35 Burst results for "Health Association"

More Black Americans Open to Vaccines After Outreach Efforts

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 5 d ago

More Black Americans Open to Vaccines After Outreach Efforts

"More black Americans are saying they're open to taking the coronavirus vaccine the head of the American public health association says attitudes among black Americans toward the vaccines have made an almost one hundred and eighty degree turn the latest Associated Press and O. R. C. center for public affairs research poll shows the number of black Americans leaning against getting vaccinated has dropped to about twenty four percent that's down from forty one percent in January in comparison about twenty six percent of white Americans said they will probably or definitely not get vaccinated what twenty two percent of Hispanic Americans expressed doubts outreach campaigns have sought to combat misinformation and reassure people that the covert nineteen vaccines available are safe and effective on Ben Thomas

O. R. C. Center For Public Aff American Public Health Associa Associated Press Ben Thomas
FDA staff endorses J&J’s single-shot Covid vaccine for emergency use

Gaydos and Chad

00:13 sec | Last month

FDA staff endorses J&J’s single-shot Covid vaccine for emergency use

"The Johnson and Johnson covert vaccine has been deemed safe and effective by the FDA. It does not have to be stored in cold temperatures will humble with the Arizona Public Health Association says it's perfect for pharmacies, doctor's offices and community health

Johnson Arizona Public Health Associat FDA
"health association" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:49 min | 3 months ago

"health association" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Is that there isn't a strict the doctors call it and I'm not a doctor. The doctor's quality dose response. So it's not like you. It's safe to smoke one cigarette a week. It's not safe to smoke any cigarettes per week and what the surgeon general Observed in a report in the last couple of years is that's really the challenge because these so called social smokers who think Oh, I only smoke when I go out to the bars, or I only smoke when I go here or there or anywhere. They're putting themselves at risk. They have a very real health risk, even though they're just social smokers. Well, and now we've actually eliminated a lot of that because they can't socially smoke at bars. They can't socially smoke at restaurants. This temptation has been removed and you mentioned that that people who are in the food service industry are now less likely to smoke and less likely to have these diseases because they're not exposed to that second hand. And were there. You've told me this before, And I don't think we've mentioned it. Today They're less the food service industry workers are less likely to now start smoking because they're not exposed to it. That's correct. How many kids have gotten there? First Jabs, part time jobs in the food service industry tables are working the back bar or something. I worked in my dad's restaurant and And by he having those environments all be smoke free. There's less of a temptation for those kids who were in their first jabs and young people. I don't mean to say kids pejoratively but young people. Teenagers, early twenties, etcetera, last time less temptation. That's that's so great because and the other thing is, too. I've always thought during the winter. It's a great time to stop because now that you are focused on having to be outside to go smoke now you have to put on a coat. You have to get your mittens on. And you can't have your mittens on because you're holding a cigarette in your hat on you have to, but if you have to bundle to do a habit, it does not seem like something you want to do. It's cold here typically, and I I've always I've always wondered how close to quitting. The people are standing outside of bars smoking on a Saturday night. You hope, their clothes. I hope, their clothes and maybe we're going to get them a little bit closer. Joel affects joining me. We have got tons more to talk about. Hustle of the Hancock is coming up soon. It's right around the corner on Ben. We want to talk about some lung cancer statistics and all kinds of good stuff. Real effort. Respiratory Health Association metropolitan Chicago, Hannah Stanley here beyond Sports. ESPN. 1000 ESPN Chicago dot com..

Chicago Joel Respiratory Health Association Hannah Stanley ESPN ESPN.
Because of Vaccines, Ultra-Cold Freezers Are the New Hot Buy

Business Wars Daily

03:58 min | 4 months ago

Because of Vaccines, Ultra-Cold Freezers Are the New Hot Buy

"In a sea of stress. Inducing headlines there is one seemingly perennial bright spot these days vaccine news the scientists researchers and doctors that have been working on a covid nineteen vaccine seemed to have made great strides toward finding effective inoculations to help protect us from the virus. Pfizer was the first to announce its vaccine in early november. The company said it showed more than ninety percent effectiveness but the vaccine also has an inconvenient distribution issue it has to be stored at minus seventy degrees celsius. That's colder than antarctica in winter. Maderna's vaccine announced later in the month had similar efficacy rate and similar storage needs. Both vaccines must be sold in special ultra cold freezers throughout their journey from manufacturing plant to where the vaccine will be administered. Those super cold freezers cheap. Their price tags may be as high as thirty thousand dollars but those frigid freezers are selling like hotcakes. Hospitals in government entities have been snapping them up to help distribute the vaccine to the masses even employers are getting on board. Automaker ford bought twelve ultra-cold freezers last month. In an effort to ensure its employees can get the vaccine tra- cold freezers. Aren't your garden variety ice cream and frozen pizzas storage units. They're typically the domain of university labs in hospitals that need to store cell extracts dna or other specialized materials at extremely low temperatures. Both a ba leading vaccine's use a relatively new technology called synthetic messenger are in a or emaar in a which attaches to the virus helping the immune system recognize attack it. The challenge is that ima- a needs to be kept super cold. Keep enzymes from breaking down according to smithsonian magazine when the team at so low environmental equipment manufacturer of these units got wind of the pfizer. Vaccines storage requirements. The company started ramping up production so low vice president dan hesler toll cnbc quote. It's been crazy. The company stockpiles been depleted in orders or taking six to eight weeks to fulfil one of solos biggest. Competitors thermo fisher. Scientific was ramping up production at the fastest rate in its history according to a company spokesperson talking wwl a local abc television affiliate in asheville north carolina. The company expects fourth-quarter earnings to grow about sixty percent over the same period last year driven by covid nineteen response but even with ultra low freezer manufacturers. Hard at work to meet demand. These vaccines have unveiled another weakness in the supply chain the cold chain. Most vaccines need to be kept at a specific temperature until they're administered. That's typically around thirty five to forty five degrees wired reports but the super low temperatures that the most promising covid nineteen vaccines require. Make it tough to distribute the vaccines widely in the highly developed north american economies. Let alone in places where equipment capacity isn't close to sufficient like parts of africa. Asia and south america wired estimates that upward of twenty five percent of all vaccines are lost because of a lack of reliable coal chains in some countries. Just one ten. Health centers have a proper vaccine refrigerator according to that report and that includes rural hospitals in the us. Allen morgan chief. Executive of the national rural health association told stat news that poorer hospitals can't afford the pricey ultra-cold freezers nearly half of us. Rural hospitals were operating at a loss as of april of this year and the pandemic has only made things worse that means that workers and residents in these areas may not have access to the vaccine. It's possible that the manufacturers may update their cold-storage guidelines or that new vaccines. That don't require such ultra-low temps may come along. But for now lack of a stable co chain to distribute the vaccine to some people who need it most is a situation with legitimate chilling concert

Maderna Pfizer Smithsonian Magazine Dan Hesler Thermo Fisher WWL Antarctica IMA Ford Cnbc Asheville ABC Allen Morgan
Children are especially vulnerable to extreme weather

Climate Connections

01:09 min | 6 months ago

Children are especially vulnerable to extreme weather

"Hurricanes can cause dangerous floods and other hazards such as down power lines and shattered windows. In the chaos, young children are particularly vulnerable because they cannot protect themselves. Children are completely dependent on adults to make decisions for them, and their welby is can be especially important when there's a threat of immediate physical harm like in the case of extreme weather events, data DDR net of the National Environmental Health Association. She says very young children like to crawl on the ground. And often put things in their mouths. To win floodwaters lead contamination in debris behind children may come into contact with and even ingest hazardous substances or objects. In, kids physical health is not the only concern during extreme weather. Major storms can harm the mental health of children and their families by causing distress during the event and anxiety or depression after. But what we know about storms and mental health that the earlier one can evacuate and the further they can get from the site of the disaster the better mental health outcomes will be.

National Environmental Health Depression
"health association" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:33 min | 7 months ago

"health association" Discussed on KCRW

"Days. May God bless you and may God protect our troops. It's part of who Joe is. Delaware Senator Chris Coons has known Biden for decades, Joe is someone for whom the ways in which he sees issues around racial justice. Around the treatment of refugees and immigrants. All of that is connected to a view of other people who he sees as neighbor who he sees as being made in the image of God, Kun says. Biden's political positions go back to his upbringing, a deeply rooted sense of fairness that he learned from his parents and from the nuns. And priest to educated and helped raise him. So I think one of the mistakes Democrats have made over decades is to be very private about values that moved him into public life with Biden ally say it's obvious what drives him. Sister Carol Keehan is the former CEO of the Catholic Health Association. When Joe Biden talks about faith, he talks very much about things like the Gospel of Matthew that what you've done to the least of my brother and you've done to make you know. Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for justice. Friends and staffers say Biden focuses on faith rather than religious doctrine. He praised with voters rather than proselytizes. And yet for some religious conservatives, all of that pales in comparison to the single issue of abortion. Earlier this week, a Catholic voter group released this ad Joe Biden would force American Catholics.

Joe Biden Senator Chris Coons Carol Keehan Delaware Kun Catholic Health Association CEO Matthew
Former Arizona health boss: Compliance needed from bars, clubs

Bruce St. James and Pamela Hughes

00:42 sec | 8 months ago

Former Arizona health boss: Compliance needed from bars, clubs

"Arizona must come down on those businesses that don't follow the rules. There's Jim crosses live in Phoenix with Mohr Negative director with ears and a Public health association says they're Arizonans are looking for specific enforcement details that make a meaningful statement. They should be able to tell you exactly what it entails. How to file a complaint. But the phone number is what website to go to complain. Who's going to follow up with that complaint and what authority they'll have to make changes? Humble says. If we open up the bars and nightclubs without a compliance system in place, we could see a repeat of June. Win cases of grown of our skyrocketed era's done after the state we open in mid May live in Phoenix jump cross

Phoenix Mohr Negative Public Health Association Arizona Humble JIM Director
Former Arizona health director discusses safely returning to school

Bruce St. James and Pamela Hughes

00:34 sec | 8 months ago

Former Arizona health director discusses safely returning to school

"Eyes on education, Arizona's former state health director, is giving the thumbs up to newly released health benchmarks that guide schools on when it's safe to reopen. During the Corona virus pandemic will humble is now the executive director of the Arizona Public Health Association. He tells his Gaydos and Chad that it covers all of the bases with solid metrics, including positivity rates and trends in new cases in terms of putting out solid guide kudos to Department of Education, the county Health Department and the State Health Department for putting something solid together.

Arizona Public Health Associat State Health Department County Health Department Executive Director Department Of Education Arizona Director Gaydos Chad
Arizona seeing highest number of new coronavirus cases per capita

All In with Chris Hayes

05:08 min | 10 months ago

Arizona seeing highest number of new coronavirus cases per capita

"Joining now from where things stand is to reject director for the Arizona Public Health. Association will humble. He's also the former director of the Arizona Department of Health Services and I know that. We've got data reportings very lumpy, and we're coming off a holiday weekend, and so the picture is not as clear on this Tuesday, as it normally would, because of those reporting delays, but this jumped out to me as of today Arizona not the cove infections per capita of any state, but also the most of any state has ever had. We hit five hundred and twenty eight per million, new. York topped out at five nine on April tenth. What what does it look like to you in Arizona, right now. That really says it all, doesn't it? I mean everybody knows what happened in New York and now it's happening in Arizona and who would have thought that it would happen in a state like Arizona but his shows you that the policy decisions that you're elected. Officials make have real life consequences and the decisions, the decisions in May and early June or lack of decisions are really what set in the cascade of events that ended up where we are today with a graph just saw. We're also seeing an inflection point in deaths in Arizona. We saw it also just I just saw about an hour ago. I think Texas reported its highest fatality level. I'm a very long time today. There's been this lag. Obviously between cases and battalions were catching more cases. There's a hope that fatalities won't be as high right now. What are you seeing the fatality data? Where do you think this is going? So. There's a couple of things that may be moderating the death rate here in Arizona. Number one is that the new cases are really exploding in twenty and thirty year old people who are. Less likely to end up in an ICU bed, and less likely to die. It happens, but it's less likely the other thing is that clinicians are getting better at treating people for covid. Nineteen at the beginning was just supportive care now there's a couple of medications that can improve the course of the illness, so as physicians learn a little bit more about how to treat illness I think that may be working in our favor a little bit and finally. I I'm hoping that this also represents an improvement in infection control within assisted living and skilled nursing facilities I. Don't know that for a fact. I do know that they are trying harder than they were and personal. Protective equipment is more available, but really there's no substitute for weekly testing of staff that work in those facilities. I don't think that that's happening. In terms of testing seeing, it's really maddening. We're seeing bottlenecks again, and you're seeing that in that positivity rate going up, and it's upright now. It's almost thirty percent I think in Arizona I mean the the recommendation the are you want the positivity right below three percent, which basically shows that you're testing enough? The MARICOPA county reported Covid, nineteen positivity rate of twenty eight point eight percent. This is the Phoenix Mayor tweeting. We've seen testing sites where people waited for more than eight hours in one hundred and ten degree heat to get tested. This is unacceptable. Arezzo needs more testing and context racing to slow the spread. This seems like a major major and acute failure right now as as the state tries to get a hold of this. positivity rate is off the charts, and as you said, it needs to be ten times lower than it is right now. We're at twenty five percent positive. The next highest state I think is Texas and Florida. They're in the the teens, so we're much higher that we need to be on that regard. The other thing is that our turnaround time on these tests is really pretty bad like we're looking at turnaround times between getting A. A sample collected from a patient and getting those results back from the lab of seven eight nine, even fourteen days, and what that means. Is that your contact tracing capacity? Your contact tracers can't do their job because by the time they get the data. The patient has already either gone back to work infected their roommates or co workers, and and it doesn't matter how good contact tracing capacity is if you're getting the results that late. It's going to be ineffective at Saint. We've gotta just get more tests, but faster testing. You know months ago. There's a lot of debate about the Swedish model Sweden was one of the few countries that had had you know. Had the virus didn't shutdown did close some things here? There? Make some efforts, and there was some question about. Can you avoid the worse consequences both economically and also of sort of social and physical and emotional health of lockdowns, and I your piece today basing no, it's not it's a cautionary tale. It was sort of a failed experiment. It does seem to me. We're headed towards the sun belt. Sweden experiment in the US I mean governor Ducey does seem reluctant to take any more steps and he has. We're just GONNA. Find out how bad it can get back. I Isaac, we adopted the Swedish model right around Memorial Day to be honest with. I've said that publicly that I think what we're really doing is going down the Swedish road and. And what we see is we can learn. The previous segment you talked about learning for mothers. You know I this is an example where we could have learned from others and I hope other people learn from us because this experiment isn't going well.

Arizona Arizona Department Of Health S Arizona Public Health Sweden Texas Director Covid York Arezzo Maricopa County Isaac Phoenix New York Governor Ducey United States Florida
Local health leaders discuss Washington DC area reopening

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 11 months ago

Local health leaders discuss Washington DC area reopening

"Working together and crossing the borders is crucial in controlling the corona virus in the DC region that according to a group of local health experts we need a new way of acting and behaving in two and mitigate the risks Dr Lisa locker Markakis senior director of infection prevention for the Johns Hopkins health system was one of five local health experts on a video panel Tuesday Dr Georges Benjamin executive director of the American public health association everyone who gets inspected on average and thanks to other people and if you think about that is it creates a chain of sex to break that chain Benjamin says fifty to seventy percent of the population needs to be impacted or there needs to be a combination of infection and the vaccine that Reebok

Senior Director Executive Director Reebok DC Dr Lisa Locker Markakis Johns Hopkins Dr Georges Benjamin
Health experts warn about risks of reopening economy too quickly

Morning Edition

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Health experts warn about risks of reopening economy too quickly

"The house committee will hold its first briefing as the nation begins the process of re opening amid the pandemic the former commissioners of the food and drug administration and the executive director of the American public health association are expected to testify the White House has blocked the nation's leading infectious disease expert from appearing at today's hearing Dr Anthony Fauci warned a Senate panel yesterday that opening the nation's economy too quickly could have serious

Executive Director White House Dr Anthony Fauci Senate
House coronavirus subcommittee to hold first briefing

Morning Edition

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

House coronavirus subcommittee to hold first briefing

"A newly formed house committee convenes today to examine the nation's response the coronavirus pandemic and peers Windsor Johnson reports the hearing comes a day after a Senate panel heard from several top administration health experts the house committee will hold its first briefing as the nation begins the process of re opening amid the pandemic the former commissioners of the food and drug administration and the executive director of the American public health association are expected to testify the White House has blocked the nation's leading infectious disease expert from appearing at today's hearing Dr Anthony Fauci warned a Senate panel yesterday that opening the nation's economy too quickly could have serious

Windsor Johnson Executive Director White House Dr Anthony Fauci Senate
"health association" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"health association" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"His mind when this Washington health association got together of medical professionals said Hey we should be able to continue with these elective surgeries he's changed his mind the bad side of that is adapter a ride at the Monroe correctional facility saying you should be releasing some of us she started to release people yeah that's true and but I've said many times I again I've also told him I'm I'm not gonna say things in public that I have not already shared with you or your staff you know in the end this effort to have social distancing and slow down the virus Ms on people involuntarily complying and the credibility of the orders in the sense that these are fair and they make sense and they're going to protect people's health is critical and that more quickly you address the things that they don't seem fair and does he was connected to Hells the more credibility you have and I I really wish that these changes which I appreciate could have been made earlier when it became apparent that maybe they didn't have a lot to do with sales is there a particular servicing on the books right now rule in the book right now that just doesn't make sense to you well there's not really a specific rule that is the most pressure in the movie it is the fact that we couldn't early on recognized parts of the economy that present no danger for example auto dealers can do a transaction that doesn't have any face to face contact it's an important part of the economy it keeps people employed it fills a need and I hope that the governor allows that now but there are lots of other parts of the economy that are just like that and I just wish that we could have a dress that a little bit earlier and I'm hoping that he does tomorrow so last last question for you what is the message to residents from Yelm to Bellingham shoreline to Olympia that are either out of work right now or they feel like they're getting to that point and they're just asking for the governor to speed things up what what's the message that you can give to them that.

Washington health association Monroe correctional facility Yelm Olympia Bellingham
More evidence emerges that Coronavirus disproportionately affects people of color

WBZ Morning News

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

More evidence emerges that Coronavirus disproportionately affects people of color

"Closer to home more evidence emerging each week the virus is disproportionately affecting the state's communities of color public health officials say the city of Chelsea has the highest rate of coronavirus cases in Massachusetts the Massachusetts public health association says that rate of infection for Latino residents is three times that of white residents black residents seeing two and a half times more infections per capita than white residents the public health nonprofit calling for urgent action by governor Charlie Baker and state officials to address the health inequities and disproportionate impact that the pandemic is had on vulnerable populations in

Chelsea Massachusetts Massachusetts Public Health As Charlie Baker
"health association" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"health association" Discussed on KTOK

"Health association Oklahoma is launching virtual support groups tomorrow to help first responders and others cope with Colbert nineteen I'm Marco Moreno they're going on the city today we'll see highs in the mid sixties mostly sunny skies and light southeasterly wind at ten miles per hour tonight partly cloudy breezy south wind develops around fifty degrees tomorrow morning and tomorrow afternoon or Saturday looking good seventy two degrees mostly cloudy skies and isolated storms possible in the afternoon while the strong south when a big front rolls through on Easter and temperatures will plummet in the afternoon for the full one storm centimeter oldest family satin newsradio one thousand Katie okay studios are service of universal men's clinic for medical solutions for Edie yellow teeth learn more at universal men's clinic dot com hired radio wants to help with a chance at one thousand dollars the nationwide key word A. two two hundred two hundred you'll get a confirmation text info standard data and message rates apply in this nationwide contest thanks to a two hundred two hundred alert the American dental association recommends dentist cease offering many dental services some offices are closing their doors we want you know custom dental will continue to be available for your dental emergencies call us anytime at four zero five five three one nine seven seven one custom dental meets or exceeds all local state and CDC infection control guidelines if you have a dental emergency don't go to the ER call custom dental immediately at four zero five five three one nine seven seven one it's times like these that remind us all of how precious life is and how our love and relationships are what really matter at diamonds direct we believe this your love and well being are truly our passion that's why we decided.

Oklahoma Colbert Marco Moreno American dental association Katie CDC
The Real Reasons for Your Child's Behavior With Dr. Mona Delahooke

Janet Lansbury Podcast

10:35 min | 1 year ago

The Real Reasons for Your Child's Behavior With Dr. Mona Delahooke

"She is Monte Della Hook Hi Mona Uh Janet. Thank you so much for having me on. I've been just kind of your book and everything I'm reading is teaching me a lot you offer so much information in this book. There's a lot of stuff in there but I wrote it with the intention of just helping create less suffering in in the world and more joy so thank you well. You've definitely do that and again. I'm going to recommend this to every parent or professional working with children. It's it's a must I wanted to see. If you could share a little about your professional journey I found what you shared in your book very interesting and I don't know Evatt much about you. In terms of how you came to these understandings and I would love to hear a little about that somehow. I just knew I wanna be a psychologist when I was a teenager so I ended up becoming a psychologist pretty young in my twenties and I began working with teenagers young adults older children because really traditional training in clinical psych is for children over five and everyone thereafter so I worked in the field for about a decade before I had my own children and I kept on hearing stories about some of the pain teenagers and adults had when they were children and even when they were younger children in things they wish their parents knew way back then and I'm a sensitive psychologist in person and so I thought well I wonder if I could be more effective if I was working at younger levels like with parents with babies and toddlers so after my my third daughter was born I decided to go back and go into more of a prevention kind of idea and become an instant mental health specialist and the training program for my I worked with was with founders of the infant mental health association zero to three in in Washington. DC So I went there for several weeks every summer for five is years and in the meantime I did two programs when was it Cedar Sinai in. La For two years in infant mental health and the other one was children's what is hospital and long story short what I learned in these programs changed my life. It wasn't anything that I learned in psychology in graduate you at school and it basically was the beginning of what was known as a decade of the brain in the nineties and that was bringing the body and the brain together and seeing little people and babies of course and toddlers as a whole in this wonderful way the body in the brain connect with each other through the information mation highway and we can read behaviors way before people are able to tell us what they need and talk to us so I became an infant and toddler specialist a-list and my perspective started from there in understanding the role of stress and stress recovery and how we can prevent misunderstanding in a lot of the ways we try to help children and teenagers that are ineffective. I think that was kind of the magic behind some of the work I do. I gathered a lot of information from a lot of different fields and put it together in kind of a new way well that definitely Bentley comes across in your book you use so many case studies you take off this veil of the way that we still as a society tend to see challenging behavior and show us what it really is and what it really means and by seeing what it is what it means we can understand how to help children with it and how to stop it. It's a much more thoughtful aware approach than just trying to fix the behavior. I really love something you said to just zooming to the end of your book where you spend a little time talking about as adults why we react to things thanks the way that we do how we get triggered into this. you talk about the negativity bias that recant sin I guess that's his term term and how we get triggered into wanting to fix that and change it. I thought that was fascinating because just understanding why we have such a hard time so that we can not only not blame our children for their unconscious behavior that so much has to do with stress and the way that they're processing processing things they've been exposed to but also understand that it's not our fault either that we are reacting the yes and the negativity bias is is where we are reacting instinctively out of our desire to be good parents this human tendency to look for the negative rather the positive it came out of what's called our Filo genetic history. Our ancestors were ones who looked for threat and who successfully fought threat off right millions millions of years ago that would have been you know maybe a lion or tiger but now we are in such a complex world and if we understand understand that we have a tendency towards maybe seeing the negative rather than positive and then remembering that having compassion for ourselves as parents institute and then opening to a whole new way to view behavioral challenges a way that just turns on its head our notions Russians about that intention -ality that we often assume that children have oftentimes behaviors. They're not incentivized the children wanting to prove a point or test limits or do something wrong there so many more complex reasons that we see behaviors and can you explain a little about the physical science behind what is going on in those challenging behaviors what's going on when they are caught up absolutely so there are kind of these different states that people are in a lot of people talk about it in terms of colors. One is where we feel like we can engage engage with others. We're talking where com we are conversant that social engagement system when you're able to engage in smile and feel calm take information in we call the green pathway and that's being in the greed of scientific word for it but we don't have to know that we all know the fighter flight. That's another pathway that's in the brain and body connection and here children and adults are heart starts to beat fast. We feel like we're under attack attack. Even if we may not be and oftentimes children we will see bear crying yelling kicking screaming what are typical notion of a Tantrum is fast movements and the child may be running away or otherwise having a really hard time so we call that the red zone the red pathway way the third major one is where people shutdown that would include just giving up on social communication or trying to to communicate and luckily that's actually more of a rare date for children but we do want to be aware of children are ever not communicating kidding with us and I don't mean like a regular teenage phase where you just don't really WanNa talk to your parents. I'm talking more about checking out where a child might look through you rather than at you very flat and blank look on the face slumped body position and frozen and kind of looking very very sad that would be another way our brain body are in the world and combinations of these things but the roadmap comes in when we link behaviors h-have yars too what color the child and we are in we always want to understand the answer to a very big question and bat is is the child experiencing our response to stress which would put them in the red pathway feeling anxious or hyper urgent or are they feeling socially engaged with us and then if they are than we would treat those behaviors ferry different than we would treat a child who is in the red zone so we actually use these markers of what's known as the autonomic nervous system but just think about it as our nervous system to understand for example when we try to reason with a child or when we don't try to reason with the child and we just maybe hold them or guineas at them with loving is or cinema song so we kind of use the child as their own road map for how we can connect with them and then what do you think about behaviors saviors where a child does not seem stressed doesn't seem like they're on the red pathway but they're still doing things that they know the parent it doesn't want them to do. I love those kinds of me to it's about children wanting to learn. How do we respond to things what kind of leader they have well once we figure that out you know check out the body signals because sometimes child might look green but they're actually red or even yellow right? They may have a smirk on their face but if you put your hand on their back or on their chest you feel their heart beating really fast so so we really WANNA make sure neuro divergent children children with brain wiring differences their facial expression may not match their internal state in the body language tone of voice and facial expression is the polygraphs for how the child feels insides explain that in the book but having having said that if if the child is in that Green Zone and they are going through the natural testing like not following directions or doing something that we don't like or that that's not part of our family's values. I love your advice along these lines that I've read in in your book being a leader and staying calm ourselves and patient and letting our child know that we will give them a redirection if it's something I think that is important for us to let them know that that's not okay. It's just how we go about it. It doesn't have to be with a hammer it can and be with our relationship.

Monte Della Hook Evatt Washington Bentley Filo Two Years
"health association" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"health association" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"We get it is welcome your at home with yourself and thanks so much for joining me another hour in a hopefully very informative our injury Andre lacroix he is my guess is president of the basement health association along with many other of credits in indoor air quality and also Erica she is with EZ brie she's the president of the EZ breathe ventilation system folks welcome thank you it's so good to be here yeah I get it before we got on the air I said he has been getting a lot of calls about humanity yeah the summer for humidity and one of the biggest summers for this year yeah yes so we'll start with you under one you know being in the presence of the basement health association basements I don't think are the most healthiest places in our home no one fortunately they're not and you know they they're they but but they are as you know a part of our home right now so they're the on healthy is part of our home but yet still part of our home yeah in this year many parts of the country from California at all just about everywhere it's been wet yeah N. ghoulish and then I got really hot right and I have been doing this show for thirty three years and I don't think I've ever answers many questions and you midi levels yeah then I have the the the education part of it is because you know I'm trying to I'm trying to teach people that it's not just about physical water in our basement right it's not just about icy water coming in from the walls that that you almost want that because then you know what the problem is and it's an easy fix run your quote but the humidity is there people don't realize it and it's yeah it's a bad one it's yeah it's stuck in there and it stagnates builds up as you know and then it starts smelling and the main problem yeah and that's what our pricing is like my basement never smell but my basement it just smells bad Israel's wet it smells and I go it is it is right because it is yeah yeah yeah when the air is damp that's considered wet dry have to be liquid water right and you know in you know that that's what leads to a lot of the stuff that that's up stairs and people recognize if they think it's just control in the basement you know that air makes its way up the stairs and in the home it's not as obvious because it's you know there's someone up there and people are moving around but that they create some real problems yeah plus the thing is when you have your air conditioner honor the fan gone it's mix and everything up right correct correct air conditioning and and the ductwork becomes if especially if it's gathering that air from the basement room it's just sending it all over the place through leaky docks or in the planet's going to distribute it on the house it's not uncommon people call us and say why do I smell my basement on the second floor we try to actually this year yes I do explain well that air your your home is not separate spaces that's a that's a big component of our education piece the home behaves as a system it really is all interconnected sure it absolutely is in well I tell you what it it's it has been a challenge a sure there's there's no question about it it folks by the way if you have a question regarding what we're speaking of indoor air quality here smelly basements or high humidity feel free to join us our numbers eight hundred eight two three eight two five five okay let's let's talk a little bit about the EZ breathe I know you got a sale going on the month of August twenty percent off easy breeze I've had one of my home I'm scared even guess how long it's been probably eight to ten years now and mine all of my basement always it's a finished basement half of it's finished and it always had a little tinge of an older and put an easy breed that eliminated it but I'm even this year running some you midi and I think everybody is blood in me but I never had that ten years is that again a by product of what we're going through this year which is the amount of rain in absolute cold temperatures to is it had everything screwed up yeah air conditioners weren't run in that's right it's a couple things near the ground is saturated as the water in the soil that surrounds your basement is there's more water in it the normal that water and not in the liquid form like we talked about but in that they perform gets absorbed into that relatively dryer space of your invite of of your base so that water vapor will build up and build up and like you said sometimes when it's really really damp and wet outside and it's not super warm people aren't conditioning their spaces right so the dampness is pervasive throughout the whole house managers dinner basement so is he good point though and that's what I ran into also and I don't have a de humidifier it was really interesting once it warmed up it quit raining any of any issues with humility anymore right I thought money you know the air conditioner was too large or something for yeah yeah and and air conditioners do have a hard time keeping up when it's so humid or when it's not really warm so they're not running as often because the the air conditioners are what conditions the error in the house right in it it dries out that air so it's more efficient to heat or cool in this in this instance the air conditioners cooling the air but it dries it out first so a lot of times people were calling us and saying you know we've got seventy five percent coming out of our dock work so the the air that was being delivered to the house was humid air conditioning wasn't running very often so yeah we were really helping to steer people and what do I do about all this humidity plus it is called relative humidity correct and then that's a big buzz word to maybe one of you can explain that they and we always say home you midi but it's relative relative humidity yeah so that is relative humidity would be higher in the basement because the temperatures cool correct well right so I I try and tell people you know without getting too scientific of the difference between committee relative mating bring and do point like that what people need to recognize is the basement is a totally different.

Andre lacroix president Erica EZ ten years seventy five percent thirty three years twenty percent
Burnout syndrome is real, and getting worse

The Big Story

11:47 min | 2 years ago

Burnout syndrome is real, and getting worse

"I love making this podcast for you guys. But man, I have my days you probably know the feeling work even the best kind of work the kind that's engaging and interesting and fulfilling can cry on you. If you're balancing a couple of gigs, or more as a lot of us, are, it's even worse. Sometimes all it is a bad run work gets tougher. A bit gets really busy, and you look forward to Friday or to your next vacation or you just take a day for yourself. And you come back ready to go sometimes, though, that's not all it is you get, so fed up or overwhelmed, or anxious that even job you might not hate becomes a weight around your neck and you burn out and then never mind a good job. You don't want to do any job. And this is the part where you need to lessen because burnout is an colloquialism anymore. It is a syndrome officially recognized. Last week by the World Health Organization, and it is more prevalent in this generation than previous ones. Some of you may be listening to this podcast wealth coasting through a day job right now because you just don't have the energy to engage anymore. And if that is you while the good news is you're not alone. There are millions of people in the same boat. The bad news though, is that not everyone on that boat makes it safely to shore. I'm Jordan he throwing and this is the big story. I'm con is an author a speaker, an, an educator, particularly on the subject of burnout. He has suffered from it himself is written a book about it news, giving a tedtalk thanks for joining us. Thank you so much for having me, Jordan. How you doing today? I'm doing really well. I'm luxuriating in the fact that the raptors are in the files, just the whole idea that we're even here in the first place is just put a smile on my face ear. This man is the opposite. But you've done a lot of work on this topic. So I, I guess, because I think it's something we all throw around, but don't actually dive into right? What is burnout now that there's an official definition for it, right? And shut up to the World Health Organization for coming out and reclassifying Burnett, because since nineteen seventy four when the term was first coined by Dr Herbert Freudenberg. Dr Gill north, what's amazing is that they would submit papers on burnout to their community. They would submit them to various journals, and they would get rejection letters. And sometimes they would be rejected on the basis of being pseudo signs. They would be laughed out of rooms in some cases. And so we've sort of languished, in this period from nineteen seventy four till very recently without a formal definition of burnt out there hasn't been a consensus. And now finally, the World Health Organization has put their foot down and said, burnout is a state of complete physical mental and emotional exhaustion and v consequence of chronic stress unmanaged in the workplace I didn't realize. That the term had been around for so long and being used that way. So how did it originally? Come to be. And what did it? What was it? What was it coined to define? That's a great question. So some of the earliest cases of burnout were found within the human service industry. So we're talking about childcare workers, social workers, nurses, educators, so on and so forth. The first documented case of burnout was related to a nurse named miss Jones. That was her name, and they're trying to figure out what was happening to miss Jones. She was a top performer in some cases in overachiever, but she just became more and more distant from her work. More resentful to the people around her. She completely flamed out. And so to try to describe what was happening to her, and then all of the other people that were working with her, and in similar industries, they had to explore that there was something about the way that they were working the way that they were moving through the world that was resulting in this level of chronic stress, and it wasn't just a simple medical element that was unrelated at the time. So kind of cynics question, then I guess the way you just defined it, aren't we all burnt out at some time. Yes, we are. And, and some cynics would go as far as saying that burn out as an excuse for laziness. And I'm going to go that far burned out. And I'm sure that we all have. But where's I guess what I'm asking is, do, we have a sense of where the line is between that sort of like the last couple of weeks have been really rough? And, and I'm feeling I'm feeling burnt out versus okay? We have a problem here, right? And so the World Health organizations reclassification of this into something that has a direct medical causes really interesting because we often saw burn out as a symptom of something deeper. We saw it as symptomatic of stress in the way that a runny noses symptomatic of a fever. Right. But now in describing burnout as something that is tied directly to chronic workplace stress. We now can speak with it with level of specificity and use the right language to validate people who are experiencing things like adrenal fatigue, were experiencing actual medical conditions that lead down the path of burnout. So what does that look like that? If i'm. If I'm a manager or even just a co worker in an office. How can I tell the difference between when one of my colleagues are employees is just again having along along week or is actually, like, we need to get them some help? I'm glad you asked can I give you two answer. Yeah. So I want to read off, if, if you don't mind over here, what the World Health Organization has characterized as there's three dimensions the first feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion. The second has increased mental distance from one's job or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one's job. And last one is reduced professional efficacy. So those are like the three sort of umbrella categories of things that might be going wrong and throwing you off for equilibrium. But the one thing I was excited to share with you at the twelve stages of burnout, which I'm sure you've researched in preparation for the podcast. But for the listeners, I would love to share those twelve stages, if you don't mind, sure. So it usually starts the same compulsion to prove oneself, which then leads to working harder than neglecting, one's needs. Displacing conflict, revising values denying emerging problems in your about halfway into the burnout cycle. At this point, then. Withdrawal. You experience behavioral changes de personalization inter emptiness, and then stages eleven is depression and stages. Twelve is burnout syndrome, all together. And so, by the time you've reached age twelve year needed Dr medical support. What is distancing yourself? Look like like in the workplace I I'm fascinated. And I always asked this question to two guests is like we can classify things all we want. But what does it look like on the ground? That's a great question. So I'll tell you a story reflecting on my time, working at a large educational institution here in Toronto, where experienced my last bout of berno. This was in two thousand fourteen and so I look back at that period of my life. And I remember that, while I was in the thick of burnout. I found myself, declining every opportunity to socialize. No coffee's no lunches out become very, terse and hurried in meetings, I would almost antagonize the people around me including my own immediate teammates. And I just became the worst person to be around. I think and I think the way that, you know, my partner describes me my friends, my colleagues at the time described me. They said that you were becoming very negative. Cynic. Closed off, and you're just unpleasant to be around while you were going through it. If anybody talked to you, they tried to. But at that point, I wasn't hearing it and I think that leads directly into this stage over here, which is denial of emerging problems stage, number six at that point, I was just in the mindset of it's not me. It's you, what are you talking about? The sinister thing about burnout is by the time you're able to self diagnose that you were going through or have gone through Bruno it's already too late. You've made it further along the burnout cycle than you think. You're so why has the WHO made it a syndrome? Now after thirty some years of not as it is on the rise. Do we have stats on my goodness? The stats are absolutely staggering. I think that's what inspired me to really go down this line of questioning and research around, burnout is because when I first tried to understand what had happened to me when I had burnt down in spectacular fashion. I found that the stats were just so alarming and overwhelming and not enough. People were talking about, so for instance, Ipsos came out with a survey that said that five hundred thousand Canadians don't show up to work every week because of some sort of stress. Rated challenges. Another one is the world other organization has classified in two thousand fourteen that stresses the health epidemic of the twenty first century check this one out. So in China today, sixteen hundred people approximately are going to die because of overwork, which is mind boggling, when you think about it, the it's gotten so bad in some parts of the world day today, six hundred people die every single day and this was found in Bloomberg. I think four years ago, and it's so bad that they have words for it, so they have in China and I think in Japan, karoshi, and goulash z respectively, which translate to literally death by overwork wild. Do we know anything about what's at the root of phys increase in overwork leading to burn out? Let me go back to this. Have you ever experienced Bernard? Well, it's interesting because I would have said, yes, coming into this conversation, but listening to you put forward a fairly clinical definition of it. My kind of feel like I've never really gotten that far along steps. I mean like. I kind of alluded to everybody has weeks at their job when things get tough, and you get mad and, and it feels crummy coming into work. This is the best job I've ever had and still every once in a while. You're like, oh man. This is a lot, right? So that's why I'm fascinated by by Bernard in general. So I would have said two days ago, I would've said, yeah, I've been burnt out. And now that I've learned more, but we're not as I would say, probably not. And there are some cases, I think the one case that really inspired me to, to make this a big part of my life was the case of a gentleman by the name of air. It's more heart who was twenty one and died because of overwork he died as a result of a seizure. But that seizure was caused by chronic stress, the coroner's found, and he was the same age that I was feeling very pressured to work in a high pace fast environment of banking, I was working in the record in record time and reading his story made me realize that there's one potential ending for this way of overwork this way of living, your life out of balance that has fatal consequences. So you asked the question of what are the? Root causes of burnout that are happening in the workplace. So I have something from the Canadian mental Health Association over here. They say that some of the factors are laws absenteeism turnover and healthcare expenditures, but the root causes that when you get down to, like, what's truly causing this it's performance pressure. That's, that's, that's some total of fear of job. Redundancy variations in the economy and generally a feeling of not feeling like you're enough. Not feeling like you're enough. And I think this is a pervasive problem in just North America. But around the world where people don't feel like they're progressive enough fishing enough perfect enough satisfied enough innovative enough. And so you start to act out in ways that are unnatural, and then disruptor equilibrium. We hear a lot about the current generation Eleni owes but also boat, the generations coming after them, not having like full careers anymore, where you're able to start with one company and progress and move up. And you know eventually rise to management, and you're kind of secure, right? The gig economy is a term that gets thrown around how. How does that impact levels of burn out? And is that because none of the stuff that you just mentioned is applicable to people who are who are moving from one temp job, odd job, reviving job to the next. That's a great question. So actually, my Uber drive over here. I was talking with the driver and he was complaining about the fact that he's behind on a couple of payments, and that he can't get enough hours from Uber, and he can't get enough hours with lifts so on and so forth, and he's describing a very frenetic work environment that he's in that he's created for himself, or I shouldn't say that he's created for himself that he's found himself in rather. And that made me think about two factors that usually to burn out. I as a frequency of stress in your life. And Secondly is the impact of stress in your life. And so when I was going through it, I had to ask myself the question of how can I reduce the frequency of stressors in my life, and how can I increase my resistance to the impact to, to

World Health Organizations Miss Jones Jordan Bernard Canadian Mental Health Associa Dr Gill North China Raptors Fever Ipsos North America Official Toronto Eleni Dr Herbert Freudenberg Reclassifying Burnett Partner Bloomberg Japan Twelve Year
Poll: Many Rural Americans Struggle With Financial Insecurity, Access To Health Care

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:30 min | 2 years ago

Poll: Many Rural Americans Struggle With Financial Insecurity, Access To Health Care

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from the university of Maryland where the founders of Google Oculus and squarespace got their started. Find out how you MD can start up your next adventure at you and you MD dot com. That's why. Oh, you and you MD dot com. The economy may be strong but many Americans finances are not. That's especially true in many rural areas in Opole of role. Americans by NPR last fall. Fifty five percent of those surveyed said their local economy was only poor or fair. A follow up poll by NPR the Robert Wood Johnson foundation and the Harvard ta Chan school of public health digs deeper. It finds four out of ten rural Americans struggle with routine bills for housing food and medical care, half of rural Americans say they could not afford it. If they got hit with a surprise one thousand dollar expense. NPR's petty name, and has more. Our new poll was telephone survey of just over fourteen. Nine hundred adults living in rural areas across the country areas like Weitzberg nestled in the mountains of eastern, Kentucky coalfields seventy two year old lethal dollar hide a retired caregiver lives nearby go out of town like you're going toward hazard. And there's a turn off there on nine thirty one south. It's within about four miles of where I was born. So I asked dollar hide the question we asked in our poll, could you afford an unexpected thousand dollar Bill? No, no. There's no way not even a two hundred dollar extra Bill. What about savings, my savings account zero I don't even have a savings account dollar hide worked all her life. But the jobs just didn't pay enough for her to put anything aside. She raised for children today, her income social security and supplemental. Security income adds up to seven hundred ninety dollars a month with that income. You watch every penny even so dollar high. Just couldn't afford to make it on her own. She recently moved into a two bedroom trailer with her daughter, even with the extra money from her daughter. It's still hard. They have no car and the cost of electricity is barely affordable. It was three hundred sixty something and the two hundred dollars rent, there's nothing left. So no movies. No dinners out. The only luxury is cable TV, but dollar Hyde says, she's one of the lucky ones she has Medicare and estate health plan that covers her health costs. That's not the case for many of those in our poll, Harvard professor Robert plantain, one in four reported that they could not get healthcare recently when they needed it, and majority said, it's either, because they couldn't afford it or they had insurance that would not be taken by local health providers a serious. National concern says blend and even with major improvements and health insurance coverage over the last decade, these. Problems are more severe for African American communities and native Americans as well as Latinos, and the future of healthcare, and rural America looks even more grim says Brock sleigh back with the national rural Health Association, one hundred six rural hospitals have closed of the past decade, which he says, can make timely medical care nearly impossible, take the town of China PA in Nevada. It's how spittle closed a few years ago this left the service to deal with all kinds of medical problems that are not situated to do. And so when they get on the road to the next nearest hospital as a three hour trip, one way, the hospital is more than a hundred miles away. We know that distance can be a barrier to timely and appropriate access to services. And so in that context delayed care can often lead to tragic consequences, especially in rural areas where people may not have a car. And public transportation may be unreliable. Bottom line says, sleigh Bach wealth equals health report, and were sicker, d Davis is president of the center for rural strategies in Weitzberg people in this congressional district have the shortest lifespan in the United States. We also are the poorest, but one of our big findings was that rural Americans are also optimistic about their communities, d Davis, people may be living more of a hard scrabble existence than folks in the suburbs, or a lot of the folks in the cities. But then mean they're not leaving decent life. And most people are pretty happy with it. And they've got friends and neighbors that they rely on their where they wanna be community activists. Now field says of the past few weeks when her husband was hospitalized her neighbors were extrordinary my neighbors come in Mohmand grass. And neighbors come and feed our cattle and our neighbors gather the eggs and every day for the last few weeks and says, so much to me makes me feel the emotion now of what it feels like to have such more, wonderful support. And I know that, that's the blessing of living in rural America. And that's what our poll found ninety two percent of those surveyed said they had people nearby. They could rely on in times of need. Penny Neiman, NPR news.

NPR United States National Rural Health Associat Weitzberg Robert Plantain University Of Maryland Davis Squarespace Google Penny Neiman Opole Mohmand Grass Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Russian Trolls May Have Played Role in Deadly Measles Outbreak

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Russian Trolls May Have Played Role in Deadly Measles Outbreak

"A new study claims the same Russian trolls who tried to influence the two thousand sixteen election now causing confusion over vaccines. As komo's Brian Calvert reports it's causing grave concerns, especially in southwest Washington. Two more cases confirmed over the weekend brings the total to sixty one people who've contracted measles in our region. The study is by the American public Health Association. Professor, David Brenner hausky says the box and trolls are tweeting about vaccinations using it to get quick. The study also suggests a significant amount of online debates were generated by these fake tweets. I'm not surprised by

David Brenner Hausky Brian Calvert Komo American Public Health Associa Measles Professor Washington
Why are people afraid to sign up for government programs meant to protect them?

Second Opinion

04:22 min | 2 years ago

Why are people afraid to sign up for government programs meant to protect them?

"The December is Casey us season of giving back. What are you grateful for breaking news, award-winning, cultural, coverage, eclectic music, free events, and concerts, and how about truth connection and community a KCRW? It's all possible. Because of you you give because it matters your dollars. Make the biggest impact this month. Thanks to generous challenge grants. So cross us off your list this season with a tax deductible donation at KCRW dot com slash join. In eighteen sixty three in the Gettysburg address. Abraham LINCOLN proclaimed that the government of the people by the people for the people shall not perish from the earth. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion one hundred years later in nineteen sixty four our federal government began its war on poverty as a program for the people following president Johnson's lead the federal government began the food stamp program. The Medicaid program head start and job corps. The goals of all of these programs were to promote health prevent hunger and give every person a chance to pursue the American dream the same dream that are relatives pursue generations ago. Well, over the past few weeks, the American public Health Association and other health organizations report that these same programs have seen a precipitous drop in enrollment p. People are even asking that their names be removed from their rosters, certainly hunger and access to healthcare remain critical problems. So what's going on? Dr John Troy till a public health expert explains why people on government assistance, like food stamps are not signing up. If somebody is here legally, and is according to the government excessively dependent on government support for their day-to-day needs. Then the government may decide that they should not stay here in the United States. So some of the most vulnerable people in society who are trying to integrate with our culture are left wondering if using public health benefits, like food stamps could cost them a chance for a green card. Well, federal policy hasn't yet changed fear of deportation targeting legal immigrants who use these. Benefits is already being felt the effects of this proposed legislation is not just on the immigrants. The impact may be greatest on those who already US citizens or have green cards you see in mixed status families where you have a US legal citizen living with family members. Who are not yet citizens? You can have a chilling effect. They are definitely afraid then they pull out they withdraw all the members of the family from these programs actually, the chilling effect affects more people than the direct effect. In addition. The proposed new rules would hardly be cost effective at best. They are penny wise and pound foolish. These are essential services that people need to maintain their health and to be able to function productively in our society today's immigrants do not. Come here to take advantage of our government programs immigrants want the same American dream that we all want if we create policies that engender fear among the twenty three million non-citizens, we are going to see hungry children people avoiding emergency rooms, we could have outbreaks of communicable diseases children, not getting vaccinated and a lack of prenatal care. It is time to stop this right now before there are real human consequences. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion this podcast was made by public radio station. KCRW our status, a nonprofit enables us to make bold and unusual programs. But we need your support to keep it that way donate or become a member at KCRW dot com slash join. And thanks.

Kcrw Dr Michael Wilks United States American Public Health Associa Casey Abraham Lincoln Dr John Troy President Trump Johnson One Hundred Years
"health association" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"health association" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"We unpack and our understanding and really questioned the role of leasing most particularly in marginalized communities communities of color, working class communities around where we've giving without we just giving the role of police of dealing with these issues to policing, right? So we have what are kind of issues around that be rooting classism rooted invasive, we have police dealing with those instead of public health can look at how do we build places where people can have access to economic ecu-. And not be selling drugs on the street. Let's say that because of being a black market becomes highly land, right? What's the role of other state funded resources that can support team needs to be healthy and frightening and economic refi -able? Yes, black lives matter chapters around the country EPA several years now been advocating defunding of the police, but this action by the American public Health Association contains lots of recommendations on how funds that are diverted from the police can be put to good public health use. Yeah. Absolutely. And I think that we can think about how we can resource programs or how can we programs build community based alternatives to public safety and really reframe. How we understand public safety. Putting it back in commute. Eighty control as well as water is that public resources and putting those back in community control. Yes. And such a large and influential organization, as this could also have an effect on how the media, portrays violence and communities and police, I hope so I mean, our hope is to have real material change in our communities, and and that we do begin to close the gap around the harms associated with policing for marginalized communities be that through how we frame and understand the issue be that among how we want. Whereas a psyche. We're gonna invest and put before public resources, you know, keeping public resources into supporting communities, and really I think what you're speaking about the media piece and having a real cultural shift in how we understand what the. Issue is now this didn't come about just because of few activists social workers came to the conference and said, you guys ought to do this. This has been some years in the making. Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, I think that you know, when we look at the issue of land in communes color and working class communities. This is a generational issue. This has story ties to the Black Panther movement. That with foundation we found eight on issues around police, brutality and black community. We have examples in San Francisco or that Latino cheap panel low rider can you make community with organizing around pre silences. Well, so be issues that community organization you bastards organizing happening working on for years. And so I've public health what happened for us is a few of us were in a master's program, and we decided to stay police. I went to public health. Issue, and and really research and through that we came to find like minded public health organizers, researchers writers, community planners, etc. Who believes that public health should be at its foundation and core anti oppressors and anti-racist, and we think together to write this proposal and provide solutions that we thought were what we think very upstream and looking at how would I say re framing how we understand they use not just to be about. I'm just course around before including body cameras teasers and community policing like a dive deeper and look at it deeper systematic issue. And so we were very influenced by community organizing was happening at that time here in San Francisco, we had a how many case that addresses for our? Yeah. So I I think I'll man who is shot and killed by. SF key. I mean, there was a lot of organizing fast foods, can you organizing around seeking festive for that..

American public Health Associa San Francisco classism EPA
"health association" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"health association" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"But at that time, there wasn't really a lot of discussion about it. Obviously, there are other political factors that that played into why that discussion came about at that time him cannabis's cousin if you will was really an industry on the rise. But so were you know, plastic and pharmaceuticals and cotton as well. And so these are three industries that were threatened by him. You know, anything that you can make out of play. Ethic out of cotton. You can make out of out of him. And really pharmaceuticals. You know, some people are of the mind that you could perhaps use cannabis instead of opiates say to to treat your pain. And so it was really a combination of political will to sort of see that hip industry, kind of pushed aside, and really, you know, racism played a large part in it too in in North America, especially because a lot of the people that were consuming cannabis, and we're bringing it to the United States into Canada were from outside of the country. And so, yeah, I think it's really really combination of racism in kind of a will to sort of see hemp and cannabis Vilnai's. So that these other industries could sort of be brought to the forefront as you just mentioned racism, and this kind of wit notion of social decay have been at least from here have seemed to be the driving forces behind cannabis prohibition in North America in the UK anti cannabis arguments tend to censor around. Mental health, psychotic episodes. Schizophrenia these kind of negative mental health associations. The kind of have been linked to overuse. And obviously in your book. You know, you talk about the positive impact it can have an anxiety, and and these kinds of issues, and I just wondered what your reflections are how you square those to pose. Yes, it's definitely a little bit polarizing, but I will say that, you know, what's often left out of the conversation when we hear about cannabis psychosis or schizophrenia is that if you have a predisposition to psychotic episodes. If it runs in your family, then you're obviously much more likely to experience this. And I think the misunderstanding is that people assume that everybody is at risk of getting schizophrenia or having a psychotic episode after they use cannabis, and I don't believe that to be the case there's science to that that up as well. And when it comes to anxiety, you know, whether or not it is aggravated or sort of relieved with cannabis very much comes down to the individual. And also the type of product that you're using the thing about cannabis. It's not a single compound medicine. There are many different things within the plant and really within different strains of the plant that can have different affects on people. So what I talk about in the book when it comes to anxiety is, you know, really searching for the right kind of product one perhaps his higher in a compound called CBD or can video which is known to not exactly have these intoxicating effects that come with THC. So it's sort of cut some of that that you for you that for a lot of people can actually bring a boating's I eighty so there's certainly two sides to the coin here. Not Amanda CBA talking too much about a book belittle book of cannabis. You can hear the full interview in the new Monica leafy which premiers on Sunday at midday London time here on monocle twenty four. Where right now, we look ahead to this week's edition of the menu, which has to Helsinki to coincide with Monaco's new travel guide to the city the program heads to see which is home of classic finish food and has been for more than half a century moncus hippie visited the restaurant speaking to manage Asana Capanna who told him how it's changed since it first opened back in the nineteen thirties..

cannabis North America Amanda CBA London Helsinki UK United States Capanna Canada
Reality Winner on Trump "so unfair" tweet: "I can't thank him enough"

Gary and Shannon

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

Reality Winner on Trump "so unfair" tweet: "I can't thank him enough"

"Counterparts from sixteen other states next week in Texas to try to save ObamaCare. Nineteen states want to get rid of the healthcare reform law which was passed about eight and a half years ago. Action is an American and it is an immoral action. Sister Carol Qian as president and CEO of the Catholic Health Association of the United States. Texas

John Mccain Vice President Google Phoenix Donald Trump Texas California Doug Ducey Bill President And Ceo President Trump Joe Biden Linda Gordon United States KFI Carol Qian Attorney Steve Gregory Catholic Health Association
"health association" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"health association" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"What we're doing we're not we're not getting hot in pursuit of the Russia collusion what happened in over last year and. A half all that tax money being spent frivolously without any accountability I say here now they had anything they would have this guided a floor I would've went after Trump with both barrels And if. Trump gets to pick a second chief Justice Between now and October like they plan The left won't know what to do and I'm going to sit here and tell you do not believe all the crap about they're. Going after abortion in Roe, versus Wade bow would be political suicide but they're using that as, a scare tactic The bottom line here is that when people don't talk about is. Back thirty forty, years ago it was a six to three advantage for the liberal judges, now six to three the other way that's. A problem but I want to believe, that these judges get picked and they do the job the right way if I were they believed that these judges judged incorrectly or. Biased to me than our, our whole system of Justice is no good It's a relevant and. I, don't believe that never have never. Will it is, the supreme court of the land they made a tremendous decisions over the years and you know what. If you think, they were biased how did they throw out the first two immigration rules, are pinions by the president's team this time It made sense bottom. Line is The, supreme court has been fair however the, Trump team is doing their. Job the Obama people are biased they came out the. Speaking against their their their colleagues I believe. You're gonna see two more picks I think Thomas will retire under the Trump watch and Ginsburg will have. To step down, for health reasons Mark my words he's going to. Get four picks. Before it's over And I'll tell you what Schumer. And the Democrats won't know what to do. My name is Patrick to Sal this is America today we come back we're going to jump into the. Health Association plans, and why I don't think the work. Right away Take to. Make.

Trump Ginsburg Russia Health Association Obama Wade Patrick Schumer president America Thomas Sal Mark
New York and Virginia Become the First States to Require Mental Health Education in Schools

The Morning News

01:20 min | 3 years ago

New York and Virginia Become the First States to Require Mental Health Education in Schools

"And find your set of keys just make it easy for these kids you know so just a reminder that they're gotta keep on reminding herself lock the doors get rid of the valuables don't have them in sight those things help to arrests were announced in that rash of burglaries last month it's a not guilty plea from the man accused of stabbing and killing his ex girlfriend and leaving her bonding in buffalo road in gates roger wiggins is charged with second degree murder in the death last month of tracey hinton williams thirty say hinton williams was stabbed multiple times before she fell or was pushed from wiggins jeep on buffalo road and died later strong hospital police believe there was some sort of altercation inside the vehicle at the time authorities say wiggins then tried to flee the country but was stopped at the canadian border in lewiston a new state laws now in effect that will ensure mental health education is provided in classrooms across the state the mental health association in new york state press state lawmakers for five years for the law new york becomes the first state in the nation to require that all elementary middle and high school students include mental health is part of existing physical health instruction in their curriculum advocates say schools will prepare students with lifelong skills to understand mental health and wellness and increase their awareness of when and how to access treatment or support for themselves or others jim donovan newsradio eleven eighty newsradio wam levin eighty time five forty three let's you're on your way home from work for a complete wrap up of today's news on.

Second Degree Murder Hinton Williams New York Roger Wiggins Lewiston State Press Jim Donovan Five Years
"health association" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"health association" Discussed on Super Station 101

"Lou willie we did get a question on facebook live i wanted to start with lou i now this question from what wilson says for us to ask the candidates about their work in the community so we'll start with lou i all right for most of my life i've tried to be active in community and charitable work i've served on a number of civic and charitable boards the american red cross the mental health association magic city art connection i was one of the founders of the birmingham played foundation i served on the board of the birmingham botanical gardens i was part of the committee that raised money to create and put in place the statue of martin luther king junior that is in the kelly ingram park that's been there for years i did that back in my twenties i've raised money for any town alabama i've raised money for path and work with them raise money for birmingham aids outreach and been a supporter of them for years and years going back you know fifteen twenty years so i've always tried to give back to the community and a number of ways and in large part one of the reasons i want to get the seat is because i feel like this is the the way that i can now give back in a very substantial way to the community.

facebook wilson birmingham kelly ingram park alabama Lou willie lou i martin luther king fifteen twenty years
"health association" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"health association" Discussed on Super Station 101

"Lou willie we did get a question on facebook live i wanted to start with lou i this question from what wilson says for us to ask the candidates about their work in the community so we'll start with i for most of my life i've tried to be active in community and charitable work i've served on a number of civic and charitable boards the american red cross the mental health association magic city art connection i was one of the founders of the birmingham pledge foundation served on the board of the birmingham botanical gardens i was part of the committee that raised money to create and put in place the statue of martin luther king junior that is in the kelly ingram park that's been there for years i did that back in my twenties i've raised money for anytown alabama i've raised money for path and work with them raise money for birmingham aids outreach and been a supporter of them for years and years going back you know fifteen twenty years so i've always tried to give back to the community and a number of ways and enlarge part one of the reasons i want to get the seat is because i feel like this is the the way that i can now give back in a very substantial way to the community.

facebook wilson birmingham pledge foundation birmingham kelly ingram park alabama Lou willie martin luther king fifteen twenty years
"health association" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"health association" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Today amid a lot of grumbling us president donald trump signed mass of two thousand two hundred thirty two page spending bill and within that home of legislation is a single sentence that is giving some doctors a glimmer of hope that sentence notes that the centers for disease control and prevention do in fact have the authority to conduct research on the causes of gun violence now for more than twenty years the cdc have avoided conducting any research into that issue after being told that they could not advocate or promote gun control dr georges benjamin is the executive director of the american public health association we reached him in gaithersburg maryland that benjamin now that the us center for disease control has been told it's allowed to study the causes of gun via silence what are the chances that it will start to study the causes of gun violence we're we're you know they did not give them any specific funds to do it but we're cautiously optimistic that the ministration we'll start to do the research that's necessarily help save lives and many many doctors are pointing out that those this language seems to open the door to study gun violence that you just as you just mentioned there isn't any funding with it so what do you make of that well you know you're right and that certainly a barrier but they've probably helping human services have ability to move some money around and in fact you originally funding for the center for disease control and prevention to do gun violence research was money that they was not specifically appropriate for that purpose money found within the injury centre which allows them to do the work so we we believe they be able to find some money to get started and then in the next appropriation we're hoping they will put some money specifically in for that.

president cdc executive director maryland donald trump dr georges benjamin gaithersburg us twenty years
"health association" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"health association" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"I've ever been aware of i mean i think you know if you're sticking with the name that you that you recognize that you've seen and in the farmers they kind of think and and make sure that you check the expiration dates that would be the other about 'cause all contents our stance with that that's the point of it in the kindergarten all right and i know that i have been guilty of abducting my 20s who men shouldn't probably get thorough condoms in their wallets right because that as a source of heated you're mentioning he connected navy as short shelf life of probably probably not not not the best i i mean not that there's anything really wrong with us for the show that you're right it did terms in terms of stolen them yet yeah cool dr plays in doors that kind of thing is meetings mojo okay so does your organization american sexual health association the d do condom distribution or just education or since its national condom month and that's why i'm asking that question yet we we don't distributor hotel elkanemi were really nejud ancient education network archive noriega okay no 45 percent say i just came across this figure recently 45 percent of the adult population is singles almost half of of all adults he see out there are single on yet many people have navy given up on sex because of you know all the media blitz of all the health risks of aids and there's hepatitis and all the stds and um they they've heard about all this and that they say is i i give up ben and even though they're single uh let's let's talk about the risks versus benefits of uh of sex and and the importance of a healthy sex life because if you on i mean they're safer sex made there's not completely safe sex but there is safer sex reign let me ask you hands on well i can tell you i i don't think the people contacting my organization have given up on stuck over those words maybe as much as they become more possible about it no again that's a good thing yeah you know whether they're thinking more about safer sex home what kind of relationship they want what they want the relationship those are usually the conversation we're having there's certainly some awareness thumb.

noriega hepatitis 45 percent
"health association" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"health association" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Health insurance system with all your employees right you have groups of people that have similar characteristics sticks that can be grouped together and that was a way to make it so you know these companies can you themselves and they're not going to be overregulated this is existed for a very long time it's not often used and the reason why it's not often used is because obamacare didn't exist and we had health insurance that actually worked so this entire time what they have done is look at these associations these health associations you know know if you wanted to do one at this company like we would be associated we both worked for the same company and we could get under the same insurance plan but let's say instead we interpreted that to say the glenn beck health insurance and cover anyone who's a big glenn beck fan right that is what trump is doing he saying look the way were a and rand paul as well have been associated we've been take looking at these associations has been these really the strict ways uh that's fantastic directly under a company now it can be let's say all nra members will be able to get on the same healthcare plan if they just show if the nra transit has tick right and then they would not have to be held under the aarp right exactly aarp's another one and so you'd have this thing way you'd have people who will be able to get this health insurance outside of the obamacare restrictions which is the main thing driving up while the crazy cost now the deal you could do like for instance a very healthy group of people strangely 'cause we eat more chocolate than in ice icecream than anybody else on the planet but are the mormons they live an average of like 10 years longer than the average person as a reporter two from yes hits it's like all the stuff euro potatoes which are ds weather as he but anyway but i would imagine if mormons could put together a healthcare system it would probably be a lot cheaper because the for the most part mormons or healthier yeah that's that's an and that is also because you're right it's all that's the benefit of it it's also the criticism of it what the left is saying is all those healthy people like you know hugging of healthy glenn beck is those healthy people.

health insurance insurance plan the deal reporter healthcare system glenn beck rand paul nra aarp 10 years
"health association" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"health association" Discussed on WTMA

"Of people eliminate critical publicheld funding devastate the medicaid program increase out out of pocket costs and we can or eliminate protections for people living with preexisting conditions said george as benjamin executive director of the american public health association in a statement these of course a virulent leftist who is in favour of government takeover of every thing and if not everything than virtually everything and that's what npr represents and they say an adult rolled back some of the expansion of medicaid which was intended to do one thing and then our obamacare just sort of through the kitchen sink at it and hundreds and hundreds of billions of dollars and and they figure hey that's okay we're only twenty trillion in debt word could go wrong what what could be the problem with that but it does take money and hands it over to the states to run their own healthcare programmes rather than having a giant national health care program gets rid of these subsidies that help people by individual health insurance policies and the reimbursements to insurance company he's the bailouts for insurance companies because the obama people knew that what they were doing would bankrupt the insurance companies which wink wink as a part of their longterm plan to drive them out of existence and they knew that they'd have to subsidize the insurance companies and that's how they got the body in from the insurance companies and have them go along with this rues with this trick and offering price bags breaks on co payments on deductibles.

george executive director npr insurance company insurance companies medicaid public health health insurance obama
"health association" Discussed on Otters Talking Politics

Otters Talking Politics

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"health association" Discussed on Otters Talking Politics

"A ferry step to health cutting out animal products and this movie is trying to say yes what you have to do and that's like really important logically there's a lot of different okay let's just talk about logic risk there's two kinds of conditions in logic one is a necessary condition and the other is this is sufficient condition what grow necessary first so if something is a necessary condition and what it means is that no matter what else you do you will not achieve this end without doing this thing it's a necessary condition to a healthy lifestyle to chat i have a healthy pmi it's a keystone its yeah it has to happen in order for me to achieve that end there's no other way and the movie as saying that cutting out animal products is a necessary condition words health run that is what we're learning around that's where i think they're wrong because i'm not challenging the fact that vegetables are fishing condition to help of course they are of course it's better to have more vegetables in your diet but what i'm challenging is that cutting out meet is a necessary condition for its health or cutting out animal products as a necessary condition and anyways we jumped ahead we jumped way the end ways are so let's check the organic so the first thing that struck me is the confirmed he he keeps showing these scenes of him calling companies like the american health association and susan g komen and mercado dared diabetes association of all these places and the music and the set up and everything it's like oh this guy's going to confront these people and when he gets on the phone with whoever he by the way he's calling a number on a website okay so whoever he's calling it's not a doctor okay it's not a high up representative it is the low lowest level public wrap that these companies higher this guy.

animal products american health association mercado susan g komen representative
"health association" Discussed on KELO

KELO

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"health association" Discussed on KELO

"Small steps to fix flaws in the current legislation four days earlier bishop frank j dwayne of venice florida chairman of the us conference of catholic bishops committee on domestic justice in human development had said the measure a revision of an earlier draft still dot still did not have enough improvement to change our assessment that the proposal is unacceptable the catholic health association is pleased that the bill in the senate will not go forward said sister carol qian a daughter of charity was president and ceo of the association adding it would have had incredibly negative consequences for so many americans dr stephen white a pulmonary specialist in ormond beach florida and chairman of the catholic medical association healthcare policy committee said that because of the complexity of the healthcare legislation he would help people would see what happened when the senate failed to secure the necessary votes for the healthcare repeal as a setback not a failure philadelphia's ongoing struggle with opioid addiction has found in epicenter in the kensington section of that city were open air heroin sales drug usage in overdoses have become commonplace in response to public outcry city officials in law enforcement of intensified patrols of heroin hot spots in the area as a result many of those who are addicted and homeless have sought shelter in other parts of the neighborhood according to father liam murphy of mother mercy house in kensington pennsylvania several people recently took refuge in the former ascension of our lord church building after the perish closed in 2012 due to low membership the church was relegated to nonreligious used by cannot michael decree and put up for sale the property was sold to a real estate investor in 2014 for eight hundred thousand dollars.

us real estate michael lord church heroin catholic medical association ormond beach florida dr stephen white carol qian catholic bishops committee bishop frank j dwayne venice kensington pennsylvania liam murphy law enforcement philadelphia president and ceo senate catholic health association chairman eight hundred thousand dollars four days
"health association" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"health association" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Show thank you dr peter what else we talk about people go when she but i want to get back to why to porn understand that when you look at scientific literature sure that's coming up in the media that you have to look at the shores as well and ultimately as dr prodigious mention that there's different components of the otago and it should porn to understand if you just go to your physician ago total cholesterol in ldl you don't see the whole picture of the you could be a i'll put it be put on a lowfat diet actually could be a causing you more issues from metabolic perspective which could put you have more risk for cordoba use i note such confusing and i don't want our listened to think oh wait a minute here the american health association doesn't care about us that's not what i'm saying what with the you're just not looking deep into the science and it's easier for cardiologists and fairly practitioners just go ahead and talk about our cholesterol health and so there's a lot of confusion there which fats good fat should bat vouch and we have to understand that the most important thing is really to understand that not all cholesterol is created equal as dr put at talked about different particle sides of the ldl and the oxidation so we're gonna really dive into our factory that bad we feel that the media chain fatty acids done appropriately without adulterating with highfructose corn syrup and other carbohydrates is probably the way to go because the shy to showing the there were of a high fat diet the property that given at the turning into the main fat burning and at luca mr byrne a police state tune after this segment and we'll talk door getting to plug version of both.

otago american health association fatty acids