think E. D. was an issue for old guys not super young hip. Early Forty dudes like myself. I use those words, right? Seriously though. D. was guys in their eighties nope. According to the Journal of Sexual Medicine by age forty almost forty percents struggle with E. D.. It's super common nothing to be embarrassed about while the big deal there's no shame get back to Russell and if you're struggling with. Checkout Hymns Hymns connects you with licensed medical professionals online to see if prescription treatment is right for you for him. Dot Com is all about men's wellness need help with hair loss have a cold interested mental health or covid nineteen home tests. Hymns has so much more than E. D. treatment in hymns makes it easy. They connect you with a licensed medical professional online can prescribe. FDA approved prescription medication. This could cost hundreds of bucks if you had to go through a doctor or pharmacy, try him today by starting out with a free online visit go to four him dot com slash time suck e D for your free visit. That's four hymns dot com slash time suck E. D. F. O. R.. H.. I.. M. S. dot com slash time suck E. D.. Prescription products are subject to a medical provider approval and require an online consultation with a medical provider who will determine if a prescription is appropriate. See website for full details and safety information. Remember that's four hymns dot com slash time Suck E D. Did. You know that your favorite devices, things like phones, tablets, computers, TV, and kindles or a major source of blue light and blue light is terrible for your is spend a lot of time in front of screens you're more prone to headaches blurry vision dry is in trouble sleeping. So filter that stupid blue, how dare you light out of Your Life with Felix Gray? Felix Gray glasses use proprietary technology to filter out ninety percent of blue light in the most damaging range and eliminate ninety nine percent of glare through their industry-leading Lens. Technology. Basically Felix Gray glasses punch blue light right it's why do you even exist in the first place smug blue face and then they kicked out of the room. They Punch so hard nine out of ten Felix Gray customers report significant symptom relief. I'm hoping wealthy a thousand podcasts a week right now, and I have to prep for all of them and that means I spend a Lotta time people on screens every day and feel great is such a good job eliminating is train that I got my son Cuyler a pair for all his gaming. He doesn't need glasses to see his vision is perfect, but he does need someone kicking blue light out of his RPG gaming pool. Everyone knows a ton of time looking their screens right now. Especially, this year, there's never been a better time to get these glasses. Go to Felix Gray glasses dot com slash time suck for the absolute best quality blue light filtering glasses on the market. That's F. L. I.. X. G. R. A. Y. GLASSES DOT com slash time suck start taking care of your eyes today feel better work smarter shipping and returns are totally free at Felix Gray glasses dot com slash time suck. Thanks for listening to our sponsor messages hope able to dig in. December, those great deals appreciate it. Please allow me to now hit this button. Shrimp on those boots soldier we're marching down a time suck time line. In the fall of nineteen seventy-three to freeze and the Berkeley rattle radicals excuse me as I just went over form. These symbionese liberation. Army I. Didn't share the following little trivia nugget regarding their formation. Let me do that now interesting theory about in the formation of the SA touchdown, but I want expand on it. It's called the CIA assassination squad theory. It takes the theory that the freeze was You know some kind of government informant, even further building on the work of private investigator Lake Healy, who may have dug into the Patty hearst kidnapping deeper than any other single investigator some authors and alternative media have developed theories that the. was a fully controlled CIA assassination squad with the Black Panther. Party as its main target. Under this narrative, the SLA originated within California prisons where to freeze was sent as an informer to infiltrate incarcerated radical groups, and then set up his own organization like all was all this plant. This theory states that Donald to freeze was sent into prison by the CIA and the Black Cultural Association was used to monitor radicals among both visiting students in prison inmates the CIA. Created the black cultural. Association at Vacaville Facility as part of developing the SLA a phony left-wing group upon meeting radicals after prison escape and before he was incarcerated to freeze was known for his eagerness to sell firearms, explosives and related related items all stuff he found but seriously, how did he get all the shit? His means of consistently acquiring weaponry has never been fully explained. Was He trying to set up sting operations according to this theory he was never sent to prison for earlier weapons charges, and he always had access to weapons because he was being given weapons by the CIA why to gain the attention of the Black Panthers so that he then infiltrate their group and then helped the CIA take them down from within now do I believe this not necessarily but I don't think it's impossible. The. CIA has done all kinds of crazy shit to take out groups. It deemed a threat to the US government. They did have a black radical groups in the sixties and seventies in their crosshairs for sure and before that fifties forty s you know all kinds of stuff that they've done If nothing else this is an interesting theory. Is wanted to share it before I move on after several months of weapons training at their safehouse the SLA committed its first Revolutionary Act on November six, nine, hundred, seventy, three, they ambush and murder Oakland, School Superintendent Marcus Foster, and seriously wounds deputy Robert Blackburn why would they do this? Foster had just three years earlier become the first African American School Superintendent of a large school district in American history. He'd received national awards. Then he got shot eight times at the age of fifty with hollow point bullets that had been packed with cyanide. He'd been a a National Award winning principal the SLA shot mistakenly or mistakenly excuse me targeted him for his support of an ID system for Oakland students an ID system designed to keep non student drug dealers off campus the SLA target foster because they believed he supported the measure to institute oppressive security measures, schools, including more police presence. There were this the program it was built around these ID's he did not foster did advocate initially for the ideas, but then rescinded his support weeks before he was assassinated. This. Crime to me shows how crazy donald freeze and his followers were in the name of standing up against white oppressors capitalist oppressors they kill black man working his ass off to keep black students safe from drug dealers a guy focused on the education of black students. The S. L. A.'s crime announced the group is one capable of committing violent acts in the name of revolution. It also brought down the scorn of the Berkeley left most of whom found the political murder of a black man by a black led organization incomprehensible. If you follow the CIA plan theory. Then you could argue that this was done intentionally to you know. To just harass the black community I guess on January Tenth Nineteen seventy-four SLA members Ross Little Jo Ramiro or arrested traffic cops, SLA weapons and propaganda found in their possession. Fearing the house will be rated Nancy Ling Perry sets fire to the group safe house and goes underground. Please find the safehouse scorched but not burned down. Leaving significant amount of evidence of what the group was up to and who some of them were. Whoops. I'm guessing, Nance Qatar. Asked you bit for that one just Nancy. What did I? What did I say to do in event of the five. Oh snacks at some of our soldiers that I say to burn down the fucking safe house or did I say to kind of scorched some of it and leave the rest unharmed so that authorities are able to get important Intel on a revolutionary organization. what's Patricia hearst of to around this time? When nineteen seventy four began patty was only nineteen. She smoke weed sneaking out to rock concerts at San. Francisco's fillmore auditorium feather in her hair like Farah Fawcett, wearing blue jeans t-shirts with no Bra Flynn. I both think that seventies look hottest by the way. Taylor Fina and pretending to relate to kids who were not raised by billionaires. She just transferred from her little private school to the state school her family practically owned. She was engaged to and living with Stephen. We'd her high school math tutor creepy sounding I know. But. He was only a few years older than her according to reports from the seventies I, think he was like forty three or forty seven. Anyway parents disapproved of her relationship with Mr. We'd and Patty briefly had to pay your own bills kind of for four months. But not really because she lived with Mr Wheat worked at a department store for four months and then reconciled with Daddy. And then immediately quit her job because he agreed to go back to paying for everything. And even we'd was twenty, six, now forty, three or forty seven. And back in Nineteen, seventy, four, twenty, six year old dating in the nineteen year old wasn't actually uncommon not condoning or judging just pointing that out. With their families money she bought expensive artwork Persian rugs pretty much do whatever she wanted. She was living the dream she was going to class when she felt like edge shacking up with her fiance party, our parents time, and then all that would change on February fourth. According to a report prepared prepared two weeks after the fact for the US House of Representatives. Committee. On Internal Security patties kidnapping went down like this at about nine twenty pm on February fourth in Berkeley California two men and a woman force their way into the apartment of Patricia hearst entry to the Ground Floor Townhouse apartment at twenty six three bienvenue Bien. Venue a bien venue. I don't know avenue four blocks south of the campus was obtained by the female SLA terrorist tapping on the glass patio door and asking us the telephone to report an accident. Miss her fiance Stephen. We twenty-six opened the garden door and the woman pushed into the apartment accompanied by two black males one armed with the rifle the other arm with the pistol, and perhaps also a rifle we'd was beaten about the head and shoulders until semi-conscious and tied up Stephen K.. Suenaga twenty-one, a neighbor who heard the noise and ran into the department was also beaten. patio taken into her kitchen tied up and dragged out of the home screaming and fighting the entire time they dumped into the trunk of a one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, three, Chevy Impala some SLA members got into another car to car sped off firing shots at the apartment buildings they rolled away six blocks away they transfer patty to another car abandoning the impala. Kidnapping is swift and violent carried out the words of one reporter with commando like precision Stephen Weed says, the police kidnappers were so coordinated they barely needed to speak to one another. That evening Walter cronkite reports on the kidnapping sparking a national media frenzy. I mean think about how big stories it's almost to the level of of one of Obama's or trump's kids being kidnapped by a group of domestic terrace as one of Bill Gates daughters was kidnapped. Terrified people because it felt like if some group could kidnapped Patty hearst, they could get your kids, it could get anyone. Patty drifting in and out of consciousness and the car would say later that she expected her father to quickly pay whatever ransom these people wanted but that would not be the case. The primary intention of the La was for more than just money. It wanted revenge against a class of people. It saw as oppressors SLA members placed her in a stuffy closet size room with a bare lightbulb portable Kat. No windows in the hot poorly ventilated room in addition to be in place in physically uncomfortable surroundings patty would later claim that members of the SLA became. To psychologically torture her as the days passed they can s- continually insisted that her parents love their money more than her that they would not save her that they were evil capitalists who cared about their image far more than they cared about their daughter's life a freeze AKA general field, Marshal, Sin Q. Aka Captain Lucky Guy Bomb and gunfighter led the others in harassing Patty. He insisted he'd killer himself as if his demands are met. What he doesn't tell her is that he hasn't made any demands yet I have no idea what these Aso's want. on the fifth day after the kidnapping reporters gather at the hearst family mansion in Hillsborough that wealthy San Francisco suburb to interview Patti's parents and they do this every day for for months also on the fifth, the FBI releases composite sketches of the suspects based on Stephen, weed and others descriptions. Two days after patties napping on February six, a letter arrives in the Mail at Berkeley. Listener supported at Berkeley's listener supported KPFA, a radio station in it the states that the group has patty but they list no ransom demands just building a little bit of suspense. The next day on February seventh Patty's father receives a letter from the SA in reads it on live television. The United Federation, the United Federated Forces of the Symbionese Liberation Army armed with cyanide litter weapons served in arrest warrant upon Patricia Campbell hearst. All communications from this court must be published in full in all newspapers and all other forms of the media failure to do so will endanger the safety of the prisoner. Should any attempt be made by authorities to rescue the prisoner or to attempt or harm and he sa elements? The prisoner is to be executed. At the bottom of the paper is written death to the fascist insect that preys upon the life of the people. Of course, gotTA throw that Little Gem in their lot of high fives back of the new safe house. When they hear that shit on the news I told you it would sound cool. You guys doubted my bug angle at first. But that insect line oh, man that is sound as a pound and totally groovy. The family wouldn't here again from the SA for five days. While they wait Patricia continues to be held captive in basically this closet. On February twelfth a message from the SLA is received in the form of a tape recording sent to K. F. Pierre KPFA. the studio played the tape for anyone listening I'll read an excerpt. Greetings to the people and fellow comrades, brothers and sisters. My name is Cinco and to my comrades I'm not a sin. I hold the rank of General Field Marshal in the United. Federated? Forces. Or the Symbionese Liberation Army. The SLA has arrested the subject for the crime that her mother and father have by their actions committed against the American people and you'll press people of the world. Randolph hearst is the corporate chairman of the Fascist Media Empire of the ultra-right Hearst Corporation which is one of the. largest propaganda institutions of this military dictatorship of the military arm corporate state that we now live under in this nation. The primary goal of this empire is to serve and form the necessary propaganda and smokescreen to seal the American people from the realities of the corporate dictatorship with Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford represents in closing I would just say to Mr Hurston Mrs Hurst I'm quite willing to carry out the execution of your daughter to save the life of starving men, women and children of every race. And if as you other naively believed that we will lose, let it be known that even in death, we will win for the very ashes of this fascist nation will marco very grapes. We are the crickets hide in the shadows. The lady blocks won't stop leaning on you and don't really scare you per se but can make you jumpy and then the next time you feel something. You find yourself thinking I won't freak out again because probably the lady bump but maybe it's a spider no thirty bucks or is it I don't know what not a winter too long now now when your head like Lady but David Peter I, told you take the ladybugs bucks shit out of the speech one insect references more than enough. We sound like idiots is a tape. So recording. Okay so I may have added the bug stuff, but the rest of the recording plate as I read it and it was a lot more to it. included in in Q. Statement was a demand that her family giveaway millions of dollars in food to the poor and the needy. Next came, they frightened voice of Patty hearst saying Mom Dad I'm okay. I'm with a combat unit that's armed with automatic weapons and these people aren't just a bunch of nuts. They've been really honest with me but they're perfectly willing to die for what they're doing and I want to get out of here. But the only way I'm going to is if we do it their way and I just hope that you'll do what they say dad and just do it quickly and I mean I hope that this puts you a little bit at ease and that you know that I really I really am all right I just hope I can get back to everybody really soon. Later. In the day, Randolph hearst makes a public statement and addresses his daughter directly. He tells that he's doing everything he can to get her out of there to take care of herself. Runoff hers is in contact with the FBI but he assures padding or kidnappers. No. One's GonNa bust in and start shooting cannot imagine how furious he must have been like how much he must have wanted to use his money and influence to destroy anyone associated with taking his daughter. Someone took one of my kids I would want to kill them myself. I wouldn't fuck why did I would just want them to die. Another demand soon followed when Angela. Atwood another SLA member informed the authorities. The symbionese war war council has determined that communication between POW Patricia hearst and her family will come only after the immediate creation of the necessary mechanisms. Russell Little Joseph Ramiro can communicate via live national TV with people and the SLA concerning the full scope of their physical health and all the conditions of their confinement. I love how they act as if they have a war council. By by war canceled you mean, Becky from Minnesota who has Berkeley Philosophy degree and considers not shaving her armpits or radical stand against the man or are you referring to Timothy from Seattle who hasn't worn shoes in two years and has been selling incense candles down by the ferry building before he joined the? SLA. These people think they are I part Randolph hearst is willing to accommodate the SLA's demand he must Godley hate them so much he said he'd do everything he could to get Russell little and Joseph for mural on the air the two members who have been arrested the previous month. However the FBI says, no, they're not willing to allow this. They think it's only gonNA, feed the leadership's. And make them even more dangerous. Like the right call on February thirteenth speaking to reporters camped outside his house. Randolph. Hearst reply to the SA demands saying that they were impossible by this time the S. l., A.'s constant barrage of accusations about how horrible the hearst's are are beginning to take their toll on. Patty? They've convinced her that our parents You know our negotiating for her ransom trying to spend less money. This makes her incredibly sad and scared I mean make sure they do they really care more about their money than about her life and then things get worse for Patty reports come in of a heavily all of armed FBI agents raiding a house where they thought Patty was being held petty filter parents were recklessly allowing the FBI to risk her life. Right Her dad said that they weren't going to do these raids. While extending the media coverage in performing for spectators she wasn't entirely wrong about the performance part pettis mom had done this weird thing she had taken to wearing black all black and speaking of Patty in the past tense. Her daughter hasn't even gone for two weeks yet. As pretty strange, how would you be if you were kidnapped and then like ten days later, your mom's on TV dressing all black talking about you like you're already dead. Worse her mom had ignored the demand by or one of the demands by accepting another appointment from then governor Ronald Reagan to be region of the University of California the ESA had told the hearst to sever their ties with Reagan the fascist. Patty said later I felt like I could have killed her when she did that my own Mother didn't care whether the SLA shot me or not. Only ten days in Patty starting to believe her family really doesn't care about her almost two weeks after her capture on February Sixteenth Ucla releases another taped message I or from hearst. And this one reveals a shift in her attitude towards her captors. She says I'm being held as a prisoner of war and not as anything else I mean I'm being treated in accordance with international codes of war also since I'm an example and it's really important that everybody understand that you know I am an example and a warning, and because of this, it's very important to the SA that return safely and so people should stop acting like I'm dead mom should get out of her black dress that doesn't help at all just hurry by. Feel she wanted to go off harder on her mom there clearly mad mom stopped making it all about you. Selfish Bitch I the one who kidnapped you sympathy for. February Twentieth Nineteen Seventy Four Marks Patty hearst twentieth birthday on third audiotape to freeze demands at the hers spend six million dollars on feeding the hungry. Randolph hearst replies at six million is beyond his capabilities. Later, his representatives proposed a compromise and offer two million upon the immediate release about he hurts and then an additional two million in January of Nineteen, seventy five. The SLA. Of course rejects this counteroffer and Randolph hearst announces that he will indeed be putting a sizable portion of his fortune towards feeding the hungry as they have asked. Quickly makes arrangements for two million dollars to be donated to a local charity and creates a distribution plan called people in need pin and just four days. Hearst and others create one of the largest private volunteer organizations in the history of the US. Almost four thousand people volunteer to help give out food PIN director. Ludlow Kramer expects at the program will be able to feed one hundred thousand people for twelve months with the two million dollars. Still, alive. These assholes but kind of cool that they got to do this as opposed to just giving them the money I mean, this is kind of some robinhood should here. Men. In the FBI criticize hearst decision to give into the terrorists her doesn't care. He's in the it's my daughter and I will do whatever it takes camping I gotta respect that. On. February twenty-second to first disastrous attempt to distribute food for patties. Freedom occurs crowds form around the hunters point distribution site in West Oakland. Soon, riding breaks out leading to dozens of injuries and arrests response. The Attorney General for California makes the following statement in the future. Every crime committed in connection with the kidnapping will be prosecuted. If it's done a response to extortion or kidnapping will encourage the local district attorneys to prosecute under existing law and if they don't we will. After. The food distribution, another tape statement by Patty hearst broadcasts, and it reveals our attitude continues to shift torture parents and society in general. In this third statement, she says Mom Dad. I've been hearing reports about the food program so far it sounds like you and your advisors have managed to turn it into a real disaster. You said it was out of your hands. You should have said was that you wash your hands of it. It sounds like most of the food is low quality no one received any beef or lamb anyway it certainly didn't sound like the kind of food our family is used to eating. The flock I mean they gotta be so sad for obviously home but also like what you just fucking say. Oh I'm sorry I with four days notice I didn't feed one, hundred, thousand people the way you preferred. The statement makes a lot of listeners wonder what the fuck patties up to rumors began to spread that she has staged her own kidnapping in order to join the SLA and a quick note on this rumor. Healy that private investigator I mentioned earlier he did think before he died that Patty hearst had met with Donald freeze while he was in prison months before napping as other students did and that she was in on this whole thing from the very beginning that was all staged. Why would you do that? He Lethal Patty pole-day colossal spoiled rich girl gets real mad daddy move the she was furious. With her father because she had dated a black man before she started seeing her math tutor, we're kinda. Creepy Guy and her dad found out confronted her and strongly disapproved, and then she and daddy had a big blow up over her also having very far left political views. You know I e socialist to the point of being communists that directly opposed her father's very far. Right staunch capitalist views. And then she pulled his whole thing off just to get back at him. Now do I believe this now really never been proven. But again, I kinda CIA Steph asks possible now to some degree also again, entertaining theory I mean how crazy would it be if she helped orchestrates tire thing I doubt I doubt she could pull off older and get away with it. And going forward, you probably operate on the on the premise that she did not help plan her own kidnapping back to February twenty-second Nineteen, seventy four. Reporters asked Math Tutor Stephen. We'd for insight into Patty, state of mind and he responds I can see that she may actually be having her doubts as to you know from her point of view it may look like we've made a mess of things. Previous to the last two months, I would say that she really didn't have a political point of view I. Think by the time this is over, she's going to have some sort of political view. Thanks for that. Thanks for that Steven Great Sites two years after the kidnapping a rolling stone article would speculate that by degrees her disillusionment with their parents turn into sympathy for the SLA. But more may have been going on with Patti than simple disillusionment she been kept that small closet room for a month. Now become mentally physically emotionally week she could barely stand up to get out of the closet. She had to attend the SLA's Daily political study sessions where she would have to listen to the national anthem they would read her statistics and. Quotes from like George Jackson Russell McGee to leftist writers arguing that less than ten percent of the US population control ninety percent of the wealth that some people eat catered meals while other starve that some can afford fancy lawyers while others just rotten jail than some live off their haired ince's or other squalor and despair, and all of that is true no argument there. However would all of these evils be cured by communism? That's what kills me about these kind of arguments. So many people starved under communist regimes. Can the world you know suddenly turned into one big idyllic kindergarten classroom where everyone shares toys and eats the same snack. There's no more capitalism me and Django don't think. So we think communism carries the incentive to innovate or to put in more hours more blood sweat and tears, and your competitor to make a better product that not only financially benefits yourself. But also improves some improve society in some way like by creating jobs but the SA. They thought some Marxist. System could cure all of America's ills and they pushed us believe on Patty hearst hour after hour day after day. And many things that this completely brainwashed her after month or so in study sessions attacked her family personally over and over again, they showed her a list of the current family holdings nine newspapers thirteen magazine's fourteen radio stations, a Silverman, a paper mill, many prime pieces of real estate on and on and on. It told her the she was clearly part of the ruling elite how dare her parents create thousands of jobs and build an empire or are they doing living the American dream? How dare forefathers become more successful than peers? SLA members told Patty that nothing mattered to her parents more than money. They told her that her parents and the economic class they represented were to blame for her misery and the misery of countless others and the only way their love for money could be conquered with. And violence. They, hugged her called her their sister by all accounts made themselves into her substitute family. They began to make not just a political connection with her but an emotional one. And by the end of February she was more of an SLA member than a captive within a month of being taken and held hostage also establish a sexual connection with someone in the group not surprising given that she was twenty in the group adamantly believed free love she began sleeping with twenty three year old Willie Wolf Aka Cujo. Wolf was the closest padding age and background. The son of Pennsylvania doctor he'd attended private schools is whole life been varsity swimmer sports editor of the school paper. He spent a summer working with kids in Harmelin an excuse me in Harlem then spurned the Wolfe Family Yale tradition and enrolled in Berkeley. At Berkeley where he'd room with SLA member Russell little and met Cinco. On February twenty eighth, the second pin food distribution goes on as fewer problems in the first. ludlow Kramer would later recalled that the program gave away thirty thousand dollars worth of top quality food to Oakland's poor. Crazy the actually did pull this off they made a billionaire feed cities poor. On March, Fourth California Governor Ronald Reagan having earlier predicted that no one would take the food from pin accuses the thousands of people who line up for free groceries of aiding and abetting lawlessness. And thousands of California's poor are undoubtedly heard same super clever things like fuck Ronald Reagan. On March Fifth and eighth and third and fourth pin food distributions take place her still have no idea where their daughter is. In a fourth tape released on March Ninth Patty hearst heard criticizing her parents Saint I. Don't believe that you're doing anything at all the what are you? What are you talking about their? And people. Try. They're giving away millions. What am I in for appearance? How do you even process your kid being kidnapped and then turned against you? Right you're so happy that they're alive but also you got to be constantly thinking what the fuck. All I ever did was give you an amazing home the best childhood. Now I'm the bad guy. March? Tenth newspapers announced that they will no longer print SLA communicates full enough's enough. For. March tenth to March Thirteenth Randolph hearst secretly meets with Clifford death-row, Jefferson, and other inmates who were SLA contacts at the Vacaville prison. He's desperately trying to find a way to reach his daughter. The discussion seemed to lead nowhere at least not immediately. On March, twenty fifth food is given away yet again on the hearst dime to thirty thousand people in pins fifth and final distribution attempt. On March Thirty First Clifford death-row Jefferson, and other SA. Contacts Appeal to the SLA on behalf of Randolph hearst to begin negotiations for patties release for the first time in over a month. He's hopeful he's close to bringing his daughter home. On April Second Salei sends a note to the San Francisco Phoenix promising more details on the possibility of Patty's released within seventy two hours. There April third less than two months after she'd been kidnapped Patty shocks the world with the following recorded message. Mom, Dad. Tell. The poor and oppressed people of this nation, the corporate state is about to do. Worn Black and poor people that they were about to be murdered down to the last man woman and child. Kill the people of the energy crisis is nothing more than a means to get the public approval a massive program to build nuclear power plants all over the nation. The people that the entire corporate state is with the aid of this massive power supply about a totally automate the entire industrial state, the point, the next five years all will be needed as a small class of button pushes tell the people dad but the removal of expendable accept the removal of a needed people has already started. I've been given the choice of one theme released in a safe area or to joining the forces of the Symbionese Liberation Army and fighting for my freedom and the freedom of all oppressed people I have chosen to stay. I've been given the name to Nia after a comrade who fought alongside shape in Bolivia, it is in the spirit of to me that I say, but tree on wet. then. It isn't a spirit of to me that I say I am the grasshopper I will eat the seeds of capitalist greed. It isn't a spirit that I say I am the carpenter ants carrying small twigs, lead particles and like and things like that back, Beckham my colony like all other soldiers ants working together unlike let's say agreed driven capitalist praying Mantis, who seemed to kind of own thing and not really work with other prey masses for the betterment of all men you dig I mean unless they are in what have you seen manses impairs when do you see those capitalist? Using Creepy Foot Lake Clot. Top things to maybe pass nourishment from one to another man got fucking Peter. We're so sick of this bullshit. Okay obviously the Peterberg stuff was me again. And obviously the entire family is taken aback by this message and also very fun to speak in that cadence with that kind of music in the background would have been fun to put out these measures. An WanNa patties four sisters goes on record saying she was sure that Patti been brainwashed by hearing one side of the story Randolph hearst expresses similar disbelief. You'll be Stephen We'd all I know it was a different time. It's still kinda creepy math tutor McGee. Who had acknowledged that? Maybe there had been a real change in paddy during her captivity saying I am reconciled to the idea that Patty must have matured a great deal in the past two months. I just want to tell Patty that I love her as much as ever and I think she knows that I can accept whatever she has chosen even though it may be hard for me I can accept it. Randolph is hearing this thinking damn. You really want. So my inheritance, don't you? Stephen. Needing to solidify hearst commitment to their cause and get some money to live off of the. SLA. Hastily plans a bank robbery in insisted I participate in it shortly after this last message goes out. On April Fifteenth Patty hearst and four members of the are caught on security camera holding the High High Bernie Hibernia Oh my Gosh Hibernia Bank at Fourteen Fifty Noriega at twenty. Second Avenue. If her family thought that they were shocked before now their minds are really blown five of the bank robbers including Patty entered. The bank will remain outside all make a getaway in two automobiles after firing several shots from automatic weapons and made off with almost eleven thousand dollars. The bank guard would later remark that patty quite comfortable with gun seemed according to him like she was ready to shoot anything or anyone who gotten away. Two civilians are shot during this robbery. Luckily, both will live. Of course, the big question on everyone's mind. Now, as a stories broadcast around the world complete with security camera footage patty definitely joining in on the robbery was whether hers was a witness or actually a perpetrator and no one is as interested in this question as as much as the FBI is the FBI has students at the Berkeley. School for the deaf read Patties, lips the security footage and find out she said I'm to Nia up up up up against the wall motherfucker. Her parents must have been losing their mind at this point. They just witnessed their privileged daughter go from kidnapping victim to a bank robber truly can't imagine. On April twenty third eight days after this bank robbery, the FBI issues a wanted poster with pictures of Donald Davie. Freeze. Patricia Michelle I hate her last name so much salt salsa sick Nancy Ling Perry Cumulus Christine. Hall and Patricia Campbell hearst across the country Americans continue to debate whether or not hearst participated willingly or was coerced. In a six audiotape released on April Twenty Fourth Patty offers evidence of her full participation in the bank robbery. She says that at no time did her comrades begun pointed at her? She now refers to her family as pig hearst's Nice. Pig hearst's and to Stephen Weed is an age just sexist pig she also says. As for being brainwashed the idea is ridiculous to the point of being beyond belief I am a soldier in the People's Army. So she's in she's real in She's one of the most gossiped about people in the in the country. Now, dinner conversation around the US Senate around. Did you hear lease message my got? A week later, may I stain just barely ahead of FBI agent searcher for them SLA members pack up their weapons applies move from a Golden Gate Avenue apartment to Oakland Street in the Bayview district the next day on May second the FBI find the abandoned Golden Gate Avenue apartment just missed him. Two weeks later on May. Sixteenth incident that will confirm too many that patty was indeed now voluntarily a member of the SLA. Patty was sitting alone in a Volkswagen while SA members emily and Bill Harris interest store in Los Angeles patties a fight break out between bill and the store clerk and to prevent the harrises from being arrested Patty shoots twenty seven thirty calibre bullets into the storefront in rapid succession. What the fuck guessing her mom cried a day. quite a bit more. The incident alerts lapd to the fact that the SA is in town, and this is not good for the SLA while the San Francisco PD was most used to dealing with petty crime at that time. The LAPD were a militarized force it had serious experience in both dishing out and dealing with violence. The next day on May seventeenth. Nineteen seventy four, the LAPD FINDS SLA members Donald to free Willie. Wolfe Patricia. So stupid name Camilla Hall Angela Would Nancy Ling Perry in a house in Compton and a shootout ensues with SWAT team members. Rather than risk civilians being shot, and because the SLA members refused to leave the apartment or excuse me refused to leave the house to police set the building on fuck and fire with gas canisters. Holy Shit a TV report announces that anyone in the house must be either dead or dying and the reporters right? All six SLA members die in the Compton. House. One four, six, six, east, fifty, fourth street, and for a while there is speculation that Patty is among the deceased that's not the case. The Harrison Patty hearst watched the shootout on TV from their motel room near Disneyland in Anaheim William Harris recalled. Later the Patty wanted revenge for the raid. Immediately, she wanted to kill some cops for killing both her lover and her leader, and for killing her friends people she now considered her family. She is full fucking SA despite the death of their founder and leader several key members the SLA not over on June seventh nineteen, seventy, four, seven tape recorded message sent to the Press Patty. Hearst offers a eulogy for those killed in the shootout. She proclaims her love for Willie Wolfe and vows that the SLA will continue its noble fight. Math Tutor Stephen, we'd spends most of June seventh. Probably Punching and crying in interest bill. A bill. Harris becomes the SLA's News Journal Field. Marshall, also in June of nineteen seventy, four patty hearst driven to New York, and then to rural. Pennsylvania where she will hide on a farm with Patti Bill and Emily Harris for damn near. Her family has no idea where she is. In November after months of not hearing from Patty, Randolph hearst now withdraws an offer of fifty thousand dollar reward for her safe return he must be so pissed. Does. He no longer see his daughter primarily is a victim now does he see her mainly as a criminal I wonder Finally on April twenty first. So confusing stories. So weird like how would you? There's so little comparable stories to this. It'd be so tough to mostly process all this finally on April twenty, first nineteen, seventy, five, the S. L. A. Resurfaces four members hold up the Crocker Bank in Carmichael. California the enter the bank announced. It's a hold up till everyone to. Get down on the floor and put their faces in the rug than a shot rings out Myrna a softball, a forty, two year old mother of two who is there to deposit church collection money shot and killed by. Emily. Harris another. SA member announces that at the rest of the bank banker customers don't cooperate everyone will get the same treatment as Myrna. And two other members jump over the counter start. Grand Cash. Kicked in the head step on their faces. Continually. Shop. Profanity's verbally abusing these people meanwhile patio outside driving the getaway car. During an interview held before her trial later, hearst recalled her involvement in this robbery sane. Most of the time I was with them. My mind was going through doing exactly what I'm supposed to do. I had been educated very well in what to do I had been you know held in the closet for two months and you know abused in all manner of ways I was very good at doing what I was told I mean they call a Stockholm Syndrome and post traumatic stress disorder and you know I had no free will. It was considered wrong for me to think about my family and Winston was around he didn't want me thinking about rescue because he thought that brainwaves could be read or that you know they'd get a psychic to find me and I was afraid even for that. It was a very strange group of people bound by. The SLA. Codes of war and they follow them very religiously. I was not inside the bank. Finally, five months after this robbery patty is captured by the police on September, Eighteenth, nineteen seventy-five SLA members, Patty and Emily Harris and Wendy Yasha Mirror Yasha Moore. Are Found it's six twenty, five more street and San Francisco Patty Been, missing for five hundred, ninety, one days over nineteen months. Cooperation, between the San Francisco PD and the Federal Bureau of Investigation Lead Her capture FBI agents who have been taken out of house onto eight eight percent of avenue in the burn heights district on a tip spotted bill and Emily Harris walking down the sidewalk in jogging attire. Bill was an easy takedown emily tried to run they. Both are apprehended at the same time, FBI agents, Tom Pat, and Tim Casey Golf The backstairs street. Where they can see the living room and kitchen through the Dutch door they see Patty and Wendy Yoshimura sitting at a table inside Patty starts to get up and agent padding yells FBI freeze I'm GonNa Blow Moosehead off agent Tom Casey Chimes in Saint Patty. Don't make a move that he does not make a move and agent patent goes inside and puts cuffs on her. Tom Casey ask Patty what she was doing there. When she replies I'd rather not tell you about it. To quote. Being booked. The officer asked her for her occupation shelter replied urban guerrilla. I laughed so hard when I first read I'd rather not tell you about it. that. To me is such a rich kid to say to the police somebody who's had such a privilege childhood. You want to do you mind telling me why I pulled you over today. Ma'am. I'd rather not tell you about it. Upon hearing that, Patty been found her family hired a well respected California attorney Terence Hallinan to defend her and patty struck Helena is a genuine SLA member. Helen had prepared. A defense of involuntary intoxication. Pay would claim that she'd been given drugs. The drugs helped convert her to their ideology, but Patti's parents didn't want drugs involved in the defense. They were too worried about the reputation they said the defense should stick to dress and brainwashing and nothing else Helen and kept telling the family that wasn't a defense, but the I would not listen. On February Fourth Nineteen seventy-six, six trial begins two years to the day after her kidnapping. By the time, a defense team has rejected numerous offers by the prosecution to strike a lenient plea bargain because prominent attorney F. Lee Bailey who joined the defense team was confident. He could win the case the hearse again worried about the reputations wanted Patty declared completely innocent of all crimes so they go to trial. Judge Oliver J Carter presides over the trial and Patty is charged as an accomplice in the robbery of the Hibernia Bank I can say that earlier why? Patty herself later admitted that she expected to be charged with murder. All of the prosecution had footage of for holding a gun at the scene of the crime. Patty pled not guilty. She claimed that she been brainwashed into acting against her own will and therefore could not be held guilty for what she had done. And defending his client barely examined a team of witnesses and otherwise who testified that her showed all the symptoms of Stockholm Syndrome? A rare psychological disorder which a kidnapping victim begins to identify with their captors. Term. At the time of the trial and we'll break down You know this term further after the timeline. Bailey, also claimed that she suffered from POW survivor syndrome. No now is PTSD. Paley said that Bailey said that above all patty had feared for her life in cooperated with her kidnappers merely to survive, but it didn't play well with the jury. Patty had been an SLA member from seven weeks after her kidnapping until she was captured. Now, eighteen months after her an initial kidnapping, the first statements, her issued following the bank robbery in which he seemed to strongly identify with SLA's cars didn't sit well with the jury should close personal ties de Soleil members especially, Wolf. She's she wore a stone almac monkey-face pendant that will lead given her. She just didn't seem like someone under any duress also, even if Bailey could convince jurors that hearst had been brainwashed that alone was not considered a defense under federal law. And then there was Dr Joel Fort Psychiatrist brought him by the prosecution who testified that he considered hers to be a prime candidate for SLA membership. He felt that she had stayed in the group and committed crimes with them definitely own free will. Ford stated that he felt it patty had found a community and the SA. He noted that her background was similar to many other SLA members who'd come from comfortable upper middle class homes forts. Expert testimony was incredibly damaging to Patty's defense, but perhaps the most damage was done by patty herself time and time again on the witness stand, she gave mono-syllabic answers to lengthy questions. She seemed disinterested she invoked her Fifth Amendment right not to answer questions over and over again because she was afraid, she might incriminate herself. She did a total of forty two times after it was all said and done the jury debated for just twelve scooby thought it was minister my nose she debated for twelve very intense hours. Before finding hearst, guilty of armed robbery and the use of a firearm to commit a felony in the end. Many jurors thought Hirst lied about her role in the SA one juror concluded that hers was lying through and through and that no woman would keep a love token from someone who abused her hearse repeated taking the I didn't sit well with yours one explained it was a real shocker. A witness can't just tell you what he wants to tell you and not tell you what he doesn't want to. Hearst was sentenced to seven years in prison for her crimes. She would serve just to in February nineteen seventy-nine newly elected. President. Jimmy. Carter Commute her sentence to time served I'm sure having super rich capitalist fascist pig parents helped with that You know little favor. Then more than twenty years later in the last days of his time in office Bill, Clinton grants hearst a full pardon. Two months after her release from Prison Nineteen seventy-nine hearst Mary's Bernard Lee Shau, a policeman who is part of her security detail during her time on bail, they will go on to have two children, Gillian and Lydia. No word on what happened all Stephen. We'd Oh poor math tutor he just kind of disappears from the story. Patty would go on to do a bit of acting appearing in some feature films for director John Waters who cast her in crybaby serial, mom pecker dirty shame, and CCB demented after patties arrested yesterday officially dies out everyone in the group ends up either dead incarcerated or goes into hiding only to be tracked down at some point by the FBI and imprisoned later today only one SLA member is still alive in jail. The rest are either living free or dead. The this group changed some lives forever in terrible ways it never became into instrument of lasting change that it's few radical believers envisioned a report once asked member Bill Harris after he spent years in prison, what did you accomplish and replied nothing? mainly. What we accomplished is we got ourselves into jail. Randomly in two thousand, Seventeen Patty hearst took home two titles at the Westminster dog show according to The New York Times. Pretty, random. Petty is also comedian podcast or actor and TV host. Chris Hardwick Law. Chris married her daughter actress and model. Lydia hearst in two thousand sixteen Chris. I used to have the same manager and do some tapings together years ago small world. what else is patty hearst up now don't know sixty six year old mother to keep a pretty low profile. Top part of the time line and take a look at the Stockholm Syndrome. Good job shoulder, you've made it back. So, what is Stockholm Syndrome and DID PATTY HABIT? Well, it's made of disease and no, she did not time now for today's top five takeaways. By. Come on now. The super annoying. Any of the show it's not calm. Syndrome is a psychological response wearing a captive began to identify closely with his or her captors as well as with their agenda and demands. Interestingly, the incident that Stockholm Syndrome gets its name from remains pretty obscure outside of Sweden few know the names of those involved in the kidnapping situation that gave the conditions name. Let's talk about real quick and August twenty, nineteen seventy-three less than a year before Patty hearst was kidnapped four bank-workers, Brigada Lindblad, Elizabeth Old Grin Kristen and mark, and Spin Southstream who worked for. Severe Gays Credit Bank in Stockholm hostage in the thirty two year old or taken hostage. In excuse me taken hostage by there we go. Thirty, two year old career criminal Jan Erik. Also later, joined at the bank by a former prison made career criminal Clark Olofsson. Six days later when the standoff ended, it quickly became evident that the victims had formed some kind of positive relationship with their captors. And one phone call from the bank's vault the country's Prime Minister Olaf Palm a bank employee kristen end mark big to be allowed to leave the bank with the kidnappers when Palmer few she said she was very disappointed with him and added. I, think you're sitting there playing checkers with our lives I fully trust Clark and the robber. I am not desperate. They haven't done a thing to us on the contrary they have been very nice but you know off what I'm scared of is that the police will attack and causes to die. Somehow six bank-workers got into their heads that the police were developed not the criminals how? Hostages spoke of being well treated by the robbers and appears that they believed that the owed their lives to the two criminals on one occasion, a Claustrophobic Elizabeth Warren was allowed to leave the vault that become their prison, but only with the rope fixed around her neck, she said that at the time she thought it was very kind of Ulsan to allow her to move around the floor of the bank. When he treated us, well, we could think of him as an emergency God spend saves from was say and the concept of Stockholm Syndrome was born. The phrase was coined by Swedish criminologist and psychiatrist nils beard. Neal's. Jarrett's maybe hang hang hang is hard just figure out the emphasis and the American psychiatrists Dr Frank Oseberg, intrigued by the phenomenon went onto define the syndrome for the FBI Scotland Yard. His criteria included the following I people would experience something terrifying that just comes at them out of the blue, they are certain they were going to die. then. They experienced type of infant infantilism. INFANTILISM they they become babies. we're like a child they are unable to eat speak or go to the toilet without permission. Small acts of kindness that is being given food promise a primitive gratitude for the gift of life. He explains the hostage experienced a powerful primitive positive feelings towards their captor. They're in denial that this is the person who put them in the situation in their mind. They think this is the person who's going to let them live. In short psychologists believed that when a capture threat captives life deliberates and then chooses not to kill the captive. The captives relief at the removal of the death threat is transposed into feelings of gratitude toward the capture for giving him or her life, and it can take only a few days for this to occur. Dr Augsburg stresses that the the true cases of Stockholm Syndrome are rare. Making, identification complicated there are no widely accepted diagnostic criteria to identify the syndrome, which is also known as tear bonding or trauma bonding, and it is not an either of the two main psychiatric manuals, the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders or the international statistical classification of diseases and related health problems. Making identification even further complicated some people who many consider as having Stockholm Syndrome deny having it. Austrian Natasha can. Push. Who was kidnapped as a ten year old by Wolfgang, a trickle pill was held in a basement for eight years in a suburb of Vienna. Crazy suck connection here she was trapped in the basement just an hour and a half away from where monster Joseph Frizzell had his daughter and his daughter granddaughters son grandsons trapped in his basement. And there appears of captivity of these periods of captive excuse. Me Overlapped One another for several years what the fuck is going on Austria anyways. When the TASHA's captured died, she reportedly cried for him and subsequently lit a candle for him as he lay in the mortuary but in a two, thousand, ten interview with The Guardian, Natasha, rejected the label of Stockholm Syndrome. Explaining that it doesn't take into account. The rational choices people make in particular situations. She said I find it very natural that you would adapt yourself to identify with your kidnapper. Especially, if you spend a great deal of time with that person is about empathy -cation, looking for normality within the framework of a crime is not a syndrome it's a, it's a survival strategy. Well whatever you WANNA call it. Survival Strategy Syndrome sounds sounds to me like Patty, hearst probably had it. She had a bunch of fellow Berkeley social activists, surrounding her telling her that her life have been allied day after day telling her that her family was what was wrong with America. Feel bad for had she not been kidnapped. She never committed the robbery she did unless you plan to be kidnapped, which we have no real proof of. What story? Donald freeze after being arrested released eight times after radicalized. Perhaps also been radicalized in prison by some Berkeley students eventually formed his own army, a small army, but still army, and they successfully took a newspaper heiress hostage and to freeze was but one of many revolutionaries who came out during the sixties and seventies in America and fans themselves as savior of the working person was. He a savior I mean, yeah. Negotiated some some food to be given to the poor but other than that. He just wrote and recorded a bunch of corporations or evil in the poor tired of being oppressed and some people have way too much money communist rally points that much cheerleading where he didn't do other than get some meals dished out was offer a better way. What exactly was your revolution going to accomplish? Donald. What if you did tear down the robber barons of the seventies did liquidate bank accounts of the hearse and other billionaires then what? What better system of government would you built in its place? What kind of communist would you have built? One my Stalin's US are maybe one like Pol Pot's. Cambodia. Maybe when like Mao Zedong's China or Castro's Cuba Laos. Laos has been communists hear about them a lot since nineteen, forty, five house that worked out. Now, now, well, if you value free speech and if you'd like to be randomly detained after some kangaroo court, no just fucking throws you in prison for some trumped up bullshit charges. A national happiness index global quality life index up and take a peek at the top twenty nations listed. You don't see a lot of communist nations usually zero why if they're so great? Outside. Of the food extortion situation to freezing army were just thugs posing as revolutionaries. Right? They assassinated a gifted education administrator rob banks wounded innocent customers killing one. Also tried to blow up some cop cars. We didn't even get into that right with police in them. in Alpha Wet. Because they didn't like the government. Don't like it go into politics try and change some things as my kinda wants to do I mean he's fourteen. So it's what he thinks he wants to do, but he wants to make things a little better for the common man by put more funding into public education he wants to stop giving massive tax cuts, giant corporations he wants to regulate frivolous litigation so we can all stop. Amounts of money to insurance companies and lawyers, and be able to lower the price of goods and services medical and dental care. Is that you've got a lot of good ideas is he's a little more socialist lot more probably than his dad. You know he thinks my libertarian ideals to radical but I'd vote for him. what about Patty hearst or is her real role in all of this? Stage you're kidnapping with nothing more than a P is hunch hearsay. I don't think we'll ever be able to prove that. Let's say she didn't do it. Let's say she really was kidnapped can't she truly blame Stockholm Syndrome for all of our actions. I don't think. So actually not a hundred percent had she not been kidnapped you know like I would she have robbed banks now highly doubt it but if someone else had been kidnapped, would they have joined the SLA? So enthusiastically I have serious doubts. I think she was a very extreme leftist Berkeley College kid also a spoiled rich kid who didn't know shit about how the world really worked who mad daddy for coming down on her for having different political opinions and interracial dating I. Think She was twenty years old and surrounded by extreme leftist radicals telling her to burn everything down you know and burned everything down was burning mommy and daddy's empire down I. think sort of teenage rebellion. She was only nineteen when she was captured played a huge part and how all this played out had the SLA kidnaps some forty year old nine no fucking way. Join up with them later I think but I've never been kidnapped so easy for me to say. In the end had it not been her fascist pig parents iron hotshot lawyer she probably would have gone to prison for longer than she did. Even though her parents did fuck up defense a bit. After being prison she sure Shit didn't maintain her SLA. Communist. Ideals. those ones you ranted about recording Senate depressed itchy. Now she's she's part of the best show. Westminster dot crowd now as about as boozy is it gets I'm guessing she has a better one time when I was twenty stories than her fellow purebred dog trainers. And that's all I got. Let's wrap up now with today's top five takeaways for real time. Up. Take Away. Number One, the hearst castle I'm fascinated by this place. One hundred and fifteen rooms thirty eight bedrooms forty two bathrooms theater beauty salon giant, Indoor Roman Pool Sixty eight thousand five hundred square feet, and it's only one of several homes built a giant sprawling property complex. Look something built for a fucking Roman emperor. In this complex originally set on three, hundred, seventy, five square miles of beautiful private land. I get why that nerd Stephen we try to stick around for pancakes. That is some serious wealth. Number two, I doubt many saw Donald David to freeze as ever leading group revolutionaries before he actually did is Shitty are breaking dad he got mixed up in crime at a young age became obsessed with guns and explosives. He quickly had three kids. Also the abandoned get arrested a whole bunch of times finally went to prison and then formed a communist group of revolutionaries and then kidnapped the daughter of a billionaire before you know burning alive during a shootout with police at the age of only thirty. Number three after failing to get their buddies out of prison the SLA used Patty as a bargaining chip to have thousands of poor people fed the hearse family paid out millions to form the organization people in need only to have the attempt backfire into riots and have their daughter Patti criticize him for not providing enough beef or lamb nineteen seventy four was a terrible year for Randolph and Catherine hearst. Number Four. Patricia. Went from a rebellious rich girl to a hardcore beret-wearing machine gun toting child of revolution. She was sentenced to seven years in prison but her sentence was commuted by President Jimmy Carter nineteen seventy nine and since then she's pretty quiet life. Number Five New Info William Randolph hearst Patty's grandfather was the basis for a movie that is topped more best films of all time lists than perhaps any other film nineteen, Forty One's citizen Kane and hearst hated this movie. The thinly veiled unflattering biography of a wealthy tyrant was produced by Orson Welles and put all of her character flaws out there for the public to see them his greed has more weakness the effects of his poor behavior on his friends and family even more loathsome to hearst in his allies was the portrayal of Kane's second wife a young alcoholic singer was strong parallels to hearst's mistress. These showgirl turned actress Marion Davies at the kitchen, a preview screening of the unfinished citizen Kane on January third nineteen, forty, one, the influential gossip columnist hedda hopper wasted no time passing along the news to hearst and his associates that the film was obviously about him. And her then used his leverage to get the films advertising out of the press. I never knew papers also went after wells accusing him of communist sympathies question his patriotism, a hearse onto forbid, his media holdings to advertise the film in any way whatsoever many other Hollywood moguls who for the most part didn't like Orson Welles finding him rude and arrogant supported hearst Louis B. Mayer Co founder of metro-goldwyn-mayer even offered to pay our hail pictures eight, hundred, forty, two, thousand dollars in cash. If the studios President George Schaefer would destroy the negative and all prints of citizen Kane just throw it away Bernard get rid of it shaffer refused at threatened to sue. Though be nominated for nine Oscars and ultimately be heralded by critics as one of the best. If not, the best movie of all time hearst managed to destroy premier, an initial profitability many theaters would not run this movie when it came out of fear of being punished by hearst. Orson Welles said that when he watched the premier in the theater, he sat in an almost empty theater. Time Tough Takeaway away. Hearst man has some power and some influence, but not enough to get their daughter way from the SLA not not in a timely fashion. The Kidnapping Patty hearst has been sucked such an odd unique story. Hope you find it as interesting as I do. Very hard to find a similar tale out there right rich kid gets kidnapped by group of domestic terrorists than joins. The gang helps them rob banks. Crazy Thank you to the bad magic productions team for for help and making time suck every week Queen Magic. Lindsey. Commons Reverend Dr Joe Paisley the script keepers Zach flannery bid Elixir Logan Art Warlock Keith bad magic baroness cade keys running badge Mertz dot com, and the socials. Please join the Colt. Curious private facebook group. If you want some community to go along with this podcast thank you to Liz Hernandez her all seeing is for moderating it. Thanks to beefsteak WHO's now our official ambassador of fun over on this cord. Congrats the sergeant awesome for curly leading round two of times of Trivia game available only space hazards on the time suck up five, thousand, Sixty, eight points, hundred points ahead of second-place very impressive. It's going to be hard to beat, but there is still more attributed come round to doesn't end until Monday September seventh at three, pm, Pacific Time, and that's when round three against. Next week on time such is going to get real. Crazy. WE'RE GONNA return to both California and the nineteen seventies to examine someone way worse than Donald. Freeze we return to the annals of true crime and suck on legit psychopath. The Vampire of Sacramento Richard Chase is it going to be like an Albert Fish y'all Kroll ed camper Chikatilo, kind of suck. We touched on this maniac and the FBI behavioral Science Unit Suck. Chases me called the poster boy for the FBI disorganized killer profile district random. So Extreme Jason, just kill he mutilated. He was a cannibal plus an obsessed consumer of blood and NECROPHILIAC fucking triple crown psychopaths. In, a month long murder spree in the mid seventy S. Likes it was like something out of Clive Barker Nightmares. He butchered total is six men women, and sadly even children in the most heinous aways when police searched his apartment, they discovered that nearly every surface within it was saturated in blood from the walls to his eating utensils. Then there were the contents of the refrigerator. Richard Shea said he needed to kill to save himself from what? The answer is pretty hard to believe. Very hard to believe mostly because they don't make a lot of sense because he was out of his fucking mind join us next week for a suck on a truly darken demented mind in real monster the Vampire of Sacramento. Analysis balls deep into today's time. sucker updates. Times. Our first update count from Super Sucker Alexandra. Ceasar just wants to send some positive thoughts and our prayers the way her friend sucker spaces in solid meet sack. Alexandra. Rights Afternoon Suck Masters Supreme I just got some pretty awful news at friend Nathan Fleck has been pretty bad motorcycle accident while we still don't have all the details we know he's been through surgery and is currently in a medically induced coma his lot of good people by his side we're all rooting for his recovery, but it'll be a long road ahead of him. He's a die hard time sucker space Leonard as well as a huge your stand up maybe more so than I am. I I was really hoping that we could give him a shout-out and just let all the suckers send him as many positive vibes as they can't. He's prime example of a great Muzak who's always there for his fellow humans if this gets to you thank you for the read and keep on Sucking Alexandra Caesar while kind and thoughtful of you Alexandra Nathan I hope you can hear this man hope you're fighting with everything. You've got get the fuck out of the hospital before he kept from covid going on your Rehab. You can get back on that bike hurry up. Awesome friends like Alexandra who are tired of about you. Seriously, we're thinking of you. Hope. You can bounce back hard and quick like Reverend Dr Horse Cock. For Roman get better get better soon data with you. top-shelf sack karston. Anderson. Now has a skin. Walker ranch citing to share with US interest is piqued. Carson writes Hello Master Sucker I just listened to the skin Walker ranch suck and would like to talk about an experience. I had with a skin walker while I lived on the reservation I was driving to a lady's House with my companion L. D. S. mission and saw a range dog like figure standing in the street. We exited the car walked lady's House to talk with her we did. So for about fifteen minutes, this dog was standing there looking at the entire time. As we were leaving. The Lady said be careful as we got back in the truck we noticed the dog or whatever the hell it was left. We turned the corner on the side of the road. We saw the same dog like creature getting up offers its is a weird green yellow yellowish color I feared for my life we drove off as fast as We could I know most people don't believe my story but honestly I, saw it. I. Saw I don't care what say hopefully can share the store in the upcoming suck. Give a shout out to my sexy wife Mattie for help me these hard times keep sucking. Sweet suck this. Thank you Karston and Hello Matty Aka Carson's loose Safina. May You forever tempt him? Stories intents shit man fucking. Did you see that dog the Terry Sherman punched? Seriously ill, there are so many stories like yours. So hope this can walk a ranch suck made. You feel good about that in a weird way I mean what the Hell is going on out there. I I kinda. WanNa see what you you saw also kind of. Ever ever ever ever want to see it. Hell Nimrod and hope whatever's going on that's not good. Turned around soon. Now. We have another skin walker citing coming in from a curious cult member. Joel Schmil end our. Shimin. Joel McCoy Joel Joel S. Kind of a skin walker side maybe not as skin Walker Saudi. Totally. But he does he's shit scared him while he listened to the skin. Walker. Suck anyway. Joel writes my hands are still shaking I was listening to this can walker ranch suck on my way home from my shift at the hospital around midnight the part started playing about Terry, his encounter with the Skin Walker Wolf the Erie music was playing as you dramatically explain what happened as a story came to its end of the music started getting louder a deer jumped out into the road and I, let out an audible screech that I am not proud of. The. There was far enough away that I did not hit it and kept my composure driving. So no harm was done except I need new pants. It's aliens knew the exact moment to send out the deer anyway. Thank you Dan in the universe for Scary Nimrod out of me praise bojangles and Hailu Safina all turned out well, Joe Joe. You painted a picture beautifully there fucking dear. Yes they're cute. But dammit, they are minutes on the road because you never know when they're gonNA pop out. Now I'm always in lookout for little beady glowing eyes at night. So many deer road. We just got a new fence and help keep those assholes out of the art. Crazy. How much they can shit so much shit the my dogs like to eat, and then the dealership makes them shit more. It's Shit Cycle I do not enjoy. thanks for sharing that spooky moments. Now, imagine if one of those who stood up on its hind legs maybe roared at you just gone full Wendy go. To Fund Dot. Now for a hateful message from a stupid. Polish Monster Cameron Cochran. This terrible sub human rights. Dear Master Suck Suck. Later, I take an ice polite shit on you. I'd like to say I started listening to times like a few months ago while searching for podcasts have comedy for years but you helped me survive monotonous slog of work this year. So thank you for that with Nice these out of the way time to get into it. This week's episode on Skin Walker Ranch was grading to listen to as a native Utah born and raised in Salt Lake and having recently moved across country to Maryland. I'm naturally very protective and fond of our beautiful mountains. So when I opened up time suck to see a close to home topic. I was excited until I wanted to drive an ice pick through my ear. They are the Utah, not you and Taw and West. Wasatch Wasatch, fucking these fucking stupid words wasatch not was such. It is insane to me that you said Duchenne just fine. I try. But not the mountains for the whole episode anyway just wanted to get my favorite mush mouth a little hell on behalf of my favorite homestate. As a side note, I love you to talk Polish soon to force you to acknowledge the Polish people's value and bad attitude bears carrying artillery undefeated cavalry hundreds of years. VETOED PILECKI super bad s keep on suck and Cameron just another dumb polack listen Cameron I've. About, the mispronunciation just so you know I, I did add a phonetic guide to all those words however between my own regional dialect and the proper dictionary dot com that's not always matching the cloak will prince. Yeah fucking. Blue. Also I am very impressed that you were able to send this message whoever wrote it to has ever to who whoever was able to take your Polish grunts and gibberish and translate into real human words, and then write those words down man Kudos to them because I could not have been an easy job. To. Seriously, we do need some more post topics and there are a lot of awesome pulls out there. We could talk about some awesome Polish people or what about a Polish serial killer there's gotta be some. I haven't. We set some true crime in Poland yet. I. Think of some additional slandering throw your people's way. He'll Nimrod I'll keep on trying to nail those fucking stupid regional words. Staffer mouth was to fina begun temptress. Now, for some contrarian dots and socialism and also on whether or not, we should judge someone by the norms the times they lived in or by some universal and timeless standard of human decency. Always good to take in contrast opinions super, Sucker Joe Messina writes the following. Hey, Dan love the show my wife introduce me to your podcast and stand up. We met almost four years ago I still listen she does not but I still anyway. I have been in and out of Santa for years myself just never got around to make a career of it. Now I request that you check to make sure bojangles leashes secure because I'm an avowed socialist. Oh, I know I know I hope we can still be friends. Actually I, appreciate your show because I know I. can count on you to challenge my beliefs in good faith, which is something we can all benefit from I have a specific topic I wanna, bring up about the Disney suck. So I won't even go into the social nitty gritty I won't for instance, I. Love This. On the fact that waltz well seemed to have actually destroyed family and the much wealth should never be concentrated and his grandkids wouldn't have to rely on inheritance money. If we all had well-funded universal social programs like single payer healthcare and universal basic income or how the modern Disney corporations near monopolization of the entertainment industry is harmful and indicative of the gilded age or the consequences of the type of union busting. Disney. Did I will not be bringing up any of those in this email that was beautiful. What I wanted to challenge you on his notion that we can't judge people by modern standards and have to look past a lot of their negative beliefs and actions because of the time most likely set meet acts have had great beliefs. Beliefs at all times throughout all of history. It's a good point. People, who make the history books like Disney are presented as so impressive for their wealth and power they acquired that we must look pastor unfortunate. But of the time beliefs or at best we view them as complicated rich famous powerful people get to be complicated. Poor powerless people are forgotten. The truth is not everyone the nineteen thirties and forties thought like Disney. That's. What we're talking about him if that's true innovations, it can also be true of is beliefs and practices, and it is take his meeting with right install i. think it's reasonable to write off. This is just business much like I was just following orders. This reason is too often used to justify evil xr associations if we compare wall to Universal Studios Founder Carl alumnae. No guests on that pronunciation I guess to someone in a similar position at the time waltz actions become even less defensible Carl help hell Carl helped around three hundred German Jewish families which came out to over thousand people, Escape Nazi, Germany, and immigrate to the US. He gave many of them jobs universal, which both made it easier to get approved as an immigrant refugee and to get on their feet and their. New Lives. This wasn't easy to pull off, but we're talking about extraordinary people who stand out I'm sure many average joes and Jones had attitudes about nazi-ism similar to waltz and many similar to Carl's I'm not opposed to considering the context of a time period and why historical figure would have held a beliefs they did. But some things are not acceptable. No matter what time period you're in slavery abolitionist him in what is. Now. The US dates back to the sixteen hundreds, which is when the North American slave trade began in northern states started banning slavery soon after the Revolutionary War that tells me, there is little to no excuse for pro slavery stances especially in the by the eighteen hundreds, the southern states made Thomas Jefferson removed his condemnation of slavery from the declaration of Independence Aaron Bird was a fervent abolitionist where's his fucking musical I? Guess. Burr isn't a catchy title side Note Jefferson and Burr both owned slaves. Now that's what I call complicated. It's okay to admire the Work Disney did but it's also Kedah unequivocally say the bad things he did were bad. This attitude of that's just how people used to think not only excuses the crimes of historical figures but encourages ageism in the form of ascribing bad ideas like racism sexism, xenophobia capitalism agree to disagree. Only two people have certain age groups for generations. People have said stuff like we just need to wait for these old out of touch assholes die out. Then we'll sort all this out which raises the fact that there are a ton of young racist bucks out there plenty of sweeties who are sixty years young or more still doing what they can to make the world a better place. Anyway all this really amount to is that we shouldn't deify historical figures because in the end they're all just. Human when we put people on a pedestal them too much power and that never ends well, I'll even my own side here. This is what gets you communist communist tyrants like Stalin or Mao it was Marx's stupid idea that communism she give temporary Tala -tarian power to one person in a transitional phase, and then that person should give said power you know how humans are, oh, you know how humans are always willing to give up power. We see the same problem on display in the US, decades In the US sorry decades of executive overreach have led the trump and the presidency in general having way too much power for one person back to Disney. His wealth and power led to an exploited workforce at a dangerous monopolize monopolized entertainment industry Disney accounted for thirty eight percent of the box office in two, thousand, nine, hundred, and eight out of ten or eighty percent of the top grossing films the same year. Even if you do love the free market I, don't think this is how it's supposed. To work one company controlling everything no competition. I've a friend who did union organizing work for Disney workers and I can assure you much like most use us corporations, the house of mouse fight tooth, and nail to give as little as possible to the workers who generate their wealth corporations have too much power in this country I think I'll give it a rest there. I. Hope you'll consider somewhat I said here because I believe you're at your best you're questioning everything. Thanks for the show. Keep on talking. While so much Info Joe, where do I begin you make a lot of good points about how you you shouldn't give someone a pass on doing something bad just because he did a lot of good. And that it's not good to deify historical figures However, I also want to become part of today's canceled culture and ignore the the good someone is done because he had some bad stuff too. You know because we all have not that that's exactly what you're saying but with this walt and Leni Riefenstahl Did walt. Install in his home give her a tour of a studio. Yes. was she a Nazi sympathizer? Yes. Had the Holocaust begun yet when she came over no was the focus of films hatred of the Jewish people no. Have you ever had someone over to your house who may have been racist probably maybe a member of a political party with other racist members. I bet you have. We can't know what everyone else thinks even friends are you greatly familiar with the political leanings racial opinions of everyone you've ever had over I. Doubt it ever find out something later about someone like Holy Shit I had no idea so and so was racist or misogynistic xenophobic whatever I have. No one's perfect. That's what you're saying But I also hope that I didn't suggest that I thought well, Disney was perfect. I just refused as described as current notion of opiates. So and so had slaves or so and so she on his wife or so and so was racist sexist whatever. So fuck everything they did. Yes certain heroic people do rise above the time they live in and that is beyond admirable but I bet we could find something wrong with most of those people too. If we look hard enough, maybe they stole something and they spread some, you know bad rumors something. To me while Disney being friendly with the Nazi sympathizer, nineteen, thirty eight isn't necessarily a big deal because I know how I was in international politics. Now, we can look back at that year look what happened in Germany and be like what the fuck but did walt no at the time exactly what was going on maybe but maybe not My son category with me for not knowing what's going on all the time. Politically I tell him I don't have fucking time. I work breaking down stories running a business, a good sixty hours plus a week I try and stay current but there's you know there's only so much time and there's so much news out there walt was a busy dude busier than me. He was managing a huge company out so many productions maybe he didn't really know who the hell Leni Riefenstahl was. I doubt. Her first words to Walter Hi I'm I hit the Jews Hiller highly doubt it. So I. Think you see the point of making here. This is why I don't like to deconstruct heroes too much and to nitpick on certain things, I like heroes I like to be inspired I expect them to be flawed. You mentioned getting so much more attention than his workers and I just think he should is it harder to launch a business than it is hold down a job I've done both and I think it is not that there isn't a lot of value hold down jobs and he didn't just launch a business he launched empire. Why do so many of us applaud that because it's very rare. it's rare to hit over sixty home runs in a season in major league baseball. That's why guys do that get paid a lot more than the guys who don't they bring in more fans more people impressed rare and difficult to be so much better. Than everyone else you can average over thirty points a game for a season, the NBA whoever does that going to get paid a lot more than somebody whoever just two points a game thirty point dude sells more tickets exciting to watch and it's more exciting to talk about someone building one of the biggest media empires in the world then in his talk about someone clocking in on ninety five. I mean the empire builder is a better person than the factory worker, fuck? No definitely doesn't does it mean lead leading anymore unique and therefore intrinsically more interesting suck really life does to me should Disney be able to monopolize the entertainment industry? No, I'm a capitalist but I'm also a big fan of antitrust laws. I'm a fan of regulated capitalism I'm a strong proponent and government regulated capitalism which I know goes against some libertarian views. and Y you give me full podcasts worth of points to address your job. You're clearly very smart. Do I so appreciate you listening to a podcast hosted by some with very different political leanings in a different historical perspective than you do. I love contrasting opinions. I. Don't WanNa live in some kind of. PSYCHO FANTASTIC ECHO chamber. That was a big word I tried to pull off. I think about got eighty percent of it There's too much going on right now people just doubling down a belief they've held for years but never really examined people surround himself with people who only think exactly like they do and I fucking hate it I hate mindless tribalism hate mindless nationalism. Hope, this show always has like you are we thinking about your word for quite some time already have been hail fucking Nimrod Mr Messina. We can get along we get along just fine. Thanks for the updates everyone. Thanks. Times. We all did. Thank for tune into another suck appreciate the continued ratings and reviews. The sucks still gross spy mush mouth haven't lost you all yet new dumb comedy podcast on. Wednesday. Thanks for the feedback has been so fun. So, happy. It's only people like it having a blast with Mr Joe more scared to death Tuesday nights at midnight having fun with it creeps in papers over there. Try Not to get kidnapped this week, and if you do don't start robbing banks and striking out against fascist pigs instead I don't know maybe just maybe just keep on talking. We need to, we need to go up on Hawk and go up to the mountain and grab from the Fascist fucking pigs and take the money and just handed out to the poor. We need to drive cool cars in where and leather jackets with fluffy kind of I. Don't know like what is it like a pilot I don't know, but it's like a cooler. And have changed a silk shirts and bill bottom jeans and platform fuck juice with go fishing motherfucking heels.

Patty hearst Donald Symbionese Liberation Army California America San Francisco hearst publications Patricia Great Grandpa George William Randolph hearst Group kidnapping hearst family United States Los Angeles Berkeley David freeze University of California Berke Menlo College hearst Willie Randy
King Of Pain

Fame is a Bitch

47:16 min | 2 years ago

King Of Pain

"From workhouse connect in a j Benza. Vein. He liked to be walked on a leash and play really dirty kinky sex camps is the guy put the cop and the peacock network. Okay bitch. Hey, everybody AJ Bantu here for famous bitch. It's March eighth 2018 Hanes. My wife's birthday. What am I gonna get for birthday? I don't know. I don't know. Haven't gotten the yet. But I'm sure I'll get something really wonderful. You know, you guys have done extraordinary things you listeners. You send me things in the mail. You've bought things you've made things you've sent away for stuff. I can't get over. But I'm gonna I'm gonna post a picture later today. You can see what this guy did for me. Greg's are autho. Greg's Raffard is a a patriot member terrific guy. I'm gonna put his information on the podcast obsessed page, but he made me Rocco at Avino and Mike's Mike son law he made us all fame as a bitch hockey jerseys, like they're authentic, beautiful hockey jerseys. And it's it's the famous bitch logo. It's it's our favorite numbers. I'm forty four. My son is thirteen I it just it blew me away. It's not not shirt, fucking hockey jersey. So Greg, you you you did yourself all the jerseys are gorgeous, I'm gonna put them up on the podcast recess page. So you can all see him. Obviously if you guys. I don't wanna save you need jerseys because I'm not sure he'll just crank out individuals. But maybe you guys are involved with the team or sport. I don't know. But I will put up his I'll put up Greg's wrath his information later on after I post this show. So you'll see by the time this show airs in other words, but thanks, buddy. Really really good stuff today show is brought to you by open fit open fit takes all the complexity out of losing weight and getting fit to brand new really simple streaming service that allows lousy to work out from the comfort of your own home. Just for like ten minutes day. That's all you got to spare. Open fit knows. Everybody's body's different. Which is why they personalized things for your needs. And they've got the custom-tailored original content. Check this stuff out. I'm telling you springs around the corner, I've been doing it for for about a week and a half two weeks. I got a late start lost eight. Pounds already. It's not hard, by the way, we all know what we need to do. But when you got something behind you like this with a bunch of experts involve it'll get the job done a lot quicker to really simple, take all the complexity in the stress of getting fit just press play workout on your schedule. Six hundred seconds is is one of the one of the program's called six hundred seconds with celebrity trainer. Devon wiggins. I've been using that one fat burning muscle building body sculpting benefits. You can go much longer if you want, but you can go as little as six hundred seven day you can scope your body with Andrea Rogers. She's the founder of the worldwide sensation extend bar or you can get in crazy good shape with hunter McIntyre name by Sports Illustrated, one of the top fittest athletes. They know how to get your results real quick. So you can do it anywhere anytime, you computer your web enabled the TV tablet smartphone. You know, the deal lose up to fifteen thousand just the first. Thirty days. I'm on my way, flagging rabs shape. Your by look good feel great. No, more bullshit guys. I'm fifty six I accept that. I do way better. When I follow an expert's lead. You'll do better too. So AJ Huckabee lose weight when you given us recipe you can just don't eat the whole the whole platter. Save some for your family. But you could do it and open fit has changed the way I'm working out this spring promise you use my code fame. Join me on a fitness journey personalized just for you. So right now during open fit, it's a thirty day challenge. My listeners get a special extended thirty day free trial membership to open fit you can lose fifteen pounds in thirty days. When you text fame to thirty thirty thirty that's three zero three zero three zero get full access to open fit, all the workouts. Even the nutritional information, totally free again, just text. Fame thirty thirty thirty you're on your way, baby. So R Kelly may be having huge money issues. That's for sure. But I think he just helped Gayle king get a huge contract a huge raise. I know the world unless they are to his heralding her for having the enormous quality to just sit there and stay calm. But I hear that is not what she's been like in in recent meetings with CBS executives. Yeah. Gaels been Don little fucking crazy. I hear she acted more like our Kelly did when when he sat down with her the other day. But really Gayle king. Is was already in the midst of a multi million dollar renegotiation with CBS news to stay on CBS this morning. I wake up to that show everyday. I like I like now she's telling her bosses you want me to stay here. You're going to anchor this shit shell that. I want George Stephanopoulos money Shatri said I want George to how much George Stephanopoulos. Make while. The progressive midget is stealing between fifteen and eighteen million dollars a year. ABC think about that money. These people retell prompters. My job is harder. It's disgusting. Right now. Gayle king is roughly like she's roughing it only making six mil you know, it's tough and our best friends Oprah who has about a billion. You know, she can't get everything she wants. But she was about to walk during all that chaos. When all the old school horn dog got fired Charlie rose last moon viz. Yeah. Those are the creep. She worked for and worked next to on top of that they really pissed her off recently when her her executive producer Ryan cadre. Oh, he split in December. After it was revealed, a his exit was mistakenly linked with those CBS those big payoffs, the bottom line is he was he was named a lawsuit which was settled, but three women accused the network of not basically, not doing shit stop to stop Charlie rose when he was hosting CBS this morning and also. Also him working as a sixty minutes. Correspondent he was constantly trying to fuck everything that walked by his desk. Don't let his age full you. And you know, I had this on good authority from an ex girlfriend who told me years ago that fifteen minutes after he I met her on a street in Greenwich Village, he was inviting her to see his new kitchen, and then he's putting his hand up or thought by when she went in because she fell it's Charlie rose. He's a, you know, classy journalists what's going to happen. What's going to happen? Put his hand rather than thi- her milky thi-, and she's one of those chicks who are not gonna go to thirties not gonna call network boss like Orion cadre. Oh, she's the kind of check could just looked at him and said, no, not me, and he laughed, but he got it. Now rose had a couple of couple of dozen women come forward with complaints of sexual abuse. You know, it's one thing for an old guy to come. Mm try to grab imagine his breath. Imagine seventy seven year old breath. If that's how old he's around that. Right. Oh, just death breath. Not good. I mean, I'm gonna be seventy seven one day, but I'm not going to be trying to fucking rape somebody it's gusting and then his buddy while Gayle king exempt producer cadre was called on the carpet. Because basically he couldn't keep Charlie rose on a leash. The first thing you did wrong. So anyhow long story short. Gayle king got really pissed when cadrone basically had to walk away from his EP job, and she was really close to him. So you know that news, and the fact that the guy who sat next to her was a creep and her boss, less moon, Bessant, even bigger creep that put her in a big position to get paid, man. And not to mention this strong rumor that the woman who sits to her left Nuoro Donal, maybe taking the nightly news job in DC. And that would be. Banish the human mannequin, Jeff gore who you cannot hire a man with that last name to be the the face that America looks at Jeff Clark. It's it's horrible. He's not good. He's gonna go Donald going to get that job in DC. And look take all that an add in the fact that she she kept calm when our Kelly was throwing a connection fit, and obviously birthing a million memes. The best one is I believe I can cry. I love that one. And Gayle king is now guaranteed to walk away with at least doubling her six million dollars salary. I can't take it. So basically and ironically, it took several guys several creepy guys who can't keep their Dixon their pants to put her in the position to sign the biggest contract of her life and one of the biggest deals in broadcast journalist. How's that for irony? The metoo movement is about not to really be swell. Forget king, and she has a lot of underage black girls in Chicago to thank. It's been so good. That CBS is now devoting a Friday night special. Forget king. It's gonna start tonight. The Gayle king interview with R Kelly. It's gonna feature interviews with both Kelly and also the two chicks were brainwashed as real clarion, Jocelyn savage. These are the chicks that live with them as well as some on aired footage from the eighty minutes sit down probably going to be an extra twelve minutes. You haven't seen yet because they've been running the shit out of it every which way, but look. You know, I know Gayle king took a beating when she first came to the scene because she went from everybody thinking, she was Oprah Winfrey's lesbian lover to everybody's screaming. Nepotism. But in reality, she, you know, she does have a background in news. She's got the chops. It isn't like Oprah just plucked some Yokel and plot or in front of America and made us except her. She warned her up. She kept put around putting around the Oprah show. Then she made the editor of Oprah magazine, and for anybody who cares, you know, her and Oprah met in Baltimore along fucking time ago when they both got their start. That's when Oprah was smoking crack and had an afro, we'll go way back. And of course, you know, twenty years, she's been editing. I don't know how much editing you do for Oprah magazine. You just you find out what story's going to run you have one meeting among and you go home God knows what she's making that deal too. And last year, of course, got got inducted into the broadcasting hall of fame, and I'm I'm cool with that. I like her style. I gotta admit I don't think she did anything spectacular at all while interviewing R Kelly. She sat there, and you know, she sat the she's being heralded for the way, she said, Robert Robert while he was going berserk and talking about how his life is in shambles. That's not it's not that hard. He did all the heavy lifting. I like to see Gayle king trudge through a field of i-it's in Syria while interviewing a soldier taking fire for ISIS. Let's try that. I'd like to see the kind of heroic insane wartime shit that Laura Luma. Well, Lewis not Louis not doing wartime ship, but I like people really sink our teeth into journalism lower logo. I met Larry Logan on the CBS chick who got fired. She's tremendous do that kinda shit. Then we'll talk about the hall of fame in enemy, but sitting on Kelly's house with ten publicists and en- handlers. Four feet away. It's not. That hard. I would have had a very different line of questioning if I were Gayle, for instance, what kind of question is this. This is the one, you know, I got I got a protest one question. She asked did you ever have sex with anyone under the age of seventeen? Hello, he married. A Leah when she was fifteen. I don't think he waited to us to banger. The fuck that's not some secret, just Google it Gail. But you know, this morning watching her female co anchors boy were they stay. They couldn't they couldn't say enough great things about her. You know, Gil, which we will worried about you very concerned because I could see the explosiveness in his eyes in the physicality his actions. How did you do your amazing never saw anything like it? All right. And she was very cool and deflecting it it's not her fault. They were blown her for for five minutes. I'll say no one nobody knows what real toughness is anymore. No one knows what aren't Kelly did will forever. Go down as an iconic moment forever. And you're gonna see Manny pictures of that day and journalism professors will eventually teach from this moment and young reporters everywhere will all hail the king. Gayle king. That's what they'll do. But the next crop journalists the ones that are coming up or so fucking spoil the little entitled pussies, you know, anyhow. So of course, a picture of Gayle king staying calms going to excite them. And did you hear this the students set up New York's pace university a very upset with the tabloid publisher David pecker pecker who's while? He's essentially my boss. He runs AM. I America media, and he's the publisher of all the tabloid star inquirer intouch radar and God knows how many more but the other day some pussy journalism students at pace university. They want his name removed from a lecture theatre on its campus. It seems the scandals he's a allegedly been involved in have them worried and concerned and they're angry. So they wrote an op Ed at an in the op-ed, they they brought up some of the various scandals, including the fact that he allegedly orchestrated a catching kill with respect to Trump and the playboy playmate of the year, Karen McDougal and also AM is allegedly black. Cnn ailing Jeff Bezos with dick pics that he sent to his lover Lawrence Sanchez, by the way. Just in case, you think Jeff Bezos Lawrence inches are cooling things off turns out a few months ago. They went in in disguise without telling their people, and they checked out an eighty eight million dollar home in Bel Air. A home. That's got insane dimensions and a car elevator. Some believable guys. It's just to think that this guy started Amazon mailing things out of his car. It. You know, listen, there's no excuse anybody can do that in America. If you got the balls and the gumption and the how nothing stopping you for become the next Jeff bass else. Unbelievable. But to say pecker was a major donor to patient Aversa would be an understatement. That's like saying Michael Jackson is mildly curious with boys in grade school. Packers given pace millions of dollars. He graduated from the school in the nineteen sixties. He's got an honorary degree from pace a professorship there named after him. So the name the lecture hall. The David J Packer lecture hall make sense, listen. These little pussies have to know journalism is a dirty game. I was given instructions and told what to do by my publisher, the billionaire more soccer Mun on more than five occasions. I was given strict instructions on who to take out by the knees in the column, you know, not physically, but it was very well known. The demands came from the head down there, are there are certain things that big rich millionaire billionaire publishers take as slights and they want their revenge. They want retribution and one of the first things more succomb in told the Linda Stacey when he harder and harder. To me is look I've got a lot of socialite, friends and. You know, I gotta make sure what you're writing is up to snuff in my friends, Linda said I'll walk away right now. I will fuck and Lee Linda was like that Linda would would knock everything offer desk when when men at the daily news pissed off. She was nuts now, she's gone completely crazy as a total lefty, but I still love her. But she she take any shit, and she said, no more. No, I'm not gonna pull punches because you have some rich friends hire someone else. And I'm sitting there going no don't horror someone else. But you know, what he respected afford, and he only bugged her a couple of times after that. But when he used to get mad or when he was concerned about who you're writing about sometime one time he came into the news in his polo Alphand. I'm talking about horse polo, like not with Paulo Cologne or polo shirt. He came in with the fuck and jodphurs, the the boots would horsh it on the heels. He just came off the polo field to tell them. He was mad. He had the writing stick. He's played polo Peter Br. Randy, the X publisher of interview magazine, another billionaire. So these guys are crazy. I told you awhile ago that the when Moore documen would tell Pete Hamill. What to do is driving? Crazy Pete would say it's like a king with syphilis. It's a crazy reference. But I love it. But that's the way these guys get so journalism can be very dirty game. And these kids have no fucking idea. What what David pecker is alleged to have done. And with some of reporters had legibly done is something that goes on constantly in the business. They just don't know yet. They're sitting in fancy lecture halls with their progressive lefty professors all of whom looked down on pecker. And they think they're getting the whole story. Let me ask you question. What college in America? Do you think would have anything remotely positive to say about a wealthy conservative publisher who's friends with Trump supported Trump endorsed Trump and allegedly help keep his affairs out of the press? The answer is not one. In college would have anything. Nice to say, well, maybe Trump university would be fine with it. But you know, that's not matriculating students right now. What bugs me is? I soon these kids have learned all about the lives of other powerful publishers like William Randolph Hearst. For instance, will you renovate one of the. One of the a major tycoon American businessmen newspaper publisher politician guy develop the nation's largest newspaper chain in media company. Hearst communications very flamboyant he began but was called yellow journalism. He influenced the country's popular media by emphasizing sensationalism and human interest stories, but don't tell these little pussies about that. You know, back in the day Hearst acquire the New York journal, and he fought a very bitter circulation war with the New York World, which was owned by Joseph Pulitzer. That's where the name comes from for the journalism, award gel, Pulitzer or Pulitzer of you pronounce it, but hers soul papers by basically, printing giant headlines with really lurid stories featuring crime and corruption sex and all sorts of innuendo and eventually created chain of about thirty. Newspapers in an in major American cities at its peak, and then he expanded to magazines and created the largest newspaper and magazine business in the world. That many control the editorial positions in coverage of political news in all his papers, and magazines and thereby was basically publishing his personal views. That's what happens it's hardly fair. But it happens so tough shit little pace university. Pussies publishing dirty game. I wonder if these students know that, you know, his his life story was the maintenance ration- for Orson Welles playing Charles foster Kane in the movie citizen Kane, who my kidneys pricks haven't seen citizen. Kane if it isn't streaming on fucking Hulu than they haven't seen it. But I wonder if they know how he got his start when he took over managing his father's newspaper, the San Francisco Examiner that was a paper as father got in eighteen eighty in a repayment for a gambling debt. And then the sensationalism that he practiced. Began when when he gave the paper a great big motto. It was called a monarch of the dailies. And after that he made sure to buy the best equipment the best printing presses the most talented writers of the time. He hired Mark Twain, Jack London. Yeah. Those guys wrote for newspapers meanwhile, William Randolph, Hearst demanded his reporters report any and all accounts of financial curruption municipal corruption which meant he was often attacking companies in which his own family held an interest. You think these pay students have balls like that? I don't think. So they specially what one no the kinda shit. He had to do after he acquired the New York morning journal. This is when New York New York had sixteen papers at one point you imagine that and publishes whatever they could whatever they had to do to stay ahead. Imagine the pressure of having to do something splashy on a on a daily basis. So that Edith and Eddie Jones would choose your paper and not any of the fifteen other choices they had it's it's remarkable. So Hearst pretty quickly had the stylish himself as the most attractive boss out there, mainly because he stayed generous. He paid more than its competitors. Patey gave credit to his writers. People got paid one bylines big bylines. You know, look he stayed calm. Even though there was a storm around him. And he used a lot of let's put it this way, the people he hired were eccentrics, prima donnas. Bohemians drunks retro Bates. Love that word. He used them. He hard them is long as they had useful talents. In other words. He allowed not true typical perfectly qualified reporters to work for him. You know, when I worked at the news, I was surrounded by a lot of guys who went to the Columbia school of journalism, and they had these master's degree and all that shit. And I know they look down on me because I was a kid grew up in the streets and figured out. I do it. And my my way of reporting and following his story was a lot different than theirs. But I knew look down on me. But I didn't give a fuck. I had the big office. I had the big column and they didn't. So it worked out. But I liked that hers. Was that kind of do that would have hired a guy like me? You know, if if the people that I just mentioned if they lived life, and they had a handle or angle on stories, whatever that meant, then they had a place in his newsroom, and that's the way newspapers used to be put together not like today. It's just so different. It's gross. His model for the paper was while others talk the journal axe a love it. I love it. And right around this time, the New York journal and its chief rival in New York World, they adopted this popular journalism, which was called yellow journalism and anybody who went to school pretty much knows what that is. It's basically sensationalized journalism and Joe Pulitzer pushed the boundaries and his newspapers he used bold headlines aggressive news gathering a lot of cartoons. Illustrates a lot of progressive crusades put it that way and human interest stories as well. And Hearst at the journal used the same recipe for success, and he told his reporters, look if you just bust your ass and do it like they're doing a better than them will be fine. And eventually they did impute to have to drop the price of his paper from two cents to one cent. So these papers were locked in a fierce fierce battle for circulation, and I wish you could have been there with me in New York City in the tabloid war the nineties when the daily news was going head to head every day with the New York Post and listen, New York news. There was a great fucking paper to. That's why learnt gray paper. Great people great bosses, but the post and the news tabloid town. And like, I told you in the past as I walked the streets in I could see could always tell what paper was a head by the size of the newspapers stacks at various newsstands. All over the city, if the if the post stack was lower that meant they were beating us that day, and when I got to work I had to fucking get something good. Something outstanding. So our stack of papers would be lower later. It was really looking as scoreboard every day every single day. You knew who is winning who was losing. And what it did was it created a competition and competition is what's gone nowadays. The times report is don't look at the stacks at new stance. Partly because most businesses online now, and it's it system personal and also because ninety percent of the newsstands or gone. When I when I moved to LA, I used to love driving to newsstands in the morning with a Cup of coffee and grabbed the New York City papers, even though they cost like a buck extra was worth it to just read Iraq's writers. I just left. I couldn't just cut cold Turkey and the other day I passed one of those newsstands in the valley with the kids in the car taken back from school. And I go all that news, Dan's dead. And they actually said what's new stand? And you know, what do you say I said at every fucking newspaper in America. Every magazine you could think of it was great usually manned by an old guy who'd been there for decades, you know, it's gone, and they sold it to somebody else who's not in the newspaper business. Who knows the probably be a fucking pop. Sprint store coming soon. Because you know, we all love those monstrosities. They're built those stores built so quickly. No elegance snow personality. Makes you feel like, you know, you're looking at the ugly architecture of nineteen eighties communist, Russia, cold bland, concrete unimagined if like Obama's proposed presidential life if seen as proposed library. Oh, my gods. The fucking concrete box sculpting. And how long tangent these pace students have no idea no idea that even though yellow journalism of was spoken badly about. There was some good to it. All good yellow journalists what they did was they sought the human spirit in every story and edited without fear of emotion or drama. They wore their feeling on their pages. They believe what they would do was honest and wholesome. It was a great way to communicate with their readers member. Tell to Sweeney. That's what I'm talking about. And Hearst believed emotions ignite our intellects, a story catering to a reader's feelings is more important than a story stimulating restarts. Right. I wonder how they'd feel if they ever took the time to learn that when Hearst went from conservative to liberal he decided to visit Berlin in the nineteen thirties interviewed Adolf Hitler. And when Hitler asked him why he was so miss. Understood by the American press, her stolen because Americans believe in democracy, and they're averse to dictatorship, and he then ran columns without rebuttal, by the way, he ran columns by Nazi leader Hermann Goering and Hitler himself as well as MS Laney. And this this is nineteen thirty four an America and Japan's relations were really unstable. So in an attempt to fix that ah prince from Japan came Estatal Tokugawa. Yeah. Tokugawa came to America on some goodwill. Visit and during his visit with William Randolph Hearst. He came in the hopes of improving the shitty relationship, we have with the other people the other country, and he did so because her papers were biased against Asians. And that would be one of the biggest contributing factors to the unfair and unconstitutional mass arrests and interment of Japanese Americans during World War Two. Oh, yeah. William randolph. Hearst had his hand in some shitty things. I'm telling you, and there are plenty of things you can find about him that suggest he routinely invented sensational stories. He fake interviews. He ran phony pictures he. Started real events. You know? And then, of course, Hearst had his hand the best story in the mysterious death of Thomas ins- and not many of you know, the name Thomas ins-. I sure as hell didn't when we did the mysteries and scandals episode on Thomas ins-, but lended up being one of my favorite most intriguing stories ever heard about Hollywood sex, betrayal. Power murder is perfect. So check this out Thomas ins rose from a failed stage actor basically to a successful film tycoon he invented the system of movie making that still in use today. He created something called triangle studios with a couple of big names Mack Senate and DWI Griffith. Hello. And eventually he founded the studios in Culver city that would become MGM not too bad. But he is where I love this story. So one day. Thomas insight was guest of honour on William Randolph. Hearst giant yacht. The. The Nida, and it was his forty second birthday of forty fourth birthday, something like that. On the boat with him is Hearst, obviously, Hearst longtime actress companion Marian Davies also on Boorda's, Charlie Chaplin, an actress name Elinor Glyn. Another actress I'll tell you about in a second. But also gossip columnists Luella Parsons was there. Now, several of these people on the boat were all at crossroads in their lives or careers chaplain was dealing with the critical and commercial failure of the movie a woman in Paris. There were rumors that he'd impregnated sixteen year old girl named lead grey Marian Davies wanted to appear in slapstick comedy rather than the shitty and boring costume dramas. Hearst was putting her in because at this point I was producing films as well Thomas inches film studio was in dire financial straits, and he was hoping to convince Hearst to take him on as a partner in cosmopolitan pictures and Parsons wanting to relocate from the east coast to the more glamorous west coast where everything was happening and all the movie stars live everybody. She wrote about was out in Hollywood. She wanted move. Out here. Meanwhile, get this Hearst suspects that Marian Davies is fucking Charlie Chaplin and Thomas ins- Chas the same suspicion, and he wanted to use that trip to privately tell Hearst in order to curry favor with him because Thomas ins- found a discarded love letter, the Charlie Chaplin had written to Davies he founded in a wastepaper basket on board the boat. So he's dying to tell her that, you know, what you're right chaplain his girl when he finally gets the nerve to tell him he goes searching for on the boat now Hearst went ballistic when he heard this. And he got even crazy. You've got even more mad when he found that an expensive piece of jewelry that he'd given Davies was found in Charlie Chaplin's cabin. So he figures it was loss. You know what I mean while fucking around something behind his back. So the rumor is Hearst. Grabs a gun, and he starts looking around the yacht for chaplain in the middle of sucking. He's gonna kill this guy gonna kill Charlie Chaplin. Meanwhile, Thomas runs into Mary Davis as he's running around. And the to have a sit down get this on fortunately in picked up one of trolley chaplains hats and put it on his head while he was secretly talking to marrying Davis. Now, the story is Hearst overheard Davies confide to instead, she never loved chaplain, and she regrets the affair. She heard him say I never loved him. That's the part that Hearst heard what he heard that. He thought she was talking about him. So he pumps a bullet into the back of not Charlie Chaplin Thomas since the next step. He's gotta dump Charlie Chaplin's body in the ocean. Promise Luella, Parsons, the gossip calmest saw everything. So now hearse house to arrange. Doc, the boat and San Diego, and he has an ambulance. Take the dying end home. He wasn't dead yet and Hearst phones, inches wife and tells her lucky he tried to kill himself because the other actors on the boat. I forget it. I aim is Livingston. He was having an affair. She tried to ended. And he assures the wife that the truth will never reach the media. You have my you have my promise that no one will know the story don't worry about it and to the rest of his guests. He tells ins- he tells people L inches ulcer flared up, and we need a quick medical attention. They didn't know that he shot him. So Mary Davis, of course, knows the truth. And she tells Charlie Chaplin would happen and he's freaking out because he could've been fucking killed. Also, loo on the Parsons, she ends up telling her you secret will be safe with me as long as you give me a lifetime contract with Hearst corporation, and that laid the groundwork for her long career as one of Hollywood's most powerful guy. Passive columnists. So after all that the actress I figured a first Livingston she went on to star in a number of successful films. Her salary jumped from three hundred film two thousand film, one why Davis Davies ended up starring in more of hers films before finally being allowed to feature in a comedy called the Hollywood review of nineteen twenty nine which as chaplain predicted was a success she stayed by her side until he died. Nineteen fifty one chaplain ended up marrying his teenage lover Lita grey in Mexico and is filmed the goal. Rush was a huge huge success Luella Parsons ends up working for hers for many years. And then she subsequently became one of the most successful writers in the history of American journalism, and sadly Thomas since people forget all about him. Every died. No one talked about anymore. Very few newspapers reported it. No police action was taken and this really proves that in Hollywood, no two accounts of the situation are ever the same. And that makes anything David pecker allegedly did for Donald Trump sound really innocent compared to what I just told you. But but that was what powerful publishes did way back in the day. And I wonder if the pussy to pace university. What a hard time learning at trade in the William Randolph. Hearst lecture hall. Let me thank my cream of the crop might tippy top alley chichi TRAN on the men and at Mony cross Angelique Keller Audra fortune. Chris Elise hu is shooting Rocco's football game next like good on you, buddy. Chris Lewis Kristoff, Debbie Anderson, George Nass, captain speed Catrin, Stewart, Kellyanne us poor many Valentinas. Melanie Howell, Melissa spear stra, Nicole Patterson, Patricia Markel, Ryan Wolfe. Sarah, Sisley Galloway Todd brand Wendy magazine. Krista Johns, dad, Heather brindell candy. Welsh, Eric Farka hub Gannett right from not right me. Joe Leone and the beautiful Kenza dean Kennedy is somebody. I recently joked that if she ever married me, she called Kenza Benza interesting. Listen, I'm gonna leave you with this. Rumor guys, there's a strong rumor out there that I n t was the first float this. I gotta be honest. The basically it's being fellow that that that Oprah Winfrey helped fund the leaving Neverland doc that she's one of the steriods producers, which is really odd to a lot of people, especially black folks, you know, who would never think one of their big powerful idols would would produce a doc that would help destroy the image of another us powerful idle in the black humidity. But it makes some sense. We know Oprah hosted the interview show that followed in which she interviewed the two men Wade and James save Chuck and the director, Dan Reed. And let me say man, what was save Chuck visibly shaken up by what he if you saw that shell he was shaking up as soon as they began to hold the energy. Because what they did is you obviously know this. They they lead save Chuck and Robson watch the documentary with a. With a room full of ink two hundred sexual abuse victims, so very emotional and save Chuck look he looked like he went through the mill man again, he relived it. But. It's so odd to me because save Chuck describes what Michael Jackson did to him like a semi smile on his face. It almost you know, like, I don't know. It's it's a very weird. Look, you know, Robin. Wade Robson states facts like he's still trying to make himself believe the insanity of having gone through that seven years he'll say he'll just say a regular sentence. And they'll say and then Michael sexually abused me for seven straight years from seven to fourteen like he's still trying to reckon with it. But save Chuck will say I masturbated so much that I ate at my penis swelled up and Michael brought me a Cup of warm water to help me p. It's like he's talking about as mother bringing them a Cup of tea. It's very very weird dynamic and not saying there's something wrong with them. Or it's said something I'll never know. But I find that the two of them having gone through the same thing. Both treated so differently in its aftermath. It's very interesting. But if anything it should just show you that everybody's different. Everybody's different come sexual-abuse everybody and look to me the fucking parents are so clueless. But beano really pissed me off. But save checks. Mom, bugs me so much. It sounds like she wants sympathy or something. I don't know. It's very, you know, she'd say, you know, Michael was like another child to me, I washed his clothes. And then later she said when I heard the news reports, I was so happy he died. What the fuck is out about. I don't know. What her I don't know? What that what are deal is? You know, but but but of Jimmy safe Chuck isn't speaking to his mom anymore. I totally get it. 'cause she's a fucking weird one. She really is. But I gotta say Oprah did. I think the excellent job of illustrating what she's always tried to explain which is child sexual abuses is really about seduction. She'll she also wanted to make make show that would allow the audience to see how this shit happens. I think a really important aspect of her. Shell was the way she discussed. How the words abuse the word abuse lacks currency, basically doesn't have the same effect that used to have and kids often can articulate abuse to their parents because they literally don't have the language yet to explain what happened to them. And basically that is that they've been seduced an entrapped, and they don't know those words at seven eight nine ten they don't know them yet. And I know that's come up a lot on the podcast obsessed page, but basically look is for the last time, I'm not gonna keep going back and flawed. Not to say you guys. Shouldn't right? What you're right. I I'm fine with anything you guys wanna post, but men handle having been abused very differently. The women do so women San the page and how men answer them back. I think we're both right with both still trying to understand each other. It's a very different dynamic. But for people to say, you know, what? And they mid it happened. The first time they went on the stand. That's that'd be perfect in a perfect world. But Robson said he I started to think about the behavior being abused. When he had a son of his own and began to learn about how children thinking and save check said his process began when when Robson I spoke out and he realized he wasn't alone. So everybody's different. I can get that. I totally understand that. Another thing. I think that was really important for everyone screaming that the Jackson's didn't give their side. Well, look as a filmmaker Ernie Els producing something like that the film the film was about what happened to Wade Robson Jimmy save Chuck, and there's not a lot of journalistic value in talking to people who are just going to say what they say because they have a financial vested interest in Michael Jackson. In other words, his family. You know, if you're going to get you're gonna get typical canned quotes like well Michaels, a really nice guy. He would never do anything like that. It's not like, you know, who need that shit doesn't balance out of story. But to me the biggest clue that Oprah had a vested interest in this documentary is how she ended her interview she said to the whole audience stories bigger than than me. And she says I said the beginning, it's bigger than anyone person. And don't let any person in your world. World make it just about what Michael Jackson did. Or did not do. She said it's about this thing this insidious pattern that's happening in our culture, and we refuse to look at it. You know, Oprah Oprah used about two hundred and twenty five episodes of Oprah Winfrey show specifically to deal that dealt with child-sex-abuse out of all the year. She was on the air two hundred and twenty-five shows was strictly geared toward that one topic. And she took on this thing because she herself was abused. That's why Oprah went at this. I don't fuck who. Michael Jackson was Oprah was coming at this. From an angle of I want to help people refused. Period. So hard getting abused in and getting to the bottom of that pain is way bigger and more important than placating the portion of her black audience who will forever giver shit because she took part in tearing down Michael Jackson legacy. But I'll tell you the names being floated around as to who helped her fund and produce. Leaving Neverland it's pretty impressive. Although it's it's hard to understand why some of the names have been mentioned, but aside from Oprah there's word that Gayle king also helped as did the two Harvey's are relevent, Harvey Weinstein. And you know, I gotta say I can see Oprah because one she's loaded and she could do it all alone. And the fact that she's an abuse survivor. I totally get it. And if she's on board, I can see her getting her best he Gail involved too. If so a big tip of the cat, the both of them who knows maybe all the creepy men around. Gayle king helped make this decision for her to fund this picture a lot easier for her. Maybe she was just sick of listening to these abuse stories. I do remember watching her every morning during all these stories, and she was really affected. She was really fed up. Whatever story about Charlie rose, les Moonves popped up. I don't know Harvey Weinstein could have gotten involved, you know, his money is stretched so thin in. Earmarked for different court cases and Harvey Levin. I wouldn't put it past. And he's been dying to make a splash producer for a long time. But the main cog that's been floated is David Geffen. And that's a curious choices. Well, I mean, God knows he has the money and the power, but if you take into account all the stories of the young men he's been involved with kind of weird that he would go that route. But second ninety something to deflects any kind of stories and rumors that people have about him could be but second the fact that he was very close to Michael Jackson is given that ruthless that he would go on and produce a documentary that literally takes down whatever was left of Jacko. Yeah. He is. I'll tell you why the trio of Geffen Oprah. And Gayle king makes sense. If anything I like, the fact that they took that trip aboard Geffen's four hundred and fifty foot three hundred million dollar yen. Last week of January to celebrate Oprah's birthing, I never knew those three to hang out together before two very suspicious pairing especially with the timing of the dock coming out. So I wouldn't put it. I wouldn't put it past anybody. I wouldn't doubt it at all if those three were heavily involved in producing that documentary. And of course. I gotta say always found it. Sure is the name of deafen jot little ironic rising sun. I'm sure David and Michael Jackson for around a lot of people sons who weren't rising more like going down. That's it guys that was famous bitch for March eighth twenty nineteen. I'll talk his Monday.

William Randolph Hearst Gayle king Geffen Oprah America Michael Jackson R Kelly Oprah Winfrey Donald Trump William Randolph CBS Hearst communications David pecker Charlie rose Charlie Chaplin Charlie Chaplin Thomas New York morning journal publisher Chuck New York