35 Burst results for "Hazel"

Charlie Daniels dead: Country music legend passes away after suffering stroke

WBBM Late Morning News

00:25 sec | Last month

Charlie Daniels dead: Country music legend passes away after suffering stroke

"Icon and Hall of Music Hall of Fame member Charlie Daniels has died at 83 after suffering a stroke. How's Hayley Daniels was best known for his hit. The Devil went down to Georgia, which was number one on the charts in 1979 and stayed on the charts for 21 weeks. He is survived by his wife, Hazel, and son, Charlie Daniels, Junior.

Charlie Daniels Hayley Daniels Hall Of Music Hall Of Fame Devil Hazel Georgia
A Nurse's Healing Story: Admitting Her Truth about Addiction

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

03:43 min | Last month

A Nurse's Healing Story: Admitting Her Truth about Addiction

"Hello and welcome to let's talk. A series of podcast produced by the Hazel and Betty Ford Foundation on the issues that matter to us the issues that we no matter to you to Substance Abuse Prevention Research Treatment for addiction. Recovery Management Education and Advocacy I'm your host William Warriors and today we have a story of hope. brought to us by Nina Pillow Nina. How are you can cut? How are you great good to see you again I know you've done a number of a public events. If you will or stood up spoken out using your own story to help unmask the stigma of addiction and promote the reality of what we look like in the fact, that treatment works in cover is possible, and we're glad that you're with us today on, let's talk. Tell us a little bit about your first experience with substances Yeah thank you for having me So my first. Experience was really the one that. Ultimately brought me here For my own in my life, my dad was an alcoholic growing up for me I had an injury which ultimately ended up I ended up getting prescribe narcotics, opiates, and I enjoyed them. Well beyond using them for pain. There's about seven years ago so. Seven years yeah. And you know kind of before. I knew it I was. Enjoying them you know Kinda like my whole mind, body, Spirit, everything and It ended up becoming. You know full on addiction which I thought I was immune to for whatever reason I was not and I was physically addicted. It got to the point where I couldn't use them. I couldn't not use them without getting sick. And the irony of this is that you were working in the healthcare field at some point along the course of your diction nurse Yep talked to us about being a nurse who is struggling with substances. Yeah, it was It was really hard. I had I knew all of I knew about addiction. I knew about opiates. I knew I knew all of those things. and I continued using them anyways and. I think I think I. particularly felt a lot of shame because of that and I. Had access to them in my workplace and so Being just didn't want to be the nurse with an addiction and I think that was a huge denial piece for me, Until I ended up diverting narcotics from the hospital I worked at. ultimately ending, getting caught and resigning. That diversion was so that you could sustain your own addiction. Yes, very much. How did that make you feel when you were under the influence? When you knew what you were doing was not only wrong, but was actually illegal and yet you couldn't stop. Just the powerlessness of it, but also in active addiction. It wasn't. It wasn't a matter of right or wrong because for me. My morals and values have always included not stealing, but that wasn't. It was a matter of feeling, normal or not or So it, just it. I don't I don't know that it was ever I know I. Felt Guilt I knew. I knew at the end of the day. It was wrong, but in the moment it was just. What I needed to do and you know. That's what I did.

Nina Pillow Nina Betty Ford Foundation William Warriors Hazel
Brit Bennett: The Vanishing Half

Bookworm

06:37 min | Last month

Brit Bennett: The Vanishing Half

"And Silver Bland, and this is bookworm. My guest today Brit Bennett is the talk of the literary world her book. The vanishing half made its debut at number one on the New York Times. Bestseller list now like me. You may not think much of bestseller was but my big surprise when I picked it up is that it's a wonderful book? It's very enjoyable to read, and it's only Brit. Bennett's second book won't was the originating idea for the vanishing half. Well thanks for having me The book actually began a conversation I had with my mother where she was telling me about this town. She remembered hearing about from her childhood, growing up in rural Louisiana and it was a town. Where was a community of light skinned black people that continued to intermarry within that community in hopes that their children would progressively lighter from generation to generation, so it really struck me as I'm very strange, disturbing idea, also place, and of course as a novelist that immediately makes you think. Oh, this is the setting for a novel. We? Get a very. Dramatic sense of that sending early in the book and I'm going to ask Brooke Bennett to read. The section that describes the town. It has a great name. The name of the town is Mallard and it's named after a duck. Go It was a strange town. Mallard named after the ring necked ducks, living in the rice fields and marshes, a town that like any other was more idea than place. The idea arrived to Alphonse to soar in eighteen, forty eight, as he stood in the sugar cane fields. He'd inherited from the father who'd once owned him. The father now dead, the now freed son wished to build something on those acres of land that would last for centuries to come. A town for men like him who never be accepted as white, but refused to be treated like Negroes a third-place his mother rest. Her soul had hated his lightness when he was a boy, she'd shopped him under the sun, begging him to darken. Maybe that's what made him I dream of the town. Lightness like anything inherited at great cost was lonely gift. He'd married him lotto even lighter than himself. She was pregnant with their first child, and he imagined children's Children's children lighter still like a cup of coffee steadily done rooted with cream, a more perfect Negro, each generation lighter than the one before. Soon others came. Soon idea in place became inseparable in Mallard carried throughout the rest of Saint Landry parish colored. People whispered about it wondered about it. White people couldn't believe even existed. When Saint Catherine's was built in nineteen, thirty eight, the diocese set over a young priest from Dublin who arrived certain that he was lost, didn't the bishop tally that Mallard was a colored town? who were these people walking about? Fair and Blonde and red headed the darkest ones nose year than a Greek was this accounted for colored in America who whites wanted to keep separate. How could they tell the difference? By the time, the being twins were born Afonso store was dead long gone. But his great great great granddaughters inherited his legacy whether they wanted to or not. Even desharnais complained before every founder's day picnic. Who rolled her eyes? When the founder was mentioned in school, as if none of that business had anything to do with her. This would stick after the twins disappeared. How desert never wanted to be part of a town that was her birth rate how she felt that you could flick away history like shrugging a hand off your shoulder. Can escape a town. You cannot escape blood. Somehow the twins believe themselves capable both. And yet if Alphonse to store could have stroll through the town. He'd imagined he would have been thrilled by the side of his great great great granddaughters, twin girls, creamy skin, Hazel Eyes wavy hair. He would marveled at them for the child to be a little more perfect in the parents. What could be more wonderful than that? The Breath Bennett reading. The section from the opening, ten pages of her novel, the vanishing half. Now. Tell me. This idea, the idea of the town that is designed to get wider and wider and to exile or expel those people who are violations of its aspiration toward whiteness. This is a horrifying idea just as in. Edward P. Jones's novel, the known world, a town where freed black people on black slaves themselves. Tell me how to we get ideas as dangerous and strange as these. Long I started so when I started thinking about the book I I read about similar communities to the stat existed of Louisiana, these krill communities of fair skin, black people who believed very deeply that it was better to be light, who were suspicious of darker skinned black people in wanted to kind of insulate their community against who they perceived as being outsiders to me. Book was taking. This idea of color is on just pushing it to extremes by locating the physical town in sort of pushing the. The extremes of that ideology to think about what it would look like. If color is not just a you know something that's abstract, if it's not just something that you think of as a preference or sort of personal opinion about light skin, being better than dark skin, what is it like if this is something that is actually kind of instituted in place and to the degree that the population is almost almost kind of genetically engineering at so that their children can can become lighter and

Mallard Brit Bennett Alphonse Brooke Bennett New York Times Silver Bland Founder Louisiana Edward P. Jones Bennett Hazel Eyes Saint Landry Afonso America Saint Catherine Desharnais Dublin
Help for Children in Families with Addiction

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

04:54 min | Last month

Help for Children in Families with Addiction

"My Name is William Moyers I. Am the host of our program here today joining me Cynthia Galaxies. Leave US welcome. Cynthia, thank you. You are the supervisor of the Children's program here at the Betty Ford Center Tell me about your personal passion for the subject of Children in Addiction. It was actually something that I didn't realize I had a passion foreign to. The first kid who allowed me to be a part of their world and start sharing how addiction had hurt them in their family that I realize the privileged. I was having about being there with them when they shared their story. With the Hazel. He's one Betty Ford Foundation for thirteen years working in the children's program since the beginning No, I've been with the Children's program. Almost seven years prior to that I was working in the admissions department at the Betty Ford Center for six and a half years, so I had to listen to the stories from incoming patients and their families. The opportunity to hear it from a kid's perspective really has made a difference in my life. What is that children's perspective that that that resonates with you? Think. It's just that they know more than what they're giving credit for. They might not know that there's a substance being news, but they know behaviors. Where maybe mom sleeping too much, so they can hang out with her. Dad's missing. You know left a couple of days and hasn't been back and just the impact that it causes them and at all times because they don't have the answers to what's going on, they can start to blame themselves or think that it's something wrong with them and that impact on children is really significant in this country. Right I think it's one in three. Families Suffer from addiction, and so the children do, too. Is that right? That's right that's correct. And I think there's a lot of programs out there for the patients, which is great There's family programs Alanon even teen, but it seems like we're really afraid of asking the younger ones what they know in how they feel, and yet they have just as many feelings as the adults do, and so tell me how the children's program here works. Children come into the program on that first day. So on the first day we have variety of emotions. There's some kids that are really excited to be here whether they're used to. Going to camp or their parents may be explained to them exactly what they were doing here. We have kids that you know. Don't even WANNA. Look at us Because maybe it's during summer break and they wish they were you know at home sleeping playing video games, things like that and within an hour, the magic of the program you can start seeing a difference as to how the kids are starting to feel more comfortable, and this is way before we even introduce each other and talk about how we're here to talk about action, and you use Use props like this I? Don't even want to say this is a prop. This is more of an icon. Tell us about. The Marine is a very special kid. He's here to my heart. special just like every kid that comes through our program he addiction and his family as well so both parents are trapped by addiction, and he has a series of books where he kind of explores along with the reader how he deals with it, so he learns that addiction has been a family secret for very long time. gets better. That doesn't even be more at ten years. old gets offered alcohol by kids, and so the kids get to explore that with him and relate because he is another kid and the kids start to understand that they really aren't alone. What about the children though that are? More significantly or adversely impacted, or who come here and a aren't certain what to do, and they have a nice warm person like you to talk to, and they've got a character like beamer, but they're still not coming out of their show. What do you do to to bring them into the process and bring them into the group I? Think the the magical part of the of the program is because we balanced our program between fun activities whether it's hide and seek tag going to the pool, watching fund movie and what? What we call sharing learning activities, so the kids really to get in tune with that inner kid obviously their kids, sometimes a little easier for them, but then they see grownups get in tune with that as well and so it helps them understand that you know I've had addiction in my family and okay, and I'm helping other kids, and so it Kinda brings comfort to them to know. Here's some adults that are freely talking to us and more importantly, they're listening to my story and not correcting the facts not. Letting US know that our feelings do matter. What are some stories that you hear when you when you talk to these children? Most of the stories revolve truly around just loving their parent regardless of what the parent has gone through whether they've seen the parent or not is just this unconditional love for that person and that hope that you know that they get better soon and so although you know they're. They're sad or sometimes angry about what's happened because of addiction, there's still that underlying love for that

Betty Ford Center United States Cynthia Galaxies Betty Ford Foundation William Moyers Supervisor Alanon DAD Beamer
Dig for Victory

Gastropod

06:06 min | Last month

Dig for Victory

"To get to today's urban gardens, let's go back in time to the founding of the US, there were certainly major cities Philadelphia New York Boston, but it wasn't. Until the eighteen hundreds that more and more people move to cities and urban ization in the US really got underway. These are people who would have grown almost all their own food before, but now they live in a city. They can buy food at the market. So how many of them kept up gardening in their new urban homes? A lot of food production went on. On within city boundaries well through the start of the twentieth century, there were lots and lots of urban livestock, because people were raising pigs and cows and chicken for food within city limits anesthesia day as a historian at the University of Delaware, and she's working on a PhD about Victory Gardens. It's only really during the city, Beautiful Movement and the progressive era that city start passing ordinances that actually outlawed these forms of local food production in the name of cleanliness and sanitation and middle-class standards of respectability, because only poor people grow their. Their own food. The city beautiful movement was big deal during the eighteen nineteen in one thousand, nine hundred wealthy urbanites, all this rural migration and immigration, and of course, the rising inequality and poverty and tenements in their cities, and they were not happy. They tried to clean the city up. They built big boulevards and parks with monumental fountains, and eventually they also introduced strict zoning laws and chickens and vegetable patches were not part of these new beautiful cities urban agriculture. Something poor people needed. It had to go some cities overtime had already. Already banned maybe the animals in the streets, or even keeping certain animals within city limits, but this really solidified during the city, beautiful movement city started to enact ordinances that said no farm animals in the city at all and no front yard vegetables, either meanwhile the poor had more pressing concerns than how the city looked frequently, when bad harvests and economic fluctuations raised food prices, they could not get to eat. There were dozens of major food riots in American cities throughout the eighteen hundreds. The first urban gardening movement starts in eighteen ninety. Ninety three in the town of Detroit, because of this panic of eighteen, ninety three, there were lots of panics. In those days, the stock market was very new, very volatile and long story short, suddenly, basically overnight, forty three percent of detroiters are unemployed in what had been a booming city and the Mayor Hazel S Pingree I has to find some way to answer. The cries of his constituents. So what he does is, he starts the first urban farming movement, which is ironically happening at the same time that many productive activities within the. The city are being outlawed. In other cities, urban leaders didn't want farms in their cities, but they also didn't want riots, and so letting poor people groza food on vacant land was seen as an acceptable temporary band aid in times of shortages. The Detroit plan was called the potato, patch plan and it had pretty impressive results by eighteen, ninety, six seventeen hundred families were farming more than four hundred acres in the city, and there are letters there from local detroiters writing into mayor Pingree, saying you so much I was able to grow. Grow Food for my family and lots of the people that wrote in. It's heartbreaking, because these letters are hardly legible there in broken English. Many of them were recent, German and Polish immigrants who were taking advantage of this program to grow foods dot connected them to their home as well as to feed their families. The Potato Patch program was seen as a success, but it was never meant to be permanent in less than a decade when economic situation in Detroit started to improve urban farms kind of petered out until the next big. Big Crisis, which was World War, one, the city beautiful movement had stamped out urban gardening the Detroit potato patches were gone, but suddenly there was a huge need both for food, and for kind of coming together in a patriotic sense. At least that's how Charles lay through peck sought. He was a lumber baron from New Jersey and early on in the days of the European conflict. He wrote the US government and said people should be reason. Food would help them contribute to the war help stock shortages, and the USDA promptly said Sir. We've got better ideas going here for better uses of fertilizer and seed supplies so thanks for your input and no thanks Charles hadn't made his fortune by taking no for an answer, so he took that Fortuna and started a Liberty Garden Movement himself, and he quickly found a whole group of rich people who wanted to join him in getting Americans. Gardening again to support the war Charles and his friends created a movement. There were Liberty Gardens. Gardens on Boston Common, and in Union Square in New York and big corporations like Eastman Kodak and General Electric set aside land at their factories for employees to grow and boy scouts even had a garden at Grover Cleveland's Childhood Home in New Jersey. Even the government caught the Liberty Garden fever, and they created a school program to teach budding young home farmers how to grow food and support. The soldiers was actually one of the first nationally. Nationally promoted curricula in the country, the Liberty Garden Movement seemed to really catch the public imagination. However, there was no infrastructure for collecting numbers. The only source we have is Charles Lathrop pack himself wrote a book called the war garden victorious in one, thousand, nine, hundred nineteen, and he claims that the movements sponsored five million gardens which time when there were just over six million actual professional farmers in the US is kind of impressive but remember. Remember Charles is our only source for this number and he might have been biased. It's really incredibly hard to say, but despite its holds on the national imagination, it had nowhere near the impact of world. War Two Gardens in terms at share mount of produce ground, sheer numbers of people participating sheer difference it made in the global war effort, and that's probably why you listeners at least in the US you don't use the Term Liberty Garden. Gardens you probably say victory garden.

Charles Lathrop Liberty Garden Movement United States Detroit Victory Gardens New Jersey Hazel S Pingree Liberty Gardens Term Liberty Garden New York Us Government University Of Delaware Philadelphia Usda Boston
Body found near Haysville during search for missing Wichita woman

Fox News Rundown

00:23 sec | Last month

Body found near Haysville during search for missing Wichita woman

"Cedric county sheriff's investigators say the body of a woman was found Saturday morning in the seventy nine hundred block of south meridian near hazel in a field near railroad tracks in the area the body was found just a few miles away from an area where a missing Wichita woman cell phone last paying the twenty three year old Savannah Schneider was last seen may thirty first investigators say they're still working to positively identify the

Savannah Schneider Cedric County Wichita
Hazelnuts could be a climate-friendly crop for the Midwest

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 months ago

Hazelnuts could be a climate-friendly crop for the Midwest

"Many people enjoy hazelnuts and chocolate spreads your as a snack and more fall in love with the flavor. The Global Hazel nut market is expected to double this decade. Keith Keeley of the Savannah. Institute wants the American Midwest to help meet the rising demand. He says growing hazelnuts on a large scale instead of soy could help farmers and the climate. Like. Soy hazelnuts can be a source of oil and protein, but they do not need planting and plowing each year. hazelnuts represent a crop where we can have long lived plants with roots deep in the soil, keeping that soil in place, adding more carbon to the soil, Kelly says growing them does not require eliminating annual crops. Farmers can plant the nuts and rose and raise other crops or livestock in between, and that also adds diversity to the landscape, which has benefits for spreading out farmers, risk, and for providing more habitat for wildlife. Expanding the Midwest Hazelnut Industry will take developing more well adapted plants, and it will also entail building new markets for the nuts such as for livestock feed, and even biodiesel, but Kelly says the potential is exciting. It's really an opportunity for farmland to become a sponge that soaks carbon

Keith Keeley Midwest Hazelnut Industry Kelly Savannah
New Frontiers in Addiction Medicine

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

04:59 min | 2 months ago

New Frontiers in Addiction Medicine

"Hello and welcome to let's talk an award. Winning series of podcast produced and delivered by the Hazelton. Betty Ford Foundation. Each podcast focuses on a topic related to addiction to alcohol and other drugs from prevention, research, treatment, current events, advocacy, and of course recovery from addiction to alcohol and other drugs. I'm your host William Lawyers and today, joining us is Dr. Martin Sepla the chief. Chief medical officer, the Hazel. Betty Ford Foundation Welcome MARV thinks in good to be here. Nice to have you with us again here at the Betty Ford. Center on this podcast, and it's rather appropriate that our topic for today is talking about the collaboration with the Mayo. Clinic on a couple of studies which I want you to talk about, but I think it's interesting that. This collaborations with Mayo Clinic and that's where a lot of your story comes from. It sure does I was I got sober. While was working at the Mayo Clinic after high school actually before I graduated from high school because I dropped out and I was working there. And and able to get my diploma once I got so. They didn't really I told her department. I haven't graduated, but. nobody else, really new in the lab work. So, somehow I, still get a job without a high school diploma while in was. Absolutely influenced to go into medicine while working there and addiction medicine. No. I wanted to be a cardiac surgeon because I worked with cardiovascular research lab, and the primary person who influenced me was a Brazilian cardiac surgeon and. He he? We would be doing surgery on these animals and he'd tell me all these stories of healing. From his work, and this is just want to be like. Was My goal. So. Cardiac surgeon than halfway through medical school back at mail. I still had that plan in doing clinical rotations and all these patients had. And or other type of diction, and I had identify that and bring it up with my attending the physician on staff, the residents and they would listen to me and then tell you we're not gonNA do anything about that Mar.. And we didn't put it in the chart. We didn't refer people for care for consultation. Nothing and it was often the cause of the hospitalization. We're doing nothing about it and I was complaining about this at A. Meeting ended weekly in after a few weeks, these two doctors in the meeting took me aside one night and said. Mark you've got to quit bitching about this and do something about it. Kind opened my eyes defensibility. His actually that discussion the. resulted in me, going into psychiatry and folk. Specializing in addiction, we're. We're glad that you did. Aged now it has. And did you ever think that the day would come? When the Hazel Betty Ford Foundation would be collaborating with male. you know I didn't I'd hoped so all along, but it just didn't have an didn't Evans I kinda lost. Hope about though here. We are doing it to studies. Tell us about him. Yeah, so we're doing. an NIH grant funded study that we partnered with Mayo clinic onto study of Medication for alcohol. Use Disorders, the medicines that camper sate. Hardly gets used because it only works for about ten percent of people, alcohol use disorder. So for me as attack. It's hard to convince myself to prescribe it to somebody and especially hard to convince him to take it because it works so infrequently you know and nine out of ten. It doesn't work for but. There's always this underlying thought that it must be a genetic sub type of alcoholics. So that respond to. So we've decided with. Mayo is to find out if that's true, because one of the main researchers there who I actually knew. Since I worked in that lab as a kid Dick, wind chill bomb, he helped develop technologies for examining genetic and metabolic biomarkers, which are just kind of. The human genome of testing that to see if an individual's going to respond to medicine or not, but also these metabolic biomarkers are just normal metabolic byproducts floating around our blood, so we can take simple blood test. And check it out to see who responsive medicine and who doesn't as a result of determining that. We put it into artificial intelligence computers to to examine the the characteristics of those bio markers, and those who respond versus those who

Betty Ford Mayo Clinic Betty Ford Foundation Hazel Betty Ford Foundation Mayo Medical Officer Hazelton Dick William Lawyers Dr. Martin Sepla NIH Mark Evans
7th Grader Starts Petition To Get New York City Department Of Education To Restore Pre-Coronavirus Grading Policy

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:29 sec | 3 months ago

7th Grader Starts Petition To Get New York City Department Of Education To Restore Pre-Coronavirus Grading Policy

"The department of education's new grading policy is being challenged by high achieving students in New York City they are concerned that it will prevent them from getting into the schools of their choice CBS two S. hazel Sanchez explains seventh grader Julissa now ski is devastated the New York City department of education changed his grading policy essentially a racing as first and second quarter grades Jude launched a change dot org petition

New York City Jude Department Of Education CBS Hazel Sanchez New York City Department Of Ed
"hazel" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

01:38 min | 4 months ago

"hazel" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Live local and hazel park and harbor will use radio nine fifteen W. W. W. dot one twenty to try police continue to come out of quarantine and they're getting back to work assistant police chief James White give an update yesterday afternoon they're showing up for work you're doing exactly what we're asking them to do we've returned a number of officers back to patrol we've had very good luck with our rapid testing actually really is a lock it's it's a really good process and is working very well for us I would return approximately six hundred members back to work they're all were very eager to get back to work and got a number of other officers that are coming out of quarantine or recovering from this dreaded dreaded virus with that we've been able to return a number of those officers back to specialize commands such as traffic enforcement at the precinct level our game until unit to disrupt our game violent gang offenders we've also implemented or return a number of those officers to other entities to help support our our law enforcement goals in addition to that some of those officers are working in our tac ops area where they're keeping an eye on our parks working with our community and we've had great success with our community as mayor indicated I want to take this time out and thank the community we put out the call a couple days ago about a week ago now for our community to let us know if there was a problem in the parks if they had groups congregating and they answer that call in a big way they've been extremely cooperative and as a.

James White hazel park
A Second Chance at Life: Getting Sober at Age 24

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

09:02 min | 4 months ago

A Second Chance at Life: Getting Sober at Age 24

"Hello and welcome to. Let's talk a series of podcast produced by the Hazel and Betty Ford Foundation on the issues. That matter to us the issues that we no matter to you to substance use prevention research treatment of Addiction Recovery Management Advocacy and education. I'm your host oil moyers and today we have a story of hope brought to us by Holly S. Welcome Holly Thank you. Thanks for being here again. I'm so struck by the fact that as a young person in recovery. You've been so willing to stand up and speak out. You were on the stage at Hazelton BETTY FORD IN CENTER CITY MINNESOTA. When we had the drugs are there yet. You shared your story that they had that feel free to be up on that stage really awesome. I spent fifty six days. He's old and as a patient three times a day. I was sitting. And you know in the seats looking up the stage and so to be on the other side of that And even having the confidence to speak in front of a group of people as astounding. My my teachers would be proud. Come a long way so you tell us just a little bit about your your addiction journey. The first time you used you remember. Yeah I do I was fourteen. Bonfire my brother was four years or is four years older than me And so he had friends in his grade that were siblings of kids in my grade and so We went to von fire a night and drink and it tasted horrible. But it made me feel calm. Addy is and I was like okay. I hear often that this this is what I needed. That's it was. I kept drinking more looking for what you found it right. Exactly and and I never wanted to find that thought. I would have a problem with alcohol because my dad was suffered from substance use disorder. So that wasn't in my plan. So you knew a little bit of history you drank. It felt good even though it tasted lousy and alcohol was the drug that you continue to use correct. Yeah it was Up until I was twenty four years old in college I did use adderall and violence is prescribed that and and abused that after you know few months of having it And then it just any any mind altering substance it was you know zero to one hundred all the time. I didn't have turned off button. And then the day came when new. You couldn't do this anymore. Tell us about that day. Yeah so I actually when I was probably twenty one I knew I mean I had always had a bad gut feeling like my drinking is not normal. It's not that I would drink every single day but it was every single time. Major anchor would block out When someone told me they didn't lack cal. I was genuinely surprised like well it. That's not what you do and you drink And that was scary. Own and the waking up and not remembering But when I started drinking every day and when I started drinking by myself and when I started using it as a coping mechanism fats and I was like okay. This isn't right And that was around. Twenty twenty one to twenty four years old Brit just progressively about so much worse towards totally isolating and just drinking by myself in my room and Stang fire and just before you had your bottom. You had a family tragedy. Yeah so My Dad died from the disease of alcoholism and fat was a long time coming. I mean I grew up watching him drink as a you know as a young kid and and I didn't know what that silver and way read can was but I knew that the more that piled up next to his recliner the more he wasn't going to be my dad. You know he damore beer. He drank or whatever So that was a scary thing as a kid for my brother and I And then after my parents got a divorce when I was in fifth grade just progressively got worse and then it's really hard to ought somebody's slowly and then quickly wither away And a degree the loss of my dad twice The first time when alcoholism totally consumed him where the disease totally consumed to him and then once again when he was actually gone And I honestly think the first time was worse Because the staff that I loved so much wasn't the same and so for me when he passed away. I I was even deeper and might action right like you think that'd be a wake up call And it was to some extent but I did. I had no idea how to cope with and what to do and so I just kept drinking four more months for former months. Yeah said enough. Yeah and then I. I'm GonNa die can get help. And I started really experiencing the physical withdrawals you know not being able to go. X. Amount of hours without the shaking sweating meant I just. I watched my dad for so many years and to be experiencing that myself I was like I don't want to live that way. And My dad dying gave me a second chance at life because that brought me to his old buddy Ford and and that helped me get through sober living and IOP And counseling financially at. That's what money did for me and what that was Was that that you found recovery November for twenty seventeen. So here we come up on. It'll be soon two years in fall. Two Thousand Nineteen Been What's been the toughest part of your last two year journey and recovery? You know. I think it's really figuring out myself and figuring out my feelings and boundaries to to actually sit with discomfort isn't easy you know it takes a while to get to get used to and I would feel a little bit out of control of you know I'm like how am I supposed to handle this and And by just sitting with it I've and reaching out to peers and the sober community and I found that okay this shall pass and I can. I can do it Shortly you will be graduating from college yet. Your degree is in community health education. Where does that come from? What do you want to do with that Yeah so I. At first I wanted to do nursing. I wanted to go on for nursing and actually working IGNATIEVA I. I loved my nurse so much and I was. I WANNA be her but I am really looking forward to exploring the advocacy piece And that's a lot of what community? Health Education is health promotion intervention disease prevention in the arena of addiction. Yeah absolutely yeah So I'm I'm really excited about it. And your internship has been working in a sober for an organization that promotes sober living. Saint Paul's living and it's it's more of a structured sober living. But it's yeah but it's all about finding life in recovery life beyond treatment and and finding meaningful relationships and sober friends. Because that's that's hard. I I believe for me. Had I gone home to South Dakota? It would have been hard because in Saint Paul the twin cities. There's five hundred six hundred meetings a week. I mean recovery. People there are so many young Pe- ray. Yeah and it's I feel normal.

Betty Ford Betty Ford Foundation Moyers Twenty Twenty Holly S. Hazel Hazelton South Dakota Adderall Addy Center City Minnesota Saint Paul Ford
Taking a Break from the Physician Grind with Stephen Beeson, Founder of The Clinician Experience Project at Practicing Excellence

Outcomes Rocket

05:39 min | 4 months ago

Taking a Break from the Physician Grind with Stephen Beeson, Founder of The Clinician Experience Project at Practicing Excellence

"What is it that got you into healthcare to begin with well? When I was in high school I wanted to be a musician. I was playing trumpet. My parents really like imagine start living doing that and I had after his high school. I actually spent some time with my uncle. Dr Robert Hazel Rig. Who's a neurologist? And he told me about a day in the life of being a clinician and what that's like and the ability diagnosed managed three and sometimes disease and the mastery endeavour of of learning a body of knowledge that allows you to make an impact and patient's lives and I was so intrigued by that day in a life that in that moment on that day I switch for music to a biochemistry major at university covering San Diego and the journey was it. Yeah that's a big shift but a good reason to do it. And Wow so the years have passed and now you. You've you've sort of given from the frontline and now you're you're taking a much more macro approach through what you're doing. Obviously there's a big void in what clinicians need and tell us how you're feeling that what we've seen dating back to around two thousand and one. I began and was selected. Aucoin appointed to to coach training develop clinicians in a very competitive healthcare marketplace driven by consumerism and patient choice and we as a group were in bottom. Dessau in terms of patient experience. So I was I was tasked with. How do we help and support clinicians to provide better care to patients and I really for the next fifteen years became a student of? What are the things that physicians need to really become the kind of clinicians that they wanna be and really what I discovered? That drove me into the work today. Is that clinicians. Make massive sacrifices to get into positions that they're in their ninety percent of all clinical activity eighty cents of every dollar that's spent in healthcare their principal cultural drivers and the fundamental skills by which to make health care. Better are never developed. And we're in a field. Now where over? Fifty percent of clinicians despite what I consider to be the most beautiful press profession that there is anywhere to make a difference in the lives of those we serve and over. Fifty percent are experiencing symptoms of burnout and I considered it now to be alive calling and again. The night is for the work that we're doing now is helping supporting clinicians to do their work. Extraordinarily well to connect to the patients that they serve to collaborate with their colleagues beside them and to lead in a way that brings the very best of each other and to use that to drive not only patient experience harm reduction but also at the end of the day week month. Your Life. They look back over their shoulder and they say this is everything I hoped it to be. And that's the essence of really. What we're trying to do is help drive the clinician inexperience in the clinician. Experience being a gateway to all the other healthcare imperatives in front of us and harm reduction patient experience patient. Loyalty clinical excellence. And all those things. Well you know. I think this is A truly inspirational work and and very mission driven folks when you're in the airplane and you're getting ready for takeoff. The flight attendant will tell you to put the oxygen on your mask before anybody that you love. That's next to you and really when we're working with clinicians it's so important that their gas tank before and the work that you're doing. Dr Benson is truly dedicated to keeping their gas tank full so as healthcare leaders listening to this looking for ways to improve. What would you say an example of something you and your organization has done to help Say a health care executive improve that leadership culture for physicians. It's a great question. I think it's a complicated answer. What are the conditions? And what are the personal approaches? That clinicians take so. They love the work that they do and we are able to create an generate and execute on something called the clinician experience. We find the clinic. Experience is this is everything I wanted to be. I providing the kind of care that I believe in were driven by evidence. We're getting great outcomes and on Sunday night before clinical day. I'm excited about tomorrow. That's the essence of the Clinton Is What do we have to do to help support that? And if you look at the data in terms of what are the greatest influences on the clinician experience first and foremost it is the conditions in which physicians work under. It's not personal resilience or their endurance. It's the conditions that clinicians worked under. So as I speak with leadership teams. There's a composite of what leaders do clinician say. I love it here number one. They are out front and authentic leaders are deeply committed to what's right and best for patients and they communicate in a way to their clinical body that connects with physicians value systems. So when we when we as leaders say hey you need to improve your patient satisfaction scores and cms regulations. We have to do this that and the other and the payer field is saying they have to see more patients for less money. That's not what engages us to change will in prompts us to sit in the backseat cross arms and say this is not at all what I thought was going to be. But the leadership approaches of out front authenticity of the commitment to what's right and best for patients. We found in our research at the clinic. Experience Project that when physicians feel as though they're leaders are deeply connected to what's right and best for patients. The probability of burnout among those physicians is for X. Less than went leaders are not led by that

Dr Robert Hazel Rig San Diego Aucoin Dessau Dr Benson Principal Executive Clinton
"hazel" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

KROQ 106.7FM

06:53 min | 4 months ago

"hazel" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

"Hazel sister hazel formed in nineteen ninety three and is one of the few bands that can say they maintain their original line up for more than twenty years and believe it or not they released a whole bunch of albums as for their name they were named after sister hazel Williams a local missionary who ran a homeless shelter when the days are cold and it's old shoulder saying we he nine days all this do you this is Grouplove leader that's group love and the song the leader K. rock good morning it is striker solo not in the studio I'm at home right now that I think this was going.

hazel Williams Grouplove K. rock
Greatest Hits: Well-traveled Bodies

Your Brain on Facts

09:31 min | 5 months ago

Greatest Hits: Well-traveled Bodies

"In the winter of nineteen seventy six the six million dollar man. Tv show was filming in a haunted house in Long Beach. California when a crew member went to move a garish looking dummy to a different spot. The dummies arm broke off at the elbow. It was then that the crew member noticed the end of a human bone. Sticking out of the truncated limb. This wasn't a mannequin. This was elmer mccurdy a career criminal who died sixty five years earlier in Oklahoma. My Name's Moxy. And this is your brain on facts as forensic science slash true crime slash weird history buff of the first order. I almost didn't include mccurdy in today's episode of well-traveled corpses. Because his story makes all of these lists. But you know me. I like to be thorough. Elmer mccurdy was born January. First eighteen eighty two an unwed mother and adopted by his uncle and aunt. The first twenty years of his life were fairly unremarkable until a string of personal losses led him to say screw it. I'm ago Robson. Trains a brief stint in the army. Seen him trained to use nitroglycerine for demolition and he decided to blend the two careers the trouble was he tended to be heavy handed with the explosives once costing his gang ninety percent of the money in a safe he blew their remaining ten percent that they did get was in coins. That were melted together. Mccurdy's final robbery took place on October. Fourth Nineteen Eleven Niro Keys Oklahoma. When mccurdy and his men mistakenly stopped a passenger train instead of the one carrying four hundred thousand dollars that they were after the men were only able to steal about forty six dollars from the mail clerk some whiskey a pistol and the train conductors. Watch a newspaper account of the robbery called it quote. One of the smallest in the history of train robbery even still a two thousand dollar bounty was put on mccurdy and someone gave him up in the wee hours of October seventh. Apostasy of sheriff's tracked mccurdy to a Hacia using bloodhounds. Gunfire was exchanged for over an hour and in the end. Mccurdy was shot in the chest and killed mccurdy. Spotty was subsequently taken to the Johnson funeral home in Husk Oklahoma where it went on claimed Joseph Johnson the owner and undertaker embalmed body with an arsenic based preservative and stored it in the back of the funeral home refusing to bury the body or release it until he had been paid for his services. Johnson then decided if he was going to get any money out of this situation. He'd have to be more proactive. He dressed the corpse up in street. Clothes place to rifle and mccurdy's hands and stood up in the corner of the funeral home for a nickel apiece. Visitors could see the bandit who wouldn't give up. Mccurdy became a popular attraction at the funeral home and also drew the attention of carnival. Promoters though Johnson refused numerous offers to buy the mummified body in nineteen sixteen a man claiming to be elmer mccurdy's long lost brother got permission from the sheriff to take custody of the body and ship it to San Francisco for a proper burial. The following day Johnson released the body to this man and an accomplice who then put it on a train bound for Arkansas City Kansas. Then were in fact. James and Charles Patterson owners of the Great Patterson Carnival shows where mccurdy's corpse would be featured until nineteen twenty two when Paterson sold his operation to Louis. Sonny Sonny use mccurdy's corpse in his Traveling Museum of crime show which featured wax replicas famous outlaws such as Bill Doolan and Jesse James in Nineteen Twenty eight. The corpse was part of the official sideshow that accompanied the Trans American footrace. In thirty three it was acquired for a time. By director Duane Esper- to promote his exploitation film narcotic with an exclamation point in a very William Castle style move. The corpse was placed in the lobby of the theater as a dead dope. Fiend by this time some twenty two years after death mccurdy's body had become fide. The skin was hard and the body had shriveled to the size of a child. Esperer claims that this deterioration was proof of the danger of drunks. Mccurdy's corpse would bounce between warehouses and movie sets for the next four decades damage from mishandling. Meant that the corpse was no longer all that lifelike which is how it found. Its Way to the left in the dark funhouse at the Pike in Long Beach. After it was discovered that he wasn't a mannequin mccurdy was sent to the La Coroner by this time. The body was essentially petrified and had been covered in wax and layers of paint. It weighed about fifty pounds or twenty three kilos and was sixty three inches or one hundred sixty centimeters tall. Some hair was still visible on the sides. And back of the head but mccurdy's ears big toes and many of his fingers. Were missing of all the clues that lead the coroner and accompanying historians to determine the mummy's identity. The most interesting was found in the courteous mouth. It had nothing to do with. His teeth was a nineteen twenty. Four penny and ticket stops to the one forty West Pike side show and the Louis Sunny Museum of crime. The discovery made national headlines and an actual distant relative came forward to claim mccurdy's body which was buried on April twenty second nineteen seventy seven in the boot hill section of the summit new cemetery in Guthrie Oklahoma next to the actual body of outlaw. Bill Doolan two feet of concrete were poured on top of the coffin to ensure that mccurdy's rambling days for over mccurdy. Hardly the only outlaw turned famous. Mummy take the case of one. Hazel Farris born in Kentucky in eighteen eighty orphaned as a child and later married to a man with whom she drank heavily and fought loudly. Her history is morphed into folklore but by all accounts on August Sixth Nineteen Five. The couple had an argument over Paris's desire to buy a new hat. If you've been in a relationship for any length of time you know that wasn't really what they were fighting about. The two came to blows and Farris ended up shooting. Her husband who died on the living room floor. Neighbors heard the gunshots summoned police. The situation did not improve upon their arrival because fairus shot and killed them to a passing. Deputy Sheriff heard. The Commotion Gained Entry. To the House and tried to restrain Farris during the scuffle. The deputy tripped on Ferris's husband's body accidentally firing his gun and shooting off. One of her fingers there is eventually broke free and fatally shot the deputy as well so she shot the sheriff and she did shoot the deputy with five murders under her belt and a five hundred dollar reward for her capture which I couldn't put into modern figures because the inflation calculators don't go back that far fairus fled to Bessemer Alabama to try to begin a new life. One version of her story has her posing as schoolmarm another as her working as a prostitute. Both agree that she drank excessively she took up with a new man and when they became engaged fairus confided in. Him who she really was. He immediately gave her up to police on December twentieth. Nineteen O six fairly certain. She wouldn't emerge victorious from a second shootout. He sulfurous committed suicide by drinking combination of Whiskey fuel. Oil and Arsenic Ferris's body was taken to Adams vermillion furniture which also sold caskets and as such functioned as the local funeral parlour. No one came forward to claim her body which was strangely mummifying rather than decomposing. There is speculation that it's because of the chemicals Ferris drink but I don't put a great deal of stock by that regardless of the reason the corpse had longevity and a certain renown Adams began charging curious visitors ten cents to see the notorious outlaw. After a time Ferris's body hit the road. When atoms loaned the corpse to various exhibitors including his brother and Tuscaloosa Palace of wonders sideshow operator Captain Harvey Leabeau's well and OC Brooks who featured the well preserved remains in his traveling show for forty years when he died brooks left Hazel to a nephew on the condition that any money raised from displaying her be donated to charity. As the story goes Brooks's nephew displayed. Ferris's mummy to raise money to build churches in Tennessee.

Elmer Mccurdy Hazel Farris Arsenic Ferris Oklahoma Joseph Johnson Long Beach Robbery Bill Doolan California Deputy Sheriff Johnson Funeral Robson Louis Sunny Museum Of Crime Spotty Oc Brooks Esperer Husk Oklahoma Great Patterson Carnival Adams Vermillion
"hazel" Discussed on Murder Minute

Murder Minute

06:43 min | 5 months ago

"hazel" Discussed on Murder Minute

"But another source claimed that so. Wolski had left to form that night and met with Frank Smith either before or after frank past Hazel drew alone both Wolski boy and Hazel uncle. William Taylor were investigated as suspects in the murder but both had alibis and were eventually cleared of suspicion due to lack of any direct evidence. Investigators were never able to identify the man who wrote to Hazel under the initials C. ES but police investigated several other possible suspects among them. Were a troy. Dentist who had allegedly once proposed to Hazel Dr Edward Nov. who was married. A train conductor who Hazel was suspected. To have been seeing and Henry Camera local millionaire who was rumored to have been holding orgies and keeping sex slaves at his resort in the mountains near teals pond but no arrests were ever made. The funeral of Hazel. Drew was held this afternoon at Averill Park in a downpour of rain wrote The New York Times. There was a large gathering of the curious to witness the burial. William Taylor was of the number. He did not accompany the body to the cemetery at Barbara Spill but returned to crepes hotel at Sand Lake. Where he said he had not seen his niece. Since last winter he said he thought the girl did not care much for the company of men but expressed his belief that she had met someone by appointment and had gone to tales pond intending to come to his house later when investigators failed to apprehend a suspect in Hazel juries murder. New York's yellow press equivalent to the tabloids today criticized the investigation speculation that he's had been involved with some local businessmen including one who owned the funeral home. Fueled reports that the autopsy topsy had been mishandled lead. Hayes may have been pregnant and swiftly followed by demands that Hazel Body be exhumed. But the press didn't just attack the investigation. He'll drew herself was blamed as well. He's always a flirt. One reporter coldly wrote suggesting that her extensive travels meeting different. Men led to her own demise. The papers printed theories that Hazel was secretly working as a prostitute was murdered by one of her clients and said that the local police were either too incompetent or worse. Didn't care enough to pursue them after just a month. Investigators had given up the search for suspect and by July thirty first nineteen hundred eight. The coroner's inquest simply concluded that a quote blow on the head from some blunt instrument in some manner unknown had caused his drew's death. As the case went cold. Newspapers derided the district attorney. His office will now draw a veil over the tragedy wrote the evening star in Washington. Dc and unless by some magic chance. The murderer delivers himself up. Allow it to remain forever. A mystery and they were right. Hazel drew's case faded. First from the papers and then from memory kept alive over the decades only in Ghost stories and the memories of elderly locals. Sand Lake Resident Betty. Calhoun pass the local lore onto her two grandsons telling them stories of murder and the young woman who spirit haunted the mountains round heels pond one of those grandsons mark. Frost grew up to become the CO creator of David. Lynch's nineteen nineties. Hit Television series twin peaks in twenty thirteen. Frost revealed that it his grandmother stories about. He's Toronto that had been the inspiration. Twin Peaks Central Character Laura Palm a teenage prom queen with the blonde up to whose body washes ashore turning a small town upside down and revealing her double life. The inspiration for the television series sprang from a nightmarish little bedtime story. My Grandmother Betty. Calhoun planted in my ears as a young boy. Mark Frost wrote in the local Sand Lake newspaper. Betty whose interest in the facts was at best glancing framed. This tale more along the lines of a cautionary ghost story. Don't go out into the woods at night etc. Some twenty years later half remembered details of this sad tale swam through my subconscious during the creation of a similarly doomed character named Laura Palmer. It seemed to be kind of a hastily conducted investigation and because she was a person from not a prominent family. I think you could fairly say and because there was very little sympathy for female victims of that sort in this time she may have gotten short shrift in two thousand seventeen. The return of twin peaks sparked new interest in Hazel drew story among fans of the show and now over a century later. Hazel drew's murder is getting a second look author. Ron. Here's published his book. Who Killed Hazel drew unraveling clues to the tragic murder of pretty servant girl in two thousand seventeen and now filmmaker John Holster? Who lives just a mile? Away from. Te'o pond is bringing the cold case to life in his documentary who killed Hazel drew. The Sand Lake murder that inspired twin peaks set to premiere in twenty twenty. This film was going to answer a lot of questions. Pollster said now. Anytime you do that you also opened up a lot of new questions..

Hazel Hazel drew murder Hazel Body funeral of Hazel Hazel uncle William Taylor Sand Lake Mark Frost Hayes Betty Laura Palmer Calhoun troy teals pond Frank Smith Wolski New York reporter
"hazel" Discussed on Wild West

Wild West

10:02 min | 6 months ago

"hazel" Discussed on Wild West

"Lean on for help in this. You know trying to figure out what's next or just people who can help you with this transition. Yeah there's definitely other people in my community. Even in Myers we have a pretty high concentration of professional athletes or athletes that are quote unquote retiring. Thirty three hundred. But it's cool to Kinda like look and see what they're doing or like bounce ideas off them and kind of see like what their life has been like afterwards and everyone has their own path right and I think it's really important to not just be lake. I M SC year and that is it. Yeah like it's really. It's great to be multifaceted so you can do lots of different things in this world because there is more to the world than just skin every day I mean I have to tell myself that but we sure there is so. Yeah Yeah there's a great community Myers and I definitely know a few people that are in the same boat as me so we kind of bounce ideas off of each other a little bit. Yeah is there like a model? For what comes next. I mean I guess it's different depending on what you WANNA do How old you are all that kind of stuff but it seems like something is intensive free skiing where you can sort of. You might have to call it. You might have to tap out earlier than in other sports. I mean they`re. They're professional athletes in their late thirties. Early forties in Big Mountain. Skiing are still crushing. It so to me. It's like there's as much as you want As your body will allow and I think it's cool to have other things to be motivated about and I it is a real thing though for athletes when they're done with com- competition to like that's all they've done for specific amount of time even that maybe they never even had a real job so like transitioning to the next step. I think is scary for everybody but it's kind of I think that's why going back to schools important for me. I have a degree already but this is like more specific and I had like a future role right. I think it's just depending on what people WANNA do. A lot of people go into like like marketing. Further companies or like Rosales wraps do speaking gigs events. Gigs or writing people. Why don't you do freelance writing? So it's not something I'm passionate about right so that that's a way to kind of keep rolling with it in a more professional capacity. So that's definitely an option for so many athletes. Yes depends on what you WANNA do? I thought of this when you were talking about how you were on the tour and just kind of feeling like burnt out or like you weren't enjoying it as much as you should have been. Yeah for sure and it. Is there like a certain? Is there any guilt that comes with that knowing that they're probably a ton of people out there that think? This is the rattus thing you could be doing. This is a great lifestyle and you should be grateful for. There's a ton of guilt and that's kind of why I was like you know it's time for me to like pull the plug a little bit and let some of the other like younger athletes. That are really fired up to get there. Have that opportunity. Maybe I can like my spot will open up to somebody else which I think it did this year like someone who was previously injured. Maybe not wouldn't have been able to get a wildcard. Got a wildcard into spot so that to me and she was so fired up and grape will be there so to me. That's awesome. I just I feel like if you're a hundred percent on a sport that you need to be hundred percent and then that's probably time to pursue other things You know totally. Yeah and I was fortunate like I had a really good season last year I didn't fall off. The two are definitely requalified in like how few podiums since for me it was like validating to go out at a high level. Ryan beating still and know that I could keep doing it if I wanted to. But I've just ready for something different. Yeah sounds totally reasonable. Yeah th- reasonable right a couple random questions for you yes the. There's this fun whenever I come up to. Tahoe and I talked to like locals and skiers and Tahoe. There's this fun Like competition among locals for. Who's doing the coolest thing and saw the coolest thing in knows the coolest people in whatever and then but they they all manage to turn their like competitive spirit against the people. The Weekend Warrior Types. Who Come up and SKI RESORTS AND DO FOOLISH? Things on the ski runs. So what are your pet peeves? I like your biggest pet peeves That you see inexperienced skiers doing on the mountain a holy petrole background right so when people duck ropes I get pretty her because just like duck ropes and dump places because it's like they could be shooting still and it ruins it for everyone else and if you duck a rope maybe just do nobody can frequency you like be smart about it That drives me crazy. I think traffic drives me crazy like everybody else. People with chains honor like who've never driven in the snow we get a little agro locals in town to be honest people stuck on your back street. And you're like God maps again right but I. I don't really get aggro. I mean people are just. I'm just so that people want to ski still in this like global climate change that we have snow for everyone to enjoy right. Yeah I think it's I don't really have any if you won't come ski. That's great fun though. Yeah another question I want to ask you. It seems like more people are getting into back country skiing which carries all kinds of Different risks dangers from inbound skiing. And I guess I just wonder about your thoughts on that teed this up with like search and rescue with other skiers with local ski patrollers and it seems like a thing that everybody is acutely aware of. These people are coming up and They want to get away from the crowds but they don't have the experience or the know how to be able to handle themselves properly in the country or the side country and they're getting themselves into trouble and it just seems like something that is happening more and more. Yeah no I completely agree I'm not gonNA say like if you don't have experience don't go back country skiing because I think that the mountains are for everyone and they changed my life so you know I like to keep seeing that with The rest of the world. It's like way better to go skiing in the mountains than it is to sit on your couch and watch. Tv Song full promoter of backcountry skiing at any skill level. But I think one thing you can do on an individual basis is get education whether you can afford a course or you learn on on just reading material online or books like that is super important in having a good partner and knowing when to go out and win his not. A good time in win is like it'll be fine so we have in the area here. One Resources Online is the Sierra Avalanche Center. And they kind of give a forecast every single day author's observations. And you can get a gist of what's happening and also just being like paying attention to the weather and cognizant of Certain risks so. I guess it's just education and There's so many Avenues for that. Appear like Kirkwood has like they host all these different airy courses. They have them at the college. They have give talks all around town any evening. Just like just even going in like getting some general ideas and like having the correct tools before you go right so like beacon shovel probe partner. Don't bring your dog back. Country Skiing Sorry And I think that yeah. I think it's definitely real issue. We're fortunate here in. We're because we have a pretty stable. Novak most of the time the all the time but in other places it's like constant Colorado and Utah were not so stable and you have a big commute like population. There's a lot more deaths But I think we're lucky here right but yeah that's I don't know I think people need to get outside as much possible full stop. That's a great place to end it. so thanks very much as well. Thanks for taking the time. Thanks very much again to Hazel. For having me over and making time to come on the podcast if you WanNa follow what she's up to. She's a great instagram. Follow check her out at Hazel Birnbaum B. M. If you WANNA follow what? I'm up to California travel. I'm on twitter at Greg. Art Thomas or you can email me at G. Thomas at SF CHRONICLE DOT COM. Wild West is a production of the San Francisco. Chronicle Support Wild West and the newsroom that creates it by signing up for a chronicle membership on SF CHRONICLE DOT COM Slash Pot. You next time..

Skiing Myers partner Hazel Birnbaum B. M. Art Thomas twitter Big Mountain San Francisco Rosales Tahoe Sierra Avalanche Center Ryan California Kirkwood Greg Novak Colorado Utah
"hazel" Discussed on Wild West

Wild West

09:20 min | 6 months ago

"hazel" Discussed on Wild West

"Year so it just honestly it takes a lot of money? You gotta travel around and more. Not everyone has that. So you drowned like dirtbag. Basically living in your car or San on people's couches in the purses aren't very big So I don't know it takes a lot of motivation. People have to really want want it to be there. That's how I've what I've discovered interesting. Yeah and did you have a? Do you have a specific style or something that you do that? Yeah I mean everyone's all different in the world of competitive free. Skiing is always is kind of evolving right now You have like your classic chargers like Big Mountain. Think like Hugh Harrison back in the or Seth Morrison and But now that's like you know. You have Raina bartered and Jackie peso and a few other athletes. They're just like these ski. The mountain as hard and as fast and just hit big airs and stop them. It's just like straight charging and then there's the more Free style aspect. The kids that have grown up in the park that are transitioning into big mountain skiing and so there are more based on like Playful Fund hits with like some tricks thrown in. And it's more like A. It's a playful way of skiing versus like big mountain charging You know it's like Respect to both but I think I definitely fall in the category of like Big Mountain. Skiing more dislike charging style versus playful. I mean I would love to be the other way. That's just who I am right. Yeah so yeah And Oh in so Kirkwood. Is that your Home Mountain. Kirkwood's Manila Mountain. So what is it about Kirkwood? I was talking to people. I was there yesterday. Talking to people in Kirkwood and it's kind of remote and everybody who I talked to their. Has this like reverence for the mountain. They all? It's all like everybody's special place. Yeah it is a weird weird thing. I think it's because it's a thirty minute drive from southlake at least so everyone commutes there so it's like you have to be dedicated to. WanNa go there. It's not that big of a mountain but there's a lot of really cool nooks and crannies and you can have for being for being so small. It's more big mountain charge. -I like style than anything else we have in the area except for maybe like you know squall and Alpine so I think the remoteness requires dedication. And I think that's maybe part of the reason why people are so obsessed like once a year kirk woody in your chest. You're addicted to. It angered a lot of snow. Yeah like if you look at. The snow totals around. It's just it's like a thing that happens. There snowed a lot. I'm going to be doing an in depth inspection of the snow. Totals there later and so okay so back to know your career in free skiing Was that look like you're traveling all winter competing at these different events. Yeah so that's kind of what the last five years even seven years because I was on the qualifying circuit for two years before that It's that's the hardest part for me is like I am very much like a really relaxed person. And I like to have my space and time and when you're traveling with the group you're constantly on like twenty four seven there's something dinners and parties and you're like sixty people all the time And then there's that and then you're traveling which is exhausting trolleys exhausting. Yeah I'm not trying to complain or anything but his tire and I'm like you know I'm always doing everything on a budget because I only have so much to work with so I ended up on these crazy flights to lake way over for twenty four hours and like China or something which is like it's character building. Maybe not it's just it's a Lotta travel for sure but at the same time. I've gotten a lot of really beautiful places. So yeah as its ups and downs. Yeah if you've been listening to San Francisco City insider. You heard from chaser bodine months before his surprise election as the city's. Da You heard from the most love librarian in the country and you heard from the man who wants to remake uni. I'm chronicle columnist. Heather Knight get to know the people who make San Francisco tick and see if you approve of their burrito choices on San Francisco city insider. And then while you're doing this are you thinking to yourself like because it obviously takes a toll on your body to not just the travel book the sport itself so you think to yourself like man. I can't do this forever. I got a line something else in the moment. What are you thinking? You just focusing on the competitions or yeah I'm definitely focusing on the competition. Yeah so like my preseason. Is I start training in the gym in like August or September and I quit mountain biking because I'm afraid of getting hurt and dirt biking and I pretty much focus on like being strong as I physically can be an like eating well being healthy knowing that I'm going to go into the season and start traveling and all that is going to be slowly eroded away right because you can't maintain that high peak level while you're traveling it's virtually impossible. Yeah and like you. You don't have access to like the foods that you want or like you just don't have all your things so then it's a game when you're on the road to like try make good decisions the whole time and Stretch and like do all the things that you need to do. So it's like and then on top of that books on the competition It's it's a law. Yes yeah a lot of people I mean. I'm constantly impressed by other athletes that can maintain you know. Yeah and while you're out there are you trying to build your rep like on social media are you. I mean I'm not but yeah I mean people are definitely like you'd be amazed when I come home. People like oil is great. Like people actually care they tune in and listen and walking. Watch our events on the live feed and So I definitely promoting as as well as I can right. I'm not maybe a strong in that department is other athletes but Yeah this is like a big part of being a pro athlete these days. You gotTa have a strong it. It is the biggest part. Yeah Yeah Yeah. It's funny because it doesn't necessarily like it's it doesn't necessarily jibe with everybody's personality now. You're sort of an introvert or somebody who is an indoor like over sharing. Yeah it can be a real struggle to post together every day that are supposed to excite people up and you know show people who you really are and all that. I think it's I'm really fortunate. And working the same companies for a really long time. And they know me as a person and so they don't necessarily demand all of that from me. There are other companies that they you know they have. These athletes only specifically based on their instagram falling in social media presence. But I let my theory is that it's not all about that and I spent a lot of time sitting on the chairlift or in my community and when I represent these brands people ask me all the time. Do you like that Ski You know all the time other things. Oh how about that? You know in the so. I think it's that personal interaction that like say for instance in new me and Me Talking about the product and like physically showing how much I love it that actually connects with people get people to buy things the ultimate goal right right so to me. I think it's more on a personal level where I think that's overlooked kind of a lot from specific brands but some people get it and I think it's a really valuable tool for product promotion. Yeah Yeah that makes sense definitely overlooked overlooked. But I think it's like it's there and people are doing it all the time so I mean I get asked every single day when I'm out skiing about my skis or whatnot. We'll get back to my conversation with Hazel in just a moment but first let's take a quick break. I'm just wondering what kind of toll free skiing actually takes on you mentally or physically. I guess both I was thinking physically mentally. Do you mean like competition or do you mean skiing everyday just seeing every day and like hawking off cliffs and stuff. I mean. It's getting harder. The older you get.

Skiing Big Mountain Ski Kirkwood San Francisco Home Mountain Manila Mountain Playful Fund San Hugh Harrison kirk woody southlake Seth Morrison China Raina Hazel Heather Knight Jackie peso
"hazel" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:37 min | 6 months ago

"hazel" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"The hazel park recreation center here's rob Morosi of M. dot on this segment three section which is between thirteen mile an eight mile we're gonna be doing bridge demolition at the end of February right out of the gate in March closing lines on the freeway just to get a jump on the project and make sure that we can wrap up everything for winter break next year now today's meeting is under way right now and it's lasting for about one more hour at the recreational center in hazel park coming up on news radio nine fifty love hurts we'll explain this that the traffic and weather together W. W. Janie's time six oh eight from the idol down motor group traffic center brought you this hour by idle downs V. M. W. Rochester hills to I. seventy five we go with Katie some eye has rolled over it has closed the freeway did around two thirty this afternoon I seventy five the Fisher southbound closed at I. ninety six the Jeffries freeway downtown now the semis right before the Rouge river bridge from there you go I ninety four west bound to say for south fielder telegraph south back to I seventy five now on I seventy five the Fisher southbound very happy from three seventy five grass it's to I ninety six and then all the way to I ninety four also I ninety four very heavy in between the interchanges with the ride home and this I have people trying to get around this now in the back of of this closer I seventy five the Chrysler a downtown of right on that ramp to I. seventy five the Fisher south bound as an accident blocking the left lane and powered by waste traffic's moving about fifty miles an hour through the back of no estimated time when it will re open with traffic sponsored by the no by backyard pool and spa show a cleanup of a reported vehicle fire on the six ninety six westbound exit ramp to orchard lake has you slow looking to the jubilee jam cams from right before telegraph in Taylor on telegraph south on a wick other our vehicles in the turn around lane and debris in your left lane tipster Matt called then and still this a disabled vehicle reported on mount south bomber before fourteen mile road in your right center lane build your dream back here this weekend February fourteenth through the sixteenth at the backyard pool and spa so save thousands on hot tubs swim spas pools and outdoor decor find everything you need for your backyard this weekend at the backyard pool and spa show at the suburban collection show place in the Alabama group twenty four hour traffic center Katie WWJ newsradio nine fifty are chilly conditions with accu weather's Brian Thompson occasional light snow or flurries into early this evening otherwise a frigid night tonight with the clearing sky low seven very cold for tomorrow sunshine and supply outside twenty two real.

hazel park recreation center rob Morosi
How Canada is taking over the tech industry

The Big Story

11:56 min | 6 months ago

How Canada is taking over the tech industry

"For a long long time there was just one destination if you were an ambitious tech innovator and eager to change the world America Silicon Valley in California. Was your first choice. Probably but New York silicon alley was right there to Washington State Chicago Massachusetts. All of them home to the industry's biggest companies cutting edge facilities and they still are home to those companies and facilities. That might no longer be enough. Okay I I'm going back to my google. Search who here is new to Canada. The Chauhan's unbelievable people whose here is newer to cannon less than three months. I wouldn't be three months. It was originally a casual prediction. Made around the time of Donald. TRUMP'S I I travel ban in two thousand seventeen so have a travel ban. It's a very powerful ban. We're adding a couple of countries to we have to be safe. Our country has to be saved would usurp American ones as the place of choice for up and coming talent now. Three years later the results are coming in and both Toronto and in Vancouver are rapidly climbing the charts and now depending on what happens down south in November. This shift might turn out to be much more than a temporary Harry. Black Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story Joel. Rose is a correspondent based in Washington. DC WITH NPR. He covers among other things immigration Hazel. Hey Jordan how you doing. I'm doing pretty well. Especially because is beating the US at something right. Now that is sort of my editors headline but yeah Canada's Canada's. Winning candidate is winning. We'll take it where we can find it. Why don't you start before we get into The whole story. Just tell me a little bit About Jason Gould lest who's one of the characters in your piece who is he and why does he sounds like a game show host so Jason Gould List was the emcee of this event that I attended in Toronto a couple of weeks ago. Ladies and Gentlemen Welcome Welcome. Welcome the first tech the decade here. We go hosted by this organization called Tech Toronto and Jason is the CO founder and they do several of these events a month where folks in the tech industry kind of get together. They watch presentations from their successful peers. Up on the podium kind of like little Ted Ted talks or what have you and they schmooze. There's a Lotta schmoozing. There's pizza. There's beer I wanted to be there because this is also an entry point for people who are new in town trying trying to learn their way around the Texan in Toronto. And I wanted to find people you know who had just arrived and sure enough. Dozens of people at this event had just arrived. I'm one of the questions that Jason Asks. Most of these events is who here is new in Canada. We have a show of hands. Unbelievable that I saw there were dozens of hands in the air All over this auditorium and I should say there are like hundreds of people in the auditorium probably like five hundred and not all of them were new in town but a big chunk thank were and if you think about it. They're doing like three or four events like this. Every month and I think you'd get a similar percentage of new Canadians. At every one of these events it just sort of illustration of how many people are coming into this tech scene from around the world All the time. And that's why I wanted to be there just to to talk to some of these people who just moved to Canada you know and and get some of their stories. Some of them had moved directly to Canada others had come from the US and had left for one reason or another and move north others were coming. I'm from outside of North America And landing for the first time in Canada. Yeah can you put into context a little bit. what is going on with the tech scene in Toronto right now and I guess yes in Vancouver to It's one thing to sort of anecdotally look at these events but What kind of numbers we have by some measures? Toronto's Rose Tech scene is actually growing faster than any other city in North America including San Francisco including Seattle including New York. Like these big. You know cities in the US that have been magnets for tech workers for you know forever and you know by some measure. Toronto is eclipse. Them and Vancouver is not that far behind Vancouver is also correct. Sort of the top five in terms of the fastest growing Texans In North America. So they're clearly doing something to attract all these all these workers. NFL these jobs. And I you know that's what's going on. I think it's worth pointing out. You know in terms of total tech jobs. They probably still have a ways to go to catch up to these big. US cities is that I've just named but they're making up the ground pretty fast when you talk to people in the industry for this piece. How unusual is that to see To Canadian cities jump ahead of some of the US cities that I would certainly Associate with tech industry more than Toronto or Vancouver. I think it's a pretty big change when I first wrote about the Canadian tech industry a couple years ago after president trump took office. People told me that Canada kind of used to be known for brain drain that the country produced loosed really good engineers and software developers and then basically watch them leave. Yeah that's been a long standing issue in Canada so this is a big change in that sense right candidate is now keeping more of those brains in jobs and it's also now importing tech talent from other countries including from the US and also outside. Outside of North America people who previously would have been flocking directly to the bay area in Seattle. And the you know the usual suspects are now taking a harder look at other markets and the Canadian cities seem to be benefiting from that. Can you give me an example of maybe just one of the people you talk to Toronto and kind of what with their stories and how how they ended up in Canada Sure I talked to several people who had Trained or worked in the US and then just has decided for one reason or another. That Canada was where the future was for them. I guess one person I would talk about is. You'll look so when I was on my last year of Mike Beach D. I wanted to go abroad and gain more experience. She is a computational biologist originally from Turkey and had done her advanced events studies in Europe and then in Baltimore Maryland in the US and she told me she did not even really seriously apply for jobs in the US. When I was applying for states I was already informed by several coaches and several friends? That's getting a visa in. US is not easy like she was well educated on it. She knew how difficult it was that you have to find an employer who really wants you. WHO's willing to sponsor you for the visa and then you are really tightly bound to that employer because your visa is bound to that employer if you WANNA change jobs it's a real complicated situation yeah And even just in the first place getting the approval to work for that employer. Who wants you right? You've already got the essentially the job offer but then there's a great deal of like lawyering paperwork that you have to go through to get the approval. There's a visa lottery. You may not even get it. It's extremely complicated. And time time consuming and expensive and she said you know what I don't need it becomes a full time job just to understand and learn the process of the weasel applications. I'm just not gonna FRY that hard to find a job in the US. I'M GONNA look in Canada and she found a company in Toronto and working in computational biology. She went up. She checked out the city she liked it. She got The offer the work permit came through and weeks. You know as soon is. She had all her paperwork in order from Europe everywhere else that she lived and then she started the job Just a couple of weeks ago at this company called Protein cure and Just it would have been if she tried to move to Chicago if she tried to move to. You know where the Big Pharma companies are in the states in New Jersey Z.. Or California Boston. I mean the jobs are there but I just would have been much more difficult for her personally and much more expensive and she just said you know what draws great. I've got a job there like this company. And there she is she's working will given that and that the immigration policies that you cover play such a big role in some of these decisions is this really Something that Toronto or Vancouver are doing right or is it more. Just benefiting from something America's doing wrong right now or maybe not even wrong but Something that has fundamentally changed. I think the answer to that is both like I think the immigration system in the US was never particularly user friendly even before the trump administration came to power right and but the reality is now that it's gotten even harder for tech workers to get visas the denial rate for the new for new H.. One B. visas is way up in the past couple of years. It used to be like more than ninety percent got approved now. The approval rate is down to almost just about seventy five percent. which you know is still a lot? But it's a difference right. I think tech workers see that difference tech companies. Assume that difference and it's made everybody a little bit more reluctant to go through this process because there's more uncertainty. It was always long. It was always slow and expensive but you kind of new at the end of the day. You'd get your visa for your worker and they'd worked for you and now there's more uncertainty in people's minds and I think that really is pushing some tech workers away Not just the policy itself right but the perception that's causing people to look elsewhere and when they look at Canada I think they see that the country is doing the exact opposite the country is making it easier for these high skilled workers to come in and start working quickly and They notice you know the new Canadians that I talk to like how quickly they can get in that they can get this work permit in some cases in just a few weeks Compared to whatever it is months or years probably months but whatever a long period of time they'd have to wait in the US and another thing they talk about his. How quickly they can get ed permanent residency in Canada in the US that can take years and years to get a green card as we call it and the exact way time sort of depends on what country you're coming from mm for people from India and China in particular where a lot of people are coming? There's a really long line and the wait times can be measured actually in decades in some cases so Compare that to Canada. You get a passport in under five years you know. So that kind of certainty seems very attractive to people who want to put down roots. WanNa have a family Hard to do that when you don't really know what the immigration process is going to be for you a few years down the road and If it's ever GONNA lead to you having a passport in your new country I you know. So that's something people are thinking about when they make these decisions they're not just thinking about this job or you know even the second job. They're really moving their whole lives to North America and they WanNa know like what is going to happen to my family where we're going to be in five or ten years in Canada offers a much more predictable path. If you're looking at that far. How do American companies feel about this because you mentioned earlier that the jobs are still there in the states People are just choosing elsewhere. Because it's easier there but these guys are used to being the top choice for tech workers. Right they are and I think you know to to be totally fair. I think they still are a lot of cases right. I mean the bay area still has the cachet it has the venture capital. It has all all of that Seattle in New York people still want to work in these places but the H. One B. visas in this country are capped at eighty five

Canada United States Toronto Vancouver North America New York Jason Gould Tech Toronto Seattle Washington America California Google Europe Rose Tech Massachusetts Donald Trump
How a beer can helped reunite a woman with her dog after three years

Keepin' It Real with Rev. Al Sharpton

00:31 sec | 6 months ago

How a beer can helped reunite a woman with her dog after three years

"A Minnesota woman is being reunited with the dog she's not seen in three years Monica Mathis of Saint Paul was living in Iowa when her terrier mix hazel disappeared from the front yard Matt this had no luck locating hazel until she saw a dog that looked like her picture on a beer can in a promotion by a brewery in Bradenton Florida mathas contacted the brewery contacted the manatee county animal shelter and said pictures and other information to prove hazel is first the non profit friends of manatee county animal services is covering the cost of reuniting Monica

Monica Mathis Saint Paul Iowa Matt Hazel Florida Minnesota Bradenton Manatee County
When Simplifying Your Skincare Routine Works

Forever35

03:16 min | 6 months ago

When Simplifying Your Skincare Routine Works

"I can't Dorri three. I'm really excited about how I've simplified my skin care routine and needed to share to someone. I didn't know who else to go to. I'm also attaching a picture of my face. You can make a call for yourself on whether or not it satisfactory picture any picture. Anyone sends us a satisfactory some context. I'm twenty sex. Live in the Midwest. Humidity have oily as F- skin. It's what she wrote and have dealt with cystic acne all my life. I was an mls junkie and US very complex ingredients in a five step process every morning and evening and after listening for over thirty five and notch butte extensively in two thousand nineteen decided to overturn my routine to cruelty free cruelty free Vegan and ex ex free products. What does that mean? I don't know hormone moon. Maybe and boy. Oh boy. Did my skin react skin-care steps one evening part one drunk elephant best number nine jelly cleanser. This has changed my skin completely. When I read this I was like I gotta buy it got to buy it? I mean I. I haven't heard such a rave about this cleanser. Though she loves it he mantras evening. Part Tooth there's witch Hazel Toner. Evening Parts three my garden John of life probiotic which I fully believe has been my gut healthy and my skin much less reactive to eating dairy processed foods used to get really bad acne with dairy eh especially four morning part one missile air water currently with Garnier which is not a cruelty free brand so I would love to hear refresher on doors recommendations for my next purchase US five morning part two which Hazel Toner and for the two months of the year that are freezing and dry. Use a trader Joe's Gel moisturizer in the evenings while asleep. And I sleep with a humidifier fire and slather vast lean if only there is a vegan equivalent on my lips to keep them protected. I want to thank you for helping us. Through teen is extremely simple but has taken months of. I'm trying out your wrecks and listening to your pod to hold into my skin truly needs and I was able to do it at a relatively affordable price point a per day cost about sixty six cents a day for are those days on active does pop up. I had grace my top product in my skin care routine because acne is normal and I remind myself to love my face those days to as my favorite line best grace as my top product. What a beautiful end to that email star and your photo I will say was so wonderful awful because you were beaming here smiling and that and you just looked full of joy I have to I have to I? I would be remiss if I did not mention one thing I would love for you. Start Wearing sunscreen. Great Call. Thank you even. If you're in a cold place even if your place I would love to. So you just put sunscreen every morning Also you know if it's worth if this is working for you and you don't have to use moisturizer except a couple months out of the year with the Great. I think most people they would find this routine to drying but it apparently works for her. So he sleep with a humidifier. So who am I to say. who were you but definitely the right person to say wear sunscreen? I am the right person at least wear

Cystic Acne Hazel Toner United States Midwest JOE
'Mother Of Environmental Justice' Hazel Johnson Could Get Postage Stamp To Honor Work Cleaning Up South Side

WBBM Evening News

00:39 sec | 7 months ago

'Mother Of Environmental Justice' Hazel Johnson Could Get Postage Stamp To Honor Work Cleaning Up South Side

"We may someday see late environmental activist hazel Johnson on a postage stamp when hazel Johnson's husband was diagnosed with cancer she started looking into the number of cases in the city the old guild gardens resident found that people in south side zip codes had higher incidence of cancer than those in other parts of the city and hazel Johnson spent half of her life fighting for environmental justice on the south side she died of congestive heart failure in twenty eleven block club Chicago reports that congressman Bobby rush has introduced two bills that would posthumously honored Johnson with the congressional gold medal and a commemorative postage stamp Jennifer Kuiper newsradio one oh five point nine

Hazel Johnson Guild Gardens Chicago Bobby Rush Gold Medal Congressman Jennifer Kuiper
The Mystery of the Christmas Tree Ship

Haunted Places

01:59 min | 8 months ago

The Mystery of the Christmas Tree Ship

"Bidder. Wins rose from the Great Lakes and Bill O.. Down the streets of Chicago south shore the shortcut off Crandon Avenue. Vanu didn't say Barbara Scheunemann anytime. She should've taken the route but she wasn't thinking straight. Her heart was elsewhere. It was about to board the ship and she was late to say goodbye. BARBA POULTER hood tighter a barrier between herself and the cheer of the Christmas season. Her husband was once the captain of the Rouse Simmons. A one hundred twenty three foot schooner that sank into winter storm in nineteen twelve every winter. He travelled north North to Wisconsin to bring evergreens back for the families of Chicago to decorate at Christmas. Christmas was their livelihood. But that didn't mean that Barbara couldn't resent it all the same mm-hmm. She knew as all wives of sailors did that. The lake was as much a grave as it was a highway. Every trips beginning could spell the end she knew it it as she walked the length of the dock Barbara paid no mind to the fishermen and rats. Her Thoughts dwelled on her daughters Elsie Hazel Bill. Pearl all at school. She wiped a frozen tear from her cheek and snap back to the present her heart leapt. Does she saw her husband. Herman waiting waiting at the end of the dock. The Row Simmons loomed large behind him. His voice called out to Barbara Wind asking her to come with him this year to spend Christmas at sea she ran to him. All the nearby tackle seller saw next was a hooded woman. Leap off the dock. With their arms outstretched stretched just before getting swallowed by the wake of the ships. Didn't matter that nobody else seemed to notice the tackle seller rushed to save the woman despite the icy temperature. He jumped in after her. He might not have done it for a stranger but he could have sworn the woman was the widow of Sadler he wants no

Barbara Scheunemann Barbara Chicago Barbara Wind Elsie Hazel Bill Simmons Rouse Simmons Barba Poulter Great Lakes Vanu Wisconsin Sadler Herman One Hundred Twenty Three Foot
Scientists discover DNA of woman on 5,700-year-old "chewing gum"

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:31 sec | 8 months ago

Scientists discover DNA of woman on 5,700-year-old "chewing gum"

"You never know what you'll find from an old piece of chewing gum live to correspondent Vicki Barker fifty seven hundred years ago a young woman living on an island off what's now Denmark chewed on some tar from a birch tree and spat it out and now scientists have been able to reconstruct her entire genome the first time that's been done from anything other than human bone because of this we know she likely had dark skinned brown hair and blue eyes other DNA traces suggest she'd recently eaten doc and hazel nuts and may have had

Denmark Vicki Barker Fifty Seven Hundred Years
"hazel" Discussed on F**ks Given

F**ks Given

03:05 min | 9 months ago

"hazel" Discussed on F**ks Given

"For you that's a good point grace thank you so much for coming this has been a long time coming on a longtime thank you so much please tell curious focus where they can find you yeah so thank you guys for having me on it's been so much fun day uh-huh curious fuck is you can find me on instagram my instagram handle is grace three underscores hazo which is height shy and you can say finding via my website which is WWW tall grace hyphen hazo dot com and we do poke costs as well guess green so series one of my polka switches conversations the stations with pussy out so we say especially diving into some of the subjects that i was talking about pussy pain also more around the spiritual side of sexuality confined focused so of course the whole debrief debrief yeah like share dual that shape along it's coming this florence normally says i like cher ray on our podcast even though you can't do on spotify but you count on apple podcasts oh really yeah con con con common oh well if you're an apple subscribe to our podcast gives a rating and review and yeah please send us any questions or sex theories that you wanna share and have us talk about on the podcast you can even voice no us and we could slip in if you don't mind having your voice awesome so yeah just dima slide into our DNA DNA us on instagram at come curious c. c. e. n. yeah please find grace as well heidi shit let's say goodbye before an aw fucking entity smell it here she's been doing talk which is not fair next week i see or harrison the at toyota we assemble cars and trucks right here with american hands american hands at the design table and on the assembly line and handing over keys hammering assembling hardworking hands hands that volunteer hands that served our country hands the coach t-ball the hands is that assemble our vehicles hold us together so when we get asked who we are we proudly raise our hands and say we are toyota u._s._a. toyota vehicles and components are assembled in.

"hazel" Discussed on F**ks Given

F**ks Given

02:44 min | 9 months ago

"hazel" Discussed on F**ks Given

"Time let's fifties condoms fifty bottles of lube all you curious fuckers you've had in your airballs table doesn't sound right apple cube testicles in the place it is yeah sounds pretty good actually imagine just like tickling them leftist sermons easiest place to be wow it has it's been a journey so far i'm so excited that we've got to this point fifty episodes in actually i never thought we'd get to this point i would not going to say so thinking about our favorite moments on the podcast and what we've done so far do you have a favorite moment florence there was a really really funny interesting with crazy time we had a focus and we were talking about pissing whole podcast where the london vagabond and something happened afterwards sydney read oh we'll possibly could have happened that fake inquisitive tiv- like what is going i wasn't not holding that baby wall street was happening both shipman you looking into the eyes of my vagina while i pissed all all over the twitter literally well i wasn't looking into your eyes i was literally looking into the mirror with the baby so yeah we had this crazy easy poke costs with the london vagabond which you can find listen to and they talk about the fetish scene and the fact that he is a human toiler and enjoys being humiliated pistone even poodle and then yeah we i knew go to experience it in real life yeah and they they kit in as well like just new baby london and it was just the the most incredible eye-opening experience to really get involved with the community because he feels left out when you're in something quite kinky fetish you feel like a freak creagh so like talking to them was really i didn't feel alone and then i gotta piss all over the toilets face so it was like perfect dream as i roy heavenly took amazing photos which i wish i could post i caught materials as you root for anything social media boring but you might find them in the like artists books blogs a website maybe yeah yeah you might find that somewhere in the ether but yeah check them out other episodes have been incredible we've had such fun nonstop laughter we've had like saad moments funny momon human resod series ones yeah.

"hazel" Discussed on F**ks Given

F**ks Given

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"hazel" Discussed on F**ks Given

"Sula especially knows that's exactly what they're trying to do. Yeah i try not to laugh fully pinga bang. You like destroying your clitoris guitar. Can you let your mind. Don't you thinking about it definitely not going to help thinking about. I'm not thinking about pleasure. I'm not thinking about what what is it. The year like you haven't gone. I haven't gone she. It was just such a nice experience to be genitals on even thanks to buddies and then yes sir i came and was he make it while she was giving you massage this. I'm always like i'm always looking for. Visuals situation came that was visual enough not no he was not but but then we switched massey's says them so i was like right. I'm going to going to match match them so i gave him a forty minute ending as beautiful then you want to play. They're like yes so it's not just by concern. I wanna go out getting a massage as four play like i actually think it probably is one of the nicest things you can do for play just just because you get like really it just starts heightening all those sensations in your body so then when you get to the sexual part of it you're just is going to be so much more receptive to every single little touch all janet it. Everyone's do this great apartments away as well forced into offering for massage the so long and it has no to us we learn about consent and stop pushing has to give me a massage of posing forcing him. He's obviously not done nine. Forcing see my plate chaining down. Ben massage buttocks consensus to get set known an. I'm joking. He doesn't like that number four th the worst. It's such a shame because we were dating and we got on so well yeah funny. He was attractive to really smart doc best conversations. Yeah no one just the sexual young it was yeah. It was one of those one of those and i think did you ever watch millionaire matchmaker. Yes much daylight. Uh absolute guilty pleasure mushed in a while but <hes> patty says that you can tell in the case okay good is going to be good yeah..

massey Sula patty janet forty minute
"hazel" Discussed on F**ks Given

F**ks Given

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"hazel" Discussed on F**ks Given

"Yeah yeah. It's always subject to opinion. 'cause everybody's different. Everybody's mental age and physical age is completely different. Yeah there is no age when typeset just do it. When you feel so ready. Literally you just have to ready and both feet people have to feel ready. I think maybe i was bad and maybe pressuring my boyfriend yeah when he wasn't necessarily ready because we only had we only had it twice over one weekend in our whole eleven months relationship and like him not not wanting to do it afterwards rows like which is going to do it all the time now we've broken the ceo but he never really liked initiated it again to me makes for like i you just push him into the situation and he wasn't necessarily ready solution. He was also a year younger than me so it didn't learn about consent though at school either you know. We have no idea that that that was what you weren't supposed to do. If you wanted sex you ask for you. You try to get it. What was your sex education interestingly. I i have mixed reviews as i still feel like my sex education was good but wasn't good enough yeah a compared to what i've heard other people having and also learn a lot from my mom and my family my friends ticket get which is which is what you need. You can't rely on sex education. Yeah i think parents need to be way more open about sex or at least get someone else in that. They can trust open about sex fuck three best faulk. It's the same guy his ego. He's listening to but not the last time so. This is the november fuck names yeah we we plan de data. We'll get it do this sketch. We've just so out for brunch something and then we just kind of got to the subject of savings and then we discovered we we both liked massage and so then we booked in a dinner date. We're going out drinking then. We'll get back to it. Oh that's really interesting interesting. I think planning sex is quite interesting yeah because i mean cut like taking the spontaneity of it is it's quite big thing ready but then it works so well some people and a lot of people in relationships. Do you have to schedule sex in well. I like to highlight something to build pulled up to as well. I'd like to date masturbate for week. Oh i oh remember that we did yeah. It was just insane because he had planned it better than i had so i would it would just go for drink who gave his and and then have been massage and sleep but no we went back to his and he said right this reception area now. I'm gonna go downstairs. Prepare the room. I'm going to call you down. When i'm ready. Okay yes it turned into a proper role play down. He said all right and so you just go into that room and take your clothes off and put this towel over you. Call me when you ready. Music had candles he bought the oil oh aw sixty and he proceeded to give me a forty minute matt fourteen minutes forty minutes before finishing me off so you go there after it was it was and i think because the focus wasn't on the ending 'cause i struggled to climax..

matt ceo faulk fourteen minutes eleven months forty minutes forty minute
"hazel" Discussed on F**ks Given

F**ks Given

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"hazel" Discussed on F**ks Given

"I just i thank the point in it and also i feel like i have different numbers because occur. We talk about this a lot today. I have budgets mus innocent. Vagina sex axes never really been on my on my capabilities yeah <hes> so i think my number for that would maybe be three interesting but then my number is higher for people that just had sexual experiences with. I just think it's interesting that people basing this number on the penis in in a whole is there traditionally is penetration but everyone should know by now that that doesn't necessarily mean sex mush is changing 'cause like having oral sex sex play sex in the still someone that's still like a a memory still a person in an experience be like saying like well. Lesbians just never have sex. Yes yeah yeah. I think my actual numbers more like seven i think and then sometimes it depends on with us. Sometimes i think that is a lot of people and then other people think oh maybe that was not a lot of tool and then i get into my head and i think why does it matter. It doesn't matter it depends on the community is already thing and i don't know if anyone saw in love island i quite getting someone was really ashamed. Aimed at amy who's really ashamed of her number being less herzog's and she was like she just she's kind of apologized for like what are you doing is be proud. That's not her is exactly everyone. That doesn't know what is a genus so it's a condition where ah the vaginal muscles of involuntarily contract so penetrations pretty much impossible and so i've never been able to tampon by did the other day so that's and then penetrative sex has always been re difficult. <hes> i sort of have a fair smith tasks that when i need to go to get that done what's is gonna happen. How's how's that can be possible for me up specula- look. Is it a uh physical thing or is it a mental thing or let me get this right. I think it's i think it's both i think mainly a mental thing and yeah you can develop it so after trauma all well like me. I've just always had it says ten really yes so it's not my period. I just could never attempted like the <hes> and i just instinctively knew something. I couldn't physically do and then medical professionals. Don't know or all of them but some of them don't seem to know that much about either by mass. Oh you just need you. Just need your boyfriend to take you out for nice romantic meal for call locally but no she was so sweet that came out that thinking i'm doomed. You know not going to be your experience with doctors. Has anyone offered anything that would actually i hope yeah i think the last time i went to a doctor was few years ago and they said this is really comment. Actually an amazing yeah you just need a little bullet vibrator start with a little one and then just keep going with it and that was the first islip heard about dilation <hes> yeah and then i go at dilating pinkett this year and i recommend it for everyone so they're five sizes and i'm up to the fourth one so i've got the beast and we left to conquer the data they little dildos or look like what what do they look at the mina curve just daughter yeah so good it to here because it's yeah i've only really heard it. In the last couple of years never got that in sex education. I've heard so many people suffer from that condition yeah and another thing that was really touching about the print was that people said oh thank you for including jainism and no one ever talks about it and i just feel seen it means like it doesn't matter how many likes followers u._k. It's when people actually come to you inside changed my fucking life yeah so i we had somewhat more my friends who had it done if she still does so into the doctor land they described her numbing cream interest so that watch could have sex she wouldn't be out here fail anything but her boyfriend overlays but then if if that's what some people need to get over the hurdle..

amy herzog pinkett
"hazel" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"hazel" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Kona Hawaii or Oahu tomorrow and you got a great chance to win it is the best contest in the history of radio all right before the break I mention the word the words of the name's Bob hurricane hazel Adam alright I want to where every twice for the giants it applies the giants I went where everybody goes to get quality information I went to his wikipedia page well anybody could have added to this I guess but Bob hurricane hazel came up in nineteen fifty seven with the Braves the catch that was it he did not come up until the Braves one hundred game of the season any came up any subtlety sector cars and you set the league on fire a four seventy three average in forty three games for the season nights I guess he had a seven over to twenty seven RBIs first first like twelve games hit five fifty and was named hurricane hazel after I guess the actual hurricane hazel but it hit his hometown in South Carolina back in nineteen fifty four two years later he was out of baseball played for played in four World Series games that year and then nobody heard from again so this is the deal where that part of the season where people come up and all of a sudden they do something yeah and no and you know I'd see Dickerson I see your strips in all that and the boost they have given that this state reminded me a hurricane hazel because it turn the team around all I can think of his nicknames have shared sending got Donnie baseball that might be the most creative thing the giants of come up with gas is a nickname crawl I mean that yeah yeah I mean the deck is probably the number one exactly but hurricane hazel named after the hurricane that hit is my goodness that's kind.

Kona Hawaii Bob hurricane hazel Braves South Carolina baseball Dickerson Oahu Bob hurricane hazel Adam Donnie hurricane hazel nineteen fifty four two years
"hazel" Discussed on Babes and Babies

Babes and Babies

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"hazel" Discussed on Babes and Babies

"So could refill, and I actually went saw healer about this before getting agreed to the DNC because I didn't wanna DNC I wanna be able to do it naturally. But my healer friend said, you know, your body wasn't ready to be pregnant, but mentally you talked yourself into it. So this was the perfect middle ground. It's like your body now is like look you're pregnant ha, but really you're not there's not gonna Beijing for a really long time 'cause there's no actual baby there. So I did have to have a DNC after doing that for six months, but I got the NC and got pregnant with well right after that. And it just I think gave me time it gave me time to really know for sure that's what I wanted for Hazel to be ready to, you know, come to earth. Comer side, and she's named after your grammar. Right. So the Elaine part is named after my rate, grandma, grandmothers mom, and my grandma lost her mom right before I was bored. And then my grandma died before Hayes was born. So yeah, it was an unfortunate coincidence in my family of this rotation. Hopefully, we can stop that. But yeah, Hazel Hazel was wild win. Because I didn't get sick with. I got sick. I didn't feel good. But I didn't pick. She was easy. She wasn't scary. It was no high risk. You know, by then I was more confident what I wanted. So that's when I you know, you were just becoming Dula. And I know what to do a was was this five years ago. So Hazel March thirtieth. Yeah. Yeah. So one of my first. Yeah. And I was a hospital. I think you had done a bunch of home but not hospital. Yep. Yeah. It was you and Ashley right around the same time. Yup. The Ashley's is just a like half a year younger than Hazel something like that. Yeah. Okay. So hazel. I wasn't worried about I kind of knew what I wanted. What I was going to do how he was going to go. And remember I was gonna try to go on natural because how fast, but then everyone talked me into going to hospital so soon because of how quick Jake was. And then she just wasn't ready to come. And then the labor to progress and she wants she talking to breaking my water, which I would never ever ever do again. Which is something to like, I know I was so new like now, I just fill also a lot more confident in my practice to have those conversations with you to know like for you to like be able to make those decisions confidently, you know. Yeah. Well, do you remember my doctor's like will? You want me to deliver you, and if you don't deliver today, I have the home with like it's marks. Remember, I was used my doctor and we'd have plates. She's like, so you got a lemme break, your what no drugs involved, and you know, she talked me into it. I'm like, oh, okay. And I so think she just wanted to be an April Fools, baby. And we forced her to come out today's early. Oh, and then the puking, you know, the that instant puking breathing it in and choking on it. And that would just like downhill, but once I got that patrol. We all took a nap, and she was fine. And I mean, it wasn't scary enough to you know, you get over it. And you learn from it. And I knew how I wanted Jason come after that it was just another experience to help to progression and Hazel was the easiest baby ever. She was so easy. I knew how to use my oils by then I knew how to stop colloquy baby. By the in for me. I knew how to change my diet says she felt better. I knew all these things I had she slept. So good. I had to sleep with my hand on her. I thought she would die in the nights because she was so quiet. Jake never to that. If Jake fell fine. He was wide awake. Oh, my like you have to force me to eat because I just wanna sleep..

Hazel Hazel Jake Hazel March DNC Hayes Beijing NC Ashley Dula Elaine Jason five years six months
"hazel" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"hazel" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Hazel here on a Wednesday morning. Big news is birthright citizenship, which shouldn't be is. It really is. It makes no sense the Mueller investigation. Some new aspects of that we just did that last segment the migrant caravan, of course, has turned completely pit political. How many people are actually going to show up a fraction of those that are moving up towards the US border right now, Pittsburgh, and I explained the last segment how the president coming to. Pittsburgh was very controversial. Where a whole lot of people said, no, thank you. We don't want you here. And we won't be here with you. Both the senators from Pennsylvania, Paul Ryan, Mitch McConnell. I mean, all the big east said, no not interested. So there's a little controversy there. Now, the other controversy, I think this is certainly less political is a conflict between what is an extraordinary crime scene and Jewish tradition and Jewish law. Under Jewish law. People have to be buried almost instantly. Based on an investigation you want the investigation to be complete before they card off bodies. And the coroner's have to come in. And obviously investigative, but this is a very complicated investigation after figure out where the bullets are where the casings are where everybody is. I mean, this take some time, and according to Jewish law there have to be people. They're jus they're basically being companions to the dead bodies, a tradition that once you die. You're not alone until you're buried. Then there is something called the Chevron Kadisha, and this is the burial society and under Jewish law. You have to be buried and all of you have to be buried, which means they come out. These are orthodox shoes, and they come out and go in in this case, go to the crime scene and scrubbing down every little tiny piece of a human being has to be picked up and buried with the person even the blood has to be scrubbed and the blood as much as possible has to go with the person for burial. And if you've ever experienced not personally, of course, but looked at an explosion in Israel when the terrorists used to blow themselves up and people up and parts of bodies would be all over a couple of things happened. First of all there was utter silence. For about thirty seconds. Then the phone the cell phone started ringing. And that's what you heard cell phones. And then as quickly as possible, the Chevra show would show up because under Jewish law all the pieces effectively have to be put together. And they're out picking up microscopic bits of people with tweezers even. Because that is Jewish law. So when you have a conflict like this. It's. I mean, obviously, what is happening with the Jewish community there they understand and they get that. There is civil authority as a matter of fact, under Jewish law civil authority has to be listened to wherever you lived whatever country, and you have to subscribe to the law of that country. So the Jewish community currently knows the investigation has to continue and has to go forward. But in light of the laws, and the observance that happens, there's a conflict there there is you pick someone up you put him in the ground because they have to be buried as quickly as possible with all of their pieces. And the investigation says we have to take our time. Now when there is no. Christian or non Jewish other than Muslim tradition. Is it doesn't matter. How long your body sitting there? Now they throw in a refrigerator they in. Balmy. You can sit there for months. All right. It doesn't matter. Not in the Jewish religion and not in the Muslim religion. And so at Jewish volunteers. Entered the synagogue yesterday to begin the ritual cleanup. And what they'll do is not only to find any parts of people. They'll actually wipe down blood with baby wipes and not leave one drop behind. And as rabbi Wasserman said, and this is part of the Chevra Kadisha is these orthodox Jews for the most part. And it's considered honored. This is not paid. These are usually elders in the community. I it's actually considered a high honor to be part of the Chevra Kadisha is they're they're in light of the investigation. It's it's really tough the first of the funerals one for the two brothers that were killed and a community. Doctor started yesterday. And that's the other thing it has to go as quickly as humanly possible were it not for this investigation. Were it not for the fact that this massive criminal investigations going on all the victims would have been buried within twenty four hours. The only the only time according to Jewish law is on the Sabbath. My dad, for example died on a Friday. We couldn't bury him on Saturday. And or he died on Saturday. And I think it was Monday when he was buried, frankly. I don't remember. But the Chevra Kadisha was there, and it's a ritual ritual washing of the body. That's the other thing, and there's very traditional very specific rules involved in washing the body. Interesting stuff. But then I like dead stories, and how appropriate is this for Halloween, right? Oh, good. God. No. It's not this is horrible. Now. Nine o'clock. We're gonna have are really appropriate Halloween story, which I do and I haven't done for the last year or two and bringing it back, and that's necrophilia the victimless crime. And I'm going to argue how necrophilia should not be an is not a crime. How's that? I'll Swain coming up handle on the news late edition, Michael Crozier with some news. A woman convicted of a deadly shooting rampage in Whittier in LA mirada has been sentenced to more than three hundred fifty years in prison Raina Gomez and another person carried out a string of violent crimes in April of last year which included shooting drivers and by standards at random. She was convicted last month of one count of murder fourteen counts of attempted murder in one kind of carjacking. One man was killed three. Others were injured. Pasadena's school district has voted to close Cleveland elementary school due to budget cuts mandated by L A county before last night's vote community members pleaded with the school board to spare it the school. This woman said she recently read a story to kids at the school about baseball legend Jackie Robinson. I'm reading it says he went to Cleveland elementary. I was wrong. People didn't even know we need to do something for the school. This is historical. Great, man. Went to this school schools closures expected to say the district as much as three hundred fifty grand a year to more schools Franklin elementary and Wilson middle are still on the chopping block the eighth week of the Thomas strategies KFI NBC four poll shows the race for governor is being pretty much settled democrat Gavin Newsom spin able to own a group critical to Republican John Cox's chances of winning Gavin's winning with independence by nearly a two to one margin and overall KFI political consultant John Thomas says Newsom leads Cox fifty five to forty one percent. We feel comfortable at calling this race for Gavin Newsom today. John Cox has doesn't stand a chance the margin of error is plus or minus three and a half percent. Chris ancarlo KFI news. Feel so fun. I hope you. It doesn't musicians have signed up the performance.

Chevra Kadisha Gavin Newsom John Cox Pittsburgh Chevra US Hazel Mueller Pennsylvania Cleveland elementary school Israel president Michael Crozier KFI Jackie Robinson NBC Mitch McConnell
"hazel" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"hazel" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Talking with Aaron Hazel corn of experience, Dr Jeffrey Milososki of basic systems, my actual data scientist and colleague, and we're talking all about data quality and processes and data governance. There are lots of new rules out there. Of course, we've talked many times about duty PR and the show the general data protection regulation, the so-called right to be forgotten which I think is downright ambitious, but Aaron all times the importance of really responsible with your data. That's the that's the one sentence version of data governance be more with your data. And I say more because you want to be improving that process over time. So there are lots of ways to do that data accesses one data policies is another, and, you know, these days Aaron it seems to me what you really really want to do is bake bills policies into the applications because to expect people to read even five. Pages of documentation. And just remember what to do. That's not the best strategy. These days you really do have to define those policies. And then we've been into the applications such that people will have a very difficult time. Breaking the rule with the understanding that you don't wanna make it too tightly constrained because that's when people come up with work arounds. That's when you wind up with shadow IT all other things, but I think a thoughtful review policy woven into the fabric of how these applications actually work. That's one of the main keys to achieving data governance. What do you think? I agree with you completely. So I think companies really do have to as you said put a thoughtful look at.

Aaron Hazel corn Dr Jeffrey Milososki scientist
"hazel" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"hazel" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"Match and i'll say like document contains match and it'll be like amount colon dollar sign and then the matches a series of numbers so i'll save a lot of pdf's where it says you know cover i have a lot of hover domains that i have receipts forward says no document canadian teens match and then hover all names all of there's a special way and so i put the dollar amount and in the receipts so i probably have about a dozen he's overall setup that i use specifically for for tax time in addition to the ones that i have already set up for for my daily filing system so for things that i know are going to be tax related i will have hazel file a copy of that document in my normal file folders filing system but then i also have her file a copy of that document in a particular folder that i have set up for tax receipts i have a tax receipt folder setup that will i have hazel sub organized the items and that that research that folder by month and so then i go through that folder month by month by month is i'm i'm preparing my tax documents and see okay is this really deductible what is it is it not the other thing that i find a lot of things that i missed i try to capture as many of those things as i can as they come in that certainly always makes tax prep a lot easier but i find a lot of things that i missed in my email and so i set up a couple of specific email roles particularly email rules for itunes receipts and email rules for pay pal receipts and so i've got a couple of smart folders that i will activate during tax time that i'll go through looking for receipts that i might have missed from itunes or from pay pal looking for things toes a couple of things that i do he's little so helpful for anything.

hazel
"hazel" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"hazel" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"Um we i think we've we beat the horse dead on hazel but but just to be clear hazel applies tax at reads in applies tax so any hazel rule you'll have that's filing something in a folder for you it is trivial for you to add additional step assists owned by the way also add the tank for this matter or this item or whatever this tag you want to add for this type of file you can add multiple tax that way so you get tagging for free if you're using hazel ra l or anything that you file automatically through hazel it's just free great stops right yeah if you if you're already filing things with hazel to have it apply consistent tags and you know they're consistent and you can search build systems without even trying another thing you can do is you can do keyword shortcut which recurrent already um uh we mentioned default folder x for a long time you know when we had was open met attacks default fuller supported that were were apples default save and open dialogue lasted not that that feature in default folder x is not as big of a deal anymore it used to be because now it's everywhere uh what about apple script to use apple scripted all with tanking uh i ju but most of the tagging that i do through scripting has done through the command line tool x at t r accenture it's the extended attribute tool and that gets complicated for a lot of tagging you have to apply uh like hashed versions of tags and it's not something that even the average mack power users going to get into um.

hazel apple command line