35 Burst results for "Healthcare Organization"

"healthcare organization" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

01:46 min | 2 weeks ago

"healthcare organization" Discussed on The CyberWire

"I. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I might find <Speech_Male> a way to to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> make it public <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Because he is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> very passionate about <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> these <SpeakerChange> surveillance <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> issues. Yeah <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> all right <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> well The article <Speech_Music_Male> is over on <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the vice website. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> It's titled <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> pentagon surveilling <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> americans without a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> warrant. Senator reveals <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> written by joseph <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> cox <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> benny <SpeakerChange> elon. Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for joining us. Thank <Music> you <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Male> thanks <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to all of our sponsors <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for making the cyber <Silence> <Advertisement> wire <SpeakerChange> possible. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And that's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the cyber wire <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> link <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> stall today's stories. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Check out our daily <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> briefing at the cyber <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> wire dot com <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> if you are looking for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> something to do over <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the upcoming long <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> holiday weekend <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at least here in the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> us. He showed <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a checkout. My conversation <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with brandon <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> hoffman from intel. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Four seven <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> one on research <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> saturday <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for discussing editor <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> silent. The underground <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> new favourite <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> mal doc builder. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> That's research <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> saturday. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Check it out. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The cyber wire <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> podcast is proudly <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> produced in maryland of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the startup studio data <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> tribe with <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> their co building. The <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> next generation of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> cybersecurity teams <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and technologies <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are amazing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> cyber or team <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is elliott. Peltzman <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> grew precaut-. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Kelsey bond. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> tim. No dr <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> joe kerrigan. Carol <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> -tario ben <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> yellen nick. Valenki <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> jana johnson <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> bennett. Mo- <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> chris russell. John <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> patrick jennifer. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I been rick howard <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> peter. kilby. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And i'm dave bittner. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks

"healthcare organization" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

01:47 min | 2 weeks ago

"healthcare organization" Discussed on The CyberWire

"The book is called sand worm a new era of cyber war by indie greenberg. And you can hear a much more indepth longer interview in my. Cfo perspectives podcast exclusively. On the cyber wire pro subscription services and congratulations to andy for his induction into the cybersecurity. In all of fame. It's time to take a moment to tell you about our sponsor ninja show. Are you tired of boring. Cyber security awareness training powerpoint that. Don't keep your attention. Turn your team into cybersecurity. Ninjas by getting them ninja showed.

"healthcare organization" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

07:50 min | 2 weeks ago

"healthcare organization" Discussed on The CyberWire

"The weekends with more stories of cyber espionage microsoft yesterday announced its discovery of new campaign by the russian threat. Actor redman calls nobel bellingham. Which is the group others know as cozy bear by general consensus. It is associated with both russia's s vr and the solar winds compromise nobel eum this week succeeded in compromising constant contact email marketing service account belonging to the us state department's internal assistance agency usa. Id the threat actor then used that account descend convincing phishing emails to more than three thousand accounts at over one hundred fifty organizations. The fish hook was a link that installed the natives zone back door and microsoft has provided technical details about the attack. Us organizations were most heavily targeted. But at least twenty three other countries were also affected velocity which has also been tracking cozy bears. New points out that the fish bait in the emails was frequently election. Themed here's one representative screamer. Us aid special alert. Donald trump has published new documents on election fraud. Another is foreign threats to the two thousand twenty. us federal elections which seems like a cheeky bit of fish bait for cozy. Bear to use chum. Volek said he doesn't claim to have any certainty about who's behind the campaign but it does think the attack looks like the work of a known threat actor. It has dealt with on several previous occasions side for attributes that point toward abt twenty nine. That is the. Sv are the attackers use an archive file format with an ellen. K to deliver the initial payload this technique was observed in two thousand eighteen. They also used an election. Themed lure that appears to come from a us government source this has been seen since twenty sixteen cobalt strike with a custom malleable profile was used as an initial payload as has been done since two thousand eighteen and finally the scope and timing of the campaign looks like the familiar paw prints of a huggy bear. Many targets got the same fishing content at about the same time. Chinese intelligence services have also been busy. Fire is mandy and unit has followed up earlier research into pulse. Vpn and concluded that the beijing-linked threat actors unc twenty-six thirty and unc. Twenty seven seventeen have introduced four new families of malware and deployed these against economic verticals given priority in china's fourteenth. Five year plan. The cyber espionage is characterized as sophisticated and evasive and as exhibiting an intimate familiarity with victims networks. The four new strains of malware are bloodline a utility that pulse secure connect log files and extracts information related to log ins fees and web requests. It then copies the data. It obtains to another file. Blood bank a credential theft utility that parsis to contain password hashes or plain text passwords and expects an output file to be given at the command. Prompt clean pulse a memory patching utility. That may be used to prevent certain log events from occurring researchers found clean pulse in close proximity to an atrium web. Shell and finally rapid pulse a web shell. That's capable of arbitrary filed read as other web shells so often do rapid pulse exists as a modification to a legitimate paul secure file the attacker can use rapid pulses an encrypted file download. Her while some european organizations have been targeted. The great majority of those affected have been in the united states. The us fbi today warned that foreign actors were exploiting unpacked fortinet. Vpn's to compromise us municipal governments quote as of at least may two thousand twenty one abt actor group almost certainly exploited a forty gate appliance to access a web server hosting the domain for a us municipal government the a pt actors likely created an account with a username ellie to further enable militias activity on that network and quote once therein. The attackers can accomplish number of unwelcome things. Data exfiltration further malware 'institution data encryption. And so on organizations that think they may have been affected look for ftp transfers over port. Four forty three and unrecognized scheduled tasks especially synchronized timezone. This isn't the first warning. The fbi or cisa have issued about the risk of leaving fortinet appliances unpacked and we emphasize that fortunate has had a patch available for some time. There first warning arrived on october twelfth of last year the second was issued almost two months ago on april second. There's almost a touch of weariness in yesterday's warning. It's like come on people. How much more can we spell it out for. You tell his honor to have people patch. The city's stuff okay. It's worth noting that local governments shouldn't presume. They enjoy immunity from the attentions of unfriendly foreign states. Blackberry puts the worldwide conti rent somewhere victim. Count north of four hundred. A lot of these have been health care or first responder targets prominently ireland's hse new zealand's waikato d. h. b. and california's scripts health all three of which continued to work toward recovery. Blackberry took a look at the free decrypt county operators offered in a fit of either remorse or more probably fear of the attention from law enforcement that widespread public odium would spur. Blackberry concluded that the decrypt was indeed legitimate and not a further scam but lest one be inclined to credit conti operators with a functioning conscience. Consider the comment. They provided news hub about their infestation in waikato quote for last three days we tried to contact them and we offered help with restoring the network with our help. They could restore it for one day without our help. They will have to rebuild their network from the beginning. They decided to ignore us and torture their employees and patients. It is only their fault that hp is still offline. they can't use their backups. We deleted most of it and quote. News hub also reported that the cancer society's medical director called the ransomware attack worse than covid. Which seems perhaps overheated. But there's little doubt that disrupting networks in waco has also disrupted the delivery of care. In ireland officials now estimate that the total costs of the conti attack on. Hse will probably exceed one hundred million euros. The dark side is another crew. That's claimed to have gone dark but us law enforcement authorities aren't counting on them. Keeping their word info security magazine reports. If you take the gangs at their word then hey we've got a non fungible token of a perpetual motion machine you may be interested in as an investment opportunity and finally the underground criminal economy is a complex one that mirrors many aspects of legitimate markets crooks have their consultants just as legitimate businesses do gemini advisory reports. They squabble sometimes. A dark web fight between are evil and a criminal middleman a.

Donald trump microsoft fourteenth Blackberry yesterday one hundred million euros april second Volek Five year two months ago russian redman this week china one day hp more than three thousand accou both ellie today
A Special on GDPR With Peter Berghmans

The FIT4PRIVACY Podcast - For those who care about privacy

01:42 min | 2 weeks ago

A Special on GDPR With Peter Berghmans

"Very happy to have you thank you very much for the. I'm happy to be so. Let me stop the all having been in. The gdp are converting owning three today. But for somebody like you. Who's started working on. In two thousand twelve giving certification them so on and also was a member of the flemish data protection authority. How do you see. gdp are. Should i say at three or zero or ten nine but what. How do you see the evolution of giddy along all these years. First of all as as you explained here. I'm leaving in belgium and in belgium. We already have a role that you have some other countries to where the role of a data protection officer. It was not called way It was the on security information security adviser extreme This role was a already existing and like local governments and healthcare organizations array. A heads some people That are doing the job that we know now as the trip of a data protection of when we started in two thousand twelve two thousand thirteen with gdp our trainings. We saw a lot of people with more technical backgrounds who already did The drop of the information security adviser and they are enrolled discourses so it was more focused on the technical elements actually

Flemish Data Protection Author Belgium
Katz Kiely Talks about how frontline.live helps the NHS with PPE and why they have open sourced the platform.

Sam Talks Technology

08:23 min | 4 months ago

Katz Kiely Talks about how frontline.live helps the NHS with PPE and why they have open sourced the platform.

"Can you tell everyone is listening. Walk is frontline live and then how you first came about forming it. 'cause you did an amazing campaign and support early in the lockdown so what frontline live is an online live data mac which means that any healthcare worker here is on the front line who finds themselves short at ppe. And therefore is at risk of getting ill can either tweet a request using hashtags hashtag frontline map. Hashtag the postcode so we can make sure they're actually at a healthcare organization not just collecting. Ppe reason and then hashtag what it is they need or they can fill in an online form of frontline dot live and we will then do two things one of them. Put a dot opin on a digital map so that people can see with the need is but also now because of a new partnership two other organizations the healthcare workers association and met share supply drive. It means that we basically have a warehouse of free. Pp which all partners of what rated long and hard for by raising money and getting donations. And because of a partnership with hermes it means that as soon as somebody on the frontline requests vp. Because they're shows of it we can get free p. p. to them within forty eight hours. How did all of this started happening. I moved back to my house in sheffield so in lockdown home alone on zoom call with a friend of mine who is a senior us. I'm saying i can't get a delivery. I'm gonna have to go to the supermarket and she said okay. I can do one better than that. I'm going into the hospital tomorrow. We don't have any masks of probably be dealing with people with covert line flown. Can you imagine that feeling so then. Of course i became a little bit hyper aware of this particular problem. And because everyone on every social media channel that doctors nurses health care workers saying we have p p that's bound on the other side there's this incredible uprising of entrepreneurs who assisting forward money three d. printing visors. That's companies like brutal and burberry. And i'm barbara who've pivot their entire system that can make pp to give away so we've got people desperately in need and scud going without pp's any of us would put up with and people are trying to solve the problem but they couldn't see very other were and so then. I hear on the news one day. Burberry making scrubs. There's an nhs trust because they didn't have to contact burberry have had to go through some ministers in the government to ask them how they conduct bribery. Oh for goodness sake. This is ridiculous. Because i'm all about technical innovation so i thought it can't be that hard surely to find a way of making it easy for people on the front line to say i haven't got this so that people who've got supply can get it and quickly. Yeah that was my beginning and a guy who used to work with who used intel is at ucla now on run did to him. About how hard would it be for us to be able to collect data and put it live on a map so that people can see what's going on and we chatted for awhile for about an hour and then i didn't hear anything back from him midnight that night i get any email. He's already got his team on it. I'm like oh so then fast. Forward six weeks. I've had about fuzi. Volunteers who've sat forward the most incredible people people who well known in the industry. People go better things to do with their times. they busy. Who sat for just getting this. Were absolutely and we're going to make this happen so six weeks later. We launched the service in the first three month period. When all of this stuff you're talking about how they've got. The timelines has stepped forward giving his full page. Spreads is giving us full page. Adverts ocean outdoor gives us sixty with the biggest digital out of home screens across the country. So we can put stuff out there. Not one penny changes hands. A snapchat talked to the general manager. he goes. Yeah wherever we can do to help. We'll do a national campaign. you give gives your assets. We'll sort out view. I have never in my career. Repos talk about purpose and actually fears purpose. You will look forward to enjoy getting out of bed in the morning. But i've never seen anything like this in my life. The sad side of that is that the nhs in my humble opinion and i we were talking about this before. It's the jewel in our crown. It's something that we should be quite rightfully proud of. And then by an example we partnered with united health who have about one hundred thousand frontline. Health co worker members talking to them. And i'm saying i keep hearing stories from people on the front line that actually the idea of people tweeting their requests is really difficult because nobody does speak cow and people are being told not to use the service from my mouth. It being told not to use it. Yeah people are being told if they speak out about the fact that appea- shortages they will lose their jobs. Assist crazy if you can't do your job one wi fi. Find another way to do it. That's most entrepreneurs will okay. I can't go x. y. And found a way round it exactly and the system should be set up in a way. This is about somebody complaining about something. It's if you don't have you're putting your life at risk. Six hundred forty doctors nurses have died. Because there isn't enough got enough. So basically i'm finding out it's absolutely known as endemic that people inside the nhs all tolls not speak up about things and told they will lose their jobs so we moved it from just twitter to having a fool where people could Report anonymously if they were too scared to speak out off the fifteen hundred. Ish request for p. P. i reckon about eighty percents of them were done anonymously by people who was scared to speak out and some of the comments they left on those forms. Joss person frankly interesting. We've been up from. You has improved or got worse vitton. What's your gut fail. It's been interesting because there was a point where there was a story or other media about the fact that management we're turning healthcare workers to be quiet and then matt hancock said in the commons. This is not true. people will be protected. It's definitely from my perspective. People are less likely to speak out and obviously we had a bit of downtime where we registered frontline is a charity because there weren't as many cases and he gave his time to consolidate and build townships so we decided in september. Do a to find out whether or not people in healthcare organizations feel confident. They're going to have enough p. p. to see them through over this next crazy time which is become crazier guess. How many percent said they felt fully confident. They'd get enough. P p twenty eight. Wow wow wow wow that super-low eight percent of frontline healthcare workers believe they will get enough to keep them safe during this time that scary as a number. That's scary.

Burberry Healthcare Workers Association Fuzi Snapchat United Health Sheffield MAC Barbara Ucla Intel Matt Hancock Joss Twitter
Understanding the Virus with Dr. Howard Fullman

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

05:16 min | 5 months ago

Understanding the Virus with Dr. Howard Fullman

"So i are host the quadruple board. Certified doctor of internal medicine. Pulmonary disease critical care in neuro critical. Care my very good friend. Dr steven day back. How are you steve doing. Okay deceive. oh we have one of our favorite experts returning to us today Howard j fomin. He is board certified in internal medicine and gastroenterology and howard served a multi decade tenure at kaiser permanent day as partner ford member president of the executive committee chief of staff and chair of the quality committee. He has supervised over forty three hundred staff and over five hundred doctors. Howard is now seen your operating advisor at atlantic street capital for their medically focused investments. Dr howard foreman nice to have you back thanks to be here high stated it good to see hey steve. What's it like in the icu. With the kobe patients has it gone. It's been very rough at my hospital. The surges hit us really hard. We actually we had a mini surge. Back in may when everybody else seemed to be really struggling at this time it has hit us really hard we have about one hundred and fifty plus cove patients in our hospital and i bought twenty percent of those are in the intensive care unit and those that intensive care unit. They are all on high flow oxygen or intimated. So they're all very very sick. And howard what. Are you hear about kaiser. How are they holding up in all this. I just very proud of everybody. Credible courage by the patients and their families what they're going through doctors nurses respiratory therapist all staff level of dedication i think of the healthcare professionals are just miraculous people. Tired in was there the other day doing data the procedures. And just in what. I do which is way less difficult than being in the icu. For twelve hour shifts just wearing in the ninety five masks in a shield and all the p p being more cautious than ever and trying to make sure that the patients can get in and out so that they're not in the medical center. One minute more than is necessary. Cetera et cetera. Just makes the practice of medicine which is already something that's very challenging even more challenging but my heart goes out to the patients and that that's just a culprit patients Anyone who needs services. The hospital is having more difficult time than usual inside easy being a patient thunder normal circumstances that along under these circumstances. i'm sure they're all kinds of treatments. That have changed since our last conversation. I mean the remdesivir steroids in a number of other treatments that you guys have raised a bad situation. What's working the best these days. Dr steve in actually the one medication that really has shown to decrease mortality everything that we have is decadent on an age old medication. A steroid that's used to decrease swelling decrease inflammation in the body thus far as the only medication that we're using that actually has been proven to diminish with a twenty eight day mortality. We do give them de severe because there has been shown that there's been some benefit in terms of shortening the course of the disease and so it's still part of our protocol and so everybody who's coming in is getting a coverage for we call community acquired pneumonia in case they have bacteria on top of covid. So they're getting the usual medications for that which is usually as for miocene in something called stuff triax zone but the standard therapy provided you have good kidney function that you're not to overwhelmingly sick is the decca drawn remdesivir but it is the decca drawn. That by far has been shown to be very effective. I do believe for those people who are not terribly ill that are just starting to show signs and symptoms of covid that have various co morbidity is considerably overweight have diabetes a monoclonal antibody that has given an infusion. I believe has also been a game changer. Although i've not seen formal data in that way but those are the big three medications that we give. I mean you've got to look at what's going on here in the us and it's gotta frustrate both of you. Knowing how many people are breaking the advice may be needle one column rules because somehow those of us in the us don't like those things called rules. Frankly i've seen a bunch of parties. Go on in my town. There have been a bunch of weekend weddings and dancing. And what have you and it's almost like. What are you supposed to do as a healthcare organization to get the message across. I can't imagine. What would happen. To dr steve here if there was a surge on top of this surge. That's an important point in all of us in healthcare professions of. I wanna start again by saying lots. Lots of people doing their level. Best imply vincent. I feel really badly for people who don't have a luxury to be at home. That essential workers people who were living in very congested areas. Tranquil did very best. They can difficult circumstances. So that's important to make sure we now. The hard work difficult circumstances lots of people living under now everybody's violating these guidelines but there are people who are either inadvertently or something some cases intentionally violence

Pulmonary Disease Dr Steven Howard J Fomin Kaiser Permanent Chair Of The Quality Committee Atlantic Street Capital Dr Howard Foreman ICU Howard Steve Dr Steve Kaiser Ford Pneumonia Diabetes United States Vincent
How Hackers Hold Schools for Ransom

Slate's If Then

15:24 min | 6 months ago

How Hackers Hold Schools for Ransom

"To try to put the attack on jessica school context. We reached out to dave bertie. He covers cybersecurity for the wall street journal. And he's been writing about this uptick in ransomware attacks across the digital world. There's been an explosion of ransomware this year. It's an increasingly common way. for attackers. to target businesses healthcare organizations nonprofits or as the case may be schools in the reason. Why is just because. It's an effective business tactic if you encrypt in organizations data. That's basically what they need to function particularly in a digital environment. So as you've had a business or school that have moved more remote learning. That sort of expands. The opportunities to take advantage are there demonstrably more attacks on schools this year. Are we just aware of them. Will the first thing that's always important to point out here is that it's hard if not impossible to count the dogs that don't bark there have been probably about three hundred fifty or more. Cyber incidents reported across the united states this year in schools in schools and others probably a few dozen have been ransomware but that said those are only incidents that have been publicly reported so in many cases schools. They don't wanna take the pr hit an embarrassing situation. They don't want people to know. They paid off a criminal group to get their systems up and running. They might just keep that on the dl and not notify anyone. Even though schools aren't the richest targets around one of the reasons that hackers focus on them is that unlike big businesses. They often aren't equipped to defend themselves. We have seen attackers really zero win. On some of these districts may or may not have built out. It departments in many cases in addition to them being sort of under funded over the course of years their it departments. The also had these really really insane strange just put on them so the coronavirus remote learning getting kids up and running with their chromebooks. Or what have you so. There's really a lot of moving parts here. And i think criminals are smart enough to take advantage of them. So yeah is there just sort of like a handful of people who are in charge in your typical school district of distributing the chromebooks and also guarding against malware. I mean i would say the vast majority of school districts they don't have dedicated cybersecurity professionals even in most districts aside from the larger ones. You don't have that much of a built out. it staff. I talked to the chief information. Security officer of seattle public. School district is a very large school district in the grand scheme of things the only have eighteen. It people for that entire district of that team. Only two of them are dedicated on cybersecurity. So when you're in a position where you are suddenly thrust into remote learning environment and you need to get tens of thousands of devices online with seattle. I think it was fifty three thousand devices for students alone. I mean you really spread thin across a very big network of devices and potential threats. The threat of ransomware attacks has extended to fertility clinics and company providing software for one of the covid vaccine. Trials and the human consequences can be harrowing. There was an incident in germany where a hospital was targeted with ransomware. And as a result of that who is actually in an ambulance on her way to the hospital had to be diverted into another facility about thirty minutes farther away and this wounded women ended up dying. She didn't get care especially needed to get so german. Prosecutors basically tried to connect those dots they were asking the question can we show in a legal way. Causation between these attackers can we show causation. That they actually causes woman's death and ended the day they couldn't it was more of a correlation not causation situation. And i think that was the closest that we've come collectively to getting to a point where we're saying. Oh there's actually a cyber attack that has taken someone's life Let's walk through how this happens. Let's say you are a school administrator or hospital. it percent what do you notice. I will typically you know if if you really if something's wrong with your laptop and you really need to get to work you'll call the. It guy you'll always it guy and you'll say hey what's up with my laptop. I can't log into my email. Then typically they'll run through some scans and see that something's wrong with the system. They'll eventually get some sort of communication from one of these ransom. Learn groups saying. Hey we're here we've gotten into your system. We've locked up your data and we want x. Number of bitcoin in response. So that's really when it sort of gets this point where a school or business has to decide okay. Are we going to alert law enforcement. Are we going to call an outside forensics firm to try to understand what happened. Have we backed up all of our data within our system. And how quickly will be able to get that back. Do we want to pay this ransom payment. Like is the tradeoff. Good enough for us to do that. So there's a lot of moving parts that a lot of Businesses or schools or hospitals have to evaluate is all as happens the baltimore schools. Where just by works. They shut everything down. They sort of put everything on pause for a couple of days. Is that standard. Yeah i can typically standard. I talked with a school district in southern california. A administrator notices email was down the. It guys said it's ransomware for sure. So they physically went to every device in their school district. So we're talking about a school district of six thousand kids. Went every room went to all of their offices. Disabled unplugged device in that entire school district. And that's that's one way you know sort of a crude way of trying to limit the spread of of these things and then obviously on the back end when all these problems need to go through each and every one of those devices can them makes your their clean. Get them back online. What how often do victims turn to outside help whether that's law enforcement or whether that is digital forensics company to help them abc's extremely common there is entire ecosystem cybersecurity firms specialized in this sort of work. So you have a forensic firm that might come in to try to understand. Hey this is exactly how they got in to your computer system. This is exactly the type of software that they're using. This is exactly the type of data that they took from your system. In addition to that you have other groups. That are adept at negotiating. They actually talk to these groups. They have long term relationships in some cases with many of these groups and they say we can talk them down from ten bitcoin to five bitcoin. Whatever whatever the the number is the so it is sort of an emerging field just within cybersecurity as this is becoming a bigger and bigger problem. How much money are we generally talking about. Because my husband actually just how to ransomware attack on his nonprofit theater company and the attackers were asking for fifteen hundred dollars in bitcoin and eventually they said you know what we're not gonna pay them. We have the backed up data but they did have this moment of thinking in the scheme of our business. It's not that much money like. Are we talking about people who are shooting for big amounts or you know are they targeting twenty five different places for relatively gettable sums across the security community. It's broadly understood that ransom demands are basically going up. The trend line is pointing upward. But it can vary between in the thousands of dollars like as as a case with with your husband. But if you're getting to a larger corporation you have some people who specialized in this area saying that ransom demands could be ten million twenty million dollars. Well so i mean. Obviously attackers are smart enough to know they're not going to go with to attend with a ten million dollar demand to a school district. That certainly can't pay that in. That would make it an easy decision for them. They're they're trying to find like the right price point as well where they can have some sort of a six rate. Do school districts do hospitals. Do these places tend to pay. It really varies. It depends on what type of data has been encrypted. It depends whether those school districts have backed up their data beforehand which would make sort of rebooting the system much easier but what is almost always true. Is that school very cagey about saying whether they paid. No one wants to say that. They paid off a hacker that they gave someone from a country in the side of the other side of the world. A million bucks get their systems online. It's a very difficult. Pr situation for any organization or school to tiptoe around because it says what your system is rable and that you're willing to pay or that you just were bad cybersecurity. I mean all of the above. And i think one of the sort of broader questions that the entire cyber community is really wrestling with is. Should you pay broadly speaking. Are we incentivizing hackers to keep taking advantage of schools or keep taking advantage of businesses if they keep on paying and i understand that argument completely. It's it's very straightforward point of view on the other hand. If your business is offline for two weeks or a month or if your schools taken off line paying off might be the better option to you if it means basically losing all of your customers or you know having kids go out of school for a month or so. Dave says it's a bit of a vicious cycle vulnerable systems plus a willingness to pay tends to lead to more attacks but the victims are only half of the equation. The other half the perpetrators behind that screen demanding. Bitcoin are part of a criminal industry. That is surprisingly organized. One of the interesting things that cyber security researchers really say is these groups oftentimes act almost as corporate entities. They're very professional. They have partnerships between groups at times they subcontract to specialists within the hacking profession. If they have you know someone who's particularly adept at getting into a system. They'll go to that person to try to launch their attack. So you'd really do have this sort of our in de element almost a within the hacking community when it when it comes to them trying to hone their craft and zero win an exactly the right targets when people are negotiating or even having a conversation with. The attackers are to be trusted. Like you know are. Are you gonna trustees folks if they say like okay. Pay us are fifteen hundred bucks in bitcoin. And actually you're going to get your data back or is that a terrible idea. You would think that criminals are not to be trusted in. Obviously they're they're not But at the end of the day these groups are also playing a long game when it comes to their business and they have as i said a reporter with some of these negotiators that work with businesses and schools. If they don't pay if they don't decryption data after you pay them money. Those negotiators will know for their subsequent clients and they will know to not advise clients in the future to pay. So you had this weird dynamic that develops were. The groups are actually like worried about their sort of like brand in some respects. That's completely fascinating. Yeah it's totally wild thing and one lawyer who works in a lot of these investigations like re recently told me we don't wanna get to the level buber comparing it to customer service. But they're like definitely getting to a point where once you pay up in some cases they're trying to be helpful so that in the future they're known as sort of an honest broker while attacks may be more. Frequent ransomware isn't new like with so many other things cove it just accelerated existing trent so we have just seen a growth in the amount of ransomware with some of these criminal groups that have been long established in countries around the world just gravitating toward an effective tool that they're using so when you talk to cybersecurity researchers who follow this closely attribution is very difficult but they tend to say that the countries in which these types of groups operate our might might be the ones that you tend to think of korea iran china countries in the soviet bloc or central asia countries that may tend to look away when cyber criminal groups within their own borders launch an attack on a us business and do foreign governments step in or they unhelpful. I think it's safe to say that the the reason why a lot of this activity oftentimes stems from those countries is because the government's take a more lax approach some of this hacking particularly if it's sort of geared at the united states the. Us government recently has tried to warn businesses against paying somewhere demands. They basically have looked at those states. In particular places like north korea and iran and they've issued warnings to companies saying. Hey if you're targeted by ransomware think twice about paying anyone who is affiliated with someone who sanctioned from those countries. You could violate sanction rules by actually paying up this ransomware. I was really struck by that. Yeah the treasury department was basically sort of saying. Gee even if you're a victim you might be maybe committing a crime here if you pay up. What was their reasoning. Their i mean. I think goes to that discussion that i was mentioning earlier about how we're creating a market for ransomware essentially and i think it's it makes sense to the. Us government's official policy as we shouldn't pay people on our sanction lists and create this market. That said if a company that employs ten thousand or twenty thousand americans has to choose between paying one of these things or laying people off. I mean that's a much different conversation. Be curious to see whether people in law enforcement federal regulators etcetera might take sort of a case by case approach to actually enforcing that sort of thing. I'm trying to figure out where all of this goes. As we maybe move to a post pandemic world Obviously people are gonna still do lots of stuff online. And that's not something. That's going away. But i wonder if you think we are going to keep seeing this increase in ransomware attacks or if this is maybe a bit of a bubble wrought by the pandemic. I think it's probably safe to assume that it will continue increasing. You will still have these criminal groups that make tens of millions of dollars per year doing this stuff who will continue to innovate continue to look for new ways to go after businesses. Continue to do that. Research and development that we mentioned earlier so. I think it's safe to say that. None of that's going to stop

Dave Bertie Seattle The Wall Street Journal Jessica United States Southern California Germany Baltimore ABC Bitcoin Wrestling Dave Korea Iran Central Asia
Hospitals hit badly by ransomware

Talking Tech

01:59 min | 8 months ago

Hospitals hit badly by ransomware

"After the show to find out how. There's been a very disturbing trend happening in the world of computing and Hatem called ransomware. Have you heard about it? It's where the hacker gets control of your computer network and then hijacks you and says he or she sees a he has control of your network and you can't get the files back until you pay me money like lots and lots of money I'm Jefferson Graham you're listening to talking tech the hardest hit in the world of ransomware is hospitals hair healthcare organizations. This is according to a new study by checkpoint research which found that ransomware attempts jumped fifty percent just in July. August and September twenty, twenty, one. And why it's because in this land of Kobe hospitals are easy. They got all these patients who are desperate for their data and hospitals apparently are not very good about keeping their computer networks up in running and safely. How many versions of Windows XP have you seen at hospitals windows xp expired of course, many years ago. and Microsoft long ago stopped updating security patches. So as equium Ahmed of checkpoint said to me, hospitals are desperate and they're willing to pay, and once they start paying hackers here about it and they become easy prey the University of California in San Francisco recently paid one point one, four, million to ransomware attackers to get their files back in. Germany. A woman died when a hospital under a ransomware

Ransomware Hatem Equium Ahmed Jefferson Graham Kobe Germany Microsoft San Francisco University Of California
Better Food, Better Health with Lauren Driscoll

Outcomes Rocket

12:07 min | 10 months ago

Better Food, Better Health with Lauren Driscoll

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket saw Marquez here. Today I have the privilege of hosting Loren Driscoll. She's a healthcare strategist and entrepreneur and founded project well to support health plan's efforts to address critical non-clinical needs of their members nutritional and social isolation. Lauren is also a senior adviser in the strategy practice of partners, a health intelligence firm founded by former secretary of human health, and Human Services. Michael. Abbott Prior to partners Lawrence, served as corporate director of Oxford Health plans. Medicare business learns also co chair of the United States of care entrepreneurs. Council Lauren is also a board member at health works a healthcare organization that addresses the root causes of illness, poverty and neglect in Burundi. Africa she served as the Acting Executive Director of village health works and has also member of the University of Virginia College of Arts and Sciences Foundation Board. Lauren grew up in Baltimore Maryland, she received her bachelor's in University of Virginia, her masters in public health from. University today, we're GONNA be diving into the topic of really health through what you eat and the work that they're doing it project well as fascinating food as medicine and Lauren. is going to be helping US understand how they're helping people stay healthy and thrive with what they eat or in such a privilege to have you here today. Saw Thank you so much for inviting me to talk with you absolutely now, I love the focus of food are you and I had a chance to connect before the interview and it's near and dear to my heart might my family's heart what we matter so much before we dive into the value prop you guys have. I love to learn more about what inspires your work in healthcare. Sure. Yeah. There are really three things. So that have really told me end healthcare I would say I is just my beliefs that older adults really deserve better. There's just so much sort of preventable hardship and suffering with respect to health and you know I guess I feel like it's just super unfair that after spending their lives doing the best they can and often nurturing sort of next generations that we aren't doing a better job out with respect to the crowd disease that. So many of our older adults southwest so that that's number one number two I would say is just the unfortunate inefficiency of our US healthcare system. Part of me I, almost think I might have been a process engineer or something in another life that drives me crazy to not take the shortest path between two points and so I look at situations in our US healthcare today especially say with dual eligible 's the care for those who are eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid and therefore sort of among the most vulnerable in our country, and yet there's just there's so much inefficiency with these two payments streams and the two sets of rules really creating just you know perverse incentives that. End Up causing these folks to sort of Ping Pong around our system and Drive exorbitant costs and not even particularly good health outcome. So I would say it's inefficiencies like that that. You know really draw me into healthcare. and. Then the final one is you know you you introduce which is just I am such a believer and food as medicine I. Think it's very simple. Good food leads to good health and so as simple as that sounds and sort of even elegant. It's clear that there's just a sort of glaring missed opportunity and our country to really leverage the power of food. So it's really a combination of these these three things that inspired me to start project well. Get for you and You captured some heavy stuff there lauren, you know older adults deserve better and you know we're inefficient and food candy medicine and it is. So let's dive into this. You know what? What exactly is project well, and how you guys adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Sure. So our mission out. So to start out by explaining project, well, tell your mission. Is really just to improve the lives of those who are suffering with with chronic disease. Often food insecurity and loneliness, and to bend the healthcare cost curve as we do it. So our solution is centered on food and. Look, at food and. Medicine but also as an anchor for socialization and Education Man's the end of the day we know people come together around food. and. So we are a young company. So we are really starting with home delivered meals and meal kits for those who really have sort of the most nutritionally sensitive chronic disease. So thank diabetes and heart disease and we're starting they're both because these are the people that have the greatest level of need we can help them us. But also because are proof of concept pilots drive results there must quickly.

Lauren United States Oxford Health Loren Driscoll Acting Executive Director Of V University Of Virginia College Marquez Social Isolation Michael Senior Adviser Ping Pong Burundi Secretary Baltimore University Of Virginia Maryland
"healthcare organization" Discussed on Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

02:55 min | 11 months ago

"healthcare organization" Discussed on Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

"The families and patients are getting what they need from us and going forward, what is the role that philanthropy will play in this sustaining and growing mission of as on Betty Ford? We won't be able to continue to be the leader without philanthropy. The great healthcare organizations in this country that are leading the way Mayo Clinic MD Anderson pick pick your great healthcare organization. They all have just tremendous philanthropy, and we need to have that also so that we can do research that we can fund education. We can provide scholarships for students who want to be a substance use disorder counselors. It's critical that we have the philanthropy because the margin from our healthcare services is not enough to be able to afford to be able to do these other very important things. We only have about a minute left mark. So many give you the opportunity to look into the crystal ball going forward and knowing that we won't necessarily hold it to. You told you to it. But we've been around for seventy years. Now is our seventy first year. You've been our presidency over the last twelve years since two thousand eight. What do you see? Going forward as it relates to addiction in general and specifically Hazel and Betty Ford's wall in dressing, addiction well addictions not going away. Let's start with that substance use. Disorders are actually climbing right now. alcoholism is climbing. the OPIOID the the use of prescription pain pills thankfully is starting to go down Fenton. All is not going down so. It's going to be with US sadly right now. Because of some of the abuses in the field I see a major shakeout coming for the next three to five years of a lot of treatment centers, closing their doors a lot of organizations and not being able to cut it, and that is not going to be a good thing because we still don't have enough access to treatment in this country a lot of the access that we have is underfunded undercapitalized in, and that's really unfortunate, so our role here has to be to go back to our previous comments we made here is to. To be that advocate out there to make sure that as this turn of the wheel occurs as we have more treatment centers go out of existence that we're paving the way for others to open. That were making sure that we can persuade these large academic health centers some of these large healthcare organizations to get into the business of providing substance use disorders services..

Betty Ford Fenton Mayo Clinic MD Anderson Hazel
Write Your Own Job Description

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:04 min | 11 months ago

Write Your Own Job Description

"Everyone, the show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches, the skin is still working from home for the time being because of covid Ninety Today Teresa. Carlson joins us on skimmed from the couch. She is one of the most women in tech as the vice president of the worldwide public sector at Amazon web services. She has tens of thousands. Thousands of clients, the world including government agencies, educational institutions and non profits sounds like a very you know low pressure job to reset. Thank you for joining us today. Welcome to skin from the couch. Thank you Danielle and carly. Thank you for having me. We're thrilled to have you, so we're going to band with asking you our our favorite questions. Skim your resume for us. Well I had been at Amazon web services now for a little over ten years, and prior to that I was at Microsoft for the lesson ten years, where I ran the US federal government business and helps set strategy there prior to that I was a little tech company that my first career I was a speech language pathologist, so I made a completely different career change in my lifetime which has. Has Been a lot of fun, so I've gone from healthcare to tech in now in tech and my world today I get to work with a lot of healthcare organizations, which for me has been I can combine my original degree in college with my new passion and technology. So what is something that we wouldn't know about you? That's not on your linked in or your formal professional bio well. My maiden name is hatfill. It's kind of a famous feuding family from West Virginia and Kentucky, so I am originally frank decky. It's a beautiful blue grass state and I lived there until I was twenty three, and then from there I moved over to Germany as a speech and language pathologist, working for the Department of Defense in Nuremberg Germany, so a lot of people don't know that because that was left off my resume. It's a long time ago it. It feels like it was a fen part of my career when I look back. Because I got to work with children up to five years of age with the military, he were away from home and needed support help with their children who has has developmental disabilities. So that was a lot of fun for me. It was a it was a really nice time. It was my first adventure of living overseas and learning about a totally culture as well. Let's start there. You have mentioned you were a speech pathologist. It didn't make switched attack for a number of years. You were also among when you made that. Switch out. What prompted the change? And how did you think through it? I would like to say. Danielle there was a lot of thinking to it, but actually I had been in I've been working in the field of speech and language pathology for a company called no, the care. Corporation that when perspective payment changed in healthcare, which meant. Meant, basically they went to a managed care model. The therapy world rehabilitation world changed a lot of how you could treat patients and the business literally almost imploded overnight. It was an amazing wonderful business. We had Rehab hospitals and Rehab Clinics and we did sports therapy as well, but our main business was in geriatric care in the business, just imploded and win that change. The business changed so match that I. Just I woke up one day and I said I. Don't know what I'm GonNa do. You know healthcare is just I feel at the time it was like groundhog day like nothing was changing, and I just didn't feel. My career was going to go in the direction and I just said I'M GONNA make a change I. Don't know what I'm. GonNa do and I kind of took stock in my resume, which was not bad I had not only been a direct therapist, but I had managed people I had I had managed facilities on a regional basis and I'd help start kind of. Of A new business model so I, said I'm going to take these skills and figure something out, but I ended up getting hired by I was living in Maryland and get ended up getting hired by Tech Company in New Hampshire. Call Ky-ko Corporation so I fly every week and work. I flew back and forth, and it was a workflow and document management company, a Tech Company that and I told the CEO. When he hired me. I said you know I'm a paper pusher, not a paper automated. But this idea of workflow docket management change my world, because all of a sudden is all the intersection of a problem, a business problem emission problem in that technology could be a catalyst to drive change in that

Danielle Amazon Rehab Hospitals And Rehab Clin Germany Carlson Vice President Department Of Defense Ky-Ko Corporation United States Maryland New Hampshire West Virginia Microsoft Frank Decky CEO Carly
Racism and Medicine

Second Opinion

03:51 min | 1 year ago

Racism and Medicine

"This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion. It may seem that police brutality, racial discrimination, Kovic, nineteen and injustice have nothing to do with each other or with health care, but they are completely related and share. Root causes related to the social determinants of health. Earning a living wage having affordable housing with a safe environment paid leave an equitable and high quality, education system, or all mission, critical objectives for a healthy civilized society, but we are failing across the board. We have seen the disproportionate impact of covid nineteen on Latin X and black communities, but this disproportionate death among people of color is not new. We've known about it for decades and have done little to address the underlying systemic. Systemic problems that lead to premature death and disease in healthcare there are powerful and wealthy stakeholders that seek to maintain their power and wealth, and are unwilling to engage fairly resource. Poor communities, doctors, pharmaceutical companies, insurance companies, clinical laboratories, pharmacies and hospitals are all politically powerful, and you don't mess with them. They use this power to stay in power and increase profits working to fix poverty reduce racism improve how or reduce food insecurity. Insecurity are simply not in their self interest the journal Health Affairs points out that if we could consider the US healthcare a country, it would have the fifth highest GDP in the world. CEO's have healthcare organizations earn millions of dollars. Doctors earn hundreds of thousands of dollars and other healthcare providers are compensated way above the average American so they have little in common with those of lesser means one pervasive problem. Is that we? We have sub groups that are walled off and sees those outside of their group as others, this concept of the other and feeling, those groups as less than is what drives toward racism disrespect for genders and other divisions, those who get the best healthcare in America are the wealthy. When a wealthy person comes to the emergency department, they are taken aside away from the riffraff and get admitted quickly to a nice hospital room. Many parts of the University of California Healthcare System won't even provide chronic care or follow up care to poor patients those on medical, and certainly not to the uninsured. Why because they can't make a profit and that's important to them. Do we consider this acceptable behavior for our public hospitals? Over the years, medicine has contributed greatly to creating myths and justifications for racist behavior. It is time for healthcare to move from being part of the problem to being part of the solution, but power and wealth stand in the way of caring for those who are excluded from healthcare or suffer from the deadly condition of skin color, related to stop talking about disparities and create a healthcare system that is focused broadly. unhealth is caring and is truly an integrated system. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion.

Dr Michael Wilks Kovic Health Affairs CEO United States University Of California America
Ransomware attacks against hospitals are on the rise

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:00 min | 1 year ago

Ransomware attacks against hospitals are on the rise

"The FBI and Homeland Security warned that Chinese hackers are trying to break into us. Companies and health organizations to steal research and intellectual property related to the new corona virus and international authorities have been warning for weeks that militias. Hackers are stepping up ransomware attacks against hospitals and healthcare providers that's when they break into networks and hold data hostage until the organizations pay. Let's dig into all of this and quality assurance the segment where we take a deeper look at big tech story. Marketplace's Scott Tong has been reporting on this from Washington. Inter poll the US government. Google Microsoft. All come out and said you know. There's a lot more attempts to get into hospitals healthcare networks drug companies working on a vaccine all of that. Take your data steal it or locked up so you can't get access to it so it certainly seems like. It is a heightened threat. There's more going on so about these warnings. Do we have a sense of what hackers are trying to get at? When they attacked these healthcare organizations the wordings have not been very specific as to what they're trying to get but what they say. Is You know. Be careful if you are a company working on a new technology a vaccine or testing technology. You should be worried so it kind of implies that's what the bad guys would naturally be after what are the attack methods. One of them is the software to get somebody in organization. Click the wrong thing as spoken to some cyber analysts. Say there's a website that looks really similar to that Johns Hopkins Global Map of the Corona virus that so many of us have clicked on if you click on the wrong thing share than the malware kind gets into your computer. There's also the fake emails and and some of them out there pretend to be from the boss of a company and then there's tools to candidate in just by hacking weak spots in a company network. And then there's another one to Kinda Rome inside the network to see what's there and another tool to lock up the data and then you can notify the people at the company the Organization to say well you know it. You don't have access to your data anymore at now you have to pay. Do we have any sense of of weather like these organizations are more or less secure? Are they in any way equipped to sort of hand deal with this at the same time that they're dealing with a massive public health crisis well people who have watched this and spoken to one person who actually negotiates on behalf of healthcare organizations and hospitals When they get hacked in this way and in what they described as many hospitals in general they don't have the latest version of software. A lot of hospitals and diagnostic machines are running on windows. Xp and they have a lot of people coming in and they're just crazy busy right now even though the authorities say well don't WanNa pay the ransom because you're rewarding bad behavior. Well if you have lives to save you might be a little bit more inclined to pay even if you're not supposed to

United States Johns Hopkins Global Map FBI Scott Tong Homeland Security Washington Google Microsoft
How long should companies give hazard pay?

Morning Edition

02:07 min | 1 year ago

How long should companies give hazard pay?

"As the corona virus pandemic continues to roil the nation some companies are weighing whether to keep giving workers hazard pay WNYC's George Joseph reports city MD is York city's largest urgent care chain and last week they ended hazard pay for their employees in an email to staff the company said business conditions could no longer support the three dollar an hour raise misperception and potentially amongst the general public that healthcare organizations are very busy right now that's Matt gov a company spokesman he said the number of patients drop significantly in April maybe because people were staying home and the company reasoned with fewer patients the work was less hazardous that we try to make decisions based on the long term health of the company the decision upsets some employees one of them said they're still working in confined spaces with victims of the virus as long as we're working through an emergency we differ however K. everybody in this city because you're taking a left that's a city MD medical scribe she asked to remain anonymous for fear of being fired and I took the job because I I love health care and I wanted to get my foot in the door and then to be treated like that children really I opening tensions over hazard pay or simmering across the country making companies like target and Amazon have promised to keep paying more but many hazard pay programs are temporary labor union officials note that bigger firms often have greater flexibility when it comes to hazard pay here's me how resort ski a teachers union researcher and co author of a book on Walmart's market advantages as a large corporation it's a large businesses whether in normal times or during a crisis like this pandemic are generally much better position to weather storms they have greater reserves they have importantly much better access to credit in New York powerful health care unions like local eleven ninety nine have

Wnyc George Joseph City Md Matt Gov Amazon Walmart York Researcher New York
Interview With Bruce Vanderhoff, MD, MBA: Chief Medical Officer at OhioHealth  About Coronavirus

Mark Blazor

10:32 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Bruce Vanderhoff, MD, MBA: Chief Medical Officer at OhioHealth About Coronavirus

"So I'd like to welcome me chief medical officer with Ohio health Dr Bruce Vander Hoff and Dr thank you for being on the mark blazer show I know you're very busy very pleased to be able to be here with you yeah it's fantastic that you've taken time to be on with it so everything that you're seeing and reading right now with regard to our we are we really close to hitting what they're calling the surge is is that something that you're seeing within the next whatever few days to a week yeah all the modeling that we've been doing here in the state really is pointing toward hitting our surge over the coming days now of course we're hopeful that that surge is as low as possible but I do think that we're going to begin moving into the peak season for our our who bid nineteen search sometime over the course of the next several days so from when you first began seeing the data for the corona virus and where it was projected to go and so on and where we're at now is it promising you know based on the comparison there and kind of the things that we're hearing kind of alluding to what you probably just heard me talking about with the governor during his press conference today and all of that your thoughts on that yeah it's very promising and I think the people of central Ohio and really people all across our state can be very very proud of all the sacrifices that we've made and although the hard work that collectively we put into one thing this curve it's it's had an impact you know modeling for epidemics is actually not something new for people in health care we've been modeling epidemics for a long time early estimates about what this virus could have done in our state we're really pointing to pretty frightening picture and I think collectively now we're all cautiously optimistic that while there are still going to be people in central Ohio who gets sick and they're still going to be serious illness for our health systems to deal with that we're looking at a much much better picture talking to chief medical officer with Ohio health Dr Bruce banner often with regard to the surge we were kind of just talking about that is projected to hit here soon how has Ohio health prepared for this well we've been preparing in a lot of ways of for a long time really dating all the way back to H. one N. one and then the concerns that have arisen around of the potential free ball walk to jump from Africa to other countries but when it became clear that this illness has the potential to spread from China to the United States we began thinking about well what were all the things we would need to do to be out that set ready to go so a few weeks ago we already had a command center up and running and from that command center we began looking at how would we need to change the care that we provide day in and day out how would we need to help support the community in new and different ways how is the house Ohio health been handling the PP shortages are you guys experiencing that I think that every healthcare organization in the country has had to contend with that you know the the supply of of PP medical supplies really it is a worldwide distribution chain and unfortunately this illness hit some of the sources of that world wide supply chain pretty severely so that by the time it got to us our usual sources had been really really badly impacted but you know Ohioans are really remarkable and certainly the team here at Ohio health I think it's been remarkable it really prompted us to innovate and so we innovated and a whole lot of ways some of which your your audiences are undoubtedly heard with we partnered with some local innovators like the tell and Patel helped us find new ways to continue using important things like our masks and so today we are recycling our masks and a very very safe and FDA approved way when we have many were very grateful to Patel for that but we've done other things up we we've worked with local companies to help us produce some of our P. P. P. companies that you know previously were were not in the business of making PPP and maybe even done other things like three D. printing a lot of the swabs now that we used to do the testing we can't get but but it's okay because we're three D. printing I I I'm with chief medical officer with Ohio health Dr Bruce Vander Hoff and I also read doctor that you know you guys are using this is incredible by the way the iPad to communicate with patients from say on like the other side of the glass in the I. vis with the longer to being set up so you know in the hallway the nurses can you know Dodge having to go into the room for somebody who's infected to change that kind of stuff is unbelievable to me that so really really cool and you know what's really the coolest thing about it is that these are innovations that were developed at the bed side by the folks who care for patients every day so when they were faced with the challenge of needing to decrease the traffic in and out of the room because we had real pressure on the availability of personal protective equipment they looked at it and said well you know I we can change how we how we care for patients but the caring for them in ways that didn't isolate the patient so while we're going in and out of the room less often because of some of the things you just described IV pumps outside the room we're also giving the patience I pads and now the doctors and nurses are able to interact with them often much more often than they were before because it's you know if you see a patient and then half an hour later have a thought want to ask them something you're on the other side of the hospital in the old days that might mean you got back around later in the afternoon now you get on your smartphone you connect to them on their iPad and it's a much better doctor patient nurse patient interaction that is really really it's fascinating corona viruses we know doctors changed you know how we approach medicine talk to me about telehealth I know that something that is kind of a newer term for some people and how it's becoming kind of the new norm right now well this this code nineteen experience really challenged our health care providers our our doctors our nurses to think about new ways to stay connected with patients in new ways to continue their vital care so some of that it's been through video and telephonic care and now our our primary care physicians are specialists are more and more having their visits with patients via video telephone I'll give you a great example my neighbor came over and asked me to help him with his I. phone because his very first visit with his specialist was going to be a videocassette this is the headphones yes we haven't set up in it and and he did very well with it but you know that's not something that would have happened is recently is three months ago give me another really neat example and that is we're doing more and more hospital at home care so patients in it in the past may have come to the hospital for something that required relatively short hospital stay but now because we're able to provide monitors special monitors in the home we're able to use these video visits supplemented by maybe once or twice a day nursing visits were caring for some conditions without the patient ever having to come into the hospital Dr venter offices Dave I was curious you know one point they were talking about forty to seventy percent of the population what would get corona virus do you and there's a thirty percent swing in there do you still see it in that regard is it just going to be that it's going to be spread out over more time do you think that percentage is going to drop any insight on that you know one of the challenges that we have is that but we really don't know how many people at this stage in the game have been infected with the corona virus but what we do know is that far more people have and miles for a symptomatic infection with us then we believe from the early data that was coming from China in a way that's a hopeful factors because if a lot more of our people have required the virus had the virus and yet really have very mild symptoms maybe a mild cold maybe little at all it it may point to there being more and you've heard this term herd immunity and we might have thought possible that that seventy percent number that you've heard referenced the recent people point to that number is that's right around the point when the community has enough immunity at at that it helps reduce the likelihood that more vulnerable patients will get the illness and be exposed to it in the general community so we don't know yet but we are hopeful that maybe there's more community in our community at the end of the spring season then at first we thought might have been possible chief medical officer with Ohio health Dr Bruce Vander Hoff thank you so much for coming out today and for everything you and your staff and everybody at Ohio health and the health community doing for us not only during this time but all the

Medical Officer Dr Bruce Vander Hoff Ohio
Boston - Gov. Baker Files Legislation To Provide Health Care Workers Liability Protections During COVID-19 Response

Jay Talking

02:37 min | 1 year ago

Boston - Gov. Baker Files Legislation To Provide Health Care Workers Liability Protections During COVID-19 Response

"Governor governor Charlie Charlie Baker Baker files files legislation legislation to to protect protect healthcare healthcare workers workers and and providers providers from from lawsuits lawsuits over over corona corona virus virus treatment treatment decisions federal state law provides certain protections for health care workers and especially volunteers against lawsuits in civil liability during this pandemic or unprecedented times where our providers may be forced to make difficult choices and we're asking them to operating conditions but they've never planned for we need to make sure that the fear of getting sued doesn't prevent them from being able to do what they need to do to treat as many people as possible first the mission interactive the will maximize protections for health care workers and health care facilities under the federal public readiness and emergency preparedness act for the prep back the federal trap act on its own provides significant protections for health care workers the directive that I'm issuing will ensure that health care workers and facilities facilities to distribute and administer testing drugs and medical devices for this diagnostic image for the diagnosis and treatment of code nineteen are protected from lawsuits and liability to the maximum extent possible under the press act but the prospect is not cover all the situations are health care workforce may encounter and needs to be protected from during this particular pandemic because it's limited in some ways to certain aspects of the cove in nineteen response it doesn't cover everything we believe needs to be covered that's why we work with the attorney general's office with many folks in the health care advocacy and medical community with hospitals and the mathematical society to create additional protections in the bill that we filed earlier today the legislation would protect healthcare professionals including doctors nurses and EMTs as well as health care facilities from liability in lawsuits when the care they provide is impacted by the cove in nineteen emergency it also provides liability protections for the organizations that have generously made their facilities available for the Commonwealth and for many of our providers to use in response to this pandemic we speak with leaders and doctors from Massachusetts hospitals and healthcare organizations just about every morning and they are stepping up in a big way during this crisis and this bill will make sure that they are free to do their jobs the best they can in this unprecedented situation

Governor Governor Charlie Char Attorney Massachusetts
The Coronavirus Pandemic Hurts Some Industries, Benefits Others

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:43 min | 1 year ago

The Coronavirus Pandemic Hurts Some Industries, Benefits Others

"Many industries are furloughing or firing workers. But some are hiring. Npr's Alina Seljuk has the story. Despite all the shutdowns and lockdowns Americans still need food and medicine and that means some companies are actually hiring at least temporarily supermarkets like Kroger and Albertsons Pharmacies Lake CVs and walgreens and retail giants like Amazon and Walmart. Not only are we not laying off? People were actually position. We're going to be hiring additional one hundred fifty thousand new associates. That's executive Dan Bartlett last week announcing a major hiring push promising to get some people into new jobs in a matter of hours. Amazon has a similar plan to hire one hundred thousand new delivery and warehouse workers in the next few weeks to keep up with a big spike in online shopping papa. John's and domino's are hiring thousands of cooks managers drivers same at meal. Kit companies like Blue Apron and grocery delivery platforms like shipped and INSTA- cart with it wants to sign on up to three hundred thousand delivery GIG workers more than doubling its contract workforce or in transportation logistics for example. Hiring is actually up seven percent a month over month from March thirteenth. Daniel Joe is a senior economist at the jobs and recruiting website glass door. He says those transportation numbers account for new hires at warehouses of all kinds including retail and new jobs are being posted by local governments and healthcare organizations basically call center workers or front desk associates. These are folks who are helping to field questions. Some of the companies that are adding new jobs including Amazon. Instant card have faced criticism from their current workers who want protective gear hazard pay and broader access to paid sick leave still. These new jobs are an option for many workers who find themselves suddenly unemployed because of Corona virus and the companies that are hiring specifically targeting. Them you can imagine not. There's an awful lot of people who have lost their normal livelihoods and are desperate to generate some income to support their family. Ruth Milkman is a professor of sociology and Labour Studies at the City University of New York. The whole point of paid sick leave is to not force workers to have to choose between their livelihood and their house or the health of their kids. But these workers are going to be put in that position. She says the jobs that are growing fast. Many of them are our leave with limited benefits and pay and of course they're risky because they involve interacting with other people while most of the country is asked to stay at home and isolate a reminder that in times of crisis some of the lowest paid jobs become essential

Amazon Ruth Milkman Alina Seljuk Daniel Joe Albertsons Pharmacies Lake Kroger Dan Bartlett NPR Walgreens City University Of New York Blue Apron Walmart Senior Economist Insta Executive Domino John Professor Of Sociology
Coronavirus concerns? The doctor will video chat with you now. Is that enough?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:32 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus concerns? The doctor will video chat with you now. Is that enough?

"As corona virus spreads in the United States the Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization are advising hospitals to increase their use of telemedicine virtual. Doctor visits over video chat. The goal is to keep what's known as the worried well out of hospitals where they might actually get exposed and potentially to reduce the burden on doctors and nurses so we wondered is telemedicine widespread enough and effective enough to make a difference. Dr Robert Wachter is chair of the Department of Medicine at the University of California San Francisco. I asked him how patients should think about using telemedicine. You mean to me the patient that has symptoms that feel like the flu and would otherwise be thinking about trying to get in to see their doctor If now I have the ability to see a doctor get the information I need. Maybe as testing becomes more widespread be guided to how I get a test done. If I can do that while sitting in my living room. That feels like a better way of accessing the medical system than requiring an in person visit for every patient that might need to get care or be triage in the kind of toolbox. Where would you place telemedicine in terms of its importance in either preventing are containing an epidemic? Like her and a virus. Not Super High on the list. Because I think at this point an in person or telemedicine visit between a patient and a doctor is not going to be the central hub of our response. The response is going to be much more in the public. Health Realm about identifying people have symptoms of being able to test them rapidly. Of course that creates a challenge for telemedicine if at the end of our telemedicine counter. You've gotta go get tested. You can't do that through telemedicine. You have to go somewhere to get a test right. Tell me about any other advances in tech that you think might be helpful right now. Specifically in terms of other technological passes I think a lot of it will come in the realm rather than of sort of the Internet and the Web and communications. A lot of. It's GonNa come in the in the way we're able to. I hope quickly ramp up the diagnostic testing for this Quickly ramp up vaccine production and other things like that. You know the way. We produce the flu vaccine. Every year is still not all that efficient so you wonder whether at the end of this we will take all of those processes that are still a little bit sluggish and Invest. What needs to be invested to modernize them so that. When the next thing like this happens we can plug it into an infrastructure and in a way that we couldn't today and sometimes unfortunately you need a crisis to demonstrate that you need to increase your capacity to be able to deal with next one. How often will say insurance cover? These visits it's improved a lot in the last couple of years. I think insurers have recognized that telemedicine is a perfectly reasonable substitute for an in person visit. No several years ago we were spending a lot of time and energy battling the insurance companies about whether they'll cover telemedicine and if they don't the business case to kind of go through What you need to go through to build the capacity build a system by the technology train. Everybody was a little bit weak That's changed in the last year or two. I suspect that this outbreak might be the tipping point to change it. Even more a most payers are paying for telemedicine visits Paying for them at levels that are not that dissimilar from from in person visits and I think it had to reach that point. Healthcare organizations invested what they needed to invest in either building their own telemedicine capacity or working with one of the companies. You know five or ten years now. The idea that I took off half a day of work drove twenty minutes parked and paid fifteen dollars for parking to go. See the doctor for fourteen minutes is going to seem crazy. It's going to be like really dad. You did that It's GonNa be the complete norm that the way you interface with the at least the outpatient healthcare system is through telemedicine visits and increasingly also through sensors and surveys that you answer and other other ways of interacting with the healthcare system which on the other end on. Aaron is going to be some of. It's going to be doctors and some of it's going to be Some of it's going to be technology so that's all growing and I think this epidemic is probably going to Turbo charge that growth.

Dr Robert Wachter University Of California San F Flu Vaccine Department Of Medicine United States FLU Centers For Disease Control World Health Organization Turbo Aaron
You can tidy up your digital life, too

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:01 min | 2 years ago

You can tidy up your digital life, too

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by ultimate software dedicated to putting people first with innovative solutions for HR payroll and talent management. Learn more at ultimate software dot com. Ultimate software people first and bell Novo for business. You're an IT. But why do you do what you do to make a difference? Emlyn ova was here to be a difference maker for you by providing innovative technology solutions to learn more. Visit Lenovo dot com slash SNB. Powered by Intel. All those unread emails in your inbox causing you stress. It may be turned to tackle them head on from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm jed Kim in for. Molly would. It's spring, which means it's time to clean your winter. Clothes and storage swept and mopped cleared up the gutters. But what about that laptop that's littered with ten thousand photos unsorted documents and a barely visible desktop since digital storage space is so cheap. It's easy to keep amassing files. But that can take toll on our work in our wellbeing. Deb Lee is digital productivity coach she helps people weed out the virtual messes they've gotten themselves into we after what makes people finally give in decide to declutter. Well, usually there is some sort of a pain point. You can't find what you want. Maybe you're wasting time looking for what you want or you just can't seem to focus. So there's usually some sort of pain that triggers the desire to start getting things organized and putting things in order. How is doing a digital declutter different from doing declutter of your house? Well, the good news is that it's not that dip. Different. It's pretty similar. You still have a goal that you're trying to achieve most of us have things that we're not using. Sometimes we have duplicates of things because we couldn't find the original thing. So we went out and got the next thing. Right. So it's a pretty similar process. You have duplicates of things you have things that are just sort of lingering on your on your device that you're not using taking up space that you could use for other things that you are using or want to use. You know, how many times have we tried to take that photo? And it says up you're running out of space. Are you can't take that photo? Right. So that usually becomes a pain point. And then we recognize I can't capture these really important moments in my life because I've got all the stuff that I don't use. Or I don't need any more. What you find is the hardest part to declutter what it goes to our digital lives. I think it's the process of trying to fix it that perhaps sometime stops us that fear of goodness. It's going to take all day or take too long for me to manage this. I think that's. Where some of that reluctance to tackle it comes about. And sometimes when it has to do with things like your photographs they come with memories and special memories. You know, we sort of we feel attached to them. We remember those moments when we look at them, and we think well, we can't get rid of this photo. But if it's the fifth iteration of the same photo, then yes, you can so to make it a little bit easier. Start with those things that are obvious those duplicates or the the blurry photos or the ones where you can't make out. Exactly what it is that you took the picture of anyway, or those burst photos where you hold your finger on the phone so long that it just takes five hundred at the same time. And I know that because that just happened to me recently, but it's easy to delete. So definitely make deleting in Pershing sort of a regular habit. So it doesn't feel so much like a chore deadly is a digital productivity. Coach I asked her about her personal habits. And she's got a simple tip. You know, the home screen that pops up when you unlock your smartphone. She keeps it completely clear of anything except a calming picture totally stealing that. Then now for some related lists not into the idea of digital decluttering suppose, you could go the other way digital hoarding. That's the compulsion to save all things digital Mike photos of every receipt. You get or every single Email you've ever received. It's been studied. And some researchers think it's a some type of hoarding disorder witness the case in the B M J, aka British medical journal of a Dutch man who took and saved hundreds of digital photos every day turns out he hoarded physical objects to find yourself saving a lot of files. Get don't necessarily have a problem. Maybe you just get a kick out of collecting Gizmodo has a deep dive into digital hoarding. It makes a distinction between hoarding and collecting a digital collector might be the person who digitises all his old family photos and videotapes it can actually be a source of pride and positive feelings. Fine. Finally, if you think if firm morality is the answer for digital clutter by which I mean that some things can be put online with the expectation. They will disappear like Snapchat. Thank again. An article in wired questions the privacy expectations. Many people have with FM morality. And of course, there could always be a digital hoarder saving screen shots of whatever you typed. I'm jed Kim. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN. That's marketplace podcast is brought to you by well frame does your healthcare organization. Give people the support they need outside the walls of care delivery. It's time for a new approach. Well, frame calls it digital health management by delivering resources and guidance to address chronic conditions transitions of care as well as lifestyle, wellness and social determinants. Well, frame helps people and care teams build trusted relationships that Dr early interventions. Learn more at well frame dot com.

Jed Kim Lenovo Intel Emlyn Deb Lee Molly Pershing British Medical Journal Coach I B M J Mike
Targeted ads aren't just online, they're on TV

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:44 min | 2 years ago

Targeted ads aren't just online, they're on TV

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by well frame, their digital health management solution connects people and care teams through a patented platform so healthcare organizations can give people the support they need when and where they need it. Learn more at well frame dot com and Bella Novo for small business when it comes to IT Lenovo is dedicated offering solutions that can make a difference for you and your company from devices to technology services to learn more. Visit WWW dot Lenovo dot com slash SNB. Powered by Intel. If you thought targeted ads, we're only happening online, you better turn off your TV from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Ali would. By now, if I'm doing my job, right? You should kind of get how digital advertising works companies collect information about you like where you live or your age what you buy online. What websites you visit and much more? And they use that information to target you with ads that they think you will like so you will buy their stuff. But you may not know that this is also happening on television. It's called addressable advertising. And it means your cable or satellite. TV provider is showing you ads on your TV that your neighbor might not see depending on who you are. And what you're into right now only a small number of the ads you see on television are targeted ads, but it's a Volvo fast because the money is good. So the cable companies or satellite company, so whether you have Comcast or spectrum or direct TV, you have a registered account with them. So they have your name. They have your address your phone number your Email address. They have all these data points. And then they're able to connect. Those to third party data providers who might also have data on you. And they do it in on my way. But basically they're able to connect the dots. To know. Roughly what your household income is whether you have a car, how old your car is. And in some cases, if you have an internet service bundled with your TV service. They can also track your browsing as well. What websites you visit? If you have a cell phone service. That's also connected. They can know where you're going out in the world and be able to take all that information into account to target. You with ads on TV how much more money can cable companies make I assume they can charge more right for an adjustable TV ad than engineer one. Oh, yeah. So they can charge. You know about ten times more for these kinds of ads because they can be somewhat more effective, or at least more pinpointed for the and so if advertisers pain ten dollars for a general ad that will just run during the basketball games, everyone. Who's watching the basketball game? They can alternatively pay say one hundred dollars to only show it to people in certain markets who have a certain household income and certain other interests levels. So there's a bit more efficiency, you're less waste with it. But it's more expensive to do that. What are the challenges around this technology because I could imagine this narrow in which you know, if there are multiple people in a household. It's just not going to be that accurate like how well does this addressable advertising, actually, even work? Yes. That's what it's largely at the household level, especially because they don't know if there are multiple people in household, which of those people is watching a show at any given time. That's why it's things like is. This a household where there are kids or is this a household where they own a car what kind of car is. This is this a household that rents or buys how many people are in this house whole, and then, you know, demographic information to age gender of the people live in household. Tim Peterson is a senior reporter at digital with address. Adds comes advertisers who want to know if the targeting is working last week S T X films made an ad deal with NBC universal and the network actually guaranteed that the ads would sell a certain number of movie tickets. I'm Molly would and that's marketplace tech. This is APN. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by backlog, developers know, the importance of officiency and transparency when it comes to collaborating on a team backlog is the perfect software development tool for managing issues from start to finish create tasks and track progress with features like Gant and burn down charts. Tackle bugs update teams on various issues and push code out from get to backlog, do all this and more with one easy tool. Try backlog for your team free for thirty days using the special URL backlog dot com slash marketplace.

Basketball Lenovo Intel Bella Novo Comcast Tim Peterson Volvo NBC ALI Molly Engineer Reporter One Hundred Dollars Ten Dollars Thirty Days
A major trade sticking point between the U.S. and China has deep roots

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:15 min | 2 years ago

A major trade sticking point between the U.S. and China has deep roots

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by. Indeed, are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. And by topa athletic making shoes for running walking, fitness and recovery all featuring their economy. Roomy toe box natural fit and low draw platform. Do your body a favor and visit topa athletic dot com slash tech. And join others who have done their research. Get ten percent off your first bear using the promo code tech at checkout on to- athletic dot com. T O P O athletic dot com. Promo code tech. A little technology shared between friends. What's the big deal from American public media? This is marketplace tech. I'm Tracey Samuelson in for Molly would. This week trade talks continue between the US and China. US officials complain that China has long failed to protect US intellectual property rights, a charge China rejects in particular, the US wants China to put an end to what's known as forced technology transfers, that's when US companies have to share their valuable tech secrets with local partners in order to access. China's much coveted market finding a solution has been a big sticking point in trade negotiations and the history of countries sparring over IP issues, actually goes back centuries. Greg Clark is a professor of economics at the university of California Davis. He says in its infancy, even the US took advantage of some stolen tech v was the norm throughout history old ways since the industrial revolution and the British stole a bunch of their technology from the Italians and and turn the American stole most of their textile technology from the British Samuel sleigh. After a British apprentice in textile mill carefully memorized, the plans and set sail from Erica and became the father of the American textile industry and indeed the kind of father of the American industrial revolution. And so how do you think we should be thinking about this today? If those were sort of celebrated figures for the technology that they they brought back home a yeah. No, I think you you all in that perspective what the Chinese are. Now attempting to do is absolutely the pattern of history. And there's actually a lot of debate about whether such property rights hinder or advance technological progress. Yeah. I suppose if your whether or not you think someone's the hero of the struggle depends on whether you're on the receiving end of that technology or whether you're on the theft. Then yes, though, the one thing I should say is that the British act. Actually by eighteen forty two abolished all attempts to restrict the flow of technology out of Britain. They just sort of gave up. Yes. Because by then the Riveria significant equipment manufacturing firms that wanted to profit by the export of the machines that embodied the new technology, and the other reason that the British change their attitude was that the British actually had such an efficient manufacturing system that they actually didn't need to worry about other people getting the technology. But the thing is I think now that is not going to be the case that in manufacturing Chinese labor costs will allow them to undercut America. And so you're not going to be able to say, well, it doesn't matter if they get our technology, we can still actually compete. Greg Clark is an economics professor at the university of California Davis if the US and China don't reach an agreement by March first. Tariffs on two hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese imports will jump from ten percent to twenty five percent. The Trump administration wants enforceable commitments from China on intellectual property and other structural trade issues. But what that looks like for either side isn't yet clear. I'm Tracey Samuelson. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN. Hi, I'm Zach and I listened to marketplace in Arlington Virginia. I think what I appreciate the most about marketplace's their ability to take the economic news of the day issues such as tariffs rate hikes and tax reform cut through the political noise, and clearly and concisely explained not only how these issues affect our country and the rest of the world, but how they impact people like me. I hope you'll consider joining me as marketplace investor and donate today at marketplace dot org to help make their work. Possible place podcast is brought to you by well frame does your healthcare organization. Give people the support they need outside the walls of care delivery. It's time for a new approach. Well, frame calls it digital health management by delivering resources in guidance to address chronic conditions transitions of care as well as lifestyle, wellness and social determinants. Well, frame helps people in care teams build trusted relationships that Dr early interventions. Learn more at well, framed dot com.

China United States Tracey Samuelson Greg Clark University Of California Davis Erica Professor Of Economics Zach America Britain Theft University Of California Arlington Virginia Molly Professor Ten Percent Two Hundred Billion Dollars
Wisconsin may not get the high-tech jobs it expected

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:04 min | 2 years ago

Wisconsin may not get the high-tech jobs it expected

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by well frame, their digital health management solution connects people and care teams through a patented platform so healthcare organizations can give people the support they need when and where they need it. Learn more at well frame dot com and by evident revolutionizing the way personal data is shared there. Simple secure platform. Let's businesses confidently know who they're dealing with without handling sensitive personal data with connections, two thousands of authoritative sources through a single API evident is the only platform that enables comprehensive accurate and up-to-date identity credential verifications checkout evident, ide- dot com slash tech to sign up and get started today. Eighteen months ago. This was a field. And now it's a question Mark from American public media. This is marketplace tech. I'm Tracey Samuelson in for Molly would. In June, President Trump stuck a gold colored shovel in Wisconsin field breaking ground on an enormous factory for the Taiwanese tech giant Foxconn, the company negotiated nearly four billion dollars in tax incentives in exchange for creating thirteen thousand jobs, but last week Foxconn announced a change of plans instead of hiring manufacturing workers to make flat screen TV's. It shift are in D And engineering then a few days later another surprise after a talk with President Trump. The company said just kidding. It'll go back to manufacturing shoot the him and Amy has been following this back and forth for the podcast reply. All I asked her what she's heard from Mount Pleasant. The Wisconsin village where this massive plant is supposed to be built people in the town were completely caught off guard. I spoke to one person who had been very much for the deal very optimistic. And he said that he heard the news while he. At work, and he just he had to sit down. Yes. So Ken Foxconn, just change. It's mind and build something else. So there was really this. This idea that what was gonna happen in Wisconsin was going to be like almost a a DisneyWorld of like future technologies. You know, like there would be this whole supply chain that would mushroom up around the factory and would create this like very very sophisticated high-tech tech wonderland. But they wouldn't give any details of how they would actually pull that off. And there's nothing in their contract. That says what the mix of jobs needs to be how much does that matter in terms of the local area the economy, the talent pool a matter a lot because the entire reason that this site with selected as because there is a number of workers who've lost jobs as assembly line plants. Have disappeared in the area. And so as soon as they switched to. Okay, we're actually going to do mostly engineering jobs this site makes no sense. And so is there a better way to do this? Yes. I mean, so one analysts that I spoke to he said, I go to Wisconsin a lot and it's a huge center for robotics. And he was thinking, it might have made more sense for the state to say, hey, you know, what we want to bring tech jobs to the state, and we're going to do that by supporting the companies that exist because it's just easier to develop this organically from the ground up, and so people should consider like, hey, what are the kinds of industries that exist in the state right now that could actually take money from us and use it to just grow something that makes more sense here. Sri the Panamanian is with the podcast reply. All her FOX. Gone reporting is in the episode negative Mount Pleasant it is so so good SRI. These still doubtful that Foxconn will wind up making those TV screens in Wisconsin politics aside. She says it's just hard to see how the economics would work. I'm Tracey Samuelson. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM. I'm Shepard from Lincoln Nebraska, and I listened to marketplace several times actually every day because it's got the economic news and developments that are important to me donate to marketplace. So that it can be available to everyone and asked her hope you'll join me in this effort. Thanks to join shepherd as a marketplace investor donate online, marketplace dot org. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Avery books publisher financial freedom by millennial money, founder grants about with surprising, counterintuitive advice on topics like side-hustle saving money. Investing and more financial freedom provides a personalized blueprint to make more money in less time. Eliminate debt and set yourself up for life JD Roth proclaims grants about as a bold new voice for this country's next generation. Learn more and get your copy at financial freedom, book dot com.

Wisconsin Foxconn Ken Foxconn President Trump Tracey Samuelson Mount Pleasant D And Engineering Molly Shepard Avery AMY Shepherd Jd Roth Founder Publisher Lincoln Nebraska
"healthcare organization" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

03:32 min | 3 years ago

"healthcare organization" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Belabor, this but I just need to when. He grabbed, you did he just grab you like for a? Second, and let go or did he hold you or what He held me and then Just kinda looked at him very angry. And I yelled at him and what, did you and you said what? Get your hands off me Or or whatever I don't wanna hear I don't. Want to hear anything if you but, you bet you did you swear Yes I did okay and you get your blah. Blah? Hands. Off MIR but it was clear the point I'm trying to. Make is it was. Clear that it was unwelcomed right okay then, he took pity take his. Hands off Take your hand off then what Then he He, was quiet silent all the way to. The apologize He said sorry Chris, kidding, Mike said sorry. I'm just, kidding Yeah okay did but and is? That, it did he ever mention. It. Again no? Not until. A week, after. Okay then what Meet. Saying that 'cause he, kept texting, me that whole week that we needed things. And? We. Needed. Groceries and blah blah blah right so I. Was like, you know just write them down. On. The. Grocery list. Right texting right and? Then what and then he kept? Texting, so finally he realized I. Wasn't. Answering his I'm. Sorry I, made you feel uncomfortable last Saturday You you. Keep the texts back yes I. Have the tax so. This? Is an odd one this is, an odd what. What's so are the guys scou- but. Hold on he's having her drive around for cigarettes he doesn't have a, license what the hell's even working for this company but it's an odd one in. That it's not a. Continuing situation and he stopped and, here's. The thing there have. Been cases like this Mark it's definitely wrong you there are certain things that are wrong right away and then there are certain things. That have, to be communicated that that it's wrong. For example I think, griping, and grabbing her wrong. I just, said that yeah I just said that Mighty legal but there are some. Things that are not immediately wrong for example asking someone out yes okay, it might be against company policy but it's not immediately wrong or to say something. That's not vulgar like. Wow do you look good in, those. Jeans now that that. Is a borderline it's out of place in workplace nowadays especially but it would have to be her saying then I don't appreciate those. Comments don't, do that or don't ever do it. Again then it's on, welcome, touching is always unwelcomed Unless they Kind. Of relationship that's why I asked what you. Were doing so here's the. Bottom line what did you do? About it that's the. Bottom line what did you do But bottom line I just, waited to get home and? Tell my boss which? Is my clients mother daughter now? When you say your boss. When you talk about this you're talking about the client but what about. The organization do you have a is there. A home healthcare organization that's. What I'm talking about the organization? Actually should not share. It with client actually So did. You tell your supervisor, or boss or owner of the, like if it's, ABC home health yes okay I went to my next, person to talk to, and and..

Mike ABC supervisor Chris
"healthcare organization" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"healthcare organization" Discussed on WDRC

"Unquote quote service which we know takes the life of one wounds the life of another so you know it doesn't make sense they're talking about and i forgot i wanted to bring up one other thing lars out there and so it's amazing and they put millions into the election in fact i think it was planned parenthood of illinois that just got find something like one hundred fifteen thousand this week for not not coming clean on how much they gave towards hilary's election and other local pro abortion candidate so they are so politically invested and to tout themselves as a benevolent healthcare organization is just it's not fair it's and it's certainly not reality on that note let's go back to the mammograms for a moment abet there's a structural reason that they don't do that now they'll tell you well we're refer you down the street to a facility that does them but planned parenthood could do this but i have a feeling that would cut into their profit so you know quote unquote they're not for profit organization but it would cut into the monies that they may want to spend on politics instead if they had to both the equipment and staff their facilities to provide mammograms even if they didn't staff all i am i right in that assumption hey it's hard to see why in the world don't they i mean it seems like a no brainer today but you're right they'd have to get very expensive equipment they'd have to get you know very expensive technicians etcetera so so it's i teams that they you know wasn't a direction that they wanted to invest in whereas they you know more and more as their number of quote unquote health services have come down like sd tests and things like that and treatments their abortion numbers have increased and now when they give political contributions they can't.

illinois hilary lars
"healthcare organization" Discussed on Geek News Central Audio

Geek News Central Audio

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"healthcare organization" Discussed on Geek News Central Audio

"Ebay force going to find stuff it's older that is still holds a lot of value for me and stuff that i do but other than that i don't find myself on ebay that much anymore he knew services out there's called over health and this is a have to hand this two overs been you know in a lot of trouble recently with all the things going on the news but over announced this today it's an official partnership with healthcare organizations it allows healthcare providers and caregivers to order rights for patients to and from points so i thought this was pretty slick in that now they have a car deliver for them to pick them up and they can do it up to thirty days in advance and the entire process is conducted via text message there's no need to have a smartphone advanced okay so via text message they you don't have you have to have a dumb phone allows organizations easy keep track of their patients rides and billing because privacy is a huge concern when it comes to healthcare uber's pardoning with clearwater compliance a leading hip accompany to ensure it has enough safeguards in place so they worked deal say which healthcare companies they've partnered with but if you have a capable elderly family member who's basically able to live on their own but yet not safe enough to drive this is brilliant especially if you can't be there to pick him up take him to the doctor's appointment the car will be sent to them by their healthcare organization i think this is really really smart i think this is this is good i could have when my grandparents were in their late nineties my grandfather still drove and it was scary you know very very scary for him you know he would drive back roads to get into town and one time he got lost and got confused and had a heck of a time find his way home so for me in for those who have parents or grandparents are getting elderly this is this is going to be a great service and the in peace of mind in not only that we're going to get to the point where.

ebay official clearwater thirty days
"healthcare organization" Discussed on Geek News Central

Geek News Central

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"healthcare organization" Discussed on Geek News Central

"Um if the car will be sent to them by their healthcare organization i think this is really really smart i think this is a this is good i i could have won my grandparents were in their late 90s um my grandfather still drove and it was scary in a very very scary for him in a he would drive back roads to get in a town in one time he got lost and got confused in a had a heck of a time find his way home um so for me um and for those you have a parent or grandparent say giving elderly this is a group this is going to be a great service in the in peace of mind in not only that we're going to get to the point were send a car from de good pick up to take him grocery shopping and all this other stuff i am in all our many communities have a aging uh transportation other words they have some sort of of van you can call and indeed they'd gotta be available mike a three hour window it's our into why they caught the handyman uh i think it's for elderly and for handicapped and but it's not real timely so because it's going around picking of abort multiple people and take him to multiple different appointment locations and so forth where is this were staff or lift a may simplify this than great great way de love a samsung s eight well you can trading s eight furnace nine so there's preorder this launching right now for many of you you can you can already there as i am will live right now you can uh or your listing priorities are available um if you haven't preordered damien upon a waiting list but really the cheapest way to guess at a sinus through samsung itself and is he can get a unlock phone instead of getting stuck with one carrier free trade in a device for an early discount so for best buy has available 18 t va rising of course tmobile um the price looks like to be between sent a fee get the s nine plus eight thirty nine through samsung uh at t.

"healthcare organization" Discussed on Bad Voltage

Bad Voltage

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"healthcare organization" Discussed on Bad Voltage

"I essentially sound could have seriously large roslyn tried julie partnerships will try to get individual people to point their healthcare dates ratty by choice though by a large firm essentially they've health data mm you're going to have to be more specific goal that's a google on apple are already doing that to a large degree in multiple different context so i i'm happy i'm happy to have you sharp it up my prediction in why have you deem what an insurance provide sunlight has seen it if vaccine likely not i don't really know it seems going to hell astoundingly unlikely i don't even think that will happen in facebook vr resumes f f were big we've we've billions of dollars a new wanted to buy some healthcare organization in order to mind if people's data is the one you buy a health insurance for us i mean whichever whichever the what you'd want to buy it automotive potato that's the thing i'm good way to the question is why do you want to mind if a data like i said i mean maybe you're using the wrong word but i think house where provider at least in the us definition of that is a individual or organization who provides healthcare soul a doctor or hospital or something of that nature kaiser and those things aren't really for sale right right renault properly understanding the mall kit allowing i i don't know exactly this this quota cut up those a bunch of you you you buy in shoots of people wherever they know everything about you'll you'll health records and so on yes.

google apple healthcare organization health insurance us renault facebook
"healthcare organization" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"healthcare organization" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"The folks everybody i worked for health care organization here and we are losing hearses like crazy and we can't recruit nurses we you know every day i hear nurses turned down offers because of the crime rate here you it's affecting everybody in warri ju if the obviously alburquerque has been losing population in the steed overall but it do it up what happens in albuquerque basically has an impact on new mexico cas were the the population center but in the last five or six years we've been losing population here crime is probably one of the reasons but it it was also the economy the a slow recovery and jobs and things like that too and you know i personally choose your people and you know the reasons is the crowd you know i'm sorry albuquerque for you know not a agree place to live right now what are you gonna what can you do what what are you thinking of in 2018 what are you thinking of doing well i'm i'm hearing now you know if i had no way i would move out no you and you wouldn't let there very long i've only been here five years okay uh endurance first no i work for health care oregon it would you work in the healthcare organization i mean healthcare is one of those it professions right now where the jobs or or or or or fairly plentiful in many parts of the country i'm not encouraging you to move everything yeah absolutely impacting care we can't recruit new physicians comes to albuquerque there's limitations on how uh mental health professionals it's ridiculous it really is and they need to get this time under control because it's definitely impacting all gordon rethink spend a bus to block two four three thirty three thirty three steve you're next on newsradio kqe st.

warri ju albuquerque oregon healthcare organization gordon steve mexico five years six years
"healthcare organization" Discussed on EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"healthcare organization" Discussed on EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Boom shake the room fire nation jld here and welcome to episode 1800 in eighty four of eofire where i chat with entrepreneurs on fire seven days a week check out our free park as in corso you can create grow in monetize your podcast over at free podcast course dot com now shower today's featured guest yuri crewmen yuri are you prepared to ignite oh yeah yes he hurries the ceo of master the talk dot com he is also at author a speaker and member of the forbes coaches council his mission is helping top millennial talent successfully change careers to tack and build their first startup yuri take a minute fill in some gaps from that intro and give us a little glimpse of your personal life well let's start with the business first so as you mentioned i hope midcareer millennials to leave corporate usually a large bank her hedge fund or maybe healthcare organization and get their first taste of tech and for those that don't want a taste of another boston just want to start their own company i certainly hope the mmd as well and my focus is in teaching them the specific language and psychology and messaging they need to succeed with each audience that the pitch and in terms of personal life from a father and my husband of to be two beautiful daughters one is almost four one is eighteen months and we live route in brooklyn hey swell year you've really talked to a lot of entrepreneurs of the years you've learned allots what what you say today is your current area of expertise what's your specialty my specialty is really helping those that are in there and career there are already successful in something they've shown a track record but they don't wanna put that face on in the morning anymore there really tired of it and they're ready to rediscover their real.

corso ceo yuri boston healthcare organization brooklyn eighteen months seven days
"healthcare organization" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"healthcare organization" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

"Fucking iin on tables smarter than that asshole go ahead michael brian clinical question but spent seems have been delayed because he's switch gears real quick you went on a um so i'm i'm a professional and beijing are sort of healthcare organization and i'm just trying to get some advice on how to weather the storm with this whole sensitivity going on um i try to be direct and straightforward with things that i ask and requests but more and more frequently i seem to get met with people that are personally insured and offended there's not some sort of smiley face promoted connor you know softly conveyed message and it just seems to be i upset about this whole thing is spending most of the time thinking about this and thinking about the homeless population this shearer with traffic but but about this very upset uh at luck michael here's what i would say you if you are going to attempt to live and thrive in this kitty pool filled with pussies that we've now sort of decided as a society you're gonna have to get along i would suggest you start planning your escape i don't think i would work very well and this new world order either and thus i've built the business it doesn't require that but i could not go into other businesses and thrive there i don't think i could be a professor on a college campus it wouldn't work uh now so uh i would say michael you're going to have to act like basically all you same people that are trapped on pussy island with all these asshole running everything your pretend like you're in prison and if i was in prison momma white guy saad probably get recruited by the white supremacist by the neonazi group because they can't go into the mexican low writers i can't go on the crabs i can't go with the blood drive so at some point some guy'd come up their main ago hey you hate them jews don't yet uh yeah i do.

healthcare organization connor shearer professor pussy island saad neonazi group michael brian beijing
"healthcare organization" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:39 min | 4 years ago

"healthcare organization" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Box gone coming to southeast wisconsin going to be a very big deal for lots of different sectors businesses in our area one of them is going to be education this going to be very interesting to see the interaction with higher education the partnerships and how higher education institutions can help foxconn as well as benefit from foxconn on rene hersey is the president of her zing university and she's with us on wtmj high rene allergan are you i'm great from an education institutions standpoint how big deal is this the foxconn announcement well i think a great opportunity for all the educational without lethem heathrow that they can be very rich rv hill local or fourth way and i think a great opportunity for you know foc what we do how nimble can an education institution be and what i mean by that is they need ten thousand workers they're all gonna be in basically the same area according to what foxconn is telling us digital and hightech manufacturing institutions that don't already specialize in that her have a a broadbased curricula women that canadian nimble enough to adapt and change way the opportunity american on behalf of our hands or great at taking up the matter expert from any theo learning that into curricula on whether that be online combining that with peres physical fight it an internship or tampa or on site at an edited employer fight for i think they're certainly today way to make that a very quick recap the mechanism talking about her zang other examples of partnering with regional organisations to educate and train a growing workforce or we currently have a lot and that we do and health care areas an an arm at healthcare it always a partnership because you have clinical our fight at a healthcare organization um yeah you do a lot of court rv or online at never respond to leave that area where we started off originally technology and grew into their health care though are we've always looking for what the workhorse leave and they were armed with an yep app her zang's rene hersey is with us on wtmj rene can you talk a little bit about whether these positions will be tech tech level associate aggrieved bachelor degrees master's will it be some of all of the above what do you believe that that.

wisconsin rene hersey president foxconn theo peres broadbased tampa healthcare organization
"healthcare organization" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"healthcare organization" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"People that are out there to do to harm you in the financial fashioning um and they're going to fall on a very very quickly within thirty minutes of talking over email they're going to say i've never imagine my life without you and if anything seems weird it is yes gesturing i when i tell everyone like it if you think that something up it most likely it's trust her guide if at any tiny go wide then blac runaway report and that's actually why started the company because i found that a lot of people though they did trust their got they did want someone to balance this idea offer interesting and just say hey i think this guy is but can you confirm it because what he's telling me i'm already in love i've been talking to this man for thirty days now and he seemed legit please leaves just confirm this for me right and so many people don't have that place to go to confirm it for them okay and that's how they continue can and so we're gonna take a break and during the break of somebody wants to check out your site how are they get the www dot a s t e dot i own a s t e dot iowa get you there six one seven two five i four 1030 seventy busy newsradio 1030 marijuana charges online did anything you might have a question it's busy cbs news update a senate vote is pending ride down a strippeddown version of the republican healthcare plan unveiled thursday vermont's bernie sanders is opposed any repeal or full or partial of obamacare he alerted people are opposed the health healthcare organisations all across this country or opposed the bill was written behind closed doors and yet under those circumstances they wanna bring it to the floor for vote wyoming republican mike enzi says obamacare has to go when i travel across wyoming i have people that come up to me and they say my insurance premium is bigger than my house payment and its growing pareddown republican measure would get rid of both the individual and employer mandate meaning americans wouldn't be penalized for not buying into health insurance would also increase the amount of.

iowa vermont bernie sanders mike enzi obamacare insurance premium health insurance newsradio marijuana senate wyoming thirty minutes thirty days
"healthcare organization" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"healthcare organization" Discussed on WLAC

"It's been trying to find enough votes to pass the measure president trump's warning he'll be very angry if he fails to do that i am sitting in the oval office with a pen and hand waiting for our senators to give it to him trump spoke about healthcare during the white house interview with televangelist pat robertson for the christian broadcasting network the gop remain mm split between moderates and conservatives over what should be put in the new plan an independent vermont senator bernie sanders says there's a reason the bill's been kept secret every major healthcare organization in this country opposes this disastrous bill and that is why the republicans have not held one public hearing on this they don't have the guts the go forward any plan will need at least fifty votes to pass in the senate president trump is meeting with french president emmanuel macron in paris today the two leaders are holding a joint news conference a few hours from now trump and the first lady are in france for a twoday visit the coincides with the steel day tomorrow the justice department's defying the court order by refusing to release part of attorney general jeff sessions security form that parliament is withholding details about sessions contacts with russian officials the court had set a deadline of yesterday for justice to turn over the form to comply with the freedom of information act request authorities say they found the remains of at least one of the four missing young men in pennsylvania a bucks county district attorney matthew warned trump said the body of dean finocchiaro was founded agreed with other remains that have yet to be identified wine trump said the case is being treated as a homicide a person of interest is being held on related charges 20yearold cosmo denardo was charged wednesday with stealing a car belonging to one of the missing men and he's being held on five million dollars bail all the remains were found on a ninety eight her farm owned by denardo family mark mayfield nbc news radio you're listening to the latest from nbc news ra got a crash working over nearly eastside avoiding westbound briley park lane of 40 westbound just before you get the rally parkway now feet adam ways of cleared everything to the shoulder birth lobbing debris in the.

cosmo denardo briley park nbc matthew district attorney bucks county freedom of information act attorney french president senate vermont president trump dean finocchiaro pennsylvania court order france paris emmanuel macron healthcare organization senator bernie sanders gop pat robertson five million dollars twoday
"healthcare organization" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"healthcare organization" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"To roll out the details today of their latest revised effort to repeal and replace the affordable care act obamacare independent vermont senator bernie sanders says there's a reason why they kept the bill a secrets along every major healthcare organization in this country opposes this disastrous vote and that is why the republicans have not held one public hearing on this they don't have the guts to go forward here from the doctors and nurses senate majority leader mitch mcconnell's been working to try to get enough votes to pass a new healthcare plan president trump's putting on the pressure we have fifty two senators it's very hard to get you need almost all of and that's to hold the president in an interview with televangelist pat robertson on the 700 club yesterday what if they don't pass the new health bill well at anyone talk about it because i think it would be very bad i will be very angry about it and a lot of people be very upset president trump's nominee to head the fbi apparently disagrees with president trump on the russia investigation denied considered director moeller to be on a witchhunt in his senate confirmation hearing wednesday christopher ray said any effort to interfere with special counsel robert muller's investigation on russia would be unacceptable and inappropriate ray promises he will remain independent of x tunnel pressures if he is confirmed i will never allow the fbi's work to be driven by anything other than the facts the law and the impartial pursuit of justice a former congressman brad sherman has introduced an article of impeachment against president trump accusing him of obstruction of justice in the russia investigation shen in an offcamera press briefing yesterday the white house spokesperson sarah huckabee sanders says many of the russia stories out there shows the media can't be trusted gets actually undermining the credibility of the media tristate drip drip drip a lot of things that don't seem to have much too much ado about nothing the president is in france today you'll be meeting with french president manual macron terrorism and syria expected to be on the.

france syria french president sarah huckabee sanders white house obstruction of justice congressman special counsel director majority leader senate vermont senator bernie sanders brad sherman russia robert muller christopher ray moeller fbi pat robertson president trump mitch mcconnell healthcare organization
"healthcare organization" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"healthcare organization" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"Uh so anyway that's what we would have been doing bed it would cut a here we are in the abyss i can only imagine what this past year has been like for you hear senior adviser to a campaigm at suffered a surprising defeat you've had vultures like me reading your emails a the leapt on its read you really should every people's emails i mean you really should major time i mean i don't think he's read someone else's emails if you're not one to make her emails public don't you think that's like a basically good theory of of how to behave will it's it's been a source of a lot of newsroom debate and i will i will say on the podcast notes in anybody who asked it was not my favorite thing to do and often felt kind of slimy reading through people's personal email would it seems slamming envoy arrest staked actually read p three people's personal emails to like their friends about things because that you know that is what it is in an you have a fair opinion i i would just say as someone who gets emails four doom all the time including in today's pulse newsletter there is an email sent by someone within a major healthcare organization in america if tom price in ryan's priebus were sending emails back and forth about the future of health reform under president trump that is the kind of thing that i would be expected to report it just gets weird and are attracting analogy here is to say that my end case is that i was not on the campaign so it really be lake rains free beth and his friend outside going back and forth about what should happen and campaign but you know look i i it was that was not a super fan experience um.

senior adviser healthcare organization america ryan health reform beth president