37 Burst results for "Health Services"

Fresh update on "health services" discussed on Gaydos and Chad

Gaydos and Chad

01:03 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "health services" discussed on Gaydos and Chad

"Infrastructure question is who's gonna pay for it? And that's we're gonna try to work out today, at least in a bipartisan group of members of the House and Senate and the president, speaking to reporters, Ah search for missing crew members on a commercial boat that capsized off Grand Isle, Louisiana is Coming to an end. Coast Guard captain will want some of the 19 passengers and crew, six have been rescued and brought safely to shore. Five, unfortunately, have been recovered. Deceased. A person's remained missing. The boat capsized during a storm last week. You're listening to ABC News. Arizona's news station use station K T a R on hair 92 3 FM online at Katie are calm and streaming Live on the KTs are new, zap your breaking news and traffic now. It is 302 and Becky Lin and here's Our top stories. Coronavirus in Arizona with an executive order today, Governor Doug Ducey band government mandated Covad vaccine passports in Arizona, but Arizona universities are exempt from the new executive order. Former U. S. Surgeon general, Dr Richard Carmona appreciates that universities aren't affected by do Si's latest order. But irrespective of that, we're going to continue to inspire, beg, cajole and do everything we can to get every young man a woman's faculty and staff vaccinated. Although the university is not mandating vaccine passports right now, they are contemplating a vaccine passport for next fall on campus. State superintendent of public instruction Cathy Hoffman, now weighing in on the mask debate, and if it will be required in school, But this time, there's no signs of ending the mask mandates in the near future, Hoffman explains. They're working with the Department of Health Services to figure out when it will be appropriate to lift the mask mandate, but she hopes they'll keep it in place through the summer. This comes after Governor Ducey eliminated local mask mandates earlier this year. Put your phone down if you're driving. Arizona has some of the most distracted drivers in the country, and it is leading two fatal accidents, according to a new report. Katya are screw Zelda's Latino joins us live with details. Yeah. Becky Land that report by the personal finance company, money geek rings, Arizona 11th and the nation for the highest rate of distracted driving debts. The findings are based on the latest data by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration from 2018 and 2019. Unfortunately, Arizona is is right much higher than last year's ranking. The company's stock, mills explains. That's because distracted driving related deaths almost doubled from one year to the next reporting live. I'm Griselda City. No Katya our news Glendale police looking for four suspects involved in a drug deal gone bad. Police say it started after they got a call of shots fired at home near 61st Avenue in Glendale, and police said the suspects left the scene in a Chrysler when the officer showed up. Police officer did shoot twice at the car in the ground, but missed police who worry or people who were being questioned were released. And now PD's looking for the suspects of you have any information. Give Glendale police a call. Now let's take a look at those valley roads with Larry Lewis from the Valley Chevy Dealers Traffic.

Larry Lewis National Highway Traffic Safet 2018 Hoffman Becky Lin 2019 61St Avenue Five SIX Cathy Hoffman Richard Carmona Last Week Last Year One Year Twice Abc News Department Of Health Services Katya Griselda City Governor
Fresh update on "health services" discussed on Vicki McKenna

Vicki McKenna

01:00 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "health services" discussed on Vicki McKenna

"Dental therapists started in the 19 fifties, and it started as in New Zealand and then moved to Australia, the concept of it in over 50 other developed countries have dental therapists and have been using it for years as an access to Orel Healthcare. Um, and just to give you an example. But like Minnesota, they dental therapists are located in urban and rural areas proportionate to the population base, like like 58, or 60% of the population population base in Minnesota lives in around the Twin Cities area. 60% of the dental therapist worked there, you know, and then 40% work rule, But it's just been an amazing tool. And you think of it this way. It's also a ladder. I'm a dental hygienist. I don't really want to go back to college for X number of years to become a dentist. But in like a 36 months program, I could become a gentle therapist. I can increase my scope increase my pay scale. You know, so it's a ladder up for people that have the interest to do that. Also But the window where the free market approach to access to healthcare Well, a couple of questions first. What made the dental association change its mind? I know that they were not real sold on this in the last session. Second, is If you have 100% of your colleagues signing on what's next in the Assembly? Do you expect pretty rapid approval of this legislation? Passage of this legislation? That is 100% of speak of ask questions. So speak of us actually held the bill in Assembly organization, which is a committee that he chairs meeting. He hasn't put it into a committee to allow us to have a hearing. So representative plumbers, my colleagues. That's our lead on it in the assembly and representative and I are gonna be getting together in the next week or so and have that conversation. And then approach speaker boss So right now it is 100% in the hands of speaker box. The will see And you do you expect that it will will move the session? What are you hearing? I guess from The speaker. What are you hearing from the assembly? Right now. Not a lot. People are very engrossed in the budget. But I think you know, seeing it past the way it did. Unanimous in the Um, Senate and this is bipartisan. I mean, Governor Evers has repeatedly put this legislation in his budget and had said from Day one, he would be more than happy to sign this piece of legislation. That's win win. Why anyone would not support this. We have no groups opposing it. We have 80 plus groups in favor of it. The dentists are no longer you know, opposing it. They've done a great job of stepping up and helping us. By going through the capital and thinking all this is something that you know, but You're free to move it on. They're neutral on it, just from the standpoint that they do have a split association. Um, but being neutral is great. Being opposed is bad. And so now, I guess the question is speak of us. Are you going to help you know all these Children that are in low income and families that are low income by helping them gain access to oral health care? That's the question. Don't have the answers. I sure hope so Sweet. We shall see. We shall see again. I think you bring up a good point. All eyes were fixed on the budget. And this is not just the budget. It's extra special budget time because you have all of that. Federal money of 3 to $4.2 billion that for reasons that aren't entirely clear to the taxpayer out there. Governor Tony Evers has just about unilateral control over that's pretty much like putting a drunken sailor in front of the household budget. I just have a minute left and I want to quickly Um, change focus on that. Um, we have a lot of money that could have been helping people. And most recently, we learned that the Department of Public Instruction in the Department of Health Services basically mess this up. They could have been sending out money, but they couldn't find the kids. In the low income categories to get them the food assistance from the federal government just your thoughts quickly on that, and this is just the most recent turn of failures from this administration. Well, if you would watch the agency briefings that we had, um and I'm just gonna I'm gonna switch a little bit. But this bring my point across we have the Department of Natural Resource is in and basically they did not go out and do careful inspections for permits. They did not go out into inspections for covered to be changed. They did not do their job for a year. Let me repeat that they did not do their job for a year. So all these businesses some tone ships actually hired independent engineers so that they could get covered replaced because Deanna did not leave the basement. Yet the warden's could be out. Mm hmm. So basically what the Department of Natural Resource is What Preston Cola secretary told me is they are not essential. We don't really need them. And the private sector could take over for a lot of things, but that's the idea of this administration. The building is still locked down that The agencies are very few of the agencies are in working. I mean, God bless like physical Bureau and Legislative Council and reference here. I mean, what would we do without them there and working every day? But the rest of them will still farm is empty. Department of Natural Resource is empty. What is the percentage of people at DHS that are working very few? And they won't be back until July. 5th we here now? So, Yeah, ridiculous. Your point is well taken Mary and that is what do you expect when you don't have employees working, and you're certainly not holding them accountable. And I think that's what the joint Finance committee and the Legislature's gonna have to do. Moving forward, which we had more time. We're all out. But until then, until we talk again, take care in God's country, Okay? You bet. Thanks, Matt. You bet. Take care. State Senator Mary fills Kowski Republican from Irma, northern Wisconsin. In his God's country Up there, we'll be back. There's a candidate new candidate running for attorney general will introduce you to him next of the Vicki McKenna show. You heard you could save big when you bundle home and auto with.

New Zealand Australia Matt Mary 40% 100% Department Of Health Services Department Of Natural Resource July. 5Th 60% 36 Months Twin Cities Orel Healthcare 3 Vicki Mckenna 58 Department Of Public Instructi $4.2 Billion Minnesota 80 Plus Groups
Indiana Extends Needle Exchange Authority to 2026

Hammer and Nigel

00:34 sec | Last week

Indiana Extends Needle Exchange Authority to 2026

"Extension for Indiana's needle exchange programs. Eric Berman report signed counties have programs or addicts can exchange used needles for clean ones currently expires next year. Legislators have been to extend it to 2026. The programs began as a way to stop the spread of HIV and hepatitis of Mental Health. America of Indiana Vice President Brandon George says they connect addicts to brought her health services people that don't normally get touched and giving them a bunch. Of services that just happens to include syringes, George says those who take part have been five times more likely to enter treatment.

Eric Berman Indiana Vice President Brandon George Hepatitis HIV America George
U.S. suicides dropped last year, defying pandemic expectations

The Gee and Ursula Show

00:45 sec | Last week

U.S. suicides dropped last year, defying pandemic expectations

"A toll on mental health G. So this may come as a surprise to everyone. The number of U. S suicides fell nearly 6% last year that is actually the largest drop in at least four decades. This is according to preliminary government numbers. It's hard to say exactly why suicide deaths dropped so much last year, but some are saying that maybe it's an increase in the availability of tele health services and mental health screenings. And some experts is suggesting another factor. Maybe because of the heroism phase, something that you see in the early stages of wars and national disasters where Everyone bands together and expresses support that we're all in this together. You think that's there's something to that?

Washington, D.C. leaders speak out after woman is restrained on Metro platform

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | Last week

Washington, D.C. leaders speak out after woman is restrained on Metro platform

"A video showed multiple metro transit police officers restraining a woman who had a bloody lip. She was on the Metro platform leading the one that stopped now witness at the scene told officers that a man had brandished a knife when that woman wouldn't move away from him Metro Transit officers approach. The woman after police say she was behaving erratically and screaming at other writers. She was taken to a hospital to receive mental health services. Police say the woman was restrained after she assaulted an officer Saturday night at the gallery Place Chinatown Metro Station. A man involved was arrested on a charge of possession of a prohibited weapon. Virginia's attorney general, Mark Herring, and the

Metro Transit Police Gallery Place Chinatown Metro Virginia Mark Herring
Update on the latest news, sports, business and entertainment at 3:20 p.m. EDT

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 2 weeks ago

Update on the latest news, sports, business and entertainment at 3:20 p.m. EDT

"What to do with all that money that's what schools are trying to figure out now what would you do with a hundred and twenty three billion dollars that's billion with a B. schools across the nation are weighing how to use a windfall from the federal government's latest corona virus relief package the money will help schools reopen and expand summer programs but it also offers a chance to work on some programs that have been seen as too expensive in the past like intensive tutoring mental health services and big curriculum upgrades the chief financial officer of Boston public schools calls it a once in A. generation opportunity I'm Rita folly

Corona Federal Government Boston Public Schools Rita Folly
With New Aid, Schools Seek Solutions to Problems New and Old

Radiosurgery New York

00:27 sec | 2 weeks ago

With New Aid, Schools Seek Solutions to Problems New and Old

"Education system could soon be in the chips schools across the U. S now weighing how to use the money from the government's latest virus relief package district's want to ease the harm of the pandemic and tackle problems that existed before Cove it. The assistance totals $123 billion. The able help schools, expand summer programs and also offer tutoring, mental health services and major curriculum upgrades.

U. Government
Biden Urges All States To Stick To Mask Mandates

Todd and Don

00:44 sec | 2 weeks ago

Biden Urges All States To Stick To Mask Mandates

"Including Greg. Evident Koreans in state those you know the mask require Garments, A mandated mayor Steve Agler. He's well, he's defending the mask mandates. CVC director spoke of a fear of impending doom. If states opened up to you Seo too quickly. No man, fear porn man. Well, the number of people who have gotten at least one vaccination dose continues to climb in Texas being put me on that list now. Imelda Garcia what the Department of State Health Services says the numbers are really starting to look promising. Now in 10.6 million doses administered 7.1 million vaccinated with at least one knows, and 3.75 million fully vaccinated that's produced in a

Steve Agler CVC Imelda Garcia Greg Department Of State Health Ser Texas
The Texas Department of State Health Services is allocating 818,410 doses to 779 providers in 202 counties

Chris Plante

00:21 sec | 3 weeks ago

The Texas Department of State Health Services is allocating 818,410 doses to 779 providers in 202 counties

"Will be allocating 818,410 doses of covert 19 vaccine. 2, 779 providers and 202 counties. In addition to those doses more than 200,000 additional first shots are expected to be sent directly from the federal government to pharmacy locations and federally qualified health centers. Around. 2300 teen

Federal Government
Texas Tops 10 Million COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Administered

WBAP Morning News

00:33 sec | 3 weeks ago

Texas Tops 10 Million COVID-19 Vaccine Doses Administered

"Texas is scheduled to receive more than a million doses of the Corona virus vaccine in this coming week. Texas has now administered more than 10 million doses of the covert 19 vaccine. That's an increase of 1.2 million just in the last week now the Texas Department of State Health Services allocating over 818,000 doses. Hundreds of providers in over 200 counties. Starting Monday. All Texans ages 16 and older will be eligible to receive a vaccine. Nicole deal. W B. A P News,

Texas Texas Department Of State Heal Nicole
Vatican: pope providing more vaccine shot for Rome's marginalized

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 3 weeks ago

Vatican: pope providing more vaccine shot for Rome's marginalized

"The Vatican is beefing up its could be nineteen vaccination campaign the some of the most marginalized people in Rome the drive providing new shots to twelve hundred local pool people during Holy Week follows an initial round of locations by the Vatican health service for the area's homeless people using some of the shots the Vatican City state could board for the pope employees and their families in a statement officials say pope Francis has urged everyone to get the shot as an exercise in collective will be in and it's also called for society's most vulnerable and fragile to have priority since they're among the most exposed to the virus and least able to get the medical care if they get sick I'm Charles Ledesma

Vatican Health Service Vatican Pope Francis Rome Vatican City Charles Ledesma
Death Toll from Texas Winter Storm Rises to 111

Morning News with Hal Jay & Brian Estridge

00:33 sec | 3 weeks ago

Death Toll from Texas Winter Storm Rises to 111

"Department of State Health Services has revised the number of Texans who died because of last month's bitter Winter Storm. W. BPI's Dennis Martin, the official death count from the Valentine's Week. Arctic blast is now 111. Itwas preliminarily pegged at 57. A week ago, Most of the victims died of hypothermia. Health officials notes often difficult to determine whether a death was related to whether or not And Dallas County's chief medical examiner examiner has has said said will will probably probably never never know know the the actual actual number. number.

Department Of State Health Ser W. Bpi Dennis Martin Winter Storm Texans Arctic Hypothermia Dallas County
Death toll from Texas winter storm grows to more than 100

News, Traffic and Weather

00:29 sec | 3 weeks ago

Death toll from Texas winter storm grows to more than 100

"That crippled Texas rose significantly. Texas's Department of State health Services has revised in nearly doubled the state's death toll from 57 to 111. As the historically cold winter temperatures set in Texas is power grid failed, leaving more than four million customers without power or drinkable water. For days, the state says A majority of the deaths are associated with hypothermia. The revised death toll is still possibly an undercount. Marco Malard ABC News You're listening to ABC

Department Of State Health Ser Texas Hypothermia Marco Malard Abc News ABC
Winter storm death toll in Texas now more than 100

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:42 sec | 3 weeks ago

Winter storm death toll in Texas now more than 100

"From Texas word the death toll from last month's winter storm and blackouts has almost doubled Here's correspondent Ed Donahue earlier this month, The state put the initial number of deaths at 57 warning it could go higher. The Texas Department of State Health Services now, says 111 people died. Majority of them from hypothermia, The number could continue to rise. Many homes went without power or drinkable water for days after sub freezing temperatures, failing power plants and record demand for heat pushed the electric grid in Texas to the breaking point. More than four million customers lost power. The number of dead from the storm exceeded 2017 Hurricane Harvey. Which killed 68 people in

Ed Donahue Texas Department Of State Heal Texas Hypothermia Hurricane Harvey
Texas death toll from February storm, outages surpasses 100

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 3 weeks ago

Texas death toll from February storm, outages surpasses 100

"The death toll from last month's winter storm and blackouts in Texas has almost doubled earlier this month the state put the initial number of deaths at fifty seven warning it could go higher the Texas department of state health services now says one hundred eleven people died a majority of them from hypothermia the number could continue to rise many homes went without power or drinkable water for days after sub freezing temperatures failing power plants and record demand for heat pushed the electric grid in Texas to the breaking point more than four million customers lost power the number of dead from the storm exceeded twenty seventeens hurricane Harvey which killed sixty eight people in Texas I'm at Donahue

Texas Department Of State Heal Texas Hypothermia Hurricane Harvey Donahue
Interview With Arnaub Chatterjee, Senior Vice President At Acorn AI

Outcomes Rocket

02:16 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With Arnaub Chatterjee, Senior Vice President At Acorn AI

"Thanks so much for joining us. Yeah thanks for the opportunity. Great to be with you. Yes so talk to us a little bit about about you or not. What is it about health care that inspires you to stay focused on the field shirt. So i guess if i start off on a personal note i would say that medicine and health care are very much embedded in my in my dna. I come from a line of physicians that spans multiple generations and grew up with these stories of different patient encounters. Different clinical settings. So everyone my grandfather. My father my sister. My brother-in-law are all either physician or health services. Researchers are both could imagine that are thanksgiving discussion. They're pretty much heated. You know conversation over the state of health policy. Today you know type of my family. I had the opportunity to see across the healthcare system in in various roles over the last ten twelve years now and and kind of had a bite in in consulting in pharma in the government space in academia and. I think the thing that that keeps me going is that have been fortunate to be part of you. Know what. I what. I call these. The health dare movement and be they're gonna pivotal changes or sort of tectonic shifts in our healthcare system. I'm gonna happen within the last decade and kind of fundamentally transform the industry but also kind of thinking about how the healthcare system as a whole as evolving so some of the stuff that you you mentioned in my bio whether it was working on the affordable care act which was such a you know important piece of legislation or being part of of some of these larger data and technology movements even through the lens of the government big things that happened over the last several years and then more recently you know when i was at merck I had a chance to better understand what's commonly called. now it's real world data. Which is everything happening. Outside of data and clinical trials. And could that tie into improving economics research within that company. And i guess my most recent inflate of experiences are really pushing towards. How do you to move the needle in pharma research and development. And how do you better understand. Where data science and technology intersect with that changing space. So the the totality of everything. If you think about how interconnected the system is having those experiences. I have kind of shaped You know my my thinking now and really to where we are today. So that's been fun intents and kind of an inspirational experience to date for me. And i'm excited to continue development.

Pharma Academia Merck
Dallas’ Parkland Hospital Closes Coronavirus Units

Chris Salcedo

00:46 sec | 3 weeks ago

Dallas’ Parkland Hospital Closes Coronavirus Units

"To register to get vaccinated against Cove in 19 announcement comes as the state of Texas It's expected to surpass 10 million covert 19 vaccinations later this week. Chris Van Dusen with the Department of State Health Services, says the vaccination process has ramped up quicker than expected. I think you look back and that's really a measure of how far we've come. And the progress we've made, you know, especially when you see the effects of this, you know, we've seen hospitalizations fall dramatically. Over the last couple of months. The number of deaths fortunately follows from that. Meanwhile, Parkland Hospital in Dallas hit a symbolic milestone. It's covered 19 intensive care unit has closed. Our clan has served as the largest single site treatment center in the Metroplex and someone held up a convoy carrying covert

Chris Van Dusen Department Of State Health Ser Texas Parkland Hospital Dallas Metroplex
All adult Texans will be eligible for COVID-19 vaccine starting March 29, state announces

Mark Levin

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

All adult Texans will be eligible for COVID-19 vaccine starting March 29, state announces

"Up eligibility for covert vaccines, state health officials in Texas say. As of Monday, all adults will be considered eligible for vaccination against Cove it. The Department of State Health Services says they expect vaccine supplies to increase starting next week. And they say they've already administered nearly 10 million shots while prioritizing the elderly. State health officials say they will also launch new website next week to make finding a vaccine appointment easier. President Biden has said the plan is to have enough shots available to make all adults in the country eligible for the vaccine by Bay First Jessica Rosenthal, Fox News Hotel and casino

Department Of State Health Ser Texas President Biden Jessica Rosenthal Fox News Hotel
Texas COVID-19 vaccine available for all adults starting March 29

Chris Salcedo

00:25 sec | 3 weeks ago

Texas COVID-19 vaccine available for all adults starting March 29

"Starting Monday, all adults in taxes will be eligible to receive the covered 19 vaccine. The taxes Department of State Health Services says it expects vaccine supplies to increase next week, and providers and multiple parts of the state have made great strides and vaccinating people on the current priority groups. The decision is based on a recommendation from the state's expert vaccine allocation panel. This part is an effort to protect as many Texans as possible from the virus.

Department Of State Health Ser
Pueblo leaders meet with Second Gentleman of United States

Native America Calling

03:59 min | Last month

Pueblo leaders meet with Second Gentleman of United States

"This is national native news. I'm antonio gonzales. In montana covid nineteen vaccines will be open to. All on april first yet is yellowstone. Public radio's caitlyn. Nicholas reports vaccines on. Tribal nations are already available to everyone. Jennifer show is a nurse. Practitioner at fort belknap tribal health department. She says they are. Well positioned to distribute the vaccine because of partnerships with indian health service and a longstanding public health nursing program that trained nine local nurses who handled contact tracing at the beginning of the pandemic girls. Were ready to go ready to start helping. Get the axing out with our population which is another plus for us. The girls work out in that area and they know how to get a hold of them. Which i think kind of helped us with getting. This rolled out so much faster as well. Tribes are also try and create a vaccination strategies show says fort belknap tribal health began vaccinating teenagers in the area. During the week of march fifteenth by partnering with local school systems both on nearby the reservation by this point teachers in the area. We're already vaccinated bubble. So you know the more. We can vaccinate around us as well as us ourselves. The better off. We're going to be trying to keep our numbers on black. Sea nation is currently reporting ninety. Five percent of eligible enrolled members are vaccinated ihs data from the pakistan and born in sioux tribes and the chippewa cree of rocky boy's reservation show a third of tribal members in these areas are now vaccinated compared to about fifteen percent of montana as a whole molly lind the tribal health director for the little shell tribe of chippewa. Indians says. The tribe has partnered with alluvial health. Great falls and is trying different. Vaccine approaches all the time instead of appointments one week. They offered an evening walk in vaccine clinic to see if that attracted members working day shifts. Were really trying to make it. As convenient as canaan for all of our members to get vaccinated vaccines are coming to tribes from direct federal allocations to ihs and sometimes through the state native americans are also prioritised under the state's vaccination plan due to higher risk of death and health complications from covid nineteen little. Shell health director. Wetland says. i really do think that tribal nation have done a really good job. It's hard to disagree. Look at montana's covid nineteen vaccine tracker map. And you'll see the dark. Green areas of high vaccination rates almost perfectly highlight tribal nations for national native news. I'm caitlyn nicholas. Group of pueblo. Leaders met with the second gentleman of the united states. Doug emhoff's last week when he traveled to new mexico part of a nationwide tour to promote the biden administration's covid nineteen recovery plan pueblo of alabama governor brian bio was one of four pueblo leaders to me with 'em hof at kua pueblo via says the trip to meet with the vice president's husband was only the third time he's left akamot pueblo in the years since the pandemic began aca has been under a number of emergency covid nineteen orders including a reservation closure bio says he shared with emhoff how the tribe prioritized elders and cultural leaders. I for covid nineteen vaccines. He stressed how the pueblo has had to put culture on the side which has been a great sacrifice. We remain rooted in our culture. that's what sustains and well we can't do we cannot practice what we not when we are not engaged in that process. It's painful and that was the case and still is the case during this time of what we are doing it because we have to protect our people file also shared with emhoff how the pueblo is continuing. Its vaccine. rollout plan everyone who is eligible every travel member every resident here. The people of alabama has an opportunity to receive the vaccine and doing all that we can also to ensure that our trouble members who do not live on the survey ship are also afforded the opportunity to be vaccinated and locations where they live one of the few tribes in new mexico working with the state vaccine distribution do its current legal battle with the indian health service over a reduction of care at a hospital on komo lands. I mean antonio

Antonio Gonzales Fort Belknap Tribal Health Dep Montana Fort Belknap Chippewa Cree Of Rocky Molly Lind Little Shell Tribe Of Chippewa Caitlyn Nicholas Caitlyn Nicholas Emhoff Doug Emhoff Jennifer Biden Administration Pueblo Brian Bio Sioux Kua Pueblo
"health services" Discussed on CAMHS Talk

CAMHS Talk

05:51 min | 4 months ago

"health services" Discussed on CAMHS Talk

"Of encouragement sapphire. If i can come to you fast. Then yeah i'd say When it comes to into health it's not about your race for niche in We gender is is just about going out and getting help. And i know it's hard in people than others baugh. Some people do and they want to help you. It just shows that you are stronger past thank you so much safa at lisa. Can i come ta. Yeah i guess my takeaway message would be kind of authority kinda said and has been the articulated. Just the i suppose from like a professional capacity feel free to ask about religion culture background with the young person like everyone's different so obviously if the young person really doesn't embrace religion coacher is nothing to do with their life they identify with it. Leave it and you know ask. Is religion an important view in non also co. We went touching again. But you know yeah actually explore it be transparent about it and dying. Don't feel like you have to as a professional. I the ins and outs with the coach. When their religion learn about it with the young person almost like a collaborative collaborative learning thing. I think the young peasant appreciate that transparency to professionals. I think just be open and honest and ask questions and really. Yeah at doug hold back supplies in terms of when am exploring coach with. The president wants to bring their culture into the therapy because of like to be stigma affair an- and fiat people. That just say you know is something you worry about what we'll family think. What will people think Similar to ided. Oh yeah even when. I be with like my diagnosis. I say i need to go to therapy. Would it be acceptable. These kinds of light concerns. Just say maybe to have some fight that your family and that will be a and they will you know. We've come so far into thumbs about society as well that i think you have to have a say the people around you who support year because of ye. I just say dying. Hold back in again. Help struggle that would be my tank Thanks so much. elise rush. Nee i dana i can is anything of the said you say wild but i guess in general this podcast live land that we are also similar. A elaine on this. I before i did this. Podcast had no idea that you know how similar experiences we've had had been and say yeah but competent any better than an isa say k. Schaja any anything to add. Izzo was tough being asked the question that the because everyone's was commodore or lesson. I just like leave me. Something please are probably just say you know doesn't much massively will in you believe as long as you're getting the help that you need prioritizing getting while i think yeah that that's absolutely nothing. Absolutely thank you well. I think helen will be. I've certainly land so much and i. I'm sure you have as well. I think the one thing. I'm gonna take one of the things that i'm gonna take for this actually so k. To show that you know you don't have you don't know everything but it's okay to show a little bit of ignorance every now and then achieve about what can get To have an a mutual understanding. Yeah for me. i think it's about like transparency being really clear I kind of going back to the days in particular because this podcast is particularly around krisztian religion of christmas actually has bought time. The other festivities that perhaps i'm always aware of and i think that's really important this time. If you think about other coaches. Not why i've learned take away and cave with thank you so much to everyone. It really has been a pleasure. accu with older few by the story costs and Thank you for your time. Thank your Honest day Take care stay safe five You've been listening to come store the podcast brought to you by the luton and bedford comes team and luton bedford. Service user participation group. If you'd like to hear more from us just go to come talk dot com and subscribe. You can also subscribe on. I tunes spotify. Google podcasts or any of the other platforms that you're using once subscribed you'll get notification on your device everytime you release a new episode. If you want to comment or share your views you can contact us on twitter using at comes talk or you can send us an email using info at comes talk dot com one last thing before we go. Don't forget to use the hashtag comes. Talk podcast when you comment on social media. We'll speak to you soon..

baugh elise rush Schaja lisa ins doug Izzo elaine dana helen bedford Google twitter
"health services" Discussed on CAMHS Talk

CAMHS Talk

07:07 min | 4 months ago

"health services" Discussed on CAMHS Talk

"Be different from from other people's Apostle Bitings were any different in. The sense needs in times of culturally like really normal about set. You know appreciate the not making a big deal out of things just because the Looking at whether or not deny like religious whether or not a so if they have different difficulties that was good. I'm shoulder lost. I don't remember they didn't make a big deal about it. Just because of what. I look like riches. We'll stay that treating you differently. Which is a nice thing knoxville. Thanks shauna the. I wonder if anyone else has any comments to add. Should you know it. Might be the ashley Made to Not treat you any differently but it might be you know should we. Should we do you not think we should be asking questions about cultural belief. Liza am definitely like relate to sean point to some extent about Maybe needs not being so different. I've mentioned before how identify more westernized nigeria saw. I'm granted very white area and all that kind of stuff. But then i'm go to say. I think i appreciated the effort. That was made by safeguarding. A kind of team. I say cutting officer at school and also my therapist is well. An effort made to try and educate themselves surprise In like i think. I mentioned previous. 'cause my therapist actually ost Their religion is a big thing for me about coach at made the effort to kind of ask a common prevention previous But as may be kind of ask about my family tree but in terms of like case. What's the name you give to like. You will non on your mom's side and you know and i didn't. I think that s it just isn't it was it was appreciated. My mom appreciated that too. 'cause i think at the end of the day as much as i may identify more westernized i am so south asian and as i've grown up more and actually come to university which is far more diverse than my kind of school in my hometown. I started to embrace my coach From fully transparent as a kid because nobody else is like me but meeting people now like when i look back on the i actually think the i made to educate themselves like to got your win. She say oh what are you. Okay extended family tree in terms of your culture and for pakistani background. I actually appreciate that end. And i think one thing i've come across in some The people is that a young person that i'm actually said something along the lines of and the best thing that therapist did was sit down initial assessment. And say okay. I'm why annual black. What is it that you want me tonight. And what is it the about your coacher in about your background. Going forward through therapy. Won't that stuff you want me to address things you don't say i actually think that transparency is really valuable. I think she does no harm in being really upfront and And saying you know maybe As as professional. Maybe i don't know much about your cultural background. So tell me about it. You know. Make because i think that if it from a young person's perspective is appreciated that if they're not educated they're trying to be by think with kind of recent events people definitely becoming more educated on the matter over like culture and background that such an amazing example. Actually i could see everyone noting that head. Some really agreeing with that actually. Let's let's just talk about it right from the start. Let's address the differences. The hey aaron. And just in the same way as i would wait on a therapist with any young person. I may a fait if they have different a different background today or at a different Religion today than i would welcome landing about us. Oh helen what do you think. That approach Yeah unlike the suggestion at the end of through where we took what he kinda suggested. Actually let's be transparent within sessions. They actually yes. There is a difference. There is no harm in being transparent and being clear and being of yes actually there is. That can be a difference. What can we do To learn about that so i found that quite empowering listening to that because as a therapist i will take that would just kind of went touch a little bit on from what you said in the happy guys at bean kind of stereotype because of your ethnic tastes guy move from that question lays whilst like that was really appreciated. As i mentioned the effort made by my therapy safeguarding team. Whatever to learn more about kind of my background and stuff and this is why like this was not ministers in any way. My therapist got team. They went all racist or anything like that. But this is this gonna give his. Just i guess an example of lack of understanding and maybe sort keys me and maybe kind of Yeah i guess less knowledge about it. So i i picked up about something in therapy and my therapist made this comment which still remember. Now i know something not isn't a typical of your culture so i was talking about ascend hus- into my family something that happened and that kind of behavioral spice and then my therapist in response to obey. Isn't that a typical coacher. Isn't that something to do. Isn't as a normative your coaches and it wasn't it wasn't something that i would like to think. If it wasn't a good thing and and in that respect that kind of common i do remember my safeguard thing lead as well making a comment similar at one point and it sticks with me because i remember off the that commitments made. I was reluctant. I have not moo about that. My family that kind of thing which actually i think now is massive pot kind of anxiety that she exploring therapy would have been probably really helpful by didn't because i was by. Oh what is that school. I want to paint my coach in a bad light. I don't want people thinking. This is wall south. Asian people are like whatever us they're not respect was most self conscious and i.

shauna Liza knoxville nigeria sean aaron helen
"health services" Discussed on CAMHS Talk

CAMHS Talk

04:28 min | 4 months ago

"health services" Discussed on CAMHS Talk

"Hi everyone and i'm delighted to entities episode three f series of <unk>. Podcasts discussing access to services from young females from an asian heritage and today we are joined once again by my colleague. Helen and we also have rush knee with us today. I liza hello on shawna. So for those of you. That have listened to our previous cheap. Put 'cause we've discussed on. Lots of different aspects of how savage says at kansas is support young people from an asian backgrounds. And today what we're going to look at is whether or not you guys. I know that this <unk>. Understanding and knowledge among staff cam stalls. In exactly how we can support our young people. Helen that this is a subject that you gave. You'll really passionate about that is in operating so of enjoyed during the costs. Kind of getting an understanding. I'm more awareness of wrong credible. Young people of what that might fail. Obey like am i guess. Kind of following on from that <unk>. Loss podcast kind of what to look at things and improvements recommendations. You know that we can take forward as a service as well as the young ppo. I'm professionals that might be listening to the podcast. Thank you so. I suppose my question than israeli d'ici fail say all four of us can about the fact that you're no longer using cam. Savage says bought when you were being supported by and the staff at cams or actually this could be open to to what the professionals that have supported you in your johnny attacks a gp all people within your school. Do you think that they had enough of an understanding about how your needs might potentially be different from from other people's <unk>. Apostle <unk> <unk>. Bitings were any different in. The sense needs in times of culturally like really normal about set. You know appreciate the not making a big deal out of things just because the <unk>. Looking at whether or not deny like religious whether or not a so if they have different difficulties that was good. I'm shoulder lost. I don't remember they didn't make a big deal about it. Just because of what. I look like riches. We'll stay that treating you differently. Which is a nice thing knoxville. Thanks shauna the. I wonder if anyone else has any comments to add. Should you know it. Might be the ashley <unk>. Made to <hes>. Not treat you any differently but it might be you know should we. Should we do you not think we should be asking questions about cultural belief. Liza am definitely like relate to sean point to some extent about <hes>. Maybe needs not being so different. I've mentioned before how identify more westernized nigeria saw. I'm granted very white area and all that kind of stuff. But then i'm go to say. I think i appreciated the effort. That was made by safeguarding. A kind of team. I say cutting officer at school and also my therapist is well. An effort made to try and educate themselves surprise <hes>. In like i think. I mentioned previous. 'cause my therapist actually ost <unk>. Their religion is a big thing for me about coach

shauna Liza knoxville nigeria sean aaron helen
"health services" Discussed on CAMHS Talk

CAMHS Talk

02:27 min | 5 months ago

"health services" Discussed on CAMHS Talk

"<Silence> and <Speech_Female> so i think <Speech_Music_Female> one young pass <Silence> into to another <Speech_Female> is <Speech_Female> so key <Speech_Music_Female> as well so nothing <Speech_Music_Female> this people <SpeakerChange> that <Speech_Music_Female> have similar experiences that <Speech_Female> you can talk to <Speech_Female> and just <Speech_Female> yeah research <Speech_Female> look into <Speech_Female> ways out that <Speech_Female> it. It will get <Speech_Music_Female> better. I think that's the one <Speech_Music_Female> thing to remember. You and i <Music> will <SpeakerChange> get <Speech_Music_Female> better. <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Thank you okay. <Speech_Female> Thank you so <Speech_Female> much. So <Speech_Female> they seems <Speech_Female> like a really natural <Speech_Female> place to win <Speech_Female> this conversation. <Speech_Female> And i know that we want <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> Next <Speech_Female> time and i lost <Speech_Female> episode in this series <Speech_Female> of podcasts. <Speech_Female> I know that we want <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> visit how <Speech_Female> we can continue <Speech_Female> to engage. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Young people <Speech_Female> in therapy. <SpeakerChange> Don't <Speech_Female> we <Speech_Female> do. <Speech_Female> I'm just sending a message. <Speech_Female> Because i think you <Speech_Female> guys have been amazing. <Speech_Female> It's been great <Speech_Female> listening to your <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> kind of positive <Speech_Female> experiences. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> And i know <Speech_Female> accessing <Speech_Female> services and being <Speech_Female> in services can be <Speech_Female> really difficult. But <Speech_Female> it's really posted <Speech_Female> to kind of hear <Speech_Female> your <Speech_Female> into wacky. Mental <Speech_Female> health failed <Speech_Female> despite the difficulty. <Speech_Female> Say <Speech_Female> it's <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> been really good. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I look forward to the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> third one. <Speech_Female> So i just want <Speech_Female> to say thank <Speech_Female> you sorry. Sorry not <Speech_Female> once again <Speech_Female> for everybody's <Speech_Female> openness <Speech_Female> and honesty <Speech_Female> <hes> <Speech_Female> In tolkien <Speech_Female> about your giannis <Speech_Female> am <Speech_Female> and sharing <Speech_Female> your experiences <Speech_Male> with us. It's been <Speech_Female> amazing <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> to bring you <Speech_Female> together again <Speech_Female> and lovely to say. <Speech_Female> Oh <Speech_Female> so and <Speech_Female> thank you <Speech_Female> so much. Stay <Speech_Female> safe <Speech_Female> every body <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> In these really <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> difficult times <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Yeah <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> take care. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> You've been listening <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to come stalk <Speech_Male> the podcast brought <Speech_Male> to you by the luton <Speech_Male> and bedford comes team <Speech_Male> and the luton <Speech_Music_Male> bedford service user <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> participation group. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> If you'd like to hear more <Speech_Male> from us just go over <Speech_Male> to come talk. Dot com <Speech_Male> unsubscribe. <Speech_Male> You can <Speech_Male> also subscribe on. <Speech_Male> I tunes spotify. <Speech_Male> Google podcasts <Speech_Male> or any <Speech_Music_Male> of the other platforms <Speech_Music_Male> that you're using <Speech_Male> once you've subscribed <Speech_Male> you'll get <Speech_Male> on your device <Speech_Male> every time we release <Silence> a new episode. <Speech_Male> If you <Speech_Male> want to comment or share <Speech_Male> your views you can <Speech_Male> contact us on twitter <Speech_Male> using at <Speech_Male> comes talk <Speech_Male> or you can send us <Speech_Male> an email using <Speech_Male> info at comes <Silence> talk dot com <Speech_Male> one <Silence> last thing before we go. <Speech_Male> Don't forget <Speech_Male> to use the hashtag <Speech_Male> comes. Talk podcast <Speech_Male> whenever you <Speech_Music_Male> comment on social media. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> Speak <Speech_Music_Male> to you soon.

"health services" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

03:26 min | 8 months ago

"health services" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"Help to identify folks who are experiencing high levels of trauma or distressed it's critically important but we also have to think about what are we doing when we are first interacting with law enforcement? How are we on boarding them into this culture is their opportunity to change. To encourage wellness seeking, and then make sure that when it is provided and if it is provided safe to do so so I think that there's an entire restructuring the needs to take place when you talk about that and you see these stats in the staff that I play earn just read about sixty percent higher than other police departments. What's your take away a? Justin when dad came out the Department of Justice report, I had so many officers. So many people who have been working in peer support and supporting other people say that's not even correct. That's a low ball thought it was higher. Yeah. They thought it was higher I don't know if it took into account retired officers, etc. So suicide is the most tragic outcome of hopelessness and I think there's a tremendous amount of hopelessness in my career as a mental health advocate is that we are not my here. We know we are going to see an increase of suicide generally because of everything that is going on in our world. And the police are the safety net right now or they they seem to be owning all of disruption and we are putting a lot on their shoulders. So they are even more at risk for feeling doubt for behaving and impulsive utilizing substances is a male adaptive coping strategy. All of these things because their trauma is so compounded and there isn't enough space to mitigate that risk Santa Joe the University of Chicago Crime Lab has been collaborating with the city to develop one of these new pilot programs the data driven officer support system. Tell me about that program. This program is unique in that it really focuses on the human interaction. It is a program that is based on specific data models that the University of Chicago folks have been putting together and working really hard. So it's it's good because it does identify a person these four hopefully next adverse action might occur by using all this historic data. The key component of the officers support system is once somebody's been identified. So let's say I'm identified as somebody who is at high risk of having another adverse reaction adverse action, right? The key piece of this is to get the supervisors involved and the existing support systems at the CPT has offer but the sad thing is there's so many really good support systems already available through pd that's the good news. The bad news is most people don't know they exist or they don't know how to use them or there is a stigma component or the fear that if they do access them, they may lose their jobs. Alexa, there is a stigma I mean police officers are almost trained to be tough to to be outside of the of of mental health issues. They're the ones that are that are coming in and they're the peacemakers. So how do you get a pass stigma when when it's so ingrained in the culture of law enforcement for so long that mental health is an issue for them. Yeah I mean bright. Totally. Stigma surrounding mental illnesses mental health issues is. Existing, every type of culture it's changing, but it doesn't seem to be changing with the same pace with enforcement it. Now, I will say this, they're just build onto what Sandy Joe said that there are resources within the department..

Alexa University of Chicago University of Chicago Crime La Sandy Joe CPT Justin Department of Justice officer
"health services" Discussed on THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:48 min | 10 months ago

"health services" Discussed on THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

"People across the UK joined in a round of applause on Sunday to mark the seventy second anniversary of the free to use National Health Service one of the country's most cherished institutions, the reverence with which it is held has been bolstered this year during what is being Europe's deadliest corona virus outbreaks though the UK as a whole has a confirmed virus death toll of forty, four, thousand, two, hundred, twenty, the third highest in the world behind the United States and Brazil the chess and everyone who works within it in whatever capacity have been lauded for their work and care. Created by the Labor government after World War Two, in nineteen, forty, eight by bringing together the nation's disparate health institutions, the NHS's founding principles have never changed funded by everyone through the tax system. It provides free healthcare to any UK resident when needed. Prince Charles said the NHS that been through the most testing time in its history, and it was right for the whole country to come together to pay tribute to everyone who works within it after coming down with corona virus himself and spending three nights in intensive care Prime Minister Boris. Johnson credited NHS workers with saving his life, and his insisted it get whatever resources it needs. The main Labour Party opposition said the NHS has been starved of funding for the past decade during the government's austerity drive. Overnight many of the country's major sites, including the houses of parliament and the arch at Wembley, stadium England's National Soccer Stadium lit up in blue to remember all those who died during the pandemic. And before the weekend, soccer matches, players joined in with a round of applause.

Donald Trump Iran United States NHS America National Health Service UK Britain soccer Anthony Davis Joe Biden National Soccer Stadium England Mount Rushmore White House South Dakota Tehran National Monument
"health services" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"health services" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"You know I think if there's anything that we've learned from you know the current you know are blending of workplace and the impact. I would say that. The Corona virus is having is that you know it just further reinforces that wellbeing programs aren't essential part of really any positive company culture. You know I love what we're doing and I think that it's important to you. Know educate companies out there that wellbeing programs don't automatically create a strong culture. You know oftentimes people think if they build it they will come. And that's not the case it does take work and it does take trust but I do get excited that you know wellbeing when it does become part of an organization DNA you know. The result are are pretty profound whether it is our ally or I or combination of both. You know and I'm excited. That we can really bring a solution and a philosophy that starts with these small lifetime lifestyle changes and really help individuals create accountable goals and make it simple make it personally event and and also make it. Make it fun you know. I think we're learning that in today's Environment. Wellbeing is not a nice to have. But it's definitely an essential. Yeah that's well put. It's not a nice to have folks. It's a must have then yeah. I think it's great and you know just thinking about the position of Web. Md in the how content rich it is and just I mean talk about a great partner for this so if you hadn't considered them what web. Md Health Services is doing an extraordinary job as you can hear What WILL CHRISTINE BEFORE? We conclude. I love if you could just share a closing thought. And then the best place where the listeners can get in touch with you and sure. So I'm I'm just excited that I got to participate on this podcast today Hopefully you can see that you know. Health and wellbeing is my passion and You know if anyone is interested in learning more about what whether it be health services does or just our philosophy around wellbeing if if you go to our website you can register for our blog because I do a lot of post on our blog That don't necessarily have to be about our product but the importance around wellbeing and things that you can do within your organization so a lot.

Md Health Services Md partner
"health services" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"health services" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Christine's moderated the Web MD health plan and employer advisory boards comprised of executives to key health topics and identified strategic marketing opportunities. She has over twenty years experience in the healthcare industry. And it just such a privilege to to have her here on the podcast to talk to us about what they're doing at Web. Md Health Services. How it's different from Heme D. and overall just how they're contributing to the HEALTHCARE ECOSYSTEMS. Christine such a privilege to have you here with us thanks. I'm really excited to be here and appreciate the opportunity that to talk with you. It's absolutely and so tell us a little bit more Christine about what inspires your work in healthcare. Well I mean as you had said in my bio I have been in the healthcare field for over twenty years which kind of makes me feel like. I'm really old. I have most of my career in the health and wellness segment of of healthcare. And you know I don't really have an exciting story about why got into healthcare and there really wasn't one thing but I think I'm just you know inspired by the fact that I can and empower individuals with all aspects of their health and I think it really comes from just me as a person and personally you know what I do. I am a mom of three active teenagers. And I my job aside from obviously providing home food and Internet because of course that's really important to them to just make sure you have you know a positive self image and you know for me. I I work out every morning. I make sure that you know we're eating healthy food. My kids know like mom. You're in a bad mood today. You probably didn't work out. Is that true so they really know how important you know. Health wellness is to me just as a person and I think it's about really how you see yourself and how you feel about yourself each site and I believe that there's this huge correlation between really the mind and the body so your physical health impacts your mental health impacts your physical health. And you know for me. I'm inspired that. I can provide motivation nudges and encouragement to our population that we work with and to my family as loud about putting their wellbeing. I so you know I'm just really lucky and in my role at Web. Md Health Services. I support our team in terms of providing tools resources and information that help our clients support their employees and members in the same way really to take charge of their health and their wellbeing and to really provide an impact that creates. You know real behavior change. I love notes. it's it's fascinating that the the wellbeing piece of this is so important and you know we spend a lot of time talking about acute care and and you know sick care. I feel like with the shifts in digital health than what we have going on now with cove. Nineteen there's there's a stronger shift. I think more dollars toward wellbeing. We're starting to become more focused. There and even the chronic care piece right taking care of that the well-being around chronic care so awesome. That you guys are focused there and that you personally are driven for that and I also I love your message about you. Know helping kids with that positive self image. I mean I've got a three year old myself and it's a it's a daily thing so thanks for the inspiration there do it with today's digital. And what they see You know not everybody's perfect. It's it's how you feel about yourself so I try to encourage that I love it. I love it and so so tell us a little bit more about web. Md Health Services. How are you.

Md Health Services Christine
"health services" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"health services" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"Way that you're used to it really contributes to the sense of hopelessness and being overwhelmed with a sense of am I ever GonNa get better when my life ever be the same. One of my patients is a Holocaust survivor. She's in her late ninety s and she was talking to me about how she really thought she was a resilient person surviving the Holocaust coming through the experience having a family around her all the time that loves her and now that she is isolated from them alone in her room most of the day for her she really continues to. She sang for her. It's almost like reliving wartime experience that she's feeling so isolated. She actually had her granddaughter. That was visiting her from out of town and we were able to connect via what's APP and as a clinician. You feel like it's you become desensitized to some types of emotions but even in this session. I found that I was tearing up and crying when she saw the way. That technology could really connect her to her family in a meaningful way. Now Mind You I was holding the phone and I had to touch all the applications to make it happen and her hands were trembling as she was crying blowing kisses to her granddaughter or great granddaughter actually but it was so worth it to see how it really made an impact in a positive way so after we finished her being able to see her family she said Oh. Please come back next week. I have a list of people I'd like to be in touch with so it was a really nice way that we were able to have technology in our session. That really supported her feeling more connected to family so if you have an older friend or relative who lives alone or in an assisted living facility. Maybe give them a call or perhaps try video chat and now for some related links health. America hosted a Webinar. A couple of weeks ago looking at the mental health of older Americans during the increased social isolation of the current of Iris pandemic warning that loneliness depression and anxiety can contribute to a lot of other mental health problems but also including lots of resources for how to help or get help links to the video and slides from that are at marketplace dot. Org We also have links to mental health resources from AARP and the organization diverse elders. There's also an automated helpline for older people and their caregivers with Cova nineteen information. Actually eight help lines in different languages including English Spanish candies Japanese and Korean and that's provided by the National Asian Pacific Center on Aging. I'm Kimberly Adams and that's marketplace tech. This is a PM..

National Asian Pacific Center Kimberly Adams Cova AARP social isolation America dot
"health services" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

09:24 min | 1 year ago

"health services" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Health Service provides healthcare to two point six million million native Americans across the United States but a Wall Street Journal investigation has found the agency hired dozens of doctors. Who should have been flagged for their history of medical medical mistakes and regulatory sanctions and that had dire consequences for IHS Patients Wall Street Journal reporter Chris? Weaver was part of the investigation team. mm-hmm and joins me. Now Chris. You found the Indian Health Service gave many doctors with troubled histories a second chance. Tell us what you found about their records and and how this impacted patient care when we began our investigation by looking at one hundred sixty three malpractice lawsuits alleging harm to patients at Indian Health Service hospitals and in each of those lawsuits. We track the doctors who were involved and look back into their histories. What we found boundary that one in four of them before ever treating? IHS patients had red flags in their past including things like multiple malpractice lawsuits in private practice or sanctions from licensing boards or in a small handful of cases even criminal convictions. That should have raised red flags with the Indian Health Service before managers. There cleared them to treat patients on the government's watch and yet they were hired anyway and this. This intern did impact patients and really negative ways. Ace Yeah they were hired any way. And we've found cases where doctors with you know up to about a dozen malpractice lawsuits against them in just a few years were allowed to treat patients at government hospitals native American patients and some of the most disadvantaged communities in the country and we found examples where doctors who had run afoul of US authorities for prescribing things. Slake oxycodone and Oxycontin were allowed to continue treating patients despite the questions that that kind of conduct should have raised about their judgment. We found instances where in one case a surgeon who had had a medical Michael License revoked after a patient died was allowed to continue treating patients at a government hospital and within a matter of Said had four major complications leading managers. which is there to reverse their decision and basically kick them out of the facility? Chris this investigation comes on top of reporting you did with the PBS frontline online series into the Indian Health Service The the I investigation into a doctor who has now been convicted of sexually abusing young boys under his care for years taken together with this recent investigation at certainly points to extensive problems within the system here in the course of our investigation of that physician a guy named Stanley Patrick Weber. WHO's now been convicted in two different courts of molesting at least six boys under his care? We saw a pattern of behavior at the Indian health. Service service where managers would tolerate both clinical and conduct problems with providers both already in their employ and candidates for jobs coming in and end. We recognize that that was one part of the puzzle that had facilitated the sexual predators career there for so long despite concerns earns about him that had tracked him from facility to facility over the years Chris at the same time your reporting has helped lead to changes at IHS. How is the Indian the in health service responding to this current investigation? What changes has it made already? What changes is it working on making well after our investigation showed that the agency had ignored warning signs about? This pediatrician Dr Webber. who was you know accused for for years and years of sexually abusing patients? They did make a series series of pretty significant changes. They immediately changed their policies with regard to reporting allegations of sexual misconduct. They've already committed into further overhaul in their policies in general for screening physicians who apply for jobs at the agency to for instance clarified. Hi that they should not be hiring doctors who have restricted licenses meeting lake. Medical boards have have limited their ability to practice. And they're also you know examining a kind of a broader set of reforms that they could adopt. There's some outside agencies and groups helping with that for instance a White House Task Force worse is currently investigating the agency and is expected in the next month or so to release a number of suggestions for improvement there. And then of course you know they've taken more day-to-day steps to improve awareness of their existing policy is among the workforce for. You know what to do if you suspect that a colleague has sexually abused abused patient. Or or anyone else your reporting has also pointed to challenges that are specific to the IHS a huge challenge being attracting and retaining qualified qualified staff to locations. That can be very remote. Where benefits are often not the most competitive? How do you overcome challenges like that? You spoke about working with other groups to help solve these problems. What other support is IHS asking for? Well I mean the issues that they face are you know in part of their own making but they also have enormous structural challenges. I think we have documented in the investigation published this week that there were cases where managers made decisions that on their faces were were dubious but the truth is that they in many aac cases have a very limited pool of candidates who WanNa work at extremely remote facilities that are often very poor communities in some cases up to a hundred miles from the nearest Walmart. Those facts of geography are not good candidates for reform. And there's other structural real issues like the government pays last for instance than many physicians particularly specialists are able to make in private practice. And that's a challenge that it's it's hard to see a way around for the agency that they are seeking to try to address some of these issues though and one of the things that they're doing at some facilities is relying on relationships with academic like Harvard. Some Harvard affiliated hospitals have been sending Physicians for instance to troubled facility in South Dakota called Rosebud. The Rosebud Indian Health Service Hospital for some time and they've actually had some good success improving improving the range of services that that hospital offers and the leaders of the agency has said they're hoping to build on those relationships. Congress has increased funding to the agency moderately in the last year. or so. But you know the amount of money that is appropriated is still far far below what the US government spends for patients who are entitled to Medicaid or Medicare air and by some counts even for prisoners. Who are cared for by the Bureau of Prisons? So there's a big money deficit to and that you know only amplifies is the problems that are baked into the particular geographies in communities that it is the IHS mission to serve. That's Wall Street Journal reporter. Chris Weaver Chris. Thank thank you so much you bet to read more about the investigation into IHS head to our website WSJ DOT COM And finally holiday decorations have long been a kind of competitive sport in many neighborhoods but usually the lights. It's and fake reindeer. Don't come out until after Thanksgiving not so in Omaha Nebraska. They're two families are competing to see who can round up the most Thanksgiving decorations nations specifically inflatable Turkeys by now their homes are overrun by a flock of more than twenty inflatable Turkeys. Each some squatting on lawn. On top of Cornucopia 's others perched on the roof wearing pilgrim hats so who are these dueling neighbors in one corner Paxton. Frisco are usually just count before the house is to see what's happened why I've been gone 'cause sometimes I came back from school on Day. Four more Turkey that came back day. There was too much if this if you couldn't tell Paxton is nine years old. His competitor is forty nine year old. Pilot Dan Vodka will what you're getting. You're getting dragging of the year and they get to explain to pass and every time I see him that I am going to have more Turkeys. Anita's IT I've proven at this year. Last year they got the better of me and it was basically. We're doing it for bragging rights for of the year this has been going on for at least two years and Paxton won last year. Oh backsides impossible deal with is is a go getter. He is You He's just a fun kid. That has a great personality. And you know you know you know the end of the. It's all for fun. Still a very competitive individual Paxton says so is Dan but some of his Turkey's or skirting the rules. It's only inflatable but dance. China get. He's got these metal to eat out there. He's trying to make those count and he's trying to make Orange Orangi count at the time of this recording there were conflicting reports over. WHO's currently in the lead? But they've still got a few days left until Thanksgiving so it's really anyone's once game to see pictures of the Turkey tussle head over to our website. WSJ DOT COM and. That's what's news for this Friday afternoon. I'm Anne Marie for totally for the Wall Street Journal. Thanks for listening..

IHS Chris Weaver Chris Indian Health Service Wall Street Journal United States Paxton Health Service Rosebud Indian Health Service WSJ Dan Vodka oxycodone Turkey Harvard Anne Marie Bureau of Prisons
"health services" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"health services" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Been a busy week of the public hearings on the impeachment inquiry which is now moving to its next stage. The House Intelligence Committee will send its report to the House. Judiciary Committee which will consider articles of impeachment. Next Steps could include a hearing on whether president trump's alleged efforts to press Ukraine to investigate his political rivals. Count as high crimes and misdemeanors leaners. That's the constitutional criteria for impeachment. President trump hasn't said whether he'll sign a bill passed by Congress in support of protestors in Hong on Kong speaking on Fox and friends trump called anti-government protests in Hong Kong a quote complicating factor in trade talks with China. The bill would require the US us to annually certify that Hong Kong is independent enough from Beijing to retain favoured trading status. It would also sanctioned people who commit human rights abuses. This is in Hong Kong if the president vetoed the bill. There's a good chance. Congress would override it it was passed unanimously in the Senate and with all but one vote in the house. US regulators have dealt another blow to Chinese telecommunications firms while way and Z.. T. E. The federal communications commission has labeled the firms a national all security threat and banned them from Federal Subsidy Program many small wireless and broadband providers in the US rely on federal subsidies to bring service purpose to more remote areas and some have already installed equipment from Hallway N. Z.. t. e. the FCC has also begun a regulatory process to force some of them to to replace that equipment a process that's estimated to cost one point eight billion dollars over the next two years. FCC officials say today's moves aren't related to broader the U. S. China trade talks and. US businesses are showing signs of an economic pickup despite a sharper global slowdown abroad. The IHS market's purchasing managers index for the US which measures business activity hit a four-month high in November in contrast the data firms composite pm. I for the euro zone fell in November indicating economy close to stagnation Christine Lagarde head of the European Central Bank warned that robust rates of economic growth are quote. You know longer an absolute certainty. She pointed to trade tensions and.

Hong Kong US trump federal communications commiss House Intelligence Committee Congress China Hong Christine Lagarde Judiciary Committee European Central Bank Beijing Senate Ukraine Fox
"health services" Discussed on Pause

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01:49 min | 1 year ago

"health services" Discussed on Pause

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Thanks <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> for tuning <Speech_Music_Female> into this episode <Speech_Female> of pause <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> in the spirit of reconciliation. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> We acknowledged <Speech_Female> that the conversation <Speech_Female> you <Advertisement> heard today <Speech_Female> was recorded on treaty <Speech_Female> seven and <Advertisement> territory <Speech_Music_Female> a land <Speech_Music_Female> steeped <Advertisement> in ceremony <Speech_Music_Female> in history <Speech_Female> that until <Advertisement> relatively <Speech_Music_Female> recently <Speech_Music_Female> was used <Advertisement> exclusively <Speech_Music_Female> by indigenous <Speech_Music_Female> peoples. <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> We acknowledge <Speech_Music_Female> the past is <Advertisement> to present <Speech_Female> and future generations <Speech_Female> of Stony <Advertisement> Nakota <Speech_Music_Female> blackfoot and <Speech_Music_Female> Tiziana nations. <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> As well as than <Speech_Music_Female> Mateen <Advertisement> nations <Speech_Music_Female> who have traditionally gathered <Speech_Music_Female> in <Advertisement> and cared for <Speech_Music_Female> this place <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> if you enjoyed this <Speech_Music_Female> podcast what <Speech_Music_Female> to hear reflections and <Speech_Music_Female> insights <Advertisement> from other <Speech_Music_Female> social purpose leaders. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> We recommend <Speech_Music_Female> checking out disrupting <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> good <Speech_Music_Female> disrupting <Speech_Music_Female> good. It <Advertisement> is a new <Speech_Music_Female> podcast created <Speech_Music_Female> by our friends <Advertisement> at Mount <Speech_Music_Female> Royal University's <Speech_Music_Female> Institute <Advertisement> for Community <Speech_Music_Female> Prosperity <Speech_Music_Female> and <Advertisement> human elements <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> it explores <Advertisement> how acts <Speech_Music_Female> of doing good <Speech_Music_Female> will change and <Advertisement> in response <Speech_Music_Female> to the unprecedented <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> disruptive <Speech_Music_Female> changes that face <Speech_Music_Female> humanity <Advertisement> today <Speech_Music_Female> find it at <Speech_Music_Female> disrupting <Advertisement> good <Speech_Music_Female> dot com. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> This episode <Speech_Music_Female> was produced by Albertus <Speech_Music_Female> social social <Advertisement> innovation. <Speech_Music_Female> Connect or APP <Speech_Music_Female> see connect. <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> You can learn <Speech_Music_Female> more about our <Advertisement> network <Speech_Music_Female> finer newsletter <Speech_Music_Female> and get <Advertisement> inspired <Speech_Music_Female> by connected <Speech_Music_Female> to other <Advertisement> Albertans <Speech_Music_Female> change makers <Speech_Music_Female> by visiting Dinger <Advertisement> website. <Speech_Music_Female> WWW <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> DOT AB SL <Speech_Music_Female> connect <Advertisement> dot <Speech_Music_Female> CA. <Speech_Music_Female> This <Advertisement> episode <Speech_Music_Female> was recorded and edited <Speech_Music_Female> by <Advertisement> Elise Martinez <Speech_Music_Female> Ski of absent <Speech_Music_Female> connect. Act <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> if you enjoyed <Speech_Music_Female> this episode. <Advertisement> Please <Speech_Music_Female> help us out by

"health services" Discussed on Pause

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04:46 min | 1 year ago

"health services" Discussed on Pause

"Western Canada our virtual designs cuisine as he's an example where we have getting people from all over north we're trying to put a spotlight on the fact that we haven't used human centered design in healthcare but we're early days a lot of healthcare systems do not have this on the radar there's huge so we are forerunners I think were slightly ahead of our time relates the interest in this entire field and let's not be liked people don't understand sometimes that's like you know what are you guys because we're not the typical it's GonNa be more social issues coming up and it's outside the hospital so and we really tried to be involved in issues where the community he's involved new world and design US human centered design and that's what we're doing right it's the country in going off the rails sorry what about interesting the favorite moment in a sprint I have one okay go for it so going to create a prototype this kind of Straw thing we call it the ugly baby and when I see them get feedback and get validated but also get some really good critique off and progress over perfect about movement and getting that because we are not usually my favorite moment is when you've done this broad understanding and just staring at Oh my God are we really going to do this like this is what we're doing nice more definitely both of those I feel like we're kind the moral it's good.

"health services" Discussed on Pause

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11:53 min | 1 year ago

"health services" Discussed on Pause

"Changes. It change making is all about people. It's true that we're now looking at sponsors. Searchers who who have illustrative boldness in other ways. They might love the idea of a sprint. Because it's sexy and it's the latest flavor but so we. We're far more careful about who engage with to do this kind of work and rightfully so because like you said that follow through. I heard both of you echo that that you can do you all this work you put in the sixty putting those two days and then what that was just drops. It's like okay cool. We did the thing but yeah we even had successes we've had our our second sprint. We did ascertain the privacy office with it was a cultural transformation. That happened even though the idea that came out of sprint. There were small ideas but what I did was change people's mindset and we're we're looking at this whole thing differently and now the whole transformation that happened a department is even existing and that leader is still our biggest fan. She kind of whenever we do a twitter. I and those you know we have a twitter very active twitter. If you've always posting and she constantly you know you know is on our webinars as messaging and sharing a lot of our growth design lab has been of all the people that have connected with us in in some shape or form and it's not just about sprint. They love working with us. Because we bring energy and you saw the kind of loudness we have. It's because we're optimistic. We believe that we can solve this conflict challenges if we just work differently but we have to our differently. And that's what I love about working in in this lab is that we challenge ourselves all the time what we can do this better and be going to try. And so we do education as one of the elements of because as we want to build the capacity. Not just within Al Alberto but outside. So we have sprints schools do teach people sprints and we are also running virtual design school because if you want to share what we learned and get people together. That's great scaling it out. Yeah so if anyone in your upside this podcast interested interested in learning about sprints or you know right now we have five people in the virtual design school so I think that's pretty copped but if those were interesting sprint school are I just have a chat with us and we even do some time where we call is. What's the word molly advice? Crowds Weiskopf the way Spurs. All right so we get a lot of people who are like Oh this looks like a different unit and who are they behave differently so they they call us and they say we want some advice advice and so we get this a lot so we started doing what we call wise crowds so instead of spending an hour on the phone with people we use this this tool which is a liberating structure. Which is actually? There's a website you can look it up. But why's crowds. Essentially we asked them to pitch for five minutes. The team is there listening then we ask them to turn around although it's all online usually pretend to turn around and listen to the design lab talk about about your pitch and your project and then we talk amongst each other. We're very supportive. But then people here how we look at things what think how how we view the world how we might approach challenge they have and then they turn around and they give their feedback about what they've heard so we do quick quick consult in that format so they can get a flavor for what we're all about before the engaged with us so that's like a light touch consultation Asian even though it seems quite simple but the magic actually listen. I think you've done. This is is we are we believe in something called radical candor. Being honest truthful care deeply challenge directly and people are not used to that in a lot of these are going to end and in this day and age. We are not being honest and tutoring China and instill old man in one thousand nine hundred. I'm maybe we also also inside but I really believe that. What the magically bring in not even these wise crouches but even sprints or all the consultation we do as we be authentic and honest with? This is a bad idea. This is not working. Well this is not this is not gonNA help make it more user centered so and we're not trying to be brash abrasive but we bring honesty to the conversation and we encourage the team to do the same so when we go when other ground whether there's no hierarchy and we each facilitation we do address elephants in the room because when you have honest conversations you get the good variety is coming up right so when you listen to all of this. What are you thinking like what come crosses your mind like what would you? What kind of just sitting in on all honesty like I give me also hundred sprint? So I've been writing just digging into sharing here just even like wow the application of this for so many different areas beyond his healthcare healthcare so amazing to be working within but just the application patients that to so many different realms and it's all about changing that mindset you both echoed that of that the thought and the the mindset in the way that we do work in the way that we approach challenges and issues. It's just like yeah like this is well. We need the One thing that I've noticed and I don't know if you agree Eliot bet because we're such an instant society and we want results results and actions. The sprints have elevated the conversation around design thinking we know we can't solve complex problems in two days or six weeks. We know that but it kick starts the process and that's kind of what we need it because people are kind of tired of complex theories and frameworks or methodologies. So it's it's just been so user friendly really basically and I think that's that's why it's been so successful definitely do you know what I mean like versus A new thing. A new methodology a new way of working and lofty completely. It'll take ten years to solve this. It's like people want what's happening now. So it was really the sprints at elevated our lab before that time people are like okay. That sounds interesting. But this was really what's changed our entire existence. Basically and when did the lab start gases at all of two thousand sixteen sixty three years old three years old three years. Young only the Internal Design lab in western Canada within the healthcare field. There's nothing like us and It's is credit coolest tomorrow. Elise how we have huge social media presence and virtual design scores in his an example where we have getting people from all to our north North America in UK. And and that's part of the lead love sharing out now to work but I mean I think what we're also trying to do is we're trying to put a spotlight on the fact that we haven't used human centered design in healthcare Dan. This is a tool for innovation. Pretty much the methodology that you want to use so you know just sharing widely how successful it can be but we're early days. A lot of healthcare systems. Do not have this on the radar. There's there's no doubt I don't know what other social sectors are like. I suspect it's the same. I don't think it's entirely different. So the potential is huge so we are four runners. I think were slightly ahead of our time. So but the fact that we're existing and that were permanent and and this is a real thing and that's why we're working out loud so much to try to stimulate the interest in this entire field and let's not be like ah beyond it's tough it's not like butterflies and rainbows. Yeah we we do beheads because we are kind of ugly duckling right. I call this. People don't understand sometimes it's like you know. What are you guys? Because we're not the typical kind of cookie cutter kind of people but at the same time what it's motivators you know. What because we really believe this is the way of the future? Healthcare is going to be more complex. It's going to be more social issues coming up and it's outside the hospital so so our lab really thrives on the fringes. We call them. You're like tethered lab where we don't sit in the healthcare like we sit out on just on the on the cusp of it and we really tried to be involved in issues where the community. He's involved with the healthcare system because those are all the problems right now. Hospitals are done. They're they're old one thousand nine hundred and you're trying to say okay if you want to move to this new world and used design US human centered design. And that's what we're doing. Well said Nice Work Ali which I have one more question for you guys so we talked about some of those going off the rails. Offroad ain't that was not right right. It's the country in going off the rails. Sorry what about your favorite moment in sprints. Do you have a moment. That released stands out of your favorite moment. Like what are you favorite things that can come from sprint. ooh This is interesting. The favorite moment in the spring. I have one okay go for it. So abyss happened. I just did a sprint couple of days ago and there's a lot of apprehension for people I I'm getting used to that I'm going going to create a prototype. This kind of Straw thing. We call it the ugly baby and I'M GONNA show it to someone and it's half baked idea and I'm not sure that users feedback feedback. It's really anxious and people get really nervous about but when I see them get feedback and get validated but also get some really good critique. Take you see them like they're like the what they had. This huge light Bulb Aha moment. Is that we don't have to be perfect. Can Be good enough off and progress over perfect. It's about movement and getting that because we are not usually what we do. Is We start a project and we wait until the end to get user feedback months down down the road and so. That's your favorite moment. That's my so I'll tell you. What my favorite moment is? My favorite moment is when you've done this broad understanding and and looking at the problem widely and I'll send you hone in so you find your pain point. People start voting where they want to put their efforts and people are just just staring at. Oh my God. Are we really going to do this. Like this is what we're doing. We're deciding right now. We've narrowed down and people feel of its shocked about room all of a sudden you're focusing. That's my favorite moment of the sprint. It's a nice more definitely both of those. I feel like we're kind of Yeah Denver conversation here. Thank you for inviting us. It's awesome thank you so much for being here like that was just fantastic. I'm just all energize. I'm like I got a Gal. How did this great yes just again? Thank you for taking the time for being here for sharing your insights and and I look forward to releasing this episode. I think it's GONNA be fantastic. Thank you for inviting it's good.

"health services" Discussed on Pause

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08:47 min | 1 year ago

"health services" Discussed on Pause

"More may brick and mortar. How do we help us? Mental Health and and families navigate through the education system and the health care system. So kind of big hairy. Oh boy there's a lot happening so it's not within the walls of a hospital hospital. It's generally involves the community so we pride ourselves in bringing community players and patients and users to the sprint to sell that that complex problem although you can use a sprint in any setting you can do do it in a in a problem that within a hospital department not and they have done it by bite the fun of investing so much time six weeks and those two intense days. It's best to get the bang for the buck is to go for the tough problems and go for the challenging problems and you know take the make the prototype and get that validation early on and I think you know one person when I when I I did a sprint once. And there's when you go into spring what you see. Visually is in flip charts and posted notes and sharpies and and there's color markers and there's breakout rooms and it's not a typical meeting room. There's no board there's not a boardroom table. There's no like a single. There is space on the wall. We your whole space is different because it gets people to be creative and visual thinkers and that's what we want. We want to bring out everyone to bring their best foot Ford so the other thing about sprint. It's interesting and it's called a sprint. Because of the speed so you ask us what what is the sprint. So essentially intially. It's a very fast pace decision making using both some information. Some you know some insight some passion intuition into wishing that's why frontline staff but we do things like crazy AIDS where we ask people to come up with eight ideas in eight minutes and we time box everything. So there's does it sometimes o'clock but usually it's like all right. I'll you have two minutes to complete tasks but you said this earlier. There is a lot of introspective time as well. So it's not all group work so sometimes people need to reflect and they just get the right down their ideas ideas and that's where the magic sprint diet thing because it levels the playing field for introvert next door. 'cause he make people have write everything down and when you posted in order to draw it out everyone is sharing their idea in simple fan and then we get them to present it so the public speaking skills but it's this constant individual work group work so we balance that out and we balance it washes out so I feel like there's no other meeting ever or collaboration. That happens other than misprint. In in that in that way. So allie I want to tell you I want to ask you you know facilitating these things are not easy like superintendent superintendents like you're like oh like you're on fire right at least it's only two days if you're a young guy in the room at the end of the second day my head feels like it's going to explode. Yes because you're you're so alert and in tune and getting people to keep moving so is there a time that things kind of went off the rails for you when you still -tated Ho. Yeah Oh yeah so okay. Here's a good one. So you know this was one of my my I know second sprint. And we were working with transitioning getting patients out of hospital into a long term care facility right and we had a group of ten fifteen people and very smart people and as you know as a facilitator in sprint you want them to follow the process. You want the individual and the okay. When we're going to do posted knows a writer thought down are we gonNA create them drawings to create your ideas out? Just follow the process. So what happened was either these two ladies who were having this great conversation and the facilitator me kind of Control Freak in me is i. Could you put it down on paper. That's a great idea. Could you put down on paper and I was asking and wants a sprint was done one of the sprint sprint. Participants came to me. And he's like what Allie you know what you're really pressing them that like. Why would make an and he was kind of like saying like just feedback? You shouldn't push people so much. And I kind of reflected that what really was is that there was an opportunity. We were having this great conversation and I was kind of. I mean deferring them saying put it on paper put wash just done is as they're just having the conversation. Listen to them and take notes as a facilitator so get my hands dirty instead of just telling people what to that was my really good learning experience. And that's what I've done like if people are having good ideas and start funding. It's okay. You just captured so you don't let that moment ago. Those my one of my favorite nods thanks for sharing that favorite moment of yours and sprints with us and for being vulnerable talking. Take time when things didn't quite goes plant and how you're able to adapt on the go and how it's changed type silicates prince now so thanks and merely I'd love to find. I noticed you have any of those moments of realization throughout your journey of facilitating sprints. That really stuck with you and changed. How you then approach coach facilitating this prince? Yes so I had a penny dropping moment so we did this amazing sprints we had three prototypes. One of them was an an epic win. It was like yes. Let's do this tomorrow. Epic winds are like rare like where prototypes just singing. It's humming. It's the right thing so six months of his friend. I thought this is a slam dunk. iphone the leader. I said so. Tell me about the sprint. What did you think of that sprint? He said loved sprint so so great and the VP's were in the room and yeah it was a real success often tastic. So what happened to the prototype. What happened to And he said Oh yes yes yes we wrote a white paper on it. And it's now waiting in the queue to look for funding and I think it's China Cuba one hundred and forty projects and then we realized we can go in and do these really dynamic creative days but if nothing happens Afterwards and we go back to business as usual because the bureaucracy takes over so we have now decided that we figure out which of her projects are long long term. And we stick with that team so that they don't slide back into getting approval doing the typical bureaucratic process. So that's what we've changed. Do you have any more ideas of where we kind of went off the rails alley or what we learned. I can think of one more and this was actually actually the leader grade and we were looking at also. How do we improve? Kind of home. Care Services Leader was great. She was nice she wanted to spring to be done. She was supporting us. And then there was a simple change that came out of the sprint and the whole team everyone is like this is simple. You just have to say. Make a decision and saying be going to drop this little initiative or or this little change and that's it and we can move forward. Unfortunately what happened is after the sprint. She went to the committee and wanted consensus. And sometimes well. We've kind of learned from. That is the innovative. Ideas cannot go through the consensus building process that a lot of bureaucracy and big organization innovation needs a little bit of bonus to be a courageous leader. Saying we're going to do this and it looks. It looks different. It's maybe it's hard but it's worth it because A.. We have gone through this problem solving brought and this is a right if the right thing to do. And so we've learned is that like Marnie saying is ultimately we have to find the right leader who's willing to invest time and resources but actually be innovative and take the courage to say you know what I'm going to try something different because then what's the point of investing so much sprint. Right and that's where we spent a lot of time front front because we do get a quest and trying to figure it out and purs- understand. Is this leader. The right one is willing to spin or you just want to do it because he heard about. I'm doing great work. Everybody who can't see there's quotation marks in there. That's been kind of a really good. That's enough of finding the right. People aren't immediate.

"health services" Discussed on Pause

Pause

08:51 min | 1 year ago

"health services" Discussed on Pause

"Hi I'm Naomi Mahaffey and welcome to pause and Alberta Social Innovation. Connect podcast in this podcast. Alberton change makers pause to reflect on the work doing together to address the root causes of messy problems in their communities. We create space for reflective dialog between people who are working together to understand the systems they worked within to co create new solutions or approaches and and to learn from their successes and failures. In today's episode we chat with my lease van. Dyke and Ali Abid from the health services design lab the right by the H. S. Design Lab believes that the biggest opportunity unity's to transform healthcare lie not within strategies or processes but mindsets people working with the health services. Come to this team with complicated had problems that have no clear solution and sit squarely in the grey zone of right and wrong. The lab uses design thinking to kickstart meaningful discussions breath life into structures with human centered design and co-develop Co designed solutions to capture hurts. Elise Martin Ski sat down with my lease and Ali to reflect elect on. All things sprints what they are wet type of complex problems are sprinkle along with some stories of where things went off the rails without further ado. Here's their conversation. Hello welcome to the both of you. Welcome to the studio and thank you for being here. I have had the pleasure of being able to get to know the both of you and see you interact in the Space Drako change maker Studio of course and the energy from your office is fantastic. I hear laughter like every day that you guys are in there and sometimes the WHO music and it just it's a hub and he'd do great work in there so that's why we brought in today. That's awesome. I didn't know people perceive us that way. Although we get that comments like way too much laughing why is it so much luck here. Now combines comes quite love you I'm not saying I'm saying it was wonderful to my ears hearing the the vibe in the space and the energy so passionate people and our passion just sometime translates out of there there you go it the right word. Yeah so to get going. I love both of you to introduce yourselves kind of role you're in in and how you came to be there. All right my name is Marlene. Van Dyke and I'm the lead for the design lab Adalberto Health Services. My name is Ali a bit. I'm I'm a senior design consultant helper. Health Service design up lovely and we brought you in today. We're GONNA be talking about. All things sprints so little bit of overview of what they are and diving into what's worked what hasn't and how you've adapted and changed your process because of those successes challenges millages. Okay I'll you're gonNA explain what a sprint is. Go Sprint is basically. Everyone knows about design thinking in the space design. Thinking is a five step process and we also know that it's a long process. Most people are in this. Space are spending months on it so we thought about is a we came across. US design sprints which start from Google and Google said. We'll take the entire design process and convincing five days. And so when Marley's actor she's the the one who is a pioneer for this said five days is going to going to work in a bureaucracy and large organization like healthcare if you can get people in five days so we challenge ourselves and we made into a two day sprint and so it's basically two days we go to a creative problem solving and figuring out what is the best solution that will work for the user and we tested and we get feedback right away and we know that what we what. We're going the right direction or not. I think that's really. I think that's a good summary. You you know when people heard about human centered design. They said well that sounds kind of good. But you know. He's at the latest flavor of the day fair point and so when we stumbled upon the Google ventures sprints sprints. We thought you know what let's give it a go and the two days really hit the mark for people because you can lock yourself. Today's and focus and pull people physicians frontline staff patients in a room so we started out just testing it and actually we're still doing today. Sprints so so that's that's how it came about that's the best part is physicians and lot of healthcare professional on the front line. Love it they haven't seen such to structure and so much intense intensity and actually momentum. Well that's one of the benefits of the sprint momentum. kind of but don't you think that one of the reason it's so appealing is because healthcare and the bureaucracy stuck in over analyzing research mindsets planning so there's not a lot of action except on the front line there is so people are are welcoming this because we are known for over analyzing things for a long time and creating position in papers and strategy documents so people are craving the action behind the sprint. So and of course we have plenty of problems to work on the complexity. LEXI is huge and so design. thinking is a very good fit for the healthcare environment. And it's a surprise. It hasn't been there sooner. I mean we're customer service oriented industry and we haven't designed around the user. It's fascinating so it was just the right time and the right vehicle to get started. Yeah that's fantastic and so I'm thinking that as you get into some examples you'll talk more but like what those two days look like and kind of some of the things run is correct. Let's do it okay. Awesome so the two days it actually takes us about six weeks to get going and Organiz but the two days once we get into a room. We have seven to ten people who are really close to the problem problem. They're passionate. They actually care about this. Some people might be the naysayers. That's okay too because we want different perspectives but we walk through the a human centered design process. So we I empathize. We define we try to understand then we jumped and we actually pick Hick. Some prototypes designed prototype. And then we test on the last day with users. So it's just an expedient of process over over two today's yeah and what makes the design sprint. Kind of unique package is tied. We're making decisions and we're getting towards we're going to deliver living next day. So there's this urgency that's comes up and we had one I've done five express already and he reaction. Oh my God. Aw You know we actually have made a decision be picked picked a solution we're going to show it to users tomorrow and people can't believe there's so much mental especially like Marley's we're seeing in when they're used to long months and months or working groups and committees and bureaucracy like this is a brighter fresher. Fair good yeah being able to get that work done in triple time. Probably more than that are elevator pitches when we're talking to leaders. We say. Look look do you want to be in a working group or steering committee for two years or do you want to sprint Ambi. In six weeks have prototype that you're testing and that's music music to people's ears. Oh sign me up but not everything is printable. So we'll get into that little bit. Yeah okay well. What can we dive into that? Striving drive into some of these examples of drag sprints have gone and who you've worked with Dr so Ali helped me here. So what is for me the first thing I look at what is what is sprint. It has to be complex. There has to be a stalemates. There has to be a paradox complexly where people cannot move forward so it can't just be complicated it has to be pretty and people ready for something big. They're not just looking for a slight adjustment there like let's go. Oh yeah and it's interesting because we have done sprints and you've realized that we're you know Artemis you cannot come in Spain with a mindset minds up. This is the solution. Your problem has to have like you know what we don't know what this there's a lot of unknowns. Can you help us figure it out so it really takes and that's why we take it to heart that its complexity of. You're trying to deal with so I just WanNa go back so let's dive into what is printable so these these are the kinds of challenges. Give you a flavor of what we're working on yet. So once brand was how do we address social isolation in a rural community in Alberta. How do we help? People die in the community with L. Building more hospices.

"health services" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"health services" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"With what's news from the Wall Street Journal. I'm Anne Marie for totally New York. The White House is convening task force to investigate the Indian health service after an investigation by the Wall Street Journal and PBS's frontline found the agency failed to stop a pediatrician from sexually abusing native American boys for decades, one of the underlying seems of this healthy agency, which is one of the largest public health agencies in the country is that it has for years provided substandard care for native Americans in some cases, dangerously substandard care. We'll have more details on the latest developments since the investigation with the Wall Street Journal's Dan frosh first here are some other top stories. We're following attorney general William bar is telling lawmakers it will take weeks not months to wrap up a review of Robert Muller's report and make version available to congress and the public. According to the Wall Street Journal reporter Sadie Gherman explains the process bar and Muller's team, and the deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein are working sort of together to scan the entire report for sensitive information, including information that's been presented to a grand jury, which by law is forbidden for public view. So they have to identify all the grand jury information. There's some other concerns legally about what they're able to release and they also don't want to release information that is pertinent to ongoing investigations are released a four page summary of the report on Sunday, according to his summary Muller found that President Trump and his campaign did not conspire or coordinate with Russia to interfere in the two thousand sixteen presidential election. A Senate subcommittee on aviation is sent to hear from the acting head of the Federal Aviation Administration and others on Wednesday as investigations continue into Boeing's seven thirty seven max the hearing comes after two. Fatal crashes involving the aircraft one in Indonesia in October and another in Ethiopia earlier this month on makers are looking into the safety certification process for the seven thirty seven max among other issues. The Federal Trade Commission is ordering seven broadband providers, including Comcast Verizon and AT and T to provide details on their data collection policies. Federal regulators also want details on whether the providers allow customers to block the use of their personal information. The FTC says it's the first step of a broader investigation despite steep losses. At the end of the year. Wall Street profits were up in two thousand eighteen according to a report from the New York state comptroller, the report found securities industry profits were up eleven percent last year as compared with twenty seventeen plus the industry added forty seven hundred workers, increasing the total number of employees to one hundred eighty one thousand three hundred that's the industry's highest level in decades. But average bone. Has declined by almost seventeen percent to an average of one hundred fifty three thousand seven hundred dollars still to come. The White House is creating a task force to investigate the Indian health service. Are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash W. S J that's indeed dot com slash W s j..

Wall Street Journal Robert Muller New York Federal Trade Commission Anne Marie White House Federal Aviation Administratio Sadie Gherman Indonesia deputy attorney general PBS Ethiopia rod Rosenstein William bar attorney AT