35 Burst results for "Hearst"

"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

05:08 min | 4 d ago

"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

"It's early 1982, 6 years after Patricia Hearst was tried and found guilty on charges of robbery. It's a warm day in Los Angeles, and Hearst is following a man down a narrow set of stairs into a cool and clammy basement. On the walls are framed magazine covers from Rolling Stone, Entertainment Weekly, and Playboy. The man gestures for Hearst take a seat in a padded armchair. Then he pulls out a tape recorder and set it on the table between them. Launching into an interview that Hearst knows could last for hours. It's been a turbulent few years for Patricia Hearst. After being found guilty at trial, Hearst was sentenced to 7 years in prison. Hearst appealed the decision, but she wasn't successful and was sent away to prison in Northern California. But the fight didn't end there. Hundreds of her supporters petitioned The White House for official pardon. Hearst always assumed it was a long shot, but after serving 22 months, there was a miracle. President Jimmy Carter agreed to commute the remainder of her sentence, and on February 1st, 1979, Patricia Hearst was set free. Ever since she walked out of federal prison, Hearst has been trying to get back to a normal life. She married, gave birth to a baby girl, and promised herself she was Don talking about the SLA and its small army of political radicals. She was ready to move on. But Hearst couldn't stop the media from continuing to cover her story. Apparently it was just too sensational. So she began giving interviews, trying to shape the story. But the media continued publishing pieces full of speculation and exaggerated facts. Eventually, Hearst decided she had to more forcefully counter the media's narrative. Eventually, she published her memoir, telling what she felt was the true story about her experience, how she was brainwashed, victimized, and coerced by the SLA. And that's what brought Hearst to this basement office in Los Angeles. She's publicizing her book and agreed to sit down with a journalist named Lawrence grabelle. After all this time, trying to avoid attention, Hearst is now ready to step back into the spotlight and set the record straight. Grubel gets his tape recorder rolling, and begins with his first question. Okay, you comfortable? All right, good. We're recording. So Patricia. I wanted to see if we could get right to the marrow of the matter here if you allow it. Sure. If I'm uncomfortable with any of the questions, I'll be clear. All right, good. Well, to start with, thinking about what's happened to you, the kidnapping, the birth of Tanya, the bank robberies and the trial and the prison. If you could go back, would you erase all of those experiences? Well, Larry, I am thinking like that's frankly a waste of time. Why is that? You'd never run that thought experiment. There's no point looking back and trying to imagine something different. The life I have is the one that happened, and it includes my kidnapping, and my time with the SLA. And in your time with the SLA, were you a true believer like the other members? Look, you have someone threatening your life. You start believing things. But it's not like I had free will. Yet you were a willing participant in a bank robbery. You just can't separate things out like that. You can't ignore the threats I was under. They said if I didn't do it, they'd kill me. The reporter scribbles down a note. So, what you're saying is you were a true believer but not by choice. You know, one of the psychiatrists used a term. Traumatic neuroses with dissociative features. That's what I was dealing with. And that means what? Brainwashing. And I wasn't loopy. I wasn't on drugs, but I wasn't in control of my mind or emotions. Things were happening to me. I was just trying to make it through. And really isn't that what we're all trying to do. Every day, just trying to make the best of our circumstances. Well, yeah, I guess we're all just trying to survive. You know, it's funny. People keep saying I had guts joining the SLA. But really, I think it was one of the most cowardly things I could have done. Patti, you're telling me joining a militant group and robbing banks is cowardly? Sure. 'cause you know what would have taken real guns. It's standing up to them, facing that threat of death. But I'm coward. I didn't want to die. But maybe your readers aren't going to be happy with that version of the story. They want me to be something else. The Patty Hearst that lives in their imagination. All the magazines, books, and news articles, they've all created their own version of who I am, and what I think. So,

Hearst Patricia Hearst SLA Lawrence grabelle Grubel Los Angeles Entertainment Weekly Rolling Stone President Jimmy Carter Northern California White House Don Patricia Tanya Larry Patti The Patty Hearst
"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

03:11 min | 4 d ago

"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

"It's march 20th, 1976, inside San Francisco's federal courthouse. Patricia Hearst gathers with her legal team around the defense table. Watching as reporters and court staff file into the courtroom. Everyone looks frazzled because no one expected a decision to have been made so quickly. As the jurors began filing back into the courtroom, Hearst tries to steady herself, getting ready for the moment of reckoning. If the jury comes back with a guilty verdict, Hearst could face a sentence of 35 years in prison. Hearst believe she's done her best, convinced the jury. She was kidnapped, kept blindfolded in a closet, sexually assaulted, threatened at gunpoint and subjected to the whims of unhinged radicals, people who had killed before kidnapping her. It's no surprise she joined her captors, what choice did she really have? Hearst and her attorney believed the argument would be persuasive. But toward the end of the trial, the prosecution brought forth new and damaging evidence. The SLA member cujo, the man Hearst accused of rape, had given her a gift, a pendant shaped like a monkey. Hearst explained that according to cujo, the necklace was a relic from Mexico, and over 2000 years old, so she held on to it. But the prosecution spawned the story in another direction. They argued that Hearst had kept the necklace because she was in love with cujo. The lead prosecutor Jim browning said the pendant was proof that Hearst was never coerced into joining the SLA. She had feelings for her fellow members, and her participation in the group was sincere. Hearst was sickened by the accusation and feared the prosecution had found their silver bullet. Hirs attorneys offered some reassurance, saying one piece of evidence wasn't enough to dismantle the whole defense. But Hearst doesn't know what to think. She's trying to remain positive. A verdict of not guilty still seems possible, she could put this whole ordeal behind her, trying to get back to living something of a normal life. But Hearst is under no illusion that the verdict could just as likely go the other way. Inside the courtroom, the members of the jury take their seats. The judge asks if they've reached a verdict. The foreman says they have. He then hands over a piece of paper, and Hurst watches anxiously as the judge reads it to himself in silence. As hearse sits waiting, she can feel the eyes of so many strangers staring at her, waiting to see her reaction. But Hurst is decided not to show anything. No matter the verdict. She's given the world enough already. Whatever emotion she feels will be hers, and hers alone. The judge then hands the verdict over to the court clerk, who clears his throat. Then he announces that the jury finds the defendant Patricia Campbell Hearst guilty of armed robbery and the felonious use of firearms. Hearst feels herself sinking into the ground. Guilty. It's all over. And Patricia Hearst is going to

Hearst Patricia Hearst SLA Jim browning Hirs cujo San Francisco Mexico Hurst
"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

07:19 min | 4 d ago

"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

"A long few days. Only two weeks in, people are already calling this the trial of the century. Hearst has had to sit in the witness stand, dissecting her own inner life in a courtroom packed with gawking members of the public. The trial has had the atmosphere of a zoo with Hearst feeling like an animal on display. Her defense attorney, F. Lee Bailey, said that this was all unnecessary part of the process. In order to win, they had to establish her state of mind, beginning with the moment she was kidnapped, and Hearst had to show how the threat of death was part of the daily fabric of her life, informing every one of her decisions over the course of months. Hearst robbed a bank, she doesn't deny it. But what they had to show the jury is that given her kidnapping and the chronic terror she felt, it's clear that she was coerced and is not culpable. So far, Hurst has gone along with the defense strategy. She's trying to stay clear of anything that would make her seem like a sincere convert to the SLA. But after days of testifying, hers can feel herself wearing thin. She's had to endure hour upon hour of intense questioning. And looking up at the prosecutor, Hearst can tell she's about to face another round of painful interrogations. Questions designed to trip her up and sway the 7 women and 5 men, sitting in the jury box. The prosecutor browning turns on his heels and begins his next round of questions. So, miss Hurst, we've heard of many instances where you had access to a telephone and even moments of privacy during your time with the SLA. Why exactly did you never call your parents or trying to return to them? I felt my parents wouldn't want to see me again. I felt ashamed of what I'd said about them on those tapes. And so you remained in a situation where the threat of death supposedly hung over you. Because you were worried your parents were mad at you, it's not that simple. And yes or no, miss hers. If you put it that way, yes, I guess. Good. Now, I'm gonna show you something. Brownie walks to the prosecutor's table and grabs a gun. Hearst recognizes the weapon, it's the one she'd carried when she and the SLA robbed the hibernia bank. Rounding sets the weapon in front of her, and Hearst picks it up and expecting it. Now, miss first, you look quite comfortable with that gun. How do you know that weapon was yours? By the stock and the bolt. Hearst freezes. She's made a mistake, revealing a sign of herself that she's been trying to avoid. Someone who knows how to handle a gun. But soon browning moves on from the gun and begins another line of questioning. Now, did you and mister William Wolfe, a man also known as cujo? Did you and mister Wolfe develop a relationship during her time with the SLA? You mean during my kidnapping? Miss hers, what was the nature of the relationship? I don't know what you mean. Was it a sexual relationship? I don't like to call it a relationship. What would you call it then? I don't like saying it out loud. We're trying to sort out the facts, miss Hurst. He raped me. The courtroom suddenly grows tense, but browning doesn't pivot. Was it forcible rape? I beg your pardon? I mean, did you struggle? Or did you submit because of fear? I didn't resist. No. Did you not say to others within the group that you thought highly of mister wolf? I didn't say that at all. Well then what exactly did you say? I said I had a strong feeling about him. And what was that feeling? For Hearst, this is excruciating. She's being forced to relive one of the most painful moments of her life. In front of a crowd of strangers. But she doesn't mince her words. Well, mister browning, it wasn't romantic. I couldn't stand him. I was just trying to survive. Hearst looks around the courtroom, seeing members of the public nodding, seeming to take her side. And when she turns back to the prosecutor, she can tell he's now uncomfortable. That feels like a small victory. For days, Hearst has been turned into an object of public scrutiny. She's felt her humanity slipping away. But finally, it seems that people are seeing her as a person again. Someone who survived a painful experience and who had to make complicated and difficult choices. It's a small measure of vindication, and there's another more consequential benefit. If the jury understands her perspective and experience, there's a chance Hearst will be able to walk away from this trial of free woman. Several weeks later, Jim browning watches as his assistant attorney David Bancroft rises from the prosecution table and begins his examination of their next witness. Doctor Joel Ford is a psychiatrist and an expert in human psychology. Browning brought the doctor into the trial because no matter how he tried to deliver the facts, the defense pushed back with the same argument. Underneath every one of her decisions, Patricia Hearst was terrified and never acting of her own free will. The defense has trotted out a group of psychiatrists, all painting a picture of Hearst as numb with terror, only joining the SLA to relieve the constant threats of death. They even had the gall to compare hers to a prisoner of war. By now, the prosecution can see where this trial is headed. It's becoming a never ending debate over something no attorney can prove what Patricia Hearst was thinking and feeling during her time with the SLA. And the jury seems like it's been swayed by the defense. So the prosecution is going to fight fire with fire. Browning assembled his own team of psychiatrists. His goal isn't to convince the jury one way or the other about Hearst's state of mind. He just hopes his experts will undermine the psychiatrist brought in by the other side, and that the cold, hard facts of the case, will finally take precedence. So at the prosecution table, browning sits listening, as doctor Ford begins painting a very different portrait of Patricia Hearst. He describes Hearst as a young woman prone to lying. A woman who strongly disliked her parents, who harbored serious doubts about her engagement to her fiance. The psychiatrist goes on to describe Hearst as a woman fundamentally desperate to find a sense of meaning in her life. Doctor Ford acknowledges that Hearst's kidnapping may have involved a period of frightening captivity. But he argues it also liberated Hearst from a life that had left her feeling trapped and gave her a sense of purpose. Hearing this assertion hearsts attorney F. Lee Bailey raises an objection, arguing that the testimony is outrageous, but the judge denied that request. Browning's assistant attorney continues with his examination, asking a series of probing questions about Patricia Hearst's credibility, as well as the likelihood that Hearst was a sincere convert to the SLA. As the questioning unfolds, Brown and glances at the jury box, trying to suss out their reaction. It's looking good, and they seem persuaded. And with more psychiatrists lined up in the coming days, browning starts to feel optimistic. This case isn't lost yet.

Hearst SLA Hurst browning F. Lee Bailey Patricia Hearst hibernia bank mister William Wolfe mister Wolfe mister browning Jim browning David Bancroft Brownie Joel Ford Browning Ford Brown
"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

07:07 min | Last week

"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

"You could help. Oh, I don't know about that. Please, just level with me. How much would it take to get her to Cuba? She'd be safe, he couldn't get to her. Randy, I'm not smuggling your daughter to Cuba, then please tell me where is she? How can I get her back? Scott shakes his head. I don't know where she is. And I'm sorry, but at this point, I'd rather not know. It's like carrying around a grenade. Besides, how do you know she even wants to flee the country? Jack, she is a Hearst. And I know you saw her playing dress up on your road trip, but do you really think she's prepared to face prison? I don't think anyone is. But the real question is why your daughter shouldn't be held accountable for her actions. Oh, she probably will. I just don't think prison is the right way to do it. Thank you for your time, Jack. As Randy Hurst, the company's Jack Scott to the door. He feels frustrated that he didn't get further in the conversation. But still the meeting wasn't entirely a flop, Randy learned some important facts. His daughters probably okay, at least physically, and she's not pregnant with the child of one of those maniacs. But it is troubling to hear that Patricia seems committed to the SLA's cause. And the fact remains, if she does face a day of reckoning, it goes up against a judge and jury. There is no telling what might happen. It's September 18th, 1975, a balmy late summer afternoon in a safe house in the outer mission district of San Francisco. Patricia Hearst and Wendy yoshimura share this apartment. And today they've been talking about a familiar subject, the slow disintegration of the SLA, as the group's members and their radical comrades go separate ways. Hearst believes the fault lies in part with Bill Harris, who took over as the leader of the SLA. After the death of sin Q M tume, Harris is no visionary and spends too much of his time bickering with his wife. But it's not just Harris that's gotten her spirits low. Hurst is tired of living as a fugitive. She doesn't want to keep having to pack up her things and move at the moment's notice. Some nights Hearst lies awake in the dark and considers what it would be like to call her parents or friends from college. It's like an old perfume she can't wash off, a sense of the people from her previous life. Hearst assumes none of those people want to hear from her. Not after she made such scathing condemnations of her family and the world she came from. Her taped commentary was broadcast on radio stations and TV. And for months, her parents haven't communicated a single message through the media. It must be that everyone's just given up on her. Hearst pours herself a glass of water and sits back down with Yosemite. As the two continue dissecting the failures of the SLA. They have a lot of complaints about the direction of the group. But it's hard. At this point, the SLA is Hearst's only real family. All she has in this world. The conversation starts to taper off, and Hearst gets up to use the bathroom. But as she walks through a hallway, Hearst hears a commotion behind her. She spins around, and suddenly hers finds two heavy set men storming in through the front door with guns drawn. They shout out, telling Hearst to freeze, it's the FBI. Everything suddenly feels slow and fluid. This is the moment Hearst has been training for the moment she's been dreading. And it's unfolding exactly a syn Q told her it would. She's standing vulnerable with law enforcement aiming their guns directly at her. Earth feels glued to the ground. But then she comes to her senses and takes off, running to Yoshi mura's bedroom, slamming the door, embracing for a barrage of bullets. But no guns are fired, instead one of the agents starts yelling that Hearst needs to come out. She's surrounded and the agents are armed. Hearst feels like she's about to hyperventilate. She doesn't know what to do. There's a shotgun in her own closet, but she could never get there. It Hearst cowers in yoshimaro bedroom, trying frantically to make a decision, something that won't leave her riddled with bullets. And then she remembers the conversation from the farm in New York, many months ago. Yoshimura said she didn't want to die in a shootout with the cops. If her back was against the wall, she would be willing to come out with her hands up to spend time in prison. As long as it meant she could live to see another day. Thinking back on that conversation, Hearst has a moment of clarity. She wants the same thing. She wants to go on living. To keep fighting for the revolution, even if it means spending some amount of time locked up. So Hearst opens the door and steps out of the bedroom. After confirming that she is, in fact, Patricia Hearst. She stands still waiting as an agent slapped handcuffs over her wrists, and leads her down into an FBI squad car, and an uncertain future. From wondery, this is episode three of the kidnapping of Patty Hearst from Americans can. In our next episode, Hearst, bases trial for her role in the hibernia bank robber, but the jury has to decide whether America's most infamous fugitive is a hardened criminal or a victim who was just trying to survive. If you'd like to learn more about Patricia Hurst, we recommend the books American heiress by Jeffrey toobin, and every secret thing by Patricia Campbell Hearst and Alvin Moscow. This episode contains reenactments and dramatized details. And while in most cases, we can't know exactly what was said. All our dramatizations are based on historical research. American scandal is hosted, edited, and executive produced by me, Lindsey Graham for airship. Audio editing by Molly Bach, sound designed by Derek Barrett, music by Lindsey Graham. This episode is written by AJ marisha, edited by Christina malls burger, our senior producer is Gabe riven. Executive producers are Stephanie Jen's, Jenny Lauer beckman, and Marshall Louis for wondering. The kick is on the way and it is good. Bills have one and what a comeback. I know what it's like to make a comeback. One of the great comebacks in history. In 2017, I was a linebacker for the Pittsburgh Steelers. With my whole life was changed in an instant. K zero in the middle linebacker is not getting up. I don't think anybody has seen his legs move since the hit. They said I'll be paralyzed for the rest of my life that I'll never walk again. But I didn't give up. I understand that that was just the beginning of my comeback. From wondery, this is don't call it a comeback. Don't cut it a comeback. Hosted by me, former Pro Bowl linebacker Ryan shazier. And me. Zero time pro bowler Dave damage. In each episode, we'll look at the down and out moments that led to the magical ones. We'll dive deep into what makes each story more incredible than the last. So follow, don't call it a comeback on Amazon music or wherever you get your podcasts, listen ad free by subscribing to wandering plus and Apple podcasts or the ones we app.

Hearst SLA Patty Hearst Randy Hurst Cuba Wendy yoshimura Randy Jack Scott Jack Harris Bill Harris Yoshi mura yoshimaro Hurst Patricia FBI Scott San Francisco Yoshimura
"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

02:59 min | Last week

"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

"Hearst has her eyes trained on the bank when suddenly a Pontiac firebird flies past the van. It's the robbery team. They're out of the bank and the getaway mission has begun. Hearst turns the key in the ignition and takes off. The plan is to meet up on another block, ditch the firebird and escape in the van. Hearst turns a corner, pulls up alongside the firebird on an empty street. Emily Harris and three of their new comrades jump out. Then they race to the van and throw themselves in the back seat. Harris shuts the door. Go, go, go. Let's get out of here. Hearst guns are down the street, making a series of quick turns and merging into traffic. They should now be in the clear when Hearst notices the mood and the back seat is tense. All right, what happened? What's wrong? Harris waves away the question. Doesn't matter, everything's fine. Everything's fine, what went on. Everything's fine. I'm sure she's going to live. Who's going to live? Tell me what happened. I don't want to get into it. Right now, just everyone take off our disguises. Everyone in the backseat starts to undress. But as hearse takes off her wig, she pauses looking back at Harris. Look, something went wrong and I deserve to know what. Someone got shot, okay? Some woman. Someone got shot, who fired. I did. How? Well, I didn't mean to shoot her. I told her to get down on the floor and she didn't move fast enough. I pushed her with a shotgun. We went off. Hearst can't believe it. Oh God, is she okay? I don't know if she's a boujee pig. It's karma. And that was her karma back there. Anyway, what do you want me to do? Turn around and give her mouth to mouth? No, but you have to remember this is war. Your countless people out there just like that woman living with their heads buried in the sand. I tell you she won't be missed. No, no, look, it's true. And more important, you need to get out of that blouse before someone recognizes us. With one hand on the wheel, her slips off the blouse and continues driving the van toward the safe house. Soon, they're out of traffic and back onto a quiet street. When hers parks a man, everyone hops out, happy to be back at the safe house. But Hearst is not feeling relieved. She has grown more radical in recent months, even threatening violence against the police. But hers believes that that's a far different proposition and shooting a stranger at a bank. A woman who could have been poor, was striving for a little bit of dignity, just like everyone else. Now that woman may be dead, and Hearst is painfully aware that she's an accomplice to the crime. Hey, prime members, you can listen to American scandal ad free on Amazon music, download the Amazon music app today, or you can listen ad free with one plus an Apple podcasts. Before you go, tell us about yourself by completing

Hearst Emily Harris Harris firebird Pontiac Amazon Apple
"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

06:50 min | Last week

"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

"Its early 1975 at an FBI office in San Francisco, California. The workday has already started, but special agent Charlie Bates is lying on his office couch half asleep and hungover. Last night was another boozy occasion in the Hearst family library. It's been almost a year since Patricia Hearst was kidnapped, but Bates, the agent overseeing the case, could only give her family the same update as always. The FBI has no news. And as always, Patricia Hearst's father Randy offered a stoic reply, saying that no news is good news, and then topping off their glasses with Morse coach. Base is now paying the price for that drinking. But he still has to put in a full day of work. And so when there's a knock on the door, Bates groans tells whoever it is to come on in. A younger agent steps into the office and tells Bates they've gotten a new tip in the Hearst case. This one comes from police and Scranton, Pennsylvania. Apparently, a drunken man walked into the station last night and said he knew where Patricia Hearst and the surviving members of the SLA have been hiding. Bates rubs his temples trying to process this latest in an endless stream of farcical news. For months now, tips have been pouring in across the country. Bates estimates the bureau has interviewed some 5000 people, just in the Bay Area alone. But all these have turned out to be false leads. Patty Hearst, the most famous kidnapping victim in the world. Apparently no longer wants to be found. The FBI's reputation has been on the line, but even with the countless hours they've spent on the case, the bureau still has nothing. They've begun to look like fools. So hearing this latest report out of Scranton Bates starts to laugh. The case has already become a joke to the public. Now they're dealing with some drunk, telling tall tales and police stations. Bates tells the younger agent to file this one away along with all the other bad tips. But the younger agent doesn't budge, he says that the drunken man is named Walter Scott, and he claims it was his own parents who drove Patricia Hearst out to Pennsylvania at the behest of his brother, a journalist. They took her to a farmhouse where she and the other SLA members kept a low profile. But this Scott guy seems to have an axe to grind with his family and is now spilling the beans. So even if he is a drunk, he may still have some credible information. Bates sits up a little more interested. This actually could be a breakthrough. But he asks one last question. Does this man Walter Scott know where the farmhouse is? The younger agent nods, and that seals the deal. Bates orders a team out to Scranton to talk to Scott. It's probably another dead end, but if it's not, it could be a turning point for the case. Later that week, a burly FBI agent squints in the afternoon sun on a farm in rural Pennsylvania. The day is getting late, and the agent wants his colleagues to hurry up before nightfall. He doesn't want to lose another day. But the other agents have to work slowly and methodically. They're searching for any clues that the symbionese Liberation Army was recently in this house, and they can't afford to make mistakes. Finally, the last of the team members access the farmhouse, and the burly FBI agent looks down at the dog standing by his side. The bloodhound has been trained to identify trace human smells. And when the agent snaps his fingers, the dog comes to attention. The agent then holds a silky pajama shirt to the bloodhound's nose. He comes from Hearst's apartment in Berkeley, a relic from the young woman's life before her kidnapping. Hound sniffs the shirt, and it sets his eyes on the farmhouse. His body alert, and focused. The FBI agent walks the dog inside. He can tell this space was recently occupied, dirty dishes are in the sink. Newspapers are strewn about, and as the bloodhound presses its wet nose to the floor, and then to the furniture, its nostrils flare. But the hound doesn't yet detect Patty Hearst's unique scent. It's discouraging. There is a chance hearse could have been here, but her scent has disappeared. Or she may never have been here. There's no way of knowing. But then the agent feels the dog leash go taught. The hound begins pulling toward the farmhouse staircase. The agent follows the dog up the stairs to the second floor. How now seems fixated, its nose moving back and forth, sniffing the air. It leads the agent to a bedroom, where a mattress and crumpled sheets are on the floor. The dog buries its nose in the bedding, it sniffs hard, and then begins to bark. The FBI bloodhounds alert indicates that Patricia Hearst was here in the bedroom. If so, it's a breakthrough in the case. And within moments the forensic team files into the room, dusting for fingerprints, bagging other evidence. They still have a lot of questions, including where Hearst and the SLA might have gone next. But for the first time, they have a real path forward, and a chance to make an arrest. It's the morning of April 21st, 1975, and Carmichael California. In the driver's seat of a stolen van, Patricia Hearst stares out the window. Her eyes trained on the Crocker national bank down the street. Hearst checks her watch, it's been more than 90 seconds, and it shouldn't be taking this long. Inside the bank, SLA member Emily Harris is leading a robbery. She's joined by a handful of leftist radicals who've teamed up with SLA. Hearst is driving the getaway vehicle, and like her accomplices, she's wearing a modest disguise, a floral blouse, sunglasses, and a brown wig. It is not the first time Hearst has been part of this kind of operation. A year ago, she and the SLA robbed another bank, an event that became a national sensation. And getting media coverage was exactly the point. The SLA was performing an act of political theater, showing the country that Hearst had become a radical and a criminal. But this time, the group isn't trying to score headlines. They just need the money. It's only been half a year since Hurst, the Harris, and the fugitive Wendy Yoshi mura left the east coast and headed back to California. Hearst knew it was a risky decision. But they were broke and stuck on a farm covered in mosquito bites. In California, they have social ties, connections, and a network of activists like the ones helping

Patricia Hearst Bates FBI SLA Charlie Bates Hearst family library Hearst Walter Scott Pennsylvania Scranton Scranton Bates Morse Scott Randy California San Francisco Bay Area Crocker national bank Berkeley
John Zmirak Decribes When America Was Kidnapped Like Patty Hearst

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:39 min | 2 weeks ago

John Zmirak Decribes When America Was Kidnapped Like Patty Hearst

"America was kidnapped the way Patty Hearst was. And the kidnapping really started with the Chinese bioweapon came to America when COVID hit America and our elites decided to weaponize the panic over that. I don't know if you remember, but I remember being told that the virus could linger in the air for up to 24 hours. So that you couldn't go out anywhere because like the black plague, this new and mysterious virus was hanging in the air and nothing you could do could protect you. I remember being actually scared. When they first closed our churches, I guess I thought, I guess that's prudent because a lot of our priests are over 70. We don't want them all dying. We as more information filtered in, despite not because of despite our elites who were hiding the truth. We're lying about the origins of the virus. We're lying about what could treat it. We're suppressing information about hydroxychloroquine and Ivermectin. We're suspending and persecuting doctors like Peter McCulloch, who are actually treating people. Our elites, what were they doing? They were dumping virus patients in nursing homes, killing thousands of elderly Americans of Korean War veterans and great grandmothers. Why? Why? To spike the death numbers so that they could declare states of emergency. John, excuse me. Ladies and gentlemen, what John is saying is true. Number one, number two, it's almost unbelievable, which is why so many people don't believe it because it's too painful. And

America Patty Hearst Peter Mcculloch John
John Zmirak: America Is Patty Hearst

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:30 min | 2 weeks ago

John Zmirak: America Is Patty Hearst

"Talk about the piece that you wrote behind you. People who watch this on video can see behind you the image of a young Patty Hearst, symbiote, the symbionese Liberation Army in the 70s when we were kids kidnapped her. She was of extremely wealthy heiress. And people who are younger wouldn't know this, but something happened. Her captors sort of brainwashed her into thinking the way they were thinking. So that she sided with the people who tortured and raped and kidnapped her. And it's called Stockholm syndrome. And you've written a piece that's streamed dot org that deals with that. So go ahead and tell us about that piece. Yeah, Patti Hearst was grabbed by a bunch of San Francisco radicals of the kind that formed Kamala Harris, Willie Brown was the political mentor of Kamala Harris. He was also the political mentor of Harvey Milk, the gay activist and the reverend Jim Jones, the left wing cult leader who started that compound in Guyana and got everyone to take cyanide and drink in the Kool-Aid. This ferment, this world of crazed radicalism is what gave birth to the woke movement, which currently dominates the entire Democratic Party and is being posed on the United States.

Patty Hearst Symbionese Liberation Army Kamala Harris Stockholm Willie Brown Harvey Milk Jim Jones San Francisco Guyana Democratic Party United States
"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

07:53 min | 2 weeks ago

"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

"May 16th, 1974, and bill Harris is walking through the aisles of a sporting goods store in Inglewood, California. Harris has a thick mustache and a pair of aviator sunglasses perched on his nose. As he peruses the aisles, he knows he doesn't look conspicuous, just another guy out shopping on a Thursday. But for Harris maintaining a low profile is key, he and his wife Emily are two of the core members of the symbionese Liberation Army. They go by the names Tycho and Yolanda, and they've worked side by side with the group's leader sin Q as the SLA has carried out a series of risky missions. Most recently, the SLA led a high profile operation in the Bay Area, robbing a bank, and making sure Patricia Hearst was caught on camera. The robbery was largely a work of fever, showing the world that Patricia Hearst had given up her allegiance to the ruling class and become a radical activist. As a work of propaganda, Harris will admit the operation was a success. Hearst's photo was printed in newspapers across the country. It kept her story front and center, giving the SLA another opportunity to publicize its message. Still, if Harris is being honest, he's begun to question sink Hugh's leadership. He agrees it was smart to relocate to Los Angeles. Sin Q thought going to LA would make the group harder to track, and they've had a chance to get some fresh recruits in the new city. But beside growing the group and running away from the cops, sin Q doesn't seem to have a coherent vision. No real strategy to bring about systemic change. Still, sin Q is their leader, and Harris has agreed to follow orders. So today, it's his duty to pick up some basic supplies from a sporting goods store. He came down here with his wife and Patricia Hearst, who's waiting for them outside in the van, serving as a lookout. Harris gathers up supplies, trying to move fast. He doesn't want anyone to spot Hurst in the parking lot. But as he turns a corner, Harris spots a shotgun shell bandolier, hanging from Iraq. Harris pauses, staring at the belt. For mons he and his wife have been bouncing between safe houses. It's been a meager existence, and although Harris does object to the excesses of capitalism, sometimes he finds himself longing for material goods, like this bandolier, sitting right in front of him. Harris knows he can't buy it. That might arouse suspicion. But he doesn't want to walk away from it either. So looking both ways, he picks it up and slides it into his pocket. And then he heads to the register to buy a few things and get out of the store. But as Harris begins making his way to the exit, the clerk's voice pipes up behind him. The man asks whether Harris is planning to pay for the item he's clearly shoplifting. Harris turns and looks at his wife. He knows he's just made a huge mistake. But they can't let themselves be apprehended. Not only are both of them carrying concealed pistols, but the most infamous woman in America is waiting for them in a van across the street. Harris has only one option. He dashes out of the store, heading to the van, but the second he makes it to the sidewalk, Harris slammed to the ground by the store clerk and another employee. Soon, other men from the store pile on in a heap of bodies. Harris can hear his wife yelling through the melee. It's a chaotic mass of grunting man and flailing arms, and Harrison is about to give up. But suddenly, bullets begin sailing across Crenshaw boulevard. The windows of the store crack and burst apart, and when Harris and the other men look up, they find Patricia Hearst, unloading a submachine gun out of the window of the van. The man scramble up, scattering in every direction. Harris knows it's only a matter of minutes before the cops show up. So as soon as her stops firing, Harrison his wife run toward the van. Harris jumps in the driver's seat, cranks the key and guns the engine. As he takes off down Crenshaw, he lays his foot on the pedal driving like a madman. Only looking away from the road to steal a glance at Patricia Hearst, who surrounded by a stockpile of guns and ammo, and staring out the window with a look of fury. A day later, Randy Hurst enters the Dan of his home in hillsborough, California. He and his wife, Catherine, sit down with a group of FBI agents. Men who've been living in their house full time. As Randy pours himself another drink, he launches back into a heated debate, telling the agents he doesn't believe the theories. His daughter Patricia is not a radical. And it doesn't matter what she said on some recording, or if she was party to some shoot at it, sporting goods store. One of the agents begins to push back, noting the seriousness of the situation. His daughter is on record, saying she decided to stay with her captors. The writers Randy is about to rehash his argument. A door to the den swings open and the family's cook steps into the room, looking nervous. She sputters out something about the SLA. The police have found them, and it's all over TV. Randy and his wife Catherine exchange a look. Then Randy hurries forward and turns on the TV, flipping to a local news station. On the screen is live footage from Los Angeles, hundreds of officers are on the scene, helicopters are buzzing in the sky, and a police officer with a bullhorn is shouting at a rundown yellow house, demanding that those inside come out with their hands up. Catherine turns away from the screen, looking appalled. Of Randy turned this off. Catherine, patty could be inside that house. It's exactly turn it off. You don't want to see our daughter. Don't want to see our daughter get killed in a fight with the police. You think it's true that she's become one of them? You think she's going to stand there with her comrades, firing guns at the police? Catherine shakes her head as a tear forms in her eye. I don't know what to think. Catherine, she's still our girl. She's been living with a gun to her head. And even if she was brainwashed by those lunatics, the idea she may have picked up are not going to stick with her. We'll get our daughter back. I just don't want to watch. I can't do it. Catherine wipes away a tear and storms out of the room. Randy understands his wife's feelings. But he refuses to turn off the TV. Not when there's a chance his daughter might come out of that house alive and free. So he turns back to the TV and keeps watching. The moment is tense, nothing is certain. And then gunfire wraps on both sides, and the LAPD shoots tear gas into the house. And then the reporter cries out that the house is on fire. Thick, black smoke begins curling up from the structure. And then flames erupt from the windows as the house is engulfed in an inferno, with everything burning. From wondering, this is episode two of the kidnapping of Patty Hearst from American scandal. In our next episode, law enforcement closes in on the remaining members of the SLA, while the hearse family grapples with a devastating loss. If you'd like to learn more about the kidnapping of Patricia Hearst, we recommend the books American heiress by Jeffrey toobin, and every secret thing by Patricia Campbell Hearst and Alvin Moscow. This episode contains reenactments and dramatized details. And while in most cases, we can't know exactly what was said in all our dramatizations are based on historical research. American scandal is hosted, edited and executive produced by me, Lindsey Graham for airship. Audio editing by Molly Bach, sound designed by Derek Barron's music by Lindsey Graham. This episode is written by AJ marisha, edited by Christina malzberg. Our senior producer is Gabe ribbon. Executive producers are Stephanie Chan's Jenny Laura beckman and Marshall Louis for wondering.

Harris Patricia Hearst SLA Catherine Randy bill Harris Tycho Inglewood Yolanda Randy Hurst Hearst Harrison California Los Angeles Hurst Emily Bay Area Hugh fever Crenshaw
"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

07:03 min | 2 weeks ago

"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

"Development in a national news story. Like everyone else in America, the DJ has been closely following the saga Patricia Hearst. It began with real news coverage, the story of a crime, targeting one of the most important families in America. But in the week since, the coverage of the kidnapping has turned into a circus. Journalists have published conspiracy theories, false leads, off color jokes, and tasteless headlines. It's increasingly obvious that the media is less interested in practicing responsible journalism and more focused on milking the story for profit. But this radio station is in the business of news, too. And with a hot lead sitting right in his lap, the DJ knows he has to go speak with his producer and figure out a plan. The DJ walks down the hallway and finds his producer hunched over a newspaper. The DJ doesn't say a word, he just slides over the photo, Patricia Hearst. The producer glances at the photo, does a double take. Then he asks, who else has seen this? The DJ responds that he hasn't shown it to anyone. And he didn't just get a photo, whoever sent this also included an audio tape. The producer sits up, suddenly looking animated. In radio news, tape is a golden commodity, so the producer tells the DJ to load it up, and I'll decide whether to broadcast it on air. Maybe even in the next few minutes. The DJ nods now aware they're under the gun. He takes the tape out of the envelope and gets it set up. And when it begins playing, he and his producer hear the unmistakable voice of Patricia Hearst, a voice that's already been broadcast on radio stations and TV networks across the country. But something about Hearst on this tape sounds different. The media heiress begins by condemning her family. She says the SLA is not hurting her, and that the real threat is from the FBI, and her parents indifference to the poor. Then Hearst makes a startling announcement. I have been given the choice of one being the least in a safe area for two joining the forces of the symbionese Liberation Army and fighting for my freedom and the freedom of all oppressed people. I have chosen to stay and fight. The tape stops playing, and the producer looks up at the DJ. This is sensational. Patricia Hearst has joined her captors. They have to air the tape right away. The DJ doesn't know what to say. Before broadcasting the tape may be law enforcement should hear it first. Or maybe the hearse family should have some say in the matter too. But the producer reminds the DJ that a half dozen other stations could have already received the same package. If the station waits too long, they could get beat to the story. The DJ nods gets ready to broadcast the tape. Two weeks later, Patricia Hearst looks out the window of a station wagon as it dries down the streets of San Francisco. She gazes at a series of tall, white Victorian homes. There's a web of electrical lines connecting San Francisco streetcars, and everywhere she looks, people are out walking alone, strolling by themselves, free to go wherever they want. It's a disorienting feeling, being back out in the world. And Hearst knows that if anyone saw her, they'd think she looks like a freak. She's wearing a dark wig and her skin is pale from weak, spent in a closet. Hearst is grateful for the opportunity to get out of the closet to see the world and other people. But she is feeling panicked. In a few minutes, hers is going to join several members of the SLA in a bank robbery. It's largely intended to be an act of political theater, targeting a steward of American capitalism. But there's a reason the SLA wanted Hearst to take part in the operation, and ulterior motive that central to the plan. Soon, the car comes to a stop, and the group's leader sinq turns to his comrades. All right, now remember, 90 seconds in and out. It's all we got. Tanya, you good on your part? Hearst is confused for a moment until she remembers sink Q is talking to her. Tonya is her new adopted name in the SLA. I've got it. All right, good. What's wrong? Her steps out of the car with a gun hidden beneath her long, dark coat. She and the others approach the entrance of the hibernia bank. When they step inside, sin Q pulls out his gun and shouts at the customers, customers shriek and fear and begin diving to the ground. As the SLA storms into the bank, first finds a security camera and plants herself directly in front of it to enact her part of the plan. This is Tanya. You all know me as Patricia Hearst. Now, the first person who puts his head up. I'll blow it off. The customers shriek again in fear. Everyone is on edge. But with her back to the door, hers doesn't notice two new customers entering the bank. When the new customer startled one of the SLA recruits, she accidentally fires her gun, and the two new customers fall to the ground. Sink you shout out an order. Let's go. Let's go. As Hearst races out of the bank, someone fires their gun again. The group piles back into the station wagon, and it peels out into the street. As she catches her breath, hers meets in Q's eyes and nods. It's only going to be a matter of hours before the news breaks, and everyone learns that Patricia Campbell Hearst robbed a bank. She'll be seen as a dangerous criminal, a true believer in the symbionese Liberation Army. No matter what she says in the months and years to come, her knows that she is crossed a line, one she can never come back from. A mysterious death happened in April 2022 in Lynchburg, Virginia. Johnny cashman's mother, who lived far away in Maine, hadn't heard from her son in a few days, and started to worry. It wasn't like him. She asked the police to go to his house for a welfare check, where they found Johnny on his back with pools of blood around him. His death was quickly ruled a medical issue, and the case was closed. But the family was suspicious and demanded an autopsy. They were denied, being told to trust the system, but when Johnny's ex-girlfriend entered his apartment a few days after he was cremated, it was obvious his death was not a medical issue. There was blood everywhere. The bathroom looked like a murder scene. The generation Y podcast has spent the past ten years breaking down cases like Johnny cashman's, diving deep into the details, and combing through all the evidence to find out what really happened. To hear the story of Johnny cashman and other incredible cases like it, listen to the generation Y podcast on Amazon music or wherever you get your podcasts.

Patricia Hearst symbionese Liberation Army Hearst America sinq San Francisco hibernia bank Tanya FBI Johnny cashman Tonya Liberation Army Lynchburg Johnny Maine Virginia Amazon
"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

06:33 min | 2 weeks ago

"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

"Collapses onto a sofa. He's drained and hasn't slapped ever since he got word that his daughter Patricia had been kidnapped. Night after night, Randy has stayed up late, waiting for any updates, any reason to be hopeful. He can't stop worrying that his daughter might already be dead. But just recently, there was a development, an envelope arrived at the local radio station, with these two audio tapes from Patricia's captors. The station got in touch with the FBI, and the agent brought the tapes over to the hearsts. So they could listen together. My name is sin Q and to my comrades, I am known as sin. I hold the rank of general field marshal in the united Federated forces of the symbionese Liberation Army. Today I have received in order from the 70s war console. The court of the people to the effect that I am ordered to convey the following message that Patricia Campbell Hearst is alive and safe. Hearing this news, Randy Hirst's body goes slack with relief. His daughter is okay, and it's not too late to get her back. But the man calling himself sin Q continues with a deranged Durant, saying the SLA arrested Patricia for crimes that her parents committed against oppressed people through their fascist media empire. Sin Q says the SLA would like to negotiate for Patricia's return, but first they have a demand. The hearsts have to give away $70 worth of groceries to every needy Californian. Randy shakes his head, stunned. The Hearst corporation is an exceedingly rich business, but this demand could add up to hundreds of millions of dollars, and even with his mansion and summers at the castle, Randy Hurst isn't as flush as most people think. And when he discusses the demand with Bates, the FBI agent suggests that negotiating a ransom isn't a good idea in the first place. I distributing these tapes to a radio station. The SLA is creating an unwinnable situation for the hearsts. The political group is creating a public spectacle. And if the Hearst tried to negotiate, they could find themselves backed into a corner, but the SLA issuing larger and larger demands. Randy knows the agent has a point, but this is his daughter they're talking about. At the same time, if Randy is going to negotiate with violent radicals, he wants some assurance that his daughter is doing all right. Sir Randy asks the FBI agent to play the second tape. Mom, dad, I'm okay. I had a few scrapes and stuff, but they washed them up and they're getting okay, and I'm not being starved or beaten. Or unnecessarily frightened. Randy has to hold back sobs hearing his daughter's voice. Patricia is alive, but in the recording, his daughter goes on to issue a warning, saying they're going to have to follow the SLA's orders, and she hopes her father will do what they ask, and do it quickly. The tape stops playing, and Randy exchanges a look with his wife. He understands why it might be a bad idea to negotiate a ransom. But they don't have any other options, do they? They need to bring Patricia back home. Several weeks later, Patricia Hearst turns over on the floor of the closet that's become her prison. Outside her small space, she can hear what sounds like beer bottles clanking together. Somebody else is making lunch. Or maybe it's breakfast or dinner. It's hard to keep track of time. But for weeks, these muffled sounds have been her entire world. Hearst is sat listening to members of the SLA constantly getting drunk, arguing about how they're going to overthrow the system, even having sex in a revolving door of romantic partners. It's a small and claustrophobic existence, only made a little better when the SLA allows her to watch TV. Hearst has seen the national media coverage for her kidnapping. She's watched her father publicly negotiate for her release, staging press conferences and working to meet the SLA's demands. Randy Hurst hasn't yet raised all the money the SLA requested. He's only managed to gather together a couple $1 million. But through some kind of miracle, he did pull off a food giveaway program. It didn't go smoothly, with residents rioting over meat and produce, but Randy Hurst was able to feed thousands of people. And while launching these programs, Patricia's father sent a message to his daughter, hang tight, they were going to get her back. So Hearst began to feel optimistic that she was going to make it out of this nightmare. But then the saga took another turn. When sink you increased his demands and asked for another $4 million for the food giveaway. After that escalation, Randy Hurst appeared to cut off talks, saying the Hearst corporation would only pay the money if his daughter was first released. Otherwise, the matter of his daughter's kidnapping was out of his hands. Hearing that announcement, Hearst was left feeling hopeless. Her sits peering through a crack in the closet door. When she hears footsteps approaching, Hearst wraps the blindfold back over her face and waits as the door opens. Patricia, you can take off the blindfold. First recognizes the voice. It's sin Q, the man leading the SLA. Hearst removes the blindfold, and finds her captor standing over her, wearing a ski mask. Okay, what is it? Has something happened? Oh yes, something big is happening. Your family was capitalist pigs. They decided they cared more about money than their own daughter. What are you talking about? Negotiations are done. Your father made it official. He's got to be just bluffing. He's trying to force your hand to get you to back down. I don't think so. No, I know them. Their business people. That's what they do. No, no, no, my little Marie Antoinette. Let me tell you something. Your father has cut off negotiations. It's over. No, no, no. Yeah, yeah. And you better believe it. What does that mean? What are you gonna do with me? Sin Q pulls back his jacket and takes out a shotgun. None of them. No. He was playing hardball. I know my father. You'll get the money. Come on out. No. Please. Don't hurt me. Come on out. No, don't do this. Her

SLA Patricia Randy Hurst Randy Patricia Hearst FBI united Federated Randy Hirst Hearst corporation Hearst Sir Randy Durant Bates Marie Antoinette
"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

07:48 min | 2 weeks ago

"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

"A PhD in philosophy. But Hearst's dreams of independence would be cut short. A group known as the symbionese Liberation Army targeted her for kidnapping. The political radicals planned a brazen assault, which they believed would strike at the heart of American capitalism, sexism, and racism. And in the aftermath of the crime, the Hearst family found itself at the center of a national media sensation. One that raised questions about what had really happened to Patricia Hearst. This is episode two, the negotiation. It's the night of February 4th, 1974, and Patricia Hearst is lying in the trunk of a vintage white Chevy. Her wrists are bound with rope. She's blindfolded and gagged. And although the pain is excruciating, hearse keeps gyrating her hands against the rope trying to break free. She doesn't understand how it came to this. Just an hour ago, she was curled up on the couch, watching television with her fiance, Steve weed. There was a knock on the door and when they answered, they found a woman in the hallway, who said she accidentally ran into someone's car and was hoping to use the phone. It didn't seem like anything to think twice about. But then, in the blink of an eye, a pair of armed intruders burst into the apartment. Hearst's fiance fled out the back, leaving her by herself, outnumbered, and held at gunpoint. At first, the crime didn't make any sense. But it didn't take long for her to realize that she was the target. At the intruders wanted to kidnap the granddaughter of media mogul William Randolph Hearst. So she was dragged out of her apartment, thrown into the trunk of a car, gagged with a cloth and blindfolded. And then the car sped away. Lying in the dark trunk, Hearst keeps moving her hands, trying to find some way out of the ropes. If she can get her hands free, she can take off the blindfold. And maybe find a latch to open the trunk from the inside. When the car comes to a red light, she'll be able to jump out and make a run for it, and pray that her captors don't open fire. For several minutes, Hearst works patiently, getting closer and closer and finally, she manages to free one of her wrists. Hers takes off the blindfold, and began searching frantically for the latch to open the trunk. But as she glides her hand over the dark metal, suddenly the car slows down, and pulls over. A car door slams, and before she can put her blindfold back on, the trunk swings open, and hers comes face to face with a man with a short Afro. A man yells out, asking how the hell the blindfold came off. He asks for assistance and right as Hearst tries to leap up, someone else rushes over and grabs a hold of her. She begins thrashing. But her two captors lift her up and then toss her into the back seat of another car. The man with the Afro hops in after her and snarls and Hearst, telling her not to make a single noise and threatening to shoot her if she does. Hearst can tell the man a serious. And with her mouth still gagged, she just nods her head. It doesn't make another sound. For a while the car continues driving through the streets of Berkeley. When it begins to slow down on a residential street, one of the men reaches over to Hearst and puts a blindfold back on. Then he tells her to get up and get out. Hearst has led into what seems to be a house. She's taken on a winding tour until finally she shoved forward into another room. The door shut and locks behind her. When hers begins feeling around, she realizes she's in some kind of tiny space, maybe only a few feet wide. Her starts to panic, feels like she's in a coffin. She begins knocking into the walls, trying to find her way out, trying to get back into the light. When a man's voice calls out from the other side, telling her to stop, it's just a closet. Her slumps to the ground, feeling defeated. But as she rubs her hand along the perimeter of the closet, she notices something strange. The walls are padded, almost as though the space was prepared for a person. Someone who might have to stay in this closet for a long time. The next morning, Patricia Hearst sits up in the dark closet. She still gagged and blindfolded and didn't get a minute of sleep all night. Hearst has no idea where she is or who kidnapped her. But what she does know is that right now she needs to use the bathroom. Outside the closet, loud music is blaring. Hearst kicks the closet door as hard as she can, trying to get someone's attention. No one seems to notice, so Hirst keeps kicking until finally, the music cuts, and the closet door swings open. With her blindfold on, she can't see the person standing in front of her. But when she hears the voice, it sounds like the man with the Afro, the one from the car. The man takes the gag out of her mouth and asks why hers keeps kicking the door. Earth's response that she needs to use the restroom. The man grumbles and grabbed a hold of her, saying he'll take her. Hearst's recoils, there's no way she wants one of her kidnappers standing over her while she's blindfolded on the toilet. But the man says that's her only option. She's a prisoner of war, and she's speaking to sink you, the general field marshal of the symbionese Liberation Army. The SLA is fighting a war against capitalism, fascism, and oppression. And as a POW in this conflict, Hearst will be treated in accordance with the Geneva convention. Hirsch has no idea what this man is talking about. He sounds unhinged, but right now she is more concerned with relieving her bladder than anything else. So Hearst asks again if she can use the restroom alone. Sin Q murders a curse, but offers a compromise. A woman named Jelena will accompany her instead. Moment later someone else approaches, and she sounds familiar too, like the woman who knocked on Hearst's door just last night, saying she'd hit a car in the garage. There's a bit of back and forth, but finally Hurst is taken to the bathroom. And while she's grateful not to be watched there by a man, she still feels exposed and humiliated to be seen like this, even by a female kidnapper. But she manages to use the toilet with a woman by her side. When Hurst is led back to the closet, Jelena explains that this is an opportunity for her to grow as a person. Everyone in the SLA once lived just like her, a bourgeois lifestyle, with no real understanding of the world. They were the kind of people who would never really see the meaning of revolutionary action, like the recent shooting of Marcus foster. Hearst knows the name foster. He was the school superintendent in Oakland, gunned down in a parking lot, and now she suddenly makes the connection to the name symbionese Liberation Army. This group put out a statement taking responsibility for the murder. Hearst tries not to show any fear, but as she's thrown back in the closet, she's hit with a wave of panic. Her captors aren't run of the mill, political radicals, their murderers, and if they are capable of killing Marcus foster, Hurst might be next. A week later, Patricia Hearst's father, Randy, steps into the living room of his mansion and hillsborough, California. He looks across the room where his wife, Catherine, is leaning against a wall. In a leather armchair, Steve weed, Randy soon to be son in law as running a hand over his black eye. And sitting beside a portable tape player is FBI special agent Charlie Bates, who is here to play a pair of audiotapes for the hearsts. The agent loads up the machine as Randy

Hearst Patricia Hearst symbionese Liberation Army Steve weed William Randolph Hearst Berkeley Jelena Hurst Hirst Marcus foster Hirsch Geneva Earth Liberation Army Oakland Randy hillsborough Catherine Charlie Bates
"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

07:54 min | 3 weeks ago

"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

"Was gripped by a sensational story involving crime, radical politics, and one of the most powerful families in America. Patricia Hearst was an heiress to a corporate empire. Her grandfather, William Randolph Hearst, was a media tycoon, who, by the early 1900s, owned one of the largest newspaper chains in the country. Publications were known for exaggerated stories and provocative headlines, a brand of journalism that sold papers and made a fortune. So when Patricia Hearst was kidnapped from her apartment, journalists took notice, the event became one of the hottest stories in the media, earning coverage from newspapers, radio stations, TV networks, and magazines. Many of them part of the vast empire built by Patricia Hearst's own grandfather. But the saga took an even more shocking turn when Hearst began aligning herself with her captors, a group of radical activists. The media frenzy soon engulfed Hearst's family, and millions of Americans, and a dozen jurors were left with some gnawing questions. Did Patricia Hearst actually become a convert of the radical group that kidnapped her, or was she just trying to survive? In an age of mass media and celebrity, how culpable were journalists for the way the saga played out, and the crimes that would leave her facing the possibility of a long prison sentence. This is episode one, the plot. It's 1965 in Menlo Park, California, 9 years before Patricia Hearst was abducted from her apartment in Berkeley. It's a sunny morning at the convent of the sacred heart, a private Catholic school. In a classroom with brick walls and tall arched windows, Patricia Hearst slides quietly into her desk, trying not to draw attention to herself. The 11 year old smooths down her pleated skirt, as her teacher begins the day's lesson, Hirst gazes out at the bright blue sky and watches an oak tree rustle in the wind. Hearst should be paying attention. The non who teaches this class is famously strict, and notorious for berating her students if they act out of line. But Hearst just can't get herself to concentrate. She doesn't like this class, and going to this school wasn't her idea either. It was Hearst's mother who wanted her to attend a Catholic boarding school. Catherine Hirst is a devout Catholic herself, and she wanted her daughter to have a strict religious education. Plus, the boarding school isn't that far from the family's mansion and hillsborough California. Patricia can still spend time at home with her mother, father, and four sisters, and over the summer they can all still travel to San Simeon, and the famous Hearst Castle there. The family estate spans 86,000 acres. It's a property Hearst has always found to be enchanting. She gets to ride horses and commune with nature. There, Hearst feels like she can be herself. Get some distance from her mother's lessons about etiquette and religion. But sitting in a classroom at her boarding school, Hearst can only daydream about summers on her family estate. She gazes out the window, staring at the trees, and Hearst is lost in her fantasy. She doesn't notice that her teacher has turned from the chalkboard and began making her way through the isle of desks. The nonstop next to Hearst. And when the girl looks up, the non demands to know why Hearst is staring out the window. Has she no interest in learning. Hearst remains silent, hoping the non will move on to some other poor girl. But the non benzene closer and continues her reprimand. She asks Hearst if this is how a student should behave in the presence of the lord. If this is fitting behavior for a respectable child. As the non chastises Hearst, beads a spit fly out of her mouth and land on her's face. But she doesn't move or say a word. The nuns face turns red, and she wraps the desk, demanding an answer. But Hearst doesn't know what to do. She could remain silent, and keep taking this punishing tirade, or she could say something, and defend herself. But Hearst doubts that will achieve anything. Then an idea strikes her. Hearst looks her teacher in the eye, and without blinking. She tells the nun to go to hell. The nun freezes, and her suppresses a grin. For once, the non his speechless. But not for long. With her face now a deep crimson, the non barks at Hearst, telling her to get up and go to the office of the reverend mother. Hearst nods and begins walking through the classroom to the front door. She can feel everyone watching her, and at first she feels a bit sheepish. But slowly her feelings begin to shift. She knows what she just did was out of character. She doesn't have a reputation as a troubled student or an unruly kid, and she only did what was necessary to get herself out of a bad situation. Sometimes you have to do that. But one shocking choice doesn't mean she's a bad person. It's 1973 in Berkeley, California, 8 years later. Patricia Hirst steps into her apartment and sets out her bag. She takes off her coat and hangs it up, and as she stands in the foyer, gazing at her small apartment unit. For a moment, Hearst considers turning back around. Walking out the door, getting away from here, and far away from her problems. But her boyfriend, Steve weed, beckons her to come in and help get dinner ready. For her, this has been a rotten night. She and we just saw a movie and spent the whole car ride back bickering about its meaning. As usual, the conversation devolved into a series of personal attacks. We'd like the movie, and his praise for the film was hyper intellectual, as you'd expect from a philosophy PhD student. Hearst, though, thought the movie was kind of silly, and over the top. We'd argued that her take was evidence of her naivete and social privilege. Hearst pushed back, she wasn't some sort of naive child. It was the kind of fight that's been happening more and more. And now that they're back at the apartment, and weed is demanding dinner. Hearst feel stung. A big part of her wants to flee. Their life together wasn't supposed to be like this. When Hearst met weed, she was still in high school, and weed was her teacher. She looked up to him, seeing weed as the exact opposite of the stuffy world she came from. He was a leftist, an intellectual, and had nothing to do with a Hearst media empire, or her grandfather. Getting together with weed seemed like a chance as a fresh start, a way to build a life untethered from her family legacy. But reality hasn't matched her fantasies. Two years into their relationship, herst is found herself fighting to find her voice in any conversation that isn't about household chores. In ways she can't put her finger on, a relationship that was supposed to be progressive, now feels backward. A relic of a bygone era. But Hearst hasn't given up hope. She still believes that she argues for points well enough. Her boyfriend will take her seriously. She can prove that she's more than just a rich kid from an ultra wealthy family. And she can have the life she wants and a partner who respects her. Her grabs a pot and sticks it onto the range top. Now she heats up some leftover soup. She looks over at weed. Steve, it's a movie. I can have my own opinions about it. I'm not a child, but you are a 19 year old getting her first taste of college. So, you're in your mid 20s, big deal. It is a big deal. There's a lot of life you get exposed to in between 19 in my age. I get it fine, but I'm not allowed to have an opinion. None of it's going to embarrass me in front of my friends. Oh, so I'm an embarrassment, huh? First ladle soup into a couple of balls, and the two head over to the dining room table and grab a seat. As she takes her first spoonful, hers pauses

Patricia Hearst Hearst Catherine Hirst William Randolph Hearst California Berkeley Menlo Park Hirst San Simeon Hearst Castle Patricia Hirst hillsborough Steve weed Patricia America herst Steve
"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

06:45 min | 3 weeks ago

"hearst" Discussed on American Scandal

"It's February 4th, 1974. It's a sleepy Monday night in Berkeley, California, and Patricia Hearst is curled up on a couch watching an episode of Mission Impossible on TV. Hearst yawns, and she turns over on the sofa, letting her slippers dangle from the edge for toes. Hearst is 19 years old. She's 5 foot two, petite, with brown hair and bangs. As an undergrad at UC Berkeley, spending an evening watching lowbrow TV isn't exactly her idea of an exciting time. But it's not that bad. At least she has company. Over on the other side of the couch, her fiance is lounging back with a book in his lap. Steve weed is a Shaggy but handsome 26 year old with wire rimmed glasses. He's a philosophy grad student at UC Berkeley, the kind of guy who seems to understand how things really work. And that's a big part of why Hearst was drawn to him. She comes from a wealthy family, family with one of those names like the kennedys or the rockefellers. Her grandfather, William Randolph Hearst, founded a media empire with a chain of newspapers that helped define America. He was an extraordinarily wealthy man, and he even served as inspiration for the main character and Citizen Kane, the classic Hollywood film. Hearst knows that her grandfather's legacy is worth celebrating. But in recent years, she's grown increasingly disillusioned with her family. She sees them as stuffy and bourgeois, and she's wanted to get away from all the trappings of their wealth. Studying art history at Berkeley and running away with an older man, a pot smoking intellectual at that, seemed like her best chance to embrace a liberal life. Once she could lead on her own terms. But tonight, sitting on the couch in her living room, hers gets a sinking feeling of doubt. Somehow she's found herself stuck in a routine of suffocating domesticity. Cooking, cleaning, catering to her fiance's needs. This wasn't how things were supposed to turn out. Hearst wasn't supposed to become a housewife. But hers tries to set aside those thoughts. She turns her attention back to the TV. The show continues predictably when there's an urgent knock on the front door. Hurst and weed share a glance. It's late, they're not expecting any visitors. So weed gets up with Hearst trailing behind. When he opens the door, they find a young woman outside looking agitated. Hi, I'm sorry. This is embarrassing. I just backed up and I guess I hit someone's car in the garage. Earth glares at the woman, which car, an MG, a blue sports car, I'm sorry, I'm not sure. It was darn. Well, if it was an MG, that was my car. I'm sorry. I don't know. Can I just come in and use your phone? Well, hang on a second. I'll grab some paper and a pen. You can write down your information and then we'll start making calls. Hearst begins making her way to the kitchen. But with her back turned, she hears a sudden commotion behind her. Her spins around and sees two men have burst into the apartment. They're wearing masks and carrying guns. And the woman from the doorway is now holding a pistol herself and racing toward Hearst. The woman storms forward and suddenly shoves her to the ground. Keep quiet and no one gets hurt. Please don't do this. I won't call the cops. I swear. I said get quiet. The intruders began rifling through the apartment, and Hearst looks over at her fiance, silently pleading for him to do something. Anything. We gives a subtle nod. And as one of the men comes out of the bedroom, he rushes at him, hands outstretched. The man is quicker and hits weed in the face, sending him staggering into the hallway. Leaning against a wall, weed wipes his nose. Look, look, take my wallet. Take anything you want. Just leave us alone. Hearst is about to call out to join her fiance and his plea for mercy, but she notices a strange look on his face. Before she can stop him, we turns and flees out the back door, leaving her alone with the intruders. Earth lies on the ground stunned. As the young woman leans down with a look of menace, when now it's just you, me and my Friends, isn't it? What do you want? Where is it? Where's the safe? We don't have one? I'm not screwing around. Where do you keep your safe? I'm telling you the truth. We don't have what the hell do you not have a safe? You're a Hearst. Hearst continues to plead what the woman has had enough. She shoves a piece of cloth into Hearst's mouth gagging her. Then she wraps a blindfold over her size and binds her hands with rope. Hearst is yanked her feet and dragged out of the apartment. With her eyes covered, she can't see a thing. She only feels the cool night air on her skin, and here's the sound of a car's trunk popping open. Hers doesn't understand what's going on. Why her fiance fled? Why these three broke into her apartment? But then she realizes, with those three words, you're a Hearst. They know who she is. And it's at that moment the truth dawns on her. This isn't just a simple robbery. This is a kidnapping and Patricia Hearst is the target. American scandal is sponsored by audible. If you're like most adults, you have chores to do. Commutes to make, waiting rooms to wait in, and time to yourself, you crave. I do too, but I make the most of all of them by listening with audible. Titles like confidence man by Maggie haberman, and like all audible members, I get one credit every month, good for any one of the many classics, bestsellers, and new releases regardless of price to keep forever. Let audible help you discover new ways to laugh, be inspired or be entertained. New members can try it free for 30 days, visit audible dot com slash AS or text AS to 505 hundred. That's audible dot com slash AS or text AS to 505 hundred to try audible free for 30 days. Audible dot com slash AS American scandal is sponsored by the new film she said. Academy Award nominee Carey Mulligan, and Emmy nominee Zoe Kazan, star in she said, as New York Times reporters Megan tui and Jody Cantor, who together broke one of the most important stories in a generation, a story that shattered decades of silence around the subject of sexual assault in Hollywood, and ignited a shift in American culture that continues to this day. The film costars Oscar nominee Patricia Clarkson, Emmy winner Andre braugher, and Tony winner, Jennifer ehle, with Academy Award nominee Samantha Morton. She said, arrives in theaters November 18th.

Hearst UC Berkeley Patricia Hearst Steve weed Berkeley William Randolph Hearst Citizen Kane Hurst Hollywood California America Maggie haberman Zoe Kazan Megan tui Jody Cantor Carey Mulligan Academy Award Emmy
How Sammy Davis Jr and Kim Novak's Love Affair Started

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:13 min | Last month

How Sammy Davis Jr and Kim Novak's Love Affair Started

"One night in 1957, Tony Curtis goes backstage and he tells Sammy that Kim Novak wants to meet him. And he invited him to sit ringside that night at the place called the shape Harry. And he didn't have a chance to talk to her. He didn't want to create any problems. So he says, look, I'm going to have a party at my house. Come on by and I'll invite Kim. That's what Tony Curtis said. And they both came over and they spent the night together deep, deep and talk. And right from the beginning, it was obvious they were getting along in a very intense way. And that was the beginning of the relationship. So you can blame Tony Curtis, I suppose. Well, Kim Novak also asked to meet him. But she wasn't alone in her being attracted to Sammy Davis magnetism. A lot of men might have considered a monthly because it was short and slight, and he had that flat nose, but chicks loved them. Chicks love his charisma. His stage presence was very sexually charged, and women were really drawn to him. But it hurt when men talked about his face being as far as his shovel and shit like that. And he'd say, yeah, it hurts me, but it gets me where I'm going. But Sammy knew how much women loved him. He liked his looks. He knew his face was ugly, but he worked on his body. He stayed trimmed he stayed athletic. Fantastic shape. He loved this little ass. That was his prized feature. He'd make a point of asking people how they liked his ass. Isn't it adorable? So he had a good time with himself. But after that meeting, the gossip industry started to hum. And went into high gear as it normally does when two big stars are seen together. Somebody makes a call as they still do today. And back then, somebody at Tony Curtis party put a phone call into Dorothy kill gallon, who worked for the Hearst newspaper chain. And she wrote in her column, which top female movie star initial kn is seriously dating which big name entertainer, initial SD. I mean, who the fuck's gonna get that wrong?

Tony Curtis Kim Novak Sammy Sammy Davis Harry KIM The Hearst Dorothy
"hearst" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

03:12 min | 2 months ago

"hearst" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Honestly, there doesn't require much effort to so that was kind of my goal too, was if you keep it low lift, it's just always on. It's not something that you're looking to to stand your business up on. But it's also not something that's going to hurt you if you just keep your product there. I think it's not too dissimilar from when every brand today is now thinking, okay, I need to be everywhere. It's very similar to the content kind of idea of four or 5 years ago was I can't just be on my sites. I need to get my content everywhere. And we did. And kind of saw how that has evolved. And now I think they need to see brands are thinking, man, this direct to consumer thing was great. And we built a nice business, but our VCs are asking for us to go for X and my Facebook CPAs of tripled, what am I going to do? I think they have to knock on the stellar marketplace that Walmart and the seller marketplace on Amazon and hopefully the marketplace at hers to say, can you help me get in front of an audience? Can you help put my product next to a brand like yours and really give it the trust and credibility that you all provide? So I think that that's when you look at the state of the landscape there are much less obligations that we need to have in order for a brand to want to join, but we are not taking on any inventory. We are not guaranteeing any type of sales. This is much more of a join our platform in beta. And learn with us and be next to great credible media brands that you know and your customers trust and let's see what we can do together. So in terms of the mechanics of it, I have a trail mix brand because we'll just have that example. It's snack time for me. I list my trail mix on your marketplace. Kayleigh goes on. She sees a met trails next to him makes good trail mix. Looks different. I would basically pass on that sale information to me and I'm in charge of fulfillment. That's correct. That's correct. And you had mentioned the draw of a marketplace like this as being next to the Hearst brands, right? The content side of it. But I'm curious how else content ties in because for a lot of publishers that I speak to about the marketplaces that they've created are the shops that they have created to a degree. It's like bringing in affiliate content in all one area and having that editorial voice directly on the product page. Or finding a way to include reviews, tests, and things like that by the editors. How does the content piece tie in to the shops that you're operating now, but then your overall marketplace plans? Yeah. I think to your original point where it was very bring commerce to our CMS. And bring commerce as close to the editorial page as possible so that that coverage of XYZ product drives directly click to sale. I think everybody is experimenting in that in that vein and I think the jury's still out whether that consumer journey can work really well and is advantageous to the consumer themselves and not just to the media business. I'm taking a different approach and we're taking both Hearst is definitely looking at that space too. I

Hearst brands Walmart Amazon Facebook Hearst
"hearst" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:16 min | 2 months ago

"hearst" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"It's not so much that people are spending less online, but it's also harder for these brands to reach their consumers. I think many of them rely heavily on Google and Facebook to reach that audience and with the pressures that they're seeing on both of those channels, I think it's actually an advantage, maybe a tailwind for publishers like ourselves where they have to explore other channels and figuring out how to sell their things. And direct brands previously had said that selling direct to consumer and having that relationship with the customer is core to our business. But I think staying alive is more important than that. And so they are going to have to explore other channels and hence kind of going back to my original point around the marketplace is why I think brands are going to be even more open to saying, hey, let's join Hearst marketplace. Yes, that means that they own the customer and they own the relationship. However, we need to figure out how we actually grow our business outside of the realms of Facebook and Google. And then just the broader recession that we're heading into is I think impacting commerce across the board outside of just media and publishing. But the whole landscape and so for hers, in particular, I mean, yeah, we probably are seeing some of that impact, but when we look at our numbers, I think, coming out of 2020 and 2021, we looked at those banner years as an opportunity for us to reinvest in the future of our business. And I think that that's obviously great for me as someone who's really trying to figure out what that diversified revenue mix looks like for her some magazines in the long term. And so in 2020 in 2021, we invested significantly in our affiliate business. We obviously invested in technology and ecommerce team to build a marketplace, seeing that eventually Facebook and Google would be run dry for these brands. Did not expect a recession on the way to a recession. But obviously, I think you always are going to end up Tapping out of a platform at some point or a marketing channel at some point. And so we've seen growth across the board. I know there are some companies that have come out and said that they're commerce business, which mostly for publishers is affiliate commerce has been down year over year. Again, we're comparing to a phenomenal year for media companies and affiliate commerce. So I don't think that that's a disastrous place to be. It may not continue in that direction, but Hurst is not seeing that. I would say year over year up, even in comparison to a banner year. When you look at just the amount of commerce that our media brands has facilitated, we've surpassed over a $1 billion in gross merchandising value. So that is, I think, shows the kind of size of our affiliate business.

Facebook Google Hearst Hurst
"hearst" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

02:53 min | 2 months ago

"hearst" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Assets that are like magazines. And I think a way luggage did that, where inside of your bag you'll get a piece and I think people know that content really does help drive that type of commerce and how build your brand for that repeat purchase. For us, we are looking at that white space in a variety of different ways. One in which our direct shops was really the phase one. So you mentioned those shops. So we have 20 branded shops. So at Hearst's magazines, we have a house of brands that are in the shelter side of things, home and shelter, some in health and fitness, beauty, fashion, luxury, and runs the gamut. And we have branded shops for each of those brands in those shops. We sell product direct to consumer that we develop in-house. And manufacturers fulfill customer service, the platform we build inside of the organization end to end our team does everything. And we've been able to grow that into a successful business. But where do you kind of take it next? And I think that next phase for our direct to consumer ecommerce business is in exactly that

Hearst
Deborah Cohen on the Journalists Who Changed the News Media Irrevocably

History Unplugged Podcast

02:32 min | 6 months ago

Deborah Cohen on the Journalists Who Changed the News Media Irrevocably

"The people in your book are mostly forgotten as you know, but at their time they were household names. Can you tell me briefly about Dorothy Thompson, John Guthrie, HR knickerbocker, and Vincent Sheehan? Absolutely. So Dorothy Thompson amassed a string of firsts. She was the first American woman to run a major overseas news bureau. She was the first American foreign correspondent to be kicked out of Hitler's Germany in 1934, and she was the first woman political columnist to have a syndicated column, political column of her own. And in the late 30s, she's reaching 8 to 10 million readers with her thrice weekly columns. John Gunther makes his name with a book inside Europe published in 1936 that this taboo breaking behind the scenes account of the foibles of European leaders. So Hitler is given to crying Jags. He reports and has as Gunther puts it an Oedipus complex as big as a house, Mussolini is very superstitious, and so on and so forth. And this is a huge book of the time. It sells more than a million copies. It's not just a bestseller in the United States. It's also a bestseller across Europe. And it's a book that makes Gunther's name. HR knickerbocker comes from Texas. He's born in Texas. And he's the son of a southern methodist minister. He always carries a Bible in his suitcase, though he can swear in all of the major European languages. He's reportedly the highest paid foreign correspondent in the world, as I said, mostly working for William Randolph Hearst's international news service and among other accomplishments he becomes the bet noir of Hitler's propaganda minister, Joseph Goebbels. And then there's Vincent Sheehan, so she and is reporter he was working for a number of different outlets among them the Chicago Tribune and he writes a book entitled personal history, published in 1935 at wins the first national book award for biography inaugural award. And this book really captured the zeitgeist of the era in a way that no other book does. What she and his writing about is his own quest as a journalist. To figure out the relationship between his life and world events, or as he puts it, the one life that he has in the millions of lives into which it's cast.

Dorothy Thompson Vincent Sheehan John Guthrie Hitler John Gunther Gunther Europe Mussolini Texas Germany William Randolph Hearst Joseph Goebbels National Book Award For Biogra United States Chicago Tribune
How Did the Public Perceive the News Media in the 1930s?

History Unplugged Podcast

01:15 min | 6 months ago

How Did the Public Perceive the News Media in the 1930s?

"In the 1930s, what did the public think of the news media? Did they trust them? They still have some latent distrust left over from the William Randolph hertz dera. What did your average person think of the news media during the time period of your, there's a fair amount of distrust in the 1930s. So not only is the Hearst press still going strong and knickerbocker, who is one of the figures in my book is reporting for international news service, but there's the sense that they're press barons that they have agendas and that heard as the so called respectable papers like the Chicago daily news or the Philadelphia public ledger and The New York Times have been working since the start of 20th century, but really from the 20s. To try to enshrine the idea of objectivity in the press, there still is a lot of skepticism. Actually, interestingly, when radio is first coming on the scene, there's much less skepticism about radio reportage. In part, I think because it seems so immediate as if you're hearing an unfiltered truth, which of course we know is also not the case.

William Randolph Hearst Press Dera Philadelphia Public Ledger Chicago Daily News The New York Times
"hearst" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

05:25 min | 6 months ago

"hearst" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Because we can start to drive a higher value of user and really pin that back to a really accurate user journey that will help a client inform their future marketing strategies. Their partnerships. And I think also that user journey and that strategy, it sometimes does start with us helping to inform the clients as well because we're doing a lot of work that leans into the power of positivity and also uplifts in positive emotions. That's something we've been doing over the last half of 2021 and now we're continuing to do so in 2022 is we are looking at our artificial studies and looking at those through the lens of emotion and seeing which of those kind of emotions we have uplifted through the campaign and what's really interesting about that is that because obviously we are then measuring lots of other metrics through the purchase funnel if you kind of talk about it in a funnel sense, you can kind of see where you're having an impact. So whilst there's a lot of advertisers and clients that are very much leading into the performance side and obviously that's very important. There's very much an element of branding too. So all of this is very much about trying to drive connections to brand and strengthening brand as well as delivering on the results for the sales too. But if you can see kind of where you're having an emotional impact on that journey, that helps us speak to them about how we create content, how we deliver the ads, the right kind of ways, the formats, the tone, et cetera, and we can kind of see where there's kind of strong points in those journeys. And what we've actually discovered is that I think it was something like a 31% uplift in those people who saw their emotions shifted positively by the Hearst campaigns. And their intention to purchase off the back of that was going to be really strong..

Hearst
What Made an Injured Willy Mac Return to Golf?

Fore The People

01:09 min | 9 months ago

What Made an Injured Willy Mac Return to Golf?

"Some, I had some pretty bad injuries, and I was like, man, oh, and what the hell am I going to do? I was trying to heal my body up and I saw pain and. The U.S. open Hearst number two, which I played the north south when I was real young and Donald Ross junior when I was real young and I just like fuck. Man, that is sick. I was like, I was blown away. I was just kind of lost in like, what am I going to do? Am I going to go back out in Montana? I just healed my body and Costa Rica for three months surfing every day I was in the best shape of my life actually. Eating well and feeling like a million bucks and I was like, man, I don't know. I knew every girl. I knew every run, I knew everything about Montana. I was like, I'm either going to go out in France or chamonix or Whistler, maybe, or whatever. And I saw that and it just turned me. I literally started hitting balls in the next

Open Hearst Donald Ross Montana U.S. Rica Costa Chamonix Whistler France
What Happened to Pamela Anderson's Face?

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:59 min | 9 months ago

What Happened to Pamela Anderson's Face?

"Did you see the interview the other day Pamela Anderson and a new husband, Dan hey Hearst? Schmuck, Dan, hayhurst, who left his wife in three kids to one from building pants deck to fucking the former Baywatch babe. All his wife and kids had no idea. I mean, his wife had dinner with Pam. They became friendly. And this asshole decides to stop. I mean, things like that can happen. I'm sure that marriage wasn't good in some capacity. But he really looks like an asshole on top of looking like an asshole physically. Now he looks that way more in a broader sense. But I watched this video of an interview they did. Some British show called loose women, which that's kind of funny in itself, to be interviewing Pam Anderson, a show called loose women. And they call her up and she's in bed. She and Dan answer the phone while under the covers, which, by the way, John Lennon and Yoko Ono did this S.W.A.T. 40 something years ago. 50, maybe. Come up with something new, Pam. It just, you know, the whole thing of being in bed with your new husband, you're 6th fucking husband. It's getting tiresome. And I didn't know it was Pam Anderson at first. I thought they were interviewing dame Judi Dench. That's what Pam is turning into. I mean, I don't know if that's her face without makeup or if this is just what she settled on with cosmetic procedures. I have no idea what option is saddest. But ladies, you got to stop injecting bullshit into your cheek into your cheekbones. It looks like you got two hamburger buns below your eyeballs. Do you think men think that your natural look? You need to know, you don't look like you're younger, you look like someone who does a lot of cosmetic

Pam Anderson Dan Hey Hearst Hayhurst Baywatch Babe PAM Schmuck DAN Yoko Ono John Lennon Dame Judi Dench
"hearst" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"hearst" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Usually helpful for us as well. So we love when readers come and talk to us and want to engage with us so yeah and it takes time to build tunnels but actually wants the panels. There is massively helpful for us. yeah are they. Are they like a few hundred or the few thousand i mean the panel is is is is enormous. We've got very different panel. So there is a separate beauty panel beauty testing panel There is a more general panel. And then there's panels ruled the brands. I mean some of the some of the panels are smaller than others. But yeah the g. h. panel is is well over thirty thousand readers. Oh well yeah yeah. Brilliant we love it. Yeah of speaking to readers. Yeah so how. Are you going about picking the products. Then that you're testing So like washing machines. You can test thirty eight at a time i guess. How are you deciding like these are the. Are these a thirty eight. Most popular brands that are being bought at At department store like how are you kind of selecting those items. So there's lots of different kinds of data points that help us decide which products to test so we start with an editorial shedule across each of the categories for each year so the data points that go into that or things like we'll check out. Google analytics will look You know actually what a consumer searching for on our sites as well so there's a and what a consumers buying so if we are if we say right. We're gonna test washing machines for example from the washing machine like there are hundreds abortion machines available. What washing machines do we wanna test will. There's a mixture of clients that we know that we work with ready. So we'll definitely be including their products will include innovative product new innovation to the market. We would definitely include tat. We will include everything for on a price spectrum as well because what we don't want to do is price out some people. There are some excellent budget products that we want to be aware of as well as you know. Innovation tends to come at a cost right so there is going to be the more expensive end of the spectrum. So there's lots of different things that that kind of help us pinpoint a case of. What are we gonna test of a a rather product will also look bestsellers as well so Washing machine is consistently in the top five bestsellers at a selection of retailers across the uk. Because if that's the product everyone's by and we wanna make sure that we've already reviewed it because again we want to be helpful so so there's lots of different ways in which we decide which products which categories of products to test and then which specific products within that category that we then decided to test and also now because we're testing for the all hearst brands. Actually we can be much more broad in our selection because we have all ends of the spectrum within the hearst portfolio..

Google uk hearst
Interview With Rick McFarland, Chief Data Officer at LexisNexis

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

01:36 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Rick McFarland, Chief Data Officer at LexisNexis

"So. I'm excited to have with us here. Today rick mcfarland. Who is the chief data officer at lexus. Nexus hi rick and thanks for joining us today. Thanks for having me. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners and tell them a little bit about your background and your current role at lexus. Nexus and maybe for folks. that aren't familiar with lexis. Nexis let them know what it is here. Serve as you mentioned. I am the chief chief data officer for lexus. Nexus and so this usually leads to the question of what you do and most parties i man and so basically i oversee the data governments governance data management data science data strategy. For all of lexis nexis manage. I manage the teams responsible for machine learning and ai development in most of our products and For those of you who those listeners. Don't know of lexis-nexis we actually Provide legal and analytical data all all around the world hundred and sixty two countries. So what else. Can i tell you why i'm also a phd statistician before joining lexus. In two thousand. And seventeen i was the chief data scientist at the hearst corporation. And before that. I was actually i worked for amazon. I manage the retail data warehouse teams and after that the kindle team so i've had kind of a diverse background before i found my way over here to the legal data space.

Rick Mcfarland Rick Lexus Hearst Corporation Amazon
Winfrey, Hearst Have Black Journalists Tell Elders' Stories

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Winfrey, Hearst Have Black Journalists Tell Elders' Stories

"Oprah Winfrey is leading a project that team's young black journalists an older black activists community leaders and regular people to talk about their lessons on life our margins are a letter with the latest Oprah Winfrey recalls being in her twenties when she became friends with port my Angelo who stressed the importance of knowing one's history Winfrey's lift every voice project teams young interviewers and photographers for mostly historic black colleges and universities with people older than seventy with remarkable stories among those interviewed or singers Dionne Warwick and Patti LaBelle actor Andrea shields an activist Claudette Colvin and opal leak the stories will run on Oprah daily dot com and in magazines like elle Good Housekeeping and esquire

Oprah Winfrey Angelo Winfrey Andrea Shields Claudette Colvin Dionne Warwick Patti Labelle Opal Oprah Elle Good Housekeeping Esquire
Famed Criminal Attorney F. Lee Bailey, Dead at 87

Joe Pags

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Famed Criminal Attorney F. Lee Bailey, Dead at 87

"The U. S. Famed defense attorney F. Lee Bailey has died. The 87 year old rose to national fame defending some notorious names, including O. J. Simpson, Dr Sam Sheppard, Patty Hearst and the Boston Strangler. He died at his home in Georgia. Bailey was disbarred in the early two thousands over its handling of shares

F. Lee Bailey Dr Sam Sheppard U. O. J. Simpson Patty Hearst Boston Strangler Bailey Georgia
Celebrity Attorney F. Lee Bailey Dead at 87

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Celebrity Attorney F. Lee Bailey Dead at 87

"Celebrity attorney F. Lee Bailey has died at the age of eighty seven according to one of his law associates I marquees are loaded with the latest Ashley Bailey made his name winning an acquittal for the second murder trial of Dr Sam Sheppard Bailey's other high profile clients included heiress Patricia Hearst the alleged Boston strangler and former NFL star OJ Simpson one of the memorable moments of Simpson's nineteen ninety five trial was Bailey cross examining Los Angeles police detective mark Fuhrman about racism anyone who comes to this court and quotes you as using that word in dealing with African Americans would be a liar would they not detective yes they would all of them correct all of them Billy was disbarred in two states for his handling of stock owned by a convicted drug smuggler really won the right to practice law in Maine in twenty thirteen

F. Lee Bailey Ashley Bailey Dr Sam Sheppard Bailey Patricia Hearst Bailey Cross Mark Fuhrman Oj Simpson Simpson NFL Boston Los Angeles Billy Maine
'Stop Asian Hate,' Chicago Chinatown march, rally joins groups across the country in National Day of Action

WGN Showcase

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

'Stop Asian Hate,' Chicago Chinatown march, rally joins groups across the country in National Day of Action

"Hundreds of people came together in Chicago's Chinatown to protest against anti Asian racism. The county board president Toni Preckwinkle among the community leaders and lawmakers who joined dozens of Asian American groups who organized the rally. Parent Cook County, where they feels to enable or allow white supremacy to flourish. We will fight back against hate violence against Asian Americans has spiked nearly 150% since the current virus pandemic began. Many blaming China for the virus in the western suburbs. Another protest against racism toward the Asian community. Protesters in Elmhurst gathered in front of the local dry cleaning business, which stirred up controversy after a photo of a sign went viral. The owner of Dulles Cleaners is defending a sign he says was meant to target the Chinese government, not Chinese people. He took it down five months ago after an Asian American customer confronted him. Hearst Police were on hand during that

Toni Preckwinkle Cook County Chicago Dulles Cleaners Elmhurst Chinese Government China Hearst Police
The Mystery Of The Pennhurst Asylum

Haunted Places

04:47 min | 1 year ago

The Mystery Of The Pennhurst Asylum

"The eastern pennsylvania institution for the feeble minded and epileptic later called pinehurst asylum was originally established as a facility for the disabled opened in nineteen o eight. The property contained in array of buildings all scattered around large tracts of farmland in chester county. Thirty miles outside of philadelphia though it might sound like it was designed for care and comfort. The reality was anything. But the institute was first created to house intellectually and developmentally disabled people alongside those who suffered from epilepsy but this strategy was unwise as such patients had very different needs. What's worse is that. Many of the institutions goals were based on the nineteenth century eugenics movement proponents of the movement believed that the human gene pool should be protected and anyone deemed. Genetically inferior. Should be prevented from reproducing by forced sterilization or segregation from the rest of society. For this reason. People with certain kinds of disabilities whose families could not care for them were sent to penn hearst. Most of them came as infants or children. Girls and boys are separated into different buildings. So there wouldn't be any sexual mixing in the decades since the institution closed a slew of modern day rumors claim that penn hurst carried out forced sterilizations on its patients. But while sterilization did occur at similar institutions in the united states. There was actually no record of it at pinehurst. Rumors of the institute's horrific procedures ran rampant. The last perhaps this is because the hospital was shrouded in an era of mystery it operated almost completely independently of the outside world. It had its own power plant and produced its own. Food and supplies were brought in by a special rail. Line pen hurts was designed so that no one from the outside could get in but more importantly so that no one on the inside could ever get out. Georgie was carrying a stack of folded sheets toward the finish piles. When he noticed a girl arguing with an orderly. George stopped in his tracks. She had long shiny hair and was pointing a finger directly at him confidently shouting and screaming. He was instantly captivated and continued to watch her but eventually to more orderlies came over to give her a shot. And take away georgie side. Good things never lasted. Long at penn harris georgia's mother had left him there when he was only three. He never knew why not what he done or where she'd gone he'd been stuck in this place for twelve years and he knew it like the back of his hand. He knew that when the girl got taken away it was the last he'd see of her or so he thought The next day georgy walked into the laundry building at his heart nearly stopped there. She was if he someone else. He could've tapped on her shoulder and introduced himself but as it was he could barely manage breathing and walking at the same time. Georgie said down in front of his pile of sheets and started cursing himself for being so shy and that was when someone tapped him on the shoulder turned. The girl was standing behind him. A fitted sheet in her hand. She has georgie how to fold it. Her name was kerry. No one was happy to be. A pen harassed. But carrie was indignant about it. She said she didn't belong there. That was why she'd been fighting with the orderly. There was no way she was going to spend the day slaving over an ironing board if she wasn't getting paid the orderly at said that barbital injection might change her mind but it obviously didn't soon george bush love. He used to find laundry duty tedious. But now it was the only thing. He looked forward to because laundry. Duty meant seeing carry a few weeks. After they first met george carey was sitting on a low stone wall outside the laundry carried. Turn to him with a frown. She asked to launch. She was a burden after her parents died. Her guardianship went to her uncle.

Eastern Pennsylvania Instituti Penn Hearst Penn Hurst Chester County Georgie Epilepsy Penn Harris Philadelphia Georgy United States George Georgia Kerry Carrie George Carey George Bush
Kamala Harris Swears In New Democratic Senators

WBZ Afternoon News

00:11 sec | 2 years ago

Kamala Harris Swears In New Democratic Senators

"History at Hearst, wearing in Vice President Kamila Harris were in some historic senators today, including her replacement. Alex Padilla, the first Latino senator to represent California with

Vice President Kamila Harris Hearst Alex Padilla California
Dallas Area's Tarrant County Opens New Mass Vaccination Site

Eric Harley and Gary McNamara

00:16 sec | 2 years ago

Dallas Area's Tarrant County Opens New Mass Vaccination Site

"Tarrant County is accelerating its vaccine roulette with the opening of a new mass vaccination sign Hearst. It comes as cases of covert 19 continue to surge across North Texas in Tarrant County, one out of every three people who get tested for the virus test positive, according to the Health

Tarrant County Hearst North Texas
Mega COVID-19 Vaccination Site Now Open in Dallas' Fair Park

Chris Salcedo

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Mega COVID-19 Vaccination Site Now Open in Dallas' Fair Park

"Is ramping up its ability to provide the vaccination to the public. The vaccination mega center at Fair Park is open to eligible residents who registered for an appointment online. David Moss, Meyer says he's grateful for the opportunity. To get his shot. All the setup is fantastic Now. Of course, I would say that I'm first in line, You know, now, do you see other people waiting out there, but it looks very well organized, and I know there's a lot of people that want to get this vaccine. The county expects most of the residents to receive their shots first will be 75 older. In addition to the Arlington E Sports Stadium. Location and Hearst is opening today in Tarrant County. The

Fair Park David Moss Meyer Arlington E Sports Stadium Hearst Tarrant County
Nearly 1,800 Receive COVID-19 Vaccine At Dallas’ Fair Park

Morning News with Hal Jay & Brian Estridge

00:18 sec | 2 years ago

Nearly 1,800 Receive COVID-19 Vaccine At Dallas’ Fair Park

"Up a vaccine Mega center. Tarrant County has done. This is well of the Hearst Convention Center, right, But this Dallas County first mega Public Center is at fair Park. On day estimated up to 2000. People will be vaccinated by appointment each day.

Mega Center Hearst Convention Center Tarrant County Dallas County First Mega Publi Fair Park
Biden holds a drive-in rally in Detroit, Michigan

All Things Considered

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Biden holds a drive-in rally in Detroit, Michigan

"From NPR News. I'm Janine Hearst. Both presidential candidates hit the campaign trail today at a driving car event. In Detroit Democrat Joe Biden slammed Republicans for holding a hearing on President Trump's Supreme Court nominee while the country deals with the Corona virus. Millis PANDEMIC. Why don't Republicans at the time as I said, to hold a hearing on the Supreme Court instead of addressing the significant upcoming needs of local communities? I'll tell you why. It's about wiping out Obama care, wiping it off the books. Because their nominee is said in the past that the law should be struck down.

Supreme Court Janine Hearst Joe Biden Npr News Barack Obama Pandemic Donald Trump Detroit President Trump