20 Episode results for "Headley"

EP 5: Bloodline (PART 1)

Bear Brook

41:38 min | 2 years ago

EP 5: Bloodline (PART 1)

"Previously unbear- brook. All right. Breaking back. Kimball. Himbal are Gerald. Argument this guy really and who's that little girl? Lou by the model. Through. One the other five of the Bill, the people might perceive. Most stories like to be told chronologically this happened in this happened and so on, but in so many ways, this is not your typical story. The narrative arc is more like a four dimensional maids one that bounces around through time and around the country. It's all connected, but it's hard to know where to start the beginning the middle of the end L change, depending on where you come in. All of which is to say we're going back to the eighties again. To another beginning of this story to another mystery that by the end will lead us back to Arba getting in the woods of fair brook state park. This is bear. I'm jason. In nineteen eighty six a man calling himself. Gordon Jensen arrived at an RV park. In Scotts valley, California, he had a five year old girl with him a girl. He said was his daughter. Her name was Lisa, Gordon, Jensen and Lisa lived out of a small truck camper at the v park, which was called the holiday host RV park. The owners called it that because it was on the site of what used to be a weird theme park called Santa's village where. In its heyday. Santa's village was twenty five acres of Christmas on steroids. There were gingerbread houses. A toy factory. Even a refrigerated North Pole that kids could stick their tongues to but the theme park went out of business and all that had been left to rot by the time. Gordon, Jensen and Lisa arrived. It was like Christmas ghost town in the woods. Also at the holiday host RV park in nineteen Eighty-six wasn't elderly couple, Richard and Catherine decker they were from Santa Bernardino, California about seven hours south. They were only staying for a few months. Richard had landed a temporary job with the state the Deckers became friendly with Gordon Jensen in Lisa. They had a grandson p lease it became playmates before long decker started keeping an eye on Lisa while Gordon Jensen was busy Negra. Fond of Lisa started to really care for her years later a detective named Peter Headley would tell the Deckers their relationship with Lisa probably saved her life. The did if they hadn't been there at that particular time said the right things. She would not be here today. Headley works in the crimes against children detail at the San Bernardino sheriff's department. It's a line of work that he sums up in his characteristically terse way that can be very difficult. What do you mean? Head. I put that in words. Did just seeing the effects on victims can be it's tough detective Headley's understated style. Trikes me is being at odds with the rest of his life, which involves chasing criminals and his favorite hobby skydiving, and I should say that detective Headley would eventually come to play a pivotal role in Lisa's life. And today, he's one of the only people who is alive and willing to tell this part of the story, but back in nineteen eighty six when Gordon Jensen and five year old Lisa I came to holiday host. He had nothing to do with it in any case detective Headley says that back then the Deckers were becoming concerned about Lisa. They both knew something was very wrong with the situation. They noticed how thin she looked. But she didn't seem to have any toys and living out of that tiny truck camper. It was hard living for a five year old Gordon Jensen told the Deckers that Lisa's mother died of cancer. When Lisa was just a baby. In fact, Catherine decker would later. Reporters that he openly cried about it. She says she felt horrible for him. And Gordon Jensen also admitted to the Deckers that he was having hard time raising Lisa on his own, and they had told him that their daughter had trouble conceiving, and she'd like to adopt children, and he ended up saying with your take Ron trial adoption. The idea was that Deckers would take Lisa to their daughter and her husband down in San Bernardino for a period of three weeks if things went well, they would come back to the RV park with an attorney to make the adoption legal. It wasn't the most well thought out plan. But Gordon Jensen seemed eager to get Lisa off his hands. And the Deckers were confident their daughter could offer lease a better life than the one. She had. So they went ahead with the Deckers headed to San Bernardino with their new granddaughter. They they were just down here matter of weeks, and they realize something was very wrong, and that she had been molested. Away from Gordon Jensen and the RV park. Lisa started showing signs of abuse. She started touching the decker son in law inappropriately. And she was beginning to talk about the things. Gordon Jensen had done to her. I don't know the exact details of the abuse. But one police department would later describe what happened by saying that Lisa was quote, severely molested and tortured. Getting Gordon Johnston to sign legal adoption papers. Now seemed more important than ever. But the Deckers soon realized that was no longer an option they brought her back down here. And when they tried to recontact him, he was gone, Gordon. Jensen had vanished from the holiday host RV park. The Deckers didn't know what to do. But eventually they decided to turn to the police in the summer of nineteen eighty six they brought Lisa to the San Bernadino sheriff's department. Detectives questioned the Deckers and Lisa then they took Lisa into protective custody. The Deckers had to say goodbye, even if they had rescued her had saved her life. She wasn't legally their child. I talked to MRs decker. Her husband had passed on a best guy told her you saved her life. She did the did. What how did she take that? When you told her that she was very emotional shoot always wondered what had happened to lease and really cared about her. As far as you know, have they ever reconnected? I have talked to MRs decker and told her what a tap and afterwards I passed on information to lease about MRs decker. I don't know if they ever connected. Lisa went into foster care in was eventually adopted today. She's married with three children of her own. She's asked her privacy from reporters. But in a statement released through law enforcement, she says she's living a, quote, happy and secure life. Of course, that's not the end of the story though, back in nineteen Eighty-six after the Deckers handed over lease it to the police a warrant was issued for Gordon Jensen's arrest. It was for two charges child molestation in child abandonment. But when detectives tried to track him down they quickly hit a dead end all of the records he'd left behind at the RV park. We're fake the truck camper. He and Lisa had lived at of how to Texas license plate. But it was registered to an address that turned out to be a motel room the social security number on his job application to work at the RV park was fake and even the name he'd been using it holiday host. Gordon, Jensen was also phony detectives rebel to pull a fingerprint from the RV park. It came back with a different name. Curtis kimball. At first I thought that caught a break Curtis Kimball had an arrest record from a few months before he arrived at the RV park. It was from Cyprus California near LA Curtis. Campbell was pulled over for drunk driving. At least it was in the car with him at the time. But that was it beyond that one arrest the name Curtis. Kimball didn't seem to go anywhere. There was no driver's license or real social security number attached to it nothing that could tell the -tective where he was from peeling back. One fake name seemed to lead to another which left detectives with no idea how to find him. And it wasn't until he was arrested and nineteen eighty eight that those charges were brought up to him in nineteen eighty eight two years after abandoning Lisa Curtis. Kimball was arrested again, but not because police had tracked him down. He was pulled over for driving stolen car in San Luis Obispo, California about three hours south of the RV park at the time Curtis Kimball gave police another phony name, he said, he was Gerald Macher men again, here's detective Peter Headley. And at that point the gutters fingerprints, who's still in custody for the stolen vehicle. So in the prince game back is still there. And that's when they found the the previous warrant under the the other name, Curtis Kimball. So in nineteen eighty eight police had figured out that Curtis Campbell, and Gordon Jensen or the same guy, and they had him in jail facing charges for molesting and abandoning Lisa and for driving. Olen car. And this is an important moment in time line because it here that detectives came so close to figuring out the truth so closed with stabbing the fact that as we learned in the last episode Lisa wasn't actually his daughter, but she's been kidnapped. In nineteen eighty nine an investigator working the child abandonment charge told reporter, quote, my guess is picked her up somewhere and was keeping her as a sex slave one. Prosecutor even said he would try to force Curtis Kimball into taking paternity tests to establish their relationship once and for all. But that paternity has never happened. At least not all the way, they got as far as taking a blood sample from Lisa, but they never got one from Curtiss Kimball. I'm not exactly sure why that paternity test was never finished. But my best guess is that it was because Curtis Kimball took a plea deal in nineteen eighty nine. He pled guilty to child abandonment in return, the child molestation, and stolen vehicle. Charges were dropped. This is pretty standard. In case. You're wondering the vast majority of convictions in America. Over ninety percent are the result of plea deals. It helps prosecutors void lengthy trials and work through more cases more quickly. But in this instance, it worked out pretty well for Curtis Kimball to by voiding a trial. He avoided that paternity test and further scrutiny to his past. Curtis. Kimball was sentenced to three years in prison for child abandonment in nineteen ninety about halfway through his sentence. He was released on parole. He fled almost immediately and became a fugitive. The next time police had him in custody was in two thousand three after he changed his identity once more to Larry Vander and murdered. Sinjin? It's hard not to wonder how things might have gone differently. If that paternity tests had been finished back in nineteen eighty nine. Prosecutors could have charged Curtis Kimball with kidnapping child of Duchesne charges which could have put him away for a lot longer than a few years. And maybe most importantly, the investigation into Lisa's true. Identity could have gotten started right away. Instead, it wasn't until two thousand three some fourteen years later that the investigation into Lisa's identity began, and if not for contra Costa county detective Roxanne Gruner, it might never have began. Remember, she was investigating her own case, the murder of Unson, John when she first learned about Lisa, and for whatever reason the hunch an intuition, she decided to finish that paternity test. Detectives had started so many years earlier back that was scientifically definitive like this person is not biologically related this person. And I'm like, holy moly. You know what I mean? Like, this is crazy right now. Like usually once Roxanne saw the results of that paternity tests. She called the San Bernardino sheriff's department that was the police department with Deckers had brought Lisa back in the eighties. So they had jurisdiction of the case. But by two thousand three the detectives in San Bernardino, who I. I worked on the Lisa case who had spoken to the Deckers were gone. The new detectives didn't know that their predecessors had once openly speculated that Lisa was a sex slave Brock sands has all they knew was the official story that ended up in the case file they had a little girl or father hurt her gave her away to these this couple. He went to prison her mother's purportedly, deceased. She goes to foster care in his adopted for all intents and purposes back then their case was closed. And so here I am calling from twenty years later going. Hey, you guys have a there's there you got it. There's a you gotta work. Like, you gotta find a who. She is. And the response. I was like, you know, we don't have. We don't have opening found child case. And I'm like, yeah. You do. Remember at this point Kimball was serving fifteen years for the murder of Unson. So once Roxanne convinced police in San Bernardino to reopen. The Lisa case, she decided to have one last conversation with Curtis Kimball. She went to the pleasant valley state prison in Coalinga, California and asked him point blank. Where did Lisa come from where we're reappearance? And I think that the exactly what he was doing what in basically playing uses Hugh Saint stuff like, well, you know, get they said I had a daughter doodo back in the day. But you know, I don't be member. You know, they said I gave her away. You know, what I can't imagine? I would have done that. But you know. Alcoholic drink a lot. Have any men my memories Shana? And I, you know, I just think in your euro lion. Your your left foot off right now. You know what? I mean. Roxanne didn't get anything useful Curtis, and no one ever will. That's because in two thousand ten Curtis Kimball. Dine at the high desert state prison in northern California. According to death certificate. The cause of death was a mix of pulmonary emphysema the Monja in lung cancer. His body was cremated ashes were thrown into the ocean off the coast of Santa Cruz. Curtis Kimball had no visitors while he was in prison, not even a single phone call. He never tried to make a deal with prosecutors with the information he had never brag about it to other inmates. As far as we can tell you never told anyone the truth about his life. Whatever he knew about who Lisa really was what happened to her mother kept. It all inside when he died. It was gone. Hey before we get back to the story. I wanna tell you about another podcast produced by New Hampshire public radio. It's called outside in and it's a show about the natural world. And how we use it. It's made by some of the same folks who produce bear brook, which means it's got great production quality and explore some fascinating, topics. You might never have thought about if you like the episode we did on isotopes few weeks back. You're gonna love this podcast plants. These ecosystems are so deeply co evolved with fire that the actually encourage fires blueberries eucalyptus Mancini sweet ferns, all of these plants have developed waxy oily leaves. So they're extra flammable. Explode into flames. It's hosted by Sam Evans Brown. Another reporter turn podcast or here at HP are Sam is funny. A lot funnier than I am. This is a bad idea. We're good hit by a car. And there's probably a couple of my favorite episodes of outside in the fantastic. Mr. Phillips or the millionaires hunt club the story of giant mysterious hunting reserve here in New Hampshire. It's totally nuts. Take your best shot. And so he did. You can listen and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. In two thousand three when the San Bernardino sheriff's department opened a new investigation aimed at finding her true identity. Lisa was twenty two years old. But that investigation quickly went nowhere for all the same reasons the bear brook investigation did no identity of the victim. Nowhere to begin for ten years. There was little movement on the case then in two thousand thirteen and Lisa was thirty two years old detective Peter Headley took over the case. He's the understated skydiving. Detective we heard from earlier detective Headley took over the road to solving. The case was as steep as ever nearly everything Curtis Kimball had said to anyone was a lie. At least it was so young when she was abandoned she couldn't offer much help to detectives, meanwhile, leases identity wasn't the only mystery detectives were trying to look into when the case was reopened. Detectives had looked back. Over the story of leases abandonment with the knowledge that Curtiss Kimball was capable of murder hundred is new light new questions arose. Like where was Lisa's mother had Curtis Kimball kilter? And there was also a story that five year old Lisa had told detectives back in the eighties. When the Deckers brought her in a story that in retrospect seem too much more ominous than it had when Lisa was a child. I recovered who was asked about other siblings, and she had said that she did have other siblings, but they had died while they were out camping for meeting, quote unquote grass mushrooms. When you hear that story from Elise as child about the mushrooms, what do you what do you hear as an investigator? When you hear that? There's more victims. So not only were they searching for leases identity, but for evidence of other potential murders. Detective Headley started his work on the case by doing pretty much the same thing. His predecessors have trying to find a missing persons report from somewhere around the country that matched Lisa anyone who fit the right age range could have possibly been in the path of Curtis Campbell before he pops up in California in the mid eighties detective Headley found a handful of missing toddler cases, from around the country that might be matches reached out to the families of the missing children and asked for DNA samples to compare against Lisa one by one be ruled them all out. Hedley wondered if maybe the problem was that Lisa had been -ducted somewhere outside the US. And that's why she wasn't showing up in a missing persons report one of the stories Curtis. Kimball had told about Lisa's mother that she was a nurse from Canada. Maybe there was some truth in there. So the Headley reached out to the Royal Canadian Mounted police who told him they had a case of a missing toddler that might MAC again Headley track down a family member. Got a DNA test out. Detective Hadley tried. Switching tax turned his focus to Lisa's mother at different times. Kimball had told people her name was either Donna or Denise Headley poured over thousands of records of Canadian nursing licensing news looking for either of those names again, nothing. Detective Headley tried switching focus again, this time to Curtis Kimball with him, at least there was some sort of paper trail, even if it was full of aliases and fake social security numbers detective Headley thought if he could just find one kernel of truth in there, it might eventually lead back to the real Curtis Kimball. His best lead was a set of phone records. She had made some phone calls from the RV park where he abandoned Lisa one of them was to an RV park in Texas. And I've actually found the previous owner of that RV park, and he had kept all the records for the park all the people that had stayed there and figured if you've made a phone call there's somebody there knew him, and that was a piece farther back and time to track him. This could be big if detective Headley could find somebody who knew Curtis Kumble before he arrived in California. Maybe they would know something about where he was from. And who he was with the former owner of that Texas RV park told the -tective Headley he had sold the park to the company campgrounds of America detective Headley reached out to the company only to learn that after they bought the RV park thrown away all the records from the previous owner. So it's been a very frustrating ks when you're going back in time on a cold coast because records are gone people are deceased and just can't remember. Yeah. That must have been a rough day. They told you they throw all those records. I thought I had it as a step further back in time. And it was a big letdown throughout all these frustrating dens detective Headley had been in touch with Lisa shoes. I've talked to her numerous times during this investigation. And she really wanted to know who she was it was during one of those conversations in two thousand fourteen that Lisa offered up a new suggestion to detective Headley, why not try one of those genealogy websites like twenty three and me or ancestry dot com. One of those sites where you send in a DNA sample, and they tell you what your ancestors came from. And connect you with long lost relatives. I detective Headley dismissed the idea. Genealogy websites probably seemed a little amateurish to him something meant for hobbyists. And retirees they'd never been used in a criminal investigation. The way Lisa was suggesting, and I wonder just talking to lease again. And I'd made her a promise I wasn't going to give up. I was going to keep trying and she brought up again, the genealogy sites. And I said all right. Let's try it. We put her on several different sites and was started getting the head of a fourth cousin a fifth cousin. I'm like this like just work. Lisa and detective Headley didn't know it yet. But what they were doing would soon change the face of forensic investigations. It was the beginning of an investigative technique that would not only solve the mystery of leases identity, but also cases from all around the country some of which had baffled police for decades. To understand. How suggestion led to all that you need a brief overview of the ways police used DNA testing in criminal investigations. Did you come from from your blood and just know that we're going to explore some of this in greater detail in the next episode? So for now, we're just going over the basics DNA strand like meat. For building living. Let's start with the kind of DNA test. You're probably most familiar with the kind. You see in TV cop shows all the time police have DNA samples from crime scene. They run it through a database to see if they find a man processing, this type of standard DNA matching test landed its first conviction in nineteen eighty seven, and it's been a mainstay of criminal investigations and TV shows ever since. DNA match then there are paternity and maternity tests. Pretty straightforward. Investigators have to samples they wanna know if they're related this kind of test is also on TV a lot when it comes to one year old is area. Jay. You are not. This is the type of DNA testing that told us that three of the four bear brook victims are maternally related then there's one other kind of DNA test that some police departments have at their disposal. It's called familial DNA testing this kind of testing searches a police DNA database for near misses instead of exact matches. The basic idea is that if police don't find a match for a suspect DNA in the database familial search might find someone related to the suspect who is in the database, generally speaking familial testing can detect relatives only as far as the immediate family, and that's pretty much it for law enforcement. But over the last ten years or so a newer and more advanced kind of DNA test has been developed and honed by people outside of law enforcement. This new test comes from a world with its own separate interest in DNA testing, genealogy genealogist study family lineages by researching ancestors and descendants and building out broad family trees, and they were quick to realize the potential for DNA testing in their work Twenty-three, a meat is reinventing the way you look at your ancestors using the science of genetics DNA would just a small saliva sample. Commercial DNA testing turned out to be a huge hit today as many as twelve million people sent their DNA into genealogy website, according to an industry estimate. Crazy nineteen point nine percent Japanese I guess in this first the kinds of DNA test Genealogists were using were the same ones. Police paternity and maternity tests to trace those lines of family tree. But over time the commercial DNA tests grew more advanced as companies like ancestry dot com and twenty three and me competed with each other to squeeze more and more information at each DNA. Sam. Before long the commercial database is made a big breakthrough using relative find to compare his DNA with other Twenty-three in the members George found out that and they could be his fifth. Cousin what Twenty-three in media calls? Relative finder is based on a new kind of DNA test called an autosomal DNA test. It works on the same principle as the familial DNA testing that some police departments use it searches a DNA database for relatives instead of exact matches. But the big difference is that autosomal DNA tests are much much more sensitive. When police run a familial DNA tests. They're usually examining twenty different genetic markers to see how well to samples match think of it like a low resolution photograph, it's familial testing only detect close family members. And by contrast, the autosomal DNA tests being offered by genealogy companies today examined more than seven hundred thousand markers on each DNA sample with this high resolution test Genealogists can detect relatives as distant as four three even fifth cousins. Speaking of cousins, you have a lot more of them than you probably realize, but to have a really simple family tree where each set of parents has just two or three kids in that scenario. You have four thousand seven hundred fifth cousins, you can discover and sisters from all branches of family tree. You never know. So this is where things were at in two thousand thirteen when Lisa suggested a genealogy website as a way to find her family was started getting ahead of a fourth cousin a fifth cousin. I'm like, this might just work. The matches were starting point the first blood relatives Lisa had ever known about. But they were distant relatives people so far removed that they didn't know anything about her parents, or what her real name might be. I think about it. Do you know any of your fifth cousins, do, you know, the names of your great, great, great, great grandparents to go from these distant relatives to finding Lisa's immediate family detective Headley would have to climb all the way up the family tree to find the common ancestor between Lisa fifth cousin and then travel back down the tree searching through all the connected generations. And every branch looking for the one that Lisa belongs to it's like trying to find out where one particularly. Leaf grew on a tree after that tree has been cut into pieces and piled in a heap to do this in need more than just a match in a database, you need to be well schooled in the ways of traditional genealogy, birth and death records, wedding announcements obituaries and social media detective Headley realized that he was going to need some how. Detective Headley reached out to a nonprofit called DNA adoption dot com which had been using genealogy for years to help adoptees find their biological parents. Which is how we met this woman. I'm Popper enter, and I'm genetic genealogist, and such angel- that's genetic genealogist and search angel barber is originally from New Zealand of now she lives in California. She picked up genealogy like so many others do as a hobby in her retirement. She put her own DNA online in two thousand twelve and found a cousin from the UK. She'd never met before the cousin was a seventy year old man who told Barbara he had just learned from his DNA test at the man, he'd always thought was his father wasn't. I had no idea how to help them. And so what I did is I went online, and I found an online course that was offered by DNA, adoption, and I took that class, and that's actually the technique that I use for doing. The work that I'm doing now from one online class Barbara quickly rose to become an expert in the field, her PHD in biochemistry, which she has in addition to her law degree may have helped Barbara started volunteering with DNA adoption dot com and before long she was teaching that class. She took along with other duties like answering all the emails that came into the website. And so back in March of two thousand fifteen those webmail came in from Peter. And basically he just asked the question is is the techniques that we use would teaching to it up TS to find. They're both relatives could that be used to find somebody who didn't know either who she is our wish it was. And she said, yes. But since you don't have any geographical information, it's going to be a lot harder. Usually with an adoptee. They'll know that they were from the state or this area. Just from where they were. And with Lisa we had nothing. The task was daunting. It would be a real test of what genetic genealogy was capable of. But the tech of Headley was out of options and Barbara enjoys a good challenge. So they dove in and together they formed a new kind of investigative team part civilian part law enforcement park, cutting edge genetic genealogy part old school detective soft-spoken genealogist and understated detective. There were major really I if you're building these trees, if she followed the family trees down I would contact living phone because you know, if if these folks are sharing DNA those in has to be a descendant of comments Esther comb, so you're related or victim. You toast. Will you test asking that question became a big part of detective Headley's job during the search? As Barbara followed out the family trees of Lisa's fifth cousins with traditional genealogy, she would run into what Genealogists call a brick wall. Basically a dead end in the record. And whenever that happened detective Headley would try to get those people nearest the brick wall on the tree to take DNA test with one of the genealogy sites, the new matches from those people would help Barbara get around the brick wall and continue building out leases family tree. But just getting those tests proved to be a big challenge. It was difficult. People think it was a scam. There's some people that just flat. No way changed. My my approach. I went depending on the the feedback. I was getting. And. Ended up telling people, please contact your local department and have them verify me earning people's trust was one challenge. Another hurdle was the sheer size of the family tree. They were dealing with. Trey. So there was a maternal tree. And that one I think it ended up being something like eighteen thousand people in it. Add to that the other side of the family tree and that makes twenty five thousand relatives to sift through twenty five. Basically get up in the morning working on it. And I would work on it all day until late into the night. I was just kind of figure this one out. Why do you think you were so driven to work like that? I do that with everything. I guess. Barbara wasn't paid for any of this by the way to her. The project was just like any of the dozens of Dopp shin searches she had done over the years using the same basic technique. Although, of course, there was in the back of everybody's minds that Lisa's parents may not be alive at she may have been killed at the time that that lease. It was -ducted. We went really show what we were going to find. So there was sort of that looking in the background Barbara didn't do all this work alone. Though, she had help from volunteers at our local genealogy society. And she also picked up new volunteers along the way from an unexpected source from Lisa's extended family as Lisa's family. Trees grew some of her newfound cousins offered to help Barbara with the project. So we probably had over one hundred people who were actually helping Bill trees and do research and brainstorm, and and so on it took a little more than a year and what they estimate was. About ten thousand hours of work, but in the summer of two thousand sixteen barber rave, enter and her army volunteers did it. They narrowed down the genealogical possibilities of who Lisa's mother was to just one person Barbara immediately called and left a message with detective Headley, and he went back couple of hours later, and he said, no such person doesn't exist. And so we we knew that she did exist because we had our grandmothers pitcher, and we had her brother's obituary. And so, you know, of course, Diddley figures out what it is that, unfortunately, it meant that she was probably deceased. The police databases detective Headley was looking at are made up of things like DMV and voting records. So if a person hasn't been driving or voting a time, they're not likely to show up. Detective Headley contacted the closest living relatives of Lisa's mother that he could find for the first time he spoke with someone who could remember Lisa herself. I was talking to one of her relatives. And they remembered her mother and her moving away, and they never heard from them again. That's when the pieces fell together. Felt great. What was what was their reaction with happy to hear that? There was some information about that about that aid in the family that had you know, sort of gone missing. Actually when I after explained the circumstances. She is very shocked. On horrified. Thirty years after she was abandoned at the holiday host RV park detective Peter Headley called Lisa to tell her career name just being able to totally sushi is that was tremendous. That was tremendous satisfy action. It was very it. Would it made? It all worth it. Her name was Don, Don Bodin. She was from New Hampshire. That's the end of part one this episode of. If you want to keep going part two is available in your feet right now.

Lisa Curtis detective Headley Curtiss Kimball Deckers California San Bernardino Gordon Jensen Deckers Peter Headley Gordon Catherine decker New Hampshire reporter Prosecutor Curtis Campbell investigator murder brook state park
Second Cup: Busy people need hobbies

Before Breakfast

06:12 min | 2 months ago

Second Cup: Busy people need hobbies

"Hey listeners lately. We've been doing everything from home working from home exercising from home schooling from home breakfast lunch and dinner in from home wishing we were anywhere else on the planet from home and with all this extra time were realizing how important it is to make sure our place is the right place inter apartments dot com with the most listings and powerful search tools. It's easy to find exactly what you need. Apartments dot com the most popular place to find a place. Welcome before breakfast. A production of iheartradio. Good morning this is laura. Welcome to the before breakfast podcast. Today's tip is to find a hobby. Or if you already have one to schedule some more time for it. This is especially true if you feel like you have no time at all. Because time is all about perception and consciously choosing to spend time on leisurely activities can make you feel like you do have time for leisure. I recently read. Celeste had these new book. Do nothing now to be clear. Headley doesn't want people to actually do nothing nor has this public radio host and speaker spent a day doing nothing in her life however she does argue that many of us could use some higher quality leisure in general people work less than they think they do. We have free time even busy. People like headley but when we tell ourselves story that we have no free time when we get a spare moment. We don't have anything particularly purposeful ready to do with it. And so we spend this leisure time in the most effortless ways possible such a scrolling through social media or we do fake productive activities. Like deleting email so one thing headley suggests is pursuing an actual hobby. There are all kinds of interesting things you can do that. Use entirely different parts of your brain or that require less intense thinking than your job. Headley has a mosque garden. You can do crossword puzzles. Jigsaw puzzles you can cross-stitch or knit or do other sorts of needlework. Legos are great or building. Model trains or dollhouses. My ten year old son. And i are building a ship in a bottle. You can plan an elaborate garden. Anything artistic is great. I just read an article about someone who makes collages out of illustrations from old books. Which sounds fascinating and time consuming. Now i know my listeners are doing great things in the world and so you may be listening to this thinking that you do not have time for making collages out of old books. I get it. But i'm guessing that this is not entirely true if someone offered to start paying you a hundred thousand dollars a piece for those collages. You'd probably find the time somewhere. It's more that this is not a priority for you and that's okay too but scheduling just twenty minutes for a hobby of times. A week can do a lot for you at the cost of one of your one hundred sixty eight bakley hours i. Most hobbies are kinda fun. That's why people do them second. A good hobby gets you off your phone. Sure you can use your phone for reference but you may be marginally less inclined to scroll on twitter while you're using your hands to knit and most importantly a good hobby changes the story. You tell yourself you can tell yourself that you have no free time whatsoever if you scroll through twitter for three hours a day. Because it's jason tear inbox. But it's hard to tell that story if you spend an equivalent quantity of time building a ship in a bottle. You are forced to acknowledge that. Yes i have some free time. Maybe not as much free time as i want. But some and that is a very different story it puts us backing control of our time so we can start living the life so we want. If you make time for a hobby i would love to hear about it. He can send me pictures of your moss gardens or ships in a bottle at before breakfast. Podcast at iheartmedia dot com. In the meantime this is laura. Thanks for listening. And here's to making the most of our. Hey everybody i'd love to hear from you. You can send me your tips your questions or anything else. Just connect with me on twitter. Facebook and instagram at before breakfast pod. That's be the number four breakfast. O d you can also shoot me an email at before breakfast. Podcast at iheartmedia dot com that before breakfast spelled out with all the letters. Thanks so much. I look forward to staying in touch before. Breakfast is a production of iheartradio for more podcasts. From iheartradio visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite chaz hey listeners. I know you're busy. You don't want to spend more time on your taxes than you need to h. And r. block offers many safe easy to work with a tax pro. You can visit an office with or without an appointment. Don't wanna meet face to face no problem job your documents off at a local office or send a picture of your docs h. And r. block. We'll do the rest. You just review and approve online or do your own taxes with a tax pro's assistance every step of the way they can help. The screen share on-demand chat and more block. Has your back gouda. Hr block dot com to learn more.

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Apron Queen

Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

42:47 min | 2 years ago

Apron Queen

"We know all too well, that running a business is very hard, and there's a lot more things that you don't know. Then you do know when you're starting any business and when you're a new entrepreneur, which we weren't totally new entrepreneurs, but like you didn't really know anything about the hair business, and I didn't know a lot about a lot and it's daunting for new entrepreneurs. I mean, one of the biggest things I think it's natural to be focused on making a profit and you, you know, you want to make a profit because that's a Germany money. But I think you know, understanding that if you're building a business, you have to reinvest in build that infrastructure and it may take a bit of time to get to profitability. And that's okay. I remember learning about that and realizing that we weren't actually going to be making money for a while that it was all going back into the business, and we're investing in the business. And speaking of that today's episode of raising the bar, we're talking about learning how to run a business on the go with Ellen Benton. Ellen is the founder and CEO of Headley Bennett and apron, and. Company than outfit some of the best chefs and makers around the world. Ellen told us about her work philosophy, the hustle really real, and you have to keep showing up and you have to push through it and that's how you get should done a meal. The pep talk, she gave herself when she decided to become a better CEO. You know what there's things you need to change. Are you willing hell yes, I'm willing. Let's go and what she tells her employee's to inspire them to do great work. Yes, you can. You. Yes, you can. Yes, you did. Yes. You will like that's the attitude of everything that we do. All right. Let's do this. From Wendy. I'm Elliot, the founder of driver, Michael Landau, founder of Dr war and this raising the bar disclaimer here we wear sometime so bad language offend you consider yourself warned today on raising the bar. We're talking about making it up as you go with Ellen Bennett, the founder and CEO of Headley Bennett company outfit servers, chefs in makers in handcrafted aprons, Ellen chef herself knew that if you look and feel good in your uniform, you'll do a better job with that simple premise. She's revolutionized that apron industry, but it took some trial and error. All right. Stay tuned. I'm going to be traveling a ton next month, and let's be honest all probably forget to pack a million things. But the one thing I'll be sure to remember is my quip toothbrush. I love that thing. Quip is the sleeker better, more affordable, electric toothbrush. It has built in timer to make sure you're brushing for a full two minutes with guiding pulses that tell you when to switch sides. 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Alan Bennett, our guest today, and I've gotta say she was so much fun to interview my gosh, she is so much energy infectious, and she was able to take that passion and turn it into a multimillion dollar company without really having any experience in business, which is something I can certainly relate to. We started our chat by asking Ellen what Headley and Bennett is all about. So heavily in Bennett is an apron work. Where company that's really morphed into a culinary lifestyle brand, and we outfit some of the best makers chefs in the world, and it all began with one apron while I was a line cook at a two Michelin star restaurant. I thought I need to make aprons that make people feel proud and have dignity and pride in the kitchen. And from there morphed into everything that we've become and we outfit about five thousand restaurants in the US where sold at Williams, enormous or Letaba whole foods. We do collaborations with amazing companies like rifle in vans, and every day is a frigging adventure. I'm still perplexed that you have an apron company. I mean, who to get his like yell, I don't didn't realize that much of need for aprons that many aprons like I love shocking men like that. It's so funny. To exactly. No, it's just it's so cool and you can find a niche that an exploited the way you have so beautifully. When most people maybe I'm not most people but didn't know that you can make a whole business out of just selling aprons. Hey, I would say the same thing for blowups. It's true. I said the same thing about flaws. Exactly. Mike goes, did not a non believer. No it. It is interesting because I think you think of aprons as like a need to have a little monitor shafts. Hodel commodity when I started. Yeah. Yeah. Interesting. Yeah, that's real cute. Good luck. God speed, you know or are fancy chef right? Yes, I work at providence in LA, which is a two Michelin star restaurant, how those proper proper finding dot Ning up enough being a food. I've always been confused by the whole Michelin star thing. Tell yourself a foodie a lot too. I like food and I care about it, but I'm not like a. About it, but no to to stars isn't sound great, but in the world Michelin, that's like, super awesome, right? Yeah, it's amazing. I mean, there's very few restaurants that have three Michelin stars in the world so to it's a big deal well, and there's not that many that have two in the United States, and this is one of them, right? It's like, all right, wild. So paint the picture here you're working at this fancy restaurant. I, I'm guessing you saw a need. Yeah, I was. It was essentially I, I was cooking there. I was a line cook and you know, having our asses handed to us every night working crazy insane hours. We've been, we interviewed Johnny because I met him and we've incurred stone and other chefs and men. It's very tough area. Graph rolled. Lot of dudes. A lot of men in there. I had a really great sort of gender, neutral space. I mean, if you worked hard, it didn't matter who's you were what you were. But yeah, it was working there and I was just like, what the fuck are uniforms look like. We feel it. Shit, and yet we're making the most beautiful LA were what they were just Holly caught in garbage from overseas they, they were so evenly ANSI too. And the. Shape to it was just like a big cube that you wore and they aprons the straps were falling apart. The pockets would revolve. I mean, you essentially were tying a rag to your body and cooking, and you had giant ridiculous crocks. I mean, the self esteem situation was terrible and not that you know, I'm like, okay, in the kitchen news, a look like you're in a Lululemon outfit, but you want to at least have some pride and dignity in yourself to say, I can do a good job good about. Do you have when you're working in a restaurant like that? Do you have the ability to just wear your own stuff that you bring in assigned uniform? I even knew that are in the chef room. They're all unless unless it's like the Sheffer, the official busted out the real. Like people like in nice restaurants, not wearing either that like houndstooth print or go to dinner. Look at the ship room. So for the longest time in the kitchen to your point, hounds, tooth was what everybody war. It was like that was it. And I don't know. I kind of compared to posted hatred all the time. Yeah, but lane. This guy slapped like adhesive at the top and became the most innovative thing ever. It's kind of like that. We had fabric, I just took it and I changed the way that people looked at it. I what I made you want to. I'm a runner. So I do marathons and things like that. And when I first started running, I got an amazing outfit from Nike, and I was like, I'm fucking runner now and I literally like held my head up. I felt powerful. And then I started training and then I ran the marathon. That was my first go at being runner. And I was like, holy shit. If I could make people feel that way in the kitchen across the United States, like we could change the culinary worries and people really. Yeah, that's cute. Good luck. Now, did you have a hard time? I have so many questions literally store, but did you have a hard time convincing. People to invest in is I'm sure it's a little bit more expensive. I'm guessing Italy is. Do you have a hard time convincing restaurant owners to to? Yeah, it was at the beginning. It was very much like you're gonna do what you want to sell an apron. That's like seven times the price normally furnace that's in Saint, but I wasn't even thinking about the cost of thinking while I was thinking about what are the materials that you need for a good product. Right. And in a professional restaurant, like providence, you're going to farmers market, you're buying heirloom tomatoes, you're buying stuff that's like the premium. Right? So that's all I did with my aprons. I went and got premium ingredients which drove up the cost, but it made it lasts five times longer. How did you convince that first restaurant toward to base for something seven times the very first order for headland Bennett was Bockel Marcotte which he was. My chef goes working half the week at providence, half the week at Baako, and he said to me, hey, there's a chick. She's gonna make aprons for the restaurant. You want to buy one. She's going to charge us like forty bucks for them, and it was like this like. Ship was sailing by in front of me thought my God should. I leave should not do this all in like five seconds in my head over the cash register at the restaurant. While I was in service cooking and I was like, chef, I haven't apron company. I will make you those Abrahams, we'll do it faster better than I didn't have a company. All I had was a db had gotten a doing business. Yes, in a lot of all that had in my pocket. A whip those guys out right now. And I was like, chef, I can do this and I, yes, yes, yes. And I just say to him, yes, you say yes. Yup. Chef room. It was. It was outside the chef and he was like, okay, and he gave me the shot. So out of the and blue I had an order of forty aprons. I didn't have a pattern. I didn't have sewers. I literally had nothing. I had myself and I knew I'd set targets for myself in the past that I had a -ccomplish and I just had enough confidence that I could do that. I said, I'll dial before we going further. And for our listeners, if you happen to be in front of a computer, you really should go to your her website because you can get a sense for your steady. I have to admit, I hadn't. I knew about your business. I'd heard about it from alley, but hadn't visited the website until preparing for the show and you're steady is fat. Congratulations because the websites beautiful everything on the site. Your office looks amazing. Oh, my office is amazing. And it very much is like your, you know, I feel like the website just so I can Headley Bennett dot com. That's h. e. l. e. y. a. n. d. e. n. n. e. t. com. So just like we talked to a lot of entrepreneurs about like finding their passion and who they are. It's like, if you do, you have to. Oh, visit her her office. Like she literally has wall outside her office. It's like all the rainbow wall and does lots of events, but it's very much who you are as a person that comes through so much in your brand and everything that you're doing. Which, again, you know, for all the entrepreneurs out there, it's like, don't be afraid to like flex that totally. You mentioned something that made me think about, you know how important I hadn't really thought about in the way you positioned it, which is that if you look like a runner, you feel runner. You hold your head higher. I've always thought about it in terms of aesthetics drive are. It's like we wanted people to feel certain way because in this I do say this a lot of am not a foodie, but I get restaurants because the make me feel the way that on the lighting is in spirit. You may not know exactly all these reasons why you feel better or having time, but we is as store owners know that, right? Yeah, the, yeah. But it comes into play for you to with both your your aprons and how you design them, but also your office in the space you create for your employees is totally. I think Headley invented like styling vibe is definitely one of positivity and inclusivity, but also just making feel like hell, yes, you can. Yes, you can. Yes, you did? Yes. You will like that's the attitude of everything that we do, whether it's a frigging sample sale or an event that I throw or a dinner. I'm. Just like your included, your important, you count, you're in, show up, smile, limits you this. Let's let's take a step back. So you're at the restaurant. You take the leap the guts to say, you have a company when you don't make the forty aprons soom he loved them. And at this point you get the Abrahams physically made. I mean, you selling them. Well, I did not. So actually I don't know how to how they get made. I mean, did she do them herself? I've, I've found some sewers and I am Mexican. I'm half Mexican half English. So I found so her and I was like you that make it in the morning. If I would, I make it. Okay, easy. She said, please, will you help me? I was like plays. I've got an order Jimmy. It's much better. Interview in Spanish. And. Great. Try guys. Mega done deal of land. No, I like I think I hacked together. I hustled together. I mean, the way that you do when you sort of gun to your head with an order, let's get it for for listeners. Let's. Started this bartered for everything that's like the real deal. I bartered for the first pattern meaning I told somebody I will cook for you. If you let me if you make this pattern for me, I'll come and cook for you. And I worked at this like crazy fans like the three hundred dollars. That's a pattern rights, fair trade. And then I found somebody else I took the pattern to somebody else and I got them to so it and that was another dinner. And so then I had my my pattern in my apron, and then I've went and found swatch fabric. And then I brought all that to my chef and I was like, okay, what do you think of these fabrics? What do you do? You like the field? You like the touch and he knew what I hated about our uniforms. I mean, the whole idea was make it better, make it feel better, make the straps not fall off the pockets of meeting. And so you had Maya static in my chefs needs and together we collaborate and made the perfect apron. So it was like a focus group. I didn't have McKenzie and myself in this chef in front of me and we figured it out. But what's crazy is that I order they looked really good and then a week later, he was like. Bennett like yes, and I ran to his office and he's like, these apron suck. Oh my God. What do you mean? And he was like, the straps are still falling because we had done this like Deering ring thing that wasn't working, and I thought, shit. He's my only. He's. Online? My boss. I mean, I'm like, I'm in the shit, so I gotta make this right? And so the little amount of money that I had made on that order. I took all that money reinvested back into these aprons and I was like, chef not to worry estate, very home. I was like, I will take care of this, don't you? I stayed calm, very calm externally internally. So I told him keep half the aprons and I will get the other half fixed while you have these on the line. And the strap situation that we use to this day, which is like brass hardware, beautiful American wedding that stays flat is the straps that we developed in that week in that crisis well, and it took the crisis almost for me to figure out the right way to do it. Look between Michael being siblings and business partners, rerun into a lot of things we disagree on. Like I believe everything happens for a reason and you not so much. It's true. I think we can both agree that we were pleasantly surprised by casper mattresses. I got mine a couple of months ago and I'm obsessed. I mean, you spend a third of your life sleeping. So why not be as comfortable as possible? To be honest, I really like my old mattress a lot and didn't think has could beat it, but I was wrong. You heard it here. First people, Michael was wrong. The original casper mattress combined supportive memory foams and just the right amount of sink and bounce in casper isn't just a mattress company. They also have pillows and sheets that add to the ultimate sleep experience. All designed developed and assembled here in the US. You can be confident about your purchase Casper's hundred night, risk-free sleep on trial, not totally satisfied. Casper offers hassle. Free returns, get fifty dollars towards select mattresses by visiting casper dot com. Slash bar and using promo code bar at checkout casper dot com. Slash bar promo. Owed bar terms and conditions apply. Don't get me wrong. I love podcasts, but sometimes I just wanna put on some good music and I want it to be just music. No interruptions with apple music. You get fifty million songs and zero ads. I grew up listening to classic rock with my dad Led Zeppelin ACDC black Sabbath. It's music. I still love today, but we definitely didn't make it through every single bands full catalog. So lately I've been having a lot of fun rediscovering songs. We used to listen to together and finding albums. I've never heard before and I'm doing all that with apple music. So if you're going to listen to music, listen to apple music. No adds nothing but songs and they have a great offer right now to sign up for apple music at apple, music dot com. Slash wondering, and you get your first three months free. We're talking a huge library. You can discover new artists or playlists to fit your mood. All by going to apple music dot com. Slash wondering, plus you get this first three months for free, and it's a great value after that. No obligation. Cancel anytime. Give it a listen and keep the music coming. Apple, music dot com. Slash wondering. We're talking to Alan Bennett of Headley and Bennett. We wanted to know how the Queen of aprons went from scrambling to fill one apron order to outfitting thousands of chefs to talk about how you actually started the business. It's also you're kind of on a shoestring right now. You've got your shoe string, right? What was the transition actually form a company and getting dedicating one hundred percent of your time to this thing? So I kept my jobs for almost a year and a half close to two years after that point, meaning I was still working at that restaurant. I started wiggling my days down at the other restaurant, and I was a personal chef in the mornings for families. So I stopped doing that. And I, I was just like the are. Family. And and on on Sundays I would set up at the former's market break down. I would manage the booth myself couldn't afford to pay somebody. And then I would stick everything in my little tiny mini Cooper. Many years ago is that was six years ago, and then I would go and clock in providence and worked the service. So I was working six AM to you girl. That's how I did it. I just kept my day jobs and didn't tap into the business money at all about two years. And I didn't hire an employee until I absolutely had to. When I did it was like eleven dollars an hour something and she had a day job. So she was working in the evenings for me and in the daytime, she was doing her other stuff and I was sales marketing everything. I was hand dropping all the packages off all over LA at that time. That seemed like a great idea. It was like I'm gonna drive to Santa Monica to handle liver. That's what I should be doing by time. And I just kept doing that and I would go to events and I would talk to one chef and then he would introduce me to another chef. And I was very fast and I would show up just mostly. Word of mouth, but I was all too, but I would. I wasn't just doing things on Email. I was really old school about how I grew this, like showing up, I would do a handshake, like my parents just sort of raised that way. Like, you know, your word is gold and you right? Handwritten notes that sort of thing, and people love that. I mean, it's really real rushing. It's refreshing. And so if I told you chef, I was going to do something I would do it stick to it. So then he was excited to share that with his friends. And then every single order was a collaboration every single because I didn't have product premade, so show up with pattern what they want, and and imagine you sitting with me and me being like, okay, what do you love you? You love, stripes and patterns. Okay. Let's talk about your restaurant. Okay. It's purple and green and blue. Amazing. Let's make something beautiful. It was a ton of collaboration really. If you look at it a lot of collaborating with people, listening, focus grouping with every single person. I'm curious to how you got from that one. Eleven dollar an hour employee shoestring shoestring. Yes, to where. Currently are now in this big, beautiful office with tons of employees. Clients. Now we have forty six. Yeah. And how big is the business? If I mean, if you don't mind me asking it's many millions. Just trying to get many, many millions many, many millions. That's a good number and you don't have investor jet, right? He don't believe you spoke to our. Yes. There's many, many people want to see. I think it's good to point out that Ellen in didn't addition to what she just explained with going to chefs personally has made all these great relationships and we know that you were friendly with one of our investors who has kind of men toward you. And yeah, giving you advice and it's like take it where you can get it people, you know, I mean anybody in your network that will give you advice and we'll talk to you and be willing to be sounding board for your business for for for free actually. What is what you've done, it's like take it and and learn from it, which you've, yeah, no, I, I did not have an MBA. I still don't have an MBA. I basically was checks her figuring this out every single day and but by listening to people and being very observant of what's happening with your product and your customers and your audience, it's like wild. The off. I just want to get back to that advice, but let's just paint the picture for everyone how you made that transition, how you how you made it all happen. Okay. So started doing all those events meeting all these different chefs accumulating Lotte chefs were really famous. So from the gecko, you know, we had people like David Chang and Martha Stewart and people like that that it was also word of mouth, but it was also me showing up to the restaurants and being like, I wanna talk to you. I'm gonna show you something. And I would give my presentation in that really say not as a person get out of the way. Get out of the way. So I would do that again and again, and again, and I just created this little pocket of chefs that were the thought leaders. And then everyone else started seeing these thought leaders where those aprons and then you'd go to your favorite restaurants and start seeing the little an percent, which is our logo and people would say, what's that percent? What's that Burnett look so much better now this time, remember nobody was doing anything like this. So the equivalent was a white Polycom neighbor. And now we had these Japanese denim Italian shamburg beautifully burns that matched in looked like the restaurant. They were on brand. They were handmade in Los Angeles. I'm like, why would you get back at this time from employees of the restaurants where you get waiters were like what we never had such great uniform. This is incredible. And the marketing departments were thinking fully shit. This look so much better than anything that they have. And then the branding departments would say or my God can't do this. Yeah. And then carpenters, painters started wearing it and then you know, I know, because like all of June. Those girls are dry bar. Joke sensitive for us. We tried. We've got Ellen actually gave us like like dealer. She let me tell people about you've just like what you just told the world. Now everybody did it deal that you never took idea. It was, you know what I would like you to know that you and I had a conversation about this Michael and you're like, we just can't justify it. And I begged bagged and I cleaned it in pleaded. Let's say you're a burns cost five dollars. Let's say the Abrahams were. We were gonna, make free were like thirty dollars. Our friends are going to last literally five times longer. And your brand is gonna look at her and your staff is gonna feel better. It's kind of a no brainer. We're gonna. We're gonna taking this sale offline. We do have the, the Abrahams. Is not. We do have them in our dry styling in like in Bethesda. Our new dry selling shop is like the elevated in our product. So we do have them. We've played around Denna colors and yeah, so we little, she let me ask you this. You're obviously a great chef and you're very creative. Do you have the business skills or how did you find the business skills to put this all together? I mean, you have a very, as you said, many, many, many, many millions. Yeah, you know, forty, six employees have this big office like, where did you develop the skills to run a business? I mean, did you do you come from family of entrepreneurs? You mentioned some mentors. I mean, did you just kind of win? I definitely winged it and still winging still linking. I started one of those twenty five. I'm thirty now and I just did. I had a lot of humility. Let's put the put it that way. I just I knew what I didn't know from day one. So I was never trying to put on a show for anybody didn't. You know? I didn't know everything. I mean, I did know some some basics. Oh, my mom had always raised me to say like, don't spend more than you make. Okay. So that was really basic. You should give alley that one? No, but think about it don't spend more than you make reinvest every penny back into the business. Those were my two guiding lights for the first two years. And by listening to those two things, I was able to make enough money reinvested all back into the business. I would never do anything frivolous. I mean, I had lists for everything I had goals and anytime I didn't know something I would tap into like five or six people that I knew that were good at that, and I would get advice from lots of different people. And then I would make up my own recipe. And so I was never taking one person's advice. I was like. Okay. I'm gonna talk to finance and develop my own idea, and that's how I cook. I will look into five different cookbooks and then developed my own recipe based on all the ingredients that every you know, I've been in a kitchen with Ellen, which is really intimating, but she's like cutting stuff and just like it's like so willy nilly. How does it's going to taste good? Ellen invited me to one of her famous Bennett brunches that she does, which actually had one yesterday that I moved, but I was so intimidated. And I was like Ellen, all you're cooking with Michael Anthony, who is one of the chefs in the United States. He's the chef of Gramercy tavern in city and alleys like how do I cut the sun yin and he's like, my wife loves dry bar. It was the greatest really did. I did. I bear myself. I don't even remember. Maybe we have her fixed. I loved it so much Ellen. I mean, it was. It was. I mean, cute is nice. 'cause I was like, what. Like, where do you Jim like? I don't like that. I don't like this, but chef. Shefrin Sheffer of. Yeah, my home. Was like grabbing things throwing like it's pretty fascinating watching you. I have to say in the kitchen. You're very impressive. Well in that style, so to speak is kind of how I approach the business. I was just like, okay, let's figure it out. I don't know how to do that. I will figure it out how to do that and you learn how to do everything in a kitchen. You don't have anything that you say, I can't cook, and there was nothing in business that I can't learn. The kid mentioned Martha Stewart a few minutes ago. And when I was looking at your website, I kinda thought she's going to be the next modern day Martha Stewart, and I wondered if you're on that. Trucking, really because I mean, you know, it's like Martha Stewart with with an edge. Yeah. Had a baby with Anthony boarding. The idea. Big, thanks to wicks dot com for sponsoring this episode of raising the bar. Here's a fun fact for you as of two thousand eighteen there. Almost two billion websites in existence mind blown, right? That means you're businesses website really needs to stand out if you want to have an impact dot com can help with that. The team, it wicks developed, artificial design intelligence that will help you create a stunning website tailored exactly for your needs. All you have to do is pick your style Adron images and just like that your website is ready to go. No creative limits, no coding to worry about just complete freedom to express yourself in manager entire business online wicks truly makes it easy. Plus you can even create your website on the go right from your phone. You can have your own world class website and just five minutes no matter where you are even while listening to this podcast, just go to dot com. That's w. i. x. dot com to get started, create your own professional website today. Welcome back to raising the bar as you can probably tell Ellen works at hyper speed when she has a vision. She wants to make it happen immediately and she's not afraid of change that was an asset for her in the beginning. But once company started growing, Ellen realized she was giving all employees whiplash. So she got an executive coach to help slow her down and become a better leader. The company was growing and it was kind of growing past a place where I felt like I could manage it. So as as I'm sure you can see now I move very quickly, right? So I used to make a decision and implement immediately. I would read a book or talk to somebody or talk with the CEO and you'd say I'm doing this in my company. It'd be great. Let's do it immediately which is curse is curse blessing, right? You need to once you have if you have one employee, that's okay. If you have forty, it's a different story. And that was part of my growing pains. Realizing you can't turn the ship that quickly ended affects lots of different things and understanding how it affects the. Context as opposed to how it affects what you think. But that's why I got a coach. I, I realized that the company couldn't go past me and I needed to grow smart and. Company back in some ways because I didn't know what I didn't know talk about that for. So we're talking about the talk about it, really bring it down. He really does. He like he's got. Go go Bosco. So. Let's get to the point Michael sparky now who's the boss? She have this coach. Yes. And is is giving you advice on how to manage your business, like in the in the nuts and bolts and the details, or is it more management style? And did you bring in other people to augment your skills that you or the ones that you didn't have or what was that like? Okay. Great question. So I. So it started more with, okay. What are your fires like? What are the things that are causing you dilemma and what keeps you night? Yeah, and it was a lot about how to how to grow and manage teams. That was like a huge issue that I just I as we were at forty six people like, oh my God, and we're essentially half a manufacturing department, a company and half of a creative company. Right? So you've got blue collar workers on one side of the factory. And then on the other side, you've got a bunch of creative to imagine running two businesses that simultaneously in parallel in vertical fashion. That's hard. And last year we brought all of them manufacturing in house. So we're, we hives year had people. We hired people from American apparel to set up our sewing floors. I mean, it's very proper. And then at the same time, you've got a marketing department is gigantic and managing all these different collaborations and events in launches. And you know, we just built a kitchen with Samsung and our factory to do events in digital stuff. I mean, it's wild. Yet, you think, oh, we're just selling aprons but much more conflicts. We've got over there. So I felt really overwhelmed and my CFO said, you know l. in the fact that you've done this long with no guidance in that you've done it based off podcast meeting people ask questions is frigging incredible in it's a miracle, but and you need, you need a somebody help you get to that next level. And I was willing and ready and I needed that help. So I was very open to and we're you not. Do you have? Did you put your hand? I have a question to finish that thought though, but do you have like before we go more into this coach? Do you have a president of your company? I'm the CEO CEO, but you could also have a president. True. There's nobody else like anywhere. No, my we have a CMO and we have a CFO and the kind of like my people. Yeah. And then everyone else below that their managers and directors, but they're young. Like people are very young in my company. So it definitely took her coming on board SIS, amazing woman. And she meets with me once a week for an hour and a half, and then I can call her about anything and everything whenever I need to, and we just started working. The first thing she worked with me on was the difference between personal and like personal power. Right. And like professional power meaning like positional power. I'm the CEO you must listen to me because I'm the versus I am Ellen, and I run this company and you follow me because you respect me as a person, and I very much leaned on the positional power before she came on. So it was like, I'm in charge. Let's get this done like, get out of my way and not so much as the highway, but I was very much like I didn't realize this, but I made some of my staff feel like they were just caught in the wheel because I'm so you're so I'm so nervous. I'm just very driven and I'm like, let's go when I have so much energy. That I kind of -ssume that everyone's just like right there with me for the ride, but I realized that they weren't. And so it was like running up a mountain by myself a little bit with people a mile behind me, and I needed to figure out how to get them up with me. And on the same thing. Which I mean one of the first thing first of all, realizing that kind of huge deal. When you when you realize that your perception, the perception that people have of you is not what you think it is is mind blowing. I was like, wait what my step because we did a three sixty and all this stuff where people were very honest about what. What is your thought of Ellen as a leader? What is l. in coach, do that like people in your company to get surveys? We didn't surveys on my attention this. They were all in animals. They were supposed to read the. My coach read them, and then she gave me like versions. Yeah, so it was very, it was very, it was very humbling and it was really hard to say, you know what? There's things you need to change. Are you willing to hell? Yes, I'm willing. Let's go. And she said that that's one of the hardest for CEO is like the the hardest thing to hear that you heard from the the perception that that that maybe I don't. They don't feel as valued. Yeah, and realizing that that was the effect that I was having with them by, you know, tunnel, but just unintentionally. But I was just so driven that I wasn't recognizing them for what they needed recognition on. Even though for me, I thought like last year I gave everyone 401K's I gave everyone healthcare and to me that was showing them that I lead them, but to them, they wanted something different and recognizing the difference between giving them things and making them feel valued very different. They just think that's such important thing is. Who are starting their business, and we husband get us question about building your culture. It is this is generation where you have to figure out everyone so different and want some sorta different recognition, whether it is financial or just like reassurance, or just listening to them talk about their day, and they want to be able to tell you something about their lives. I mean, it's so it's so great that you did that. Yeah. Do that. And I will say, took took over two months for my team, believe it. It was like, okay, she's going to do something and they just they didn't wanna believe it. And I just kept showing up and I kept doing it and feel like now you've won them over and they know they, they legitimately or like it. I, yeah, they, they are in some cases a little speechless over the fact that there's so much more Mason. He needed it and not just like lashed out or gotten mad about something or or started making decisions running and gunning it like a used to. Now I think things through and I incorporate them in and there's a lot more collaboration. I, I've paused and I take a beat. I look at the situation and I talked to my CFO and then I'm like, okay, what does it? How does marketing think about this? So I'm really learned. I'm teaching myself like the muscle memory of being a proper CEO which means you don't just like flip and stick an idea out there and say, okay, it's happening right now. You know, you have to piss off. I made hard. I mean, I feel like I'm going to preschool slash Harvard of being a CEO learning day in day out on the job, and it's crazy and really hard. And I've definitely had moments where I'm like totally in tears when I fail at something, but then I pick myself up and I learned. Okay. That's not how you do that. Let's try again. Man, that was a fun interview. She's amazing and I just wanted to learn more. So a few days later we hopped in the car and visited Ellen at work. Here's a segment we call out with Alli, whoa, whoa, I was there to fine, but it doesn't have the same ring to it. This segment is called out with alley and Michael. So when we walked up to the apron headquarters, there was literally cowboy out front cooking chicken in a giant cauldron only goes big. She gave us a great or so much fun Allen. Can I get a tour of the Ellen willy Wonka factory. Lutely. Okay. We took on the space and it was much bigger than we needed when we originally got it. But we wanted it to be gigantic because this was going to be our community space. So we designed it with a whole area, but just the showroom combined with a kitchen that we built out here, that's our latest project. We have zip line that crosses the entire community spe. It really works and it really works on writing it before we, we have a slide that's tach to our customer service tree houses, and then we also swing and what happens on the customisation wall. So this was inspired by the build avair wall, and I wanted to be very hands on. You can actually take everything on take everything off. You can go up to the strap wall and say, I love purple, but then I also love this blue stripe. Can you do this online order, your own and like this? Not yet, but one day we'll be amazing thing. That's the dream. That's the expensive green. And then over here, this is our manufacturing floor. So as explained to you guys, it's split half enough. So you have the community space, but then you have the actual working floor. So yes, so this is our sewing floor in over here. These are rows and rows of cutting table quite the operation. Yes. We walked into Ellen's office next and the best way to describe it is it was like you're walking into her brain was literally one side of her office that was just chaos and pictures and colors everywhere. And the other side was just totally sparse like a whiteboard, and that's kind of the way Ellen operate. So this is now my office, it's in the middle of everything. How many people do you have working here under fifty? And it all happens here, sales marketing production? Yes. Idea. Next, we wanted to talk to some of Ellen staff and get the lowdown. I'm Lauren, I am the senior marketing manager here. Amazing. That must be a fun job. It's a blast every day. And you just never Ellen? Honestly, it's amazing to work for female entrepreneur. It's been a dream, so she teaches us every day. Jeff, one place to come to work is it? Is it. I think I need to go on the zip line a little more. I haven't been. Maybe you need like. Zip line and the slide you kind of take it for granted. So after about an hour just could not take it anymore. I had to get on that zip line. Define a little scared. Sure. That you've done it. I don't let go. You'll be fine. That is actually really not as scary as I think it looks. It was so fun that I think that maybe we should consider putting zip line it every dry bar. No, no, no. Those plans knows it lines day. I hope you enjoyed this episode of raising the bar. Our next up features the Mary co-founders have played Rachel Bloomberg and you've all fit is a high intensity workout done, vibrating plates Bill, tell us about the science behind the vibration and how Rachel knew they were on the right path. You know, when you have a vision, you know, and it changes your entire life and you just can't not do what you're supposed to do. If you like our show, subscribe on apple podcasts, Spotify, NPR, one one dot com or ever you like to listen. If you go to the episode, find linked to subscribe more information about raising the bar, just tap it or swipe over the cover, our help us by helping our sponsors. You'll see some offers from them on our episode notes to rate and review our show on apple podcasts. The more good reviews the show gets the easier it is for new listeners to find it. You can help raising the bar become to show you want it to be by filling out our small survey at wondering, dot com slash survey. This episode was hosted by me. Michael Landau. My sister, Allie web audio engineer. And produced. But the regional music by Scott Somerville produced by Greta, Weber and be Patel, and executive produced by Jonathan Hirsch for neon media executive produced by marshal Louis for Wendy.

Ellen United States Ellen Bennett founder and CEO CEO Martha Stewart Michelin apple Michael Headley Michael Landau Los Angeles line cook Abrahams Casper Ellen Benton Headley Bennett CFO Headley Bennett Headley Bennett company
[Trailer:] Halloween Special 2020

We Fix Space Junk

01:34 min | 9 months ago

[Trailer:] Halloween Special 2020

"Smarter and killed. I've been sent on a special. Squeaky mission is way to and to stay overnight and inobound dimension there butts delays. Yes and we could die head. Join the as they explore. I ask you to watch your step. We wouldn't want to trip and break your knicks. find out. More about the mancha seat of vomit. Just try to survive the night. Guest starring james connie headley nights. But my now david defra. We shouldn't have come here. James kearney wilkin visit us welcome unveil. He'll use night and on the hill house. This as we expes giancarlo special will be released free to patriots and is available to preorder now. Visit bus will be dope reductions slash specials of see the show nights uh-huh.

james connie headley david defra James kearney wilkin knicks hill house giancarlo patriots
Part 3: Headley Bell

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

35:02 min | 1 year ago

Part 3: Headley Bell

"Welcome Val good morning. Good Morning Steve. Pleasure to meet for me as well. This is really a an honor for your mother. Alice Chandler being added to the pillars of the turf and we don't know when the ceremony is going to be but The honor is is so appropriate. I mean it. Certainly she's been recognized from every corner of of the industry but the this is really a kind of crowning achievement and and celebration of of her dedication to the sport. Well you couldn't say any better that it is the pinnacle You can't even dream about being in the hall of fame. particularly So without question it is. It is the pentacle and it's it's truly It means you know. Thankfully Steve. She's actually still with us at the age of ninety four. She's not with us in the same way that she might have been But she's still with us and that that really contributed to the the experience for us to be able to say to her specifically While she's with us that You have reached the pinnacle And and and again as you said she she is deserving and it's a great honor Mill Ridge and all all of the the bloodstock work that you know that your generation has crafted It it I mean. It's generations at this point. Of course for her to for her to elevate the operation starting in nineteen sixty two when when her dad and a legend of of this of the sport how. Pricey Italy left her the farm two hundred eighty acres and four broodmares and what she accomplished From that point is just remarkable. Well again thank you and she would be the first to tell you that it. It took a team And truly it is a team and to this day at the team And as you know well you're only as good as your team. But but her her husband of now forty nine years whom you mentioned earlier. Dr John Chandler Was such an integral part of it in the beginning. Steve Because As as a mom bread survivor that won the nineteen sixty eight Kentucky Derby and really kind of kicked off the American bred recognition in Europe of breed to consider And Dr Chandler had Been practicing in new mark so he'd grown a number of European relations so this was So then he came over here and was practicing with Haggard Davidson McGee. My mother and father divorced When when in nineteen sixty five so Ninety that they met each other along the way because mom was always on the farm always working it. She she that she. That's what she did she was she was in the trenches and so they they grew relationship and married a nineteen seventy-one and so with drive or being a European recognition the Europeans. Then all of a sudden start. I'm over in By the American bred horses and and he was instrumental in In those relationship nurturing Along the way so he was just the start of it and then many many more in that now nearly sixty years with mill ridge what elements of the success. We're things that that she more or less had advanced from you know from her father and then folding in the advice I mean nobody very few people anyway in in this game even historically Do it completely on their own as as you as you reference But certainly certainly the expertise of a of a HAL Price Headley. has to contribute to being a success with the instincts. If nothing else absolutely She will tell you Her father was was not only her inspiration but her her deepest love and she was a shadow with him And as you as you noted in the beginning he he was a mover and Shaker He was a very unique man And is recognized for being such an integral part of Kane line and and just that alone demonstrated truly his ethics which is keen on was built for the people And share the horse with the people and the community and so an example like that was such that not only on her horsemanship in raising the horse and associated with horse but the contribution to make the industry is good as the cost would be and so he was an example In in every way you can you can imagine and And and that's for for our son price than I have been the exam and our my siblings all our family. They been the example for us. Try to to to do what we can to make the Industry Best. It can be one of the unique Elements of Alice Chandler into the pillars of the turf is that she joins. She joins her father Who of course was was one of the you know? When this concept was conceived was was one of the founding pillars that The hall honored with with the Distinction. And it's one of my favorite things. I mean whether it's You know the books by Ed Bolen Matriarchs Patriarchs and tillers of the TURF When you get interested in this game To me it it's not just reading about you. Know the the racing results in the exploits of of the horses in the afternoon. But you know how they how they came about and and really how. The industry was formed and One thing about this and I was looking forward to A. There's been plenty of families. Hateley that that have gone on with it as it were and I. I'm curious if you know from an observation standpoint. You're feeling I mean did you. And and Reynolds. Did you know from from early on that that you were going to be involved in bloodstock and involved in the game well? We grew up here on the farm And so you know you. You've touched all parts of it but you never know. I Love Sports and so I was in the sports and things like that and And so you never know Particularly so it wasn't like Oh you're scripted you're GonNa go and do that by any means But certainly As I say the influence that they had You you couldn't ignore it By any means and then early on survivor kicks off. I mean just five. I mean he's he's he wins the Darby six years after after was founded you know and then just the whole energy that went with that against thinking terms of the Maktoum starting in the seventies and Prince College and all the Europeans get involved so there was lots of synergy and energy Involved with with farm. It was no longer just the farm raising horses. Now the commercial aspect of it in the international aspect of it that whole cycle had turned around whereby now the Europeans are coming in buying our horses. And we've got a whole new energy That that that created as a result of that so you'd be foolish not to not to follow and and then mom again she was She was so inclusive in everything that she did. We had total Ron. I'm here looking over the farm as we speak. We have told her on when I speak of. We are family. Had total run of not only mill rich. But but it's it's part of Beaumont so we had a total up of two thousand acres of which on that is Is is is three and a half miles of direct road On that we're by so as kids you know you're riding go karts and motorcycles and then cars and you were raising all sorts of hell you know so you up. You grew up not only with this land in the horse but you grew up with whatever you big enough to do. Because that's the way mom raised her. Her One disciplined was do not disappoint me. That's all she had to do. Not You do whatever you do but do not disappoint me and So that's the bounds. Were were broad. And that's the way we raised. That's a that's A. That's a sort of Damocles that's a notice that I don't know I don't know that's great that is great well Yo certainly certainly with with Nicole Ma and of course the coma bloodstock The the you know the nom decor course as it were for you know for your bloodstock consulting and on your own You've been you've been making her proud Has Has Reynolds and I. You know I'd love for you to weigh in on not just her influence on your decision making and and understanding of of the business and bloodlines and crosses and and such but You know also on certainly topics of the day because of that yesterday said Fernando and I were talking about the jockey. Club's stallion cap. This is something you've spoken on going back. Fifteen years well again You know we're staying at now watching the Michael Jordan series. You know Be the very best. It's it's a finite rare air situation so Naturally if you're a student of it you you absorb all that you can and so in this arena that I that we were raised in. We had a chance to soak up every aspect of this. You know and then mom been going out in different directions with with their leadership roles a reminder Bill Thomas and was with us for twenty eight years In such like that so we we were surrounded with talent. Dunkin MacDonald. Who's our farm manager of thirty eight years? I mean that that says nothing just rights there in some in some statement so you're surrounded with with talent and and trying to be the very best you know that's that's what that's what that's what you do And and So so that's what we did When we were being raised and then as we took on these roles as you mentioned Nkhoma was it was a gift for me because I was finished with school. And and all of a sudden There was an occurrence with regard some farms getting some stallions and It was a brand new kind of a role that they were playing and and in offended mom and some some other breeders around out town and they said listen. This business is changing as a result of this commercial side. We need to consider having an agency and he'd leaves not doing anything he would. You begin after the like hell. No that's like being a car salesman you know. I don't WanNa be an agent so They said we'll just do it differently so I went about it. Was that kind of direct to do it differently. And that's truly been what I've tried to do In in my role with an agency to do it differently but but I was fortunate to have Some tremendous mentors and again think about our clientele that we had right off the get go. I mean we worked with the Maktoum's all the Maktoum's in the beginning Prince College. These were clientele that were just starting in the business and because all of a sudden we have a consulting agency. We're providing them services so it was it was handed to me with Opportunity And fortunately you know I navigated that water when you talk about legacy operations and certainly Juddmonte and you mentioned the Maktoum's we also talk about. You know domestic breeders and owners where you've made I'd impression and contribution you know not just to success on the racetrack but to the studbook because it mean specifically the Derby wins and we think about the Jacksons and Barbaro. And while he wasn't able to you know to stand but certainly Taufel We had NASCAR last week as we celebrated the The chronologically Anniversary of St Senses. Win I mean these are these were matings? You help plan and recommend and You know success breeds success but this is a moving target Sydney. I talk all the time about how you have to stay. As he says all Koran understand where the the bloodstock flow is is going and how the breed is changing. I mean talk about the decades at this point lead because you're still producing classic winners and you know as a family operation it. It's it's sixty years worth well. You've mentioned somebody whom I Adore Dorset for Nando I Adore people who are soon Of this of the industry in the TD end this morning you know Or sorry the blood horse was was Arthur Hancock. You know. And all that. He's extrapolated from his generations and things like that and So you study these things Sit as the students you know and these people that that do Accomplish the three or air our students you know Of of an inexact world that we're in in this force he tried to. He tried to pull as many different Things as you possibly can. So that's all I've tried to do is just to understand and the study as well as I can and I'll I'll you know I've said it before which is I try to. I try to put enough Good good things into the STU and let it grew and see if you can get lucky. Because that's all you're doing. We don't know you know mom bread Attica is like six different times to gaylord and she had one survivor and the other one's couldn't beat your meat and so There's no we read we. We were trying to the Jackson's we're trying to get affiliate full sister to Barbro so we we continued to go back to Donna former and none of them were Barbara. You know so so to think that you've got it all figured out Is Forget about it. You know but but you can you. Can you can position yourself to get lucky That's the way I express it and that's with that's with just being trond of trying to study and discern and they're all sorts of different roads to go down and most of them aren't right But but I refer to it often also as you've got to connect the chain each of the links have to connect So it's not just where the where the the mating that's occurred. It's not just where the horses been raised. It's not just you know we're we're the horses broken and it's not just the training it's gotTa be best of all those things It's got to allow those cause a weak link. You change broken. Those are the things that I try to associate with and and in guiding our. Our our clientele are the best You know they give you the opportunity. It's all about them without them. It doesn't matter You try to have all all all the links of the chain connect he'd Liebau is with us. And we're celebrating his mother Alice Heatley Chandler and her induction at the announcement last week of her going into the pillars of the turf in the hall and at the same time really Acknowledging the the great legacy that The family continues and I'm curious if if you provide a not so much direction but advice to you know fledgling breeders and what qualities what elements they should. They should try to include in in their approach when it comes to building broodmare band and finding success whether they're breeding to race or or breeding commercially. The first thing I would say again you can. You can do choose to do but I would say fall in love with horse Have to let the horse be your driver. You know So Fall in love with the Horse If you if you're able to and then then to Be a student Identify Successful Operations They exist. I mean Juddmonte Judd not an enigma. There's a reason why they're Judd Mon- you know why well you know. There are lots of things but study. These successful programs confer with people. I mean we've got to two associates now with us do that. That came out of the the Sean clancy. School of the Togas. Well filters you know as far as we're concerned the hell the filter and so those are the kind of our son. You know prices now. He's such a part of it one because Oh he's our oldest now. He's a namesake or anything like that. That's that's not the way you do it. But he grew and he he did what we're talking about which is just to be part of it and then to navigate this water but he's the reason for all this next phase stage all the stuff that we've got going on of course country and virtual tours and this you know trying to grow the fan and inform educate and just get in the water Navigate it by studying those that are successful. Try to fall in love. You know because there'll be lots of tough days but try to fall in love that horse be what you fall in love with the rest. You know the rest will fall into place I think. Well while stated and there there's there's so many challenges and I asked you about It was kind of referring to You know one of the current Rip From Today's headline stories. The you know the stallion Cap Middle Ridge gotten back into the styling and business degree and You know as has Jog Mont You know who's been kind of passive about about it You know talk about new directions and you know the industry at large. I know we're all dealing with a you know a situation. That is a a once in a century. Kind of scenario but You know planning has to go on and People that breed and operate in this game. They have a long term strategy. Or they need to so you know a an inflection like the this pandemic taken in stride. He'd lead to some degree. Because you're already looking to three five years down the road but You know where are we headed And and what are your thoughts on on the game at large? Well I think you. I referred to the one hundred forty mayor type books at the Jockey. Club is has his implemented Initially you referring to experience you said I kind of expressed mass feeling about that but but I commend Brett. Jones said it well on the TV and you know we. We looked for leadership and And I commend. You know we come in. And we don't have quotas are so you commit they are. They're well intended. There's no question there well intended With that and and there's no question that that we You know a couple of farms have stretched the bounds on on over-breeding their stadiums. You know and that's eventually you you get you get pulled up on it you know. That's and that's and that's proper. You know my argument was can you know? Let's let the let the economic you know. I Hate to control the economic side of his plan to man relatively. Let's let's let the market say. Oh I'm not going to breed to those stay in because When I go to sell my you're on so I'm I'm competing against eight five others you know so. Let the market decide that. But the fact is that it hadn't really decided that It's it's it's it's difficult like so much of it. It's difficult because I want to on Komo or George. Strawbridge WANTS SPREE DOT com. Oh and We restrict one hundred forty mayors. We'll now all of a sudden Georgia GonNA GET DOCOMO SEASON. And he's not going to be very happy about that. You know and now we have to pay rent one hundred. Twenty Five Live Foal. We go back to this. No guarantee market because its supply and demand which was the reasons for staying accessing matchmaker. Years Ago What's you know a northern dancer? Seasonal bring a million dollars no guarantees. You probably recall Steve. So that was the market before when there was a restriction on on supply and demand. Well we're probably going to get back into that those are the kinds of ripple things that you run into with this next phase but but over-riding they're well intended the Jack well intended. I don't know about the genetic side I wouldn't that's that's beyond me. You know So that's the one side of it That's my opinion about that I would go in the middle of all that as far as the industry goes. We're trying to Through through through the source country initiative. And I'm not touting more country I'm just talking about what we do which is to allow people to get on these farms To allow people get close to the horse to allow people to fall in love with the horse to allow people fall in love with the Central Kentucky Community. Things like that those those will those will translate into really the people whom you speak to which are at the races you know those will those will reach to your fans and to eventually. You're you're you're better you know because hopefully as we're as we're building that product maybe along with the efforts of Craig and Pat trig Burns and Pat. You know maybe we'll build that that betting product is well. I'd like to believe there's there's so much talent out there generations that truly they don't care about this Pan de or you know what's going on their their their their heads are down there just booking it because they love this industry you know and and let's allow them that chance to to build this next generation of what this industry looks like you know. Let's let the Jack good kind of provides and leaders provide some boundaries? Stay within but let's let's get asylum run with a little bit. You know. That's what that's what I've done with price. Serves it you know. He's thirty eight years old and he's earned that right but I'm letting him run with it and I'm just kind of trying keep it in the bound. You know a little bit and That's what I say that our industry should do let let this generation let them let them drive passionate and there's talent out there it's been talking to. He'd Liebau and appreciating The life and the work of his mother and her induction into the pillars of the turf and The He'd Lee legacy that She advanced Into a into a new century and that Heatley and Reynolds and now prices weller are continuing before we go. I got ask you what What she's most proud of you think In her life and in her work. And you as well yeah. That's a great question I would say she would keep it simple And and again I'm looking out on this land and I would say that she would say that. This land continued to be Our greatest emphasis really Because it's the core which raises these horses. Which takes you to those those steps. You know I I would say just that that the land that how price easily Initiating his father before him initiated state vibrant And carried on for raising really good horses which have continued to contribute to the breed. I would say that would be Because it's for her. It's always been about the horse you know and In the land and I would say also that the people whom allow her to celebrate an elevate to this incredible honor as pillar of the turf She would she would celebrate them. Steve and say you know without them. I wouldn't be in the role that I am. That's what that's what I question. And then the last thing she would say would be man. I have lived an incredible life. That's what she's the sweet And then really the any answer would have been would have been good That one is particularly great. And how about you? What what To this point because you know you're not retiring. Nobody retires in this business. You're not you're not giving that luxury no we. We don't work so we no reason to retire I would say. Wow you know mine is a chance to do. Just what I just said you know to continue in that water of of own that I mean how. How fortunate am I be into that but but I I I am proud that We have taken the example of our grandfather and how pricey land mom in into try to try to make this industry the best it can be in to allow others to get in into us. You know it's not easy. There's no as we said there's no the Jackpot is our is our leader and it's not easy you know to navigate all that stuff but but I- US trying to to to make it better is is is what I'd be most proud of and what I would we enjoy the most we really we love to share this. We absolutely love to share it because we know how very fortunate we are and so just having the ability to share that is is is is is all I care about. really Because about sharing and doing the best we can everybody's going to be elevated and so that's what that's what I would say is what I care the most about ads Beautifully said and one of the things that we we've tried to perpetuate is the guiding principle of of and being involved in the game which is to be a good steward of of the game and That's a an embodiment essentially Your family privilege stay truly a privilege then and took nor that privilege would be idiotic. You wouldn't be you wouldn't be going down further generations you know so it's privilege we recognize that privilege and We were taught at and That's why we raise so that's the thing And if I may see safety if you you probably come to an end but I haven't spoken with you before but you you. You are a student In listening to your your knowledge and it's truly a joy to talk with you because I love to speak with people who are well informed you know and and you've touched on a number of different areas that yeah you can go on Google and you can explore but but you've done a nice job and this interview to to understand thank you so much thank you. That's a very kind compliment and I my interest in the game. I was surprised you know having come off to the race track As a as a horse player and then as I you know as I started to read and research and I talk about W H P Robertson thoroughbred horse racing history thoroughbred horse racing in America. And you know the more you read and the more you you were intrigued by what what the game is and and it's underpinnings I it's just one more area that can just Intoxicate someone and it there. There's so much about this game. That's appealing That once you once you start down any of those rabbit halls I. It's hard you know it's hard not to not to just be engaged. And certainly the you know the the legacies of the TURF Like your grandfather Is is an area that is well worth anybody's time. That has an interest in the sport and You know from there at all you know it all just spills out and it makes you makes you that much more aware and that much more that much more of an understanding of of the game and where it came from and why people who are impatient and angry at every single thing. That happens in. The sport really aren't understanding how we got here and what you know the whole organic part of of the Games of evolution. You know how it's happened. And that's why everybody's got to be patient with each other and and work together toward you know that that stewardship and the overall improvement whether it's improvement of the breed improvement of the betting product. Whatever it is It's it's so easy to feel good about the game if if you've invested Some time and and try to understand it. Well well well said I often speak of the twenty eighty rule. I think it applies almost everything and in so often all we hear is the negative of everything you know but but you just spelled it out right there that underlying if you speak of the positive things all of a sudden they become infectious. It's like oh. Wow and if you if you continue to bring those things which is really about eighty percent of this thing all of a sudden. That's your driver rather than Oh man. We are absolutely going down to accept Leno. We've got something so extraordinary when you're talking about this history this land these forces in this experience that let's elevate that you know. And and where exactly takes you? For instance fear example about you know from Getting involved through through by playing the horses I mean look at Bobby Frankel or should mcgahey and their their natural intuitive nece. That is the result of betting horses. You know how that how that takes you down to hall of fame kinds of experiences as well. You know so if you get into these if you get into it and allow yourself to find you know just like you touched on that the beauty of it man. It is really outstanding. And that that's what I would like To for us to walk away from just today too. So let's let's so many great things about this rather than harp on the negative Because that's just perfect. Anybody can do that. Just an absolute pleasure Heatley Bow. Congratulations again to your your mom and to dock. And I can't thank you enough for this and the look forward to talking again soon. Well you call anytime. Thank you so much for sharing. Not at all Aniko dicamba is Is Heat Lease Business Address and Mill Ridge of course as well and what a great way to close out a a wired a wire Wednesday Starting with Keith shambling and Pete for Intel and Austin read the One and only Blue Nick. Tomorrow thanks the Deja on the board. Good luck at your playing today. I'll have the the pick five up soon. I'll talk to you tomorrow.

Alice Heatley Chandler Steve Reynolds mill ridge Juddmonte Judd Dr John Chandler Prince College Liebau Maktoum Mill Ridge HAL Price Headley. Italy Europe Bobby Frankel Ed Bolen Matriarchs Patriarchs Sean clancy NASCAR salesman Kentucky Derby Kane
The Imbalanced History Of Rock And Roll: Led Zeppelin IV - From Stairwell To Stairway

Rock N Roll Archaeology

33:48 min | 1 year ago

The Imbalanced History Of Rock And Roll: Led Zeppelin IV - From Stairwell To Stairway

"Hey Ray Marcus today I would like to take a look at maybe the coke side of rock and roll the mystical side of rock and roll. Not The whole thing but one important moment in time we're gonNA discuss or even look at fairies and dragons and battles with swords and Vikings and biking's Vikings. Wow which means we're going to be drinking are crooked eye from grog today. That's right. Crooked eye our sponsor here on the imbalance history of rock and roll. Wow that's very drastic imagery some of it sounds like it could be an token book. It could be in a token book. So we're going to middle earth. We're going totally middle earth with perfect sound. If they had sound in middle earth in the time of the Hobbit and all that it would have been this album with would have been perfect perfect Sam every now and then we like to dig in here on the podcast. Just talk about one of the great albums of all time. Can you guess which one we're talking about today? I see a hand over there. Okay you on the left. Yes yes. It's led Zeppelin Four. Even though it's technically not called led Zeppelin for we'll talk about that and Whole Bunch of stuff here about the fourth record from the mighty Zeppelin. This album is magnificent and the stories behind it which I'm learning more and more about as we research are just unbelievable and how the song came together. How they were written. It's hard to even wrap your head around how magnificent and how close to perfect this album is most of it was conceived and recorded at. Headley grange a country poor house. It's where they used to send you if you got like convicted. You're poor you're poor. You go to the poor house you grains you know what I mean not the poor house where you get no not that Peo- O. Our House and that's what it was. And by the time the sixties and seventies came around. They weren't doing that anymore. But the land was still there and headley grange was still there and somehow it became available as a a rehearsal spot for bands getting ready to go on tour. Getting Ready to go in the studio and Zeppelin liked it as a place to hang out and to record. It wasn't uncommon in that time period for bands to go to country estates in places remote to recall with the rolling truck stones parked outside. Jimmy Page said that one of the things that was very important to him about recording it. Headley grange was the fact that they could all stay there so they could really dig into the project because he was that type of a workaholic where it was very important to him that you be available twenty four. There's a lot of footage out there on Youtube on the Internet and a lot of places of them. Arriving walking about you know there was not as much filming going on as there is today is of artists doing their thing but there was they knew what they were in the middle of. And there's film of it you can find it on the Internet. It gives you a look at Headley. Grange in those days but there's also a more modern clip. You'll find it's Jimmy page taking you through. Headley grange including taking you to the spot. Where John Bonham's drums were recorded at. The bottom of the stairwell boy sprees. This is Well comes for into the entrance misses. The this is the whole where the drums were set up in laugh. Olivia breaks was recorded. Now did you ever have any images of that in my head? A and what was your. What did you envision in your head? When you thought a Bonham at the bottom of the stairwell like a big school stairwell yeah open and metal and banging and rely always thought poor house. I thought of Oliver Twist. Yeah so I always thought it was like you know like you said like at the end of all the floors there. The stairwells that went down. And they're all like wrought iron and it was old and crusty in dark. In and that they the microphones that's white echoed. So much not knowing that when you looked at it it looked like the entry way to a very nice bed and breakfast all sunny and light wonderful dance to the drums. Yeah you can hear the rating live and I'm being we had a recording trot. Paul on the outside here. You'd be running the wires cables with the Mike needs running in house. The mikes were put up here of an abundance this often this you heard of other other you know dramas bands looking for live show. So they used to record them to get to get the height you see. But that's where the sound came from. And they captured it with. Just a few microphones placed around bottom and in the stairwell itself. And that's where you get the sound on all those amazing drum tracks on led Zeppelin for yeah and the stories of how the other songs came together which we will address throughout this episode are wonderful and definitely when you hear these stories explains why this album so good all the way through and why they did it the way they did it. I can say without any reservation that if I did my favorite rock albums of the seventies that's gotta be somewhere in there. It is front back inside and out one of the greatest albums no filler. No leftovers in fact there were songs that were technically leftovers. That are also zeppelin classics. Now from the sessions that they did songs like down by the seaside late and Boogie with STU which was one of two songs that featured Ian Stewart of the Rolling Stones on Piano Rock and roby and the other one that made the record by the way in and Sandy Denny from fair port convention. The only two artists ever to record with led Zeppelin She's of course on the battle of evermore one of the songs here on Zeppelin which we're discussing here on the podcast. The imbalance history of rock and roll to get into the middle of led Zeppelin for Marcus. We kind of have to start at the end of led Zeppelin three really. Because after all that. They've been on tour recording on the road. In releasing records and touring some more constantly since they started so they decided they would take a break no performance they turned down tours and they all just focused on making the next record. If you're looking for why became the Tour de force that it is ever since it was released they just put the full force and energy into writing and recording this album and that included going headley grange if they were so burned out and they were so fried? How were they able to put that much into it? That's the part that sometimes can be really hard liners too hard to understand and really hard to grasp because they were fried. The Piano realize how hard they were touring and how hard they were partying it. That tour record tour record. There wasn't really downtime. They do Zeppelin three. They went to Brown your cottage to get away from everything and everybody no electricity and no indoor plumbing that kind of stuff and came back with led Zeppelin three. They're not getting away from everything here. They're just turning everything else off. They just turned off. Touring all other distractions. Just go to headley grange. But that's that's where they were coming in off led Zeppelin three and and the fact that despite the fact that all three of their first records had continued to sell briskly Peter Grant and and the boys were very pissed off at the way that they continuously were treated by the press the media at large but certainly by the press when it came to critics and and whatnot except for you know Lester bangs. Who just praise them every chance he got and he called. Shit out when he needed to as well. So let's create this moment in your mind. Everyone has it. Where for the first time you take out led Zeppelin Four. You put it on a turntable and you drop the needle words from a standstill to dog. Hey Hey Mama said the move one of the oldest blue style vocal riffs. You can go for right. Call right back to the roots of the blues in a new way with black Dr Suction right away pulls you in right from the moment. Those notes hit you side. One Zeppelin four became famous for making in a movie was in fast times ridgemont demo mode that the mole rat. Some advice this is most important goes down the making out whenever poss- thrown side one. Let's up on for Black Dog. Got Its name not from the lyrics but from a black dog. That was actually hanging around. Headley grange when they were making the wreck since worth noting since they named the song after the dog they didn't call it wrecks or anything and wasn't that riff written by John Paul Jones. If I'm not mistaken I think he's the one who came up with that opening riff. According to Jimmy page go next up on side one the anthem rock and roll again looking back a little bit. It's been a long time since Iraq and rolled right and it's all the power and fury of these guys. I picture the the other guys recording different parts of the House and Bonham there at the face of the stairwell pounding the shit out of those drums. My God I bet he was just abusing those Johnson. And that's also one of the songs that has STU on playing the piano. That rock and roll piano boogie. Woogie Stewart who is one of the founding members of the rolling stones. If you didn't know see start with this one to power rock salvo and if you're listening for the first time at the end of this year you're coming up for air man you're like Holy Shit. And then they bring it down and they bring in Sandy Denny to do with Robert on the battle of evermore and you're starting to see the tolkien imagery that we were talking about in references in lyrics Beginning to bring in the mysticism maybe mysticism. More than the occult. But the code was definitely mixed in because of Jimmy's dabbling. Well they were both dabbling into it a little differently. It seemed that Robert Plant was more into the Viking aspect and the tolkien aspect of mysticism whereas Robert Airways. Jimmy Page's into Alister. Crowley dark of it so they were in different universes gloomy. And you get to the end of side one Marcus. And it's the one the anthem the number one and every countdown. Fan Favorite countdown radio countdown. Since it came out Stairway to Heaven all eight minutes of it. Not The edit for radio. They didn't release that it for radio. I swear they must. They did not the label did that. They said no Jimmy page actually mentioned that in a video where we decided that when we release that as a single we couldn't find any any place to edit it so there was no way we were going to release. It doesn't add it. Well done. Well play my friend because you know what I didn't realize that I figured they have one for the am stations now. That was one that was done years later. They were like you will play at all in its entirety. Which of course. Fm radio did especially A or. Yeah they made it. They made it into what it became. And what it became is why there's a lawsuit being resurrected Regarding the copyrights of Stairway to heaven the earnings from royalties from airplay from SCAPIN BMI and airplane. All that good stuff for for this song is such a number that it's easy to understand why somebody would want to pursue a case if they thought they had one. But I think what we talked about doing today is looking at the actual audio and seeing if we can't figure a little this out on her own in regards to all the lawsuit stuff over. Stairway to heaven is to explain royalties a little bit better. Maybe think of Bobby Bona's million dollars a year. He gets from the New York. Mets if you have a songwriting credit you get absolutely some sort of insane. Royalty like a million dollars. The song depends on how well it did and how well it continues to do airplanes. I guarantee you they make insane. They would never have to work. There are a lot of people on this planet. Who had that happened? Three or four hit songs had huge. Ron's made a lot of money and and have had a wonderful life just being playing around town and being semi retired. Absolutely doing what. They want the way they want to do it. So so those are the stakes in regards to this lawsuit. When it first came up I looked at it. Because that's what we do right. This is long is when we were friends but not doing a podcast. And that's what I heard about. Of course we're talking about spirit and Randy California's estate and I think. Mark is also involved from spirit. Suing Jimmy Page and led Zeppelin over them stealing this the descending riff in the beginning of Stairway to heaven so I started looking into it and then I found out about this guy he was like the Jimmy. Page of the sixteen seventy s instead of the nineteen seventy three hundred years. His name was Giovanni Battista Granada. Giovanni isn't that like Johner. Something like an Italian Gianni Granada in his little. Takata to one of his compositions and I thought we've been talking about it. We've been listening to all these things. Let's make our case here that there's no case against led Zeppelin for Stairway to heaven. So I this is Giovanni Battista Granada doing his Takada. There's the descending pattern and then it changes so we'll show you how each example changes sound. Good I'm good with that all right Johnny Iran just a little bit more about. Giovanni he lived Sixteen twenty one to sixteen eighty seven. So you get an idea when he was around yeah. He lived a very Long productive musical life and everything. He is credited with writing including his. Takata is in public domain which means anybody can use any of those notes at any time and build around him now fast forward to the dispute. We're talking about spirit and the this lawyer his put together the lawsuit and it was denied. And it's been a granted a new trial. They say that Jimmy and the guy is having worked around spirit heard their Song Taurus and lifted this rift from it for the descending riff at the beginning of Stairway to heaven so this is spirit now. Does that sound kind of like Giovanni it it sounds like Giovanni same kind of descending thing and then it goes to the left instead of its own direction. Yeah all right. So here's the famous descending riff from stairway and he gets to the bottom of the descending riff finish it turns in another direction different altogether but I hear Giovanni in that one as well yes so if you could would he sou everybody. I don't think so man. His lawyers would be really expensive. Well Marcus before we flip it over and talk about side too and more about led Zeppelin for on this episode. WanNa we had to hamper and see the guys could get I. I know when I'm thirsty. I head to the heart of hamper and go see my friends at crooked eye brewery. I want to thank Paul Paul. And the whole gang for their support for our podcast. It's been great. Yeah when you WANNA taste the freshest most creative bruce in the bucks Mont you go to Crooked Eye at York road and Montgomery right there. The HEART APROPOS. Pouring the cure for what ails you. Since twenty fourteen the crooked eye crew makes every single night fund. Hey can keep up with the live entertainment on the breweries facebook page. That's the best way to know what's happening there including their free Tuesday nights blues jam which is taken off. The home brewers club and my partner in crime raise final nights which are the third. Wednesday of the month as brewers me and live music. All the time including the crooked eye band is always good fun to be had to be made at crooked eye and we wanna thank them as always for their support of what we do on this crazy imbalanced podcast when you need a fresh tasty brew head to burrow make crooked eye. It's funny because you know there's actually a beer called misty mountain hops. Did you know that I don't know but I saw it out? There on the Internet is pretty funny at one. That's a great name for a beer. Yeah and it's also great name for a song also kind of based on the Tokyo and stuff that we were talking about From side one. And that's how starts I? Two of led Zeppelin four on this episode of the Imbalance History of rock and roll and its power rocker. That Jones E. Keyboard Beano Electric Keyboard. powering through the beginning get into the heart of the song and just like on side one. It's followed up with another pounder four sticks. Do you know the story behind that. I don't know the story behind. Four sticks another one where the title of the song doesn't really have to do with anything in the lyric sponsor had a style that he could play with two sticks in each hand and when he does that that's with four sticks and that's where the title of the song coastal again pure power. Man that guy hit you. He had the hammer of the gods. He hit like the hammer of the gods salute that it was so beautiful to the sounds. He made were magnificent and he kept the band in line. That nudes Drummond kept them all in line well. This is the album where everyone is hitting on Mac cylinders full power all at one time all at the same time and you know some of the finishing work was done in a regular studio but you know the songs they recorded out. There in the country came together. One of the prettiest things going to California Is something that That Jimmy and Robert did. And Jimmy wasn't really a Mandolin Player. He just started farting around with a little bit and this rift came out months. Next thing you know. They've got this great song and Lyric Joni Mitchell and it becomes one of those radio favors forever. Every song on. This album is a radio. Favourite is it's fan favorite. I remember hearing every song in this album. On Rock radio through the late seventies every single song would be here would be played on. Aor radio it's like all your life seriously you know it's just always there and The arm closes with their extended. Zeppelinesque TAKE CAR MEMPHIS Minnie's when the levee breaks which includes I mean that the drum riff at the beginning has been sampled in us by so many in hip hop is an example of where the two meet and crossover but the power and when he breaks into the harmonica wrath and just burns the fucker down all just that song blisters all the way down to the quick dinner at the end right just equipped ending and that's how you ramp up Zeppelin four but you're not done. You know what you do next if flip it over and you look at the cover your read all the liner notes. Of course you do but you're doing that. Are you reading the liner notes? While you listen to the music my I listen off was listen to the music but the second. Listen which was right afterwards. Yeah then I got all the notes out and all that stuff and we learned so much since then when they were putting their record together kind of an answer what we were talking earlier about the response that they got on the first few records. They decided that they weren't going to put anything on the cover. The pictures you see the pictures that are there you see the artwork. That's on the inside We talked a little bit and we'll talk a little bit more about the symbols. But you know the inside. Paper has that kind of modeled aged look to it and all the all. The letters are in hand written scripts in all very cool and all that. But there's nothing on the outside grant and the band were adamant no stickers. No node everything. They wanted to do to identify what it was. Because of the Internet. Now you could take an image of led Zeppelin four cover. Put It on the led Zeppelin Social media pages and say new album Thursday and people would know and they go and they would get it wherever they get it now. They probably still digital download Bungee Anyway. In those days it was pretty amazing to be able to do and they did it the way they wanted to do it. And it was a response to that and the album turned out to be one of the biggest selling albums of all time. Despite the fact that they were they were thumbing their nose. The whole fucking thing in the United States. That album alone has outsold back in black by. Cdc It has outsold fleetwood. Mac's rumors and this was as of two thousand sixteen. Twenty seventeen when Jimmy page was talking about it for one of the Guitar Magazines of the Rock Classic Rock Magazine's during an interview. Also it had outsold So many other it was one of the biggest all time selling rock and roll albums in the United States as far as Glasgow and I think it moved like seven hundred thousand copies in the first week it sold through on everything it was mold of I. Twenty three times platinum. Not many albums have reached that plateau in the annals of rock and roll number one in Uk and Canada but only reached number to believe it or not in the US on the on the billboard two hundred but multiple multiple platinum diamonds everywhere all kinds of territories one of the most iconic records of all time and force. It is and part of that is something we've been dissecting in discussing Is the symbols that they use For the cover art and inside and to identify and on the label to to identify the members of Zeppelin and we had actually had a pretty spirited research dive in discussion about that While we were talking About this whole thing with the symbols basically they wanted each them to come up with a symbol that would be representative of them on the liner notes and You know and in the artwork Jimmy page came up with the ZO. So and what's the source of that the C- it's it's From ecology to a call to the secrets of led Zeppelin for from Louder magazine. Which is at louder sound dot com and it says what of Jimmy Page's ruined his symbol the signal that became known Izzo. So which by led Zeppelin for with some times termed before Jimmy himself adopted. It is kind of a sober K. It was more arcane. I guess there was this guy that he was collecting art. From named Austin Osman Spare Jimmy sometimes called him. Britain's greatest unknown artists and it was tied with chaos magic in the Zoro's and Deep Shit. Really deep stuff that. I don't even really understand because I haven't studied it. I really yeah. And he designed it and he never copped to what it really was all about. And that even though people called Zo. So for the name of the album some people caught runes as about you know but he designed that. Jones he He chose his symbol was from Rudolf. Cookbook of signs. It's a single circle with intersecting vesic. Pisces a trike Quechua and he was kind of try triple threat in his role in Zeppelin. Then plant has a large ring with a feather in the middle is symbol the feather of Maat. She was the Egyptian Goddess of Truth Justice and fairness with which the Egyptians were to conduct themselves on a daily basis and this included family community the nation and the environment and then your favorite is Bonzo. Because it's a multipurpose symbol. It's signifying In strength in man woman and child and we know how important his family was to him. You can take other applications and You and I had quite a spirited discussion this week about its similarities to the Symbol for Ballantine beer. Yes and I think it had something to do with a coup label like a Balentine local beer in England. There's like a micro brewery. I would call it by back then. We don't we don't really know here in America. Valentine's been around since the eighteen hundreds and I saw that that's when they're the patented their logo don't K- but they'd had that logo since way before led Zeppelin had. Oh yeah so it was part of and it was really coincidence like I said he was. Maybe he comes up with this and they go. Yeah that's really cool and by the way it looks like the Ballantyne bill ago man bones. You know maybe I don't know you never know. And that's where part of the legends come from because a lot of the stuff is we don't know because they didn't tell us all the stuff the other thing that's interesting about. The symbols is that they gave one to their Guests Sandy Denny and it's three inverted triangles. But they didn't give to students. Do we know it? He didn't get a symbol which is weird. This other should technically be six symbols on there. I wonder why they didn't do that. I wonder if he declined assemble. Oh maybe labels enough but it's a symbol without a name so you know what's funny is if they asked about it he probably would have said. That's all right. I'll just go in with the ballantine beer. Crowd would be so that's awesome. But then you know they would get out on the road and And continue the out your e in the funding games. That we've heard about you know through the seventies as long as they could do it but this point in their career was huge. The response immediate and continued for decades to led Zeppelin for today is unheard of. There's always new leads. Always THEY ANNOUNCED PINK. Floyd's dark side of the moon or albums that have that impact on people. There are others but there were very few that are still today showing at an appreciable level. Yeah they're out there. It's happening in pink. Floyd led Zeppelin and there's so many other bands and we definitely do an episode on that as far as the album goes the Hermit on they're pretty interesting From the Tarot card of the hermit and it's tied to Earth Ecology and we need to save the planet and I think There's isn't if I'm not mistaken. There's a little poster with some words written on there that people can't see very well on the inside yes as far as the cover goes and talking about the hermit on the cover and not only were they interested in their symbolism and whatever a cult type of things they were believing right at that time they were also very concerned about the environment and that's something that they've all been very concerned about throughout their lives and I think they've made it very clear something that was said in an interview in twenty and the cover was supposed to be something that was for other people to save a rather than for me to actually spell everything out which would make the whole thing rather disappointing on that level of your own personal adventure into the music and all the other stuff about them wanting to just strip it all down and and bring people to it naturally. It's it you know. The environmental side of that goes back to their experiences. Emits the debauchery of the first years. getting away and just and realizing that we only live on the very top little fringe part of this blue marble that we had to care of it and so pretty amazing album through on through. Zeppelin. Four is definitely in my top. Five ten records of the Seventies. We should maybe a five favorites on that the one thing. You're GONNA have a hard time. Doing you might have a hard time picking your five favorites of led Zeppelin Four. Because there's every songs great I don't know if I could pick because it would depend. It would depend seriously on the day on the week. I mean on my mood could be could be so. Maybe we won't do that one. I mean seriously think about how many people we hear complain about songs like Stairway to heaven but boy when that instrumental part kicks in everybody. Who's complaining about it as jam in the hell out her when it gets role. And you're into it to that. Song is magnificent but then again so is every single song on that album or the legend continues to grow. It doesn't seem to fade much. I'll say that and Even as our heroes continued to Age and do what they do We can always flip on any part of led Zeppelin four and right there. You're back in the moment. Whatever the moment is for you wherever you jumped onto the mothership It's that moment when you plugged in his. Aplin for reals still one of my favorite bands of all time and I don't think that will ever change. Give us your thoughts your feelings about this episode and anything else about the PODCAST. You can email us here at imbalance history g mail dot com the F. We missed anything. Please let us know. We are on facebook. The imbalance history of rock and roll twitter imbalanced. His stow and soon we will be on instagram. But again you can always email us at the imbalanced history of rock and roll a lot of you. Were finding us on the Pantheon podcast network. That's great a lot of you are on other apps all around the world and we thank you from wherever you plug in Let people know that you like the podcast spread the word? It seems to work and just keep doing this crazy. Podcast my man. It's been a blast and I think we should still continue the conversation about rock and roll. There's so much more conversation to be had about this rich magnificent history. Thanks to Paul and Paul and everybody occurred. I for their support of the PODCAST. Here on the Pantheon Network live from the dark talk media studios wrapping things up until the next time we get together and crack the Mike Anna Nicole. One I'm Riku Marcus in the dark is and thanks for listening to the imbalance history of rock and roll.

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Episode 169: The Science of Teamwork, with Dr. Rachel Headley and Meg Manke

Absolute Advantage

54:55 min | 2 years ago

Episode 169: The Science of Teamwork, with Dr. Rachel Headley and Meg Manke

"Welcome to absolute advantage. The show guaranteed shorten your path to success. We talked to amazing entrepreneurs and leaders at the top of their game. And give you the tools to develop the advantage to lead succeed and make a difference. Now, here's your host successful entrepreneur investor and master connector Kelly field. Welcome everyone. I'm Kelly Hatfield, and and so thankful you join me today as many of you know, who are regular listeners this show that ripple effect as a concept near and dear to my heart, and it really feel truly like it's about how we show up in life, the actions, we take and how that ripples into the world. And in today's episode. We have to amazing guests not one but two joining us today who we're going to explore that ripple effect with a little bit deeper as it relates the civically to leadership and building cultures within our organizations. So they. They are going to share practical and tactical lessons with you. So you can shorten your pass to success and make a bigger impact on those user of so truly the ripple effect inaction. So as far as our guest today, I'm super excited introduce you to. Dr Rachel Headley and Meg men key co founders of rose group international or RG I and co authors of the book, I XE leadership create high five cultures and guide transformation. So a little bit about RG. I before I make a formal introduction to Rachel and Meg RGI connects your big vision. Two culture an execution through what they call. I X which stands for internal experience. They diagnosed root cause issues and guide your team to develop the behaviors needed to achieve goals beyond what you can imagine. I know we can all get behind. Rachel is a Mensa PHD scientist who is also a project management professional to make sure things get done. Rachel spent the first decade of a career as a satellite image. Scientist most of the second decade as the operational science officer at the land sat satellite mission. And today, she applies those lessons to business. Make takes care of your people. She has high expectations around accountability knowledge and transparency she brings a western get it done and take care of each other mentality to business. She has a deep experience in talent management, safety, organizational, psychology and communication, and she's still burns cattles on her family's ranch together. They design programs that suit your needs, and your organization and creates a culture that is dynamic responsive and brings an innovative and entrepreneurial spirit to bear on your toughest challenges. So. Welcome Rachel and Meg I just delighted heavy on the show today. We'll thank you so much Kelly. I'm not sure we have any time left up. You don't. Oh, great. I love. That's awesome. I haven't heard that for while. Wonderful will before we dive in. So I'm really excited to to to get into the concepts and learn more about I XE. But before I do that would you might. So how did the two of you meet? I mean, can you tell me your story, and how you came together to form this amazing company and write this book together will we kind of we live in the black hills of South Dakota. So it's kind of the where the wild west meets the front range of the Rockies. And we we choose to live here. And you know, the we reported this women in business universe. Promoting and supporting women and just kind of get run into each other. And I was an entrepreneur at the time and make was and a corporate gig. And but we shared a lot of challenges and what we're trying to accomplish in the world and one thing led to another and ended up. I ended up coaxing her away from her. Very stable high paying job. Awesome. She's never read it. Well, you'll learn later in the show. I guess I'm an independent anyways. So it suits me to be in chaos. We are. Right. You're in the right profession, then that's for sure. Wonderful. I'm interested, really. So can we talk first about this internal experience? So what I ex- starts stands for and framing that a little bit for us. And then really truly to catalyst for writing the book. Sure of so I extend for internal experience. It's really the feeling the culture. Would it is to be part of your culture within your organization and the back story on the the name that we created which has nothing to do with apple products. We were in Phoenix talking to a group of people in the tech startup industry and in the tech startup industry, and especially in the customer service and everything is about a CS CX, which is customer service customer experience. And you know, they're always trying to find the the the answer, you know, the silver bullet for gosh. How do we make sure that our customer services? So amazing that our customers will never wanna leave us. What we heard though is the root cause, you know, somebody said mole. Yeah. Okay. What's the problem? Why are they leaving? Well, they're not getting very good customer service. Okay. Why are they getting customer service? Well, because our turnover rates are so high our pleaser, you know, we can't keep anybody by the time we get new people trained, they leave in train new people or customer service experience. Just isn't very good through said. Well, what if you actually focused on creating an environment where your employees wanted to stay, and they felt engage in powered and accountable for what they were going to do. And then they would probably serve other people better. And that was a little bit of a a light bulb not just for that group, but for Rachel night. So we were in the middle of writing the book at the time. And we got back home, and we're talking with our book writer, we're kinda going through all the iterations drafts of chapters and all the things in our book, greater finally, kind of look to both of us woods the point though. What is the point of this book sharing so much? Good information with me. But like, I'm having a hard time drafting outline, and so then we said because we just been in Phoenix. I guess it's this I XE leadership in that. I said oh my gosh. I think we I think we just started a new leadership style, and which made Rachel sort of and of cringe a little bit. I was I was. Bye. Yeah. To being a leadership development thought leader leadership stylish. She's panting right now. Right. Of course, I'm all about it. Because I'm like you Kalama old HR Bob and nerd, so. Anyway, that's how I started in. That's how we really landed on that concept is sort of our flagship piece of for the book and for our consulting. Excellent of pander stand here, then the internal experience as an organization's culture and the impact that that has on employees success and retention. So we talked a little bit about it. You know, it from thirty thousand foot you, which is, you know, if you're if you're ploys were happy, you know, and you're or focused on nurturing, your your internal Boulter that your clients are going to have a better experience as a result of retaining your employees that can you dig into that a little bit deeper for us and help us understand maybe some of the tactics that you're talking. About as you talk about understanding, your organization's culture. Sure, if you think about all of the problems are the challenges Meg as an HR person likes to comb challenges. It's never a problem. There's never a challenge. You know, thinking about just when it comes down to humans and how they interact and how they get things done. It's about productivity it's about time management. It's about interpersonal conflict. It's about competence Lucien. It's about it's about how we get things done. And and really a lot of those things we really are passionate about we really believe that. If you focus on internal experience at your people such as working with the big accounting firm as an example, and they have a lot of people who are they're they prefer order. We call the mortgages, they prefer order and the hard part for them is when things feel chaotic that makes them go a little nuts. They get a little anxious. They start checking out a little bit. They get less productive. They start talking hallways. They start finding reasons to be in conflict with other people. They don't know how to have hard conversations because it feels to them. Might conflict or conversations are conflict instead of conversations are for clarity. And so what happens is when you throw a little chaos into an order tolerant group that kind of breaks how they get worked up. And so what we can do we can come in and say, but they don't even know why not this is the real secret to what we do. The magic is that a lot of times. We don't know why are people are behaving. They do. Sometimes it's against all sort of logical reasoning. They're changing their behavior, and we really take a look at. Well, are you order to argue order tone people? And are you throwing chaos at them and that makes them really anxious? And so if you wanna have excitement in your office and engagement instead of disengagement, anxiety the way to do that is to understand how your people the work environment, your people contrived, then and then you can change how you communicate you can change. How you roll out big new implementation, and you can change how you think about. Leveraging their energy to the better good of the organization. So it really is a understanding how people wanna work really reveals how the exiled people have around certain activities, or let's say between leadership and staff lock times. There's a disconnect between leadership wants to go million miles an hour in the staff's like, wait a minute. We have to actually do things, you know, there's all kinds of those that tension, and understanding culture types, which is culture types is a real key aspect of our philosophy. I lost the understanding how that works really is an incredible tool and strategy for leaders to develop teams and actually get incredible levels of production engagement out of their staff. I don't know if that actually answered your question now, it it it really did. And I think the question that I have going one layer deeper than is what are the the culture types do have. Those kind of into buckets or can you give us a little insight around culture types. It's our favorite topic. So. A little bit about it. So there are four different culture types, and they are on sit. They sit on an axis in. If you you wonderful listeners of absolute advantage would like to buy our book, you can find it on Amazon by googling or looking on Amazon for I XE leadership. That's that's my radio voice of. I love it. So the four culture type sit on a a matrix or two axes and one on one side on the left side is team driven and on the right side is self driven on the bottom. You have order and then all the way up to the top. You have chaos in so fixers start with fixtures. Fixtures are on the team driven. They're in the top left corner. Their team driven in chaos tolerant. Three. That's Rachel type. So fixers really like a when there's a big change or something going on or even if there's nothing going on in specially there's nothing going on give those people project. They liked to have something to do. They like to get gang together. Talk about other gonna a tackle the problem. Get things done independence are still on the top half of the graph. And so they love chaos, but their self driven. So they are not so interested in what the rest of the team is doing. Now, we're very careful to say that independence and organizers like they're not hermits. They're not introverts. They are. They just actually processed information better at first blush by Hainault by themselves or with the smaller group and saying, okay, what's really going on here. So independence, don't need the gang. They're happy to sort of sort of things out on. Their own and they'd much prefer that actually. And they're really cast learnt in like that feeling of what we call freedom. I am an independent. So school. That that's the top half of the graph the bottom half stabilisers during the bottom left corner. They are team driven and they prefer order in. So those folks and there's a big change. They like to have lots details and information, and they liked to have those details information because they liked to know how that change is going to impact everyone not not just them, especially them. But not just them. What's going to happen with the rest of the gang? And so that's gonna what the stabilisers are interested in organizers are on the bottom right side. They are order tollerance and self driven. And so they they prefer order. They like lot of details. They like to have some time to process that information on their own. And they like the the information for the sake of information. They wanna know why something is happening and how it's going to be done the difference between what? We've created with culture types, and what exists currently in in the space for leadership development. Is that Myers Briggs disc, colors social status communication quiz, the fun during finders on and on. We know pick the string out of my hand. And that'll tell you what your personality is all of them, those are all based on personality characteristics. Our system really evaluates the way individual rolls up into a team by their work preferences. So the reason that we created the system in the reason we created the way we did is we saw that. There was a real gap that we've been training leaders to be leaders for the sake of professional, individual development and have then unintentionally for Sekine the development of teams. And so our our assessment is really created. So that leaders and teams alike can understand each other better and move forward together. Be more productive and engaged together. Excellent. No. I love that. So by work preferences, not by personality traits. So I love this. I so where do we start? I mean, obviously. He digging into the concepts in the book, but what are some practical things that we can look at right away. I'm thinking specifically about my organization as you're talking. I'm trying to say okay in my mind thinking about this person. And where do they fit into this framework where do we start? What's the process when we start to look at this from this perspective versus maybe the way we've been looking at it, which is pertinent personality type, right, right? So the the challenge of the personality type, you can do some of this with personality types to some degree. So if you think about that one person in your office, the drive you crazy, how can you work without person? Sometimes individuals stuff really works. Well, but when you get ten of you in a room and there's some dysfunction. That's when that stuff release starts breaking down because there's too many connections in the room. But if we think about, but we always do even before we. Times before you start having a conversation with the new client is we we culture type everybody, and that really gives us like immediately we concert telling how can wear some of the conflict into b and like we did a so then what we do is we culture type everybody, and then we can start seeing immediately. Okay. What's going on? Like, we've heard this own Sarah will close there. We'll say her name Sarah rookie with one company Stera, and there's many Sarah's there's a Seren every organization, right? Just to be clear Darah is one of those woman women who go into one room, and she'll tell people in that room everything they wanna hear and then she'll leave the room and answer. We'll go into the next conference remover and tell them what they wanna hear. And it's exactly the opposite of what he told the other room. Right. And so this creates the sort of on stirring drama chaos in the in the office because she's she's kind of. Telling everybody different story and no-one like everyone just sort of starts dismissing her as this crazy person who likes drama. Well, what really often not is is that she's often a deep stabiliser, which means she loves social connection, and she likes order is ability, basically. And so, but what happens for her is it in order for her to feel aligned with the people in the room. She tells them things that make her line whether she truly believes internally or not she wants to feel part of the group, and then she'll leave and she'll go into the other group, and she wants feel part of that group. And so it doesn't really come into play that those two stories might not mesh if those two groups of people talk to each other, right? And so what we can do immediately for Sarah is to say Sarah's feeling disconnected for lots of reasons. Probably because he's now being ostracized, which is a huge Ernie. Right. Her need is to be a part of the group, but because of her behavior she's being pushed away. Yes. But we can do for her is we can say, listen, let's get her involved in the group in a very real way and much more. Much more engaged way in a productive way. And then literally when we when we do that for her. We figure out a way for her to play slightly different roles. So she feels engaged with the group than her anxiety. Dell's way back and jank she stops the behavior because the behavior is not really about her wanting to cause drama it's really a side effect of her not feeling like she's part of the group. And so once we figure out where people are in these dynamics is really powerful to help them solve some of these real problems at like so much about leadership is about taking the emotion out of work and focusing on the logic. And I totally get that appeared scientists. Totally get it really missing. That is when you get these emotionally charged situations, which we all have of there's really not a lot of tools to understand how to deal with it in the in the sort of the, you know, the current way that media leadership and an and we don't do leadership light group hug leadership like that is not where really into high performing team driven. We're gonna cheat more than we ever thought possible kind of stuff. And so we wanna deal help figure out how to deal with whatever this dysfunction is in your team in a very like very real strategic way. We use empathy as the strategy and we use accountability as a strategy to accomplish amazing things with your gazelle. And frankly view of a team that like is proud to stand next each other in the heavy others back and they're proud to have their logo on their hand. Or they're sure that is of. Team that will just really fight tooth and nail the make you successful. And that's what we want for all of our on. And and frankly, we want our their lives to be better. Those people go home to families, and so we can improve their life at work, and they're going to have a better personal life. And that's going to have the your point vast ripple effects across across entire psyche. Now, I absolutely love what you're saying. And it's interesting I have a question for you. And I'm sure that there are many of our listeners who come across this and through my interactions with clients they will. They're uncertain. They think they know what their culture is. So they think they have a lot of clarity around that. And then virg- sample as as were kind of diving in to get a clear understanding of their culture. So that that we can attract and help them find the talent that they need for their company and part of that processes interviewing and talking with some of their internal employees. There will often not be an alignment there between what leadership felt like, you know, or sees or perceives their culture versus the actuality of what their employees or saying. The and there's some definitely some threads that run throughout. But often we see that there isn't a complete alignment in that, and you speak to that, you know, a little bit more. And what are some of the things that we can do to start to uncover see some of those blind spots that we don't we're not recognizing right now. We're looking totally shocked by what you just said. And I can't believe that. That's the response. We usually get when we start working leadership teams like everybody knows what's going on here on the results from our our three sixty feedback engagements where like what do you think about this will? That's just who. Okay. Reeling off into the dark shaking fetal position in. Thanks. We get him out of there yet. I think that what happens a lot of times is that organizations leadership leadership within the organization has some major thing happen. And that's when they realize, oh, we're not aligned like, you know, they they in has to be something usually within the defects the organization negatively, so we're losing a lot of people. We didn't meet our targets. We have a pending discrimination lawsuit that we didn't see coming. 'cause we didn't know there was even an issue. I think that in order to get past that so that organizations like ours in like, yours don't have to be helping these people in crisis mode is leaders have to really decide they wanna know what's going on in the organization. Once you decide that you really wanna know what's going on a new organization, it makes it a lot easier to open your eyes to. Things that are happening that you wish weren't surveys employee engagement surveys are great if you do them, right. My my hazard or my caution would be don't hire some consultant to do a four hundred ninety seven question survey 'cause you'll you'll have so much information. You won't even that is a bad use of big data. You know, but ask a few really pointed questions of your people and make sure you're asking questions that you really want answers to do not ask for suggestions. If you can't fill one of the potential answers. Okay. So I think that's the real jump off point. I think you have to open yourself up for that. And then my my advice always is find out what people are saying in the bar, whether they're drinking drunk or not drunk at all people are more relaxed in their own space in they're going to be saying things in you'll you. Just get a sense. You know, if they buy their body language in their tone of voice, whether or not they love where they work or they're really dreading Monday. Well, I think too that one of the challenges we see we've talked a lot about vertical vertically integrating, which is which is, you know, usually a manufacturing term, but how do you vertically integrate your your values near vision, and one of the really interesting exercises that we do that any company listening could go and do right now is we have the staff create what they feel are the company values. We actually like get him in a room. And we have a little we make him draw a little values crass dislike your name crest of old timey ole time middle middle ages or whatever like your family crest, and we make people draw them, which makes stabilisers and organizers crazy. Pendants. They're all making stick people. But we talk about personal values. I and talk about that. And how those aligned with the company, but then if we challenge the staff to create a what they think the values are the top four values are of the company, and then we, you know, then you get in the group, you can really see that their their values that they feel the company stands for may be none. And how that aligns to how what the official leadership, you know, stances and by doing it that way and kind of a kind of a fun sort of project. He kind of way actually fascinating I did this with a company about a week ago and the staff they they felt like like the values were like hard, work and productivity and like actually getting things done like his always they're kind of mid size. Startup. So there's always pushing pushing pushing the accelerated the floor, and, but if you talked leadership that are all about community in honesty, and you know, all of these things that they thought they think they are they are, but that wasn't translating all. And so that was a really simple way. I could literally take that values crest out of that staff meeting, and that way, no individual staff person can be tagged with this is their idea, or this is their fault, or whatever you take that values crust out of the staff meeting in walk it over the leadership, and you put them next to theirs, and you can immediately see visually. See the disconnect between the two. But that's powerful that panic a really great picture. I mean, that's a great tactical thing that we could look at doing right now within organizations to get a better idea. Whether there's a lineman. They're yep. And it's really, you know, an income of the day. We all. All want the same thing. We all want a successful work environment that we all enjoy that all is challenging, but yet doable. And we learn we feel like we have a family there. But if we don't even get that core thing, right? It's really hard to ever achieve that. Now. Absolutely in there. And there's something to that. I want to focus here for a moment on with our listeners because the work that Megan Rachel do at rose group international is so important in general, but I feel now more than ever I know so many of you listening are especially in the area that we live in here. Which is in the northwest were were in this Seattle area, greater Seattle area. We're in a talent war and the building an organization with a strong culture like this and your ability to then utilize that and leverage that to attract and retain top. Eylandt is critical. So this work that you're you're putting into transform your culture is so important to the future of your organization. I feel like the companies who aren't doing this are not going to be able to compete because they won't be able to attract and retain the talent that they're looking for do do the two of you have any comments around that topic in terms of driving point home to our listeners a. Yes. To say, yes. One hundred ten times over that's exactly why we're doing doing. I mean, the whole world whole world's in war right now. Turnover in the transportation industry is over a hundred percent. The center hall centers nursing a healthcare lodging has Taliban seventy percent. Yeah. And then, you know, so you, and then you put on top of that, you know, the average person average businessperson. Average professional now is going to do what change their job seven times ten years as opposed to seven times maybe in their career. And so it it is incumbent upon leaders to make sure that they are developing a way I mean, you can call it a system, you can call it a process way culture that supports their employees. And you know, we get asked his questionable time will who whose fault is it who'd we blame who who's not doing their job. It's leaderships job leaderships job. I'm gonna say right now if you're a leader, even if you're in a small. Organization if you are a leader, and you have people working for you. And you're still doing the accounting doing the website building. We're doing the whatever you're doing. You're not doing your job. Your job is to make sure that you're looking out for the culture of your organization. And so anyway, I could obviously go on round. I right. Well, couple couple of other things too. You know, your internal experience of your employees is designed by accident or intent. And so, you know, you have leaders have the responsibility for the health of their business. And so you might as well just take this bull by both horns and own. The fact that you're going to be responsible not only for the health of the company bottom line for the health of the people and their internal experience. And and we see a lot of this being blamed on touch another sort of hot button HR issue right now is this generation gap. As you're gonna ask a question about that for you guys. Let me jump ahead. Please. Because this is another thing we hear all the time. Osa generations millennials like to move around too much. And they never stick around. What really is happening. We really weed culture tech everyone from the baby boomer generation to whatever's after do we it's after money'll esters nesters to the numbers. They have the next one. I came all I feel I note, right? He won't talk about that Kelly not can talk with that. But really the the the challenges that we see executives who are you know, in that chaos. The top half of the chaos Graff NBC millennials that are in the stabiliser side of of the of our graph in in what it means is is that, you know, every single age of every single person it really is all about what work environment you need. It's has nothing to do. We see very conservative young people and we see very chaos tolerant senior. People. And so it really doesn't anything to do with your age. It has everything to do with every single generation at work wants to feel valued and they want an opportunity to grow. And so what we see now is if regardless of age if I start a new job if I don't feel like I belong or I have a team or a family. However, you wanna say it if I don't feel like I have a social structure within a nine months six to nine months, I'm gone, his I don't wanna like we all talk about social media, good or bad. Will this is what we create is a feeling of belonging. And so if we can't create that feeling of value that we Baillieu these new people immediately, they're gonna go and that has nothing to do with their age or their inclination for hard work or any of the things that sort of get thrown around. And so we kind of we kind of reject the whole notion about its generations problem. It's really. Culture problem and developing a good culture. A man I am so glad that you touched on that. Because I probably have this conversation or a similar one like this on the daily with the client where there perhaps, you know, maybe there are baby boomer and they're talking about the millennials. And there, you know, there there's this dialogue happening, and it's always challenging that. And so I'm really glad that you were able to really with a lot of clarity break that down for people because I think you hit the nail right on the head a question. I have for you around the the structure, you know, those for those four culture types is this something then that an exercise within the team where the team member then knows where they've kind of wear their at within that culture matrix. I guess if we were to call it that is there. In education or an understanding around where each person and fits into that culture as well as their other teammates and understanding of that is that part of this model that you teach yet. So when we go work with an organization or someone picks up the book, and they wanna make some safe assumptions along with we do have a free. You can get the sentiment on our website for free. And so. Well, it's a shortened version of it. But it still doesn't job. And so anyway, whether we do it for an organization or someone tries to sort of figure it out themselves, or if they wanna get certified in than they can do it sort of train the trainer style. And then they can be the person who does that sort of internal consulting for their organization, but the answer is yes, everyone can be culture typed in then training goes along with that to say what he you know, culture type likes doesn't like. And then also we talk a lot about change change can be anything from. I don't need to blow my nose to I need to blow my nose to. We're owned by one company, and we just were sold for a million and a half bucks in. Now, we have to figure out new health insurance plans and a new management team in bliss goes on. So we talk about the process of change and how understanding. The way each culture type goes through that process of change is different than how that impacts the changes hole for the team. And so we are our goal, even if you know, we've got executive coaching clients even with them, we still work with their full team with the culture typing, and the Kurds changed transition model to help everyone understand why they're trying to get on the same page. What that same page looks like how to be there. When to be there who'd asked the questions of when you're not sure what's going on your love Aloma that made mention that. Because the other thing that's really valuables. If you have a if your internal change agent or your or your consultant or a. Or a coach of some kind the with the culture can really help you with we we type our people that we work with. So that we understand how they're also going to take on change. So if we're dealing with this organizer organization with mostly organizers, we know that they are going to take longer to embrace a new idea a new change no matter organizers, like if it's logical they'll they'll Marie suitable of faster, but they have a law. They take them a long time before they really take on any major new change in. So that means that we actually have a much longer contract with this organizer organization because we know it will take longer if our goal is to provide value and make sure that they can take on this new these new ideas and implement new who would approaches and processes and communication or whatever solutions that work for them. It's gonna take them a long time. Whereas if we were with a, you know. More of an entrepreneurial chaos oriented group, maybe a startup well in six months, we're gonna be doing something totally different than they're doing now. Anyway, so we know we can go in there and make a huge impact very quickly embed, some basic tools, and hopefully they'll use those tools and whatever else are doing in the next year. But we probably won't see them after three months. And so we can it really helps us understand how they're going to take that on how they're gonna process it who's going to be the fast ones to take it on. And how how can they help get the folks that are slower to embrace change? So it's really cool strategy. If you're the one implementing or trying to roll out a change on how that's actually gonna go. How are you going to be the most successful at doing that interesting? And you know, as you're talking I'm reflecting on a couple of conversations that I've had recently. And again, my my line of work is connected to yours, and you there so much value that you have and what your what you do connect to them. So I had this question come up the other. Day or a Cup in a couple of conversations recently that was like Kelly. We like we're ready to take things to the next level. And we've been trying to get to the next level for the last couple of years we've been in the prime market to do it. But we just can't seem to make it to scale and take it to that next level. And and you know, we're looking to build a team, you know, an and one of those challenges and reaching that next level of growth is is hiring and growing team. But we just seem to not be able to get over that hurdle for whatever reason, we have an identified that does that have something is there, a direct correlation between what you're talking about with this this transition model, and and the work that you do there with that particular scenario because if there's gotta be some kind of correlation there he ah in. So in the Kurds change transition model, there's a point where you the person the group. Whomever has to do what we call let go if to let go of what was and decide what you think the new normal might look like and then after you let go there's an innovation face. And if if the organization the business owners in this case, they think because every business business owner thick survey. I mean, like, I wanna grow my business. I want to grow my business when you get to those critical points where you have to decide. Okay. That means that I need to hire three more people than that means that I need a million dollars more of income every year to cover those people. And even if you've already made the money convincing yourself that you're ready for that change to let go of what was in whatever money complex, you have whatever success complex. You have can be a real project. So yes, I would say, you know, for those people who if they're if they're at a point where they're saying will were ready to grow. But we were not. Ready or we don't know how we're a little nervous. I would say probably I guess my recommendation for those people would be get yourself a business coach somebody who's got some financial in strategic smarts. I don't know like rose group would be. I. Seriously. I mean, there's a couple of people who are probably listening. The call them, please. Because I think that that actually we're talking about you need to get to the root of I think a lot of it, you know, to get through those transitions faster a couple of things, you know, you have to be anchored in the vision of what you actually want like if it's one thing to say, yeah, we wanna grow. We wanna get bigger on a scale. But what does it actually look like what does it? What does that look like for the leadership? What does that look like for your staff? Have you talked to your staff as much as you've talked to each other about this. Because what always happens, you know, Ellie is the think about it gnash their teeth and argue and whiteboard in heavily bliss nights for a year. And then they roll it out to their staff, and they expect their staff to like right to go, and it takes their staff longer to reach those same points minute does for them because it's not there. It's not the staff's idea if feels threatening. And in a lot of times, our leaders don't know how to communicate to those people to the to the staff people. So organizers on stabilisers they won. They're the ones that are getting the work done a lot of times, they're the specialists there, you know, there's the guys at two AM coating or or whatever or the best welders in the in the on the floor, whatever it might be. And those guys need to know. Like, what is the plan? Like, okay. We know we're okay. They're okay. With craziness. For awhile is long as understand that. Okay. It's gonna be six months and nuts. And then we're going to roll out of it by doing this. We're going to six months we're gonna hit this target in a higher person. That's gonna make your life a little better than Raymond do this. And even if you don't hit your targets, or if you think it's a sporty schedule or optimistic those folks need to know that there's at least a plan, and that you are really anchored in what that that scaling looks like is it is it a ten x in. That means we're gonna. Have by more people, and we're going to work from home or Rogan have to know work in the office because we used to work from home like all those things need to be really thought through for the staff to want to follow them. And and leaders often don't know that this is a different leaders think that is a great idea may thro idea over the wall and they run away, and they expect the staff to do it though. And so, you know, a lot of the culture typing is about okay staff like because leaders, we're we're all not going to change how we do things. We just don't we're not gonna change the core of who you are. And what we like to do. So what we do we need to figure out how to communicate better, as you know, a lot of all of this is about communication, but it starts with understanding. The kind of information you need, I'm staff person. And I have a, you know, the leader coming in for the fourth year in a row saying we're gonna make a difference this year in a scale. I could now knowing I'm an organizer and he's a fixer. I can say. Great Bob, tell me what is the plan. Tell you know. Can you help me understand what your vision is what do you think's gonna happen? What's the next thing? House gonna affect me is if I know I need that stuff. And that's if I understand it. I'm gonna move faster for him. I want the company be successful. I just don't know how to help him. So a lot of times. It's also self awareness and words of the team and what how everyone's false. This is such wonderful information. I I wanna be respectful of your time. I could just stay here with you and pick your brain forever. But thank you so much for sharing all of your insight with us, and there were so many excellent pearls of wisdom in here. And and one in particular, which I think is a really great place for everyone. Listening to start and believe make shared this, which has decide that you want to know. Because I think there so many people that is going to resonate with because there's a lot of fear around. Gosh, this is what I think. But is it really? And then if it's not that's done might be a lot of work. What what happened next? Exactly so fake you bowl so much before. I let you go. How can our listener? So if they're interested in rose group international services in purchasing your book, you mentioned Amazon, I'll make sure all a biscuit into the show notes. But but we please let our listeners how they could connect with you. Yes. You can find us an all of the places that there is social media. I mean, like literally all of them. I think I probably have some sort of social media account in Africa that I don't know about. The best place to find us is we've got a website rose group. I n t l dot com are their website is I XE leadership dot com. That's more about our programs and services, and then Lincoln, we're both on Lincoln quite a bit. So you can find us there when full and his far as client working directly with clients, do you work within a specific geographic region, or or or do you work with companies all over we work with organizations all over all over the country? And we've got the partners that we work with outside of the country. So Yep there ever there. People problems. Pretty much everywhere. We're never going to run out of things. Wonderful. Thank you so much, ladies, I have enjoyed our conversation. I know our listeners will get so much value out of this will make sure all of the the show all billings are in the show notes. And again, I know how precious time is I am so grateful that you both shared some of yours with us today. So thank you so much for helping our listeners get the absolute advantage. Thanks. Thank you. This has been absolute advantage, interviews advice and success strategies for today's thoughtful leaders, but there's much more to come. Visit absolute advantage dot com slash by tunes to subscribe and leave your rating in review for the show that way, you'll never miss an episode. We'll talk to you next time. Absolute advantage.

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Off with the Head

Sips, Suds, & Smokes

51:20 min | 2 months ago

Off with the Head

"In the next episode of sips suds and smokes today. We definitely have some cigars boy. Nathan is going to tell us where we're going to be discussing on today's episode all about crown heads. So today we've got the four kicks warez be luminous the headley grange before kicks especially off sublime the meal diaz. Yeah so a really great lineup that we have on this takeover edition of our smokes episode with all things from crown heads. Crown heads is the brainchild of jon huber. Crown had his brand. That's been around for a while now. They've worked exclusively with to factories. So tobacco lira law alleanza. If i'm saying that right and they also work with my father's cigars and that's a nicaraguan own factory by the garcia family. We'll be right back after this. Marie brought to you almost live from the dude in the basement studios. Why 'cause that's where the good stuff is it sip suds and the smokes with your smoking host. The good old boy. Hey man gotta light. It's time for smokes. Hey welcome to. This smokes episode where everything good in life is worth discussing. We are missing on at two. Am i am one of your hosts here. Good boy mike and joining me here. It's table is a boy. Nathan music going good old boy. Barnard i that. Did you work all day on that accent. Maybe in the mirror in our watched a few paul hogan that we need to rate that maybe and get a boy just joined us as well. Hello well are smoke. Segments are all about cigars in well. Anything that is you know smoked Yeah but Today we definitely have some cigars. Gover nathan is going to tell us for enemy discussing on today's episode all about crown heads. So today we've got the four kicks warez voluminous. the headley grange before kicks especially off sublime in the meal. Ds yeah so a really great one that we have on this takeover addition of our smokes episode with all things from crown heads. Well this is your first time embracing this topic. We'll let you know that you can go back to find out all about the basics of cigars. Check out our cigar. Wanna one episode Linked to that episode is in our show notes. Or you can ask your phone play. Podcasts sips sudden smokes cigar one. And it'll be right there for you so you'll get here all about sailing and you know it's right at your cigar properly that christopher colombo You can learn what. A petit corona is except. We forgot to talk about that as well. Justin gets the honors of going over our smokes ratings for today. Okay justin so the accent challenge of the day is to sound like the king since this is a crown heads episode unless you want to try to tackle the queen at the. I wish i had this one. Be careful what you wish sir. James is good to beat a game. Boy justin takeaway. We're going to discuss one smoke ring. This sucked even before it was lit. That sounds like this boy. Sound like a gang could all change linens here. Some hard to smoke rings. Do you really have to lie this three times better. It sounds like reminding how three smoke rings very noise now. Just go away. So i can enjoy this so i don't know that was okay. I believe that he was a kenyan over. The should i do it. Is the queen. Honestly i meant for that. Yeah so yeah. When you're a little bit of queen you know the tasted okay. Here's some heart won't smoke ring four. It wasn't niche better. Go save the queen. This boy please. Everybody's leaving england area go well. We have an exciting episode Lined up for say in burgers can give us a background on all things crown head all right so crown. Heads is the brainchild of jon huber. He was the face. If you some of you remember long ago with ceo. But when ceo sold general or whoever it was that they sold to the John started his online called crowned heads and it has not disappointed so craft brands been around for a while now. They've worked exclusively to factories so tobacco leila alleanza. If i'm saying that right. It dominican factory owned by ernst up says creo junior and they also work with my father's cigars and that's a nicaraguan own factory by the garcia family law continue to work with these parties over the past years kind of has begun to add additional manufacturing partners. But they've kind of stuck close to their roots so crown has also started working with jerus- states at the legrand fab frederica factory. Out of the was original released knows the buckeye land which you can only get that in a couple of regions in america. It's not sold everywhere. This was also followed up by the hawaiian a hawaiian regional two thousand nineteen There it's called the crowned heads p. No sp l. two thousand and nineteen probably butchered that but i don't speak that language And a local. Nco wooden it's project has worked with jewish states in their master blender willie herrera and it's highlighted by connecticut. Probably ever now what we're going to be talking about first cigar we're gonna be talking about. Is the horace chihuahua. Went quick tale for recharging. The so it's really funny. So john and i actually shared a office building. here We are actually recording at the basement studios in nashville tennessee. And i actually used to have an office on second avenue and literally. Our offices were right beside each other and we used to always go down to the beer cellar which is a. It is a poll in the wall place on the wall and was underneath hooters. was what was in the rest of the building and Underneath the beer cellars and understand. What happens if you can imagine like eight tables in a dartboard and a like you know eight taps on the end. It just reeks of bad decisions bilger tavern but it was really interesting because that was the heyday for. Ceo was really great. You know to go down. And i ended up talking with a bunch of folks from ceo. In i just I remember when the buyout came for them and You know There was just a very interesting time to be around them So anyway it was just a very strange connection. You know that i have a kind of makes it close to home. It does so irritating. You may tourist schwab the size. That least smoked was a five and a half by forty eight reengage. They come in a box of twenty and they rappers at san andreas. That's right so you rappers. The san andreas near binders in ecuadorian. Sumatra your filler. Is nicaraguan dominican now. The crowd has wires. Gerard is a premium cigar. That was created at the boutique factory. Tobacco picado in nicaragua. it it's draped in a dark savory san. Andreas rapper which is delicious. If you haven't had one utilizes ecuadorian sumatra tobacco for the binder and filler and category. As a full body. you will taste not dry. Woods coco and gentle spices. Sometimes a little earth as well. So that's that's what we got on that. So as you in justin had a chance. Go over there. So what you guys think about the stick. Well i have like a kind of adult cutter. But it was still easy to cut It was attractively constructed. I got brown sugar and wrap cedar on the Throughout the cigars on the sweet side but not overly so and it never had to relate it so i enjoyed that and it's not complex but it was good but you think so i liked it. It burned really well for me Maybe it was my atmosphere where. I was smoking but i'd never had to rely it as well Very earthy to start with a lot of dry kind of kind of kind of like leave know how to describe it it was just kind of earthy to start and then it got your spices kicked in after you light and then when you get further down to at the spices kind of come back in and it just makes for a really smooth cigar thought for for a budget line stick. This is this is not a bad stick while our smokes rating for the war. Shwe is going to be two in. We're out of the gate so this was really You know it was really interesting. Come back to a lot of this product line. Because i think the thing that struck with me was that i had many of these products as they were being introduced and so i was seeing them almost in a standalone mode and to be to sit down and smoke all of these in a shorter period of time. It was interesting to see the commonality variations that they had you know from one factory to another you know that they were actually doing all of these on so i see a lot head nodding because that was one thing that i think when you work with the manufacturer that is working across multiple Blenders for this that you're getting individual characteristics of both making that cigar physically as well as the the products itself you know that they're actually using Have some variation as opposed to some other lines like The first thing can mind was davidoff where you know. It is incredibly consistent crossing product line so This is where you have a common brand but you have a lot of variation basically under the hood or what i like about it. The most is is. It's easy to make cigars taste the same across the board. But it's hard to have different flavor profiles for your catalog. You know the the blending that it takes time and takes it comes to do that. I think they've done it really well with their catalog. Yeah so definitely exercise. We're going to go through today. If you've have had some of the same experience where you have tasted these like one time like every six months or every year you know. Go back and have like all five of these once absolutely. That was kind of quite interesting. Yeah that's interesting sure. Well we'll be right back after the break and talk about more crowned heads with the luminoso. Hey welcome back to subsidence smokes on today's episode we are covering a product line takeover with crown heads and we have A few cigars from their product line. We just managed to cover the warez and our smokes reading for that was too because she missed that. We're going to charge right in to going over the lemonade. Justice introduced this product for us. So crowned heads luminoso. It's in the shape of toro. It's six and a half by fifty two. What your girth earth. It's gonna be a really good t shirt by the way we're happy. Girth were all under the hood is your cigar. Cobb comes comes with three outsail personal loops strawberry that we were on. Icu hotpots mile freeze. Come on a family friendly scar. Show we so it's a mild to medium. smoke for me was on the mild side To dominican republic stick it to connecticut shade wrapper colorado color and Proprietary binder and filler. So they don't want to share that and it was enrolled long filler. Great blended by john uber area of it. So the master at work so some of my own Review notes here about the luminoso Really spicy foot. Definitely one of the things that i was just was kind of catching me off guard. Because i wasn't expecting you know that much spice so definitely for me to write that down. I thought the first third was very spicy. Cheese credibly abrasive. Yeah the second third. The draw really got a whole lot easier with this particular light. Woody sure It's like puffing on a campfire described. You know the middle part of this. The final third actually move back to spicy In kind of finished Quick ahead of the ban you know when it turned so i was just kind of sitting there. You know. remember staring at the sick going really really. It's we're going to really and that's what we've got today actually thought it was over stick flight So yeah my favorite justin. Would you think of this so that the space for this stick was teasing me. It was off front palette and you expected to have a lot more notes but it really didn't deliver them before you got to any of the spice that was there was Either cedar or oak mine was pretty easy in the beginning. The middle third got hot and then the last there. I don't know if they put in less secret filler. What proprietary in melody. Proprietary proprietary crappy. Finish so while. It wasn't the best thing i ever had it. I never smoked one. That that went quite that way Yeah so i think definitely you know. Being one of the worst you know products in the flight earns are smokes rating of one zero but Yeah this is probably not something. I would probably go back to. You know once again if you've never smoked one try one. Yeah you're right and You know they can all be hits but you know it's interesting. Well next step is going to be the headley. Grange s stupid. Endo stupendous s to pendle is a the eighth try almost women. I think we're over eight. That's the mayor the bathroom. Yes hard. I hear people saying band once again. Sorry lost half the follow fighting mike to the marketing meaning. Now as a man all right so the headley grange. I'm just gonna say headley grange sisters saying the wrong. Another fourteen bucks. It's ma-maybe the tobacco. Laura lanza factory location and dominican republic. The dimensions are five and a half by fifty. Two or girth. What is your girth phillips from. Nicaragua binders from nicaragua and wrappers from ecuador. So The concept of headley grange came somewhere in the summer of two thousand eleven or in the midst of finalizing. The blend of what would become our first release of four kicks. The tweet was posted to the effect of a wish. We could plant a cigar that tastes the way the drum sound on when the levee bruce steady sound of john bonham's drums on tracker unforgettable heavy wadi ominous thick. I'm sorry we're not playing in the back rights for funds rich. What may not be a widely known as a signature that signature. Drum sound is that the headley grange is a former poorhouse built in one thousand nine hundred. Seventy arm sorry. Seventeen ninety five and headley. East hampton england uk. The headley grange is best known. As a recording venue in the nineteen sixties and the nineteen seventies and acoustics of the room at headley grange in which when the levee breaks was recorded is what is credited in large part of giving bonham's drum lead in that track that unmistakeable sound so yeah i really love the storyline. You know behind this and it makes sense. You know because. I'm going to talk about a slightly different version of this In addition to the S but as a stupid and stupendous. You'll get it man. I believe in you close. Yes i d i needed. Holy so i'm going to call it the tour. How about that you go. That wants dick young one stick. Yeah my own tasting our own notes. Around the headley grange. No oughta touches a leather So the first third was very mild. nice easy draw of this. I was i'm members. Just kind of sitting there with this moment of like great anticipation. And i wonder what this is going to bring the so. The second third was This very nice even burn Very easy draw continued. I'm lying well. Somebody gets a straight started out with easy draw. Continue with an easy draw. Very mild in terms of Taste profile around this And i found that that really just kind of finished out you know Much like you know that all the way till attorney in it actually turned on well into the band. Yeah so i really thought this really came with A lot of a lot of Value you know. I got to enjoy so much of this particular stick burger. I know you had this. Yeah it's a. It's a great cigar. I enjoyed it actually smoked on the way here. Today it was yeah. I've got nothing bad about the spices. The flavor of the body of it is this kind of unmatched it's one of their staples in their line. So it's it's the they actually had a couple of special releases on this one. I believe as well that have been fantastic as well as well. So what about you. The eighth and i've pretty much almost the same notes That mike had it was so consistent consistent. I do my notes with thirds. Just like you did but pretty much in the entire way. Didn't start with pepper. It was it was very mellow and creamy and then Towards the end. I got a little bit of pepper on the on the side palate but altogether. It was pretty impressive cigar. Actually one of the most highly rated line that we did opinion so i actually ran into a really cool version of this. That floats along with the rest of this background. Which is the trump strict version of this and It's not widely available. And i only know of one shop In the national market. You know where you can pick these up. I honestly don't know how widely distributed the drumstick version of grinches. So i i think it was a limited run. Yeah so i think that it may have been dispersed but people that love crown heads as soon as it gets to their shop. They're they're gone so there's a good stick. I enjoyed it the best way i can. I don't know. I don't have the dimensions of the drumstick in front of me. But it looks like a drumstick It's kind of you know it's almost the same size in and it's not as long as a typical Drumstick probably maybe half that length of a of a drumstick But it feels that way you know In your hand You know as well as just you know kind of one of the cigars that i was okay with holding in my mouth. You know because it just wasn't really very heavy and thank you very much nathan. It's seven and a half by what you girth that's right. So that's like a petite lancero. Yeah exactly what. And those are some of my favorite cigars lancero really well. yeah so i really enjoyed. I probably enjoyed that particular size. Variation of the headley grange more than i. Did you know the one that we just talk. I thought it was. It was had a lot of the same draw characteristics consistency of much longer cigar. And i would've really thought that the draw would have you know Just quit you know somewhere around half wave and man. It was really good. I remember just how consistent the burn was old time. The burn line was rose really even. I don't remember realizing the cigar at all. Consistency is a big factor. So i would definitely encourage anybody to definitely Seek out headley grange in any size and our smokes rating for. This is going to be three. So nathan's going to talk about our next product which is the for kicks. Kappa a special sublime. So i those that actually a really interesting cigar Start to the size. It was six inches by a fifty four. Reengage Usually comes in a box of twenty four rappers. Ecuadorian sumatra binders nicaraguan. The filler is nicaraguan and dominican. The four kicks kappa special. Sublime is the latest release from the crowned heads crew. This amazing cigar started as one of the final test plans for the original release of the four kicks. In fact it was the cigar that was prepared by master blender nesta perez correa junior making the kappa special unique is the use of the sumatra rapper and dominican tobacco in the filler. So i thought it was a super interesting cigar me and were just talking about actually the four kicks. We decided this because it has four different flavors. That kinda of fluctuated throughout so yeah. It was interesting. Good they're really does taste like four different cigars When i lighted or sorry when i did it Was it was super bold. And i got kind of Red pepper in tuition. It was a super bold and then towards the middle started to get a little bit sweet. More suites are like a cinnamon type Spice it was really tasty in nice and then towards the end the pepper kind of kick back up again. So really was like yeah. It changed so much at the flavor related fluctuate a lot. I've been a fan of this cigar. Since their first release. I remember when their first release came and it was just glorious. That's our was really hands down hard to beat that year. What's that. I was just agreeing and there are a lot of headlining about it. Yeah completely i agree. Yeah oh yeah and the spiciness in the bold flavors you get from it. It's really hard to contend with. So if i'm in a humid door surrounded by hundreds of options. And i can't think of what i wanna smoke. I'll grab a kids. Because i know they're consistent. Every time i pick one up. I have the same draw. I have the same spice. I have the same consistency. Which is what. I look for in a cigar. So i can't tell you how many of these i've i've purchased over the years. I was incredibly Surprising cigar in terms of changing flavors. Yeah several times. Which i thought was incredible but i thought in terms of their super dark cigars. I thought the imperial so was kind of interesting as well. Because it's so dark. This one is also very bold anyways. They're both incredible. Good steaks. And i think that rapper is key differentiator. You know For this burger. What's your What's your notes on this one. I mean you know it's funny. You guys wrote notes down. but i've smokes amenities. Didn't write any notes down there. Because i know that when i smoke it i'm going to enjoy it and you know i get the pepper off the light i get. You know the sweetness mildness towards the center and then i hit that pepper again and it's just like as you were saying like i really don't have anything to contest with with your thoughts of it because i think that that's exactly how they smoked for me as well and it's just it's kind of refreshing to see someone else. Have that same experience. Because i enjoy that cigar so much i was very pleasantly surprised change. Yeah it started off. I was like whoa yay. Keep these in my humidor at home. So i if. I can't think of what i wanna do. Whether it's working on something at my house or keeping my brain going. I'll i'll smoke a four kicks. It's a heck of a stick. Justin what did you think of the four kicks. So i didn't read anything bad or have ever had it before had in preparation for our talk but it looked like it going to be madero sake expected that and it started off that way but then i kind of got some of that drew estate style sweetness that would come intermittently in visit and then it would leave so it was like to to cigars in one. I thought it was pretty cool. Because i hadn't had a cigar. Actually do that for some of my own review notes Around the four kicks. It really smelled oily in old leather. When i picked it up. I was like wow war man. This is. This is going to be good. You know And i happen to be hopping on a boat. Here we go to the store. Yeah so i Was Going on a trip out in the gulf and it was going to be a long today or we were standing about overnight and So i ended up taking several things with me. And this was one of the one of the six brought with me and I was really looking forward to it. So the first third of this so It actually reminded me of an experience. The first time actually visited visited the harry wad dessert room at Brain dead earns ed burns. Thank you felt under dressed. And they'll prepare for sure. This huge full flavor invasion just says You know you really did not pick appearing worthy of this particular moment. Sure you know it was like seeing right there in the stairwell in the lobby Of that deserve going. I don't know what's about to happen but this this this could be really good. I like l. the everything that's the aroma. That's drifting down into the stairwell. Get in there. But i was three hundred miles out in the gulf In huddled on the leased. Side of the i'd The dow is still incredibly. Ill prepared for. Probably both you know activities for sure for sure. The second third the recovery After the first ash was really nothing short of amazement it was incredibly well constructed Like it has been for a while. Or since i've actually experienced incredibly slow even burn. I think that that was the thing. I found myself going. I really just don't want this to be over in the oil. You know that. I was picking up on your own or giving way to this very deep kind of attack room leather And i just remember. I had a room with me on that trip. And i was going to stick is definitely overwhelming and i was like you know i don't know of a lot of peering so it really stand up to just you know this incredibly full flavor so it kind of got messy in spicy on the back end Which was kind of i was like. Wow you know. Don't just walk out of the desert room and leave me. Hanging amaro did to stephen couple of re lights You know it's not so deep. Finish that you know that. I was really expecting so we'll be right back and talking about more for kicks after this break. A welcome back to sip sudden smokes on. Today's smokes episode. We're going through a product lineup from crown heads on. We've covered some really great scar so far and you know. I think i feel like we're just getting. The conversation started about four kicks. Oh yeah I was kind of finishing up some of my own notes about having this guard kind of at sea and really just You know the first two thirds of the scar were so good and then you just kinda got to the end. And i was like man what happened so i don't know if it was just invasion of the you know. The sierra or whatever's going. On at that moment i'd be willing to bet at sierra e. Yeah i would especially you drink in that round that full of sugars you said you had it with it room which is full of the sugars maybe so crappy appearing in the wrong environment. That's okay though 'cause you that first two thirds he really liked it. Yeah you know. So so john you need to send me a whole box and i need to work this out in my research lab the city. Exactly what twist my arm. But i'll help you with that. No big deal so you know. I think a lot of people That i run into I there are like for kicks fanatics. i mean all over the place on this is a huge it in this product line for them for so one thing you mentioned earlier was talking about your ash how your ash held on and you know i still had an nash. So that's one thing. I've noticed about a lot of the crown headlines so the head the grains was the same way for me as this four kicks is you'll get a third of the way down your cigar and your ashes still hanging on that construction of the body is still getting and it's a it's a great thing if you're worried about it you can tap it off what's wrong that's fine but once you tattle trash it wants you tap your ashok. You'll notice your flavor changes in. It's really been interesting to me throughout my years of cigar smoking. How just how much it changes the flavor of a cigar. You know. it's not just a pride thing. Where look how big my ass can be ha- also that for some people. It is hundred percent but for me. It's a flavor in it's a consistency is every is if i go back and revisit isn't going to do the same thing and men that four kicks does the same thing. Every time it's fair. I agree yeah. And i think that you know. Why do you think about all this gars that i have. I'm guilty of. I really wanna see what that scar is going to bring. And i'm guilty of you know just really wonder you know especially on that first ash. I'm like you know. Yeah it depending on the general size of scar working with can get through. You know the first you know with without tapping it you know and i really am paying attention to just how dramatically both flavor and draw are altered At that moment. And what is a recovery you know. Look like that's the way wrote on cover after the first you know is it. You're sitting there suffering. You know through three or four draws you know before it finally comes back around to the point that you had before you know that i ash descending kind of stuck and going well that was a good cigar up until that moment you know. Yeah it's like the wrong person walking into the room. You're like tam really. That's right and he's back tweeting a cigar together. What you're which means like once you asked it's like hello newman remarks world. So have you guys run into like you know these rabid four kicks fans all over. It's all over. Yeah it's like you know. some people have run into. They have that you know. They invented fire crown. Ed's what's funny is. I was down in austin a couple years ago. Now they have a cigar called the yellow rose that they only distributed in texas. so it's a texas exclusive cigar and it's almost the same vein as on the doing hawaii. Well it's just a regional. So the bucks i ever saw the buckeye one. They released in ohio. You know and and the yellow roses in texas and the i. I'm not even gonna butcher it again. That one for hawaii. But it's fantastic as well but that yellow rose. I've had that yellow rose. Put me down. I'm telling you you talk about spicy full bodied cigar. That will just knock you on your but that's it interesting. Yeah not a pair with texas brisket then. No no. you'd be in a food coma and a cigar. A i don't think you would want to go to franklin's barbecue and joy four kicks kind of be just flat on their back knowing what happened man. Now that's right yeah you know. I think it's I really fun that there's a lot of fan boys Four kicks with People that work retail and In a lot of smoke shops. I can't begin to tell you how many i've walked into the. That's my first time in like so what's interesting. Here's and i'm like yeah. I'm quite aware you know. I'm like you know it's an amazing cigar but you know s ability man. Yeah that's true It is very widely available. Which is really great. You know especially for crowned heads. It's probably one of those products. Both headley in four kicks. I've really seen debt around quite a bit. Yeah i think where they know that out of the park on that this where there's not a cigar shop coast to coast. It's you can't walk into find a box. Cram heads the four kicks in general it. It's you know what you're getting. You know every time you get it. It's consistent you know and i think that's something to be said around the board because you know there's there's a lot cigars that better and there's a lot of cigars that are worse but when we when we go into look for cigar if we can't make up our mind me personally can't make up my mind. I'm gonna grab before kicks israel to go to a good goto cigar grilling cigar golfing cigar. Yeah yeah it's it's yeah yeah suggest end of those Any four kicks fan voice. I wasn't even familiar with the brand before the show. So no now al. So you're the newest fan boy. Yeah i just It's it's very interesting. And i think that this is really coming around as a cornerstone of very iconic part of their product. Line in. i really see that You know they put I i put a lot of work into producing really great products right. But i think the other thing. I think they've done a really good job of i think is marketing right behind. You know a really good product. So i think they have kind of a really good one two punch a great product and they have you know coupled with very good marketing very wide distribution. Yeah and i think. That's the reason why i going to continue to build on a lot of the success. You know for this so if you had to pick like the perfect experience to pair a four kicks You know what would it be. Good steak dinner good stake. Oh yeah good. Cut a steak dinner little salt and pepper two minutes. All sides medium rare. Stay little bit of bourbon. Have you noticed that. He always pairs cigars with food. Kobe there's already not against it. Yeah for my experience was much different. It was a scramble on every hole that we birdied was another bud light okay. So mind was Tampa weather with with bud light. And i think i thought it was pretty incredible as a pairing. I'd i'd advise that. I mean i man seventy degrees in a bud light. It was nice with colusa great with cooler so justin what would be the experience. You would pair with four kicks salmon. Dinner coughing coleco little black russian balance out nice. Yeah black russians might change my parents. I was thinking that. I would probably pure four kicks with that Nieces or nephews wedding that i was just counting the moments to leave. And i really needed a figure out a way to just get out of the room. Firing up a four kicks Room to go. I'm sorry. I need to go outside. I'm thinking that could be a good escape clause That was probably the first thing that came to my mind in terms of you know experience. So yeah well. It's a rate the four kicks kappa special sublime is going to be three so nathan. Do you really do. You enjoy smoking a cigar while you're out playing golf golf. So yeah i. I drove the car. You drove the car scorekeeping. Yeah i was really good with the pencil because he forgets strokes so so it's like less every time you play. You know beer appearing. You know to definitely go along with this. it's fair. It was the day after new year's eve as well. So so taste. Subjective at that point bud light in some In some golf course hotdogs. It wasn't a bad pairing well. There's definitely a hundred percent. You should ask it. Oh boy dave what does hot dog water tastes like. Yeah you actually used a tasting note of a beer that we had you know. One time was like dog. Water confirmed that the bgp tasting guidelines dishes like hot dog. Well i would you know that you're like people say you know this has caffeine and how do you know that right. Grandma's house talking with carrie. I was like you know this is really had a an an aroma. That was very akin to getting sick and it was the club you know that was close to her house where somebody's thrown up and put down. You know the stuff to soak everything up. And then they ran. Sit down with not enough water. It's just stuck to everything. Smelled like that. And i'm like do you know what that smells. She she used rancho suspend their done that. Yeah that's exactly the way so I don't know if you hang out on the golf course and smoke cigars. Yeah you have. Yeah so is that a regular thing for you. I mean there are definitely people that i've been on the course that i it's like you know you. They're always going to be smoking more when they're on. The course is part of the experience in the very rare event that my game is going. Well i don't get into cigars. I will have a couple of shots of whisky because my game just gets better until the third one. Guess apart as it usually does yes. I'm lighting something up. So what you're saying is. Is that drinking whiskey and smoking. Cigars is directly proportional to you your score. They're saying on a percent abc by scores directly proportional to weather. I'm gonna smoke in your contingent tipping point to its four cigars as my as my sweet spot and then you get to like six and seven beers and you're like i can't play anymore yeah Very true and so part of my game. Imo is directly proportional to the amount of alcohol consumed. And it's always interesting. My wife knows this incessantly. And she's like. Have you had something to drink before you go on the course because you'll enjoy if you have a drink or two before you go to the course you know. Some people hit the range some people at the bar. It's all matter of you're stretching out either stretch. So i just need to stretch my elbow if you will get into the problem where you have like you know eight am seven am t time and you're like stuck you know when it's like what do you do you know that i know i'm not that good. I can't drink early and often. But you know i just can't that's one of those things i haven't quite mastered just shed so i think our next episode should be a smokes from the course smokes from the lawrence should do. We should all go to the golf course together. It'd be funny. Well they're probably. I don't enjoy the experience of smoking a cigar on the course and i think part of it is because you have so many things that are interrupting the process. You know Enjoying the cigar. And actually when you're driving the golf course and you have the wind in your face actually is artificially kind of moving air through the cigar in a way that you know you. You actually don't wind and right. I find myself always struggling with Even burn you know when. I'm in the golf cart itself and so i i think that especially. I don't usually wire something that i'm enjoying for the first time you know On the golf course because inevitably. I know that i'm gonna get frustrated because it's going to go out or you know the nashes kinda get knocked off you know or when you're chipping game is off when you try to get the smoke in your eyes to. that's right. yeah. I like doing this. Can you could smoke one while the three people in your car are doing the scramble. Well we had done. Yeah that's right. We had one more. Quick stick to go over and i'm sorry Which was the crown head. Mill diaz bargain. Tell us about this really quick. Yeah so we got the mil- ds it's a ecuadorian bano. Rapper is rodman origin. It is not a box pressed. It's it's binders nicaraguan. It's filler as costa rican nicaragua peruvian. it's a quality cigar. I really had enjoyed the cigar. Crack heads is quickly becoming oppressive with what they're releasing currently. I'm real happy with that. Cigar while are smokes rating for the crown head mill diaz is going to be a definitely check that out. Nathan's dead and i enjoyed that cigar couple of days ago and he really really enjoyed it so i would highly recommend checking out for sure. Sorry didn't give it enough time but it's a really great stuff So we're gonna wrap it up For today's smokes episode. Hope you enjoyed this episode. And if you're listening to us online yourself a favor and tap the subscribe button just tap it in a the easiest way to listen to. Our show is ask. Siri google awkward. Larry or any of the chicks on your phone. Hey juanita play podcast episode on your phone that way. We love your feedback and you can reduce online at lola's subsides smokes dot com. We love your feedback in. You can reach us online at info at Smokes dot com. Our daily takes him nuts flood on twitter every day. Our handle on there is at sips at smokes in facebook. Page is always buzzing with lots news. you'll also be able to interact with thousands of other fans on those social media platforms do favor and take the time to rate this episode. Five stars if you're listening to us online that's a great big help to us and we get to see your feedback as well. Do you suck okay. So yeah they don't have a budget for that. Thanks for being here. Good boy nathan. Hey i appreciate it man. That's been fun. Yeah great stuff from crown ads. Thanks good avoid barker always a pleasure. Yeah thank you. Good boy justin. Thanks keep on smoking for sure. Well i hope you get a chance to Definitely check out. You know the product line here for crown adds it was really great. Go back and enjoy the whole flight of these Sorry didn't get as much time talking about the maldives but Really great products. Yeah for sure. Don't let that Flying radar clues though. And if you see the green trump six definitely grabbed those boy my cast and you come back. Enjoy another episode and to keep on cyp. This has been one ten ham production of sip suds in smokes a program devoted to the appreciation of some of the finer slices of lighting from the dude in the basement studios your host. The good old boys will see all next time.

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Ep. 108 | Customer-centric Culture Transformation with Dr. Rachel Headley

Customer Equity Accelerator

38:42 min | 1 year ago

Ep. 108 | Customer-centric Culture Transformation with Dr. Rachel Headley

"This is the customer equity accelerator if you are a marketing executive who wants to deliver bottomline impact by identifying and connecting with your revenue generating customers. Then this is the show for you. I'm your host Alison. Ceo Edition data every other week. I bring you leaders behind the customer center. Lucien share their expert advice. If you're ready to accelerate let's go welcome everybody to the show is about creating centric culture transformation and it helped me to discuss. This topic is stopped. The Rachel Headley. Rachel is the CEO of Rose Group. International she is a Ted Speaker and Co founder of the I. X. Leadership which is also the transformational change concept. I think you will find very valuable. It's also the name of her book. If you don't have it highly recommend it Rachel welcome to the show or allison. It's great to be here to tell us a little bit more about your very interesting background and how you landed in this culture change spot. It always fascinating journey. Cliffnote version probably is that I was out of college. I Love Science and I was as an image analysts or the federal government where I actually looked at satellite images of the earth. Kinda figured out the stories what was going on on the planet which was super exciting until I realized that that sort of routine focused work committed. Every day was really not probably going to be very satisfying for me. Ask just how I like to work and behave. And the kind of CASS. I like so about a year and a half. After that went off to my master's degree worked internationally went back worked at the United Nations Environmental Program helping them. I worked with environmental ministers around the world on disaster relief and how to them and then I went back and get my PhD. At Penn State. And then I went back and was invited to become the operational science officer of the land. That satellite mission which USGS NASA operated mission and so I have three degrees in geography and Earth Science and human impacts on the planet. So that all sort of linear but when I got into my lance out role as the operational science officer I was working with one hundred fifty engineers. All of whom distrusted me hugely to be and I was the first operational officer on the operational side of the house so for many many years. There's been amazing incredible. Phd Research Scientists. Who have been pushing the limit of how you use the data and directing that sort of effort. That wasn't me. I was in the middle of the implementation side of it so that I wasn't unusual sort of person being there. During that time I really had to sort of navigate things like how do you get people through changes in one of the big changes we made was? We used to charge for data to the tune of about five million dollars of revenue every year. And then we were tasked to give away the data because the whole world was giving away their satellite data Brazil and Japan and India and France and a bunch of other countries that are spacefaring and we are the ones that were charging and so we thought well the federal government asked to go figure out how to make this happen and it was really a panicked moment. I mean imagine trying to give five million dollars of revenue while we are conducting your entire systems. While knowing you're GONNA HAVE TO GIVE UP PEOPLE. It was a really heavy time and this may the engineers nervous. Yeah well pretty much everybody. And well in the way that the satellite mission running ranging from how biggest our pipe to disseminate data through all the way down to or up to rather to health and safety of the space craft is just a project objective. And so it's just a massive and five major systems. They'll have to work together and it would be a massive overhaul of almost everything and so not that they were scared of it. It's just that overwhelmed. We had a project manage our head person. She thought the mission would end if she thought the emission ending decision and she actually resigned her job and went and worked for another mission and so that left sort of the three of us to really sorted out and the new person that took her role after. Give her huge credit. Her name is Christie Klein and she was able to help navigate option and support the engineers that so I really had to figure out. How do we navigate this and I got to see this team? Go kind of immediate panic of. Oh my God how are we going to survive to like developing into this incredibly but kicking we can pull off anything we see the harder the problem the more we step up kind of team and it was like this magical thing to watch and so that's what kind of got me nerdy about the change so so you really spend some time thinking about. How did this change come through? And what was it? It was almost like a little microcosm like a little experiment. Yeah really accidentally. And we also saw other teams in our organization outside of lands that were also going through massive changes just due to some other eurocratic stuff and they were collapsing. We saw teams like just completely miserable and we spent all of our times in other people's offices complaining about what the Hell is going on because we didn't really know what's going to happen raging against the people that were putting this horrible stuff on us and so we saw that going on all around us but because of we kind of accidentally did things right with our team they really thriving and becoming this amazing power out and so that piece of it actually not only watching our team go through it but juxtaposition of watching other teams not working mainly really start thinking about what we were accidentally doing bright. Could we rupp technique or that flow for other teams that clearly because we're not teaches you about how to do this though? So how could we support other leaders doing that? So that's Kinda how it got started yet. And this reminds me of so. Many companies that chat with that have put a stake in the ground and declared that their customer centric and then they have different teams that dig into customer experience and they kick off a digital transformation technology in the ignite loyalty programs and instant customers interested fueled by data and process. What's not to love right? So what is it that these teams are missing that you discovered in your previous time with NASA? We started really seeing was that people. React very differently to those sorts of initiatives. So if we think about people in our lives probably come immediately to mind when you start thinking about some people clearly jump into change and embrace it and run away and you're like too fast way back we got all these other people and then you have other people. That are like literally digging their heels. No matter how hard you pull them all they will like you'll be dragging them along behind you if you just force it and so that's the real tension that I think most organizations don't really understand how to strategize four. Who's on our team? You might have three different teams that are supposed to be implementing this new process. Maybe it's products. Maybe it's marketing. Maybe it's an Olympics but those different teams have totally different kinds of people in them as far as how they react to change. And if you don't recognize that and sort of a strategic rollout initiative and it's GonNa be really painful. We've all lived through that the painful expensive take way longer than we think and often initiatives are kind of just you sort of alluded to sort of they say that they're working but really doing it or partially implemented and people think well at least we got that done. They don't really strategize movies initiatives out and it's more than just developing the process because there's a thousand things that we can look out about sort of change management and how you roll things out and project management theory Agile Development. So there's a lot of technology or technical terminology process base but very few people actually understand how humans responded that process and how can get him onboard faster and more effectively. So let's talk about that because it's like the concept of strategizing for change. I mean like you said it's very much like oh it's a process you just walk people through the process but you don't consider the variable of the human and how people react to that. So what did you discover it? And how does it work when you want to strategize more effectively? You know when you think about humans and trying to understand behavior a lot of times of the things that we've all done. I mean I don't know if I talked to anybody that's been anytime in corporate for very long. That hasn't done. Things like Myers Briggs strength finders all of the variety of those sort of personality assessment and those can be very helpful very self reflective but the challenge that we really saw is the pieces that we felt were the most critical to understand about people were people's ability to tolerate or their need for order and that spectrum varies widely between people and we really feel like that is something that no one really measures right now current assessment and then on the other side. We also see that some people desperately need to be embedded in a team and then we have people that are desperately want to avoid meetings and other humans as much as possible and so what we did is we created an assessment that measures those two gradient. So we've kind of created a typing system that can you can look at entire team. Even if you have a thousand people on your team we can look at that result and no immediately what the different strategies may be for your team versus another team in your organization. That's so cool. I love this idea. So can you walk us through some of the different types and I assume it's like a quadrant system so because what you laid out is basically X. Y. ACCESS. Yes that's smiling because we allow him with people that don't speak in. X. Y. Axis term. So a lot of time. Did I just type myself? They're not necessarily. But you did tell me how much about analytics that you know in math. And so yes about horizontal axes. X access is really team to self and so on the left side. Think team and on the right side you think. Think so and the vertical axis that y axis is at the very top chaos at the very bottom order so for visual learners. You can kind of sketch it out and we have four types and in some ways that feels very simplistic because of course we're very complicated creatures and lots of likes and dislikes but what we're really trying to capture the way you like to work and typically how you like to work under stressful circumstances so that's really our focus and so the people that love chaos and when we say we don't mean drum we mean changing all the time we think of it as freedom right but everyone else in the world of business now so the people that love chaos and the people that love team work on fixers. I'm a fixer and so I love to help people in fact if you put me in a meeting where they're trying to solve a problem even if I have zeroed to do with anything I cannot help but jump in and try to float ideas and Co create solutions right so those of you out there who whiteboards and groups of humans that. You're probably a fixer. Then we have the other type we have an independent which they're the self driven chaos lovers and so self driven doesn't necessarily doesn't mean that you don't like people don't value your team but it often means that if there's a problem you'd rather sit in your office with your own whiteboard and try to solve the problem. I think about all the options before you roll it out to your team and talk about it you white to do things sort of internally first and then you like to engage your team. So that's my co-founder meg. She's a independent. We have this fixer independent challenge down pack as we just a day in day out and then on the south side of the graphic you are the team driven or tolerant people and they really love to know what the Hell is going on so for those people who WanNa plan. When does it affect me? How do I have before it's chaotic? Or if it's already chaotic when is going to be over there very embedded in team a lot of people? Don't even like to be promoted. Because that separates them from their team structure certainly not into any kind of position that removes them from their technical rule. And they can do it. Of course we can all do anything we want. But they prefer that T. embedded in a team could be anything from a Nobel scientist to a welder. So there's highly intellectual highly tactical people good bad rockstar worse employees in all categories and then in the organizer Tigers last one. Some of your listeners might be an organizer tends to be very logic driven. Because they don't have the need to be surrounded with people and to make people happy like did they don't really care. I mean they care but they don't think it's their ability to make you. Happy so organizers are self driven and order tolerance so they don't mind the chaos in essence if they can or organize it right so they want to take the some crazy squirrel and your company throws out seven new ideas every week. And you WanNa take and actually rack and stack them in priority schedule. So that's kind of our organizer so there are four types. Okay so so. On the top of the chart fixtures versus independence and then if you go back to fixtures fixtures versus organizers and independence versus stabilisers and in terms of the team dimension I that right yes so chaos laughter. I team taught bottom. The team. Side is fixer upper left and stabilisers in the lower left. Sorry I got it backward. Okay so team left right. Chaos have got him got it fixers and independence on the top stabilisers in organizers on yet got it okay so we've got these four types so and you've given us a little taste about the different types. How do they react to change? Yeah so that's the fun part to me. Because if you google change models or how organizations change you see this sort of standard use occur which basically means you institute a change. Everyone's morale energy doozy productivity completely falls off a cliff everyone's miserable for a while and then magically they come out the other side over time and you've probably lost some good people and no one really knows how to gut it out knows how to do anything but gut it out. I was talking to an owner of a rather large insurance conglomerate the other day he said yeah well it's going to suck for three years but we'll get through it. I know that is the worst. Anyone who is cast tolerant would be like okay. I can deal with this for a while but the other is look the stabilisers would just be like no bright and so. That's the secret so we have sort of a generic how people go through Change Model. Which kind of updates this sort of older idea about this u-shaped curve and we really look at what excites me. Is that what I saw in the team that the lands at engineering team was that after they accepted that we were moving forward so after they let go of what. They've always done everything then they got into. This innovation pays where they were just firing. They got excited about ideas and options and because they weren't really sure what that future look like. But they knew they kind of had some parameters about where they wanted to go and so then they were just really open to exploring lots of option and not all of them but most of them and they try something and it would be decided. That wasn't the right idea or they bring seven different technical solutions into a bigger team. And we'd all scrub it. So I really saw there was opportunity through this crucible of change to create a much more connected and get an engaged team. So that's the piece that people give up which is really a tragedy when they just got out change so if you do it well and you strategize about it you can actually build your team into even stronger and more powerful instead of just going. Well WE'RE GONNA lose our best people but that's okay. We'll hire some others in a few years when they leave so we start with that sort of generic change model and then that includes that innovation phase and also. We could talk a whole other episode. About how big companies? Trying to be innovative in probably why they fail. They don't have this basic sort of embedded so then we take that change model and we filter it into a modified for every type so then for every type of group that you might have you have your own chain model that you can look at it and think about and figure out how to move people along. I love the benefits of this. Because if I'm hearing you correctly it sounds like it's not just a more connected team but it's a happier positive team. That just feels like they're part of something big. Yeah and now. It's the biggest. Most exciting part is that you as a leader or a part of the leadership team with other leaders. Really figure out in a very real way how you can create that feeling in your teams so many people act like it's some kind of magic wand or some special super charismatic executives. I mean think Richard Branson right like I prioritize my people over my prophet and then all of a sudden. It's ridiculous because if people are happy but it theory so but it's more than just a charismatic front guy or woman. It's more about how you think about how people deal with all the things you're throwing them and how to help them thrive and your organization because of course happy thriving people enrolled that makes them excited and proud and feel valued mean. They're going to like blow up all of the good things. All of your customer service all of your profitability. All of the things that you worry about a lot usually away from humid really are driven. I that we source that you have your disposal that's wonderful. Let's talk about some examples of where you've seen this maybe succeed in. Maybe you've seen it not succeed. Well I think we all have lots of examples in our mind where this hasn't worked right or for the where we have known about it. The other great thing about it is you have. There's a lot of personal examples that you can think of so even if you haven't had an opportunity to see this happen in real time in a role in your career in your workplace think about when you were dating somebody and maybe you are the one that broke up with the other person you have already done. All of that mental gymnastics about. Should I stay with this person? Should I break up with them? What is my life? GonNa be like if I leave. How am I going to manage our finance living together? We have a dog or whatever right. The person that leaves the relationship is already gone through all of this mental gymnastic. And so you're already passed that like I'm GonNa let go of what was and then you have to tell the person and of course when you tell that person and they start that process that you've already gone through and so this is why a lot of times friends. They might be ready to date somebody immediately when they break up with. Somebody and the other person doesn't date anybody for a year. Well it's because we moved through change differently and we've been started the process at different points so from that simplistic idea. We laid out over company so we had one company that I love to tell the story about. 'cause in all an me go in with the assumption. Everyone's working hard to do the right thing. Y- you get bad actors sometime but we go in with the assumption that it's not about someone being like when you have dysfunction or conflict so one of the things that we worked within a team in Atlanta was we had one an operations team and we had a marketing team and November. They sat down and they put together. They're GONNA have a new product and they put together the product line. The marketing marketing should look like. Would they agreed on a timeline? So this was the marketing was supposed to kick off in March. They created the schedule in November. So the team could do whatever testing? They needed them away. We'd go well. So March came around or February really before launch and the marketing team started taking the pictures and getting the copy ready and all the magic things that marketing does and figuring out their demographics and all the things well so then they had a meeting in March and so marketing department is ready to launch and they had sort of update executive team and the marketing is like okay. We're right along on Monday or super excited and the OPS team said the OPS. Vp said. Well wait a minute. We're not launching. That we totally changed the product in January because the testing show that it would work and the marketing person was totally paste because she had spent time money effort. Of course to get this thing ready. And it's not even the right thing and the operations guy was upset because the marketing person in touch base with him and so at the core of what was going on is that our marketing person is a stabiliser and she had a schedule and in her mind schedule is what it is and if that changes you better tell me. I'm balling schedule. And the OPS guy was a fix or very high tolerance fixer and he figured that of course everything all the time. So wouldn't the marketing person touch base with him before she launched on this expensive marketing campaign right and so they one person out of schedule and said we'll schedule. Don't stick so clearly talk and the other one's like scheduled or thing. I live by schedule and so it wasn't anyone intentionally wasted money time and energy and their team time and energy but at the end of the day both teams ended up not being able to stand each other well. This was among many other similar problems. That happened but that was at the crux of what was going on. It wasn't that bill hated Sarah or vice versa. It was that they just see the world differently and operate on different ways especially around cow calf in order tolerant. They both are often at the root of a lot of these challenges at work. I think it's interesting that the marketing person has the stabiliser and I want to get back to the story in terms of like what they should have done but I have to ask before that different types gravitate to different departments. They can but that's very complicated often because if you think of marketing today you have the range of the creative. That might be berry chaotic. They're walking around the purple hair and their drawings. Sketchbooks right and then you have the analytics team or the people that worry about segmentation are the ones that are touching the technology teams and gathering information and the information people so marketing has this huge range of skill sets that are required so. I would say that in a very large team. You're more likely to have like those. If you have a creative role you might a more chaos person or maybe not one of those creative people that sits in their room and just sketches all day by themselves. Maybe they're not that like chaos tolerant so sometimes yes what we find actually is that people are often also drawn to the kind of company are so if you have a engineer. They Propulsion engineer on from Aerospace Right. So Propulsion Engineer. And you are cast tolerant. You're going to be drawn to SPACEX because they're sexy and launching cars into space and doing crazy stuff. But if you are a very order tolerant person you might be drawn to the Nassar's of the world that are very stable. You're going to have a good paycheck and good health benefit and you're going to have a jumper and so we see a lot of that. That people are drawn to the business. So that's why start up you get all these chaos people and that's why a lot of startups don't actually gain traction and move forward. Because they're so chaotic that there's no one embedded in the team that actually make sure things get and so we see that a lot and it's sometimes role but it's also often the kind of job kind of company that too so it's an interesting after that so true because there's a philosophy in start ups that there's a point where you need to bring in the adults to stabilize the operation right. You don't get the really good ideas flowing and you get traction in the market then and I saw it with my own start. Have we got about two hundred people? And then they brought in three adults manages right and that's hard a lot of people. Don't stay right because a lot of people are self aware enough to know that I like the excitement of the startup phase exactly and it changed the culture because one of the first things they insisted on was. You can't bring your dog to work anymore and it was like of course. I can bring my dog to work which today we almost take for granted but back then was like only done in startups. That was one of the innovative things that piss everybody off. But that's a great example though where it goes overboard right like your performance and your stability organization had zero to do whether you have a dog at your feet right so this is kind of interesting balance that if those adults in the room that show up and supposed to know where the company if they don't value and understand the people in the room they often go too far and that chases away. The very talented created that company. And so that's even that piece. You can really insert the strategy into that just to get a sense of how to even do that kind of cultural. I WANNA get back to your example. If they had known that the marketing person was a stabiliser and the ops guy was a fixer. What would they have done differently? In order to not cause this unhappy chaotic situation. Miserable tension awkward. Oh so when I walk in the room I was brought in to do an executive one day retreat and in partnership with another consultant. Who was kind of loving and caring for this company? And she recognized that it was the team dynamic. That was the problem and we were working with them and by the and when we first started that meeting they could hardly stand to be in the same room. They couldn't even stand to look at each other. Like do did not like respect. Any of that was awful. And we've probably all been from meetings and some degree like that and the only reason they were there because they were required to be there otherwise someone probably the ops guy would have blown it off right. 'cause he's the guy so really. What it takes is do not recognize that. This is the reason that we drive each other crazy because over time you start really believing that this person is doing it on purpose or they don't care and then you start taking that personally and it's very personal as you know. We like to think that businesses all numbers and process but at the end of the day. It is very personal for us. And so what has to happen? Is You have to recognize that you're different. And that's the fun thing about the culture type. Assessment and leadership philosophy in general is that it allows you to see each other through a new land so it can take away that sort of unknown or the ego or the assumptions. Actually let you see what the root causes and that is powerful itself but the next thing that has to happen. Is You both have to acknowledge that you had something to do with it and that you both are going to work on? How can we do things together because of course if somebody in the room is thinking yeah? I knew that Sarah was driving me crazy and I don't give a shit about it. Well then all of a sudden you still have that negative dynamic so what has to happen is you have to recognize that you're different and then both commend often putting your heads together and saying what are we committing to. How are we going to commit to working so we can both do what we do. We'RE NOT GONNA change anybody. We can both do what we do. Best and how we thrive but we also can find a way to work together and often. It's little things like okay. We'll let them have one owner of this project instead of throwing it over the wall from ops to marketing. We're going to have one person in my team. Whether their side it's going to stay in touch with someone on your team to make sure that we have one owner from start to finish so that somebody knows what's going on in the team all the time simple things like that. We don't want to see like you burning down your whole way of working. It's often just these little tiny changes that can change the way that he worked together and acknowledged that. Yup You're right we don't work well together but it's not because you're a jerk or I mean to you it's because we just see the world differently and how are we going to tweak what we do to make that less noxious and frankly a detriment to the organization reminds me a little bit of NPS scores. And I wonder if you've ever had like a misery meter where you measure the misery of the organization before you come in and then you measure at six months after you apply your magic right we sometimes do surveys before and after engagement surveys big and HR space. But that's so subjective and I'm not sure gives us any more insight but it is what we can actually measure in some kind of productivity. Kpi or schedule a schedule on time deliveries or. It's amazing. How when you have people that are excited because if you have a miserable environment dysfunctional or even slightly unhappy or unhealthy you give people a door to walk through that says. Hey we're not gonNA fix anybody here but we're going to give you an opportunity to make this thing class. They will run through that door. And so that means that everything works better so profitability is going to go up because your costs are going to go down. Customer Service normals will probably go up and so it is amazing how we can track human happiness through and we don't really focus on happiness because we're all about getting things done and yes that often is happiness is involved in that but Lot of executives. Don't WANNA measure your people's happiness if you're you know it's not part of their job. Descriptions it's an indirect measure. It is exactly but the direct stuff is profitability. Cost reduction turnover reduction. Like we've actually been able to do some analysis of we've done a lot of research about how much productivity suffers when there's disengagement in the workplace and it ranges anywhere from say five percent kind of on the low end to eighteen percent kind of high end. So super stressful. You know face or people are afraid company's GonNa close or whatever and so if you do the math on that it becomes very obvious very quickly. How much costing you. So nobody has a cost and their cost sheet. Nobody has employees misery is costing US X. amount of money right. Maybe they said Oh. Yeah we can tell you because if you will save a thousand people and you have an eighteen percent productivity hit because people are miserable. Well that means you're the analytics person but that means that you're paying for thousand people but you're only getting eight hundred and fifteen people worth of work. Yeah exactly so. If your average salary is fifty thousand dollars you take fifty thousand dollars one hundred and nine people that have millions of dollars that you're losing. It's not on any time. It's not a line on any spreadsheet but it is a tangible thing that we can feel we see in our deadline Mrs in our customer service turnover. All the customer centric measures those things. We see it all of the customer. Centric measure yeah. It that ally. I think you make a really good point for if you're going to be customer centric. You really can't do it without making sure that your people feel like they have enough gas tank that they can reach out to the customers and feel good about the problems that they're solving for them right. Because of course the people interface with your customers are nurturing your company because without your customers of course you don't so there is a very difficult for somebody to nurture the health of your company. They themselves so miserable. How their experiences in your firm? So it's not people can do it because some people love people and they wanna take care of them but most people cannot pretend that much or for the they might be able to do it for a while but now for very long. It's can let me to either any other quick examples. You WANNA share. Yeah we're one of the ways. I'll share really quick because there's very specific about the customer end of the customer experience and all of that how it's executed. Which is we were working with. A Technology Call Center down Phoenix and they were expressing their frustration about how poor their feedback was from customers and how they were losing customers because of poor support and they didn't really understand it. They've spent all this time and money with all the analytics building all of this amazing training for all of their call center people but the problem really was at the same time because they hadn't made the connection it accidentally complained about how high turnover and so they have such high turnover that they can ever get people in and train them on this very complicated customer experience platform and process You actually get good at it and stay with it and so it became very clear. They'd spent so much time energy on their customer experience but if they would have just taken a fraction of that time and money and applied it to the quality of their employees experience or their internal experience of their people. Then that would probably do vastly more to support their system. Irs than all of the time and money and process that we've developed about how to actually speak to customers and so that was a huge moment for us about people are tend to focus on that customer experience in without addressing the health and wellness of the people. Actually doing engaging and I WANNA call out that I ex leader. Shed is about internal experience. That's where I x comes from right. Yeah 'cause we started with and we actually migrated. We said well. Let's put that one eighty and talk about internal experience. So yeah that's where it came from and this is just a perfect example right. Here's all the money that you're spending on customer experience but you have an address internal experience backley and it doesn't matter how amazing the processes you've developed how magnificent you still have to have human but actually pull it off. And that's where a lot of people don't invest enough very true. At least today we still need humans. Okay so let's say I'm convinced and I really WANNA think about applying leadership these techniques. What should I do? I I think probably is to think about the way that we start. Every engagement is to a have a goal in mind right because you probably are feeling the dress of something not working so make sure you understand what you actually want. Because that's the thing that you would think people know but it doesn't actually happen from time but then really what we do. Is We start by doing this? Culture type assessment for everybody in the organization that immediately affected and then often it cascades down into the organization but we have a free assessment on our website were Rhode Group international with Dr Brose Group entailed dot com or your L. We have a free version of the assessment. There where you can take just get on our concepts page and of course in the book we go into what it really is. You can kind of figure it out as far as I guess. Sense of what kind of organization you think you have or what kind of team you might have. And then it's really fun to get them. All assessed and start really comparing that to what you expected. Which could they try you? Because I've been doing a long time a lot of people and I'm still surprised some time and that's what you really get started. Is once you kind of know? Okay I've stabiliser team and then in the book there's some strategies about what does that mean. And how do they deal with change? And then you can apply your level of knowledge of your people and organization what you're trying to accomplish and sort of layer that along with this okay. They're going to change. They're gonNA WANNA move together. They're going to want me to show them that. I'm committed to this initiative to and how can I do that? So it kind of gives you a starting place to start seeing slightly differently and how to get where you want to get so in our show nuts will make sure to both linked to the quiz and I also WANNA linked to the book in case people want to check it out and try typing themselves. I've done it and it's very interesting and I was reading it know. It's really kind of terrifying. How much we can can type ourselves. And I'm just going to warn the independence in there listening that you will not like to be pigeonholed. So independence load any kind of idea that their predictable because they love that chaos. And so every time I give a big keen out and I've got six people come up through afterwards and they can you really pigeonhole people like this and I'm like let me guess you're an independent right. How did you know so even your reaction to your results got me a lot. You are got it and then Rachel people want to reach out to you directly or reach out to risk re. Pasha they get in touch with l probably the best way is. I'm all over linked in so there are a lots of Rachel. Headley's out there so Dr Rachel. Mta had leave my Lincoln. And I can send you that link to include and I think I have my phone number and my email address or the way you can reach me so great so we will include that as well a highly recommend giving Rachel a call if you're struggling with this kind of customer centric challenge. I have not seen anyone in the analytic space per se. Address it in this way from the human side because I guess we're just also Geeky in quantity and deeply involved in our own little wells that just feel like I hear this and show after show people are like. Oh I come trotting out with the insights. I've done all this work to find the answer and then no one wants to use it and it's strikes me as such a cultural problem of how we communicate because it's about change right. Here's an insight that requires you to change. And that's a difficult concept that you've hit the nail on. Yeah the other little nugget I will tell the analytics people out there that are feeling that pain is one of the secret is to figure out how the analytics will help the person you're giving them too so you of analytics because he worked so hard and all all of the work and here you come with this amazing number or particular insight that you're like. Oh my God isn't the one but most people cannot make the connection about why that's important for them and their work and that's one of the key things you can do just yourself when you're handing off this amazing little staying. Tell the people figure out why they would think it's exciting and that will help you allot perfect so as always links to everything. We discussed are at ambition. Data Dot com slash podcast. Rachel thank you so much for joining us today. This has been just a really fascinating discussion. Grow thanks and I just love the kind of work you guys do. I as a science nerd I love and respect it. So it's really a pleasure to have the opportunity to chat. Thank you remember everyone when you use your data effectively you candle custer equity. It's not magic. It's just a very specific journey that you can follow to get results. See you next time on the customer equity accelerate.

Dr Rachel executive Rachel Headley engineer NASA officer federal government United Nations Environmental P Penn State CEO Sarah Lucien Alison Ted Speaker gymnastics Earth Science Tigers google
How to Be a Better Conversationalist, With Journalist Celeste Headlee

The Upgrade by Lifehacker

39:32 min | 2 years ago

How to Be a Better Conversationalist, With Journalist Celeste Headlee

"The upgrade is brought to you by audible, so listen because listening makes us smarter. More connected people. It makes us better partners parasol leaders, and there's no better place to start listening than audible, if you're an audible member you can download three titles every month. One audiobook plus to audible originals you can't hear anywhere else. One of my favorite books from audible is far from the tree by Andrew Solomon. It is non-fiction book about how families accommodate children with physical mental and social disabilities and differences. It is totally fascinating. And I can listen to it on the subway while walking down the street in bed, anywhere members also have unlimited access more than one hundred audio guided fitness and meditation programs, I think I need to meditate. So I'm going to look into that. Audible also offers free and easy. All you book exchanges credits. You can roll over for a year and a library. You can keep forever. Even if you cancel. So if you read a book, and then you're like, I don't really like it. You can return it and get another book. Start listening with a thirty day. Audible trial in your first audiobook, plus to audible originals are free. Visit audible dot com slash the upgrade or text the upgrade to five hundred five hundred. Hello and welcome to the upgrade with podcast from the team. Life hacker. We help you improve your life one week at a time. I am Alice Bradley life. Hackers deputy editor sadly Melissa's out sick today. So it's just me I'm drunk with power. Let's see what happens today. We're talking about talking. Look, we could all get better conversing with our fellow humans. It's just too easy. These days to hide behind our screens. And when we're finally face to face with actual people. We're often talking too much and not listening enough. How can we make the most of those one one face to face in real life moments? We'll hear from journalists. Celeste Headley whose career revolved around talking to people in that conversation to learn if you haven't learned something from the other person, you haven't had a real conversation and life Packers own Machel. Ru tells us how to talk to kids because do any of us really know how to do it. Don't change your voice a lot of people when they meet a young kid will go in. Into this high pitched. Hello my goodness. What a shooting you are. But before we get into how to improve our conversational skills. Let's address bad conversation habits. I what are the most people who only talk about themselves chronic interrupters, total bores, we sent our producer Casey out into the streets of New York to find out. What drives people crazy. Just standing outside the church avenues diction. Do you want to answer a question for a podcast? Okay. Awesome. What is something in conversation? That people do that drives you crazy. Talk about like, the Royal baby and stuff like that. That had I did what really pissed me off times. When people only talk about themselves. I guess it would be cutting me off during mid statement something like that. I was speaking on this same time. So that that drive me crazy. Paying attention. Interrupt when I'm speaking. That's it. I like to finish what to say. Then I'll give you a chance to speak when they don't really say what the mean, you're just it just makes you go crazy, and they just keep repeating themselves. Yeah. In directs individual as alterior motive as opposed to stating their entire purpose of the conversation. Probably when they asked you for something directions. And then they just walk away instead of Sam, thank you. I'm from the old school. I say, thank you. You're welcome. How are you? They asked you. Does this train go to Atlantic avenue? And you take the time you say, yes, turn them walkway. Don't say. Thank you. Welcome. All right. Thank you. You. Welcome. Today. Do you? Find yourself voiding kids all together because your judgement. Do you have a kid, and you won't talk to them. Do they try to talk to you? And you're just like, no, you're you frighten me don't be afraid listener, it's gonna be okay. Because life hackers parenting editor Michelle. Woo has some tips, and she's going straight to the source Michelle's daughter, Maggie and her friends tell Michelle grownups should talk to them. Cry catch up or sneeze cheese. Cry because I love catcher benigo like cheese. Hi, I'm Michelle Wu. And I'm the parenting editor at life hacker. There's some people who are great with little kids. They're fun and engaging and they just kind of get what kids like to talk about. And then there are others who are slightly awkward around young children. They might even fear them. If this is you it's okay. I have some tips that might help. This advice is from the members of the life hacker parenting group on Facebook. And also from my six year old daughter Maggie, and if you have her friends. I don't don't change your voice a lot of people when they meet a young kid will go into this high pitched. Hello. My goodness. What a Cutie you are. By the way, don't start talking to a kid by commenting on their looks. Changing your voice might be okay. If the kid is one or two, but with children over the age of three just talk like yourself. Something I like to do is namedrop specific kid interests. When telling stories about myself, for example, if I asked the kid, hey, have you ever been to Disneyland? They might say yes, or they might say, no. And that's the end of the conversation. But if I say something like, so I was writing the tea cups at Disneyland. And I spun really fast, and they felt really dizzy there is might light up, and they'll be like I've been on the teacups, and I felt dizzy to and then they'll start telling their own stories. Also have some tricks in your bag kids love little games. Like, would you rather? Would you rather fly or be invisible? Rather have a big. Or a horses. Made a whole is. All of the same thing. Yeah. Because he approved year, the prettier one mom named Clovis says that kids love when you show them your scars. She says show them off and tell the kid how you got the scar kids will then show off their scars, and you listen to their stories about how they got them. If you have no idea what a kid is talking about a simple thing to do is say, tell me more this works with adults too. Finally of the cheap tricks. These include trying to get a kid to open up to you by tickling them or having them. See how hard they could punch. You. Remember that kids are just like us. They just want to be listened to. If you talk to them in a natural way, though, probably open up, and you might just have a great conversation. To do more. Do you like when up? What do you wanna be? When you grow up kind of a hard question. I know. Be of her teacher battling teachable. I wanna be up teacher to Fuller's. You know, you know, why I like naptime who? The upgrade is brought to you by Madison Reed, take coloring your hair at home to the next level. Because I know what you've been doing even buying those box kits and they'll look great. Eight or okay, you're going to a salon spending hundreds of dollars. You know, you are admit it. And you're there for hours. It's like a job you deserve to get paid. Not spend all that money. You deserve gorgeous professional hair-color delivered to your door for less than twenty five dollars many Madison reclines love their new hair-color. They say it's improved their lives. This aids changed everything. Everything's changed. I'm pretty sure that's true. This is game changing color, and you can do it at home, which is the best whoever wants to leave their home. I don't I wish I were at home right now. In my pajamas coloring, my hair, find your perfect shade at Madison dash Reed dot com. The upgrade listeners get ten percent off plus free shipping on their first color kit with code the upgrade that's code the upgrade. Joined in the studio by Celeste Headley Celeste is an award winning journalist professional speaker and author of herd mentality, and we need to talk how to have conversations that matter over the course of twenty years in public radio. She has been the executive director of on second thought a Georgia public radio and anchored programs including all things considered weekend. Addition. Welcome celeste. Thank you. Thanks for having me. Thanks for being here. My pleasure. So you gave it Tech's talk ten ways to have a better conversation. Right. What what inspired you to to do that, you know, the prompt from Ted was think of something that's going wrong in the world. And then tell us how to fix it. And quite frankly, I I did not expect anyone else to find the subject. Interesting. I was like, well, I'll tell you what I think is going wrong in the world people aren't actually conversing with one another. They're just talking. But I I did. Didn't think anyone else would be intrigued by honestly thought we I put in jokes because I thought people would be bored. Oh, then it turned out to be quite the opposite that yeah. Turns out everybody to me. I would have put on makeup done my hair. Yeah. Quite you. Great thinks I have to say that. I didn't I didn't. But I did think. Yeah. So it ended up being going super viral, which I find a hopeful sign. Yeah. So why do you think there's this sort of need to have conversations that we're not having? Why is there need, you know, we have a biological need to converse with one another. That is the one Volusia Mary superpower that we have is our ability to communicate and collaborate better than any of the species, right and conversation is so good for us that lack of it leads to loneliness social isolation, which literally degrade your internal organs. So why do I think it's important? It's because we need to survive, and we're not doing it. And I feel like that's one of the reasons the talk went viral that people put it in a Google search string. Right. I mean that meant that means people are realizing something's going wrong, and they're looking for ways to fix it. And you give a number about how much teens text. I don't remember what something really alarming. I think I think I remember it because I have a teenager. So I loaded it teens text their friends a hundred times a day or more than it's by now that was twenty fifteen. That was so the current statistics are way for the you know, as we think about the generations. There's a couple caveats which has number one younger people are have no less social skills than older people. That's number one. They're just finding that department. Number two millennials actually listened better than baby boomers better listeners, the differences in this is a really important difference younger people both millennials and gen which is the one after millennials are the most likely to believe that a text exchanges the same as a conversation. And that's alarming as it is in no way the same. Right. Can you talk about just briefly the differences? Well, you know, anytime you study a conversation between two people we see what happens in the brain. Right. We have FM are is now we can also test things like cortisol, the stress hormone and see whether a conversation increases brain activity in the important parts of your brain. Like, your cerebral cortex, all those other things, right? And whether or not lower stress, it does all those things that Lois blood pressure. They if you have a five to ten minute chat before you take a test you'll perform better on the test. Right. Even if it's with a stranger, but when we test that with texting. Nothing. Right. I could go on this subject for while. But let me give you one more example apologies. So the the process that takes you from I'm sorry, all the way to forgive. You. I can let it go is it's relatively complicated physiologically neurologically. Right. It begins in this part of your brain, which will call the compassion center. I simply say and somebody apologizes to you and this part of your brain activates in. It starts the whole process. Right. So we have watched the effects on the brain of both a spoken apology Email apology because most people I would say probably Email their apologies. Yeah. Why? Because it's more comfortable uncomfortable to to apologize someone's. It's easier craft your apology. Exactly. So what they found was that. When someone if I'm apologize into person, the reason we don't like it as 'cause it's hard, right? You don't say you feel awkward you just watching their face for that? I still hate you look, right. But the other person is seeing you struggle, and then suddenly being the compassion part of their brain lights up and the process that moves toward forgiveness begins. When you read my apology in even in a handwritten note when you read it in text nothing. Well, no response from that part of the brain, which means that process never begins. It's as though you should never apologized at all. And I actually asked a neuroscientist in a social psychologist is it possible. At some point that text will replace the voice as a more effective means of communication, and they said yet in perhaps in like five to ten thousand years. Wow. Sar brains needs to really catch up if we're gonna. Yeah. Or they may not have right, right? Yeah. We're just designed to communicate through. Voices and we had those mirror neurons. Right. Doesn't that activate when you do? Absolutely in person also on on teleconferencing and tell on the phone, okay? Yeah. Fascinating. So you said in your Ted ex talk that all the advice were given about having good conversation, which is not a lot maintain I contact or, you know, only to certain extent too much as creepy exam of repeat the thing that you just heard back all bullshit. It is all bullshit. But the thing about all those things we've been taught for so long is that basically we've been training us to pretend that we're paying attention to someone. That's what that is truly paying attention is what's hard for us. Right. So you don't solve that by acting. Yeah. You know, you have to just actually learn the hard thing, which is to stay focused on what someone else is saying that's hard. It's really hard. It is and listening doesn't come easy to homo sapiens. No, we're not great at it tight, a friend who worked. On a suicide hotline and talked about Hof 'cause you really have to God. Yeah. And it's intense listening, and you can't drift off at all for anything. And how just what what a marathon was just imagine endurance. It is incredible training. So that person probably really honed their listening skills. And it does listening in any gateway does Berta trace amount of glucose. Not enough to help you lose weight. Listen to yourself slim. Yeah. No. That's not gonna happen yourself fix. What it is. An example of the fact that actually tangibly burns energy. Yeah. It's tough. And that's that's what we've been avoiding doing by pretending. I mean, the truth matter is that if you're actually really listening to someone you will naturally not sometimes will naturally say a home, sometimes the just released a study that showed that people can't tell when you're actually keep maintaining I contact most of us don't look in somebody's eyes look at their hairline when their or their neck and people can't tell the difference. Yeah. I sometimes I can't if somebody's really intensely staring. I didn't wanna say anything listeners. Staring. It's not blinking. That's really good. It's creepy. Isn't it? I don't know how you're doing it. So let's talk about your ten ways to have a better conversation. And you say there's no shortcuts a better conversation. These are certainly not not that. But I think they are really interesting. So number one, don't multitask. Yeah. And most people have heard the science that human beings can't multitask, people don't believe it to know. So a lot of the research that we've gotten on multitasking in general has been pretty alarming Nali can you not multitask? But trying to multitask. Although it gives you a shot of dopamine making you feel like you're really cool and productive. It makes your quality of both things you trying to go down by significant amount. It drops your cue by ten to twelve points and overtime if you are the kind of person who multitask on a regular basis it degrades your cognitive abilities possibly permanently. Yeah. We're just forcing our brains. The constantly do something. It doesn't want to doesn't. It can't do. It's a specially bad. If you're doing things that require the same part of the brain. Let's say you're on a conference call and you're also answering Email, right? That's the same part of the brain. An interesting thing is that the mere sight of your cellphone or any electron ick is extremely distracting to your brain. They found the same sort of if you're the type of person that leaves your Email inbox open on your computer all the time. I q down by ten to twelve points. Oh, because your brain is expending energy preparing to respond to an incoming Email. You may not be consciously thinking about that Email in box. But your brain is right. Yeah. It's trying to prepare some part of you. That's look. That's that's listening to it. Exactly. That's like runners pose, and it's the same when your cell phone is visible. It's deeply distracting to your brain. So don't multi task. Yeah. Don't pun ticket. Yeah. Don't lecture people. This is actually important. And I am I wonder if people still know what the word ticket me like it. So. So this is really important in our political times what this means is don't try to educate them, don't try to change their minds and don't lecture them. And frankly, this is the most common version of conversation conversation. I'm using air quotes losers that I hear these days people talk at each other. But they don't actually listen, you're not going to change anybody's mind. It doesn't matter. How great your statistics are or how deeply personal the story that you tell you won't change their mind over the course of a conversation. That's it's just not how humans work, and I would challenge people to tell me the last time, they changed their mind over the course of a conversation, right? So you're just wasting your time. And generally, you know, here's a really important thing to remember unsolicited advice is ninety nine point nine percent of the time criticism. And by that, I mean, your brain literally sees it as an attack and it goes into -fensive mode. Even interestingly enough, even if you ask for the help or asked for the advice, your brain still really doesn't like it. So a we all sort of have to deal with that. But also just don't get it. And that includes all unsolicited advice. In other words, somebody says, oh, I'm taking the train to Las Vegas, or whatever you go. Well, when I went to Las Vegas, we took that still unsolicited advice. Right. So you you just can't lecture people. And and I get that. There's a bunch of people whose job is like training or I'm a manager. Mike, how the heck am I supposed to do my job? You gotta find another way you have to make them engaged in the process of problem solving rather than. Saying sit on I'm going to tell you how to do your job. This one is a good one ask open ended questions. The rule is a simple question in and you'll get a complicated answer out and the opposite. So if you put in these long winded detailed questions, you're probably gonna get. A one phrase answer at most. I mean, that's the thing and interesting enough people watch Sesame Street, and they're like, oh, look, that's how kids learn they learn by being interactive and being engaged. No. That's how human. Right on stop at some point. Yeah. I mean, that's how we all learn which means you have to make it interactive. Right. You have to give the other person a chance to respond, right? Yeah. Go with the flow yet. I mean, the flow of the conversation, right? And this is one of the harder ones. It's simple. But it's really hard because your brain is thinking all the time. You can't clear your mind. If somebody's told you to do that. That's another thing. That's bullshit. Not going to happen. If your brain is constantly supplying you with information. But it's for you. You're supposed to let the thought come in let the thought go and then go back to listening, and it's hard. Yeah. And it's not always to selfishness selfie wanted to get your story out. Sometimes it's it's I find people have a real fear of quiet of just dead air. Whether it's in an interviewer. Terrifying. Right. Especially interviews. I will be thinking about the next question to ask and hanging onto it. Yeah. And I know there's the rational part of you knows. That's that's not the best interview. And you do say in the talk could interviews or good conversations? The rules are the rules are the same right, basically. Yeah. So you have to kind of let that sometimes let people sit in silence, and you and I both heard interviews where someone says something, and it's clear the interviewer didn't hear it to you know, just onto the next question. Yeah. We do this tweet other all the time. Him. If you don't know say, you don't know, this is so hard, and it's ever especially hard in this day and age when Google makes think we're all. Couple clicks away from being an expert in whatever it is. Right. We read a couple of paragraphs about something on Facebook. And then we feel comfortable giving our opinion on. But human beings are a hive mind, we are a pack which means we rely on other people's expertise. And right now, we're all thinking that we're experts in everything. But the fact of the matter is is that it's a roading our relationships, and I say that because we know subconsciously that everyone can't know something about everything, right? There can't be a hot take. Everybody has on everything. We just don't know which of it is bullshit in which isn't. So our mind learns to stop trusting everything they say because we can't tell the difference between what is just hot air, and what is an actual informed opinion. So if you're trying to rebuild trust you have to get back to the habit of saying, I don't know, you know, interestingly enough ten generally people who look up their symptoms on web. Mm d are less accurate about what's wrong with them than people who don't look at all. But they're more likely to distrust, their doctor and not follow the prescribed treatment. Yeah. That makes sense, right? Because they've looked it up. They've decided. And it can't be allergies. Right. As they think. They know. Yeah. But also, there's a there's a the need to kind of connect with the person you're talking to they're saying talking about something they know about this. Well, you know about the incident I find myself inclined to agree because I know about that you wanted them to keep talking. Of course, of course, I know about that thing, you you wanna be in the know it's hard to practice saying, I don't know. It's the way it's a good practice. Yeah. And think about on the other end, though, when you're talking about something, you're passionate about and someone stops you and goes, wait. What does that? I don't understand. Explain what that is. Yeah. That's awesome found somebody does that. Yeah. You're you're suddenly a fascinating person. Exactly. So you can make someone else. Feel fascinating by asking them questions. I don't know what that is explained. Right. We never do. You think the other person is stupid free talking about exempt? We're so inclined to dissemble. This is a good one. Your next tip is don't quit your experience with theirs. Yeah. And you know, frankly. This is the one I get the most push back on really. Yeah. Interesting. I would not think that so what this is is talking about this specifically talking about cases in which someone's telling you about something painful or tragic that's occurred to them. And we have a tendency to offer up are similar experience. So somebody says my dog guide and you say, oh my God. I'm so sorry. My dog died last year. And it was really terrible took me forever to get over it. I'm really sorry. You know, whatever, I know how you feel. I think the reason that there's so much pushback on this is because when we do that we feel like we're being empathetic. We think what we're saying to them as I've been there too. I know how you feel you're not alone. So when you say, you're gonna be okay. That's I it's it to them that can feel like you're completely mitigating their experience. They don't need advice from you or solutions. They just need a witness, right? If they lost their dad, they wanna tell you about their dad. Yeah. You know? And it's okay. If you don't know what the. Say because don't say anything, right? And everyone's experiences are so different dads are so different. How can you possibly know? Somebody feels. Yeah. You can't. Yeah. So try not to repeat yourself, your mom. So I don't know. I've never repeated myself. What that even is, you know, at this looks like so let me explain to you. How I got the Pitney on this particular one. I was training. My dog. And she standing outside and I'm saying Sam commu Simon's, SAM's Sam and after. Couple minutes. The trainer looks goes. She's not disobeying you because she doesn't hear you. And suddenly I was like oh my God. My son. So it turns it when I looked at the research on it. It turns out that if you're the kind of person that repeats yourself, literally what you're training to do training people not to listen to you because of consciously they learned that you're gonna say it again, and they don't feel the need to put it in their memory banks. So they just. Delete. Wow. Yeah. All right. But what if you? Teenager. And you know, he's not gonna listen the first couple of times, you got to say a third time or something terrible happen like it'd be late for school. I don't know. So here's how I broke it. And I I wanna say right now that I don't recommend this strategy 'cause it was harsh, but I just went cold Turkey. So I went into my son was a teenager at the time. And I said he's playing video games in his computer. Of course. And I said, hey, I'm taking your car in to be fixed. It won't be back until Monday or Tuesday. Okay. And then he got up on Saturday morning to go to work. And there is no car. I was like I told you I was taking your car, and I'm doing this new thing where I don't repeat myself member. So that was an ugly weekend. But it worked when you train people that you're gonna say something once, and then the consequences are not yours, but there's they become way more likely. It's going to take a little while they're used to hearing it again in the end it again. But they're just deleting. You like spam being deleted spam? You are spans terrible. Phil terrible about things I've done the same thing with my dog. We're just repeated the same thing over and over again. And then thought I'm teaching her to just sit like to not come. I think he's comes nice something. She does it here. Oh god. Okay. So so part of good competition is teaching people to listen to you as well. Yeah. Of course, good part of conversation is modeling the way you want to be heard by listening to someone in in a certain way, you're training them. How you want to be listened to? Yeah. Stay out of the weeds. I love this one. Yeah. Because I I have several people I can just want to point to this one. Right. I'm gonna start naming names. So it's the shaggy dog story, right? Like in with journalists say someone's in the weeds, it means like would you're interviewing professor or a doctor or scientist, and they just. We're gonna give you every date and every acronym and every name that was on the report in nineteen eighty five or whatever and you're like cut the mic. We we stop listening when we hear all that. When you're interviewing somebody, can you get them out of the we's. Yeah. I just interrupt them within we don't care. I don't say we don't cash hush now. I just say, you know, you're losing me on that. Let's get back to blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, especially with scientists and things I'll be like, I have no idea what you're talking about. But let's get back to the place where I feel comfortable as an interviewer. You know, how it is? You have to redirect people as politely and respectfully as possible. So you're next tip is, and this is my which is interesting to me, listen. Yeah. And its ninth because it's basically what we've been talking about in the other ones. Right. I mean, we're I'm basically saying you need to listen to people. I'm just the other tips are sort of explaining what gets in the way of that. It's obviously the most important, and you know, we think all the time about how when we listen to someone all that. We're doing for them. Right. We're being so kind to them. But physiologically neurologically emotionally the person who gets the biggest benefit is us. You know, there's even evidence that you can predict your level of enjoyment your level of enjoyment. A conversation goes up as the amount. You talk goes down. Listening increases, your empathy increase. Is your cognitive abilities? It pumps serotonin and sometimes oxytocin into your system, which are the neurotransmitters that make you feel wonderful. But not in the she can I say shitty. Shitty way like dopamine, which makes you a crappy person oxytocin insert tone on those are like the mommies hug hormones like listening to people makes you a better human being. Yeah. So stop thinking about what you're doing for other people, though, you are you absolutely are. But think about what you're doing for yourself. And also keep in mind, you know, we worry about how to give back to the world or solve the world's problems or all those things and that's important. But you know, we are in a crisis of loneliness right now, a crisis association numbers that we've never seen before in historical record and loneliness kills you it shortens your lifeline, it makes you more prone to cancer, and diabetes and all kinds of horrible disease. As I said, it degrades your internal organs. So if you're thinking about how to make the world a better place. Listen to that person who is telling you too much information on the elevator. Yeah. Give them two minutes of your time. Loneliest generation are millennials? I'm just saying. Yeah. The younger people are socially isolated in their the suicide numbers are are horribly on the rise. So force your teenagers to talk to you and force young people to talk to you. And listen to them ask them. Good open any questions who listen to them. And you're less tip. Be brief be brief one is really quick. It's stop talking. Now, we have our tensions bans are really short at this point people, you have less and less time to keep people's attention. So in your own interest, keep it short, especially for one of those people that sort of list off a whole laundry list of things remember, the Sesame Street model. The there needs to be interaction. Yeah. I wanted to tell the story about your grandfather's visitors. Oh, yeah. So my grandfather's a famous composer. Here's the dean of African American composers William grant, still and he would have all these people come over all the time as they relieving. My momma come over and say that was she was the runner up to miss Erico. That's the mayor of Los Angeles. And I'd be like, and I just gotten this habit of being like is that that then? Newell prize winner. And I just sort of. That's how I grew up was thinking. Okay. What is it? What do you got for me? Who are you? What's your secret superpower? And I think that's what led me to has led me to be a better interviewer because I'm just waiting for someone to reveal their specialists and the truth of it is everyone does have it. It wasn't an allusion. Everyone does has some secret superpower. Everybody's an expert in something. Maybe they're an expert in bottlecaps who knows? But there's something they know better than anybody else in the world. And if you're using your questions to find out what that is. You're gonna have a great conversation. You say prepare to be amazed which I thought should be your Levin tip. Yeah. Well, yeah. You should. I mean, you're in that in that conversation to learn if you haven't learned something from the other person, you haven't had a real conversation. And some of that stuff is gonna be amazing. Yeah. What's here? Superpower. I was saying my incredible use of jokes. My son would vastly disagree. Time for upgrade of the week. Every week. We talk about that one tiny thing making a big difference in our lives Celeste. What's your upgrade? So my upgrade is to be the first one to reach out. And I read this the book by one of my favorite, researchers Nicklaus epaulette, Chicago. And he's at one point says, you know, almost nobody waves, but everybody waves back, and that's in my mind. All the time. I'm gonna be the one that waves takes a lot of bravery to do that you think it does. But honestly after the first few times. I love that. You would be surprised even in New York. You would be surprised walking on the street, you smile at someone and say nice dress or nice hair. You've just totally improved their mood. And I feel awesome. Yeah. Yeah. It makes a huge completely cost-free mostly effort free way to really change your life. Yeah. I love that. It's great. That's a great upgrade I'm gonna I'm gonna be thinking about that. Nobody waves but everybody waves back. Everybody waves back. Love it. So my upgrade is similar my new. We new mantra we'll see how long this lasts is show up. I recently had a weekend full of obligations and putting in air quotes like things. I kind of didn't want to do and one of them involved getting up at six I am on Sunday to drive two hours to my friend's daughters. Mitzvah who daughter. I don't really know. Actually don't know at all. And I frankly just didn't wanna go not for any good reason. I love my friend. He's one of my best friends. I just am lazy. And it's six o'clock Sunday morning. I'd want to do it. But I knew it was important. And I just said I'm going to go. And it was a great time. I had a wonderful time. I rented people haven't seen in years in mental ought to my friend and actually ended up being a really really great day. So yeah, that's my greatest I wholeheartedly support that waving at people just. Show up for though, nobody else invite me to anything involves six o'clock in the morning. On a Sunday come on. They will because that's what they're going to do it. I know especially after listening to this. You said show up show up. Yes. Thank you so much less pressure. It's been a delight. And that's our show. The upgrade is produced by Casey Georgie. This episode was mixed by Brad Fisher. Our executive director of audio is Monmouth feed E rate review us on apple podcast. I've stars. Please follow life hacker on Twitter at life hacker and on Facebook at Facebook dot com slash life Agar. And if you wanna say Hello sent an Email voice memo to upgrade life hacker dot com, or leave us voice message at three or four seven six eight seven eight one zero nine and you can find show notes for this and every episode of the appraised at life. Hacker dot com slash the show.

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A New Way to Solve a Murder, Part 1: The Genetic Detectives

The Daily

27:05 min | 2 years ago

A New Way to Solve a Murder, Part 1: The Genetic Detectives

"From the New York Times on Michael. This is. Today, a year after police used a genetic data to crack the case of the Golden State listening technique has been used to arrest nearly forty other people now for the first time one of those cases is headed to trial in part, one of two part series, the story behind the tool that is transforming on forcement and testing the limits of Christ. It's Thursday, June sixth. Heather weird is the story begin. So the story begins with this guy is Kurt Rogers. Hi, kurt. Kurt rogers. It's Heather, hi there. How are you and Kurt Rogers is an entrepreneur, he spends his life in a lot of different kinds of businesses at one point he runs a series of candy shops with his father in Florida for a long time. He worked in. Start with creamy Frisch health real trying to develop markets for helman's mayonnaise products in Asia. Into a special treat. For one thing we wanted to introduce mayonnaise into Japan. They were not familiar with mayonnaise, so there was trying to figure out how it would fit into their eating habits, and what ends up happening, though, is he gets interested in genealogy, like a lot of people do as they get older, my life. I've been working on this as a hobby and back, then there is a site and actually still is a site. Family tree DNA. And somebody said you should join this project for people with the last name Rogers, and it helped people with the last name, Rogers figure out how they were related. So he did. And he got really into it. He was so into it actually, I was asked to manage the Rogers group for one of the testing companies family tree, DNA, the pretty soon he became the administrator for the Roger project. And so, what that really means is used just trying to help his fellow Rogers. Connect. And he's doing a pretty good job at it, but he's getting. Frustrated because. They offered kind of cookie cutter type of a website. It's all just a little bit clunky and I wanted something more interactive. And so he asks his network of Rogers, does anybody know guy. So I found a person who is very technically oriented, which I am not. And yes, one of the Rogers knows the guy and was able to talk him into making a few algorithms for me. So we have much more interactive site. And then we're getting around twenty ten and he's hearing that people are starting to do DNA testing with sites like ancestry dot com and twenty three and me these companies could test people, and then they could match the people they've tested with other people. They've tested, but there was no way for them to match with people who'd been tested by other companies. The problem with these other sites is that you have to pay to join them and then they analyze your DNA and once they do that, you can only find relatives who also tested with and paid to join those sites. So he sees us opportunity to create a site or no matter who you tested with no matter who you paid to join previously, you can take those files that those created upload them for free and find relatives who've tested with all kinds of companies. And they also sees us opportunity to help people find and understand not just how they're related to second cousins, but way, more distant relatives. And so we asked this. Grammar who's now his business partner to make this and he did it. Anyone who had been tested by any company could put their information on our site if they wished to do so. And then find matches with people who'd been tested with other companies, and it was such a great program. I said, this is really good for just my little Roger. Cernan group. Let's start another website and share this with other people. And so that's how their website began. And how do I say jet match? You said it absolutely correctly. It is jed match Kirk calls it jed match has partner calls a good match. So for people were looking for relatives. It's a free place where they can go to find many more potential matches no matter who the people on that site tested with. Yeah. Exactly. And just takes off Kerr told me that he was expecting. Okay. Maybe ten percent growth out would be good based on working at something like the man as business, but he is far exceeding that the number of uploads are doubling every year and that's without. Any kind of advertising? Wow. And they're growing, and growing, and growing so fast that at some point, they crashed the server to many people using too many people are using it, they're getting so many emails that Kurt's wife is really angry with him because all he's doing is responding to emails, all day, one of the first one ever did, it was meaningful was a woman who did know her father because her mother had done test tube baby. And so she finally found her father, and she got up the courage and called him. And, and she said, who she was, there was a big hesitation on the other side. And the father, then said, this is the happiest day of my life today is my birthday and there is no greater gift than this one. And he was crying, you know, things like that make you realize how much you do. Help people. That's really what it's all about helping people but aside. These letters cur really had. No idea, how people are using his sight across the country. How were people using his sight across the country? Well fast forward to twenty fifteen. There's an investigator named deputy p Hadley Headley hair can help you and he's working on a case. Hi. Can you hear me? Yes, I can. Yes, I about a woman named Lisa. The begins when this woman is just five years old. This is the late eighties. She's living in a trailer park in California with her father, and he's not taking very good care of her. There was a couple there older couple the befriended them and the neighbors, start to notice. The new something was wrong. You know, living in the back of camper shell like that. They heard Lisa cry at night, sometimes and they're talking, and they say, oh, she's such a sweet girl, you know, we we're happy to help out with her. Sometimes they told him the their daughter was having hard time, having kids and she'd like to adopt into take her for what starts as a few weeks. It's the sort of trial adoption, obviously, this is a pretty unconventional situation. And during the course of those few weeks, they start to notice that it's even worse than they thought she's clearly been sexually abused during this time he. Disappears. They don't know where he went, so they go to the local sheriff's department and say, what should we do and the sheriff, but thought a word for his arrest both for child amendment, and for us the little girl ends up in foster care, and eventually, they find him and arrest him. He was in jail for about a year and a half when he was released he immediately absconded parole. And his location was on known again and chill. And then quite a few years later, he was arrested in two thousand two and contra Costa county. He's arrested again this time for murder. And when they arrested him they ran his fingerprints, and it came back with all these other AKA's as C you had a list of different identities. Like how many identities we're talking for him? Let me see we have Robert Evans, Curtis Kimball ordin Curtis. Jen, Sarah Macher man Lawrence van or. Louis Jensen and different variations on the names, and they saw his previous criminal history involving these and they obtained DNA from him at that time and compared it to Lisa and the at that point everyone realized he's not related at all. Where did he get this kid? That's when we went back and reopen the case to try to determine who she really was and where he took her from. That little girl whose neighbors were concerned about her dad, and that, that got arrested. And she goes into foster care, this test is showing he's not actually heard at this, right? So this woman grew up thinking that she was abandoned by her abusive father now as an adult, she's learning actually, abusive father was not her father. He was her kidnapper what we know we know the suspect kidnapped her, and she has no idea who she is. But we don't know who she is. So we're trying to determine who she is. So deputy Pete had Lee. He's one of these traditional cold case. Detectives who never give up. I just kept hitting did ends and it was really frustrating. But, you know, I had promised Lisa that I wouldn't give up it just keep working, and working, and working in working case. And so I just kept trying to think of any possible way that we could identify her. Right back. The daily is supported by TD Ameritrade. There's no our ally on. T. M I. That's why TD Ameritrade created a learning experience that will actually learn with you, curated from their vast library of exclusive content. It customizes to fit your investing goals interests and needs. So you could exactly the information you need. And none of the information you don't get started at TD Ameritrade dot com slash education member as I p c. So detective Pete Hedley is hitting dead end after dead end in the Lisa case, what does he do? So by twenty fifteen he starts to hear that adoptees are finding their biological parents through these genealogy sites. Anything's wait. Actually couldn't that help us so he reaches out to an organization that's known for this type of thing, just sent an Email to DNA adoption dot com asking them if the same methods that they use to find Dopp tease bio, families could be used to identify Lisa. Barbara venture responded to my Email, okay? I'm going to take the headphones off second earrings off. Okay. And who is Barbara Venter Barbara adventure, is a very interesting character I robbed on the US in December sixty eight. She's originally from New Zealand. I applied to the university of Texas law school and was accepted. She spent a lot of her life as a patent attorney in she worked on all kinds of interesting biotech innovations anything from new organisms for making bitter strains of penicillin including the first Netflix modified fruit to flavor saver tomato. The flavor saver tomato for company that leader became part of Monsanto, did you ever find yourself having to defend your employer to your friends? I didn't make a big point of mentioning that. I didn't clean out a fight food and other things. No, as she got older in life, she got interested in genealogy, as many people do in, she volunteered with an organization called DNA adoption where she helped adoptees to find their biological parents. And she was really good at it for me. Of course I understand the science. I don't need to Oriels on that. So for me, it was probably a little easier than for most people because all I'm trying to learn is how to actually use the DNA in conjunction with research techniques for traditional family history research. And then one day she gets a message from deputy Headley was working on my computer on something, and the Email came in and to me, it was an intriguing question, could we in fact, a dentist by somebody who had no clue who she was? When all we really would have is her DNA wouldn't anything else about her. That's when Barbary venture responded back and said, yes, but because we had no geographically information honor. It was going to be difficult. So how did you go about finding this woman's parents? I mainly worked through deputy Headley. But I did have conversations with lease rent various times. She's a very charming, very sweet person, but she also is obviously wanting to very. Much maintain her privacy. So what she needs to do is, she needs to find some relatives hopefully close relatives theoretically, the Technic that we were using for finding both relatives should work for somebody like Lisa. And so I had Lisa tests at ends history Twenty-three inmate and Femina treaty. And I in can also flown to match Kurt site. Get match is an essential tool for her and all the matches that showed up there Barbara would build a tree up from these people that are related to our and till the trees cross, and you get to ancestor in common. I hope that it's somebody relatively close like a great grandparent, or a great, great grandparent. And at that point, I then search for all of the descendants of that common ancestor. So then she can say your victim is a descendant of this ancestor in common, and then as she followed the trees back down to the living folk, I would use all of our law enforcement. It resources to find those living people in contact them make, what kind of resources, everything from DMV records to old census records. But at this point, my primary job with Barbara was to find the living folk and call them up and start asking them to do DNA test. And that's how you narrow in is the amount of matching DNA increases, you know, that you're getting closer to the correct family. Descendants. And what did you say? When you contacted them. It was difficult making cold calls like that. I would always start off with I'm working on a cold case. And I'm hoping you can help me out some people they would just hang up. A lot of people thought it was a scam. I had one woman that thought I was going to try to clone her. Yeah. So this goes on, for many months, Barbara estimates that the end that it takes twenty thousand hours of work from about one hundred volunteers. Many of whom are distant relations of Lisa's. The maternal line tree in particular was enormous. It had something like eighteen thousand people in it. So eventually, they narrowly his father down to one five brothers who seem to live in New Hampshire. Unfortunately, all of the brothers were married when Lisa was conceived. And so they're not really happy to hear that they might have this other child. Got it. Yeah. So they don't wanna be tested which is not helpful on the other side of Lisa's family, though, on her mother's side. Barbara and her team have more luck. They eventually find this person who based on looking at the family, tree appears likely to be Lisa's grandfather breakthrough. It's a breakthrough. He is also skeptical of all of this at first, but they eventually convince them it's legit and he agrees to be helpful partly because another family member convinces him. And they do a DNA test in what they find. Is it confirms that he is indeed? Lisa's grandfather and would her grandfather tells her is the last time he saw her. She was too, and her mother was involved with this guy. And his name was Bob Evans family to know a lot about him at the time he talked that they owed money to avenge people insinuated that it was to Bandra speech. Bad people that the money to even but in the middle of the night, they absconded, the family never heard from them again. And they just assumed that she just gone off with this guy. They didn't know what had happened thus wanted contacted Manchester police department and brief them on the case told him, this is a missing person Denise Boden moved away with the sky Bob Evans, and she's actually missing person. So what did you tell Lisa? When I called her up, I told her that we had been able to figure it out, and she got very quiet. And then I asked her if she'd like to know her name. So what happened? I told her her name is Don Bodin. And then she called me a couple of days later. Had had some time to think about it and was wondering. Well, should she change her data Burs change her name? It had to be a big shock. And I told her that's, that's something for you to think about and decide on. It was very satisfying to be able to tell her who she is it made it all worth it. It was very emotional being able to actually do that for her. Particularly knowing what had happened to her. And so it was very nice to be able to give her back her family and to give her name. So what deputy Pete Hedley and other investigators believe is that sometime after he kidnapped on. He killed her mom. They have not found her body. But the reason they believe this is because this was part of a pattern of behavior. It's believed that he killed at least two other women he was involved with and three children. Wow. But not done, but not done. We still do not know the extent of his crimes, but he's known as the bear brook killer, any died in prison. So just want to get this straight, that little girl who is taken by her. Neighbors ends up in the hands of police. The man who she thought was her father was actually a serial killer who kidnapped and likely murdered her mother. Yes. And Lisa is don't lease is done, and Barbara has done all this using match. Yes. And this is a really big deal because it shows that you can use get match and use family tree building techniques to identify much more than just an adoptive parents, you can identify a person. And so we're gets out that Barbara Pete solved. Lisa case, and eventually, there's another investigator. He's been working on this cold case. For decades, he has no real leads. All he has some crime scene DNA. And so he reaches out and ask for help police finally got their break in the Golden State killer case by combing through commercial genealogy website. And this is the case of the Golden State killer police say one of the most elusive serial killers in American history state killer, filler, Golden State killer has been captured at least twelve twelve murders. Forty five eighty five rapes and more than one hundred burglaries. They have been searching for more than four decades. Tonight, the major clue best gainers compared DNA found at the crime scene. We found the needle in the haystack, genetic information listed on the websites, which rapists sell your ransacking. The original night stalker and the Golden State killer. Today is our pleasure to call him. Defendant. So all of this work from the Lisa case has led to this groundbreaking moment. This is the first time that we're seeing a public arrest in such a high profile case, the case of a serial killer that is alluded detectives for decades, and now they finally have a name, they finally have somebody behind bars. And that is because they have used this technique that people are calling genetic genealogy, and that leads us back to the site. The Carajas Bill get much. Yeah. It's only after the announcement that the alleged Golden State killer has been arrested Kerr told me that he learned that his site have been pivotal to this investigation. He had been asked previously, if his site could be used by law enforcement to identify murderers, and rapists. And he'd actually said, no, he couldn't explicitly sanction it because people were there primarily for genealogical research. No one was expecting to be Cooper. Meeting with law enforcement. My concerns were that there could be a violation of privacy. I had to figure that out my head. If that was true or not. And what helped you figure it out time a lot of sleepless nights, but then he starts getting these emails, and they are so congratulatory are telling him that he has done great things for the world. And he is feeling incredibly proud of what he is created. He like when they first discovered the fingerprints could be used to dentist by individuals. We've now started a whole new field of fringe IX. It's not as direct as fingerprints, don't get me wrong. But it's a whole new way of finding people. So he and his partner decide to officially open up, get match to law enforcement to me, the real important thing was the people who've been victims, and that includes their families, and bringing closure to them is extremely important to me. It really is. And they rewrite the user agreement so that what it now says, is that by default users are opted into allow their profiles to be searched by law enforcement, for the purposes of sexual assault, and murder cases. I never realized how many families and people there are out there who had been suffering for decades. Because of some violent crime this happened in their family. And, and there, there must be millions literally millions of people like that. And that changed everything. Tomorrow on the daily part two of the story at the time of the Golden State killer suspect arrest. A lot of people were pining that this was going to be a one off that it was too difficult too much time investment at cetera. And I wanted to prove that, that wasn't true, but the power of genetic genealogy could absolutely be applied to cold cases, and even active cases. There is no reason that, that couldn't happen. Well, do they back? What are you working for? It's more than what you do. It's about a cheating something greater for yourself. And for others. That's why ADP is enabling people to work better and embrace new challenges to work anywhere and everywhere, and helping everyone reach their full potential because the things we work for our what defines us at ADP we're designing a better way to work. So you can achieve what you're working for HR talent time benefits and payroll informed by data and designed for people ADP always designing for people. Here's what else you need to. On Wednesday YouTube said it would remove thousands of videos and channels that advocate for bigoted idiots like Neo Nazism and white supremacy in the latest attempt by a major technology company to limit hate speech, which is owned by Google said it's new policy would ban videos that justified as crimen by claiming a specific group is superior to others or deny the existence of violent incidents, such as the holocaust and the sandy hook school. And the Trump administration said it would drastically reduce federal spending on medical research that uses tissue from aborted fetuses fulfilling a longtime goal of antiabortion. Scientists have long used fetal tissue to test drugs and vaccines targeting everything from HIV to cancel and say that in many cases there is no substitute, but opponents including Representative Steve Scalise, the number two Republican in the house of representatives called federal funding of such research immoral. That's good for the I'm Michael Barr. Up to twenty six billion pounds of plastic, enter the oceans, each year by twenty fifty there could be more plastic in our oceans than fish love beauty and planet. A line of personal and home care products encourages you to start with one small act to make a big difference. Support groups organizing beach cleanups. Did you know if we cleaned up every mile of US coastline, we could remove up to one hundred fifty million pounds of trash. Find us on Instagram at love. Beady and planet. For more inspiration.

Lisa Kurt Rogers Barbara Rogers group Roger New York Times Michael Barr US Barbara Pete partner Hadley Headley Pete Hedley Rogers Asia Kerr TD Ameritrade Heather weird investigator
Bonus Episode: Celeste Headlee Wants You to Do Less

By The Book

44:45 min | 1 year ago

Bonus Episode: Celeste Headlee Wants You to Do Less

"Thinking about changing your relationship with alcohol with their evidence based digital recovery program tempest can help you. Stop drinking and feel better. Learn new healthy habits better, coping mechanisms and get community support, so you can build the kind of alcohol free lifestyle you want visit. Join tempus DOT, com to learn more and use code bt be to get fifty dollars off any membership option you choose. You like podcasts. Right whether you listen occasionally can't get through your day without them. There's a great app you need to try. It's called stitcher. stitcher is a free APP for IOS and Android. That's really easy to use from classic favorites, too. New Hit shows from Oprah and Conan O'Brien, as well as the best of true crime like cereal and my favorite murder stitcher is home to all your favorite podcasts visit stitcher dot com to download stitcher for free today. The following podcasts contains barnyard language and some adult content, so maybe listen on headphones. If you're at work or around small children now here's a show Hagia Linda. Yes, Creston I like to think that you and I do a pretty good job of questioning the advice that self help authors, Shell Yeah, I totally agree with that. especially the ones who insist you got to maximize and optimize multitask can have it all and be more and do more and achieve and operate at one hundred percent. You. Know what I mean. Yes, well dilemma. What do you say we talk with? Some of the other people out there who are poking holes all that self help advice out there. People like Celeste Headley author of the new book do nothing that sounds amazing, because one I love Celeste Headley and too I also love nothing. Well! Let's do it then because I'm kristen minds. Her and I'm dilemma. Greenberg and I'm Celeste Hanley and this is by the book. Your life is going down the drain. In so much pain, you'll need some help. Self. By the. By the. By the! By the. By the. That's right. It's time for another. By the Book Bonus episode are between seasons. Treat for your ears, and for the next few episodes. We're going to be talking with other people who are looking at self help world with a critical eye. We began last week with Marie and today. We're continuing with Celeste Hudli. That's right. Celeste is an award winning journalist, professional speaker and a bestselling author of the book. We need to talk how to have conversations that matter are Ted ex talk sharing ten ways to have a better conversation has over thirty million total views to date and her most recent book is do nothing how to break away from overworking overdoing and under living. Living Now Kristen I was sick on the day that we were supposed to interview Celeste, so you had a conversation with her solo and thank you so much for doing that I was very happy to I. Love Celeste and the first thing I said to her. was that a lot of us? Don't WanNa, do nothing. We love to achieve to work to learn to engage in hobbies to be involved in our communities and I asked her. Do you really want us to stop doing all those things? Here's what she said so I don't want us to stop doing all those things you know that the inclination to produce and be creative. That's absolutely natural but the. The the point that it's gotten now to where it's. It's frankly kind of toxic I. mean it's for some people. It's impossible to sit there and just watch a movie rather than watch a movie and check your email and check your social media without feeling guilty, or or let's say that you sat down on your front step on your balcony, and whenever you have where you live and just sat there watching the street for a half an hour. Some people can't do that without feeling guilty. That means it's become a little bit toxic, not even a little bit toxic, a lot toxic and in the book I try to trace back why you feel that way. Way It's it's not just you. It's us, and it's not just our generation. It goes back like two or three hundred years while I have to say I feel it very much. In this generation I mean the number of people who used to love to just crochet or embroider, who suddenly feel that? They're supposed to have an at see store, or they're supposed to turn into a side Hustle I definitely feel the rise of that over the last decade or two you. Oh, yeah, you know I do cross-stitch and one of my friend says. Oh, don't do cross-stitch takes way too much time. You'll never be able to sell. Sell it for what it's worth. And yes, it has gotten to the point you know. This has been coming. Said for generations, but every generation has leaned into it. This idea that idle hands are the devil's playground. Right that every moment of Your Day has to be leveraged, and then now it's gotten to the point where even your personal hobbies have to be leveraged. They have to be part of your brand. Right has to be something that you can post pictures on instagram and and turn into a side, hustle as as as an Instagram, influence or a or a youtube chef, or whatever it may be so yeah people can't simply enjoy what they used to. I mean think about this, Kristen. Think of hobbies are our grandparents and parents had right stamp, collecting and coin, collecting and rock polishing all those. Totally supposedly useless things people used to do, but they were smart like that's doing that. Stuff is actually very healthy for your body and your brain. What do you mean by healthy? Well? We know ball through cognitive science, and through you know biology physiology that being on all the time directing yourself in focused activities, all the time is just not the way the human body is meant to work. We don't persist. We pulse so a human brain in body is designed to engage in focused activity and then rest engage. Engage and rest engage and rest, and we also know that for the most part for the average person. You have maybe four to five hours of focused work in you every day you know some of the great minds in history like Beethoven and Charles Dickens and Charles, Darwin they only worked for three or four hours a day, 'cause. That's about all we've got after that. It needs to be sort of unfocused activities less mentally. Strenuous activities and rest rest is productive, and what are the benefits of doing nothing? So I mean they're manifold. You know one of the things I try to point to all the time. Is that right now? We're in an epidemic of burnout You know the W. H.. O. Just recognized burnout I. Think last year as a as a real not only hit that it's a it's an actual syndrome that it is a global epidemic at the moment. Everybody's overwhelmed. They're all on the edge. and what that means is that were were running around the world, being ruled by our amid della are fighter, flight, brain and your fighter flight. Brain is not the brain that you want making your decisions. It's the. The brain you want controlling you if you're being chased by a tiger, but you do not not that one making actual real important decisions. It's going to make your decisions on what you eat worse. It's going to make your decisions on how you sleep and all other things. It's going to be immature about those things so when you do nothing what happens, is you relax yourself to what you're not in fight or flight anymore, so Nali can help you in terms of your physiology. It's GonNa. Make you healthier. It lowers your heart rate as I mentioned before. It makes you less prone to get all kinds of different diseases. The. Other thing is is that you gotta keep in mind that when you're when you're in burnout, you're most likely to be ruled by Your Analytical Brain, and your analytical brain is the one that solves math problems. Rider says you know. What time do I need to be home to get the delivery from Fedex or those kinds of problems, but if you need to be creative if you need to innovate if you need to. Solve any kind of difficult, nuanced or emotional problem. You need your insightful brain and your inciteful brain comes into it comes into play when you are at rest. When your brain is at risk, it's not literally at rest. Your brain is pretty much working all the time, but when it's not any focused activity. That's when you're most likely to get those. Moments that bring you new ideas and new solutions, but you know I got a point out. That are union, forefathers and four others, and so on. They fought for us to have a forty hour work week and and that was a privilege to have to work only forty hours. I thought, but you're saying we shouldn't even be working forty hours. Yeah, because listen I for this book I. I had to do a lot of extremely boring research like I had to go through a lot of you know history of working hours going back to the time of the Greeks and Romans right, and so I know that for most of three hundred thousand years that human beings have been on the planet. We didn't actually work all that much. In fact, even bedevil surf worked less than half a year. So He, you know they would do a very strenuous focused activity like bringing in the harvest, and then what happened? They had like two to three weeks of Harvest Festival When they? When they went for months exactly when they celebrated on wedding did it for couple weeks the again most of their year was taken up in feasts and festivals and religious days, and and other kinds of things. They didn't work that long. Before the industrial revolution, so yeah, it feels like this is always the way it's been done, and you're right. Our forefathers literally died to get us an eight hour workday. And would be disappointed. That were were voluntarily giving up, but the eight hour workday in and of itself isn't necessarily the way we naturally would do. It were not punching in and out of time clock. But you know you acknowledging your own book that going to work gives us a lot of psychological mental and physical benefits, and that when people retire, there's frequently decline all three of those areas, so that kind of suggest that doing less not working as much might be bad for our health, but that's not your point, right? Right I mean you have to separate out what you do for survival from what the rest of us are doing, right? A lot of us are not doing work. That's necessary for survival. Right. I mean we're doing extra were all extra. and. It's very difficult at this point from a research standpoint to separate out the disadvantages of unemployment that are in eight that are because we need work from the disadvantages that are caused by the fact that at this point in our history and our culture. We get are worth from our job. like your rank your salary. That's what gives status. When people ask you how you are, we say busy like that's become your status in life, so it makes sense that if you lose your job, not only are you losing income? But you're also losing status. You are in the eyes of our culture at least worthless, and so, of course, that's going to have impacts, but you're suggesting that maybe we work less than that. We do less, and that's GONNA. Maybe result in some of that losing our status and depression. What do you want us to do if we're not working as much, what would you in your ideal world? What would we do? We'd be doing instead of first of all. We don't need to be working the hours that we're working. We could get our jobs done in much less time. A lot of the work that we're doing of the habits that we have are actually making us less productive. They feel busier and they take up more time, but in fact they're wasting time so I want you to think for second. Let's imagine a an accountant in his in his Brown, polyester suit in one thousand seventy one right getting his job done and taking care of his accounts. And so fast forward to today. It takes so much less time for that accountant to get his job done and yet. He still working forty hours a week. and. You have to ask yourself why we know that technologically we can all get our work done in much less time. So why are we still working forty hours well, there's a few reasons one is that working extra hours has become the way to signal to our employers, and to our friends and family that were important and were hard working, and because we're hardworking were deserving. It is it is literally our our value as a human being that we are hard working. And sometimes that can become even more strong as you get more income this desire to prove that you earned it, so you work more hours, even the what's unnecessary. There's also a thing that I. Talk About in the book called Parkinson's Law which basically says that WORK EXPANDS TO FIT the amount of time. Allotted for it. So, if you have if your boss comes in and says you have two hours to write this memo, it'll take you two hours if they say you have until Friday. You Yeah but also interestingly. Only eight hours anymore I. I would argue that almost all of us have this computer carry with all the time called a phone where our bosses email us on the weekends, and on the in the evenings are coworkers do we are reached out to an a million different whether it's like taxed or slack? I just think like I. Don't really even have only forty hour work weeks anymore. I feel like my workweek is more like sixty or eighty hours a lot of the time. So this is the difficulty, and this is something that an institute. Australia calls polluted time, and it's what makes it difficult to track. How long people are actually working? We do know. Know though that. Technically, we're working fewer hours than our parents and our grandparents. E, even when you include the amount of time. We spent an email at home. The although that self reported so it's difficult, right? All of this is self reported, but we have been tracking working hours for a very very longtime decades, and so we know we're actually working fewer hours, but you're absolutely correct that because we're carrying our work with us, and because your brain does not distinguish between you doing online shopping and you doing work, your brain thinks that if you're paging through facebook, you're working that literally makes your brain and your body feel that you're working all the time. And people even take that phone with them. Like a third of people say they take the phone with them into the shower. I do that. Yeah, one in ten people say they've answered the phone or looked at a text while having sex. Oh No, yeah, what yeah? Yeah saw if you just think of that phone or that tablet or that laptop as an office, you just have to think about win. That is present and visible. You're in the office and therefore it's important to make time during the day when you're not looking at it. So in addition to cutting down on how often we're looking at our phones. What else would you suggest we do? If we are going to try to do less? Yes, the first one. I want to really emphasize that. Let's say that you know one of the things I tell people to do is make sure to take a break every hour because your brain needs it and we've tested this over and over the most productive brains, the ones that get a break, every forty five or fifty minutes or so. So that's the first thing, but if you're taking that break, you immediately, pull at your phone and start paging through things. Then you're not actually taking it breaks. As far as your brain is concerned, you're just continuing to work, so that's the first thing is take a break and take a screen free break, but you know what here's the beautiful thing. It's not actually all that complicated to give yourself a real break. We are so beautifully biologically designed to take benefit from simple inexpensive things. It's miraculous. If you walk outside for ten minutes without your phone and look at a tree, it boosts your mood. It lowers your heart. Rate Lowers your cortisol levels the stress hormone. You will take almost an immediate benefit from it. In fact, there are some studies showing that. If you look at a picture of greenery of a forest, it's it's not. Not as big an impact, but you'll still get an impact from it house plants, but again you have to make sure that you have removed the things that are causing the stress. which is you just have to turn away from your screen? Another thing is we know that just a simple conversation. It doesn't have to be zoom conversation, which can bring its own anxiety and stress, but the sound of a human voice can be very soothing. One thing that's interesting during the time of cove. I think people may not have really appreciated. What psychologists call the power of weak ties and those weak ties or the things like the the few? Words you exchange with the Barista or your grocery store, clerk, or the the mailman, or whatever it may be those actually have a big impact on your mood, and in fact can lift your mood out of depression and give you a boost that lasts for a long period of time. We Ju-. We maybe weren't aware of that. But if you're sitting in isolation and wondering why you feel unmotivated, exhausted and a little bit down, it's possibly because you've lost. All of your social weak ties. These are all like things that are so easy and inexpensive to do another one is give yourself a helpers, high doom, one nice thing for somebody else. Else every day and I know that makes it sound like I'm Mr Rogers but instead of focusing on the good. You're doing to the world, although that's real, the fact of the matter is that when you help someone else's a number of things that happen inside your brain and body. It distracts you from your own problems. It gives you context, and it also gives you that rush of adrenaline. That is gonNA. Lift your mood again. They've even shown that. People who are offering cancer. If they if they in the hospital, get them to help out other patients in the hospital. It lifts even someone suffering from a deadly disease so. The first steps to do nothing you're saying are give yourself a break. Don't look at your screen. Be in the world in a way that you're observing nature and have little conversations with those people that aren't necessarily close to you and then also get a helpers I. Love All of those those are very easy things that we can all do. Even if we don't know how to step away from work, I, think can do those things. We are going to take a quick break, but when we come back, we have listener questions from you. All were Celeste, so stay tuned. To, you are one of the best pet parents I know. You are so frank, and you always seem like you're prepared for anything anything like open gates. Pushy dogs at the park. Anything out there. It seems that you are ready to take care of Frank. I mean I'd like to think I'm not ready, but I'm not, but thankfully nationwide pet insurance does help you prepare for everything, and they cover up to ninety percent of the cost of your pets care. Yeah, and that means a lot nowadays, because chances are. You're aware of the rising healthcare. Healthcare costs for humans, but you know it just doesn't stop at humans. Veterinary Care is also getting more expensive. It's true many of us. Parents find ourselves in a abide with unexpected healthcare's or accidents that can lead to hundreds and even thousands of dollars in bills. It's happened to me, but luckily nationwide can be there for you. It's the oldest and largest pet insurance provider in the United States visit www dot pet insurance dot com slash podcast to find the best coverage for your pet today. That's www dot pet insurance dot com slash podcast. To lender. You know this I. Don't know if the listeners know this, but one of my favorite things to do lately. Since I've been spending more time at home is making my house a little bit more spruced up and one way I've been doing that is with painting and Lou. Yes, I got the best paid from. Express Oh Gee Barry Express is awesome. They deliver thing. You need to get painting rate to your door. Yes, I, you choose from curated Palette of bears, fifty five most popular colors. I chose a beautiful shade of blue, which is going to make our bedroom so dreamy. I do not like the wrong color is right now. This blue is just gonNA TRANSPORT ME TO A. A new place, and then everything you need from Peel and stick swatches to brushes and rollers to the paint can. Itself is shipped to your front door. That sounds divine I love that If you want to get it on the paint action, go to bear dot. Com backslash expressed to get started today. That's be H, R, dot, com backslash express bear today. Let's paint. Did you know that Ostermeyer offers natural products. Well, you do now. Oscar Mayer natural is a full line of fresh high-quality meat, that families will love with no artificial preservatives, and no added nitrates or Nitrites, ostermeyer natural means no problems enjoying the taste you love anytime i. personally am a huge fan of the Oscar Mayer hotdogs. That's right fresh off the wiener mobile I have always loved an Oscar, Mayer hot dog, and what's great is that Oscar Mayer natural include not just hotdogs, but cold cuts, bacon, and so many other great meets that you'll love, and you'll never have to worry because only Oscar Mayer natural provides what you need to confidently feed your family. Again that means none of the nitrates and none of the NITRITES. You might find in other products. Whatever your taste in meat ostermeyer natural means. No problems find it in the prepackaged meet I'll or visit Oscar Mayer. Dot Com to learn more. we are back with Celeste. Had author of the new book do nothing how to break away from overworking doing and under living and now so we have a lot of questions for you, so we're. We're GONNA. Try to get through as many as we can. We have a lot here. With jewelry jury says what advice would you give to people who are facing pressure to somehow be more productive or take on new projects during the era of covid nineteen? have any of your thoughts or approaches changed during the pandemic I? Think if anything. I went entirely the other way probably because I. I've tried to focus on each day spending some time. Okay. How's my body doing? How am I feeling? And what emotions and my feeling at this moment in time, and it's made me a little more compassionate like there are days when I'm like just don't feel like doing anything and in. Past years. I would have been like. Get Your Butt Up. What are you doing you lazy? Get get to work a whole list of things to do but drink ovid I recognize that I'm dealing with a with anxiety every single day. There's just a baseline of anxiety and fear all the time, and so if my brain is saying I need to not do anything I. I honor that you know when we push ourselves through those emotions and try to force ourselves to go to work for the most part from you. It feels like someone forcing themselves to take a jog after they've sprained their ankle. Like you have an injury and you need to rest it, so that's one thing that has changed, but if you're getting pressured to be productive. Ignore that crap. Absolutely ignore that that is bs, and that is someone who is still in in the cult. One of the things I talked about is the cult of efficiency that is someone who still brainwashed. Just you've heard this interview. You have taken the red pill. You are unplugged from the Matrix. Just ignore it. All Right Vanessa has this question. She says if I were to put in fewer hours, my coworkers, but presume I'm not making a fair contribution even though I get the same amount of work done in forty hours as they get done in eighty. What's the best way to get one's Co workers on board? If you want to put in fewer hours on the clock? Of, the most powerful words in Human Lang in any language for human beings are. Can you help me? So one of the things I would do is go to my coworkers and say listen. I am really stressed out and I. M not taking any off time and I'm trying to counter act that so can you help me with that? If if if I'm sending you emails at nine o'clock at night, or whatever I'm trying to keep myself to my strict work hours of these eight hours a day. Can you help me keep those hours? And you know if you see any change in my work or the quality of my work, obviously let me know, but in the meantime trying to pay attention to my own health I love that because it's it's also empowering the people around you to beyond and to be helpful. I love that. My has this question my says? Does your message also apply to working class people? Does it recognize the systems that keep us having to work and be productive simply to get by? You know that's. The case and there are going to be some people who don't. Have a lot of control over their work schedule but there's that's few a fewer number than you think so if you're an hourly worker. If you, you simply cannot reduce your hours, or you don't have enough money to pay the bills I, absolutely empathize and with that and I understand it, but you probably can find five or ten minutes a day. and. It's important that you do because right now. If you're in that situation, you are a victim of your schedule and you need to find at least a tiny bit of time of the day when your in control. Otherwise that's going to bring its own stress and anxiety all on its own. It's GonNa take a toll on your body like you would not believe so you need to find those five or ten minutes here or there when you are taking care of yourself when you step away from the screens, step away from your family. If that's at all possible, if not grab your kids by the hand, or whatever and take them with you on the walk, take a walk around the block without your phone. Take that time be in control. I love that. What I love about that is your acknowledging that you know we all have different challenges. We're facing and does not set up to be fair where everybody can work the same amount, but but you're right. Anybody can take five to ten minutes a day. All of us can do that. All Right Don has this to say. How do you reconcile the joy of achieving a challenging goal that takes a lot of work with the equally valid joy of downtime You can have both of those things like I said think of those you know Greek. Farmers bringing in their harvest and then spending two weeks. Partying. You know. Them sociologists and statisticians have it. We absolutely at this point. Could be having schedule where you worked for a full year and then took an entire year off. That's what we could have right now. If the decisions we made in our culture, put more emphasis on our on our free time and leisure, and not on constantly improving prophets. Which I might point out the workers themselves almost never see that growth and income. It's almost always going to the top one percent into the company itself, but if we shifted our values toward our time, really valued our time. Then, that's what we could have. We could work one or two days a week. If that's what we wanted, and you could still have that feeling of accomplishment and yet still have that ability to party and celebrate your accomplishments. Do you really take an equal amount of time to celebrate it? When accomplish things I? Mean we spend a lot of time beating ourselves up when we make mistakes? Do we spend an equal amount of time celebrating our triumphs Oh God. No. I would say absolutely not. No, yeah. I mean that shows your priorities right there. Yeah, well, Susan, as this question. How do you counteract things? -iety around knowing if you don't do it now, you're just going to have to do more later. Also what about when you do less, it negatively affects people. You're the caretaker for like. Let's say your children. So. There's a few things I mean obviously. I don't know everybody's individual situation and I would never suggest that someone choose not to feed their kids. But you don't have to feed your kids a organic. Made from scratch using my sourdough starter. I found this recipe on pinterest recipe, so yeah, we we. The thing is with the tasks that you where you where she saying that. If you don't get it done now, you have to get it done later. The thing is that list is never actually going to end oh. We have we have just kept adding things to our list. When we S, you know one of the things I had one of the moments for me was when I came home from work one day, and I was completely exhausted and I like to cook, but I looked into. My kitchen is like I do. I cannot possibly make my own dinner on order. Take out again. And then I started to notice all the things that I have that. My grandmother didn't have that saved me time. And I started going around the house, adding up the time that I save writing like my microwave and my robot vacuum and my dishwasher, and all these things that saved me time and I came up with between twenty and thirty hours a week. Wow that I have that she didn't have. And yet and yet she constantly made cookies for the PTA. She was a member of the Lotus Club, and she grew her own vegetables, and she invited neighbors oversee see her vacation slides, and all these other things that she did, and I started thinking why. Why do I not have more time? And the thing of it is the reason we don't have more time because we keep raising the frigging bar. As, women went to work. You'd think we would have relaxed about what we did at home. Nope, we made it worse. We added onto the list of things that you needed to do to make sure. Your kid had an awesome perfect childhood, and all these other things we keep adding to the list, so yeah, a thorough out the list when you get done for the day because you're not being realistic about what you can get done, and also that list will never end. The list doesn't go away. The list just has new on Emerald. Yup. Katie says sometimes I choose to be inactive because I'm lazy, and it feels good, but then my mind can't let me enjoy the inactivity and I beat myself up for not being productive. How can I find compassion for myself when I do nothing? Well I I'll stop calling yourself lazy. You wanted to call me on that Celeste. Last year we gotTA. Talk about this. We did, but I didn't I. Didn't you are in the book? Name you. I recognize myself when I got there. So listen stop using that Word Lazy. It is highly unlikely that you are lazy. Just like Kristen called herself lazy and I was like. Are You freaking kidding me? So, no, you're not lazy. You have to keep saying to yourself. Rest is productive. When you give yourself arrest. It makes you better when you get back to whatever it is, you were trying to focus on when you don't give yourself rest. You waste time. You know how you waste time a you make a ton of. Your work is not nearly as creative and efficient as it could be. If your mind were arrested and see, you're going to deteriorate your own health and wellbeing, which is going to make it more likely that you'll take sick days like believe me I could cite you study after study, but just listen to me. You are not lazy in activity is productive. And so that's part of the problem and the other thing is is I. Want to be Compassionate to to to you about these feelings that you're having because literally one of the things I discovered through the research for this book is we've all been washed in many cases? It was literally intentional for us to believe. That we were lazy and bad, if we took time off, and that is literal in that they made posters, they made ads. They brainwashed us into believing that so that we would just be better workers and bitter cogs in the machine. So you know, forget that just. Oh forget it. It's so great. It's so great so last and yes, you do at great length differentiate between laziness and doing nothing. It's really good to have the differences laid out. We're GONNA. Take another quick break, but when we come back, Christian has one last question I the less you won't want to miss. By. The book is supported by better help online counseling. We are in extraordinary times and needless to say some of us are struggling with stress anxiety depression. You name it. You're not alone. Better help is here and they offer online licensed professional counselors who are trained to listen and help you better help. Consular specialize in many areas, including relationship, conflict, anxiety, depression, loss, trauma, and more, you'll securely connect with your counselor in a safe confidential environment. Simply fill out a questionnaire to help assess your needs and get matched with the counselor under forty eight hours I. Love that you can easily schedule. Schedule Secure video and phone sessions with your therapist and exchange unlimited messages, and of course, if not happy with the counselor you get paired with, you can request new one at any time at no charge. I'm Kristen. I'm going to be real with you. In these times, I have been very reliant on therapy, and in particular, all forms of therapy on the Internet can better help has been doing this remotely from the very beginning, so they know what they're doing. It's true better help as an affordable option, and our listeners get ten percent off your first month with the Discount Code. Joined the over one million people already using better help. In fact, so many people have been using better hope that they're recruiting. Additional counselors in all fifty states get started today at better health dot com slash bt. That's better H. E.. L. P. dot com slash, bt be talked to a therapist online and get help. Support for by the comes from C. are clear. If you're the type of person who cares about keeping a clean home, tough messes can make you crazy. Hard water build up rust stains. Grease stains shower mauled. To drive you mad. Luckily, see Al are clear has an entire family of products that can help to combat all of those messes. When you're armed with CSLR clear, you can fight the clean fight all around your home. There are products for countertop showers, stainless steel, even plumbing and the best part is that a lot of their products meet the EPA safer product standard. Standard so while CR clear as powerful against masses, it's less harmful for your family and for the environment. If you want to learn more about their entire line of products or want to find out where you can purchase, sale are clear. Go to C. L.. OUR BRANDS DOT COM that's c. l., R. B.. R. A. N. D. S.. Dot Com to learn more. Are Clear fight the clean fight. Truly grass fed dairy is committed to crafting delicious cheese and butter that pairs with your tastes and values the mill for their natural cheese and butter comes from approximately three thousand farms located across Ireland's fertile land, guys truly grass fed farmers shared deep bonds with their herds with sustainability and animal welfare, always at the top of mind. I love that I love their herds I love that sustainability. Yeah, each cow! COW has average of two acres to chill on, and it's certified animal welfare approved by Greener World. Which is an independent nonprofit farm certification program that guarantees animals are raised outdoors on pasture on independent farms that use sustainable high welfare farming practices throughout the cows lives. That is incredible indolent. I gotta say they're butter is so freaking delicious I know you love their butter as much as I do oh truly. People in my house, I've been fighting over the butter. Because I want to put it on bread and other people want to use it in baking, and let's just say it's highly coveted in this house. and. Did we mention that it's non GMO? Project verified hormone, free and antibiotic free. That's amazing visit truly grass-fed dot com to experience how truly grass fed cheese and butter pairs with you and to find your closest retailer? That's truly grass-fed dot com. All right so last or back things. Are GonNA. Get real now. have. You scared. Yes, you should be because you are one of the hardest working people we know. You were constantly on the Speaker Circuit. You have one of the most popular Ted talks of all time you host multiple shows for both TV and radio. What have you written two books in the last three years? You Two classes, you mentor people, and so I got to ask. Are you actually practicing what you preach? How to do nothing phenomenally surprisingly I am I didn't used to be like this book came from. We also your mom on top of everything after a month. Although you know he's twenty one not that that means I'm not her mom, but he has way less work but no I didn't used to be, and that's kind of where this book came from was because I it was not sustainable, and I was unhappy and miserable tired all the time in irritable but now okay, so here I am the best advertisement for my book, so here's the thing I take a massive amount of time off I literally walk my dog. Dog for like two and a half hours a day I. Just before this interview. I was sitting on my front porch, reading a book and watching my neighbors walked by, but the thing of it is, this is the this is the great revelation empowering revelation. I've discovered which is that when you lean into your human gifts when you say Oh, this is the way were designed to work, and you actually allow your body and brain to work the way naturally work best. You don't lose any productivity. That's the secret I actually feel like I'm more productive now that I sit around and twiddle my thumbs all the time. then I was when I was constantly keeping my nose to the grindstone. I get more done and I'm an happier, and you'll get more nothing done also I do. I! Do absolutely you know what I did? I Made A TERRARIUM OF MOSS That sounds beautiful. Beautiful it's very relaxing to look at. Feel free to come over and look at my boss. I would love to when all of this social distancing has done. Watch out. That's right. Well, Celeste! Thank you so much. It has been such a pleasure talking with you I. Love Your New Book. Reminder is called. Do nothing how to break away from overworking. Doing and under living. Thanks my pleasure. And that's it for this episode of by the book huge huge. Thank you to our fabulous production team at Stitcher nor Ritchie. Jared O'CONNELL and Andy Kristen's also daisy Rosario executive producer and Chris Bannon who is digital chief content officer, thanks also to nate wider, who composed our theme song to Gerald, Arnold, who arranged this season's version of the theme song, and to our own nor Ritchie, who performs the song with such style and panache dumper gets us stay in touch. Send US questions. Santa's US thoughts on south help books. Send US pictures of animals and close our email. Address is first and Enchilada at gmail.com. Don't forget you can. Can hit us up on twitter. Atlanta G at Princeton minds, or at by the book, Pod and of course you can leave us a voicemail at three zero, two four nine bucks. That's three, zero, two, four, nine, two, six, six, five, seven. Also, please rate us an review, apple, podcasts or Stitcher, it helps other people find the show. It fills our hearts with joy when we see all those stars and reviews, it just makes us. It makes us even more excited to make the show for you. We love it when you do that. And if you haven't already telephoned about the show until next time I'm Greenberg and I'm Christopher. Thanks for listening. For Fifty Oh sorry. Stitcher. By the book is supported by better help line counseling. We are in extraordinary times. Add needless to say. Some of US are struggling with stress anxiety depression. You name it. You're not alone. Better help is here and they offer. Online licensed professional counselors who are trained to listen and help you better help. Counselors specialize in many areas, including relationship, conflict, anxiety, depression, loss, trauma, and more. More you'll securely connect with your counselor in a safe confidential online environment, simply fill a questionnaire to help assess your needs and get matched with counselor in under forty eight hours. I love that you can easily schedule secure video and phone sessions with your therapist and exchange unlimited messages, and of course. If you're not happy with the counselor you get paired with, you can request. Request a new one at any time at no charge. I'm Kristen I'm going to be real with you. In these times I have been very reliant on therapy, and in particular, all forms of therapy on the Internet and better health has doing this remotely from the very beginning, so they know what they're doing. It's true better help as an affordable option and our listeners get ten. Ten percent off your first month with Discount Code bt be joined the over one million people are using better help in fact, so many people have been using better help that they're recruiting. Additional counselors in all fifty states get started today at better help, dot com slash bt. That's better. H E L. P dot com slash be talked to a therapist online and get help.

Celeste US depression Andy Kristen Oscar Mayer Celeste Headley Ted Greenberg Kristen I Celeste Hudli Hagia Linda Instagram Creston Marie Fedex accountant murder
Episode 6 Willow with Pete

The Relaxed Dog

43:04 min | 1 year ago

Episode 6 Willow with Pete

"Welcome. To the relax stalled. PODCAST. The podcast with the dogs. Publish. And Welcome to the relaxed dog podcast sponsored by throw likes dog. Thank you for listening. On your host, Robert over and our hope that you and your dog well. I guess this week is Peter Rose and he's going to tell us all about Willow and few other beats. Also this week in Dog News. In Louisville Kentucky. A family received a pleasant surprise when they collected the young daughters, Yibo. Headley Joe had just graduated from kindergarten. and. Alongside her picture was a picture of Headley. Joe's service dog. Reo. Reason why? Heavily, Gye, Safas from epilepsy, and during that time all three kindergarten. Aerial was. Her side. Wasn't that north the school to do that. In Allah DOC news. I mentioned last week that the Boston robotics dog spot. Well spot has been traveling around the world a with been sorted in New Zealand. Herding shape. At this right, we might even have a new segment spotting spot. Or not. Anyway. Now this week's interview. Pete Rose will tell us all about life with willow. Welcome everyone I'm here with my friend and mental Peter Rose and to not wait to talk about a willow. CIOPPINO welcome. Robot how Nice I am! Fantastic today! They'll! Be here. I'm so happy to see you. You you look good I with. The up in in-person now. Will one day we'll hit the snap. Sounds good. So Willow. Guess. She's a she's. An exceptional animals he's. She's actually Lebanese. At this time. In December. dissemble the voice in the background. Did you hear that the? at Willow is. Have fibers, but if it was, it would be willing to relax. Because he's she's. She's the one that actually taught me. More than I've actually told her. And choose a cheese. Later. She's a great lady dog and she's. What would you say? Cheese. Stick. She's clinically. Clinically correct and it's it's wonderful heavily. Doggy can't take stuff for that. For those. Listeners that I caught catching on. Willow is A. The Brady Soviet. ABSO- rubbish not. When I realized so blessed saw Husky! WanNa, Asking Lock Submarine Husky Style. That Chiro, tutor, ribble and she's eleven year old. and. She's still a all jaw say he's actually only mad on Siberian huskies. I am I am of the main reasons he is is because if you've coast, link lay dog. What does that actually mean? Satellite dog is actually a dog actually The sledding! Equivalent of a late runs hope time. Will I was run a time from a trudeau. Up to attend dog so I put on a twelve dog at one stage, but they they. Didn't jealous as well as on cooled. Back to ten dog, and she did a exceptional, her son soy as run. Her rights as well so he's genetically. The sign as well as we'll as. A fast dog, but she's an accurate dog and the one thing that she wanted to do was actually place and the temperament did that Robert Norway tolkien before that temperament form and function temperament something that we we troy put. Joined Dick's. Because I always either try, and all I wanNA. Do is place they want to. Make. You happy, so temperament gives that. knauss com. Effects so easy to try duly dog Detroit dokes. You can't when they become leg dokes or they Allah goats that. In addition to actually go out in front of. Trying! Will I start from the back? And with other dogs so I stopped from the back, and the dog wants to run. Ran The other crew wants to run ran the other, so she wants to move forward and when I got her to go in front. It was a natural. Natural. Why? She actually moved the way she. She thought she had everything that she needed to make that. transition and and and tight challenge, and she was one of the one of the editor was surprising. Because not that you're you're you're standing all? Because they listen learn and they make decisions for themselves and and you've gotta make. The only dogs that we try to run away from ass- have United Center. where? They're the front sight with a lot of people trying to to come to we, we try and the next right away. And they're very very good at it. Is Never. saw the lead. Take us back a little bit too way. Why Willow! Degrees! Yet. We saw her father. Her father was American import, and we will have father and sniper. Was I-? magnficent look dog. He really was he was I. Agree. thinking dogs really and then we read the with one avail. Soybeans Wanna bail girls and she was a smart dog. She really was. Way will I came from. She will try to the father, and all the arrogance of Martha so to put her in front was a natural order of things. Where did she come from? She come from. Two beautiful temperament, dogs and The lawns that actually went through willow. nitrile smart and she was a very sweet dog actress now. Okay, so you're on a waiting list for anything like that or was just timing for us. We we bred. because. The! Other was was a a a great attribute, and we thought we could actually get something that was. That was half as good as him, but I think we'll actually APP, Sean. snort as as a sled dog as a running dog, so yes, the braiding programs started at that point so. Everything changes because we've. We've wish. Dogs wished out of showing the note so. That running them to kick the IT. But the natural order of things at breeding program or changed because I enjoyed training and running the the disobedience. Change in direction. And I think going back to what dogs are supposed to be doing. Gay. He's respect from the show world standing around looking pretty but. Getting outside and doing they do best. Yeah well, we we run, we run, will Charlotte Kit the Cape muscled out to get them. Times the the the running sort of at Ted's took, either because it was more enjoyable, way on the dogs loved. The spices more like the rings so and and awed. Enjoyed that sort of his will launch to. So. How was I was a as a pop? He was mysterious. And She was dying. You visit one of the best dogs We had luck say a surgery before we have? A yod at one stage we had four dogs and we'll. I was by. She was only a poppy, and she would not yield to the big dogs The big dogs push arrive at. That would never heard. The guy she to to bend to the will by She died respect. We like either. Back Down when I push rival, she would actually sit back. Apple Stare at him and it was. Always a bit fearful for willow, the at one stage, but She never backed away, but you never heard anybody say and she's still assigned eleven. She's still assigned she still. Earn respect cheat. She eats. She wants the. The young to now who she is, but she doesn't want to hurt themselves, so yeah Gripe Gripe Matriarch also great tracer. And a great learner sates. stabbed. Stubborn stubborn to. Says A pop. How big was the pack? She was in at your place. Here, at one stage he wants died. She would be running through the wake. Matt seven dogs two miles and miles Motherhood Anti. Grandma and to begun cold, so it was funny because she was a big dog with the other ones would, and she'd running between the legs and. And that's actually get away Yeah, so it was. It was something that. Was An. Auckland Mall from Willow. In the. The hockey. Than I did from anything else because. She would, she would bail would bend, but she also was resilient and she would actually if she. Knew that she. was something that she wanted she. chewed back in. She would holograms. To disgusted the big adults. And one thing about Sauber Style Dhakal. I do tole they do. The big dogs would actually. Argue is show. that will has done some. She's toys and destroyed the quaker in. It was as little things that she did. and and and It's. It's easy to walk. The Dawn makes it's easy to watch. The. The the the. Or the bottom of around to the top of the run and have they get? That picks. One of the time they usually gotta talk I and the talk with was her mother so. She was she was she never guidelines to on the mother, says she always environmental track so. All rest says she cared was she was a great dog she was she was not to. She didn't have what we allow had. And how many have many dogs as willow sort of a new in in your pack now and she's the matriarch now, isn't she? Yeah, she. She's ninety four percent, so she's got nonex- Sir says ninety five percent chance that she's GonNa come back so? He's the top dog if you like because the the the league, the young as it actually follow her, and she still talks to them, and she's still recommended that you'll says to price with says she'll colder Matt Sawed by with the Windsor, knots and she she goggles, grounds, cokes and carries on. She never heard some, but she just tells them. That's gown inside. But. SEIB leagues. She has she's a granola grim. As. A. She. She's part of that that dynamic which he still she still runs the show. She should direct traffic. When when our wants to As we do now when want to take the young puppies? The young's will put them with. Willett, I won't because she swayed. That she's. Militant. She's got a job to do she does. The poppy will ply. She'll tolerate Puffy, but when it comes to work in. She's got the softness and the taxes and the toughness to actually get the dog to move forward. She's A to. She really does. She does a wonderful job misinformed. And, is she still with a team now? Yes, she does. I've got the pension his group. One I'm all wheel dogs. Matilda and Augusta and she's GonNa be twenty she so. easy ten. willas eleven. And SISK is no once. That's the pension group, so we do. We do what they? Leads me to this up one day we'll do fog is next style? KS But they still want to Hamas on I still. WanNa get net gang lan by Stewart. A New Ford Sigheh out will is out in front, directing traffic as usual not as fast as used to close, but still directing traffic story. Still enjoying and at some, that's one of the things as long as I step into that Hannah's type. Maybe Tom Science Oh. So Today or to do what she does a what I do. At their right It's it's a really credit to the. They love it. So billions round. That's all they do the not. Protect Your House. That I catch bulls thyroid. That's what I do. You trouble bowl to allow you look at your. Obviously, you don't want it. Say. She does she does a wonderful job. She's rotten. A lot of kilometers she is. One, of. My best noodles. As rising in the snow. Willow will sniff at a track to never stop. she will make that. move the way they spice to and she will create that lawn taught. As as good as any dog can. And still are took her her last rites. She was a ten year old. And she was still. Top Ten. A So which is which is credited a really. You don't teach that. That's that's in new copies in A. As as a lot of the the people that we have in this audience expressed. the dogs move forward. Owing to do is get them. Enjoy themselves and they always do. Say That's. Them that's what we try and get the. Talks to a joke. I know it's prostrate. You can't push a law. Push right, so yeah united. Or they got some of the people. Listening would be probably a little bit surprised. When Nice, I, Wa- We've got smashes in Australia, I mean. Way. That's right and said. Understand that the that realized that we that that we have as well so and that's that's the hardest part of the. Don't Doak said. In that SORTA category. The other gripe about dog sledding with got a dry land version as well. As true extremely. Yeah, we had called enough. We run nothing moving forward degree, so the humidity's go to be round. The fifty to seventy percent anything any more humidity experts temperature on so so we run less than forty degrades, so we do have a draw. On scooters, that's how will start an audit until. Started running We'll end. Absolutely fabulous partner hot. He's nineties and. The man was a machine botch. As. As all spacey's. Man Has. Action. So you had you had? Never Guy System so. Hot was a a wonderful animal such a sweet dog. He was muscle. Muscle. To one he's to one of he started. Will I would do too, but he could run with that will I because he's direction was crap. So we'll you one? Such into dog and our love is simply enjoyed. Run on because it was. Pure ecstasy by the because. I just wanted to go the forty to the got. From years ago they've never been. Always Been Charlie shoulder and when I put them in a in a in a bigger tied or put hot beyond Willa because I knew that he would follow that tile everywhere, he went. Say you're gone way down. He read the best front we ever did. If if the people who actually Now Cambridge Cambridge. Like. Mount Everest. It's after this now. Cameras on the side of the mountain and holiday Cambric label. there. Is Dog sledding down in Canberra? Is. So it. Sit Count Forest. The the Rice Dan is is again. Test your metal on because it's on the sort of the NAM. and. The Camera Club. They put on a rice that is. Hard. you really. Do you really do need to know? The middle of your dogs If if you. A not. Mentally fix your dogs. You'll find it challenging. You'll find it hard. You'll find it exhausting. If you are the same metal issue, dog. You'll find exhilarate. You'll come back absolutely. Exhilarating and it is called is hard. It is hilly, and but when you get back, you know you've actually accomplish or something because it's again, it's it's on the side of the man There's a lot of is that we have in Australia. We have batory dry. which destroyed camera? A Din applied out awesome the old craik. Again. Testing and challenging. And I think. When we when we rice dogs and we've become pottage that dynamic we. Have Company something and with without hot and CISCO. Matilda. That was something that side paddle did win. Seldom no very often. The did finish. Yes, I did. And when I got back, it was one leg. And the dogs are happy and always always on accomplished something that people do this out. and. To Run two dogs, one dog two dogs. Trade old photo six guide dogs. It's something to have a wonderful dog in front. Who understands what you signed and waiting to be and to have that forty spirit that arrogance to actually get you a unite the big and we'll was one of the she was. She was one of the one of the dogs Would not let anything. Anything getting away if I asked it again some way. She would do it and and I was. That's why then have favorites? And that's why, because of that and her offspring signed thing, and and that lawn, temperament, and that law of of. Going forward arrogance and and it and it is. It's arrogance and pigheadedness is this you're not going to beat me this. This is what he told me to do it, so I'm doing in us a that temperament and and that guy forty something to something that that. They signed by cited the Siberians or dogs general are the ultimate athletes and the ultimate poppins on your on your your words die. The dog will be hit next year. On the best that you had assigned to sit next year. All the dies in the middle, and all the guys in the middle of a would you rather have? That would be the family member that odd next to me. I. Won't be thinking. Because of the nature and role sports, dogs and they're all athletes, but. Tell me where I sti-. Where do they live your plice? The vast system of Kennels out the back. Built a Kennel show by building Fred olds and they've never leave, didn't. Tell, everyone, do leave. A. Robot, yes. Lillian at this point six billion hustle and when I get up for Work Dyke. So. Say They. They cried they. They want to be patio loss. So that want to be a part of you so therefore with you? waited I live morehouse panel. But inside that Get Along response. When I the Dole. Using ended up my back Milan's bags. because. There's just so happy debate would be. Saying. Do they live in the? Yes, they do. does McCallum about jumping. Yes, it does do they? Moves. In the house as individuals or as a pack, but when when we? Doing something. The dogs revolves because they probably their loss and that's something that I think that that helps with. The dynamics and the training because I have laws and they they. They Look Nanas, and I learned equality, and I learned hierarchy, and how will wrought from wrong They're all toilet trying. They're all they all white I have a doggy door and the does have clouds. Because they coming out twenty s this is they has as well so. You know a A. Of playful. My father was running. The dog's always the dogs or read solid the inside. I could never do that. I could never could never keep. A dog at saw it because he was my best friend, and here's one style with me. again it's it's the dog the worst in the best situations so he. Did the dogs. To Issue Kristie Rogan. Yes So. You know that that that is something that. A. Lot of people agree with that a lot of. Dogs. Out Saw tink. Dia, Dia Potholes. The dynamic or a rice them I live with them and and a lot of people who actually had. Detained BA- kettles. They had their particular dogs that actually do. Stay with them because I apologized on. And when they puppies. Asia For them to listen, you can actually get A. A sense of. A sense of A. Stop to understand the Herati to stop understand so when on that Reagan and on the Snyder to win all screwed up. They can hear. My voice said they will that. That dynamic of the top dog or trump person. Is Welcome and dynamic lessons out in Hassi exactly. The science I think it helps with the Chinese. So. Much thing it's, it's it is a question. Of some times to h their own. And? It just shows another level of that you have. Dogs with jobs. And! Able to be just the same as any other house dog. That doesn't do any of these sort of things that does just law in the lounge old and Ken. And that's that's I. think that's the case that they can do that. And that's that's what it's different strategy isn't folks and I'm not. Your Dog Amato era working. That's what they do. The the job actually do sledding in It's it's what the dog is built to do. And what you want. You wanted to do so if it wants to line landry that. Head soft. Bond Lab. Had any interesting. Off Track Adventures. Wall willows been in charge. Yeah, WE THE RABBIT ONE! Six cliffs That was interesting. And, it was a threat to the that the Celtics so, but it's in inside that. I had to and the one thing that the drive is do. As you as you narrow. Calms the. Because if you'll listen it, the dog's GonNa lose it because you'll top dog. You'll run on the show so if if you lost it. Don't lose, so united woke up and comedy. Can You hops Pam the hanes sweat. You you, you've got blotted your body whatsoever because she just lost it Chris. He's been having placed. You're GONNA woke up. Delay Dog at it on the head. Now we've got to get back up the hill. You're an gone. And the Masha Standard. You'RE GONNA. Come back where you went off. Yes, thank you for that. So yeah, so? We have more trouble is Walmart. Will Had I. Had I experienced with Where around the back of the water, there, Waldholtz? and. we got gusts to. Went on a ghost. He actually practice. Sorbonne saw A. Hot D, Too but I called him on which is a which is a word. We use code on bought so and and it's to. It's to let the dog neither on now. It's Day. United Kate moving forward and united. Because if we start. Off By so. We got got us to. Probably. To strike is. and His dog popped out in front and and it was, it was a beautiful animal, actually was quoting Christie that was a big German shepherd and It had two or three, but it's a must've saw. Stop the train. and. They just dissipate. And Obeying will, I was the one that actually kept us down forward so The boys wanted the boys wanted to. Like stay marshals. Will I to to. To Her Credit. She actually made that trade. Do what she was supposed to do. This act, which was which was right so. That's and that's you. Don't take that stuff you did she just. Wants to place so and the other one. was that blank last night? Forest will always run. The six doctors lost was. Going to? Always always always go. Online right? And on the and it was in the data was in the dock, so it was. Also in the dock at last night forest. Mitchell latch. During a rice or training run now trying to run. Down There Dan to say guides. And we did I did Iran. before we went hunt so wallace colon we took him at. So. It was the first sight of the forest and. Or head on the front of Radio Got A. Lot and it's a beautiful big lot. Of. Autonomy, bandstand, mine, ride and sort of recognize. It was gone. I was gone to this ride. A Horse and it was this big figuring out this whole. that. Whole wear hats. Fog went, dea never say before, and said as soon as the dogs had smelled it I just off the back to second, and why they went and D to off, and our swear never touch the ground. It was such a beautiful thing to say, but we changed it to Qantas. Distinct never got close to it. But it's the first Senate dig a host of the hats. Speaks point had I will. Go on. Sale this is Is that we? We took off? And the funny thing was actually read back to the way we will go. So actually behind, so which which was so yes, she's She's quite happy to chase walled laws. won't bats Patty. Melons Kangaroos. Small rabbits. chysler you. And that's that's the one thing you always. Hated the bright because Because something can come in and no eight. So. The horse would be had and the kangaroo. We'll have any strange habits set at home. Which one would you like? quaker at all the toys. She Heights the square. What else she? She talks too much a third. Abdul, coming saw to dob to show you talk to Ben, puppies and a really. Though what else cheese cheese funny? And you SNORT. To? Cheat. Get answers she wants. You snorts to start. Disgusted she turns it back on yet to look at a guy. That's not the answer I want. And she woke up the auto gallon. Gallon? Yes Oh. I can think funny more you, you behave. I don't think that's I think that's I. think that's saw during Because, she's got latitudes. She, thinks he. She thinks. She thinks he's allowed to do that. We're going to sell your word. Snow the snow. To to what's. Funny. Molly from physics that sidewise in the the big. Beget! What? That's. The. Look of disgust. What are you doing that? Folk you? Finish this sentence for me. I can't believe willow. Eight. Every big everything. Jack. mcglasson! Her son son shortly. I`Ma boss hold doors in the archives. What else? I my hat. Place what else? The. The KNOB On the bed. On. Bullies have a winter. I went to Alaska genital. Adults. and. Like A game you Darren brand, grab your hat and it's blue. And an award. Everyday! Come high. And I didn't WANNA come to the front door? Because a good fan of this is actually looking at it from adults. So I went through the garage into the back and Come up the rain and I saw the and I ended up back. At this happy to save me a and and audit. There isn't that as my hat was gone, then head off. and. I didn't think anything of it, and show next diet and she said. Do you know that is you recognize it and it was a little blue dot. At it look like baton. And Shiite my hat. And that's what was less in the odds. At a going through the system. That it. Could you imagine you hear what I'm? Here with again. Shells, shells good patrol, and there's a little blue dot in one of them. And I said are. From a hat now it is. She said to recognize that. The whole lot and she said. Take? A An. Plastic biddle, the plate and say. Or had might listen. Can you give me an adult side? Saying. I'm guessing now we'll fix or runs to the Venar anything so. Now, all went through. Except Little Blue Gate. A. Of the Ye she. Does Ripe Toys. That was that was a bit slow? It was It was terrible company. What else? Just a multitude of Leg Breaks. La- what else and I. Like. That would hurt. A really would start down through the. Ranks. Shed and. Ends Groom's. Toilet brushes. Total rawls. Widows Talk Widows So, WHAT'S HIS TESLA CRUNCH? It's gone so. Everything every seen anything like. Get hold on the VERANDA title Verandah. Had to replace all the bottom rile. When I take it must the Oregon and in touch anything else. Only the Oregon sanitize interesting. With Oregon got anything to do with it. I all the argued that all the other stuff all the ponding crap. I THE EXPENSES! Action. Thank you very very much having a the Chattanooga and sharing the law of of willow. I'm GonNa give you a quick plug to the club. A would actually thank you. Robert Thank you so much express. Is A club for everybody a dog. You don't have to have salvage all. HUSKIES. Robert Hesitant. Malik. And he had. She's beautiful sight. You don't have to have Saban Husky. If you have a poppy and you would like, you would like to actually learn how to. Exercise though because that's what it is a safer fun. You don't have to write it really does. Help you. Help you and you don't. There's no obligation. We have an iphone died when this. Is Issues, but we have an date. Please just call us We will help with. We want you off Don. It's down. Download the bottles. Tryin and. Donaldson. I want to give back or got from the mentors that are had The Donny's in the and the. Dawson and all these people that have. That have. A sledding from a enjoyable. and. This is this is what. Our Committee wanted to you. It's not it's. Not that have to Rice. You just enjoy loss and puppies lost. Just a dog that. Likes to run. Right they all they. All WanNa rob. Way To. Thank you very much again. You take care of happiness in. Robert Reich came on trade. I will say you obviously you on the road. Thank you very much for listening I. Hope that you enjoyed the show. If, you did it would be appreciated if you could leave a review on Apple podcasts wherever you are listening to this show from better still. Tell a friend. Lock Washer or something. Let me know I'd love some feedback. If, you want to check out the relaxed dog podcast facebook group to get in contact with me, Mike any comments and look I would love your help to make this a better listening experience foyer. Until next week, stay safe and remember. Your dog is family.

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GSMC Movie Podcast Episode 127: Fighting With My Family

GSMC Movie Podcast

34:57 min | 2 years ago

GSMC Movie Podcast Episode 127: Fighting With My Family

"And now an ad from dad, right? Save money on car insurance when you bundle home and auto with progressive. Gotta take these off. Right. What is this? Wow. Where did you get this? I'm talking to you with the hair. Yeah. Where did you get this? Good stuff. Solid. That's not veneer that solid stuff. Progressive can't save you from becoming your parents, but we can save you money when you bundle home and auto. Progressive casualty insurance company affiliates and other insurance discounts not available in all states or situations. Can't decide in torn between her romantic comedy action or an indie film to watch for the weekend. Well, well, well, Golden State media concepts. Loom you podcast is your ultimate guide to them latest movies. Join us is we dissect the latest on the blockbusters. It's the Golden State media concepts movie podcast. Hello. And welcome to the GMC movie podcast. Brought to you by the GMC podcast network. I am your host hiding, and I am very happy today to have the wonderful, Sarah. Joining me I am excited. Be here. I don't often get to join you on the movie podcast. I know and we're talking about the exciting topic of wrestling, which I know not much but more than I used to. Oh, good. Because of my husband. Yeah. That would make sense. I don't actually know that much about wrestling. And I'm not necessarily talking about the sport. I am talking about movies about the sport of wrestling. Right specifically one family that wrestles. We will be talking about the film fighting with my family and the documentary, which this movie is based off of which is called the wrestlers fighting with my family, and I would say going into both of these films. I. I don't know a lot about wrestling. And I didn't really walk away from it. Knowing about wrestling, you know, what I know about right? Well, here this isn't what I know is what I like to point out that really annoys my husband. I like to call those little tiny things that the guys sometimes where man panties, which doesn't appreciate the little Speedo tight yet. Like granny speed owes big wrestlers are big. So I tend to have to wear. Yeah. Man panties. And then male wrestlers have this really like when they have long hair. It's really disgusting. It's always Wes, what are you looking? And clearly it's product. But grosses me out. He doesn't really appreciate my commentary on that either. Well, in general, I would say every one in wrestling sweaty. Yeah. Generally. But I I don't know. I don't feel bad that I don't know more about wrestling after watching these films because they're not really about wrestling there about the fan. Family right Szekely the night family, which I will mention I want to start by talking about the documentary which came out to twelve and I'm gonna talk about this. Then I'll go into the current film. So this documentary came out just in twelve I mentioned it was produced and directed by max Fisher in it's around forty seven minutes. So it's short, and I want to mention you can watch this online. You said forty seven four to seven right no kit. Just sure I mean that would be very short minutes, depending on which ending you choose. So this is easy to watch. You can type it in just into Google and you'll find it. It's also posted on video. It looks like posted by the director. So this wasn't seemed to be like a super. It's not a big budget documentary. Not that there are many big budget documentaries. But some are some have more budget than others. Yeah. And I didn't that didn't take away from the home. It is an enjoyable movie. Again. I liked documentaries. I've said that may timeless podcast. So I found it very enjoyable. But it was it was a fun movie to watch it focuses on the family of British wrestlers the night family. The father is Ricky night. He has groomed. His kids to be superstar wrestlers he has his daughter Seraya and sons Zach and he encourages them to try out for w e you see that Seraya makes it in and Zach gets cut. But because of that the family has to unite they have to support their daughter, and it just kind of shows them on their journey supporting her and WWE stardom and also just as the family continues on in wrestling, even when she is not when she cannot be there. Also want to mention I said, it's not about wrestling. It's about family that is very very evident really from the beginning of the film till the end and also very evident in the film fighting with my family, which is not a documentary, but the feature film. I. I guess I learned that the strongest force is not like muscle. It's not spandex not sweaty greasy hair. Or I don't know wrestling moves insert wrestling move name here that I don't know. But the strongest forces really family, and that compels this movie that makes it way more interesting. I personally don't watch wrestling. I don't really enjoy wrestling. So I feel that the documentary and the whole movie becomes more interesting because of the family not because of the sport it's not trying to show you like behind the curtain of wrestling what it means to wrestle. You know, they're trying to reveal that to you. They're talking about the family, and I enjoyed that element. It made it easier for me as someone who is not interesting. So I would say if you're interested in you would enjoy it. If you're not interesting, you would also enjoy it. So the family their middle son is back, and they're kind of like the kid that they focus on not in a way that I don't know. I feel like he's the kid that the family has the most hope for and getting into WWE, and the movie opens you think they're going to focus more on him a little bit. But that's not really how it goes. Because Seraya or cold riot by her family. She proves to be the star of the family business, and then because of that leaves them and goes to Florida to work with WWE, and what I find the most interesting part about this is I would have thought that Zach would maybe be more bitter towards her because it is it's also his dream to go to work to work and perform with WWE and also. I also have to point out. There's really like from an outsider's perspective. At least I would think that the families honestly, the family's poverty and also a potential for downtrodden attitudes would have made Zaka little bit like act out more related to psoriasis success, but Zach is really sincerely happy for his sister. And he clearly loves her and he loves his family, and I guess just shows that like the family love and like communal focus is stronger more than just individual success. I feel like the focus is a lot more on the family as a whole unit. And that is also expressed by psoriasis mother whose ring name is actually sweet Seraya so rise actually named after her mother's wrestling ring game. Yes. Okay. This makes more sense because I was looking things talk. Yeah. I'm like I'm so confused because this one now she's married to Ricky night. But she's the daughter way what? Yes. Okay. Getting on the same page. Mothers. Wrestling name is sweetser daughters. Real name is Sarah. And she goes by a wrestling name WWE page. Yes now. Okay. Now, it's becoming. It's all falling into place right in a strange sort of way. But really that you know, that could have gone in so many different directions as you said with the family like there could have just been. A lot of anger and a lot of resentment. Yeah. Especially with the title like fighting with my family, right? Exactly. Which I guess was the most surprising part not really knowing much about the movies. The most surprising part was how strong family was. And I do I don't want to like, I don't know. I don't know if this comes off bad, but you can't tell from watching the film the family is gritty. They're not rich. Their only source of income is the wrestling program that they have which is not huge in England. It's not like America America has WWE the UK just watches American wrestling Murray, right except for like local wrestlers. So I would say I would think that from an outside perspective, the family could be a bit more potentially bitter towards Seraya or just the using her in a way that seems mean I guess using her success and using her looks and all of that to like just help themselves like just selfishly, but I really didn't find that the families really obviously loving towards each other. And really, obviously caring, and I think that was really heartwarming. I was that made it so much more enjoyable, and including Zack who's older than Seraya. Like, you see him from the beginning of the film talking about how his dream is to become a pro wrestler with the WWE like since he's like six years old and his sister's kind of happenstance steps into the ring and becomes the star. It's like being set up. Up for him to be really bitter. And it doesn't come across that way. Yeah. So I'm really glad also with the family. You do see some darker elements related to it not extremely bad not like depressing, but a little bit you kinda see like family obligation, and how that can kind of be like hand in hand with family love and also like the idea of family loyalty and not wanting to let your family down. You see that a lot with Seraya? And the fact that the whole family does wrestling it's not like they're really doing anything else committed themselves to it also particularly Ricky Knight. Like, he's his wife describes as the brains of the operation like he's very much. Clearly desiring the most for his kids to go into WWE. He sort of like is driving them to always be training. Always be working out always be going towards the big time. Really? And you kinda see like the love of your father. But also, the obligation to him and not to let his dream die and kind of like how that mixes with personal dreams and like the personal goal of becoming w WWE star. And just like is that you're just your family's dreamers that also yours what you again. It was interesting. It doesn't really go into a place that feels really dark or doesn't feel like psoriasis bitter towards her family for like pushing her to do this. And she really does want to do it. But it's interesting to see it shows a glimpse of it. I would say also I kind of feel like that could be a bit helpful. Maybe like the idea of your family is counting on you. You don't let them down and that could be like propulsion for your own personal dreams as well. So I enjoyed watching that part about wrestling. And it came in two thousand twelve you said, yes, okay. Yes. So. So before we continue talking about this film. We're gonna take a quick break. To know the latest and hottest music hidden be airwaves be left out listened to the Golden State media concepts music podcast Keat keeps you on the loop with everything you need to from pop rock hiphop top flooring. And we'll throw in news of your favorite artist, concert and tour dates and so much more. Listen, no further because this is the gold standard in music podcasts. Welcome back to the movie podcast. We are continuing to talk about the film. The wrestler is fighting with my family, which is documentary. I want to encourage you to watch this film. It's easy to find. I've mentioned don't skip on it. The film focuses on the night family. And I really I found myself falling in love with his family, which makes sense because the rock sauve this documentary, and then wanted to make the film that he did make which is fighting with my family based off of this documentary based on the night family. So when we get to that point. Yes. Yes. And they are very lovable in the opening scene of the documentary. Here narration about the family, and you kind of see like the chaos that can erupt during a wrestling match. And at least for me, it starts, it seems like they're going to tell you about this film. That's really extremely I dunno crude and fighting and just rough and people who I guess speaking for myself, I wouldn't necessarily be drawn to. But as I watched the film, I didn't come at. It wasn't like put off by any of their antics. They do cuss a lot, you know, they body slam each other. They fight. They, you know, they're crude like people in their speech at least. But that wasn't ever something that I was like, oh, I don't like them. I don't wanna watch them. I thoroughly enjoyed watching them the entire time. I really got to see a real family and how they showed each other how they loved each other. And also just the bond that they shared which spoiler alert is related to wrestling. What announced surprise surprise? It's really helped what they've dedicated their lives to and you get to see them. Just try so hard for this. I also want to mention they wrestle and you see them in the ring wrestling. But then it also shows them they have a wrestling program with they put on for like kids and whatnot. It's kind of like getting the next generation of wrestlers. When I mentioned the film fighting with my family that comes up a little bit more than in the documentary. Well, because the documentaries forty seven minutes, and yeah, exactly gotta do some gaps which I'm glad they did. I'm glad they filled in the gap specifically about the program. Mm-hmm. Was pretty entertaining. But yeah, I got to see not just about the wrestling. But also about the program about the family like their continual goal. I guess spreading wrestling around this country. I'm surged interrupted you this family has more names there the night family, but that's not actually their real name. But then they've also got about sixteen stage names each. Yeah. No. That's true. I guess the night family because that's what they go by. Yeah. Go by especially in the documentary in the media and known by. Yeah. I'm just you know, again, doing some reading we're chatting, and it's amazing to me for a while. I was like wait which one is this because the then the whole psoriasis Araya go that is also Seraya kind of looks like her mother a little bit a little bit. Yeah. So I at least I see with the fashion sense. Got rubbed on. But yeah, that is a bit confusing. And like her mother does talk about like, oh, the greatest compliment is when they say, she looks like you, just cute. Yeah. Okay. So do want to mention the wrestling bit. The wrestling is not. It's like the overarching theme, but it's not the pulse of the movie. I would say it's not like what really comes across the strongest element. I would say the strongest element again is the family, but you do get to see a little bit about the people who are involved in wrestling. Specifically, you see more about those who are involved in wrestling. But art in the WWE in the movie finding with my family, you get more about the WWE than you do in this documentary bigs it follows the family. Also, I believe the documentary was produced by channel four which is like a news station in England. So who they gonna focus more on what's going on in England than necessarily in Florida with Sarah? But because of that you see a lot of the family and how they put on their program and how they continue to put on wrestling matches even without their daughter. Okay. Also want to make something that's interesting. I said that the family isn't like using Seraya as like this giant meal ticket. But because she does go to the WWE. She does like that makes their wrestling program, more popular. And at the beginning, you see that Seraya is clearly the most popular member of the family and in the wrestling ring. Her mother actually says that Sarai is candy on posters and money in the merchandise. Thanks, which is is really interesting. She said like at times like forgetting that she's her daughter. She is kind of like a wrestling product for the family. They have posters and everything of her which is again kind of weird. But like, you get a glimpse of this is the family's source of income. You know, they have to be able to survive somehow, and they also talk about wrestling being proper salvation for the family. Basically, everyone was saved by wrestling in some way, either from the streets drugs crime or just like the Rhone bottled up anger. Wrestling is really a way that saves them. I guess interesting and kind of like how at least for a lot of members of the night family like they need the attention somehow, whether that's going to be through wrestling, or if not wrestling potentially through crime that they could have committed. So it is it's pretty interesting. And I want to mention I felt every injury that happened every every. Pop everybody slam. I felt it. It doesn't the symbols and focus on injuries necessarily. But it comes up because it's wrestling, and I felt it every slap. Oh, man. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Especially again, it's not Hollywood. You know, it's a documentary. It felt very real. Okay. I want to move on and talk about the feature length film finding with my family. It's outright now. Twenty nineteen directed and written by Stephen merchant produced by Kevin Mischer, and Michael J louisi- also Dwayne Johnson or Dwayne the rock Johnson felt his production company was related to this. Which interesting also it's made by WWE studios. And there wasn't WWE studios. I didn't either I feel like there's definitely a reason that none of us know. Essentially W E is owned by the wrestling corporation, and for their films that come out they were frequently mixed well-known actors and actresses and leading roles with WW wrestlers and a lot of big Sistine productions and all of it. They've been distributed to like. Not necessarily theaters. I think in a way to make like a cheaper product for both like WWE and like the wrestlers and whatnot. They're just trying to produce movies and not trying to make big bucks. And they're trying to make it ecconomic -ly. In terms of actors, you have Florence feel his name wrong Florence pug. PGA? I think it's pew. Okay. Florence pugh. I've heard pronounced before. But I could be wrong that that sounds right. Florence Pugh who plays Seraya or page and the last name of the family is Beavis. But again, they're wrestling name nights. My kind of interchangeable. There are a lot of names as Sarah said, I'm just going to just going to go. I'm going to say all of them. It's important beginning of the documentary Seraya slash page slash whatever. She is also introduced as Britney. Yes. Her original original stage name. Yeah. It's a lot of names. Also, Jack Loudon plays Zac or Zak zodiac. Yes. Nick frost plays, Patrick or rowdy? Rick night. Lena Headley, Lena Hetty Hendy Noel, Lena Headey plays. Julia or sweet Seraya villi. Yup. Jailing? It was really interesting role for her. Vince Vaughn plays hutch Morgan and. Dwayne the rock Johnson plays himself. Okay. That was my question. I was like, okay. I'd seen previews for this movie. Didn't really know what it was about the only paid attention. And then when we started talking about it. I'm like this is about a British family. Dewayne Johnson is doing what is he gonna do a bad accent over way to notice like he is too. Well, known to be in a wrestling movie and not be himself. Yeah. Yeah. Are cameos of other wrestlers? They don't try and be someone else. Okay. I mean, I love doing Johnson. Don't get me wrong. I'm not I'm not this him and his maybe maybe not ability to a British accent. I just couldn't figure out how that was going to work in here. No very fair. I'm really glad they didn't try and make him be someone else. And the rockets so charming like it didn't like it didn't matter. I was like, oh the rock. I don't care that. He's in this because I don't actually think the rock was really involved with the night family. And then it was mostly for the movie. And because he I feel like he was a driving force about making this film. Because I think again he saw the documentary and really liked it. So it's interesting. They put them in a lot especially for someone who had again, don't really think was that super involved with the family, right? But you know, again, he's charming. So any does that, you know, he's the people eyebrow. Come on, these the what that's his nickname. This is something I do know about wrestling. He's the people's eyebrow. You know, how you always does that eyebrow thing? He doesn't do it as much now. I think he's maybe. Oh, yeah. Or possibly had a little work done. I yeah. I don't know. But yet, the people's eyebrows that whole IRA lift got an name. Wow. Now, I know more but wrestling now from this show than I do from watching the movies about wrestling. Wonderful. I'm here for you. Thank you. I appreciate that. Like the documentary. This film is about family about the night family. It focuses on their love free. And for wrestling. You get to see a little bit more about the family business again. Like, I said, it's a longer movie. So you get to get into more about what they do. And you see them like trained young wrestlers around town. It's kind of like showing the family is. Kind of like helping kids from lesser backgrounds. Kind of become something else, you know, have like an escape from their life and potentially become really good wrestlers. They actually have a kid who is blind wrestling. And I was like there's no way that's real. Apparently that was real that. Actually did happen. They did train kid who was blind to become a wrestler. Oh, well, good for them. If that's really what he wanted to do. It wasn't just bullied into care for blind ring. But it's pretty nice. Is this a comedy drama? What is this drama? Probably. It's like a heart warming film about a family. Okay. And the rock definitely puts in humor. I like he's sort of like the comedic relief a little bit. I mean, the family they're funny because they're just kind of gruff, which makes it funny. I guess, but it's a drama family film of maybe not super young kids. Sure. But I did enjoy that part. It's heartwarming. I would say I really like I had like a genuine smile on my face entire film. Okay. So you also get to see more of Seraya once she goes to Florida and trains WWE, which you don't see in the documentary. Again, the camera crews not allowed to go into the WWE in film her. So you get to see more of that again that's made by the WWE. So I'm sure if there any parts about the training that aren't super great. They probably didn't put it in. But you know, villager tame you still get like workout sequences like on a beach so ghetto people running in sand montages. Oh, yeah. Lots of workout montage is like flipping tires kind of thing. Lots of sweat ghetto before we continue. We're gonna take a quick break. And then we'll come back and keep talking about fighting with my family. Fingers and everything you means games. What you really? Much more. Libary there. It. We deliver by delivering on March. Fifteen. Welcome to join Jennifer garner. Matthew Broderick John Oliver was none of the couching Foale me lacunas. Keenan Trump's in Ken, John. Embarrassing. The most hilarious animated comedy of the year. Critics raving about wonder park talking about beats great family ride. Awesome. Most have this year. A great day. Bring it down. Ganda wonder Petri just in theaters March fifteenth. Tired of searching, the vast jungle of podcasts. Now, listen close. And here this out. There's a podcast network that covers just about everything that you've been searching, the Golden State media concepts podcast network is here. Nothing less than podcast bliss with endless hours of podcast, covered from news sports, music fashion, hooking entertainment, fantasy football and so much more. So stop blurted around and go straight out to the Golden State media concepts podcast network, guaranteed to fill that podcast is whatever it may be. Visit WWW dot GS MC podcast dot com. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter and download us on I tunes. Soundcloud and Google play. Welcome back to the movie podcast. We are continuing to talk about the film fighting with my family. So I want to say about this film. It is about family love it focuses more on wrestling. Because again, they have the time to do. So you get to see more of the training. You see more of Sara's struggle when she's in Florida the documentary shows more about the families struggle while she's away and also the loneliness that they feel for each other. But you get to see more of psoriasis struggle. She is the clear protagonist in this film. I would say the documentary the focus is the whole family. The film is definitely more about Seraya or page, whoever you wanna referred to her. What is your name so much Britney? I dunno. Also, Zach has a pretty emotional storyline. They focus more on him and feeling rejected by the WWE. I I don't think that's bad because. Don't think that takes a bunch of guessing to be like, well, he probably that. Of course, you probably felt sad about it about not being chosen and having a sister being chosen basically on the spot. But they focus a lot on it. The I feel like these emotional storyline that he has more intriguing than psoriasis. I kind of felt his heartbreak more than I felt psoriasis like her emotions not that. You don't see her motions when she's struggling to fit in at the WWE and things like that. But I felt like maybe it's because his struggle was potentially easier to portray. I'm not sure or perhaps it was just written in a different way. But I felt that his storyline was a little more intriguing. Terms of emotionality. Also, I want to talk about the rock a little bit. He is in this film a lot. Sure. Because these the one of the biggest names in right? And that's very believable. But he kind of just like guiding force for like young Seraya, and like also provides humor also at the end of the film. There's a text that comes onscreen like talks about where they are. Now, you know where the family is. And it informs us that the rock has left wrestling and went on to do other things which yeah, he went onto make movies. He's in a movie. I like I read that because this show, but I don't find it super funny. Because of course, he went on to be successful in films. Like, everyone know that. I know it like I'm not living under a rock. Carefully. Crafted joke. But I just thought that was weird. I'm like, of course, doing. Doing this. That's weird. Like, you're gonna talk to me about like where like Seraya is in wrestling. And then the rock like, I don't know. Choice. Maybe was a little tongue in cheek hope. So I hope. Yeah. I don't know if I could really take that seriously. Also, Vince fod is in this film. He also plays this like, he's not really humorous character. He's kind of funny because the way he says things because he could be funny, obviously. But he also likes sort of wise character that provides page or psoriatic, whatever bits of wisdom throughout the film, which was interesting. He played it pretty well. He kind of wears like workout clothes tracksuit at times, which just made me think of him in dodgeball. But again, his characters much more subdued in this film. I kept seeing it. I really felt that the retrial was convincing. There's only one time that I laughed because I'm pretty sure he was trying to be sincere. But he like winked like, and I can't take that seriously. Like, I'm gonna laugh at the winking. I don't I don't know how supposed to not laugh, but generally thought he was pretty good Lena heady as the mother sweet Seraya, I felt was pretty good as well. Definitely a different role from like game of thrones. Right. But I thought she was really good before that using the Sarah Connor chronicles. So she tends to play like tough. You're active. She's definitely tough in this film. And I really enjoyed everyone's portrayal. It's generally a movie made me smile. I wonder what the night family thinks the movie they have been going to a lot of the premieres and stuff on promotion. So if it's like, they're on board. Good. They can't deny the rocks charm. They couldn't say no they couldn't right. He just had to smile, and they were like, oh, we're in his eyebrows. We'll go exactly just the eyebrow thing. And they're like, all right, whatever you want. My niece. I told the story before when when I was on with Stacy once, but when my niece was for my parents own the movie theater my hometown and one weekend, they were showing movies shooter with Mark Wahlberg. And so there's the current movie on one side, and then the upcoming movie post side of the door, and every time we walk by the theater, she would say and not washed shoot a now watch next weekend. It was the tooth fairy. And she'd say what's that shooter? I watched Dwayne to walk to walk Johnson. Anybody says Dwayne Johnson, I think Dwayne to walk walk Johnson. So it really no one can deny the charm so struggling to walk. You four year olds love him. I mean, that's yeah. I could see you through this film is funny at times, it is heartfelt at times. There is an emotional poll. I would say, but it's not super super overwhelming. But it's there it's a family film in general. There's no real explicit swearing that. I can remember but hinting at more mature content anyway, thirteen not too bad. Yeah. I would say it's a fun film. And also it made me potentially more it should in the WWE. I might potentially look into maybe watching a fight or two. Are they called fights the called matches okay or events or I don't know. Are they fights not shows match it? No. They're definitely shows. They call it that though that's a good question. But I'll have to get back to you on that. Right. I'll have to look into it overall. I would say it's enjoyable. I think it'd be a fun weekend watch. So that brings us to the end of the show. Thank you so much for tuning in. And please listen to the next movie podcast. Listen to the Golden State media concepts movie, bud cast part of the Golden State media concepts podcast network. You can find this show and others like it at WWW dot Jesus MC podcast dot com. Download our podcast on itunes Stitcher sound clock and Google play this type in Jesus MC to find all the shows from the Golden State media concepts podcast network from movies to music, throw sports, entertainment and even weird us. You can also follow us on Twitter and on Facebook. Thank you. And we hope you have enjoyed today. Sa- program. Hi, it's Jamie, progressive's employee of the month two months in a row. Leave a message at the. Hi, jamie. It's me, Jamie. I just had a new idea for our song about the name your price tool. So when it's like tell us what you want to pay. Hey trombone goes, blah, blah, blah. And you say we'll help you find coverage options to fit your budget. Then we just all do finger snaps while choir goes, savings coming at ya. Savings coming at you. Yes. No. Maybe. Anyway, see you practice tonight. I got new lyrics for the rap break. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. Price and coverage match limited by state law.

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Brooks Headley: Doing More With Less | The Dave Chang Show

The Dave Chang Show

1:08:48 hr | 1 year ago

Brooks Headley: Doing More With Less | The Dave Chang Show

"Hey this is liz. Kelly welcome to the ringer podcast network up on the ring dot com this week we've posted our streaming recommendations for the month of september updated our fifty deep best superhero movies of all time list and make sure to check out our stephen king coverage by ben lindbergh on site and on the big picture podcast on the sports side are n._f._l. Experts are giving their air predictions for the season. The storylines are most excited about and finalizing their rankings of the top one hundred and fifty fantasy players twenty nineteen he can check it out on the ring dot com. You're welcome to the dave changshu part of your podcast network as always thank you to yo la tengo go for letting us use their great salt past the hatchet this week we have chef brooks headley a security burger one of my favorite of all all time and for years. I've just thought he's one of the great chefs of are not just pastry chefs truly one of my favorite people in this culinary industry this tree someone that does it the right way and if you haven't had his food before go check it out in the east village. It's a beloved cult institution now and there's just there's nothing like it and when i talked to him it really reminds me. Oh how momofuku started out in two thousand four but he's just his own person doing his own thing thing and if you didn't get a chance to taste desserts at dipoto it just gives you an idea what he was able to do someone that has open minded and continuously tenuously desiring to learn more about his craft and his profession and man that guy knows how to make food and he's one of the best people out there so check checkout his restaurant by his cookbook in in the podcast. I talk about people copying in we've had a lot of people like is good friend. Jessica koslow oh and just a variety of other chefs. We've had on this podcast and copying is necessity to becoming your own voice in your own chef what i continue to say people copy upi the wrong things whether it be renamed zippy or brooks heatedly you can copy them all you want but i don't think you should copy the recipes. I think you should copy their philosophies and how they a approach the culinary profession with integrity and the right attitude and these people are inspirational to me and that's what i try to copy so here's my conversation with brooks ely one of my favorite people out there and not just one of the best pastry chefs which is one of james beard award and a bunch of accolades. He's one of the best chefs out there. In fact i think he was nominated in new york for best chef new york city in the beard awards. Take the bureau awards forever. You want with a grain of salt but here's my conversation brooks purity burger. He's done a bunch of podcast before right a couple so welcome brooks excited to have you on so i don't even understand how to talk not. I don't understand it talk about it but like your life is so interesting you have arguably the most beloved restaurant in new york city and i don't know if you love compliments but it's the restaurant that everyone wants to go to when they're from out of town. It's a restaurant when people from new york worked leave new york and what what is it about what you've done at security that people love so much and i never sort of wasco eric about any chefs that we have on but you have something so singular in different that i think if you haven't visited you may not resonate or you may renowned understand <hes> i mean we just have a little tiny weird restaurant in the east village with six six to nine seats depending on how much people wanna squash themselves together and it's the first thing that i've ever that's ever been my own thing like. I've always worked for other people up until for years. We've been open about four years now and i don't know i've just been basically going full throttle like since day. One and i don't really have any plans on stopping. Even though it's one tiny little place so p wells gave you a two star review and did that change business at all. Oh yeah yeah yeah yeah. I mean that was in that was the about four years ago. That review came out in which was a pretty crazy review because it's you know we got to stars and we don't have a bathroom. We don't sell any alcohol <hes> we don't only meet and there's no place to sit so that was pretty. It was pretty wild. <hes> yeah i mean it was there was an instant change in business from that but the place is so strange in small that what's so strange about it because i've never started off a podcast with a chef talking about their restaurant but you have something that i wish people would immolate more narcotic but emulate more of what you've done and there are a lot of cooks in aspiring chefs that listen to this and i think this is the thing that maybe i don't want them to copy your recipes but they should copier philosophy i mean i just think it's cool like i mean i spent a long time working for other people in this big fancy restaurants are not even necessarily big restaurants but you know like kind of high end restaurants so learned a ton about cooking that i wouldn't have. I definitely wouldn't have learned otherwise but when we opened up superiority burger the kind of the goal was like what if we kind of do the same kind of cooking <hes> but make it as cheap as possible and as accessible as possible while accessible is not totally the case since this place is really tiny. I mean the chinese of it kind of is kind of part of what it is you know which absolutely drives me crazy a thousand times a day the the lack of space but i've grown to love the constrictions that puts on me and puts john like the rest of the cooks working at the place and even the people just like taking the orders of the register you know like having this tiny little space with a bunch of people squash and do it is kinda fun kim. Can you elaborate a little bit about the constraints because when you talk about it or i've read about it it gives me an all sorts of good feelings but also nostalgia of pain too hugh because you've worked at a lot of huge restaurants. I mean huge relatively speaking but space was never really an issue particularly. Let's say like dell posta right like oh yeah sure sure i am i we had i could do things that postal as a pastry chef that weren't necessarily like particularly complex in terms of what ended up on the plate but but i was able to do things because i had a walk in freezer. The thing about this great about the space of dope also is just there's flat surfaces everywhere which if anyone knows working small kitchen like having flat areas to put stuff is always kind of yours constantly looking for that in and facts to the point where like you'll put something down and then move it for half a second and someone will immediately put something down right in that space because there's such a everybody wants that like flat area elsom eating that friction is just vital to the heart and soul of your restaurant because it creates kind of creativity you could never get in in the confines of comfort. Yeah i mean to a certain extent the smallness in the tightness definitely helps like like agitate you to kind of like if this is all i got i'm gonna i'm gonna go crazy with this and i really enjoy it when i have someone cook look come to work at the restaurant and they get it too and then after say a couple of weeks a couple months or however long it takes them to kind of get acclimated to the fact that we're all a bunch of the people crammed into this tiny space or they're like oh okay now. This is what i'm gonna do. I'm gonna chop these things up and then i'm gonna throw him in a bag and stuff them in the top of this cooler and in and see what i can do tomorrow when i can get more space to finish it up you know so the the the creativity and the tightness is definitely like the definitely tied together. I had a journalist told me once the creative aspect of operating the tiny space. That's a lot like the whole trend of tiny homes you know and i was like no. I don't think that's anything like it because <hes> creating some sort of permanent in a tiny home turn this is there's constant variables changing every day's different particularly your restaurant that has seasonality and just every day is different in an a heartbeat. I love it. I love having tiny spaces. I also hate it because of the same thing but what i've learned is when you talked about getting someone else. That's new that understands it. I love it because they immediately tell me that they're open to something in the not bringing in their sort of past experiences and trying impose it on of course. How do you get someone to understand that in a normal restaurant space. That's the key. I think if you can unlock what you're doing. Do you really need a small space to see the way you see. Now i mean there's lots of restaurants that have small kitchens like that's not any were not unique in that sense but the scope and ambition of what you're trying to accent right well. That's i mean that's that's the thing and you know i will have people come work at the restaurant and we because because we're vegetarian mostly begin because it's this weird strange small restaurant <hes> we tend to get a lot of people with no experience at all like literally zero restaurant experience and with the right attitude that kind of person i can actually like bring in an after a certain amount of time like get them saying in a few weeks or a few months or what how long it takes that particular person get them to starts charts eliminates seasoning broccoli rob salads. You know which is a really cool thing to watch doesn't always work when it does work. It's great but it's also like when somebody really that has maybe has a little bit of restaurant experience comes in and what i feel that we do at the restaurant in between myself and my my business partners and cheryl are our manager who basically does everything. She works the line. She sees in salads. She shapes burgers jail. So does the schedule. She also is the h._r. Person like kind of the coolest restaurant manager that i've ever worked with but you know so. It's it's. It's fun to see people like kind of a attack. The situation and i think what we do is we foster or this really creative environment there where anyone can kinda do almost anything and the people that really really really get it and wanna cook a bunch of food and come to the market with me three or four times a week during the summer or even in the winter. We'll go to the market to you know and like pick up some stuff and then talk about. How can we turn this into a salad that makes sense and feels like superiority burger because we don't really have a theme. It's not an italian restaurant is not an asian restaurant. Is this bej italian restaurant. That's pretty focused on like using the best quality products. We got our hands on at the same time like i have no problem with you. Know certain commodity things too like i think i like the attention of having boats so and how many square feet isn't <hes> actual restaurant itself is two hundred and seventy five square feet that includes our basement which doesn't have any any running water so we can't do any prep down there. It's pretty small anyway like if anyone if we set up a prep table down there would be really depressing so basically we have <hes> <hes> four induction burners that we inherited which have all since been replaced in figured <hes> we have a thirty six inch griddle <hes> where all the the burgers we make it cooked and also almost everything else to <hes> and then we have a still oven below the griddle riddle that is one of those restaurants still ovens that either like off or thousand degrees. There's nothing in between so there's only only a few things we can cook in there like <hes> and then we have a very tiny convection oven that only takes half sheet trays that has <hes> <hes> five racks and then in terms of like firepower. That's it isn't a lot but we have figured out a way to make it work. We just finally replaced the convection oven couple months ago and it was the most thrilling thing to see the old one. Just get the fuck out of the restaurant and the problem was that it was such a small amount of space that we had to deal with that. We had to get the exact same oven so when we're at the store on the bowery 'cause we needed it fast. Vast <unk> oven died we had for concert. We needed to bid on friday like we couldn't have that so we had to like. Get an oven as fast as possible so we're at the place on bowery in the guy's like oh don't get that oven that sucks and i'm like well. That's the only one that will fit in this space. So is it also uses the prep table. No it's actually it's actually tall i level so i've actually had some incidents where pulling things out of the oven splashing on your arm you know the z. It's we basically utilize every single quadrant of the space. You know so you said something earlier and described. Do you still think of yourself as a pastry chef. Oh one hundred percents so yep i make i made ice creams all three in the morning last night. So i love coming to the postal. Because of your desserts. I would tell everyone i knew i think <hes> you were the best chef right anything about patient so a unity considered as being one of the best chess in the country because no one was thinking about the things that you were doing and it was so hard to then just make pastries and baked goods with the original thought that you put into it somehow i don't know how to articulate but if you tasted and looked at your desserts particularly after the years of making desserts at before you left up took the postal i was like this is like this is as good as it's it's ever been and i put it in the same conversation as sam and then cloudy fleming right. You're like in my i mean those are those are two miles for sure not eh cooking and both of those people sam mason an cloudy fleming. I consider them. Both chefs. Rather than base for cloudy was the first person to start till i think like like i say every shift to integrate those ingredients and i was you know obviously i tasted your your popup burgers. As of course it's delicious anything you've done. I've never been like i was never surprised. Do you think people were surprised at your transition number one. I mean well yeah because when you asked me if i if i consider consider myself a pastry chef because i actually get that question a lot like people will say don't you miss making desserts and i have to say like we'll we. I make desserts every day so oh i definitely don't miss it <hes> but in terms of like the like the transition from cooking only desserts and then moving over to my own place at superiority burger in than doing all sorts of savory stuff like <unk> i always kind of looked at things in a similar similar way so even though i wasn't professionally cooking you know making creating salads or or sandwiches or anything like that like to me. It was just a a very smooth transition to do that and maybe it was like a jolt of creativity to 'cause is now. I could do things that i couldn't necessarily do before and when you made that transition again i remember privately. I think i'm wondering your biggest fans were like. Is this a possible. I'm always shocked at how little some journalists know about the transition of people that were pastry chefs to savory chefs and you worked in washington d._c. Shower rested piece like he started off as a pastry chef of course and ingenuity he had in his dishes. Were very clear that like i almost recommend recommend you should be a pastry chef first and then rule because it teaches you control finesse in ways that i don't think i could of ever learn learn without learning it later in life and something that i still suck at comparatively. It's just so funny how things might be different now moving forward. I think you're gonna. I see a lot more cooks. Try to learn what you learn. I i hope so yeah. I mean that's cool. I mean i i don't in any way i wouldn't change any of my progression ashen as a cook the way i did. I think it was it was kind of perfect for for me like starting out working as a pastry cook in different places aces in kind of like when i started the first restaurant where i worked i had i was brought on zero experience so that's that's kind of why i'll do that to people or do that for people at superiority burgers because i was in that position wants to and even though i had cooked with my grandmother my mom or something i'd never the unprofessionally so if you have the right attitude if you're willing to kind of just go for the gusto than maybe you can learn how to to be a cooking restaurant you know so because that's what happened to me and like i loved it immediately and i'm always kind of looking for that person who doesn't doesn't have an experienced but like is the kind of person that will go home and just sit on the internet for hours like researching things or go to the library and get a bunch of books so it doesn't have to be a thing that like cost you money. Doesn't you don't have to like ghost is in europe or something like there's ways to like learn and kind kind of develop as a as a cook without culinary school without with doing things that are like inexpensive too and like last time i'll blow smoke up your ass. It's like always study albert andrea because i we elect his career is under recognized in comparison to his older brother but having worked with him in a variety of different places and events and stuff like that. I've always studied everything he's ever done and i was always comparing. Do we have anyone unlikely that in america and i think he is the greatest sort of creator cook ever fucking baddest ass. I mean the his co. Wanted his cook. I cook but i cook might nineties first ones impossible to find out yeah but it's a post because like he's the benchmark for the reason reason why i very much respect you to the highest level of like albert is because if you do something without really having the care air. You're not trying to have yourself understood. You're not you know what i mean. You're not communicating to everyone. Albert doesn't fuck. He doesn't care he doesn't care. If everyone says says oh. This is fran. He doesn't care if people like your face ship. He wants the challenge. He wants to create himself. He wants to create the best possible but it's just an expression of who he is and he's not beholden to anything and that freedom to me is what you have in your restaurant and what you've done in your career. It's like no one's ever said you have have to do this. You're like you never explain yourself as much as you could and that's what i see as a similarity beside you guys both being like just prodigiously talented. It's your ability to express yourself or lack. Thereof sometimes that i think is the most respectable thing for me because everyone including myself is always trying on a fucking explain themselves and you're like whatever it is what it is <hes>. We'll get that a lot of the restaurant like people say because scotty burgers vegetarian restroom <hes> but because our spatial limitations it's almost all vegan but at the same time i'm not willing to make it totally vegan because i i don't wanna have a vegan restaurant or i don't feel the need to like. Put it into like a category. You know so. Sometimes people say well. It's almost all it's like ninety nine percent vegan. Why don't you just make it totally vegan and my response to that is usually just silence because i don't even have to try to explain that you know i mean part of that is like i made ice cream and gelato with dairy for eighteen years and i'm still i haven't totally italy figured out a vegan version of that. That's as good as the dairy version i can make so i'm always going to have a dairy lotto because that's i know how to do that and then like trying to do a vegan version of java which we've had tons of success and failures of like things that are good and then they're good for a while and then we fuck em up again and we can't make them anymore because the one of those things where like you come up with something and then it's great and then you lose the ability to make it which is actually one of the things that i really enjoyed to because why why can't i cook the rice like that anymore. Why does that starch based. Ice cream not work the same way like even last night where at the restaurant till two thirty three in the morning morning like why is the blackberry sorbet coming out icy when we did everything exactly the scene like i get off on that even though it sucks because you know it takes more time and takes more therefore money to like figure out or whatever but <hes> i like. I don't know what's what's driving you on that curiosity because i can't you asked me that i wouldn't be able to tell you i don't know i think it's just that an i'm always i'm so excited to go to work every day like i moved to the east village about two years ago so i live like a forty minute walk to the restaurants so there there are times when and months will go by where i go nowhere except my apartment's asleep the restaurant and then union square to go to the market and i'm fine with that like <hes> and i'm so every single day. I'm so excited to go in because it's it's number one. It's my thing. It's not anyone else's thing and and i can do whatever i want. One of the things that always kinda bummed me out working at fancy restaurants is having like a selection of ice creams and sorbets base so you have. Let's say you have four july does enforce or base and what if no one orders them. What do you do what happens to them that so you know <hes> and if you're gonna spend so much time sourcing tristar strawberries from rick bishop and sharing them in carting them back from the market and it's turning them into this beautiful sorbet that is somehow tastes more like a strawberry than the actual strawberries started with like that's like that act in sorbet making one of the things i just love totally because it doesn't make any sense like you're taking something that's perfect watering down adding sugar to it. Reincorporating rating acid may be adding some salt and it tastes better than the thing you started with like that's just the coolest thing in the world you know so and i just love love of love the creativity of that and then also just like getting a bunch of stuff at the market and being like all right we have a vegetarian hamburger restaurant which is kinda stupid and then but instead of having french fries we're gonna make all these different vegetables sites and it's still cracks me up to this day because people will come in three three four five six ten times a day especially on saturday or sunday and and kind of get mad at me like why don't you have fries. Why don't you have fries. You know it's like it's like we're making being all this other crazy stuff like you can get. I can tell you somewhere to give rise and it's not i don't have a problem with french fries. I love french fries. I mean who doesn't know but i don't have a deep fryer dryer so i'm not gonna make them and also we're just doing this other thing. Instead you know but the excitement of actually going to work is so strong and it's still strong and we're we're talking for years and to me. It's like a sort of waiting. When is it not going to be exciting anymore and it's been for years and it still is so so but there are moments where you hate it though right you just love more than you hate it sure the i mean of course there are moments when you know the dishwasher doesn't work the oven dies five minutes before we're supposed to have twenty eight focaccia in the oven and those situations like someone's working there who decides that they are gonna moping <unk> the whole day not for any particular reason like things like that where like all of a sudden all this. This is such a i'm having so much fun fun like why is this stuff happening yet you. You kinda hated for the moment but you work around it. You make it work so so like here in this out. I never thought doc because i live in a world of comparing everything to anyone other sports music or other shafts and i always pepper other chefs with these questions because i always want to know a little bit more the chef i i really admire. The most is passed carbo in paris at it is a twenty seven seat restaurant. It <unk> got demoted recently from three stars to stars which i think is completely stupid but when i asked pascal how do you do this because the kitchen literally is to triangle burners. It's like the size of school desk do cooks and he's got a pass that is maybe you know half a sheet of paper and that's our plates are being plated needed in every table gets its own menu and in the morning from talking to people that were there throughout the years. He'll wake up at like five in the morning. Go to the market purchase sit drop it back off of the restaurant go back to bed and then he's going to expect his two cooks to museum plaza out just clean it and prep it out to how they how they think he might want it and then that's how the menu gets created for the day <hes> it's that dry that makes him love work so much that he can't can't stop thinking about anything else and i also see the downsides of a two because he wants to do other stuff still but he doesn't know how it's a little bit of fears also a little bit of out of his comfort zone and also he's like he's being forced by other people. You got open more restaurants now and he's like. I don't want to now if i don't and i'm going to be punished and it's this shitty vicious cycle and i feel like not just he's in but like i'm sure you've gotten in a ton of opportunities and a lot of people asking hey. How do you do more and now you're fucking up the very thing you wanna do the most and go back to scout. I am so angry the fact like that he's given his life to this restaurant said no to everything <hes> and the michelin guide said we'll take him star away yeah no. That's fucked up. He's as is the epitome of integrity in this profession as you can find and i see someone like you and i feel like you're a real fucking artist in the best possible way in like i'm putting you in this pantheon of people that i admire tremendously and i wish you all the happiness because there's very few people like you in this business and i wish more and more people are getting we copy your philosophy. How do you navigate your future. Then because is your body breaking down at all. I feel pretty solid right now. So snow outright s no nothing now every once in a while. They'll be like a weird a weird like ankle pain or something like that but <hes> you know. I try to take some care myself so <hes> <hes> but i just i enjoy working like if i go on a trip. That's like supposed to be kind of vacation like i mean i'll always try to figure out some some way to do something food related or whatever even if it's like a small thing at a friend's restaurants in copenhagen yeah now is amazing too and i actually talked to receive about the two 'cause she said the same thing like i was like. When are you going to be back in the u._s. She's like i think i'm coming back in like a month or so and i was like oh that's cool and she's in was basically ace. Go again. I'm and i'm doing a bunch of pop ups in chicago or you know so which i immediately it was like oh of course you know that's what i would do too so but what i love is like i get a text me and you're like hey man i finally made a copenhagen fucking awesome and i did this this and this and it's very palpable reading your tax like you love this. You love it so much that that's what you wanna do and i maybe i lost that loving feeling a little bit because i keep having opened up these restaurants when a younger cooks talk to me i'm like how do i tell them to find what you found. How did you find this because it's the most infectious thing i don't know. I'm not sure i mean <hes> it. Just things just kinda worked out in the sense where i found a couple of friends that had just enough money for us shoe shoe secure lease and get just enough equipment to open up a place like i mean in retrospect. There's a lot of things we didn't think about like the fact act. How do you operate a succeed restaurant in ten degree weather without like a you know one of those right on the area you know so <music> which we couldn't necessarily afford and also like it. Would i think the people on the on the block <unk> episodes to but things like that or like how do you make money when there's only six seats. How do you make money when you're selling everything for under ten dollars like and then i come in with like oh. I'm going to buy the best possible muscle produce that i can get at the market. I'm getting by the the best possible canned tomatoes that i can get from the italian purveyor. That's the most expensive stuff but but it's the most delicious and then still sell it for like basically as little as possible you know <hes> it just kinda worked out on the burger that we sell is pretty inexpensive to make a nest the thing we saw the most of so it kind of floats the other crazy stuff that doesn't make any sense like like this week. You know cam poroso. The market has tomato so i bought you know something like fourteen flats tomatoes to the point point where like they laugh in when i go pick the stuff up because they're like number one where you're going to put this and number two like what are you going to sell this for. How are you gonna make your money back. You know uh-huh but it somehow kinda worked out. We also don't use any meat so obviously like protein is a huge expense for restaurants as you know <hes> in were avoiding that entirely early also we don't even use any eggs because number one like we don't have a fridge. That's our walk in to take a case of age you know and when we first enough we did use eggs to bind the burgers and we used eggs in july auto basis but one of the things and this is cool too that i found out that when you open up a vegetarian restaurants which is what we did you kind of open up a vegan restaurant because you can't have you can't have options for regan vegans so and that's fine so it sort of like mutated into the sing where like i may be in in initially i would have used more cheese more more dairy and then we kind of figured out ways around it basically because we didn't have enough refrigerator space to have two of everything you know so but i like i kinda like that too like to the point point where we've like. We have over the course of a few years now figured out this fermented cashew yogurt that we make that is a absolute invite a prep destroyer like it's kills the vita prep we burn through them but this stuff when it's inoculated and left command mant we basically have this blank slate of a yogurt slash cream cheese slash mild cheese that tang indian delicious is almost identical once get seasoned up and can be used for all sorts of different things and like we never would figure that out if we were just using getting dairy from from our dragons for very unisom i again i'm having flashbacks at the old move our own this all the things that we still cooked today our base because we couldn't have a <hes> space to cook anything. Are you supposed to cook all this stuff when you're not supposed to. I like that and i mean that does happen at spirit disparity burger a lot where someone will come on. Maybe as a cook maybe as a person who wraps burgers maybe as a person who works the register and they won't realize how kind of crazy the whole situation can get <hes> and then they occasionally will leave kind of abruptly because they're just like i cannot deal with this and it's not a bad environment to work in. It's just very intense and there's a lot of stuff going on at all times like when i had i don't remember where i had your your first security burger burger how many versions and when i tasted. I was like this then game you want. That's what i felt like pretty strong. I still feel that way now but i want to tell the story simply because it gives us an insight into who you are people haven't figured it out by now. How many versions of the burger have you made. I now after what now what you've been making the long six years now. How many versions now version one on now. What do you think you're at now. Maybe ten eleven something like that. <hes> it's kind of like steadied in the past few years you know we don't mess with it as as much but you know the original version had farro <hes> the there is on version had farro is basically stuff that i found in the del postal dry storage area so so far also had twenty four months age charm you know that i like turned into a free go in the pan and that was kind of an an integral that became kind of an integral flavor component on its which when we opened up the restaurant i was like all right i i definitely can't order wheels <unk> of two year old parm to grind up and put in these burgers so i think we switched in body bags of like more like commodity kinda parmesan kind of thing you know and just wasn't the same so we just eliminated that thing completely now <hes> but yeah it's gone in different stages. We used to use eggs to bind it j._j. Basil worked with us for a while one of my favorite people and he <hes> basically i was like we can't i can't use eggs anymore. What are we gonna use to bind these now and like you now gimme like a laundry list of different things and the thing that ended up working. The best was just straight up tatum starch. That's the perfect j._j. Like nothing gas because i was like maybe some method cellulose we do this and this and that and he's like just use potato center actually the first the first thing he suggested and this was even before superiority are open when i was just texting like i need something to bind the vegan one because i was still using aids and he's like he's like do this. Boil some potatoes and put them in a row oku and just put it on high and make disgusting paste like everything they tell you not to do. When you're making mashed potatoes you know he's like do that in you'll make this glue and then incorporate that in and i bet that will bind them together and now it's cool because it would it was so disgusting like it was just this slime time slime you know and then i was like as it gets a little feels a little weird in like i feel like i can still taste it. Even though i probably couldn't sense it you know it was just it was so such a strange strange matter to put in this like basically like vegetarian meatloaf that we had made you know so and then we eventually settled on the potato starch because that worked at best. It's easy you know we got non modified. Potato starch from bob's red in august before we go on but let's take a quick break to hear from our sponsors. Today's day of changsha was brought to you by ziprecruiter. 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Is that very similar to being in the position right now of <hes> it's different. It's it's pretty different. They're pretty different parts of my life like an. I still play music not nearly as much as i used to but i have a friend that i play with here. We we practice actus every thursday pay by the hour place in times square. We do the ten a._m. To noon shift which is the least rock and roll time to have band practice this ever you know but it's good if they get done with that you can go to work you know so <hes> they're just very different things for me in terms of the creativity of playing drums in cooking like maybe times i've tried to like make connections in between the two but they're they're. They're pretty different. You know i i for instance like <hes> aaron. Franklin played drums and i think you would agree that. We talked about it on this podcast. If he didn't play music he probably wouldn't be as successful as a chef. It's there's something that unlocks in your brain somehow some way and i find that the more and more chefs that i'm drawn to you and i admire. They're not the ones that just seventeen. I worked at all these fancy restaurants and this is all they've ever done. They have nothing to say and and i wonder if one reason why we don't know how to talk about it. At least in the culinary perspective is because no one's ever looked at it as a way of actually becoming a chef it is at the last thing you should do is only cook right <hes> yeah. I don't know it's it's a i mean everyone has their own paths to get into it and you know but everyone can get into cooking. That's easy but to get to the level where you're at to have autonomy and the ability ability to construct incredibly original dishes and if you saw a photo of it you may not understand that it is a life's work to make it as what it looks like and how that was presented as delicious as it is but i think what i'm struggling if the fine is when i see what you do and how you doing everything you stand for i own equivocally. It's because because you've had other interests ironically enough its cooking's all you do really now but more and more chefs that i wonder admire and i'm i'm sorry it's blanking on the other than aaron franklin just because he was also music food wasn't their first passion was all these other things and they still are their passions and somehow there's overlap that i think allows them to create dishes in their head or like have an idea of where they wanna be because ironically that's all they do who knows cook but their mind is still somewhere else right right and they have like a. There's a balance in their brains from like what they i think when people say you're crazy easy or you think you're crazy. It's simply because people can't understand all the life experiences you've had in the past now sort of translate into your present day birth yeah for sure. I mean that definitely a hundred percent. That's part of it. <hes> it's hard to like kind of pin down to like a certain thing that this caused this you know and there will never be another brooke simply because no one's had your life experiences and maybe some people of had. I'm sure but no one's decided you know what i'm gonna. Go work at this fancy restaurant in dc not that i'm going to go work for maybe the most high end italian restaurant that's ever been made and then i'm gonna open up of vegetarian burger shop in the east village in two hundred ninety five square feet and that's the philosophy i feel like people need a copy is like whether it's you or rene or even koslow. I see these people that feel like everyone can do it right but they tried to copy you. I've seen ever since you made your recipe. Your your cookbook which you should buy you are home cook or professional cook because it's fucking packed with jeremy foxe's book and and causes because i well you just gave ever your life's work and i've seen those three books really sort of trickle out into recipes throughout the country and people copy. You guys whether that's flattering or not i would like. How do you tell people bullock. Don't copy me copy how i think how i've lived my life <hes> well. I think that's a yeah i mean i actually like i mean and and this is definitely related to like music thing like when i was in like a functioning band and playing drums i would say i ripped off. Every single fill. Villain rifts that i ever did like can be like immediately like this is a butthole surfers song. This is <hes> pylon song this is you know <hes> and the number problem with access to me. It was just taking these things in like squashing them back together in like putting it with some music that sounds nothing like those two two bands whatever so so in terms of like if superiority burger was to be ripped off somewhere else in the world of the country. I actually think it's kinda. Cool like i'd be kind run into it. You know so because i know that like you can't like our restaurant as it exists like can't be totally copied copied because it's such a specific thing you know it's kinda like having finally gone to noma a couple of weeks ago at only having right about it on the internet in books and stuff like that one of the things that was like the most telling to me when i left to walk back to the place nursing are saying is that it's almost strange that people rip off noma so much because it's unbelievable yeah absolutely it's such a specific thing okay and now that i'm comparing superiority burger to know more whatever but it's like. They're very very different. Of course you know but like having a thing and it's very specifically typically a person or a group of people people's vision you know as a thing you know like i think it's like you can't really rip it off. I mean you can take little bits of it but it's not any of the same zone so if you're okay with people copying you and may being making facsimile you your restaurant somewhere in the world and we've talked about this here then but like over the past few years the question i get from a lot of other our of our peer group friends is like hey war why do next right and what i love most about this business is the fact that we can have someone like you create something beautiful out or something bad most people would never think about doing and it enriches new york city in the culinary landscape at large truly he does my concern is we're like the second generation that's going to see the first generation of chefs and their careers and this is where i do think it's similar to to music because i am friends with musicians that have been quite successful but they're not my millionaires they've right. What do they do when they can't do it anymore. And that's what i i don't want to see anyone. I know or care about do what they love and then. I have nothing to show for it at the right now. Yeah that's something to think about. Is this shitty thing to think about but i think about it a lot more and more because i i see this next generation of people that i work for the people that you work for coming to the twilight of their careers and no one's ever prepared this generation shen for what that looks like and i don't know what that looks like and then let's just say you don't have anything on the horizon soap and another superiority burger. Maybe you do. Maybe you don't read <hes>. Do you want to open up a couple more investors that are going to be amazed. I have a couple of places that i could imagine it'd be fucking unbelievably. Leave early success with great products right. I think japan would fucking just maybe the perfect place for your mindset in the shokhin in in sort of i gotta do shit. I gotta make it fucking better. I gotta ask myself why didn't turn out this way versus the other way <unk> yesterday you know california produces next is level all these days. How do you do that because this is the fucking thing that no one's really ever answered in their stupid fucking business what happens when you grow not just as a person but now as a business and that's something that i've been wrestling with for forever and i don't have an answer yeah i mean i know that terrifies me because i think about that all the time because we have so many awesome regulars that come to the restaurant. I mean it's crazy. We have people people who come every day or almost every day or people the people that come so much that we know them so the point that we invite them to our holiday parties you know and it's good too because it means that like if we have someone like that is coming all the time they're coming because they can in kind of like get something new every once in a while or maybe every time and that's kind of my barometer like if i have a couple of different regulators here's our one of my business partners his girlfriend when they come in like if they're coming constantly if i can have something even slightly new for them than and i feel like i'm still kind of pushing in like having like started like resting on my laurels or whatever you know so so that's like a that's a cool thing but at the same in time i know for a fact that almost to the point where i can like righted as a script like if we were to get a bigger space enclosed down this location and have a bigger space with say that doesn't even have to be huge what if it had twenty seats instead of sixties which at twenty three restaurant is not very big. <hes> the script ever in my head is everyone's saying like oh. It's not as good as it was so much cooler when it was just like this fucked up little thing and and we had to eat outside in the snow but then if that percents eating outside in the snow the probably like fucked us we should go somewhere we can in sit down where we can take our parents where we can like four of us can come at once you know so so that like the tension that like people want the comfort of a a real restaurant but at the same time kind of like this like fucked up version of a restaurant which i like to because that's part of the thing that makes it so fun for me but at the same time like yeah what happens what happens if there's a bigger one and all of a sudden it's just a different vibe or people say that it's just not as good even even if like i can say like i've got more flat space. I'm gonna walk in freezer. It's better it's totally better. We just tweaked. The burger like is definitely early. Better i guarantee it's better you know just like it was it was it was different. When it was a small you know some. I think about a lot so i thought about vatelot as i opened up basically in shopping malls now right and i have my own takes on this and i can talk about variety different ways but if i stayed in noodle bar two thousand four. Maybe we'd have three michelin stars. Maybe we'd be number. One rushing the world or whatever but that was not my path it is what it was and to this day everyone. Oh it's not what it is anymore and i'm like you're right. It's not and maybe worse for you but what i've really internalized paralyzed and maybe i'd love to hear your thoughts on this. Is your valuable customers the people that give you fucking life. They really do to see that joy. You give it's amazing. It's like it's the best thing in the world best asked makes it the best part of the fucking job i would argue that that is also what's going to keep you stuck in stallion and prevent you from growing as as a person in that same curiosity that you just explained about why this sorbet or why this july does not the same as it was yesterday at some point you're going to have all those the angles in that perspective and you're gonna know why then when you stop asking yourself that you're not gonna grow anymore and 'cause i've lived in about the shit so much then the same people they're going to grow and maybe they're not going to see the same things that they saw before and you're fucked. You're damned if you do damned if you don't mr and the only thing i'd ever thought of is i'm not gonna let someone else determine what that fucking perspective looks like right and i'm all support like if you decide to open it up up. I'm going to be like yeah fuck yeah he should and it's not about just making more money or whatever it's like. He's exhausted his creative resources and he needs to do something else. We should be supporting supporting you to grow and partly is hopefully we can talk about this on this podcast in other media outlets food can be like actually we can't do what we normally do in say. He shouldn't grow fucking thing. I've ever heard of that no it's. Why should you be challenged and feel guilt ridden dan of like if i decided i wanted to do which is why i do what i do to do what i wanna do. Why should i be punished for fear that people may not like it. It's the dumbest fucking contract. I've ever heard of well. The thing that in a similar line that cracks me up a lot is that i mean i spend a lotta time at the restaurant. I mean it's it's my thing. It's what i do you know so if i need to go to the market really early in the morning and then a bunch of other stuff and then all of a sudden an it service one service where open straight through so we're open from eleven thirty a._m. All the way to ten pm. We don't close in the middle. It's just like a straight thing so <hes> also like sometimes we need to spin ice cream after service start making stuff after services because of the lack of special. You were making making cakes at three in the morning after twelve hours of sick which is fine. I don't have a problem with that but it so i i am known as being the crazy person who's here's where does the exact same outfit every day and is in the restaurants scooping ice cream. I'm just always there you know but it's funny then like if if i go away for a couple of days or if han practice in the morning and i missed a couple of hours or whatever <hes> a regular maybe not so regular will come in the next time they seemingly go good to see. I haven't seen you in awhile. I haven't seen the last couple of lines and i'm always like what are you saying taking too much time off. You know no no no no. That's not what i mean. That's and what i mean but it's kinda funny. That's the first thing they say like so when it is this weird crazy tiny little space in where i'm always there the times that i'm not there like the people that i that i actually loved that. Come all the time. The first thing i'd say is like oh oh but you weren't here the other day you know so which i you know i just turned into a joke because it's you know i obviously can't be there every single second of every day. Although if there was a way i would it. I mean the other thing about restaurants if you haven't been to superiority burgers. It's like you see everything like it's just one big room like as a counter but two feet away from that there's someone wrapping burgers or somebody on the griddle like it's all right there you know when the health department shows up they can be all the way to the back of the restaurant in five seconds. You know like there's no like there's no air locks to like of this place. It's all on display like everything is on display away. <hes> so i think part of that is because people see they see me always there. They see certain people like the like christina who's worked register for almost for years like just they're like. It's almost like i always try to explain it to new cooks or people coming on. It's like we're putting on a show you know yeah and this isn't this isn't like a tasting menu kind of restaurant but it's the same way where like everything like everything that a customer says we can hear everything we he say they can hear. It's all like one big amoeba of just like people in this room. It's just like some of us are cooking the food and the other people blur eating food so what happens when your employees that's been four years and then let's say it's another eight years later. They're like kay brooks. I want to open up in my hometown of you've sacramento. <hes> and there's a great opportunity we can do something. That's the embodiment of what we're doing. What do you do because because i'm asking you. I'd love your insight. That's the challenge that i've always had is ultimately then. It's never about myself anymore. At some point becomes about everyone else. That's around you want to do was provide. I think that's what we are in this of course here yeah. How do you explain that to someone else like hey. Why are you in up up and they're like well. We can make more money so we can get health care or we're making more money so we can provide this. Isn't this for these people. I'm really fed up with everyone thinking that it's always about like just blind capitalistic growth but it's not sure yeah i mean i even we'll even get leaving at at security burger which is rich. If anyone knows anything about restaurants is clearly clearly not raking in the dough. Everything is nine dollars an under you know but you're trying hard not to make money doing my best doing my best reform so working still working so you know like you know knock on wood <hes> but like i mean it's tiny too in that that you know like if there are ten people in the restaurant toronto six people sitting four people standing. It looks busy. Even though that's only ten people like ten people in normal restaurant normal a normal sized <music> thirty feet forty seat restaurant like oh shit we we have to close the restaurant because there's no one fucking here you know and then if there's even a couple more people and we have this thing we have a concert. We have this special dessert. We have this tofu sandwich where like you're so. It's a specific special thing. They're only doing on one day. So people like lineup you know but if there's eight people in line than eighth person has to be outside because there's not enough room in the restaurant for there to be a line of seven people so all of a sudden it's like oh. Your restaurant is slammed constantly. You must be rich. You know which is which is kinda funny and that's like you're also alcohol. Yeah we'd know alka we do not talk alike were sailing salads or sellings or selling and very high end salads and veggie burgers. You know so but it is. It is a very funny thing where even like people in the neighborhood of the people that live on ninth street are so amazing with is we have the coolest bunch of folks that live on on the street like nancy lives discuss street. She's lived there since nineteen seventy seven mary who is live. They're probably just as long and you know just pee in a love a restaurant and so awesome because like when we first opened up people on the block. Where are you going to sell alcohol. Is this going to be a bar. You're what are you doing here and i kind of explained now. This is a vegetarian restaurant. You know there's not a lot of seats other definitely be people hanging out outside but it's nobody's gonna be drunk. It's going to be like kind of like very polite people sitting on planters eating radio. You know that's not if anything it's gonna be good for the block rather than like a bad you know so we've really like a lot of the people that live on the block have given us tons of support in that sense so it's pretty pretty fucking cold so whatever you wind up going. I wish you nothing but the best because like i know you have a ton of opportunities in it's remarkable that you can be as focused as you are doing what you're doing and i wish you to have all the freedoms that you want because i know a lot of people would love to have your food in their city so however that happens or if it doesn't happen that's a whole nother conversation because i don't. I don't have any fucking answers on that but i mean just you you know los angeles just the produce alone that the santa monica market in hollywood market like it's so insane in november you you know two springs. It's yeah now. I mean i spend as much time as i can l. a. and just basically hanging out the market so i just laughed. Whenever ever we go to the market 'cause markets everywhere not just santa monica there anywhere hollywood pasadena yeah every pocket of l._a. Essentially has a farmer's market and i actually laugh out loud whenever i taste stuff because i'm just like this decree i mean i i lived in l. A. two thousand three two thousand in five worked at i worked campanile and i learned a lot there especially like with my first restaurant jobs. You know we went to the farmers market. We got got really good. Peaches from pennsylvania did canning stuff like that but when i worked at campanile you know we were getting stuff like straight from the market in wednesday's this would be like we have to come up with a menu based on stuff. We're getting that isn't doesn't have anything to do with the menu that was on yesterday now so and i never <unk> experience like i'd only driscoll's strawberries and raspberries. I'd never had like raspberries like you can get at those markets in california. Were you just like this is insane or persian mulberries or things that can't get shipped to the east coast 'cause they won't survive. You know just dates tape dates from palm springs zona like how is this possible like. I didn't know date. I thought dates are kinda. Whatever you know like specifically at campanile i learned like like we didn't have specific recipes to make a sorbet base. It was just like the way the dahlia nancy would describe things like you know who knows how much sugar is in this fruit that we're using you can't have three hundred and forty three grams of dextrose some four hundred twenty seven grams of organic sugar and that's always gonna work because who knows the sugar content because of the sun or the rain or whatever you know so being able to like adapt to that in like look at something as simple as a blackberry or a red current sorbet or something and be able to look at it and not think of it in like finite terms of graham measurements and how can we make this as delicious as possible while at the same time making it perfectly smooth and because the whole thing was forbe's is all about texture and what are some i mean i just want to get back to l._a. Right now one more thing and i think it's a good way to end on. I don't know if people are still confused. <hes> piss people may not even know your previous career and that's completely fine but to get out of fine dining and i think i think that a lot of things get lost when people saying <hes> why do you work at your fancy restaurant and i've always said because it's not because i want to eat there would be nice. It's not because i wanna feed these people like when i worked at cafe balloon like i fucking hate recite. I don't wanna feed these people. Some of them were great right but <music>. I'm gonna learn the best techniques for sure yeah. We're all gonna learn how to make these terrains and to dress a chicken this way or whatever in the fabricate aggregate all these beautiful things that i was gonna learn anywhere else. Am i going to learn how to cook a chicken in a pig's bladder shit like that. It's like wow. This is where i have to learn but in can only come across as sounding pretentious to some of my friends. They're like dude. You only wanna make food for fancy people. Yeah i mean i have a very complicated relationship with fine dining restaurants obviously but yeah i don't. I don't regret any second of working at any of the places where i worked because i even like at dell postal. I worked there. I was hired as has the pastry chef so i wasn't like i was like going to learn anything new. Although of course i did because you learn from every single person who comes to work at the restaurant. You know like i wanted to work because i wanted to work for mark ladner like i wanted to see how he did things and even though i wasn't doesn't cooking pasta i wasn't making pasta wasn't like making stocks like just being in that environment. I learned earn so much that wasn't even part of my job you know and that is something that i can't recommend enough for people that just really wanna learn as much as possible is a go find a restaurant in work there and don't just stay with blinders on your station figure out a way to learn stuff that no one's even teaching 'cause that's totally possible and at especially at a restaurant where the the level all of cooking is so high like you can do that and the dining room may have no bearing or influence at all as to who the kitchen is and what share yeah for sure i am. I don't know if a lot of people quite understand that and i think that's changing because a restaurants like superiority and i said this with costlo too when i just feel like she's just one of the best chefs out there and she may not get the credit she deserves simply because she's making food that people wanna fucking each and mercer made with love and the same same kind of fucking excellence in getting the same product as any of the best restaurants in los angeles. If there's something in the procession that can't be as good as this fancy restaurant over here on santa monica and that kind of ignorance bothers the shit outta me and when people talk about the best chefs in new york and congrats on the beard nominations all that shit whether that means something or not and you've already won beard best pastry chef. I still feel like the next level. We have all this town in the world. In america specifically they may not be the traditional sort of hallmarks of how chef was in the past and i look at what you've done and what you're going to continue to do and i'm like you need to be in conversation because you deserve it with your dedication to the culinary arts whether it's savory or not what you've done out of tiny tiny postage stamp of space is as remarkable as important to what we do like as any three mission star restaurant and i want more people to understand that. I don't know if you really think about that or care. Whatever but i think that's what i want more people to follow his what you've done because that's the only way foods gonna change is. It's not going to be on porcelain china with a fucking somalia like foods. Gotta get better everywhere else and then if i'm a young cook. I'm working for a guy like you because we're going to learn how to think like you so <hes> i wish you all the success man because i just i watch everything you do from afar with total admiration genuinely because i just think you get a ton of praise. I just don't think it's enough. This is plenty man. We can chat here. Thank you well. That was my conversation with brooks could've talked to him for hours and hours hours and he gave me a one of his <hes> focaccia with tomato and fuck. It was so good god. It really is good like god. Damnit brooks is just everything he makes us something you want to eat and to find your own voice to do it as distinctly distinctly as brooks's done just don't know if he gets enough credit to make kind of food vegetarian vegan sandwiches and salads and gelato and all these these things that are really well known already and to put a distinct voice behind it is almost damn impossible and to his is credit. I don't know if he gets enough credit for doing that and really admire him and he's one of my heroes so thank you for coming on to this podcast. Thanks for listening guys. Thanks again to brooks. Stay tuned next week. Give us five stars on itunes. Give us a great comments and however you this podcast on stitcher or spotify. Thank you so much guys guys.

new york brooks albert andrea james beard award brooks headley Jessica koslow brooks ely dave changshu hugh john Kelly stephen king washington europe italy japan michelin dell aaron franklin
Qual o sentimento que mais faz mal?

Feliz Dia Novo

02:59 min | 2 months ago

Qual o sentimento que mais faz mal?

"Wasn't sent you bully. The put was essentially cooper sentiments mice body for multnomah said hiver set out. Mid said i'm maga bus was going ski. What the most any signage. The we still do down looming novel. Arkady forgotten heaviest signifcant motion head alex cigarette. The skin were going. Coastal news item. Anthem lukac kino's fas into coop. Bides joke by the dodgers noise guam. Cigarettes it is. They say is pronounced bay star but also telephoned so sea. Ice sewage saguntum. Michael is levian. Get magic with. Y'all told principle i keep it. Deep is authorities in thirty. Still participants cigarettes. You never develop going the coupe billy dodge. Guess we'll see how muslims start going to gio goi Follow his will cuomo so insignificant. You save the coupe. Habitual simple head. Moss ouput albuquerque's no bus south in tho- this of you're going yup coop bookstores. Do as moscone since my sister. The yup on. Friday doesn't also buys icus komo high-value mid if any all throughout the four individual they're going yet coop ac- offending them. Yeah keep the ball mice as limber density meanchey. Ovadia them up your so calls them. My scoop single ninety lemon support Cume saw being see. Don't those his new cigarette homophobia. Y'all go out that they're going is you. This was known video. Don't do it. Milos ms must go the paint. So we see in sales put up to cigarettes. They'll headley's now says a dunk lou l. c. c. body. Just you if you're going to kupa put algal. Casiano pods similar temp project. Y'all with don't push it to you if we hello. He thought grundig give vocal committed to omar bizarre live youtube. All pimple of avocado parts stares there's article the to through it. Put a simple name. But i just go fees so simply as mice importance.

alex cigarette Anthem lukac Bides Arkady Moss ouput multnomah cooper Ovadia dodgers cuomo moscone Milos ms albuquerque Michael Casiano headley omar bizarre grundig youtube
Introducing 'Following Harriet'

Following Harriet

02:16 min | 1 year ago

Introducing 'Following Harriet'

"Unless Most people I met Harriet Tubman in a black and white photo in a textbook. We all read a couple of paragraphs about how she was a conductor in the underground railroad. She saved the lives of people attempting to flee from slavery. And that was it. That was the end of the story. We got but Harriet. Tubman was so much more than that. She guided union boats up the river and she moved from Port to port from place to place along the river. Bank where the enslaved people could come and be rescued and be taken to freedom. You know this is one of the moments most people who think they know anything about Tubman. They're like wait a minute. She fought for the Union. She was a wife and mother an entrepreneur. A soldier spy nurse an activist who fought for women's right to vote. She was a woman of action while there were many men of words during the antebellum period. I'm Celeste Headley and this is following. Harriet it's a podcast that takes a closer look at the life of one of the bravest and most extraordinary women in our country's history. It puts Harriet in a broader context examining the nineteenth century. Experience of African Americans especially in Virginia on October. Twenty second you'll be able to follow. Harriet follow her. Life story followed the example. She said subscribe to following Harriet. Wherever you get your podcasts or visit Virginia Dot Org backslash Harriet to learn more.

Harriet Tubman Celeste Headley Virginia Union Twenty second
A Prayer for Peace That Surpasses Understanding

Your Daily Prayer

06:25 min | 5 months ago

A Prayer for Peace That Surpasses Understanding

"Hey listeners we are so excited to tell you about the two new podcasts. Life audio has available now. The first is rise up to raise up. Faith built kids. And the second is mama take heart. Both shows are for parents who are trying to navigate how to raise faithful children and a strange world. If you're at all a part of a child's life whether a parent grandparent family member teacher or mentor and are looking to understand. Gen z kids and how to reach them with the love of god. We hope you'll go to life audio dot com and check out our shows again. That's rise up to raise up faith build kids and mama take heart A prayer for peace that surpasses understanding by alicia headley read by liam martin be anxious for nothing but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving. Let your request be made known to god and the peace of god which surpasses all comprehension. Will guard your hearts and your minds. In jesus christ philippians four six seven. We have a very real sinister enemy. He's invisible yet. He's been effective in stealing our peace. Since the beginning of the world satan knows that. We're there's no peace there's no victory that's why he comes to steal kill and destroy john ten ten those places of peace in our life. But what if you could live in. Today's world with peace. Despite your current circumstances a piece that far exceeds your fears a piece that centers you despite death betrayal and heartache from today scripture highlights a piece the can lead us better than the worries of the world are circumstances might not make any sense to us right now. The god's peace cancer pass our limited understanding his piece can and will become your guard and protect her. How can we have this incredible piece. I to bring everything to god by prayer and supplication in other words. I request to do it with thanksgiving. We often don't think of things to be thankful for as we're going through a difficult crisis of sorts but friends. This is the key to allowing god's overwhelming and indescribable piece to takeover our hearts and minds despite the circumstance in which we find ourselves. Even if your situation doesn't change as god's peace takes over your heart and mind can change so fine those things for which to be thankful if you've experienced the death of a loved one. Thank god for the years you spent with them if you lost your job. Thank god for the skill set provisions and healthy family that you have if you're anxious for the world to feel less scary. Thank god that he is in control. And here's your prayers. There's always something to be thankful for. Trust that god is who he says he is every time you feel worried or anxious take it. As your sign start thanking god then watch god replaced that worry with his peace that surpasses all our understanding. Let's pray dear. father thank you for. Not leaving us empty-handed you provided us the truth of your word to help us navigate through this life. Thank you that we can bring anything and everything to the foot of the cross and make all our requests known to you. Thank you that. Even though there may be trouble in the world you have overcome the world. John sixteen thirty three. We cannot survive storms of life without your piece and we are the victors enemy who attempts to destroy it. We ask that you cover us in your piece today. You see us and you hear our prayers. We know that even if our eyes can't see our circumstances changing the uc it and you're in control. Thank you that your pieces. Not only our guard but our guide protecting us we ask the holy spirit. Prompt us in those moments of worry to turn toward you in thanksgiving. We worship you for being a faithful. God whom we can trust with everything we love you. Jesus name amen

alicia headley liam martin john cancer John uc
iX Leadership and Culture Transformation

Women Worldwide

44:21 min | 2 years ago

iX Leadership and Culture Transformation

"Here. Listening to episode one hundred ninety five of women worldwide you've probably heard about Ceac or the customer experience. But how much have you heard about? I XE or the internal experience will it's the leaders with an eye ex mindset that can shift their companies culture. Stay tuned to learn more. Hi, I'm Deirdre Breckenridge. I've spent an entire career helping women to share stories nurture relationships road their brands, but most of all to find your voices. So they can make a difference. Do you feel stuck do? You wanna power up? Your own voice women worldwide features of stories of passionate women who've navigated big career challenges. And some of the toughest changes. These professionals offer deep insights and advice to inspire you to help you uncover. What's holding you back and that women worldwide igniting your passion? So you can excel in light. Hi, everyone. Thanks for tuning to another episode of women worldwide. We really appreciate that you take the time every week to listen and share the stories of amazing people who come on this show, you're helping to amplify their voices, purpose and passion in this really helping to create more impact and to make a difference in this world, or it will let's get right to today's topic because we have to special guests joining us on the show. Our topic is culture in the organization, and the internal experience your lot about Ceac s-. Right. It's all about the customer experience. Well, shouldn't really start with the customer maybe needs to start with your own people. So this is the perfect segue to my special guests who are make. Minke and Dr Rachel MK Headley. They are the co founders of rose group international. And they're also the authors of the newly released book really excited about this one. I XE leadership create high five cultures and guide transformation. Rachel is the senior partner and CEO of rose group international and Meg is also a senior partner, and she is the COO. So their bios are way too long for me to start picking out things. Lots of accolades around these two women. So I think it's best that they share their journey with you, Rachel Bank. It's great to have you on my show. Welcome. Thank you so much. Thanks for having us at so nice. When two partners right can come on together. And I guess we're really should start the two of you coming together. Rather how to professionals from completely different backgrounds come together to stern business and to write a book magwar to jump in and start us off? Sure. Rachel nine met at the kind of got to know each other when we were floating around the same circles in the local women in leadership group, and they do a lot of conferences big conferences or the whole state really of South Dakota and lots of Zillow -tated training in Rachel liable. Did some facilitation for training in new way, we see other these events than visit about different challenges and things that we had. We got started commiserating about one is work really always as bad for people or ISIS hard. And we don't think it should be or that it should be like that. So. So anyway, that that that conversation created a monster of the excitement really for us and the concepts in I XE leadership in have you Rachel want to add to that a little bit about the way that you met. Meg informed this beautiful partnership. You know well for us. It was for me. I was already working for myself. And I already had a company and was doing that full-time when I was doing corporate consulting in my background is satellite science and leadership in like outer space satellites kind of satellites, and that's cool. It's cool. I still bright a lot about it. Has will you? But you know, in that environment big big budgets big teams. I really started seeing the difference between team success in why in the same organization with the same senior leadership how some teams could thrive and other teams were just really miserable in. So I started getting really interested in what leadership choices was really impacting the team. And in some teams seemed to do better with change in some teams just hated it at why even in the high performing teams there was differences. And and so I was really curious about this a lot, and I understood boots on the ground as part of the leadership team for the land sat satellite mission. I understood boots on the ground. How to navigate this a little bit intuitively. But I also knew there was a lot more going on. And so when I met Meg Meg was this really intelligent dynamic Nobias kind of age are executive professional. And she has a master's in strategic leadership, and she really loves the literature of that world. And we're I'm really focused on. How do I get things done with this team and make them feel great an execute? She's really understands like what motivations are how to connect with people. And so it was just really such a great opportunity for both of us to have fine was other person that had the same drive to change the world in this really exciting way, but have to completely complementary backgrounds and experience, it was just gonna say you guys definitely complement one another and that that's so important when you have a business partner, but yet you still have the same goal in mission. What's interesting is that you know, the question Meg that you. I started out with reset us work, always this bad or does life have to be so hard. Heard a lot of it. Because we work work is a big part of our day. You know, it starts in the organization. I kind of wonder how your new book came to life. Was it seeing what was going on in organizations feeling the pain of people who were asking that question. What did you wanted to write this book? Yeah. Well, mostly just as I wanted my name on a book cover. I'm just kidding. We not a bad region, right? Rachel night started talking a lot about we had a lot of concepts that we developed right off that about you know, it's one thing to have a lot of theory around leadership than say, oh, well this servant leadership or a transformation leadership is a good way to lead, and you can read this book in it'll tell you kind of the theory behind it. But we said we'll yet these leaders though. I mean, my gosh, we're all drinking from fire hose all the time in checking our emails. I just read something the other day that we check our Email subconsciously. We check our Email like a hundred sometimes day, and that's frightening. Yeah. It is frightening. Why started counting mine, and I'm definitely all well within that range. So I'm like oh my gosh Sundays enough on day. Anyway, people are too busy to try and figure out how to implement a theory in. So we said, well, let's develop some concepts in some practical application something that people can actually use. Then as we generated all these. Concepts said, well, gee, wouldn't it be great? If we had a book with all this. So then they could just actually read it is people traveling all the time in in. All let's make it about the right length for a plane ride something that easily digestible. So that's been how we landed on the book in our real goal is to make global impact. We thought that was probably the best way to to get that done his book where you can actually action something I think is really helpful because the theory is great knit frames out concepts. But when you can really dive in and get some takeaways, the you can use it so important, so Rachel writing this book with Meg was there. Certain reader in mind. I mean is it the the leader of any industry any size company? Would you say, well, it's really funny because we get that a lot, you know, marketing world, the they want you'd have an avatar like watch the what's your person who were witted, right? Witted where do they they work out? All that stuff in the kind of joke that I tell a lot is everybody I sit next to one in airplane that I have a conversation with about what we do they need this book. And so that's the that's the really both the wonderful and challenging part of what we do is. We have not yet met a team in any vertical that doesn't need something about our book. We do we have we found a new way we developed a new way to look at not necessarily. We don't personality type because we feel like that's been misapplied in business, whereas about personality, it's how it's how Meg wants to work with Rachel wants to work with Steven Wright, and how we can work as a team, and that team notion has really been missing in a lot of leadership training. So what we did is we took what kind of environment. Do you like to work at you know, we love chaos some people hate it. And how do you help those people were? Together in not drive. Each other crazy who you're speaking to so your environment, and every organization creates an environment. But it's really the people that make up the culture is so Redan talking about culture here. And I know personally from my work in communications and change management, the culture's really hard to shift sometimes because it's just so rooted in the way the teams operate whether organized operate, so how do you actually shift the mindset, and the culture, and where do you begin? Or is this just way too hard questions even ask? So Rachel you jump into that. No way. Man. We love this question. Okay. Great. No. This is the crux of it. I think the reason that we need this at this time is that if you noticed over the last few years cultures become more and more of an emphasis, you know. We have these trendy places to work. Google Amazon that have this culture that people love we've heard lately that maybe there are some holes in some of the way, they do things. But but really the culture is ours to create we say that a great culture, a great internal experience is designed it doesn't just happen in. So the real challenge about changing the culture, you have is understanding how individuals think about in react to change in a lot of people that change feels like chaos to them and people do not write chaos, generally speaking about sixty five percent of people. And so you have to understand you can just throw something new out there or put new values on the wall. And hope they all go for it. Greg opened six. Wow. You really have to make them understand. Why it's important to them. Like we worked with the healthcare system in one of their strategic goals is cost savings right will end that makes. Lot of sense to the guys in the in the women of the business executives sweet, right, but to a nurse in the Neo Natal floor. What does that mean does that mean there's less nurses does? That mean, there's less medical equipment will know they're gonna they're only wanna do is love and care for those babies in. So you have to relate what you're trying to do to the people in your office. I mean, we're really trying to bridge the gap between leaders in their people. That's really the first thing. So I'm gonna jump on that this one's for you. Meg. So if people have to you have to make people understand as Rachel was just explaining as a first step, so they can buy into this. But what does it actually take to get your people to go into battle for you? So there's all levels of understanding, and when you're shifting that mindset, but the very top level is that embassador Reid who would do anything to be part of that team in that culture. So what would you say? That meg. Yeah. I the culture that I use a lot in explaining or talking with an executive team about what what they're looking for is think about a college sports team. So let's pick on might wave fronts team is the Notre Dame the fighting Irish rate. I mean, those people paint their bodies it's freezing cold and snowing. They don't have any clothes on the pets not running their nose. They've spent twenty five dollars on own finger that their drunken will lose somewhere. I mean. But they in it doesn't matter if that team's winning ING, they are screaming in bleeding hearts until the very end. Uber fans right there in one of the fans of their fans of the thing that it is in so organizations. Have the find thing that it is now it's not quite as much fun. You know, like, let's pick on a manufacturing firm who's making widgets. It's not quite as much. Fun to find the thing that it is for normalization when somebody's going to work in doing their actual J O B everyday, but readership team has to believe so passionately in the way that they're changing the world improving the world, and then do a really great job. Which is what we help them with in explaining that in language as Rachel said that their teams understand, and then that way those teams will go in bowl into battle with you. No matter what you decide to do in the other thing, that's really really important. Maybe even more important than finding the thing that it is is making sure that you've developed trust. And that all comes out and making sure you're transparent with your people. And I think that's actually the thing that most organizations problem struggle with 'cause there is a certain amount of information that you do have to keep a close to your keep your hand post your just on a as an executive team. But I think. It's really important that wherever possible be super transparent with your workforce because that develops trust in the trust develops that winking arms and going into battle together. Right tristen transparency through communication. So you talked about sort of hurt a barrier their communication if you're not gaining the trust are there. Any other barriers that would prevent a culture from taking root in getting these Uber champions on the inside your there's actually a lot and our probably our biggest one that we face is people's discomfort with change, generally. And what really is powerful about what we've developed is that we we look at we have developed four types of people in how they like to work. And once you understand what types of people you have in your organization in the sense of the work environment that they prefer. Then you understand how they move through change. So you and I and Magar probably all fixtures, which means that we want to change the world. We rely a little chaos in our lives, although you have a stop watch out. So you might feel a little more order. Yes. So we look to the chaotic where people that like that three week all at freedom. We will that like that freedom in their day. They're going to jump on that change in love it. They might even want to help you figure out how to change more. And but the people that aren't don't like that chaos. They really and it's not because they're being jerks. They really feel like the wasting are just fine. And they're going to live with it for the rest of time, and you have to be. So if you understand how those guys in women worked together, and how their brain works, then you can help move through the transition much faster and much more with much more excitement because executive around change could be can be tweaked just a little bit become excitement around change that you've got to kind of know who we have in what strategies of that communication that you can employ to get them. They're really putting that you just said that the enzyme can become. Excitement in this is a life lesson. Right. Doesn't even if we're not talking about culture and people in the organization shifting anything. You do that's new that is stepping out of your comfort zone. When you get that feeling of. Oh, gosh. I gotta do this. You turn that into. Oh, I'm gonna do this. And you just have a whole different perspective rate. Yeah. It's really powerful. In fact, people tell us all the time like you mentioned in front of the show that change is hard people. Don't like it, you know, really changes thrilling changes thrilling, if you think about all the big decisions you've made whether it's go out on a first date or get married or have a child or by a fancy new car or by house or whatever big decisions you've made that make you feel that little anxiety. We just hired our full first full-time vice president of sales. That's exciting. It's exciting. It's a little mix election. Remember in our all it's a big change for us. But we're so excited about it. But people don't like to be anxious. They don't like to walk on bells. And so if you give them the reasons to be excited, they will be excited in we've seen literally from one day to the next teams pivot from just disastrous anxiety unspoken conversations than and then you talk about the things and you get him excited in the next day. They're completely different. And so it actually isn't as hard as we make it out to be the structures of our companies make it heart. We don't have to make art. I was just going to say that the the institution itself for as long as it takes for the culture to route. Do you think in Meg maybe you might want to jump in on this does it necessarily take that long to see a new transformation? Full depends on the size of the organization depends on the buying of from. The top. And then all the way through. It depends drew on the health of the organization in terms of how big of a mess. Are you a how big? Asian when you decide to implement a change. But the reality is is that once a mouth people in enough could maybe just be read, you know, at the executive level on that note through down from there. But once enough people grab onto that change and refuse to use words like can't or this is hard. Or, you know, they always just talk about this is operatives for us. We can be innovative. We have new ways to think about things have a new lease on life perspective. Everyone will start eventually whipping over and it it it really wouldn't take that long. And I guess what is that long? Maybe a couple months in a huge organization, maybe a couple of days or a couple of weeks in mid sized organization. Amac could happen in one meeting. I mean, Rachel I've seen it happen in a meeting before. So it really depends on the buying in the health of your donation, but it doesn't have to take. Long time. Like, we all think it does. That's fantastic. Because then it doesn't seem so daunting this change in transformation. Meg rachel. I'm just gonna ask you to hold your thoughts for a moment. So that I can share a little bit about our sponsor. Who is prep dish heavy the review ever heard of I haven't. Yeah. I have not. And it sounds like it's gonna make my life easier. So please tell us more. But love that you said that so. Blooming. Tell you about prep dish. It's a subscription based meal planning service that saves you a lot of time and helps make your dinners a lot more appealing in really delicious. So I'm learning through firsthand experience for me practice took away a couple of one question in one statement that I heard far too often the, oh, what's for dinner, and that would be a five o'clock, and I would never know. And then it was the Ono nut that again. So let me tell you a little bit about prep dish in how it works. Every week you receive a weekly meal plan with a grocery list, you know, exactly up front all of the ingredients that you're going to need a so you can prep for that week in you just go when you do your shopping you set aside to three hours to prepare everything in advance. So prepping on a Sunday means you'll be set up for the entire week. I have found recipe. As that. I really love added to my favorite's list. So I wanna share with the two of you. If you like kale, the kale salad with pomegranate and avocado, and I also really liked the mushroom in cal- for Todd cups. So yes, I am into Cal. And I can tell that. But you might wanna check out some of the other recipes, they're really good. If you think about it. Prepped ish helps you meals to be easier. Mine are and you're saving time, and that is a precious commodity. So with my schedule little bit crazy all the time. I let prep dish do the planning for me. But here's the best part win worldwide listeners can take advantage of practice offer. So you can go to prep dish dot com forward slash worldwide and get two weeks of practice free. So I think you should try it. I know. Oh, you're gonna love it. British dot com Ford slash worldwide. And I'm really excited for listeners to try prep dish because it's that easy. All right. Let's just dive right back into segment to here's we're going to pivot a little bit more to you ladies to get to know you professionally and to kind of find out what's on your minds. So I would like to know because we certainly talked about how you came together as partners all the way that you met in how you complement one another. But it does make a question. Do you always agree? And if you don't agree how do you handle differences? I'll take that one. I guess I met can offer her rebuttal, which is will absolutely happen. No, no, the fun thing about having partner is the thing. I love is that you share all of the highs and lows. Right. So you're not in the loan. And that really talks speaks a lot to how we're wired again to our icy everything through culture types. Now, it's our it's our typing system, we we'd love people. And so we live to to help others. And so having someone in the fight with you is is critical, but we don't agree on things. And so we, but that's the fun part. We again, it's it's that attitude of of growth and valuing other people's perspectives. And you know, I always say that I like to be the dumbest person in the room. And because I am a expert in some things, but I'm idiot in others. And so I wanna be surrounded by people that disagree in the challenge. My sumptious in the tell me when I'm not thinking about things in. The way they do in. How do we figure out how to get there? So, you know, it's really a collaboration and sometimes one of us just has to give up our opinion because you know, some things you can't compromise on like a client that you might want. The other person might not want to take on or whatever it might be. So I love I really do. I think there's a trust that has to build up because just like you said break, Joel if you're going to whether it's give up or or given because there is no real compromise in the middle you trust the other person nag, maybe you want to jump in. Yeah. Well, you know, I am I rish. Saw. I dislike input argument because. And Rachel's, the scientists likes argue about everything so, you know, that's difficult. How we Munich eight is basically arguing that we've created it. Is down. It's we have down to a fine science where you know. It's not an argument. It's really just a discussion about how we're going to proceed forward. And so, you know, yes, we both think it's important because that's what really helps us bro is to discuss things and understand other perspectives. I think the one thing that really keeps us going on the right path. Even when we don't agree on everything that we always been ourselves back to what's our real goal. Our real goal is to make an impact in the in the world in how people see their job than how how businesses done, and then what are other goals in our four core values within arm's ation. And so let me say all right will based on that. What what can we agree more asset? So, yeah, we love our view, and it serves us, really. Well, no, it's great that you have that kind of dynamic after you know, just brings the I think of families how some those families get toge-. And even though they're all arguing talking over one another. They're still love admiration. Your is just a way of communicating, but the fact that you could be so grounded in always bring it back to your goals in core values is definitely how you're successful in in. How you can move forward. And on that note. I'd love to ask the question because as entrepreneurs in business there are those ups and downs. But maybe each one of you can comment on what has been the most rewarding part of being in business. So Rachel that's trust. You I well the very biggest thing for me is getting to choose my destiny right to your own adventure. We get to decide what we're doing when and don't get me wrong. There's still the daily grind the the things that you don't wanna do. But it's you choose to do it. And so that's incredibly empower. Thing. I think though, the most rewarding part is just share a little example of something that we just found out about yesterday. I think maybe the day before was we found out that two people last week when that we know that have the just the that we know it as colleagues in sort of they're totally imbedded in J O B's. They one is in a of vertical like a fundraising vertical and the other one is in manufacturing vertical. So completely different kinds of humans completely different in styles of leaders, and they went in for job interviews for promotions and outside their company, and they took our book with them. And to talk about how as new leaders in organization. They were going to create better cultures better teams because they believed in what we had to say they wanted to share the an actually took in shared that book. With their interview panels. That's huge. What is so huge honor? This is the most stressful time in their career maybe their life, and they took us with them as having their back. And I just thought that was the biggest compliment, I think I've ever gotten is awesome. That is such a gift amazing night. How about you? Can you talk that? That's kind of a show. Stealer. Totally is. I mean, it affects you too it could be your rose rewarding moment as well. Yeah. It actually is my most rewarding moment of in Brighton. Current anyway. But I would say since we're on a podcast women worldwide. I grew up in a small ranching community in western South Dakota, oldest of three girls. And of course, my folks never said he couldn't do anything. I mean, I I don't even I still to my demise. Sometimes especially in hot yoga, like I still think I could do everything. Anything I want to and you know, but the the world doesn't always treat you like that's possible, especially your female, especially if you're trying to make it in the business moral, and I think the most rewarding thing about being successful both in a career Anna's not for newer in adds, a female inst- to he know with that book coming out is like, yeah, you damn right? I am awesome. Though. I guess I think outside of all the amazing amazing ways where impacting people's lives of professional. I'm personally really the way. What's show? What has been shown to me, is perseverance does pay off in that? If you're smart and motivated work hard. You can do literally anything you want to. I agree. Then you need the passion in the perseverance. So I I mentioned the ups and downs before and clearly what you've pointed out. What are the highs the rewards you mentioned success? So what about challenges would you share in Rachel will start with you on? What do you think is been maybe your toughest challenge or challenges as an entrepreneur business owner, and author, you know, it's really hard to. I think when I first started actually hit five years October. I which I will celebrate adequately kinda pass me by noticing. But you know, those first starting out moments when you're not really sure it's really about not being confident in what you have to offer in not being sure that anyone's gonna give you money to support. How you think the world can be changed? And there's a lot of just self chatter internal head talk about that. And then, of course, there's always the exile about money writers that money mindset. Right. And you know. Analyst that sort of poverty can like the the concern that I might not be able to make my mortgage payment. I left that quite a while ago. That happens when you first start because you're just you have to convince your own brain that it's it's gonna work. But for today, I think the biggest challenge was honestly, taking on mega partner in the sense of you know, I was my own boss. I just stood wherever the hell I wanted in. That was the thing. And actually, I was quite successful. I was really lucky I was a solo produer. But you know, I felt like that wasn't enough. So at some point I felt like okay, I've gone over the hurdle of can I make it to I wanna make a bigger difference in. So deciding to bring Mang on that was really a tough choice or invite make to partner with me because I knew I wouldn't get there's a limit. There is a limitation with with more people less. I had to make twice as we're making. We're making team. Mm-hmm. So that part, but scheming about how you're going to do that together was way outweighed the potential exciting stress about are we gonna make it as two people 'cause I wasn't willing to have my income. And so that meant we had to double our income. But it also meant that if we're going to double it, why not quadruple it why not ten exit. And so we actually ended up with these ridiculous at the time. Not so ridiculous now revenue goals that we now every day. We think about like, okay? Will this get us closer to our real goals both revenue and passion goals might? It's really exciting. So the heart the heart stuff, always leads to exciting. So definitely it. So prescient your transparency about taking on a partner because that is always a it's a big decision, especially for a solo preneurs. So what would you say about tough challenges as an entrepreneur business owner? Or in the past or now? Well, you know, I think like Rachel said there's the stuff that's every day. Even it's kinda funny. How of your perspective sort of roots itself in whatever challenges you're having at the moment. So, you know, you go from feeling like there might be some starvation or famine ham, make your mortgage or whatever to gee, I don't know if I have enough money in my savings account feel comfortable because I really liked to make, you know, an extra three payments on my house this month, or you know, whatever it is. So one of the challenges. I think that exist is a challenge is always exist. I think a lot of people get it in their head that like a like Damon John's of the world don't worry about anything on all you're still worrying about something all the time. Whether it's figuring out how to create a new product or make your car payments. It doesn't really matter. There's always something to be thinking about. And so that's a challenge to me that. Because I'm a fixer, and I'm a preemptive fixer. So I want I wanna fix things before they're broken in solve the fact that something's always sort of challenging I won't say broken. But something's always challenging manage feel like I can't ever get ahead of the bus. So I guess that would probably be one thing that's challenging the thing. To me. I suppose it's been the most challenging is thinking about how to make sure you know, as non for new her in a as a non for Noor with business partner. How do you make sure that you're contributing all the time in making sure that everything is moving forward in the. The the wheels don't fall off the bus in. So always thinking about that in the Kazakh days where there is, you know, like, we're always busy with their days where there isn't a lot to be done. And so I came from corporate world where there's always something to be done because while I was nature. So someone's always making it has to be fixed of so to go from that environment where you're literally working or doing something or fixing some problem refining some event or whatever all day long to having time to sit down and really curate your thoughts and think about you know, what's going to happen next. Those days are challenging for me. Absolutely. Thank you for sharing that in you know, as I was listening to you. And also thinking about what Rachel said challenges can be stressful. And this is where I would love to hear how you kind of manage that stress, sir there certain stress busters because man like you said. Said there's always going to be challenges. And you know, I think they're supposed to be there. Because you never wanna stop keep every hurdle. You jump over. There's something in the bigger picture in in your closer to your goal. So what about stress busters? Rachel can you jump in on on how you're managing stress. The one thing I protect viciously is music. I sing in a small chamber chorale, and I use it as my drug of choice. I have beautiful. I love it. I into singing is really I can listen to music makes me happy. But for me singing with the group and being part of a bigger group. And and I do so the work too. But I just there's something yummy about music in chords in court progression that just really hits that dopamine trigger for me in. So every Tuesday night. I don't care what the world is falling down. I am going to choir. That's great in protected that for like ten it's like abandoned at ten years now unfit. I've missed if I'm in town. I have never missed a rehearsal. So that's what I do. That is awesome. I I left to sing to. I don't think anybody wants to hear me sing where I think in your case, you probably have a beautiful voice, you're saying that reaper water like anything, you know, with practicing better. When I first started ten years ago, I had not sewn in a I haven't seen it in a group since I was in like freshman year college, which was a time Oma heading grade to go try Bill love before. They have a your stress BUSTER. Yeah. My stress BUSTER is running and if I can get out on the trail and preferably somewhere where there are another. Human beings are like human noises cars and things like the whole world sort of fades away, and I don't think about much of anything. But that's when I also have my best moment, so running his my drug of choice and wine never heard. Yeah. That we review I guess mine. Meg. Hopefully, the wine is after you running enough before jet. I guess let's get that timing. Right. Okay. Thank you for sharing stress busters because women relied listeners everybody out. There has stressed. So it's always good to hear from others who were super busy entrepreneurs hectic days with challenges what you're doing to combat stress with to ask you an advice question at this point for both of you. Once your best advice to other professionals who are looking to make that shift. Let's say shifting culture in actioning behaviors to reach your goals. So Rachel, we think for me, it's a lot of people are afraid of change and my advice to to those women is to start small, you know, so many people wait in an are frayed of these huge things like leaving their job or getting a new job or going out on their own. You know, what don't take it on? So massively start small. Go to that first choir rehearsal. Go to a new cafe go to a new networking of do something small that feels challenging to you. But doable. And then do that once a week or every other week in over time, you're gonna feel much more confident that you can take on new things that you're not even though you're afraid or nervous that it's all going to be better than you're going to grow in yourself confidence about new things. And then you want to build that culture. We want wanna go to your leader or be that leader, it feels much more approachable and less scary. And so a lot of things stop this the fear of failing stops a lot of people for doing everything. So that's where I would start. It sounds like you're getting some small winds right along the way to build up confidence. So start small. Absolutely. And celebrate those we always wait to celebrate. Until we get the building built, you know, sorry to earth's floor. Or celebrate. The fact you have indoor plumbing or whatever it is. Like celebrate along the way. Okay. So that you don't wait to feel great about what you're doing mother. That's important every day to celebrate. Meg what about you? What what's your advice mind? Feis would be to really know know, your core values are things that are important to you in just don't ever band on them. And that might mean that you leave a job or company that you thought it'd be with forever inside this really great career path or it might mean that you start your own business and you're scared to death. That sounds obviously like I'm reciting my my own history. But I guess I just always people would say to me, especially when I was working in corporate America. You can't say that you can't do that. Or you can ask for that. Especially as a woman can't ask for that. You can't ask for raise or whatever I always did his I thought, well, you know, the worst they can say is no. And I've been told no while, but you just don't know if you don't ask them, then you start to harbor some bad feelings than than. Before you know, it you don't believe in the change that you're trying to make either in your own life or in your career yards -ation. So I would say, you, know know, your core values frost, your gut in just go for because at the end of the day is long as you're feeling good about what you're doing rest of the world will kind of float along with it. That's really the device it. It sounds like you're saying be true to yourself. Yup. Well, ladies, thank you so much. Excellent. Vice from both of you. This is a super easy question. Whoever wants to jump in where can people find out more about you, your work and your new book while I will if you want to check out the book, I XE leadership dot com will get you where you need to go to get the book in our website and fuller more about as were pretty active on social media. So you go to Lincoln or Twitter, you're gonna find us out there sharing. Both our work at other people. Great work at some of the challenges questions that we have love to hear from people at those places too fantastic. Rachel Meg thank you so much both of you for taking the time to be my special guest today on women worldwide. We so appreciate your insights on culture, change the. I x no in leadership. We've learned a lot from you today. So thank you. Thank you so much for having us is really. Yeah. It was pleasure cre-. Thank you. And I also wanna thank our sponsor prep dish for sponsoring this episode of women worldwide Dover, get listeners, you can go and get your free two week trial. Just go to prep dish dot com for slash worldwide. And also to all of you listeners out there. Tune in every week helping to amplify the voices the purpose and the passion the person were. Thank you for fuelling, women worldwide our network. With energy and a lot of inspiration. And remember, you can always tell us how you're feeling you can go on itunes rate, the show give us a shout out on Twitter, or this know, how you're feeling on Facebook to okay, friends until our next episode. Stay focused, energized and feeling empowered. Thank you.

Meg rachel executive Meg Meg partner South Dakota Dr Rachel MK Headley Rachel Bank rose group international Rachel Meg Ceac Rachel night business owner Deirdre Breckenridge Zillow Meg senior partner Twitter Neo Natal Google
Creating High Performing Teams with Dr. Rachel Headley

The MECE Muse Unplugged Podcast - Helping New or Aspiring Consultants on Their Journey to Greatness

33:39 min | 3 years ago

Creating High Performing Teams with Dr. Rachel Headley

"What we do in science, at least in the kind of science. I do is we take very different ideas, and try to find the commonalities connections across very different disciplines and try to bring together a whole story. And I think the reason I love business consulting so much is because that's what we do as business consultant. You now tuned into the mec- muse unplugged, a pop-up podcast variety show helping consultants along their journey to greatness with your host, management, consultant, Walter, and globe Christie Lynn dogs. Hey, my go get her. Welcome to Amisi muse unplugged guard touched show. I'm Christie indoor Super Bowl to be your host, and we're actually doing episode forty nine today. We're gonna be talking about high performing teams on topic for me actually really near and dear to a lot of the work that I do. So I'm really excited about today's gust her name is Dr Rachel heavily it about, Dr Hadley. She is actually go getters a PHD scientist turned consultant, she's the founder of the rose group international of goosey consulting firm focus on organizational cultures. Dr Headley's also a coach, anti tech speaker. And as I mentioned, we're going to have a little bit about high-performing teams talk about her journey and how she kind of really made that transition from being. Being, you know, kind of in the science field, and really going into more of a consultative type of faith, and we'll also talk a bit about her headaches journey as well. And some of the things that she shares it's really super cool conversation today. So I hope you check it out. We also go getters. I wanted to make sure that you had lake to my talk. I know I had mentioned it. I think my previous episode, and I actually also have recently posted the transcript of how a lot of people ask me about the transcript. So I've posted it out air. So I'll add Alba links to the show notes as we normally do. And also, I've actually started to get some really cool ideas of names or the future podcast show. And so I wanna kinda put some of the ones out there. Exploding actually had go gutters. I've actually had some of you share you the name. I don't know if it's because you used to the current name these things unplugged. Or if people don't wanna change over not sure. Yes. So now, if you're just tuning and in the last episode, I did mention that, you know, we're going to be kind of shutting this showdown, and in the fall, I will be watching a new podcast show, and I was asking listeners to provide some things to right now, a couple names that's been floated, obviously, the Christie Lindores show. I think again that was my default. But I felt like it was boring. Another name actually someone stopped me was the go, gutter podcast, which sounds really full and, you know, one of my favorite sayings. So I'm definitely considering that now third is just keeping the name as the saints and just maybe taking a break in just restarting it up with my new missions. So those are the three deans running fill free to drop me a line these sees unplugged at L dot com. Let me know what you think, you know, over Lincoln Levy, nor think of future of new name for a show or keep this name and just take a break. So we'll continue the conversation on the new podcast show today. Let's get started. Rachel, thank you so much for joining us on the news on plot. How're you doing today? Take her see things for having me. I am great. Thank you so much for being on today's show. I'm really thrilled to have you. We're going to have a really great conversation about a topic that is near and dear to my heart, and I know it is other go getters out there around high performing teams in so before we talk about that. I wanna take a step back and with love Rachel for you to introduce yourself to the go getter of the museum. Thank you. I actually go by Dr Rachel Headley, because I spent a lot of my life as a page scientist, working with satellite data on land, sat satellite mission. So the first ten years of my career in the second ten years of my career, Spence as the operational science officer of that same mission. And that's what got me really excited about high-performing teams. And the it's not just some magic thing that you do it's actually leadership choice and then about five. Ago. Now I started consulting business consulting around that very thing around high intellect. Hi tech, high science companies that is such an interesting background, and it seems increasingly, you know, I continue to hear people that are scientists or in the science in that space that's transitioning into consulting that seems to be a trend seen over the years. How did you decide that was the pivot you wanted to do Wilson? Interesting are I think, you know, these days, especially for independent, people we go into as young individuals who go into college thinking, we have to decide on the saying in the redo the saying when we sort of over our life, you know, sort of wander around and finds the next fun thing to do. So for me it was I love science is still a science might Ted ex was, you know, connected the science with the humanity part of it of the world's unloved all of that, in an interesting thing about science is what we do in science, at least in the. Of science. I do is we take very different ideas, and try to find the commonalities connections across very different disciplines and try to bring together a whole story. And I think the reason I love business consulting so much is because that's what we do as business consultants as your go getter audience knows is go into a client organization. We try to figure out what's going on from everyone's perspective in how can we put together a whole picture? So it's actually the mechanics of it are very similar, and frankly, the older, I got the more. I realized that it's all about the humans, so about the people in how we all interact as team in interact together in how do we make our lives better every day? So that's kind of how my life sort of merged from hard science to leadership in a big team science team into the business world where I now still help grow and create teams slightly different way. All right. We'll said I would agree with you. There's definitely is sounds like there are synergies within consulting in. Science disciplines. What would you say is your definition of great consultant? That's a great question alumni question, a great consultant is someone who has the knowledge that it takes to actually provide value to their clients, and that can be in lots of different ways we work with risk people. We work with communications experts, but you have to have the base knowledge and frankly, I think you have to be pretty good at figuring people out, and you also have to be aware that what you're not good at. And so I think those are kind of the three basic things about how knowing win to say. You know that's a great question. I don't understand or don't have that background. Let me bring in someone who does because you really, we are anchored, my companies, anchored in providing the absolute highest hospital value, and as long as we're doing that in a very genuine way, I think that's what makes great consulting awesome, awesome. And earlier you mentioned about your tech. Dig a chance to check it out and, and go getters. We'll make sure we put a leak out in the show notes with your attacks that you did. So can you just share a little bit about, you know, that your venture? I just did a tech stocks. I'm all about taxes. These days graduation. Thank you. So I would love to hear about your story. And how did you decide to talk about earthly planetary impacts noble not store? I would love to see the background of. Yeah. My real intention of my Tech's is to sort of showcase a life mantra. I have, which is there's ways to have everyone worked together. You just have to find those ways, especially when business in high-performing teams in teaming in my opinion, there's very few bad actors truly it's really about communication values accountability. So once we get everybody on the same page, there's always ways to help people work well together. And so really what I want to talk about was my Tech's was that idea. But how I did it was? A used satellite imagery and talked about the humans impact on the planet. Very directly whether it's cutting down for a store, planting crops, or turnober, which was a technical disaster, but perpetuated by humans, and I want to use that as just a beautiful backdrop because frankly at sexy in fawn and, you know, who doesn't wanna look at beautiful pictures of the earth, but also relate, the humanity in how humans impact the earth, but it's not always bad. It's not always irreversible in how do we, you know, the answers of really complicated problems are never at the extremes. It's always somewhere in the middle. And that's really the message I wanted to drive home, and so people that wanna see it as an environmental talk can see it that way. Some people see it as a political talk and you can see it that way. But really, it's about how that we really need to work together to solve the most complicated problems and that's why I love teamwork. Now, when you did your tax where you still working as a scientist or had you transitioned into the consulting room. No, I've been working in the consult. Thing for four years at that point. Okay. Okay. Awesome. I love it. And again go getters, we'll put the link out there. I know you talked earlier a little bit about rose brew for those get as interested. Maybe just share a little bit about what your company does specifically like what are some of the service offerings? They think it's so so unique will we have rose group? We have two partners do the thought leadership for the company's me and my business partner Maggie, and what we do together is we've created some IP around how to actually create high-performing teams how to overcome barriers between let's say leadership and staff or relooked at vertically through an organization how we could improve communications team in value accountability. And so the actual programs we offer our much usually very long depends. We have arranged but our most favorite thing to do is come into a company and really fix them. Them. So one of the things we do as a quick example is, we have a financial software company. We work with the leadership in our finance folks, and the people are actually doing the work our young engineers. They have very different working styles. Leadership likes to have a lot of understanding in control staff likes a lot of freedom wants to just move forward as fast as they can. And so after two and a half years or so they have a hard time even talking to each other. They're so frustrated. And so we come in, and we say, okay, we're all in this together, we all want the same things. How do we move forward? And so, when we do those kinds of programs, that's year, commitment, usually, at least, because it just takes a long time for people to take on new things really change a culture. We also do Meg loves to prevent this kind of problem. And so she loves to train, frontline supervisors Meg has a group of consultants, she works with she'll go into a company and train all front line supervisors their supervisors, and, you know, help them really establish leadership culture, and so we do both. Ways I love to come into a really early problem help fix it. And she loves to prevent those problems from ever happening. So we work on both ends of the leadership and culture spectrum. Nice is actually a nice segue to our topic for today around high-performing teaming. I would love for you to talk a little bit more about your research that you've done in the space, but before we do that, maybe you can share a story with us. You know, maybe I'll let you choose a story of the best team you've ever been on what made it so great or the worst team. You've been on it, and what made it so terrible. Yeah. We thought a lot about this topic because, of course. That's really what drove us to do the research. We did create the solutions. We have and for me, I was like at team. And I save my very broadly. Right. It was a still on ownership because it was such a powerful experience. The team I helped manage, so there was a four percent management team in we have about one hundred fifty engineers that we lead that team was incred. Edible. And that's really what an interesting thing about this incredible team. So they were incredibly smart experts in their fields, but they knew that they needed the other people in the room to do the entire project. So one of the really powerful things I loved about working engineers is that they are working with engineered really work for them right in a servant leadership mentality. Anyway, I really loved, how they were really great at their job. But they also knew that they weren't everything. And so that was really a, we have to get all the horses, pulling in the same direction kind of Bob, no matter what challenge I laid before them and the management team lay before them. I was part of the team that migrated from cost model, so we would charge houses of dollars per image. Make about five million dollars a year and sell about twenty five thousand images that was the forecast model and we transferred over to a free model so now you can get data for free all over the world. And that transition was massive overwhelming. Some people. Thought it'd be a death spiral for the mission. We actually lost our leader because she didn't want to be the one that was in charge with this, all this shit happens. And it was really stressful time. But we really challenged our team name stepped up. They released ahead of schedule with nobody's we ended up distributing. So when we were charging it was twenty five thousand images, a year we ended up distributing twenty five thousand images day for the free model and now they've distributed, something like eight million images all over the world. We have forty thousand plus users in the community. It was just really inspiring team environment. And I just learned so much from working with them and guiding helping guide the team, the interesting thing about that, though is at the very same time the building the organization that we were in was falling down around us. The very top brass at the organization were asked to resign because of a little scandal, which was nothing. It was sort of created to get rid of them the whole. Place was big culture of the building was just becoming Warren, more insular, more and more sad. Three one hated to go to work. And in the meanwhile here was lying team in the middle of just really being incredible. And so it was really great dichotomy to watch what not to do and what you still could do as a leader and what the differences were, and that's really what got me really excited about teamwork. That's awesome. And so maybe you can start there and sheer little bit about the research you did, and looking at the personality, the different personality types on teams and INA shears some insights for especially go getters you know as consultants I think ninety nine point nine percent of our experiences are on project teams. And so it's always nice like you said to be on a team. We are, you know, you're energize. But when it's bad it's bad right as you just mentioned. It's really bad. So maybe you can share a little bit of the insights. You've picked up through the efforts you've done so. So what we really started. Looking into was what really drives team. And we were really curious about the change because whenever go-getters go into an organization. You are trying to instill some kind of change on the landscape and it has to happen change has to happen has happened in a team environment. And so we are really interested in the crossroads of that experience. So how do we create the highest value, and get people through that changes quickly as possible to the good, and so with the least pain, and actually, if you do change right in a team, you can actually create a high performing team through change? So that was what we really were trying to get to the root up. And so we started looking at were for the people on the team. So we've created four different culture types in a team environment. But since I know you guys love kind of the how this all gets put together, I'll spend just a second talking about the intellectual side of it. So what we really felt like there's two axes that we want to think about one. Is some people really love to work in a team embedded in a team. And then some people love to work alone or by themselves, and they prefer to work on independent projects. The other hacks that we looked at was were a lot of people really love order in their life, and they like predictability, they like to know that they're gonna paycheck every week and it's going to be this, and this is how they can be promoted. This is how they can excel. So some people really prefer that order. And then some people really love much more freedom, freedom to decide what to do everyday freedom to decide how to make it better. Make the team better to decide how to problem solve. And so those are really the two axes that we felt like if we could get a handle on how you fit in to those two things those two angles, we could really help strategize about how to make things happen for you. So Christie, I would imagine that you are fixer what we call a fixer a fixer really loves problem solving for the betterment of the environment or the team. So. You love working with a team but you love to come in and solve problems for people. And if you are on my team, and we had a big change coming, I would reach out to you and say Christie, we have this big challenge. Coming up. How do you think we should tackle this? What do you think will resonate with the staff? What do you think we can do that will make it exciting and interesting instead of scary? And so because I know you're fixer, I would give you challenges that would energize and excite you. I mean, you can't always do everything every day, something that's fantastic. But I know what gets you going. What excites you? And then if you're an organizer who loves to create order out of chaos in those are you can work on your own pretty well. But you really love order, I would say you know what we have all this data. We have all of this information. Check this out in read through it. Let me know what you think about what the data tells us about this change that were coming up with because that's going to be the thing that you're gonna really love. And so what we figured out is, if we can get you in one of these categories we can strategize about how to. Motivate you excite you what you're afraid of how to allay those fears, a not just super charges the team in the environment. That's awesome, awesome. Do you have any advice for people that are joining a team like a newbie consultant? Let's say listening to this and is hairiness in saying that makes sense. Like, how would you give them vice to break this down into kind of an actionable for stop if they're just joined a new team or they're on a team? That's like I like to call them runaway trains there on a team that's in really bad shape. Like, how would you use this rape? A love that analogy totally using that way training, algae run off, but nobody can write yet. No, we use it, and how it's exciting for everyone else to use frankly is it's really powerful because you can immediately figure out if you're a dysfunctional team, we can immediately figure out almost every time. I don't know if it's ever not happened with the sort of the root of the communication challenges because that's really what it was down to most. Of the time or values alignment issue. And so what we do is we go. And we give them a little quiz. Well for clients, we give them a bigger quiz. But it's really based on all of this personality profiles that we know Myers. Briggs dials, all of the things I can pretty much guaranteed. It anything that you've heard of about personality profiles, we've looked at and what we've done is we've embedded those into our culture, types, and so it works phenomenally, well, and so what we do is we give them some questions, and then we can put you in a quadrant, and then it's a great way to have a conversation. A brand new conversation about looking at what the challenges might be in a totally new way. So it really everyone loves it for several, I don't know what it is about personality. Profiling in stuff, but people just really dig it. And then it gets them to say, oh, well, you are this kind of person that means this thing. And the reason that we like our approach better than a straight personality profile is that we embed, the ways that you work in a team. So. If I know I'm an EMT J as in a Myers, Briggs, I cannot possibly figure out how I interact with the fifteen other personalities on my team. It's just who over Wellman we've really shortcut it all that to say, okay, we've taken all information turned ninety degrees. And this is how you work in a team environment. And that immediately resonates with everybody, and they can start really fixing in addressing communication challenges, and that's how we use it. We go in and just we said, okay, you're are you need to know this who in this room knows the data behind that question? And so it's just really away to be up front about how people work in kind of, in a way that's every one of our categories is very positive. There's no losers quote unquote. Everyone is who they are. And we value them as who they are. And that's a really important promise. My right. Do you find from my experience, working with different personality instruments, and working with different teams? Have you found with your assessment that people in certain cultures tend to? To value particular archetype, her filed more than another. Have you found that with yours because I've found that in some groups they think like, oh, if I'm analytical right? And I just totally made this up. But if I'm analytical, I know that my firm or the people, I work with values that, so I would want to be. I wouldn't wanna be like, you know, the happy go lucky person right on the profile. Do you find that with yours? Absolutely. In fact, we've been using it now for about two years. And we actually over time have relabelled one of the categories because we really found men and some women didn't feel like it was a good thing, like it's what we call a connector, which is really the glue that holds a team together, you know, they're the ones that gets done. They're the ones that are dependable. They sort of deal with all the craziness that some other people have like the anti drama people. They don't wanna drama. They wanna just come to work and get job done and be. At their job. And if you're a leader of the newer, connector means that you really try to protect your team from all the chaos, that might be going up above you, which I think is one of the most valuable things that you could do, but a lot of people really thought felt connector was to like soft or weak. And so we actually changed the label to stabilize her because that's really what they do. And that feels a little stronger for people feels like a car part or something, I don't know. So, you know, for some reason that languaging we needed to change, because we really don't want people to feel like there's winners, and losers in the room because single person, of course, contributes in a very important way to the team environment. And we want to make sure that there wasn't someone in the corner, like in disk. We're just talking about this recently with a client in disk. There's one kind of they sort of sit over in the corner, and they feel like they're not worthy of respect. Now. We absolutely do not want that. We want to see everyone is like, oh, that's who you are not as cool. That's, that's why we were pretty careful with. That's awesome. That's awesome that you have that type of flexibility with the instrument. Now they on Monday. Consultant and all Christie Lindell chance, quit based on fifteen years of experience Lucking top in a new book. Bluffs elected practice on. The right consultant. Views. Nights consulting. Profession Christie conducted research connected industry, twenty seven professional. She makes it great consultant. To date. WWW dot news. Don't you? If you have a team and I'm gonna go back to a little bit of the example on image early. If you have a team nuts, let's go back to that runaway train if you've got one of those, which people do, and they're, they're horrible like what's the first step you would recommend that, you know, a go getter take to really start to try to turn the train around like what would be that for step the first step? Because when you get to that runaway train a lot of the times runaway train has been gaining speed over time. Right. So this is not a short term problem. And so what happens is feelings. Get hurt emotions. Get embedded in the everyday day-to-day, and you really have to get people to get up an out of that mindset. And so we always do, which is incredibly powerful, I think is that we interview people individually depending on the size of the team and all that sometimes we interviewed teams, but we interview people and what we do is we say, tell me about what your ideal day is what? Are you want this company to look like what do you want we deal with lot of start up? So that's like, in the startup world. But what do you want from your experience at work? What is your ideal day? And then we do that with everybody every team. And then at the end the day, we have an all hands meeting, and we bring everyone in the room when we say, this is what we heard from you start writing the list on the board. These are the things that we heard, and the great thing about that Kristie is that every single person in the room thinks it's their list because we heard the same thing from every single person. And all the sudden, everyone looks around and says, oh, we all actually want the same thing here. No. Exactly. We start talking about. Why are we working so hard against what this looks like what are the things that we need? And then it's a moderated conversation. Right. And then we talk about the hard things we speak truth to power, and we, we don't let sacred topics go on spoken. Don't let you know old wounds. Go on healed like we talk about not in a we're very masculine in our pro, we are not, you know, some people are great at sort of that softer. Let's sit in a circle in cry and you know, get all the stuff out and that is very powerful tool for some consultants is not our approach. It's much more. You know, let's pull on our big pants here and talk about what is going on. Let's get these problems. All that's much more direct. And my business partner would laugh at me because she hasn't this HR background, and she wants people to cry it out if they need to in on. I'm like, okay if you gotta cry goes. His we deal with business and businesses always run by men in as added that is we're getting better at it. You know, we're creasing are female leadership. But even then a lot of female leaders tend to be much more masculine than their approach Nash just resonates with us. So that's how we really tackle a lot of problems as all right? This is just a logic problem, folks. There's no mention your no-one's bad. No one's naughty. It's just a communication problem or it's an accountability issue. Let's just talk it out. You know. And that's how we, we really address it. Yeah. As you were describing your kind of the process of how everyone got together, and it turns out everyone had shared common goals at the end of a session. It just fascinates me in terms of humans. Right. Like in how the stories we make up our minds or in the day today interpretation of actions, how they just get so, like I don't know what's the word. It just gets modeled up to the point where you know. I've always found it so fascinating. Like how did we get here? Right. I don't know if you do if you've ever had like those off limits, you're like, how did they get to this point? You know where are they going to be in a year for now? Right. And that's important Arctic consider a lot of times we try to make a clean break. I mean, intellectually we go back to the hotel, where like, wow. What is going on with? How did this happen? You know. But in front of the staff, it's all about. I don't care what went on before. Now that ends today, you know, there's no finger pointing, there's no it was his fault. It was her fault. It was that team didn't do. Their thing is not. Okay. What do we do now to achieve the things that you've all said you wanted to and for us, it's choice? We talk all the time about living in choice. If you don't get a workout today, it's because you chose to use your time in a different way. It's not because you're too busy, or somehow victim of your circumstance that you chose to use. Sometimes a mostly it's reach us to use our time differently. Same with work. If you're unhappy at work, and you're the leader of that team in your team's unhappy, that is the lead. Ship choice within your power to change that. So we talk a lot about, you know, you have to own your circumstance and what's going on here, and we need to make the choice, took need to make the choices to change it. And everyone in the room needs to commit to doing that. Absolutely. Hashtag own your circumstance. We're gonna we're gonna gonna hashtag out one. I love it. You can't see, but I'm like shaking my head in violent agreement over here, me, too. Yes. Yes. Yes, yes. I'm gonna pivot for the last one of the last questions of the interview, I think I heard a rumor that you were potentially writing a book out, right? Yeah. Tell us about it. We are we are well, one of the things that we love about our approach that we've used it a lot. Now is that we've just figured out that we don't want to grow our company to be a huge stable of consultants that then have to answer to us most go-getters want to work for themselves, and we want to support those women men. And so we wanna do is starch sharing the way that we think about leadership in teams and especially our P around how you do culture work. And so the book is just very first start right now, the working title is called juice, because we are all about energizing, and making you want to go to work. That's really our goal is making every single person excited to go into work in the morning, which is very lofty. But we know it can do it, but we can't do that ourselves. So. We wanna do is start putting these techniques in the power of what we do in the hands of other like-minded go-getter independent consultants that want to really change the world and lead powerfully through their consulting business? So we're getting the book together, it's really about the culture types, that we've developed, and how you actually think about embedding that in the sort of traditional sort of count ability team, focus empathy. Like those really core leadership values that we all train on cochon and then but really changing culture is kind of an advanced skill for consultants. And so we kind of weave it into the basics until you how you would actually use it in a culture in a client, or in your own company, and then how to actually lead through change, which is like the top notch leadership challenge that we all face. And then we later this year once the book should be coming out, and the fall. We've got a great writer who supporting us. But when that book comes out what we really are going to start. Doing certifying consultants in our approach, so that when they on the landscape, they know that they have they really understand what it is. It really understand how to implement it. They can really use it to the highest value for their clients. So that will be the model that we move forward down twenty eighteen. Yeah. That sounds so exciting. I would love to stay connected with you. Have you come back on the show when you publish the book oh, that'd be great because it'll be really exciting. I mean it's all exciting time, but seeing it in having in hand is going to be really exciting. Yeah. For sure. For sure. Well, this was a fantastic conversation if, if people are interested in getting a whole view or doing work with the rose group, maybe you can share some ways people can reach out to you. Yeah. Well, I'm really active on Lincoln. So if you just search on Dr Rachel MK head late, you're gonna find me, and then our website is rose group. I n t l dot com. And so we have a if you wanna find out what culture type you are. We actually have. A quiz in it's a link right on the top frame of our website. You could find your culture type. If you wanna go check it out and a lot of our materials on there. We don't have a lot of the details because of course it's being trademark right now. So we are little careful about how much we reveal the details, but you can certainly find out a little bit about some network there will, thank you so so much for being on today show. It was such a blast. Oh, thank you so much for I love talking to like minded people really joy. Yeah. For sure for sure. And think you might go getters for tuning in today. This is Kristie Lindores signing out for the museum use unplugged pop-up podcast. Here's to your journey to greatness. Tune in every Friday for a new episode syndicated on itunes Google play music and many more, visit WWW dot muc- news dot com. For more information.

consultant Profession Christie scientist Dr Rachel Dr Rachel Headley Christie Lindores Kristie Lindores partner Amisi Lincoln Levy Dr Hadley Bob rose group Google Meg founder Wilson Christie Lynn