20 Burst results for "Health Canada"

"health canada" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

08:05 min | Last month

"health canada" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"Instead of cloth masks how effective are they as an alternative? We don't truly know yet how effective shields are I am really hoping we get that data together soon because it seems like it could offer a nice alternative to wearing a face mask. The one thing about fe shields is most of them are open at the bottom and depending on if they shift and how they're positioned on your face, you may not get adequate coverage from below. So that's one disadvantage of the face shield but the positive that facial offers that amass will not offer is it also provides you some protection. So with these viruses, we talk a lot about the respiratory. Transmission, that is the most important risk for getting infected but you can also get droplets at splash onto your eyes and can lead to an infection that's less of a contributor but it's still a possibility I. Don't know about you Dr Houghton certainly heard from people who have said they need to be able to read lips to communicate and they can't because the person they're trying to communicate with is wearing a mask. Have you encountered that situation I have I've heard this from several people and then I've heard this as well with with kids you know kids who were learning language and. Who Do really need to see facial expressions not just lip reading but also see the facial expressions of those that are speaking and I think that's where. I've seen some creative clear colored masks again, the material that they're made of. May or may not be a good choice and I don't know how well they've been evaluated by certainly there is a need for something like that to come onto the market. And again, the face shields. An option in those kinds of settings where people need to read lips. I've seen one called mingle mask, which which is one of those alternatives that you're talking about not tested yet by Health Canada approved but but but an option out there and let's not forget that there are APPs hearing helper, for instance, where the person who's speaking to you can speak into their smartphone and you can actually read on off the screen what they're saying, right? Right. So I think you know it's bringing it a lot of good creativity as to how we can actually overcome these problems while wearing masks. Dr Hulda I wanted to read you a tweet. We got about people who work in healthcare. It's from at top coach. Dino. I see a lot of photos of healthcare workers, cars with many masks all over the seat or the floor. Could they have the corona virus and could the virus be airborne inside the vehicle do rummaging or removal, and then be again? Well the one thing I would say is the virus SARS covy to that causes cove nineteen is a pretty wimpy virus. It's not like it sticks around for that that long on most surfaces and especially on softer surfaces. So, while we know that surfaces and can get contaminated with the virus and that's why it's important to wash your hands and keep things clean. We're learning over time that is seems to be less of a contributor transmission overall than the respiratory route of transmission. So it doesn't look good seem strewn all over a car on the ground and not really necessarily stored in in a good or safe way. The overall risk is probably quite low to anybody who'd be in that. Car, and certainly, I'm not worried about airborne transmission within that car because of the presence of those masks, I'd like to ask you a question that will eventually get us to masks. It's about something that that that we've been hearing about in the news quite a bit lately more and more provinces are opening up bars where alcohol is being served and there's a lot of concerns about about indoor bars. What's the risk for frontline workers and patrons in that kind of Environment Bars really are in my mind one of the riskier environments for transmission in it does make me nervous to see bars opening up the challenge with bars is they are often. Darker, sometimes less ventilated area hs They're closed environments in many cases and you get people who were there intending to socialize I mean that's the main reason why you go to a bar and are moving around. So it's not like you're usually just an fixed position when you're in a bar and then you're of course there to drink and eat and talk to people and so master often off and You know you're sharing alcoholic beverages sometimes and and that can get your inhibitions down. So all of it together is kind of like a convergence of different factors that make it pretty risky for transmission. As the night goes on. I think the patrons of people who are visiting the bars are the ones who are at most risk. Those working there can probably continue to wear their mouths through their shifts and they're at slightly lower risk, but they're there for long periods of time. So I do worry about those folks as well, and for patrons the safest thing to wear a mask, which would continuously, which would kind of defeat the purpose of going to the bar. Yeah I still haven't figured out how you can drink your drink or have your meal with your mouse gone all the time. So I you know it's just not a realistic expectation for people. I I I don't know it's a very difficult topic and personally I feel like I can try it and see how how it goes. But ultimately, it would be the first place where I would shut things down again if there is a concern. We've been hearing a fair amount lately about possible airborne transmission of covid nineteen. How does that affect our approach to the decision to where mask or not? So, this is actually a really complicated topic because I think people are mistaking the possibility of aerosols which means small droplets being generated by those who are sick with covert nineteen, coughing or sneezing, or even talking vigorously with this being something that is primarily transmitted through the airborne route. So in my world of infection prevention and control, and we say something as an airborne virus or an airborne infection, it means primarily, it is transmitted by these tiny droplets that can travel far distances within a room or along air currents, and therefore, in fact, a lot of people. In that range large range weren't just not seeing that happen in real life with covid nineteen we know that people can generate these small droplets but lately, there's just not enough virus in those tiny aerosols or it's not capable of setting up infections because otherwise we'd see much higher attack rates within airplanes or in even in rooms where people are infected and are around them or in households where the attack is a ten to twenty percent in most of the studies that we see not fifty, sixty, eighty percents like you would suspect for an airborne infection. You have already relieved me of the burden of wearing a mask outdoors. When I'm going on my long runs, I just wanted to ask you is what are the places? What are the situations where you would recommend wearing a mask outdoors? I think that if you're going to be in a situation where you're around a large group of people and you're definitely not going to be able to maintain your distance from them, you can consider wearing a mask even then it's you know it's all kind of a matter of weighing the the risks of You know how much space you can have between people how much movement there is those people in that environment. What the days lake and what's what's the direction of the wind? I mean, it's it's really We don't know we just haven't studied transmission in outdoor settings well, enough yet to truly know what factors to look at. So it does take a lot of judgment as to whether you know you're going to be in a large group of people compared to what you feel comfortable with and and how well you can keep yourself from from them. In a few weeks. Many Canadian students will be going back to school for the first time in many months should there be mandatory masking in schools. Yeah I think for younger children. That's more of a tolerability issue than anything It's it's difficult. If you have young kids, you can see how they might get excited about wearing their mascot first. But pretty soon, the novelty wears off and. In fact, they can start tugging at them and wearing them.

Dr Houghton SARS Dr Hulda I Health Canada
"health canada" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

05:42 min | 2 months ago

"health canada" Discussed on Front Burner

"I think it'd be a good idea if we added to. This is picks of the Portuguese model where there is decriminalization of small, an ounce of. Currently controlled substances. So people opt labeled as criminals and spend follow this time. It cool it. That I've seen. is people with health chronic relapsing health problems? Making put a cast to around. I mean very interestingly every one vs hurling treatment programs as being. Assessed for his cost benefit analysis. Clearly shows that is same society considerable else money compared to leaving somebody out on the street or untreated, or at the mercy of an illicit drug supply, and whose primary contact with healthcare is possibly through the police so the jail system? Right so you know you talked about how it can save money. It's been well studied. It's a medically approved harm reduction measure, and you mentioned before that there are a limited number of people in Canada specifically in British Colombia I believe one hundred and thirty people. Are Receiving injectable legal heroin. Why isn't it a more common practice right now? I that is a very good question ME. It is I think the issues around pricing and difficulty in accessing, but I think as well. There's a kind of political Heroin has a lot of sort of baggage with it. I mean you will recall it. The Harper Conservative government, the first thing they did when they cut into power Tony said the party's over. I'm one of the things that he down almost all harm reduction and the happen. Government passed legislation, making it illegal to prescribe her to anybody, and that was on the overturned by Supreme Court of Canada the same, and so there's a political package. Don't see it as A. Legitimate but. If used properly. It's time to be straight with Canadian so Canadians who use drugs can get straight because narcotics destroy lives, they rob people of their futures. They tear families apart, and they lay waste to our communities came across an article from Mcclain's in two, thousand and thirteen. When the Harper government was attacking, one of those the safe supply programs that that you've been talking about, and you said at that time that that you think it's ethically quite dubious to withhold access to a scientifically proven treatment. I mean it must've I it must have been frustrating than and I. Wonder if it's frustrating now to run up against these kind of. Political obstacles. It is particularly when other countries have sort of overcome that barrier and Can provide interventions that seemed to work and work well. That means I mean public health faces alert of these obstacles It's part of history of public health and. It takes time to bring these initiatives to bear I mean look at insight from the first report that was written for the Health Canada the. Federal provincial territorial health ministers to opening insights to all of four years. And you look at the trials and tribulations of inside had to keep telling narratives that people were believing in were based on false assumptions that had been created out of this more on drugs mentality that the drugs themselves. Available most significantly people came to accept that you can't reach people if they're excluded and we need to bring them in. Now supervised substances feature across the landscaping. There's still usually contentious in the United States, so we have some provinces that. Political one ideological reasons I think my dot happy with them but We have to change people's opinions I think what at the time?.

Harper Conservative government Supreme Court of Canada Health Canada Tony heroin Canada Heroin United States Mcclain
"health canada" Discussed on Crackdown

Crackdown

03:32 min | 5 months ago

"health canada" Discussed on Crackdown

"Being able to provide that heroin to ourselves has always been the dream. But it's been hard right like we were able to just open and SAFE INJECTION SITES. Bhai ourselves illegally without permission but it's sort of like the government has the keys to the medicine chest here and when I when I say it was hard to organize this sort of thing you know like a safe supply. It's hard to organize it. Openly people have been organizing it on the down low for a long time and like we know people who've used drug testing and kind of found the best illegal source they can and and hooked up there sort of network of people with it and sort of cobbled that along but that engenders a lot of um sort of legal risk for people in that position you know more recently. I'm just last year. We did put forward a proposal where drug users would do. Just that we called it a you know a heroin compassion club or heroin coop. What what is a heroin COA? So the idea would be that You know a group of drug users. We organize ourselves and we buy a diocese morphine. You know we find a source for it and purchase in bulk pharmaceutical grade heroin and we distributed to people in the Co op. So we pool our money. We get the stuff we do this stuff. And at the same time we seek an exemption From the government so that the cops aren't kicking in the door and seizing it and arresting. Everybody this was the idea of the heroine co OP. We're just getting ready to get going here. I think we're planning on doing something quite historic here and Garth is thinking. There's some wisdom and and doing a bit of documentation which I support over to garth and so we're thinking that this is going to be like the insight of this crisis and it's great for people see drug user activists in the front seat so I asked so what you're hearing is footage that we gathered about a year ago. Ray garth on the guy that was talking is Dr. Evan would and he was chairing a meeting. That was full of drug user activists in Vancouver. We were all kind of gathered around this conference table at the be center on substance use and some of us were on the phone calling in and we are sort of debating how this would actually work. You know we were trying to blueprint out. What a heroin would be implemented any type of drug user network that we could establish having a substitute navigator supply dots here and our place to go no matter what that isn't going to be Oppressive message in any way or or do surveillance on you. Whatever people are going to do? It's replacing the shit in pig wermer and all that stuff with that trae something that straight up pharmaceutical decent job right. And then the second thing I think is is the democracy. So it's the same sublime the democracy which is the people who were members of the cooperative. Decide what they're going to do with it. We need some kind of plan like we don't want to be George Bush. The book saying Mission Accomplished and then two years later. The wars. As bad as we've got a PLO and what one is almost weekly. We gotta make sure that this this thing is happening. I think I mentioned this. But I want this to come forcefully when it drops on the lap of government which I think helped grease the wheels with Health Canada and you know The province and even people who may be skeptical light light the RCMP..

heroin Ray garth George Bush Co op RCMP morphine trae Vancouver Health Canada Dr. Evan
"health canada" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

03:20 min | 7 months ago

"health canada" Discussed on Front Burner

"The surrogate seem to be mostly women trying to do a good thing for struggling families and it certainly seems to me like they're being managed by business and industry that can put a lot of pressure on them and do the experts. You've talked you worry about a lack of protection for the targets. Yes some of them. Do I mean we spoke to multiple different fertility clinics about the way that they managed services and they all have generally pretty high standards of clearance and psychological and medical testing but each one of them differ is in how they treat any sort of back to back surrogacy because there are no national standards for wait times? There isn't even national standards. For General Women having given birth or Raymond who are going through the F. themselves and we talked about before how some clinics would allow a woman to be a surrogate and others would not exactly the same goes for wait times so we had some fertility clinics that were okay transferring in six months. Post a natural birth. We had other fertility clinic saying nine ten months. At least they would wait me. And even other fertility clinic said that they wouldn't consider doing sort of hormonal treatment with any woman regardless of whether she was a circuit or a regular woman coming to do. Ivf herself in under a year so it really does depend on the clinic. That you're going to sort of a mixed bag is showcased in the fact that we have Dr Kingdom saying if you have a C. section pregnancy. You should wait a year before you start getting transferred with another embryo and yet we found women who were transferred in as little as four months even with that profile. Okay so how do we fix these vulnerabilities of screening for being a surrogate in the first place you know? Proper communication rules successive pregnancies. We went looking for an answer to that and I mean the best thing we could come up with was health Canada because they you know the federal government was one. That legalized surrogacy in Canada. So we thought Health Canada might be able to give us an answer on medical guidelines. Here that could be followed by doctors. All across the country and fertility clinics all across the country. So there wasn't this patchwork approach you just described but health. Canada says that because it's a medical issue and it's about medical practices that ends up having to be up to the provinces and they said that they just don't have the authority to step in and I mean we know from covering pipeline disputes. And all of this other stuff that it's tough for the provinces to agree on certain things so if we want to have a national standard where we don't have surrogates and couples. Taking people across provincial borders to places where they feel like it more in line with the timelines that they for example one we would need to have some sort of national standard are there even standards in the provinces right now. No really no provincial standards. It's really up to each individual clinic and how they're going to operate. Okay guys thank you so much for this conversation which is fascinating in which we will continue. Tomorrow we're going to focus on the cops which I know our frustration for parents and and also at at times the surrogates as well so thank you so much thanks for having US thanks. Jbc.

Health Canada federal government Raymond Dr Kingdom
"health canada" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

04:23 min | 10 months ago

"health canada" Discussed on Front Burner

"So today. I'm hoping that you can help me understand how vaping really really proliferated here like. How did we get to this point and to do that? I think we need to talk about how it's been regulated. You've sort of alluded to this. E cigarettes have been around for a decade now and you know early on. Can we talk about what Health Canada's initial stance was and how it's evolved over time so the interesting thing when we went back into a look could how we got here. was that the first instincts of the public health regulators in Canada and the US was to slam the door. Shut okay these devices. I guess it's important to start. Start out saying this sort of slipped onto the market. The A couple of small companies began importing Chinese product and it began to be sort of out there Internet base sales and that sort of thing and at that point Health Canada's insects. Were that we don't know what these are. We don't know what's in them so they issued a strongly-worded warning saying to Canadians. I don't use them because we don't know what's in them or what they're doing. Okay so they were like illegal here and they were well nicotine. Based vaping devices were illegal legal. Okay the other ones would just be like flavoring or You know you can put cannabis in them as well. We'll a candidate to so so they remained illegal legal Until just may two thousand eighteen but getting to two thousand eighteen Health Canada had to try to figure out what what to do about these devices and there was a a strange kind of role reversal in the marketing. Because it wasn't the industry that was out there saying these will help you quit smoking and in fact if they had said that they probably would have had to get approval as a medical device. Okay so the standards would have been much higher. They would have had to produce animal. Tessie would have had to produce clinical trials. They would have had to get a special special approval so they they didn't do that. What happened? was they simply simply made. This product available highlighted the fact that this gave smokers and alternative and the public health officials are the ones who were running with this idea that this could be the secret to finally getting the last fifteen percent of Canadians who keep on smoking to quit. And what evidence that they have at the time that this was safe that this was a good idea. We didn't have any so. Why did they do that? Well it seem- it made sense. I mean the point I tried to make a in my reporting on this is that we never stopped and said what is a vaping aping device on its own. It's a cocktail of of an addictive nicotine and other compounds that have never before been inhaled into the lungs is that are suddenly out there and being used. Is that a good idea right. Never the compensation didn't really start there. It started always as a relative comparison. For how are they compared compared to combustible cigarette and they are better than combustible cigarettes or so everybody seems so obvious now. An evidence base situation. We don't have have the evidence of that even now in terms of Ahead for head comparison in terms of long-term Yankus I argued that they The industry got got a bit of a free pass because they didn't have to prove that these devices were safe or that they worked for smoking cessation the Public Health officials. Just some this house debate. I talked to Dr Charlotta Kissinger. WHO's a Danish tobacco control physician? Who was one of the early voices warning? Voices saying I I'm not sure about these. And even as public health England was coming out with a statement saying these are ninety five percents safer than cigarettes she was doing a systematic instamatic review. The first line she said I'm not so sure. And she updated that again a couple of years later and said actually the signal for harms is growing but she said she felt alone loan maybe in Denmark it was because it wasn't considered a problem. There were only a few percentage of the population that we're with paying at the time and we had no just ration- on Way Ping you very powerful very prominent Tobacco Oh control experts. Most things nicotine replacement products like patches gum. The nicotine inhalers tobacco. Counseling still still. I works about twenty percent of the time and usually people have to quit many many times before they finally are successful. So this when this came along it did seem like the magic bowl.

Health Canada nicotine Dr Charlotta Kissinger point Health Canada cannabis Tessie US Denmark England
"health canada" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"health canada" Discussed on 600 WREC

"What goes on in Venezuela with what I believe is extremely on sale I'll tell you what I believe in terms of quite down a minute there fella. in the end this is where it leads. it leads to a smothering central government. that leads to massive red tape. the powerful bureaucrats and politicians. its most aggressive form of course it leads to genocidal oppression. but even if it so for so called soft this form it leads to oppression. the de humanization. two conformity in uniformity. and yes the death. what do you mean by that mark the healthcare system. is destroyed. you can't secure your borders. the police are undermined unless of course they're working for the left. go ahead. I agree with what goes on. it Scandinavia. health Canada and Scandinavia. as has been pointed out by me and others all the countries that make up Scandinavia. are not socialist some of them of large welfare states but most of them are capitalist. even back in Canada. the millions of you listening to this program right now I have a very serious question of S. to be for how many of you would go to Canada for medical treatment. how many of you would go to a Scandinavian country for medical treatment. how many of you would go to a socialist country with socialist healthcare..

Scandinavia. health Canada and Venezuela Canada. Scandinavia.
A new story from Morning Edition

Morning Edition

01:38 min | 1 year ago

A new story from Morning Edition

"Did you know that many hand dryers are actually harmful to children's hearing that's according to a study published by the Canadian journal pediatrics and child health and trash actually really really loud and especially our children tied since they're closer to where the error comes out and also children's ears are more sensitive the study's author is thirteen year old nor Keegan of Calgary she has been studying this issue since she was nine transaction using hand drives my ears would start bringing and I also noticed that children was not one is hand dryers maybe like coming there yeah I wondered maybe we are just thinking I told are too sensitive but maybe actually they are too loud so I decided to test it Keegan measured over forty hand dryers in public washer and found that many dryers run louder than the manufacturers claim an offer that noise levels that are not safe for children at around one hundred and ten decibels but not Alanis measurements was one hundred twenty one decibels from the Dyson airblade model and this is not good because like health Canada doesn't allow for you for children to be sold over a hundred decibels as they know that they can damage children nine wow this is amazing she hopes that her sound a science will move Canada to regulate hand dryers but as for her future in this specific research at the moment I'm not sure if I'm gonna continue this project or not but I want to be a fine one nine indeed Keegan says Dyson has reached out to her but she hasn't had a chance to talk with them yeah

Keegan Calgary Canada Dyson Canadian Journal Alanis One Hundred Twenty One Decibel Hundred Decibels Thirteen Year Ten Decibels Forty Hand
Edmonton doesnt want to be Oil Town anymore

The Big Story

12:31 min | 1 year ago

Edmonton doesnt want to be Oil Town anymore

"If you saw the title of today's episode and you immediately thought all Edmonton and you don't actually live there, then we should have had a prize ready for you. But maybe it's not so surprising that this city has found a way to punch so far above its weight over the past few years. Most of the things needed for giant leaps and medical technology. We're already here, Edmonton has more postsecondary institutions than any other Canadian city, it has a burgeoning artificial intelligence sector and a lot of numbers to give those machines to work with, and it has a push from the city that really needs a new way to do business. Our guest today has bugged me a few times about what's been happening in his city and he hasn't been the only one and everybody that did had a story about something they're doing an Edmonton. Sounds like it's from the future. So we wanted to tell a few of those stories and try to wrap our heads around. Why Edmund how much is this? Push costing the city, what does it plan to get back? And is this part of a bigger strategy and a province that could really use a booming non oil industry to emerge over the next few years? I'm jordan. He's rawlings. And this is the big story. Steven Sandler is the editor of avenue Edmonton. Steve been one of the people that keeps telling me these crazy stories invetment. Yeah. It's, it's really been amazing, the kind of I guess it's almost like a perfect storm right now for the city in terms of putting together, a lot of different fields, a lot of different really fields of research together. In terms of creating this health city initiative to basically really promote the idea of a cross pollinating health innovation real hub, that's going to emerge Edmonton, so sort of like a Silicon Valley, if you will for health, health research, and health care where the researchers don't work in isolation. They work knowing what the others are doing to sort of really ramp up in speed up the way that, that medical research is conducted and done and to create a new business model. I mean Edmonton, obviously, any reader reader listener outside of Alberda, obviously thinks of Edmonton. And Calgary as cities still less. Oil comes first and natural resources. We're fully we're fully aware now Berta that we need to sa- firearm, our economy and diversify our the way we live, basically. And there has been this very large push Edmonton, a lot of it based on the fact that university of Alabama is one of the largest medical schools on the continent. It is one of the largest schools in the country, and it is a big research center, and using that as to underpin a real new way of looking at Edmonton, as a research hub as it's a city that's not overly big. So in the sense you don't get lost, and it's a city that has a history of being somewhat collaborative where people do talk to each other and get ideas and received a real mix not just of doctors and surgeons and all the various medical researchers. But the bringing in people from other. Fields as well to inform that research anything from industrial design to big data. Artificial intelligence at Edmonton, you of has been artificial intelligence and has had research and artificial intelligence. When we were still talking about if like the apple two es thing. So they've been Vic goes that goes back twenty thirty years will we're talking today. Because every couple of weeks for the last few months, you've kind of dropped in dropped into our little chat with, like, did you see this coming out of Edmonton, did, you know, about this technology and a number of them have been fascinating, and you've gone to look at them? So tell me you've written a few stories about this. But give me an example of the one that made the biggest impression on you. When you actually went to see what they're doing. They're a couple of I think the cover of this month's issue, which we have is something called a Kobe, Microsft fears. It's a company called IM biotechnologies out of had been Benton. It's not a secret that cancerous tumors can be dealt with if you cut off the blood supply. The, the red blood cells. They're like lot, like other organs. They feed on the blood cells. They need to survive. And if you cut off the blood supply, you can shrink it tumor or battle a tumor or possibly even kill a tumor. The thing is, is that while that practice has been known. It's never been officiant. It's been very invasive process. It's dangerous because also as dangerous for the Oregon and for the patient itself, it's a lot like a lot of other cancer treatments that the cure can actually kill the patient or hurt the patient. You know, maybe more than the benefit outweighs the benefits the holy grail. And this would be is if you could develop a system that was basically dissolved after a few weeks or maybe couple of months. And that's what they've done, and it's been approved by Health, Canada and the FDA. So instead of being this hugely invasive procedure. It's an injection and then you go home and these tiny balls go into your blood, vessels and create like a little damn that block off the blood supply the cancer, but then dissolve in time that it doesn't really hurt you long term. So the idea is, this is a big again, this is a big kind of holy grail moment to, to do this dissolve -able blood damning that can really treat cancer, and it's a big business. So we talk about, you know, the altruistic part of this, that this is wonderful. But sure, these vials are these files are going to go. I mean when I talk to they were talking about five hundred dollars of I'll, and these files are, are tidy medic. Vials. Right. So this is, again, talked with not just about the benefits of medical research, diversifying the economy and getting these businesses, not just to start here, but the plant root here in St. here that's always been the big challenge, for Canadian pharma in any way. It's not the development part. It's the stain part once that they've developed not move to the to the United States. Well, they can make more money. This is year. Absolutely not. And as well as there's a lot of other benefits in terms of how you pay staff and such like that. Let's, let's face it. But I think we're doing a better job of trying to retain, and this is the big part of that health city initiative. It's part of the part of the discussion is it's one thing to have the researchers all here in working here, but to create a Silicon Valley kind of environment. If you wanna use as analogy you need to keep them here, you need to keep people as they do in Silicon Valley in the bay area. And that comes down to a lot of things it comes down to, you know, law things that maybe don't even have a lot to do with the research. It's about the quality of life. In your city. How your city is perceived internationally. And that's where I think, actually, the biggest sort of work for Edmonton is gonna have to, to come is create a profile for the city. I mean obviously even Canada there's a lot. I mean, how many listeners here have actually been deadman ten? It's not like Toronto. Montreal vancouver. We're most of us have spent a lot of time there. It's still a kind of a mystery to a lot of people I get that. I understand that I think everyone understands that. And that's where I think that sell job has to come in. Will you mentioned earlier that, you know, to people who haven't spent time there don't know much about it. Like it is to me. I'm since I was small to meats and oil town. Right. And how do you how do you change that perception at a time when oil town is probably not the not the label? You want to attract talented people to your city. Well, I think that's part of it is trying to spread the gospel of things like health city is trying to show people that there are other other economic drivers in this city. And I think as well. Well, that it's a big research town. It always is a university town at is a government town. And therefore, has a lot of government supports and municipal supports right now is, is, it's a good time it might be ironically, and while the government here, the change over the provincial governments new just like on -tario right now, you know, we're seeing that there's already talks of some cutbacks in these areas like AI, and big data on -tario. Is that going to add further benefit to Edmonton in terms of wealth, money, isn't available in Toronto or an Ottawa? Is it gonna float Albert now, we don't know what the government is this new here? Jason Kenny, what he's going to do in that, that realm. I mean right now he's really working the carbon tax. And I think that's his that's big his big white whale right now that he's chasing. So but we're going to see long-term how that affects things, but right now I think that puts his step up, but yeah, definitely. It's a lot of things. I mean I mean, the city they talked about other things like what is the quality of life? I mean. I mean, what is things like, honestly, the theater scene. What's the downtown dining scene like, and it's really, really improved Edmonton. In fact, you know now we have some Canada's best restaurants here, but it wasn't like that even five years ago. It's changing you know what kind of sports teams do you have to go out on a weekend evening? And are you. Okay with watching the orders lose again. Or is there other options? These are all part of keeping people in a city. It's, it's, it's almost as important as the research, and the scientific work being done is how to make sure these people are happy when they come home, and that there's a lot to do, and that they have a positive image of where they live. It's not a it's changing, but it's not let's say as showy a town, maybe other places, and I think that's a good thing. And it and as well, something that, that were were jesting too, and that's something when you deal with you deal with your worldwide reputation, we'll tell me how the different aspects of health city work together. To create something like this cancer treatment, or some of the other ones, we're going to talk about you mentioned that there's artificial intelligence play. There's big data play. There's, there's medical research. How do they work together in a way that, that they may be another places? I think one of the best examples is a is an institute institute for reconstructive medicine. That's based out of a hospital in the West End of the city, they build people's faces. Let's say you have a, you know, we don't wish this on anyone and knock on wood, a terrible cancer or a terrible accident. The car accident and you have severe damaged onto your face or because of cancer because of cancer or some other sort of disease, doctors have to remove part of your face. Or, or, you know, I talked to a patient who had throat cancer, and they basically had to take out much of his throat and replace it with muscles from other parts of his body, Chris, thanks. Jesus looked like percents. Right. You know, you'd know if someone had let's say. Say a glass eye or a fake knows percents ear and a few years ago, the whole thinking was wire doctors doing the measuring part because that's not their expertise. Their expertise is going after the cancer. So the idea with IRS with they're doing there. They brought together industrial designers computer designers to work on building the implants and is Ben, Ben king, who is one of the designers there. It said to me, very, he said we said the dog who said to the medical profession. Why don't you use the carpenters adage measure twice cut once and so using a lot of technology now with these facial surgeries? Not only are they building percents that are custom made to people's faces because they're measuring and saying it's not one-size-fits-all because it used to be like that you had, it was like getting a t shirt, like, oh, if you're this age, you get a small medium, or large percentage. Now it's custom built to your face. Or if you need to get new teeth or. You need to get new parts to your face. They can look at it and I mean some of the stuff they're doing. It's incredible. I mean I described it walking in. It was you walk into it looks like a Star Trek sick bay mixed with a costume parlour because there really are like masks, that are all that, that are that they're working on and molds, and as well. There's this top end machinery to scam people's heads and scan people's faces. And, you know they're talking about developing dies that, that change with the sun.

Edmonton Cancer Canada Silicon Valley Toronto Steven Sandler Edmund Calgary Apple Government Editor United States Berta Jason Kenny Steve VIC
"health canada" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"health canada" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"It's limited to how many employees you wanna use it for at, but always, does the same thing in fix stress and the time the time management that the doctor spend on board king in the practice you wanna working on the practice, not in their practice. So I'm very proud of that accomplishment stream dental HR now is she in your. British Vancouver Columbia officer, she in Montreal. She was in my Cowdery office. So it's the third one that you mentioned. And so the business got the stream dental gets so busy that she actually get. What guess what quit? She goes. I'm quitting as your office manager. I'm remaining as your business partner. I go what you know what you have to do before you leave. She goes, yeah, no use then stream dental to find my replacement and sure enough. She didn't. So she with you now she's not, unfortunately, I'm in Vancouver, and she's in, she's an L Berta. But I we connect on a day on a weekly basis, but she's not with me right now enough to bring her off. Yeah. Well, that, that is just so important immediate just HR is everything my buddy fridge oil writes, these amazing books called marketing is everything and. I think HR is everything and we marketing is so important, but gosh, HR is just so tough. So, my gosh, I can't believe we, we went over all this is there anything you're hoping that I would talk about that. I was on do not bring up one one point is just because and it comes out of pride more than anything about. I have a product that is called a issue. Yeah, that's your. My name is on the bottle. So after mention it, you understand so sterilizer is a solution that cleans a liners, we got it FDA approved in Health Canada proved in it selling all over the world. But the way was born the story behind it as an easing. I have a lady an older patient with seventy three years old, with treating her with invisibility because she wants the night smile for her daughter's wedding. But she comes to me, she pulls me aside, you know, with their generation being privacy goes talk to Dr I wanna to ask you is there anything I can use these tablets. You're giving me to clean the liners. They make him look white, but they still smell and they still face funny, these liners. So try this try that nothing would work out. So Finally, I met with classmate friend of mine, and a PHD chemists. And we worked out a solution for these eleven months, and then we came up with sterile liner..

Vancouver office manager officer Montreal partner FDA Health Canada seventy three years eleven months
The Rock N Play sleeper was recalled in the U.S. after 32 deaths

The Big Story

13:51 min | 1 year ago

The Rock N Play sleeper was recalled in the U.S. after 32 deaths

"If you've ever been a parent or taken care of an infant for any length of time, or even just had a baby in the same house, as you, you know, how much sleep matters. When will the baby sleep when will I sleep for how long please don't wake up yet, if this gets bad, and sometimes with kids it gets bad, you'll do anything for a few hours, which brings us to the Fisher Price rock and play sleeper. If there's a device out there that will get a child to sleep and help them stay that way. Then there are parents desperate enough to try it. And sometimes the unimaginable happens. Tonight. Parents warned to stop using the Fisher Price rock and play sleeper immediately. The move comes just days after a consumer reports investigation found at least thirty two deaths linked to the incline sleeper. That's why you can't buy be Rockin play sleeper anymore in the United States anyway here in Canada. It's called the Fisher Price Rockin play soothing seat. And yes, it's the same thing. I can buy this right now. I have an open order sitting on an online retailer right in front of me. Does a label change that much can a new name help parents use this product in a safer way? And look, I get that there are loopholes and regulations around products, but doesn't the term better safe than sorry come into play. At some point. Jordan. He throwing. And this is the big story Arielle Brewster is a senior editor at today's parent, high RAM and Claire ganja is the health editor at today's parent. Hello. Hello. REO. First of all, maybe can you just describe the rock and play, like what does it look like what does it do? It's sort of a waste high place to put your baby down not as far as best in it. It's not as seat like as a bouncer chair. It has mesh sides. It can fold up and sort of collapse into itself to go under a bed, your baby would sort of sit in, in a nestled position and I should mention there also safety straps to keep them in it. It could be used for naps. It could be used when you want to take a shower and drag it into the bathroom wanna unload, the dishwasher and to mobilize baby for a little while. Yeah. Just put them down without putting them on the floor and how. Do parents use it in general. I think it depends a lot of parents probably use it for Notts. They nursed their baby the baby falls asleep. You put them in the rock and play you go unload, the dishwasher. Some parents use it I leap. And that might be up or it might be for the whole night long, obviously with intervals breaks to feed the baby in the US the product was labeled as a sleeper and said, safer overnight sleep right on the box in Canada. It does not help popular are these things. Well, we know that four point seven million of them recalled anyways, so quite a few were sold. You know, when my first daughter was born didn't exist. So it's not something that I had its parent, but I had heard of it, you know, going through my parenting and a lot of parenting groups Facebook where they talk about sleep. It's called a lifesaver. It's something that many parents, sort of have come to rely on as a place where their kids might sleep for three hour stretch versus maybe twenty minute stretch. You know, they were getting in like a flat bassinet type environment. I do think they've been increasing in popularity even between having my first kid and second kid, I started seeing them out. They're more WalMart target when target was in Canada. They started doing designer collaborations as well. So you could not only get the basic rock and play, you could get a Jonathan Adler designed rock and play with special fabric or wouldn't accents. There were a lot of different options. Some of them were as low as like eighty dollars. It could go up to one twenty one seventy depending on how fancy however, for place for your baby to sleep like hundred twenty dollars is actually quite cheap. When you look at the other options out there, which I think, was part of the popularity as well, when, you know, you're only going to use it for a couple of months to be in your room, or when the baby's under three months, it's a seemed like a great option. I think you also saw it's sort of cult like status in the reactions that came out after it was recalled there were stories on how do we know maybe off the rock and play, you know. What are you gonna do? Now that, you know. So you kind of got a sense of how ingrained it had become in sort of an early parenthood news that product that everybody had that they relied on for their kids to sleep in. So this is a major recall in the parenting world done. It's fair to say. Why was it recalled consumer reports didn't investigation and they linked the rock and play to thirty two deaths in the United States to thirty two deaths since two thousand and nine this came out in stages. The consumer Product Safety Commission issued a joint warning with Fisher Price saying that parents should discontinue use of it. Once the infant has been able to start rolling over or is three months of age, and I think I was always in the, the guidelines on how to use the product, but they came up with a warning on April fifth, and then on April eighth consumer reports published a full investigation, and it became clear that they had been looking into it for a while. So they had, you know, interviewed doctors look debt, medical evidence. I think there were some lawsuits that had been launched from some of the families where the baby's head died, and they had been digging around, and they sort of said, hey, we have guidelines for safely, the guidelines are babies should be. Lying flat. Flat surface, there shouldn't be any anything that might cause them to suffocate nearby, like so, like, you know, no blankets in the crib, stuffy no pillows. These are all very long standing guidelines, the very clear and they're arguably doesn't meet those guidelines, so consumer reports seem to be saying, hey, we need to look at this product, we're linking it to these deaths Fisher Price at the time and still to my knowledge is saying that there was misuse of the product. So it was being used longer than the recommended time. So like pass three months or pass when it could roll over. Or maybe there was a digital batting put into the rock and play that shouldn't have been there. I don't think we know all those details at this point. But consumer reports basically was saying, hey, we've got thirty two kids who've died. Let's this product it was shortly after that, that they actually recall the product, how do babies die, and this thing he's at Suffolk Asian. Is it do we know we don't know all the details on that still? CPSC is focusing on rolling over so babies who they've Rishon age where they can turn themselves over, but they can't get themselves back into recession where they can start breathing. And so parents sometimes even know that they can roll over right? Like that didn't roll over yesterday. But the man product and now the they're rolling over. So that is also why it's like three months because three months would be sort of an age of that milestone where, you know, babies more more likely will be able to, to roll over that is one cause of death. There are indications that there could have been, you know, other contributing medical factors in some of the deaths that also needs to be looked at, but there's also something called positional, asphyxia succesion, and that is, is basically, it means you're suffocating based on your position. So the babies would have gotten themselves into -sition where their, their chins were sort of down on their chest, and it's cutting off the airway that is something that can happen in car siege. It can happen in a swing. It does. Happen. And I think it's under that would that they'll be looking at parents might be using it wrong or using it for longer than the intended time. But I mean, I'm I'm a parent and I understand that you do what works, but even for those who aren't parents are because you guys talk to millions of parents, give us a little bit of insight into the mind of apparent that is trying to use contraptions like this to get their kid to sleep share. I think I think let me posted our story. We got a lot of then they're done that moms who were very defensive or saying, you know, I suffered with sleep deprivation. That's just what being a parent is, basically buck up. And I thought that was pretty unfair because my sense, is that when you're using this device, it's because you don't have a good sleeper naturally, and we're not talking about parents who are leaving their kids in Iraq in play for eight or nine hours. And an assuming that early parenthood is a full night's sleep for the most part. I think it's parents who were hoping to get a two or three hour stretch instead of twenty or thirty minute stretch they didn't have. Unreasonable expectations they'd tried bouncing on a yoga ball for one hour. Two hours than gently putting the baby in the bassinet. They'd tried pre warming the best in it with them microwaveable bean. Bet you know, they'd done everything every white noise machine lullaby and the only way they're babies slept longer than thirty minutes was in the rock and play. And that bought them, maybe three or four hours, and that is considered a huge victory when you have a young, baby. So I, I don't think we should think these are negligent, parents, these are parents were actually trying everything, and they're extremely sleep-deprived because what happens to all those cases is start maybe making other decisions that aren't that safe fall asleep with the baby on a coach or just in Iraq. And so parents who are deciding to use products to help the rape sleep or not necessarily taking shortcut or they've actually spent a lot of time, weighing all the risks and benefits and they know that they're not functioning properly southern. Making a choice. I think maybe is safer here in this thing, then with me at this time, so now we get to the risks and benefits, part this product is still available in Canada. Correct. So the product is available in Canada, but it's not called a rock in place, leaper. That is what it's called in the United States in Canada. It's called a rock in place, soothing seat. And so the pictures on the box, and the wording and everything, sort of, implies that it's, you know, for that I use that are was talking about before, where you maybe need to the dishwasher, and you put your happy baby next to you, and they might talk to them a little bit while you're you're doing it, but they're just sitting in it. Sure. I mean that's not reality, especially with a newborn, they newborn sleep for a lot of the day and, and night, maybe not a night. But if you have a baby, that's, that's napping. Those chances are it's going to it might sleep, even though that's what it's called in Canada. It is the same product so a baby might fall asleep in the product in the. United States just as they might fall asleep in the product in Canada. The reason is still for sale here. Is that Health Canada had concerns about it, but they brought their concerns in two thousand eleven when Mattel brought the product to Canada, they said, whoa, they're calling this a sleeper, and it doesn't meet any of our requirements for safe sleep environment? We actually have regulations here. They're called the cribs cradles bass nets regulations and they sort of outlined, what a product that's going to be sold here for that purpose needs to look like you know, probably has to be a certain size. And the one thing that definitely needs to be as flat. This product is not flat. It wasn't until they changed the name of the product and all the labeling to call soothing seat that it was even allowed to be sold here. How different are the actual to products. We did try to find out the best. We could if there were any designed differences. We don't think there are we everyone talks about them, as though they are the same product. We. We asked Mattel, if there are any designed differences, they did not respond to that part of the question they referred to the labelling differences. So we're assuming they are the same product. I can tell you about to about one in the US. My parents are American had it shipped to their house because there's more variety. I was shopping around for a different design, and I got one that I liked better while shopping online in the US smuggled it in and I also I think I got one from an event here in Toronto. I did not notice different labelling on the box. Did I look that closely? I'm not sure if said, soothing C N, one said, sleeper, I can tell you I use both had one upstairs and went downstairs, and to me they were the exact same product just different colors was a bunny was a lamb. Talked to Canadian parents about this. They use it differently. No, they do not. They use the exact same way in American parent would use it. I wanted to add that a lot of parents who use the product have babies who have something called reflex, which is not just spit up. It's a baby who always pukes allot after feet and you're instructed to keep them upright for like thirty minutes after feed. This is actually quite difficult. If you have a baby, who falls asleep while nursing falls asleep, while taking a bottle, and then you're supposed to keep this asleep. Newborn, upright, somehow waking them the rock and play really to me solve that problem. And that's actually why I got it for my second kid. My first kid was super bar fee. It was a nightmare. I thought, oh here's what I needed some way to keep him upright. Without waking him, put them in there to sleep. Definitely and other parents, you talked to in Canada, the same thing. Yes. I mostly did it for naps. I'll admit I never did it for overnight. Because his reflects never seemed as bad, then but I can see. If it's working during the day logically, you would think why not do it at night as well. What do doctors in Canada? Think about the fact that this is available here after it's been recalled.

Canada United States Fisher Price Iraq Mattel Product Safety Commission Facebook Jonathan Adler Jordan Arielle Brewster Walmart Rape Cpsc Suffolk Asian -Sition Health Canada Claire Ganja
"health canada" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

Psychedelic Salon

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"health canada" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

"I lived in Oshawa and studied yoga and meditation. So by the time I got back to Canada. Data and starting new laboratory, I still had no idea. It wasn't until I appeared in front of mind states in Berkeley that I realized how many people came up to me and said, you have changed my whole life. I've been wanting to meet you for twenty or thirty years. And of course, this was amazing to me this was in two thousand and one. So this is the two thousand and one mines days, I think it was a may late may and. So after I made that appearance really was like since nineteen seventy two two thousand one. I know I dear the effects of what I doing. I did it Sheely on my own personal experience. And how important it became to me through all of my visions that everybody must get stoned villain used to say, and that it's a really good thing. At least once in your life to take a look into, you know, you're in a self and see that listening to everybody above you around two is okay for surviving. But if you wanna have deep spiritual experience and know God, you must look within. Because it doesn't exist inside of you. That's that's exactly right. Those those are my sentiments share with share with me. And our listeners the lab that that you put together in in Canada. And and how you've actually were were found out and arrested there and then extradited back to the US. Well. When I was in Canada, someone came up. To me. And they said, you know, a few people found out who I was what I could do. And a and I just basically it was living mining little goal then farming up northern Canada, a peaceful life, and they prevailed upon me to open a laboratory and teach them to make psychedelics which I agreed to do. And we got together, and we did it and we produced. Very fine MDA GMT hell s the and then surely we were. Did few the cowardice of another second pallet chemist named Lenin? You know, when our food the so that was very disappointing. Lavatory was extremely beautiful. We really it was a it was a work of love and it worked perfectly, and we produce superfine sacraments for people to take a lot of ecstasy a lot of pure ecstasy better than pharmaceutical grade and. Is it? And then I was taken back laboratory was one of the finest laboratories that it ever been discovered. And it was so fine lavatory that the Health Canada, his show in charge of the thinking down of the laboratory said that they didn't have anything like this anywhere in Canada, and not even in their own RCMP and level abattoirs and Ottawa, and he was very impressed with what we had. And so made feel full length video of it, which I've got a copy of it's kind of depressing to see them. Destroys something didn't really destroy. But they just made a movie of what was there? And so, but the atmosphere, of course, sad, you know, very terrorizing many people of our groups who seeing this. I don't wanna see that again. It's just too depressing. But there's a full screen version of the full length film of the laboratory being entered and filmed, so that does exist. But I think what things I would like to say about end EMA, which we haven't hit yet is that I think it's very important. And I think that L S T, you know, in the deconstruction of the paradigm that is beginning to be dysfunctional such as United States policies and hypocrisies that you need to start to deconstruct..

Canada RCMP Lenin Oshawa Health Canada Berkeley US United States Ottawa thirty years
"health canada" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"health canada" Discussed on The Big Story

"You're trying to access services to mitigate some of the health and social impacts that people feel when are reliant on the street drug supply. So he's, you know, been basically like a massive resource for us. In terms of explaining how to design this lifesaving service. And does he then golden evangelize for you? I mean, we're getting close to launch. But yeah, I mean, he's he I think he would be sort of an early proponent among his, you know, his social network about why this is an important service. How could be helpful kind of what to expect what not to expect its limitations? And you know, how basically like how people can incorporate this service into their daily life. But the hope is you know, that with the help of people like Chris who are again, like the experts on what it takes to solve some of the health issues that people who use drugs in a city face because of the policy and criminalization that they experienced daily, you know, with his help and explaining that, we can design a better system before you kind of go onto the front lines with that system. Have you tried to get a sense of the scope of the problem in Toronto? Yeah. There is actually some pretty compelling. Data. That's unfortunately, the most compelling data. We have comes from the coroner's office. And there's a reason for that. Yeah. And year over year. We're just seeing an increase in the number of people in Toronto who are dying of overdoses and an increase in the proportion of people who are dying specifically a federal related overdoses one of the major drivers. Here is the fact that our street drug market in the street drug supply in Canada is just poisoned. It's just absolutely poisoned. And the analogy I I like to make is a this exhibit that we're gonna talk about is really focused on stigma, and the analogy I like to make is, you know, how do you think the government will respond? If Toronto's water supply was poisoned like how rapidly. Would there be quarantining? How rapidly would be flooding. You know, the supply with freshwater how rapidly would our response be in terms of making sure that everybody knew the risks informing people educating analyzing the substances. Now that's happening in Toronto. It's just that people are dependent on a supply of street drugs rather than water. These are people who rely on one supply, and they are being poisoned. And the fact that we see a difference in the, you know, the slow response of government. Well, we have to consider the risks of actually intervening, and there are regulations around like all of that is stigma turn into policy slowing down the policy works slowing down the speed at which we can intervene and stop people from dying of really, unfortunately, extremely preventable death. And when you're trying to take this technology out to the streets and test these drugs, what has stood in your way before. Now. So to do this. I mean, we were funded to do this. And you know, we're we're funded by Health Canada, which is amazing. So they are interested in helping us to respond and provide people with hopefully life saving information about the kinds of toxic substances that are industry drugs that people are gonna. Us, but we've had to go through all kinds of regulatory hurdles there's exemptions from the Canadian controlled drugs and substances act. There's four layers of research ethics board approvals that we've had to do we've had to basically make the case for why including people who use drugs as core. Members of our team is integral to the success of this project. And it's not just implementation we also have to because we're scientists we have to evaluate it. And make sure that you know, we're actually seeing the effectiveness that we hope we're going to see right. But really, you know, again like for all the interest. The government has in trying to mitigate you know, this opioid overdose epidemic at the same time. Like, we are just facing administrative hurdles all over the place. We're overcoming them. And that's great. And in a way, you know, we got a crash through these layers of bureaucracy now. So that in the future, they're kind of trampled a little bit. And but yeah. It's a it's a slog for sure if the best data we have now comes from the coroner's office. What do we need to do to find better numbers? So that we can stop this at least in in some people and help them before it gets there. Yeah..

Toronto Canada Chris Health Canada
"health canada" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"health canada" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Manufacturing and healthcare delivery. We're actually pharma grade facility. What's important, and what makes us unlike contract manufacturer in other industries is that we don't just put people into business we go into business with people. We will get our formulas involved with their formulator and really launch a product that way. Many farms focus on quality and purity to uphold Canada's reputations as a global leader in the cannabis industry. We use advanced processes are equipment is not new in the way that it's been used successfully in other industries, we've taken from those industries and applied them here in a way that is automated at an industrial scale, even if they work at twenty five percent, capacity. Many farm is projected to make twelve million dollars quarterly in revenue which puts them at par with some of Canada's top licensed producers led by a team with a proven track record of success using innovative extraction. Methodologies many farm is creating there in the cannabis supply chain the fact that we are the first licensed by Health Canada, solely for extraction solely for concentrate production physicians as well to be one of those leaders, and it is really exciting. To come to work every day knowing that you're developing and industry from scratch is an opportunity that we haven't seen kind of in the past few generations of global business. Cannabis industry has opened a new chapter in the Canadian marketplace, and many farm labs is poised to be a valuable participants as the sector matures. After the break was happened to one company does ventured beyond dried cannabis products, they've been able to penetrate the market with about sixty percent of their sales derived from cannabis extracts and later like all companies with their eye on the future. This is well aware of the challenge ahead in the edible cannabis Marquette's able to infuse cannabis with minimal amount of impact on the aroma and taste of.

cannabis Canada Health Canada twelve million dollars twenty five percent sixty percent
"health canada" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"health canada" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"An unparalleled processing expertise comes from a team of experts in pharmaceuticals bio, manufacturing and healthcare delivery. We're actually pharma grade facility what's important, and what makes us unlike contract manufacturer and other industries is that we don't just put people into business we go into business with people. We will get our formulas involved with their formulator and really launch a product that way. Many farms focus on quality and purity to uphold Canada's reputation as the global leader in the cannabis industry. We use advanced processes are a is not new in the way that it's been used successfully in other industries, we've taken from those industries and apply them here in a way that is automated at an industrial scale, even if they work at twenty five percent, capacity. Medi farm is projected to make twelve million dollars quarterly in revenue which puts them at par with some of Canada's top licensed producers led by a team with a proven track record of success using innovative extraction. Methodologies many farm is creating their niche in the cannabis supply chain the fact that we are the first license by Health Canada, solely for extraction solely for concentrate production physicians as well to be one of those leaders is really exciting. To come to work every day knowing that you're developing and industry from scratch is an opportunity that we haven't seen kind of in the past few generations of, you know, global business the cannabis industry.

cannabis Canada Health Canada twelve million dollars twenty five percent
"health canada" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"health canada" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Factoring and healthcare delivery. We're actually pharma grade facility. What's important, and what makes us unlike contract manufacturer in other industries is that we don't just put people into business we go into business with people. We will get our formulas involved with their formulator and really launch a product that way, medi farms focus on quality and purity aims to uphold Canada's reputation as the global leader in the cannabis industry. We use advanced processes are equipment is not new in the way that has been used successfully in other industries, we've taken from those industries and applied them here in a way that is automated at an industrial scale, even if they work at twenty five percent, capacity. Medi farm is projected to make twelve million dollars quarterly in revenue which puts them at heart with some of Canada's top licensed producers led by a t. Team with a proven track record of six tests using innovative extraction. Methodologies many farm is creating their niche in the cannabis supply chain the fact that we are the first licensed by Health Canada, solely for extraction solely for concentrate production physicians as well to be one of those leaders is really exciting to come to work every day knowing that you're developing and industry from scratch is an opportunity that we haven't seen kind of in the past few generations of global business. The cannabis industry has.

cannabis Canada Health Canada twelve million dollars twenty five percent
"health canada" Discussed on The MacCast

The MacCast

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"health canada" Discussed on The MacCast

"So when is apple going to roll it out in other countries in other regions, we really don't know although a person in Canada was curious and sent a tweet to Health Canada. The government health agency there on Twitter, and their response was rather interesting. They said they had not received an application. For apple watch series four. And that they said, quote, the decision to submit a medical device license application rests on the manufacturer. So they're in essence claiming that apple has an even applied for a medical device license for apple watch series four in Canada. Now, the how and why and all those things those are big questions, but only apple is really going to know the answers to those. We do know that apple has said they're planning to bring out the feature to more apple watch owners over the next year. And the big question, of course is which regions which people and the answer. Unfortunately, is we really don't know. So all we can do is wait for more news in when I do when if I do get more news. I will. Of course, let you know here on the MAC cast few other features of apple watch. Or watch OS rather five point one point two of note, you do get direct access to supported movie tickets coupons and re roared reward cards in the wallet. When you tap on a contactless reader. So if those things support contactless readers than they will automatically come up with your apple watch, you can also receive notifications in animated celebrations when you achieve daily maximum points in the actively inactivity competition and finally there is a new ability to manage the availability of the walkie talkie feature from the control center, so you can add a walkie talkie button into the troll center to turn on off your availability for walkie talkie, which that is really handy because that whole process a little bit was a little bit buried in the past so to be able to just get into control center and turn that on off that is a nice little update. So if you'd like to grab this it is available now, you can not just initiate it through the. The watch app on your device. Looks like US carriers have finally begun. Offering e sim support for Apple's.

apple Canada Twitter Health Canada US
"health canada" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"health canada" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"I think you listen for five minutes what's going on? I would listen for five minutes because they have to. First minute. I'd be thinking I made a mistake. Oh, this is a screw up. Awesome. Then I'd start to worry. What's going on? Probably okay. Is it somebody faint Marcus attending to him? And. At some point you just give up maybe five or six minute, Mike. That's my guess. I have to tell you that program directors used to talk about dead air, and how what a scene it was. I mean, it kind of is. But his thing. No one is going to turn it off during der. If there's thirty seconds of dead air, you're not turning it off because you want to find out. Why does there? It's not pleasant it's unprofessional. But you're not turning it off for sure. By the way, a lot of stuff. People used to say back in the day program directors used to say turns out to be wrong is this never know. Larry, I won't get into that. I was never a program director could never do that too much management of people. So six one seven two five four ten thirty. And. Love to chat with you. I guess filmmaker writer producer what the Health Canada, an extreme view of. Health and food says no meat. No eggs. No dairy. And he's a yoga, dude. And yes, he's extreme. But he might have a point. Probably the some kernels of truth of what he says, I still can't figure out what their eggs are good or bad for you, though. Look it up online look for exit good view, and they'll tell you. Oh, yeah. Exit great exit bad. Same thing. Okay. I asked the question on. The line. On the computer. Yeah. The day, and I got a massive response. And it was a simple question. Sometimes it's simple questions. Get the most response. And it was only a forward question. One two three four. And the forwards are what's wrong with people? It's wide open. What's wrong.

program director Larry Marcus Health Canada Mike writer producer five minutes thirty seconds six minute
"health canada" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"health canada" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"All the legal product going on sale across Canada is coming from licensed producers regulated by Health Canada. These are companies that largely got their start under the legal regime set up for medical marijuana. Now, the ramping up for massive expansion as legalization makes their product more widely available, which introduces a new kind of scientific question. How do we grow cannabis? Of course, people have been growing cannabis for thousands of years and illegal growers have been famously maybe notoriously innovative to maximize production, but big growers are looking to science to move past that underground knowledge and get the best out of their plants. And this knowledge might also be useful to those interested in growing their own in the provinces where that will be legal. So we visited a licensed producer just outside of Hamilton Ontario to get a tour with a grower and meet the first North American. Scientists to scientifically study best practices for growing cannabis high, corks and quirks. Welcome to believe b. l. e. v. e. like leaves from the plants. My name is Tara. I'm a grower at belief canvas. So if you come on in here, you can smell the aromas from the doorway someone who's during Kaplan. I recently finished my PHD studying cannabis culture. The degrees fairly unique because cannabis has been illegal for so many years believe I'm the first in North America have these credentials. So in this room right now, we have three strains growing. We've got coal creek San Fernando Valley and Schick berry in terms of canvas science and literature and scientific journals. Right now, it's sparse. There's lots of things that have been tried that seem to work practice that growers will use right now. But we found that even the ones that are tried and true underground, we've tested them and some of them don't work out the way they're supposed to so important to build a body of scientific information. That growers can base their, they're growing on their production choices. One of the things I found really interesting about the industry is that there's a lot of practices that have been around for many, many years, but there are definitely new techniques that are coming in to replace them and to improve on those techniques. So cannabis growth in nature and under controlled environment is split into two gross stages, the vegetative stage in the flowering stage, and it's controlled by the photo period or the number of daylight hours the plan receives. So if the plan has more than twelve hours of daylight proximity, then it'll remain in the vegetative state and they'll grow leafy growth and will grow quickly. And when that lading period is adjusted to twelve or fewer hours than the plant starts to flower. And then once started to flower, it will begin producing flowers, which is generally the product sold and it'll semester die after seven to twelve weeks. So in front of every room that we enter, we have sticky mats that will actually collect any debris that you pick up in the room and prevent it from being tracked through the facility or out of the facility or into facility. So we started with some of the most basic horticultural production practices and fertilizers, one of them. Interestingly, in the flowering stage, we found that more fertilizer would dilute some of the important cannabinoid THC and CB for example. So the first thing to keep in mind when it comes to fertilizing your cannabis plants is that applying too much for the laser can decrease.

cannabis producer Canada marijuana Hamilton Ontario Health Canada North America San Fernando Valley Kaplan Schick berry Tara CB b. l. e. twelve hours twelve weeks
"health canada" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"health canada" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"At the beginning of the year Health Canada issued a guide to cannabis. It included a helpful glossary of euphemisms to help clued out. Parents sound hep when chatting with red teen kids about Reefer this glossary included bud pot, Mary Jane, and we'd it also included Earl perp and dank creepy. I don't bring that up to make fun of the government. That's not the only reason I bring it up. The other reason I bring it up is to mention another federally sanctioned euphemism herb. Now that is a legitimate slang term, but it's also a term for you know, an urban, it's important to know the difference. Now, some teenagers in Colorado Springs Colorado have learned that difference probably after about an hour of seeing dude, are you feeling anything early yesterday morning, these teenagers just smashed a minivan into the front window of cannabis store called native roots. Then they grabbed as much stuff as they could grab, and they took off in a car, leaving the minivan behind as heist go. It was irritatingly idiotic, but it was also hilariously idiotic because all the herb, they stole was an actual herb oregano all of it, but ever joints, sore jars, whatever they thought was quality weed or. Earl, if you will was oregano as native roots spokesperson, Kim, Casey told TV in Colorado Springs quote, we do not put actual Medicated product in them. So we use oregano to simulate the canvas. Our product is never out unquote. Now who would have thought that a store would keep its valuable product locked up and put something that looked like it on display in the window. I know everyone everyone would have, so you would be thieves, need to get help and learn to distinguish Komen herb from dank creepy..

cannabis Earl Colorado Springs Colorado Colorado Springs Health Canada Mary Jane Kim Casey
"health canada" Discussed on The Chad Prather Show

The Chad Prather Show

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"health canada" Discussed on The Chad Prather Show

"Remember with my bookie you play, you win. You get paid, so you wanna call next. I don't know. We call him that's on McCoy country legend Neal, McCoy. I just got off the phone with his daughter because. We're doing that event at the end of September, let's call him on the phone. So if we can get him as called me on McCoy making, she's a sweetheart. She runs all Neal's business. She's a sweetheart. Man, I got you on speakerphone. My wife sitting here I got, we're record. I'm a record this conversation. We'll put it on the podcast this week, so you better straighten up and fly, right? Yeah. What part of the country are you in. Not. I'm llanview Jackson day. Got home late last night when she go alone. Fan of ours, then gap Hoppy. Got it. Thirty six. Lada lot of different complicates. He passed away last Thursday to service yesterday in Chicago, so abashed Gaga flew in winter that. So sorry to hear that. Yes, you're good man meal. They'll don't spend as I Vaga. Exactly exactly. I just got off the phone with your daughter. And Mickey was telling me because I told her, I said, look about the message you and let you know that through the weekend and through Tuesday, we'll be down to south Texas, and I'm not gonna have a cell signal because we'll be doing that. Look getaway thing down there in the canyons and. And she's, she said, my daddy couldn't handle that. She said he couldn't handle that going without a cell phone. But I said, I don't know how I'm gonna handle it. His Co. calls me some real stress is what is going to do, but we got everything worked out for that east east, Texas angel's network that you guys are putting on in. I'm ready. Going to be there Friday night. That's as Health Canada can't breakdown. You got about a million. Thank you'd be doing. Look, y'all offering free dinner. I'm coming. Remember that next time I got extra minimal come. It is free, right? It is free. Well, the big thing that I want to do is I want to go visit with the kids on Saturday morning in a new that getting in would be it'd be better. I'm sweet. I'm pretty sweet and I don't mean. And when you when you get out of Carl dog, you and ask her about that. And I'm sure she had this. Yes, yes. He's she'd rolling her eyes right now. You can't have it, but no, I'm looking forward to it. Man. Charley pride's come and you're going to be there. I guess they're gonna let you do something right..

McCoy Mickey Neal Texas Charley pride llanview Jackson Health Canada Gaga Chicago His Co. Carl