3 Burst results for "Head Of Product Development"

"head product development" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

12:29 min | 1 year ago

"head product development" Discussed on Superwomen with Rebecca Minkoff

"I know I talk a lot on this. podcast asked about my breasts and their need for something that hold them up. And Abby has answered my call. I really love her story how she founded her company and and also our product so take a listen about how she got her. Start some with Abby Morgan the CO founder of Cup. Hello see you. Up Yup. I just just one day and I'm not sponsored by Beautiful Bras and as soon as I'm done with my twenty one month old monkey sucking the life out of my my husband calms calms my frosting bags. I will be coming to you to give it so. Thank you for being here today. Thank you for having me. I discovered ever do you on instagram amazing and I was like that's a good Bra yes. I'm so happy that you think that I would love to hear like where like. How did you get started? Did want to enter the market. Yeah so I got started because I worked at free people for a long time and I saw. Aw like it was kind of at the beginning of the BRA taking off and it was all about you. Know How much lower can we get. And how like free. Can we be without wearing bras. And and it was great and it was amazing to kind of see that trend take off then. I had a friend who she's a thirty eight e and she was like Abbie. You're so mean. Do you know what this actually feels like. When you have boobs terrible it feels terrible? And she was like not only that but she's single close to forty and she. She was talking about the bras that she asked aware she has to like. Take off and then kick under her draw because she doesn't want the guy that she's hooking up with to see these bras. Yeah the Old Lady Bra Aasiya matronly and their slings and extra fabric and it's just like there wasn't an opportunity in the market for something that made her feel really sensual a made her feel all supported and beautiful so knowing that and then also going on my own Braga anywhere. I went to journal and I tried to get fit and and and I got fit by actually abroa- therapist that we hired cop after amazing And it was such a beautiful experience. It was like something that hadn't done since I was seventeen. Seventeen years old and Kinda just always thought. I was the thirty four C. and never wore Under wire bras because we're so uncomfortable 'cause they just kept sliding up and I finally went in and found out. I was thirty which I didn't even know that size existed. Well and so I was like I had this whole size. Stigma like I- Copying e cop like what does that mean in terms of my size and you also don't look like you're an e e I know because you don't realize that thirty you know. Twenty eight bands is to forty two bands like there's so many different body types in actual cup sizes. But because we've been kind of forced to think about or fit into seventeen sizes versus the a sixty that we actually should be in. We've kind of got this like size stigma around like what we think. Cup size should be I mean I thought he was like. Oh you should could have like Porn-star boobs or something like what. That's like crazy you know. What does that even mean Just this like negative commentator connotation sexually about like what that looks like and also how you should be wearing your you know how where your boobs are positioned on your body and and just kind of the different options that you even have a cup size like that right yet So really negative feelings with it so I got this Bra in an essentially there was one bright and my size at your now which is like the best I this is Manhattan can happen and I get this Bra and its own name it but it had like memory foam lace and it was just not my style at all you know it felt great so I wore it every single day but it was like a band aid nude that just didn't look very good and again like I'd take it off and not want to not want that'd be seen in it by my boyfriend and I was just thinking like this is you know I'm not that different of aside you know there's so many women who are also my size and power or they're just so limited options for what we actually feel sexy and supported in so that's the product side how I how I came to this but with my co founders also oh but I would say like the passion side is I've always had a extreme passion and curiosity about brands being callous for change it's like my mo since like I starting out worked video for one of just always had this like this passion about kind of we have a responsibility is brands. There's a beautiful movement that you can create with the brand. So how can I create something positive. That's actually making like real change in shape and culture in this world so when this opportunity came up and it was like I connected with my co founder who had done a lot of market research and came from kind of the private equity world so he had a lot of understanding of the actual like white space kind of thing and then Our other CO founders. One had worked at Victoria secret for a very long time. So really new kind end of the merchandising and all the technical things that she wanted to solve for and then another one who Worked with me a free people just kind of like workwise essentially and and I was really interested in fashion of creating a brand that could actually be meaningful and do do some real work and I thought like what an opportunity this could be with the most intimate things that were wearing and like at the center of of this company has to be support because the product has to support you right like could we create a community that could also support so we literally support with product figuratively with community. And we actually start to change some of the ways that we look at ourselves in our bodies and then essentially build a narrative an story around that so that was what I was really interested in and I thought like in where we're going right now when I looked the other brands kind of post metoo movement in this like what I call like the love yourself psychiatrists like like. Where's this conversation? Conversation of real vulnerability. Where's this conversation around like the defining what sexy is so knows looking in? It's like this most intimate category these bras and these underwear. You've got really really sexy. which is kind of sexy through a male lens in my opinion and some brands that we all know are in that category? And then you've got this kind of like norm core body inclusivity movement happening so beautiful but didn't identify with me because it didn't feel sensual not at all some some of the stuff that's launch and like why would you wanna wear that like no one wants to see you naked in that and I get the like anti. Victoria's secret like come on. I look sexier in my post is baby underwear than some of this stuff. Yeah exactly and it's like you want to feel sexy it hold on. It's okay to feel sexy out wrong. It's not wrong at all and this. It's like reclaimed sensuality. So I started going down this path of like what makes you feel sensual and there's so many things that go into and it's such a nuance conversation sation. But it was one of the biggest things was kind of like feeling sexy. Fear Self I totally and feeling like I. It's that feeling versus needing to kind of like capture somebody else's interest or attention with it and I thought that was really powerful because I was looking around and thinking about some of the most like sensual and confident women that I found just really inspiring people like my mom and different people and And they were never doing it for other people they they really did it for themselves. Selves so being able to create a brand where we could visually show that and show all different people and ages ages and walks of life and be able to then create a platform which is called body talk which stands for a body of women in support of a woman's body where those people people can tell their story and and if we could do that and actually change the way people see themselves? That was the goal for me with cup. Wow and and now a small goal. I know it's really cool though Rebecca. I had the Dan this weekend. And this woman literally said she's choose like I'm from Amsterdam. I like really WanNa work at Cup moving back to New York and she said like I really love how. You've you've changed my perspective of how I see myself and it was just like to hear that narrative back from a customer and just great. It's totally great. I remember I was is using my nursing bras that were like seven years old and I finally like bit the bullet and bought new ones and I was like. You're brushing exactly ahead. Changes how everything feels. Yeah so how did how did you funded. How did you start up? And what's it like working with four co-founders. Yeah great great question So we started it by. It was a conversation between essentially three friends. So Kiernan Lauren. I Lauren and known for a long time and I worked with her as a client when I was at video and then we work together at free people very closely and we just had this same kind of curiosity curiosity and passion around what I just discussed but also she's a really great visual storyteller and I Kind of communicate the story in different ways as well. So so lauren was very good friends with Kiernan socially and essentially he said when we started talking about this topic. I'm realizing that there was a need. He he had all of this market research He actually tried to. He was with blackstone tried to buy La Perla many years back so he really knew the the opportunity unity and then he brought Kristin who is our fourth co founder. And she essentially he he had connections with supply-side chain and different things actually with with making bras. Because that's one of the things that's so complicated is it's thirty seven. Different steps to make one of these bras and a lot of them are actual tailoring tailoring. It's not just machines because the fabric has to be manipulated in such specific ways so like having someone who really understands the technical Of this and being able to Kinda cheat this this visual that we wanted that was lightweight and in very minimal on what we thought was like a modern approach approach to two bras but being able to actually make them work was minute took us two years to develop you continue to have a day job during those two years. A hat too. Yeah Yeah and and it was bootstrapped. I mean we had kind of it was just it was founder funded essentially. We were planning on doing that through launch and then N- Kiernan who's connected in again the P. E. in in venture capital world. He actually received a call from four runner who are one one of our lead investors and the Houston. She's so amazing. Yeah Melissa shout out to Melissa. Yeah they're so great and and have been so supportive in championing the mission and also like being able to kind of understand the passion that we have. It's not just about selling products but actually building a brand in a community and they've been really supportive of that too so so oh yes we Received seed funding from them and then global founders capital and. Now we're actually just going into our series which I've never done before and it's wild. What is the the most wild part? I think it's communicating the feeling and brand vision at times to men all right and that feeling of sensuality. It's you know that's a really tough conversation to have the investment level when when a lot of the conversations around financials and kind looking at PNL's stuff totally. Yeah so that's definitely been one of the the other one is just it's a whole new job on top of your job. Yeah so as the founder. When you've got you know we have nineteen amazing women in the office And and being the inspiration for them and really leading them while also so trying to concept for future and then also I mean you know and then manage the team on top of kind of making sure everything is actually delivering being the face outside right and somehow having a balanced fear life balance. It's wild but so what do each of your vendors do and what happens when you don't agree yeah So the primarily Kiernan iron the office. day-to-day okay Our Co founder who heads product development..

free people CO founder Cup Kiernan Lauren Beautiful Bras Abby Morgan founder Melissa Manhattan Abbie Braga Co founder N- Kiernan Victoria Rebecca Amsterdam co founder Houston
"head product development" Discussed on The Journal.

The Journal.

08:20 min | 1 year ago

"head product development" Discussed on The Journal.

"Of frustration in contract negotiations forty six thousand autoworkers walked out on General Motors on Monday. Guillaume hasn't seen strike like this in more than a decade union leaders are angry that their demands for a bigger share of GM's prophets better healthcare and a promise that factories won't close those aren't being met on the other side of the table. GM management which is living in the shadow of the company's two thousand nine bankruptcy in government bailout and GM led by CEO. Mary Barra is dedicated to making sure the company stays profitable strong. General General Motors is the best way for me to provide and maintain the ninety thousand plus jobs that we have across the United States today on the show a legacy labor union union and a legacy car manufacturer are at odds what both sides want and why they wanted welcome to the Journal our daily show about money business and power. I'm Kate Lime and I'm Ryan Knutson. It's Thursday used as September nineteenth. Christina Rogers is the Wall Street Journal's Detroit Bureau chief. I have covered. Gm Ford and Fiat Chrysler I've been an auto journalist for nearly a decade now and this is actually my third round of labor talks but your first strike yes. It's my first strike. What was your reaction to this. Were you surprised by the the decision to do it. No I wasn't wasn't surprised. There's been a lot building. I mean you have a confluence of events here you have these tech companies are trying to muscle into the car business and like you also have new technologies that are becoming required like electric cars because of emissions requirements and so it's trained to make sure it has the cash to invest in the future. The future is becoming expensive and the thing with GM the other other Detroit carmakers is there really vulnerable to the industry's boom bust cycle. I mean basically for decades that the companies you know they have at this period of extreme profitability when things are good when the economy's good and people are buying cars and then if the economy weekends all of a sudden the whole thing thing turns on its head and they can go from very profitable year is to losing money in a short period of time the current conflict between the UAW W. N. G. M. Actually has its roots in the economy's last August. The two thousand eight great recession and both sides are looking at what happened then as they think about the future. GM had been struggling even before the recession in two thousand seven the company posted a loss thirty nine billion dollars and by two thousand nine it sales fell by almost thirty percent such bad sales and such big losses brought the company company to its knees. Today is the day that capitalism capsized the symbol of American industry. General Motors is bankrupt once the world's largest corporation and now GM hopes to emerge from bankruptcy a smaller company that makes vehicles people want to buy the break it was the culmination of kind of this like long slide jam had for years had numerous challenges one of them being very high cost of labor they had too many factories they were stuck doc in the cycle overbuilding cars and then having to heavily discount them and that year GM turn to the government for help and filed for chapter eleven bankruptcy in the midst of a deep recession and financial crisis the collapse of these companies would have been devastating for countless Americans what's and done enormous damage to our economy beyond the auto industry is also because the auto industry is so crucial to American manufacturing factoring in the economy the government stepped in and invested fifty billion dollars in GM to help the company rebuild working with my auto task force. GM eminent stakeholders have produced a viable achievable plan the we'll give this iconic American company a chance to rise again and and after it was all over and GM was out of bankruptcy the company's leaders needed to figure out how to never let that happen again that bankruptcy was really traumatizing for leaders at GM. I mean the memories of that are still really fresh. GM's currency. Oh Mary Barra came in a few years after the crisis assist in two thousand fourteen to get the company into shape she was brought in to be a change agent to really change the culture and make it more proactive. You've really kind of make it more forward thinking so Mary Barra. She made major headlines because she's a first female executive to run a car. Our company and she's also electrical engineer. She's what we call in Detroit. GM lifer she's been at GM for most of her career and was did her dad adwork. GM to yes her father did work at GM so she's second generation jammer and she's from Michigan as well. Do you remember your first interview with her. The first time sat down with her like what is she like and what is it that she talks about when she talks about. Gm yes I do remember very vividly away when I first met her and at that time she was heading product development and I remember asking her what changes she was making and she she gave me this example of how you swipe your card in between to get into different departments and that she was going about removing those because it just seemed like a barrier that was not needed and that to me was symbolic of how she was trying to break down. GM Silo Culture. I think GM is really looking at like look. We cannot not just lean on our history. We have to make decisions that are looking foward and if that means kind of blowing up the way we did things in the past that's fine in the past two years under Baras leadership. The company has posted record profits. Wall Street investors have been thrilled with her performance and and one reason they like what she's doing. She has remained vigilant about preventing another financial meltdown at GM to do that. Bar has made major decisions decisions about the company's future so is really last year that GM decided that they were. GonNa execute on a big restructuring the really want to do some belt tightening and generates meaningful savings not only heading into the downturn but also to free up cash for some future technology bets such as self driving cars cars and electric cars so that set the stage set the stage for a big announcement from GM in two thousand eighteen. This was the weekend after Thanksgiving and news star to leak on that Sunday night. That was going to start closing plans the next day. Barra got on the phone with investors to explain the news and she stressed that you know this is going to improve their cash flow. It's going to really prepare them on to take the next steps and I mean her. Message acid was like this is really going to help us move through the next downturn and free up the cash to invest in some of these future technologies we taking these actions now while the company and the economy are strong stay in front of a fast-changing market and capitalize on growth opportunities as we push to achieve a vision of a world. Duro crashes Euro Missions Zero Congestion and did she discuss the impact on employees. No she did not on that call..

GM Mary Barra Detroit General Motors General General Motors labor union union Guillaume United States Wall Street Journal UAW Journal Kate Lime Christina Rogers Ford CEO engineer
"head product development" Discussed on CarCast

CarCast

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"head product development" Discussed on CarCast

"Um and so we started some work on that and and the mustangs a great car but it's a big car and so aerodynamically it would have had a really tough time against the competition and we could have done a lot of waivers and stuff so we started working on that car basically came up with the home obligation special mustang um would have only build we need to build three hundred of them so we would have built three hundred and the key thing as we would have gone in 2015 and so we would have had a year under our belt and then come to 2016 because noone wins the first year lemond adjust it just doesn't happen i mean it's it's such a hard race for good or for bad probably actually for good the company we took it forward end at to basically at the o chairman level we were told that we didn't wanna do that it it wasn't it didn't really look that much like a mustang any more carbon gulf carbonfiber mustang and and most of all mustang didn't need it mustang didn't need a win at la to to carry any panache mean mustang has its own name in his own history and its own heritage and and it stands for something that has obviously been very successful globally so we went back and salt for a little while and then we got mad and um and then we kicked off the basement project inada don't want to make it sound like it was a legal or anything because as as heading product development at the time so everybody working on it worked for me so they were doing without told me to do but at the same time we had been told by world headquarters that we were not going back to the mall.

lemond la product development chairman