17 Burst results for "He"

"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

03:33 min | Last month

"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"York city it was sparse and mournful perhaps bracing for another attack. New york was trying to press forward baseball as part of that and the yankees where the yankees they were in the world series for the fourth straight year. Yeah they were on this magic ride through the postseason and other facing the arizona diamondbacks. But this wasn't the evil empire anymore. Not this big corporate sports giant that nobody at least outside of new york wants to admit rooting for this was maybe for the first time. Ever almost entirely because of nine eleven. America's team sustain threes back in new york and it's going to be the spectacle show the city the country in the world though. We're not afraid of terrorists now. Quarter of households watching on tv. And it's more fifty five thousand people at yankee stadium that night. The house that ruth built and all these politicians and celebrities were there to people. who'd wind up shaping. Our next twenty years new york mayor rudy giuliani there in his yankees cap sitting behind the dugout. With a son andrew arizona senator john mccain sitting next to him and his diamondbacks had even donald trump. Is there on news just a real estate developer. We reached out to many of these people to hear their memories of that night. Paul o'neil the yankees rightfielder that night national security advisor condoleeza rice anki fans of just full disclosure. Who's watching from george steinbrenner's box brian anderson to this day gives me use the starting pitcher for the diamondbacks at night. It billy nice to meet you. Think you're muted. Comedian billy crystal. That's why i'm on. Aol joe buck. Hey at warrior the play by play announcer for fox. He remembers how uneasy the night. Phil here we are in new york. Were in yankee stadium. It's the great american pastime and you felt vulnerable. I did going over to the stadium. And then i got there. This was the beginning of kind of the all. These serious security checks that we really weren't used to there. Were bombed dogs and the locker room and you could see gunmen on the roof in the bronx you. The american flags draped in different places. The tattered flag from ground zero flew in the outfield. And you had the signs that were out signs that read usa fears. Nobody and yanks won't be rattled. And there were rumors that president george w bush might be making an appearance. You know everybody had heard that the president was throw the first pitch but it was like. Is he really going to come here. You know with with all that's going on and you know the the security that's here but they they they wanted him to be there and then when that when it happened and he walked out there..

yankees diamondbacks new york ruth built andrew arizona yankee stadium Paul o condoleeza rice anki York city rudy giuliani baseball donald trump brian anderson george steinbrenner usa john mccain New york joe buck billy crystal Aol
"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

08:07 min | Last month

"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"From the top spokesperson for the pentagon when it comes to presidential authorization for acts of war. One congressman has had a lot to say congressman. Ro khanna is a democrat representing california's seventeenth congressional district. There should be some oversight. On what these drone strikes are what are the authorizations that are needed to be able to conduct them. What is the goal of transparency. In how do we do it in a way. That really is is minimizing. Civilian casualties is honest about civilian casualties. That do result this summer. Congressman kana and senator elizabeth. Warren sent a letter to the defense secretary about civilian casualties in. Us military operations. The letter claims that the defense department has a history of under reporting numbers of civilian casualties from drone strikes congressman khanna has been restating his call for transparency since sunday when a us drone strike killed ten afghans. Eight of them children. I asked him what more accurate reporting of civilian death tolls could mean for the future of drone strikes. It would take into account the human cost. It would take into account the families that are being destroyed the weddings that are being interrupted. The number of children that are being killed. These have an enormous moral cost. These strikes they have enormous cost in terms of how the united states is perceived in these parts of the world they result in generations of people growing up with a vengeance against the united states because of what they perceive as lost family members or or friends as a result of it so there is a real cost to these drone strikes now in some cases in my view they are necessary when you have a terrorist target with threatening harm to hundreds of civilians or to the united states There is often little choice. I mean if you for example have an actual car bomb which could explode and kill hundreds of people We need to make sure that that doesn't go off too often. The drone strikes have have been conducted without sufficient concern empathy for the civilians. Who are being killed. I don't think we ought to just call it. Collateral damage we ought to be very upfront about the ugly costs award that yes we have to kill terrorists but in the process civilians die and that the more we account for that the more we report for that the more cautious we will be in minimizing. Those civilian casualties has the made any improvements on this when it comes to considering the safety of civilians have we made progress. I think we have. I think we were making progress in the obama administration. I know this weighed on the president. President obama deeply. My understanding is that he had to personally approve most of those strikes and he took into account the enormous impact. That could have civilian casualties. Then we had the trump administration. I don't think they had the same same protocols. The biden administration is going to have to make very tough decisions. And i'm very hopeful. That human rights and strong protocols will be part of it and that should be a an appropriate part of congressional oversight especially given that. We're going to be relying on these over the horizon capabilities over the horizon. Capabilities is in my view just a euphemism for drone strikes. We're going to be relying more on these strikes. Then we have to really make sure that we have procedures in place to minimize civilian casualties and to be transparent so the armed services committee and others will conduct oversight on this. And that's what prompted senator warren in my letter to the pentagon to let them know that this is something that congress is watching in cares deeply about. So what are your next steps here. What are your goals in the next couple of months our goal is first to get transparency on what happened in the bombing. They'd kill ten civilians. We owe it to those to explain what happened at military said that there was a car bomb that exploded and that that car bomb could have killed many civilians and american troops and we just need to confirm that. Confirm the facts and make sure that we are really accounting accurately for what happened and then going forward. We need to have an accurate assessment of civilian casualties. Anytime these strikes happen An accurate report to congress and inaccurate procedural safeguards before we have those strikes and those are all things that senator warren and i will be pursuing in our respective committees. The senate armed services in house armed services committees to make sure the administration does that. I supported the president's decision to strike the isis planners and the isis masterminds that killed thirteen of our marines and that posed great danger to our troops at time and two afghan civilians. Just a quick note here to clarify the attack last week killed. Eleven marines one. Maybe cormon and one army staff sergeant so thirteen. Us servicemembers total supported the president's decision to have strikes to prevent any of the bombing impacting our troops when we were there so in that case. I think that the president was acting in his authority as commander-in-chief what about his pledge to carry out more strikes in afghanistan. Is that of concern to you. I believe we need to repeal the broad authorizations for military force that the president has had but to have a much more limited authorization of military force that would allow him to have counter operations and to conduct strikes against isis k. Leaders who plotted the murder of the thirteen american marines so then under biden's proposed rule changes for drone warfare. The military would have to obtain consent from the state department's chiefs of mission before a strike. That hasn't happened in these recent days in afghanistan. So do you think in cases like this and emergency situations. You sort of just alluded to do you think that the president should be unilaterally allowed to conduct strikes. I think in the aghanistan case. That was a justified use of the president's powers there was an imminent threat to our troops. Four thousand troops there thirteen marines and other service members had been killed. There was actionable intelligence. That people were targeting our tropes whether they were going to be firing rockets that were intercepted or using suicide bombers or using car bombers in the president had every authority to act to prevent that kind of violence and to keep our troops. So when i see the president having done in those cases was consistent with his powers to react to an imminent threat. So what's an example of an inappropriate time to use a drawn for targeted killing from your perspective. Well if they haven't gone through the procedures that the president has laid out to which means the appropriate sign up if they haven't looked in evaluated critically that those targets are actually a terrorist. And that if they haven't taken every possible precaution to minimize any civilian casualties. All of those things have to be to be done and then it has to be something that congress has authorized. It has to go through. the proper. Procedural safeguards in there has to be every effort to.

Ro khanna Congressman kana senator elizabeth senator warren congressman khanna pentagon obama administration biden administration defense department Warren cormon congress armed services committee california President obama thirteen american marines Us chiefs of mission afghanistan thirteen marines
"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

07:53 min | 2 months ago

"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Michaels. The biden administration has been touting high numbers of americans and afghan refugees that are being evacuated from afghanistan every day to reiterate a total of approximately nineteen thousand people were evacuated from kabul Over a period of twenty four hours at of course ended early this morning. This is the result of forty two. Us military flights which carried approximately eleven thousand two hundred evacuees and forty eight coalition flights which carried seventy eight hundred people for a total of ninety flights out of kabul. Which if i get my math right. That's approximately a flight. Every thirty nine minutes. I believe the department of defense gave that statistic. Those numbers have left a lot of unanswered questions. Particularly how many people are still waiting to be evacuated. The us actually won't say an exact of how many people are trying to get out but there's tens of thousands of people that's holly bailey. A national correspondent for the washington post. She's based in minneapolis and has been following the influx of refugees around the country. A lot of the people that the us is trying to help get out or pupil that assisted the us military during the war. There over the last twenty years we're talking. Interpreters were talking people that worked with programs as varied as usda agricultural programs. A lot of them were approved under special immigration visas saves as what most groups call it and a lot of them apply. Many years ago. They've been stuck in the pipeline. And now it's turned very chaotic as they try to get out of the country because there's a fear that anybody that worked with the united states their lives are in danger at the hands of the taliban. And there's also been some sort of help with women and children especially women given the strict societal guidelines that are imposed by the taliban women that are going to college women who are trying to have careers or seen especially at risk. So what's the latest on the progress. The us has made on getting people out as of wednesday morning. According to the white house just over eighty thousand people who had been approved under the sieve guidelines had been gotten out of out of afghanistan but the question is how many people are left. And like i said before the. Us has been very cagey on. How many people there are left to get out. President biden has at least indicated that there might be a sort of shifting timeline. Initially the plan was to try to get everybody out by august. Thirty first but president biden in his speech on tuesday seemed to indicate that that number may be that date. Bb influx that it could be that the changing conditions on the ground means it speeds up it just really unclear efficiently and safely as possible. We are currently on pace to finish by august. Thirty first the sooner we can finish the better. Each day of operations brings added restore troops but the completion boggles thirty first depends upon the taliban continuing to cooperate allow access to the airport for those who were transferred transporting now and no disruptions to our operations in addition. I've asked the pentagon and the state department for contingency plans to adjust the timetable. Should that become necessary. I'm determined to ensure that we complete our mission this mission. i'm also mindful what we've evacuated people from afghanistan. Where are they going where we bringing them. Essentially all these people are being taken to processing centers or bases in cutter and places like that and from their their take into three military sites in the united states that have been announced by the pentagon one is fort lee in virginia. Another is fort. Bliss texas another as fort mccoy in wisconsin. And you know we've started to see some of the arrivals. In recent days in wisconsin. It's unclear the exact numbers but essentially what's going to happen. Is that these families. These people will be taken there and from there they work with refugee settlement agencies around the country to place them in communities and in temporary housing to help get their lives resettled america and in trying to get their lives resettled one. Big complicating factor. Here is obviously the ongoing cove in eighteen pandemic and the rising case numbers in many places across the us so what problems has the pandemic created for getting these refugees processed and housed well. It's quickly turned a bit political. There's been a lot of concerns about whether these people are vaccinated and what kind of danger they might be bringing into the communities that are already struggling with a surge from the delta variant. So you've heard president biden another. Us officials in recent days emphasize a couple of things one that they're vetted for security reasons and also that they're all going to be inoculated against cova nineteen so as not to sort of introduced certain dangers into these communities where they're going but there's also just various issues with were already seeing sort of a shortage of housing across the country and some of the refugee settlement groups that i've spoken with in recent days have been struggling to find temporary housing because you know housing. Rents are so expensive. And there's just a struggle because it's also happening so quickly usually these groups have an upwards of several weeks or sometimes months to know that they're going to be resettling a family and in some instances. They're getting twenty four hours notice of whether they can accept a family to help them resettle so in your conversations with these refugee organizations. Have you encountered any particular stories that have really stuck with you. Any refugees that you've spoken to who stories paint a picture of this humanitarian crisis and the refugee experience. You know. there's a woman that i talked to here in rural minnesota who was in afghanistan and she ran a usda program and she's been sort of desperately trying to get out people that she worked with for many years now she and her wife and from her home in rural minnesota and just trying to do paperwork and she's been fielding calls from people her in kabul desperate to get her advice on how to get out and yesterday i got an email from a woman who read our story who was looking to contact her because she was aware of a family that i worked with the usda and was desperate to get out but they had been told that they wouldn't be approved for a special visa because they hadn't worked directly with the military and the two connected and it just shows as there's sort of this unknown about when we're going to leave afghanistan and if we're going to get all these people that are desperate to get out people are still desperately fighting and trying to have hope for these people people on the other side of the world and rural communities finding for these people. We did the things that's been really striking to me. As president trump really sought to limit the visa program into the united states limit. The number of refugees allowed and specifically targeted places like afghanistan in reducing the numbers of people allowed to come here and so for several years. The numbers have been very low and part of the problem is that many of these people applied and have just been waiting for years. The governor of texas greg abbott last year or two years ago i should say sought to block the number of immigrants coming into texas. Saying we've taken our share and we're also facing this crisis of migrants of the border and our resources are stretched thin. A federal judge basically threw that out that argument out but it sort of speaks to the political.

america president biden kabul afghanistan biden administration taliban holly bailey President biden usda fort mccoy pentagon Michaels department of defense the washington post wisconsin minneapolis fort lee white house Bliss fort
"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

01:30 min | 2 months ago

"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Ask them to fill it out in a day or two a week at max work it out agree to it. Then take Be there to enforce it up. Get a number of un peacekeepers to monitor it. It could have been a whole defense seen yet. It could have been a new transitional government inclusive of own of those in it maybe would have been some relations on some fighting and this and that it wouldn't have been this today. The is no money in african banks. Everything is so it cliff to.

"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

08:11 min | 2 months ago

"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"To me like we unfortunately get devastating reports about the climate with some regularity these days. So why does this latest. Un climate report matter. Yeah that's a really good question. An important one too. That's brady dennis. He the washington post reporter focused on environmental policy and public health issues. And the reason this matters so much. I think is because this is an assessment. That's done by this really preeminent group of scientists from all over the world about roughly every say six seven eight years. The last one was completed in twenty fourteen and that was before the paris agreement existed and it was a long time ago in terms of science. And how it's progressed and and also the climate and how it's progressing and so these scientists there were about two hundred thirty or so of them relied on something like fourteen thousand scientific reports. This is really a comprehensive. Look at what the best science we have tells us today about. Climate change so yes. You're absolutely right. We hear these trickles of news about climate with regularity were sort of bombarded by that these days. This is really an effort to compile all that and to kind of say looking around the world what we know about the state of the planet and what science says about how the climate has changed in his changing and our role in that its report of all reports. Thus far sounds like so. Let's go through some of what the findings of this assessment actually are. What does this report generally say about the health of the planet one. Maybe not surprising but important. Update here is that scientists are really telling us in their own scientific way. There's just really no doubt anymore that humans are fueling climate change. What would have been a hypothesis. Maybe four or five decades ago and sort of likely but not one hundred percent certain not that long ago the scientists in this report. This week says quote unequivocal that. It's now an established scientific facts that humans are emissions primarily through earning a fossil fuels are are causing the planet to the ipcc to the authors and to everyone who has been involved in in this latest climate alarm. you'll work they. Some science is particularly appreciated given the disruption of kobe. Nineteen you've been telling us for over three decades of the dangers of allowing the candidates. Wome the will listen but didn't hear the will listen but it did not act strongly enough and as a result. Climate change is a problem. That is here now. Nobody's safe and it's getting worse foster so with that in mind. They also say that we're changing. The planet really unprecedented ways that includes everything from carbon dioxide in the air which is causing the earth to warm to rising seas to oceans. That are getting more acidic. Glaciers and ice sheets that are melting and all the impacts that come with that on our everyday lives more heat waves like we've seen this summer out. West drought conditions that can lead to these terrible wildfires more intense hurricanes and other kinds of extreme weather flooding that sort of thing and they also say not only. Are we causing that. But that we can expect all those impacts to get worse over time unless we really rapidly cut back on on greenhouse gas emissions in a global way and and really in a dramatic way. You've covered climate change for for quite a long time. Does any of this come as a surprise you. Was there anything in the report that really stood out to you as new information or more dire information than we've had in the past i think we all know and have read about the different ways that climate change is affecting people. One of the scientists said to us what seems to be different now is that were not quote unquote surprised as scientists by these things. These are the kind of impacts that we expected. But it's a different thing to to see them play out and to see them. Effect sort of every region in the world and she said maybe in the past when we issued these. These warnings these findings. It seemed kind of hypothetical or far off. But these days you don't have to be a climate scientists you don't have to have a phd. You just have to be somebody who looks out your window to really understand what's going on on the bad news ledger. Also i guess that the findings make pretty clear that we're we're in for more this in the coming years kind of no matter what we do which is not to sound completely hopeless but we can't turn off all our power plants and stop driving our cars and whatnot tomorrow so so our mission these worsening impacts in the warming of there is going to continue for some amount of time and so that is also message in here. Now we've seen a lot of really awful climate related events this summer. Wildfires extreme heat earlier in biden's administration there were freezing temperatures causing power crises and several states. So how does the binded administration been handling some of these climate emergency as we talk a lot about what they can do to prevent these things in the future but has the biden administration responded to some of these climate crises in an appropriate way and ineffective way. I think there's several different ways to think about that. One is that these incidents that you reference whether it's of winter freeze in texas or wildfires in california and heat waves and oregon and other places really kinda put on full display. How unprepared we are as a country to deal with with a lot of these impacts. I don't think that falls on any one administration but it makes pretty clear that as a country we're just kind of woefully unprepared for for what may be coming do think the vitamin station has again use those incidents to say we need to find a way to be more prepared and we need to not only cut our emissions and things like that to prevent more climate change. But we need to adapt to. What's coming and i think you see that. In some of the funding that either has passed his proposed to put money to make communities around the country. More resilient whether it's resilient to rising seas if you're coastal community or resilient to heat or wildfires or reducing the threat of wildfires whatever it may be. I think we will see more money. Going into resilience. The question is whether it's enough and soon enough and and whether we sort of are able to cover all our bases and attack all the ways that were unprepared. It seems like there is a body of people who despite words like unequivocal included in this report and the inevitability of what we see when we look outside that still don't take climate science as truth. Does this report or this moment in time. Does it do anything to change that to influence the people who are climate science deniers. I suspect the answer to that is no. I mean folks who have not been swayed By the evidence to this point. I i would think are unlikely to be swayed now but i do think it's important to point out that this isn't sort of an even-handed he said she said weighing the evidence. The vast vast overwhelming majority of evidence is clear that that we are playing a role in the warming of the earth and this is an established fact at this point and so the scientific community at least has moved beyond that argument and really more is focusing on the broader questions. Now of not whether this is happening not whether climate change is real but what do we do about it and at what pace and how big of a priority is it in in the list of priorities that the world is facing a pandemic and so many other things. Those are things that are really. The big question marks going forward. Yeah and part of that is where this fits into the list of priorities specifically for the biden administration. So i just wanna talk about that for a second. Former secretary of state john kerry is now the biden administration special envoy for climate. How has he publicly reacted to to this report. How is the administration.

brady dennis Wome washington post biden administration Un ipcc paris biden oregon texas california john kerry
"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

02:10 min | 4 months ago

"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Then states in towns right so what was it. Was that distant thing over there. The federal government that led the army right. It was the commander in chief and a few other things. Maybe the supreme court was in washington right and now we looked to the president for rules about when to take off the mask and put it back on so that that is american history. So i think it's hard for a president to do well now because it's very hard to run an economy. That's what the soviet union discovered to run an economy. Actually no one can do it and yet. Generally the people of the united states look to the executive branch to play a large role in. And as you look into the future thinking about this survey let's say twenty years down the road do you. Foresee more recent presidents changing in their rankings. So donald trump and barack obama. And george w bush do you imagine that they will have much different rankings with further hindsight from their presidencies. Oh absolutely if you're voting for a recent president is still alive. It's almost as if you're asking yourself whether you would reelect him. Rather than whether he achieved in history his mandate but but c-span is correct in asking the question because then it has a benchmark against which to measure change. Thank you so much for your time. I really appreciate it. I'm honored thanks for.

federal government supreme court army soviet union washington george w bush donald trump united states barack obama
"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

08:14 min | 4 months ago

"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Greater connectivity benefits degrade good and qualcomm invented. Five g breakthroughs that make it possible. See us where five g is helping to make remote education more accessible. Join us in making the world. More connected with five g as michael explained jaffer. Shetty's business has grown a lot in the past few months while his brother. Steve serves in a senior role at the white house. But that in and of itself isn't an ethical violation. The lines are murky with distinctions. That are tricky to understand. So i decided to find a person to explain it to me who knows quite a bit about white house ethics rules. My name is. Richard painter malone professor at the university of minnesota. I was formerly the chief white house. Ethics lawyer associate counsel to the president under president. George w bush from two thousand five to two thousand seven. I was also formerly the vice chair of citizens for responsibility and ethics in washington crew in two thousand seventeen and eighteen. Senate safe to say you know a lot about ethics and the government. So what exactly does an ethics lawyer for the president do. What does a typical day look like in that role. The cheap white house ethics lawyer responsible for dealing with financial conflicts of interest from investments and also from emma relationships with previous employers for the white house staff and for every presidential appointee to the executive branch who is confirmed by the united states. Senate the white house ethics lawyer and his or her staff goes through the disclosure documents for presidential appointees looking at investments and business relationships. And making sure that everyone was appointed by the president complies with federal ethics rules and statutes on one hand it's to uphold the ethics that have been set forth by the government but also to protect the president from facing any ethical conflicts. Absolutely it is critical that the president of the united states be beyond reproach and the people working for the president but the interests of the united states first and foremost in their minds and not have conflicts of interest involving family members previous employers or their own personal investments. I wanted richard to help me understand. Exactly how the Families actions fit into white house ethics rules as our reporter. Michael mentioned earlier. Steve shetty has recused himself from white house matters. That involve a handful of companies paying jeffrey ready to lobby on their behalf. I asked richard if that is typical. Yes this is a standard procedure when senior white house staff for senior executive branch officials. I have family members siblings. Our children our parents who are lobbying. That oddest government. First and foremost the executive branch officials should recuse From any and all matters in which the family member is lobbying. The united states government second the agency of for which the official works or in this case. The white house should not entertain a lobbying overtures from a family member of the senior official. So this would mean. Mr rashad case that he would first foremost recuse from all of these matters in which his brother is. Lobbying work on other matters. Only and second when jeffrey shoddy lobbies into the executive office of the president on antimatter he very politely told to communicate with other parts of the united states government but not the president so that's put up firewalls for the actual interactions between the brothers between jefferson. His shop and what. Steve is doing at the white house. But it doesn't really eliminate any potential conflicts of interest because of course clients of jefferson. He know that his brother works in the white house. Right and of course steve Decisions in the white house knows the interest of his brother with. That's why it's so critically important. That's deeper shetty recused from any and all matters involving the clients of jaffer shatti. They're plenty of other matters which he can advise precedent biden but he should stay away from those matters in which those clients have retained jeff for lobbying or any other interactions with the united states government. Do we know if that's happening. How how this enforced. I have not seen the ethics agreement for for shoddy and of course we have no idea whether ethics agreement says written or enforced during the trump administration. We had a serious problem where a lot of ethics agreements is written. Were not enforced. I trust that the biden administration will enforce the ethics agreements as they are written once again. It's critically important to go above and beyond what is literally required under the criminal conflict of interest statutes And focus on what is how can president biden a whiz. Dave shot his advice and advice of other senior white house officials. Best serve the american people free of any appearance of conflicts of interests and that requires complete recusals from all those matters in which jaffer his brothers representing clients and also the executives to the president simply cannot accept. Phone calls other contacts from jeffer- shadow or his firm that would be an appropriate in these circumstances. So that if you had been advising president biden in this scenario would you have recommended that he not hire steve shitty. No i think this. Just gonna hire steve ricciardi. I'm not sure that all the all the kids also need to work the administration's efforts subject. We can discuss as perfectly fond. Hire someone who's who's a brother is a lobbyist but the firewalls need to be put in place so it is very very clear. The brother is a lobbyist is not be lobbying the executive officer the president. Of course he has a first amendment rights lobby whoever he wants but he should be lobbing other parts of the united states government. So i do want to ask you about the children of the rich and also other children of high ranking officials in the administration who have been given sort of lower level jobs at different agencies in the administration where are the ethical lines on that with federal anti nepotism statute prohibits the unites those government official from urging encouraging promoting the employment of a relative in any agency over which official has jurisdiction or control. It is true that technically the president of the united states article two of the constitution as the person who makes the ultimate decisions about how to run the agencies but the senior white house staff as a critical role in that so no senior. White house official should ever encouraged or promote the employment of a relative in any of the executive branch agencies. And i trust that steve Did not do that and can represent the united states congress. He did not do so so we can move on. of course. i'm sure to many of our listeners. The question is raised about the trump administration and president trump's hiring of his daughter and son-in-law and others Into the white house. So why is that different than what. You just mentioned. Now in terms of anti nepotism laws. Unfortunately the office of legal counsel concluded that the anti nepotism statute does not apply to decisions made by the president of the united states about the white house staff. I disagree with that determination. But that was the exception was used a higher jordan nevada and it turned out to be absolutely disastrous. For the american people jared kushner was put in charge not only the middle east which he did nothing to alleviate but with covid nineteen. That matter was terribly handled by mr. kushner and that's an example of what happens. When unqualified family members or brought into positions the united states government given significant responsibility for important matters and then they bumble it so we just talked about trump generally speaking how does biden stack up against modern presidents in terms of hiring people who have potential conflicts of interests in his administration or hiring people with ties to lobbyists or other industries into these.

Steve shetty jared kushner Michael Steve Dave steve ricciardi michael jefferson jaffer two thousand George kushner jaffer shatti richard five eighteen jeff congress Richard painter malone five g
"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

07:57 min | 4 months ago

"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"My name's michael. Sheriff national political reporter for the washington post. Michael has been covering the story of the brothers for the post. I asked him to start with the basics. Who is this steve. ricciardi guy. So steve is a longtime democratic hand. Both on the lobbying side in washington and on the white house site he served as a deputy chief of staff during the clinton administration remained close to senator biden and then vice president biden and in twenty twelve came into the then obama white house senior adviser to vice president biden and he was the chairman of biden's campaign last year and after biden one he came in is a senior counselor at the white house is without a doubt one of the three or four closest advisors to the president right now is history. He also dabbled in lobbying as well. He did so at the end of the clinton years in the late. Nineteen ninety s. His brother jeff was a lobbyist. who was logging. The clinton white house while he was deputy chief of staff and then after the clinton administration ended. Jeff and steve opened a lobbying firm together that was quite successful for the two thousand during the bush administration and that continued until about two thousand nine. Stephen shetty stopped registering himself as a lobbyist because the obama administration at that time had a pretty strict rule about not any lobbyists work in the white house and then in two thousand twelve. He left the firm that he'd worked at with his brother but his brother continued as a lobbyist and continues to this day as a lobbyist given that jefferson had shetty works as a lobbyist lobbying be administration and his brother. Steve works in the administration. Can you describe the big conflicts of interest that have arisen or the ones that have been brought to the attention of the white house ethics team. So this gets into legal technicality. And it's important to note here that there's a difference between what someone might think of as a conflict of interest and what the law and white house policy considers a conflict of interest on the ladder with the white house. Counsel has said is that it is a conflict of interest if jeff shetty is lobbying the executive office of the president on a specific party matter. And that's a technical legal term for one of his companies in those circumstances. The white house's stephen shetty to recuse himself from any discussion of those issues now. Specific party matter under this definition is something that really only is affecting that particular company so in this circumstance. Jaffer shetty has four. Corporate clients lobbies. The executive office of the president did last quarter three pharmaceutical companies. One energy company that works on the keystone xl pipeline. General pharmaceutical issues would not apply here. Stephen shed he can still generally work on pharmaceutical issues. But if jeffrey shetty was lobbying on a particular drug for instance steven shetty recused himself from those conversations now that still leaves an enormous amount that both brothers can work on simultaneously both because of the definition a specific party matter is and because in the first quarter jeff had twelve clients. Four of them were lobbying the white house. The other clients are often lobbying on legislation up on capitol hill. That steve for shetty's also involved in or jeff for shetty. The lobbyists is lobbying the commerce department or the treasury department on something and steve for shetty might be involved in those issues as well and those are not considered technical conflicts of interest by the white house that require refusal and so the most obvious example of this is that right now jefferson. He is hired by general motors to lobby on pushing for more. Federal funds for electric charging stations for the next generation of electric vehicles by ministrations proposed fifteen billion dollars in funding. It's quite a lot of money in the infrastructure package. He is lobbying. The commerce department who is also been involved with steve rashidi negotiations on capitol hill about this infrastructure bill. Because he's not loving the white house because electric charging stations are something that apply industry-wide to the car industry and not specifically to general motors that has triggered a technical finding of a conflict of interest. Even though steve rish he is lobbying senators on behalf of the white house and his brother is lobbying members of congress. On behalf of gm would probably object to the lobbying steve as steve is involved deeply in the negotiations with republicans and democrats on capitol hill about what goes into this infrastructure bill and at the same time. Jeff is lobbying possibly those same offices definitely the house the senate and the commerce department according to his filings on those same issues so is interesting as you pointed out there is this legal definition and then there's what you've said are sort of what the american public might perceive as a conflict of interest so how is perhaps perceived conflict of interests like the one you just outlined how has that created potential problems for the biden administration. I think we'll have to see. The biden campaign was very clear and spoke in very broad terms about restoring ethics in washington. He campaigned as someone who's going to turn the page on. The trump era among the many concerns of the trump era was the lobbyists. Were just too deeply woven into the white house that were other examples during the trump years where the husband for instance of a white house official was lobbying the executive office of the president that was seen as problematic in practice. Though biden's own voluntary rules have been a little more circumstance back than the serve broad claims that i will take care of all of these issues for instance. He has said very clearly that none of his family members will be involved in lobbying or working with his government in any way and he's basically put out a public statement that says his brothers and his son hunter and other people in families should not be contacting. The white house should not be involved. That voluntary step has not been extended to his senior staff. So you have a circumstances like this by that you mean. His senior staff can then have family members. Working in different agencies of the government is more about the senior staff can have people on the outside who are contacting his government ethics concern. Here is if. I called the white house as michael shear they might take. My caller may not take my call. But if my name is michael shetty they might want to take my call because they recognize that. I'm related to their boss more or less. Whoever i'm calling and so the concern is that someone would trade on the name or the relationship in a way that would give them more access. Or i mean what what seems to be happening. In the case of jeffrey shetty that companies on the outside would come to someone. Like jeffrey shady. And say hey. Your brother is now the big cheese at the white house. We're going to pay you. A significant amount of money jeffers shedding the first three months of the year. Build more than eight hundred thousand dollars in lobbying fees from these companies. That's quite a lot of money to make in three months and it's five times what he made. In the first three months of last year so clearly the fact that the biden administration has come in has been very good for jefferson his business during the trump years he was not in the business of lobbying. The trump administration has lobbying with relatively minor dealt with house and senate but now he's got an expanded business. And so that's the concern. It's the concern that came up during the biden campaign where there was lots of reporting the showed over. the course of biden's career members of his family had been involved working for industries that he regulated as a senator in the case of his son hunter. He was put on the board of ukrainian energy company. He had some board experience but it was rather odd timing given that his father at that time was sort of leading foreign policy efforts from the obama administration towards ukraine and he was paid quite a lot of money for that role and that created an apparent conflict of interest apparent. Look of impropriety not illegal. One this podcast is supported by qualcomm.

Jeff Steve Stephen shetty jeff shetty Stephen Michael congress Jaffer shetty steven shetty steve jefferson five times three months jeffrey shetty michael Four michael shetty jeffrey shady jeff last year
"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

16:05 min | 4 months ago

"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Well added to the list bucket list. So that's sort of been president. Biden's i stop. But i want to talk a little bit more about where he's going to go for the rest of this trip. What's on the rest of his itinerary so starting today the real business begins. He begins with a meeting. One on one with boris johnson. Prime minister of britain. Then the business of the g seven begins the g. Seven is short for group of seven which is itself short for the major industrialized democracies of the world. Sort of the old boys steering group of the global economy much-maligned in some quarters of many people think it's had its day but in this case the group of seven leaders are trying to make themselves in a number of ways including by focusing very heavily on the distribution of vaccines to poor parts of the world to countries. That are not part of the g seven from their president. The first lady will go to windsor castle on sunday. To see the queen on their way out of the country and next up is brussels. It's where the european union and all of its steering bodies are located. It's also where nato is located and from from there he goes on to. What many would consider the main events of this about approximately week on the road which is a one on one. Sit down in geneva switzerland with president putin of russia. This briefing is brought to you with support from nets by oracle the world's number one cloudy r. p. right now net suite is offering a one of a kind financing program that net sweet dot com slash. Wap so that's a lot for one week. Let's talk about his goals for the trip. He wrote an op. Ed for the washington. Post that this trip is about quote realizing america's renewed commitment to our allies and partners and demonstrating the capacity of democracies to both meet the challenges and deter the threats of this new age. So can you break that down. What's biden hoping to achieve on this trip. Lee's hoping to achieve a couple of practical things starting here at the g seven which is The rollout of a vaccine largesse from rich nations to poorer ones. That is something that biden. Frankly had been criticized for not doing earlier. The uk and some other countries were also accused of vaccine hoarding. So this is a chance for wealthy nations. That have a handle on. Vaccinations at home to start showing how they will distribute vaccines around the world. And pay for it the deal. That biden is announcing here as for five hundred million vaccines that will start going to less developed countries less rich countries in august and that will be paid for by the united states but the larger amorphous purpose of the trip at all stops is to show that democracies and elected government as cumbersome as it can be offers its people much better alternatives and can actually deliver on those alternatives versus authoritarian governments. And it's an answer to. The argument. Made quite forcefully by china and a little bit less directly by russia that a top down version of governance. Where one person or one power structure makes all the decisions and can act more quickly that that is the answer. We've seen that in. The vaccine context both russia and china. Were quick start passing out vaccines to other countries. Hey courtesy of us. Here's a vaccine stamped by the kremlin. Please habit on us. They did that very fast. The united states did not other western democracies did not so they're playing a bit of catch-up but the idea is to say we can do it. We can both be responsive to our people elected governments and we can do things fast and efficiently when we need to part of what president biden has positioned himself saying many times in the lead up to the strip and even on. This trip is using the phrase. America is back where the. Us has back when discussing his approach to foreign policy. What kind of message is he. Trying to send by using that phrase. America's back what does that mean to the biden administration. It's a phrase. He's been using since the first weeks of the administration and it's a way to save very specifically to us allies that the era of donald trump is over. The united states is back as your friend in a practical sense. The united states is back as a reliable ally and participant in group activities and these meetings like the ones. That biden is having this week. Trump kept blowing up. He blew up a couple of g seven meetings. They blew up a nato meeting over refusing to participate in what he considered to be. You know group decision. Making that he didn't think was beneficial to the united states. Didn't like him. He didn't like the setting. Didn't like being told what to do. So when biden says america's back he's saying who are here. We're going to sit down and we're going to work alongside you. It also means america's back as leader which is in some ways a harder argument for biden to make stick. The world is different the world. He says he's back to lead is different than when he was vice. President it's different because of donald trump. But it would have been different anyway and that is something that i think. We still do not know the answer to how much by will be a leader for these organizations and allies. He sees this week and how much she will be a compatriot but in any event they are just glad to have him. So at the g seven you mentioned he wants to focus on vaccines and vaccine distribution globally. Are there other issues that are sort of front and center for this g. Seven meeting specifically things like trade climate change. Yeah climate change. Sure about the three cs code climate and china. There are issues related to all of those that are being dealt with here. There will be a pretty significant discussion of ransomware which is in some cases. A russian originated problem. In other cases. Chinese and other cases cybercrime is emanating from all kinds of other countries as well by the way including within the united states though talk about ransomware and cyber crime. That's another see for them exactly. I know somebody didn't count rate. did they. And they will also talk a little bit about some complicated post pandemic finance rules ways that countries that need an economic leg-up can get some access to funds through the international monetary fund. That's very traditional g. Seven kind of stuff to do the vaccine part of it is new territory for them. So then let's move onto the nato portion of the trip where he will head after the g seven after meeting with the queen. What is biden hope to achieve on that nato leg of the trip so the nato part of the trip is very interesting to me. Not only. Because i'm kind of a nato geek but it's one of the first times in a long time that i can remember that there wasn't a ton on the nato agenda and yet the stakes are pretty high for nearly twenty years. Now nato has fought alongside. The united states at us request in afghanistan and that conflict is winding down as a military conflict. And there's a degree of hurt feelings. Among some nato allies. This is not a major major deal. But it's something that the biden team is very of when biden was elected despite what anybody who had been listening new was his personal opposition to continuation of the war. Really thought it had run. Its course there was an assumption. I think among many nato countries that this wouldn't be something that biden pulled the plug on right away he would want to study it to be not trump. He would want to think about it. Consult all the allies that kept saying over and over again that they weren't gonna make any rash decisions about anything anywhere in the world without allies by their side. The days go it alone. We're over so is a bit of a shock. When biden said yep. We're leaving and the biden people will tell you that it's not correct that they sprang this on the europeans and nato nations but they kind of did there was not the level of consultation and coordination certainly a number of nato nations. Were expecting so. I think it will be an interesting meeting on the atmospheric side of it as far as very practical things to come out of the nato meeting. There's a need to address the issue of turkey which is a nato member but is creeping toward authoritarianism and has bought. Russian made weapons. Which are not supposed to do if you are a member of the. What is often shorthanded as the western alliance. I e the people who are not russia. You're not supposed to be buying those weapons. Turkey has done that to thumb its nose at nato of which it is a member. So that's been an issue for a while but it wasn't an issue for biden until now so i think we will see how he deals with that. And the other thing he's doing on the sidelines of the nato meeting is to meet separately with the turkish president aired on where they will talk about those weapons but also probably talk about a number of other things including how turkey can better cooperate with europe soon after that nato summit biden we'll head to what many consider the main event of this trip which his meeting with russian president vladimir putin. Can you explain a little bit about where the relationship with putin and biden's dan's now heading into this meeting so the relationship between putin and biden is complicated as all. Us interactions with russia. Are it bears mentioned that. The united states and russia have the world's two largest nuclear arsenals enormous nuclear arsenals and russia for all that it is no longer the soviet union and is in many ways diminished presence in the world still owns a really really lot of nuclear weapons and russia sees the world fundamentally differently than the united states does. And when you have these two divergent views of how the world should work from biden's perspective. The world should work in an orderly way and from putin's perspective the world has a symmetrical. And you should use power where you can get it which may mean sideways and that is how putin has operated for a long time. He cannot win a war one on one with the united states unless he's willing to blow up his own country in the process he knows that so. Everything is a symmetrical with that backdrop. They know one another. They have met a number of times before biden knows what he's getting into which is in typical russian fashion. Putin come in with a list of complaints i would. She will want to get through before they can get to anything else. Biden says he has a list of complaints as well. They want to run down. Those and biden would like to talk about some areas where the two countries may be able to cooperate including arms control. There's only one major arms control agreement. Between the two countries that still exists biden acted fast and in his first weeks in office to extend that but it will still expire in five years and then what that framework that governed the way the united states dealt with the soviet union and then with russia for the last thirty years is sort of coming apart and biden would like to repair that he thinks the united states in russia can cooperate on climate change putin came to the climate summit that biden held in april and behaved himself and they also think perhaps the united states and russia in space. We already do with the international space station but there may a number of other ways to do that so they hope the united states. The biden team hopes to be able to come out of it with a clearer understanding on both sides of what they think is wrong and a way to work together and kind of clear yet. The announcement of this meeting with putin has been met by some controversy and criticism from republicans and democrats as well. What are some of the concerns that people are suggesting as to why it's potentially problematic for biden to meet with putin. The concerns are chiefly that it looks like a reward to putin to be able to sit down with the american president so soon in the president's term and for biden to bend the one to ask for the meeting. There's no instant crisis here. There are many things that are problematic. But there's no one thing potential explosion that means that the. Us president felt that they had to have have crisis talks. He didn't the invited putin to have a sit down summit because of the lengthy list of things to buy wants to talk about and not only putin and others in russia have cast that as biden coming hat in hand and asking for this meeting in elevating putin in the process but some republicans at home have made that charge as well. The white house answers that by saying look. You don't solve problems by talking to people you agree with. We disagree with him on so many things the only way to really resolve those is by attempting to sit down and talk through them. So we do it. The other thing that the biden administration hopes to do is to make a very forceful comparison with the last time. An american president had a one on one summit in a european country with vladimir putin trump and putin in helsinki in two thousand eighteen which was a disaster when then president trump refused to back up his own intelligence services in. They're finding that. Russia had meddled in two thousand sixteen election and deferred to putin standing next to him smirking over what had happened and the assessment that the united states had made about it. Would you not expect there to be a side-by-side press conference this time. I'm disappointed by that. I hope that might change. But even without it the visual of biden including sitting down next on one another and biden being forceful and direct in the white house view. They hope will help. Dispel some of that prior image speaking of that prior image and the prior president during his time in office. President trump tried to disengage from us multilateral agreements he even floated the idea of withdrawing from nato president biden has spoken about making the us a global leader again. And you've touched on this but my question is do other. Countries want a return to that previous world order. I guess i would separate that out a tiny bit. Other countries want the united states to return to the fold no real major decisions that involve several countries together can be made without the united states is the richest country has the largest military is powerful and other ways it cannot be ignored at the same time not all countries not all countries represented within these groupings. This week fully. Welcome the idea of the americans coming back and sitting at the head of the table automatically there remains some bruised feelings from the era of trump. But there are other dynamics that play. They worried that. The united states has short election cycles. We're going to have another election. You know in about a year and then another presidential elections right on top of that and the same forces that brought trump to power once could bring him or a trump like figure to power again. And so there's a questioning of the durability of the kinds of promises biden is making. that's a long way of saying that they want america back huge sigh of relief but there is concern about exactly what role the united states should play and how much those other nations can rely on. Biden's word however sincere. It might be so then last question to you taking all of this together and what. We've seen so far from biden on this trip. How would you describe a biden doctrine in foreign policy. Well i think it's still. Tvd the simplest way to think about it is that he wants a restoration of the world order in terms of the united states being joyner and a leader and he wants a way for the united states to pivot toward heavier concentration on asia..

Putin Trump helsinki donald trump five years boris johnson trump april vladimir putin Lee two countries afghanistan Turkey one week geneva august today republicans sunday two
"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Public outcry and calls for police reform have erupted across the country with movements, taking aim at not just policing tactics, but also broader racial inequities embedded in American life, and now many of our nation's leaders are responding to those calls for reform on Tuesday. House and Senate Democrats United Behind Federal. Legislation the justice and Policing Act that act bans. Certain tactics like choke holds and make it easier to hold officers accountable for misconduct. Just a day later Senate Republicans began drafting their own police reform legislation. That package is expected to include a national police commission that would help determine best practices for law enforcement agencies across the country, but even with similar goals there are no guarantees of course that the democratic led house and the Republican led. Senate could agree on the specifics of police reform bill. There's also no assurance from the white. House that president trump would sign it. Trump has struggled in his response to policing and protests. He's tweeted. False conspiracies about protesters and. And he's defended law enforcement while also acknowledging some mistakes, he's now considering an executive order on police reform for actions he can take without Congress meanwhile changes happening at a local level, too, with some states like Minnesota announcing their own police reform legislation, these various efforts across the country at a federal level and local level. Raise questions about what's most effective. Can Federal Police reform efforts help locally? How much can congress do to change the culture and practices of local police departments, and what are the president's goals as the country approaches? Week of expected unrest. This is, can he do that? A podcast explores the powers and limitations of the American. Presidency I'm Alison Michael's. A Washington Post Shar school poll released Monday highlights how attitudes about police treatment of black Americans are changing dramatically. The poll found that seventy four percent of Americans say to support the protests that have been carried out in cities and towns across the country since the May twenty fifth killing of George Floyd more than two in three Americans sixty nine percent say floyd's killing represents a broader problem within.

trump Federal Police Senate president George Floyd Post Shar school Alison Michael Congress Minnesota executive
"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Bush presidency I'm not sure you would have had the Obama Presidency so the impact. Each of those presidents had on the next election is immense following his resignation then there is the the slew of legislative reforms that came out in a way to try to restore the public's confidence in their elected officials and and You know to rebalance the power of the executive office. Do you think that The reforms put in place for the ones that we needed. Well you know the some of it worked some of did NABY ASLI Restricting campaign contributions worked for a while. Now that's gone with the Supreme Court decision. People in groups and corporations can donate endless amounts of money and had put more money into politics. So in that sense there's a failure It's not something you can correct with laws. I think it's something you can correct with. WHO's the person who's president? So what's a a biggest leadership lesson that you take from Nixon's presidency that the presidency is a sacred wintrust that it's not something. The person who is president owns or is entitled to that What needs to accompany that offices grit deal of humility? He listened to enough of those tapes and and what is important is the dog that doesn't Bark to my knowledge. No one ever says. What does the country need? What would being good it was always about? Nixon settling scores his political standing and future. How could be leveraged? I think we need to the presidency's not about the president. The presidency is about the the execution of the Constitution and laws within the defined framework in the interest of the people in the country. You never met Nixon. Do you wish that you had or do we try Carl Bernstein and I tried but we never got close and he was quite angry at our stories. And and that's you know that's under stand of bull team ever get. Do you ever get tired of of him. I'm studying him thinking about him. Having your own life story so intertwined turned with his. It's something Tired I'd because they're all there's always new material and tapes MM said new dimension to Nixon so the ultimate lesson is history is never over spirit of history. Never been over in the end this episode by asking current Washington Post executive editor Marty Baron for his reflections on how the legacy of the Nixon era. I still reverberates newsrooms. Today I hear all the time from people in the public who refer back to what the Washington posted in the era of Watergate and are calling upon us demanding that we do the same kind of work that we hold our politicians accountable and we dig beneath the surface and we keep digging and we'd be persistent. Those events actually inspired a whole new generation of journalists people of my age group To get into the field in the first place I think it also sharpened the definition of what are our core. Mission is certainly one of our most important core missions and that it is that we are supposed to hold powerful individuals and powerful institutions accountable in many things to this week's guests Mardi bearing and with enormous gratitude Bob Woodward original music for the podcast by listener and next week we will be discussing Nixon's vice president who took office upon his resignation Gerald Ford and finally just out of curiosity do any of you want another podcast when this one is over and thinking about whether we I should do one and if we do what it should be so if there's anything that you're dying to hear as kind of a season to I would love to hear your thoughts. Thanks you can email me at Lillian Dot Cunningham at wash post dot com or you can reach me on twitter and instagram accounts at presidential presidential underscore w. p.. Thanks for listening..

Nixon president Carl Bernstein Gerald Ford Obama Washington Bush vice president Supreme Court executive Lillian Dot Cunningham Washington Post Bob Woodward MM twitter Marty Baron executive editor instagram
"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"President trump sent a tweet yes. That's how many of these can he do that. Episodes could begin but this this time that tweet led to a series of events that nearly two weeks later is still unfolding and that single. We'll tweet poses a larger questions for the country. That might not be initially obvious. The message was an incorrect claim from the president that Hurricane Dorian Korean would hit Alabama soon after the Birmingham weather forecast office sent a Tweet to quell fears reassuring the community that Alabama was is not in fact in the expected path of the hurricane that contradictory tweet for Birmingham's weather service outpost did not sit well with trump according to Washington Post reporting.

trump president Hurricane Dorian Birmingham Alabama Washington Post two weeks
"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

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"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Thanks for listening to another episode as Kenny as always if you liked this episode, please share it or leave us a review on apple podcasts or every listen. Can he do that is a team effort here at the post? It's produced by Carol alderman with special help this week from Dennis Vonk design help from cat rebel Brooks logo. Art from the Ren Bogue. Leo and theme music by Ted Muldoon. The Washington Post's newest podcast post reports is doing something different. Every afternoon. We'll bring you stories about in the state of the country a number of false and misleading claims he made on the campaign trail the last few weeks is breathtaking and the worlds, and I think that that is where climate change is starting to come in. It's causing fires to move more rapidly to spread more rapidly. And also to burn hotter. The stories behind the stories, and how we come to know the things, you know. That's the sound of Antarctic snow, healthy snow. Not healthy so stories of catch the reality of the world inside and outside of Washington with nuance and unflinching honesty. That's post reports. I'm Martine powers, and I can't wait to share this new podcast with you get it. Now at Washington Post dot com slash post reports or wherever you get your podcasts.

Washington Post Ted Muldoon Kenny Ren Bogue Carol alderman Martine powers Washington Dennis Vonk Leo
"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

04:06 min | 3 years ago

"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Rowe price and the Washington Post brain studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. Throughout US history. Some vulnerable presidents have decided not to run again or the failed to win reelection. But I wondered how unusual might it be for a sitting president to be challenged for nomination as their party's own general election candidate, it's happened. And if you get a real high profile primary challenger, you may still win the nomination in most cases, but it could hobble your presidency it could prevent you from winning reelection. Because your whole political stature has been a road by primary campaign. A lot of it matters about what's happening in the turbulence of history. You think about in one thousand nine hundred seventy four Richard Nixon resigns amid scandal in Watergate, Gerald Ford becomes president. And then he was challenged by Ronald Reagan in the nineteen seventy six presidential primary. So presidents were seen as vulnerable or tinged by scandal. They have had primary challenges before Jimmy Carter, Gerald Ford. George. Jj W Bush. So it's only in this White House wants to avoid but things are so fast moving right now in American politics. We don't know what Robert Muller's going to do. We don't know what's going to happen with the economy. If it continues to be volatile that there could be an opening in twenty nineteen beyond all the Democrats were heading to New Hampshire. There could be an opening for Republicans to start start to say is this party lost. If we don't have a more moderate or mainstream candidate at least have that discussion. So considering some of the historical context. Do you see those same vulnerabilities now as the president has into twenty twenty not yet? Okay. I mean, we're at but Romney even making noise about it shows. He's not making knows about twenty twenty. But this is a wink, wink, remember me for twenty twenty if things go bad. That's that's what this up it is. That's why it's on the front page of the Washington Post. That's why it matters in American politics because this is not just someone crowing from the sidelines. This is as a president's dealing with a government shutdown volatile. Mark. Empowered House Democrats the twenty twenty presidential race starting on the democratic side. He's under siege. A president under siege. A primary conversation is almost certainly going to start historically if you have these kind of dynamics over a presidency in the first line of Romney's op-ed, he refers to this particular month being a sign of President Trump's administration in turmoil. Can you talk about what's happened this past month that might make Trump vulnerable to a contender will Romney calls? The quote deep descent of President Trump's administration Romney is someone who mem-. Remember wanted them be secretary of state had frog leg John Georgia's New York with then president elect Trump thought about the idea for Trump. Aides told me it was never seriously considered to actually have run their that President Trump actually kind of teased Romney along and thought maybe made Romney think you could maybe secretary of state. This is how President Trump often operate with people. He doesn't like he'll. Try to bring them into the full, but not necessarily give them what they're seeking Surani had all these meetings about secretary state, but was never offered. Secretary of state is Romney's sort of flip flopping on the president or his tendency to give him the benefit of the doubt. And then publicly criticize him does that represent a portion of the Republican party's kind of sentiment towards Trump or is this uniquely Romney Romney is such a microcosm of the Republican party. He's someone who even when President Trump in twenty eleven when he was a birther. He accepted Trump's endorsement when he was running for president. Then he flips he becomes anti-trump. He gives us big speech in in Utah in two thousand sixteen in denounces Trump as this wild man who should never be president. And he becomes kind of a hero to the never Trumpers for being out there and saying that then President Trump wins, and he says, well, wait a second. The Republicans now have power they control the house and the Senate and the White House. Maybe I want to be involved. Maybe I should give Trump a chance maybe it could be secretary of state, and then that doesn't work out. Out and it becomes anti-trump again..

president President Trump Romney Romney Washington Post Gerald Ford White House US Jj W Bush Mark Richard Nixon secretary Republican party New Hampshire Robert Muller twenty twenty Jimmy Carter Ronald Reagan George
"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"He's going to step forward. Right at this moment and try to unite the country and make character an issue. This is a salvo across the. How of this White House and to the Republican party saying, yes, you've embraced President Trump? But is it really worth the cost and does character directly affect policies. Kind of. I'm trying to get at. It's a big debate. In politics, always has been I mean, we've had presidents before who've had bad reputations presidents who've had huge scandal. This was an issue with President Clinton when he had his personal troubles. Did it really matter? Did character matter if you're if you have a president who's popular who's able to do stuff with Newt Gingrich like Clinton was does character matter. It's always been something that has hovered over the presidency is the presidency about policy, or is it about representing the country in a certain way. And that's always the tension. And this tension again is being exacerbated by Mitt Romney Hussein character needs to come to the fore more than it is now now why is mitt Romney's choice to speak out. Why does that feel different than say? Bob corker or Jeff flake doing. So. Because Romney is someone who is considered by many Republican donors and Republican strategists as someone who could run for president in twenty twenty. Now Romney said this week he's not trying to mount a campaign for president. But what really matters with this Ahmed as well is that there is a conversation but note beneath the surface to be sure for the most part. But there is a conversation that's growing in Republican ranks should President Trump have a primary challenge, Ohio. Governor John k six out there saying he may do it Senator flake is that he hasn't ruled it out corker as that..

mitt Romney president President Trump President Clinton Mitt Romney Hussein Republican party Bob corker Newt Gingrich Jeff flake White House Governor John k Ahmed Senator Ohio
"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

04:39 min | 3 years ago

"he" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Rowe price and the Washington Post brain studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. It may only be the very first week of twenty nineteen but in the world of presidential politics. That means it's time to think about the twenty twenty presidential election more immediately, though, it's time to welcome a new congress to Washington where the you will support and defend the constitution of the United States against all enemies. Foreign and domestic among those sworn into congress this week is Utah's junior. Republican Senator Mitt Romney Romney made a run for the presidency in twenty twelve as the Republican nominee and just days before he starts his new role as a Senator in Washington he made a big splash about how he thinks of president should act in an op Ed published in the Washington Post on Tuesday Romney, harshly criticized the president suggesting he has not risen to the mantle of the presidency. Trump responded to a reporter's question about Romney's op Ed so I was surprised at Mitt Romney. But we just hope he's going to be a team player if he's a. Team player. That'll be great. I will say this. If you've fawn really hard against President Obama like he does against me. He would have won the election. Other Republican reactions to Romney's off Ed have been mixed and some of you been speculated that he might be making a case to challenge Trump in the twenty twenty primary so that got us thinking how vulnerable is Trump to a Republican challenger? Can he lose the twenty twenty Republican nomination? This is can he do that a podcast that explores the powers and limitations of the American presidency? I'm Alison Michael's? The posts political reporter Robert Costa has been covering Romney since the days of his twenty twelve presidential campaign. He explained Romney's message in this op, Ed it's not a surprise what he wrote in the op-ed taking a hawkish position on foreign policy raising questions about the president's decision to remove troops from Syria. But at the foundation of this article is Mitt Romney raising questions of character about President Trump. And that's really the case he's making against the president not an ideological case as we saw from Romney's CNN interview this week he supports the border wall. He supports criminal Justice reform. He supports the tax cut. What he really has a problem with is President Trump's character and the way he arose different norms and institutions, yes. So I wanted to ask you specifically about that he praises the president for a lot of these things criminal Justice reform appointing conservative judges. Cracking down on China. These are pretty mainstream Republican policies, and yet he makes this case against character. So if he's getting the policies that had conservative voters presumably want, why does character matter to him. Romney has nothing to lose four Massachusetts. Governor who moves to Utah is in political winters, the former Republican presidential nominee now gets elected as a junior Senator from Utah to a six year term in his seventies. And he's saying to himself based on my reporting talking to his friends and his allies why not be out there as someone who doesn't destroy the same kind of bargain as every other Republican has struck with President Trump, which is what you outline which is well, we don't like him on his conduct. But he's giving us all these goodies on policy for Romney. And this was reflected in his presidential bids. He really believes the presidency is about more than policy gains. He sees the presidency is an American institution. He's an old school. Cool mainstream Republican, and he's going to be in the Senate in that way advocating for those values. What struck me specifically in Romney's approach to addressing the character of our president is that he kind of uses it as this thing that represents how a president trust to unite the country yet over the past several presidencies in our country. We've seen despite presidents who've spoken about unity. We've seen a further divided country. So how important is this sense of character? This sort of speaking about unity homeport, and actually is it how unified a country looks feels the context matters. Right. Romney is saying to the Republican party. Character has always mattered too. Most Republicans over the past few decades throughout American history. His op Ed is not so much about him saying to the country..

Senator Mitt Romney Romney President Trump president Washington Post Republican party President Obama Ed Washington Senator Utah congress reporter United States China Alison Michael Senate CNN