35 Burst results for "Hauser"

No. 6 Kansas rallies late to beat No. 7 Duke 69-64; Michigan State outlasts Kentucky

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 2 weeks ago

No. 6 Kansas rallies late to beat No. 7 Duke 69-64; Michigan State outlasts Kentucky

"In the opener of a double header unranked Michigan state took care of number four Kentucky 86 to 77 in double overtime The Spartans outscored the wildcats ten to one over the final two 30 and got 23 points from Joey Hauser After Friday's game coming that close to beating Gonzaga on a big stage like that coming here and playing this event which is just as big Double overtime game In game two number 6 Kansas rallied for a 69 64 win over 7th ranked duke The jayhawks were led by Jalen Wilson with 25 points Tom mccabe Indianapolis

Joey Hauser Spartans Wildcats Kentucky Michigan Gonzaga Kansas Jalen Wilson Jayhawks Tom Mccabe Indianapolis
Tatum scores 31, Celtics beat Pistons for 4th straight win

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

Tatum scores 31, Celtics beat Pistons for 4th straight win

"The Celtics own a four game winning streak after Jayson Tatum jaylen Brown and Sam howser carried them to a one 28 one 12 victory against the pistons Tatum had 31 points and 5 assists scoring 16 in the first 5 minutes of the third quarter and 26 after halftime Brown finished with 30 points and 7 rebounds We got a lot of options a lot of threats And so far we've been you know for the most part it's based on the floor The Hauser added a career high 24 points off the bench Jade and ivy had 19 points and ten rebounds in Detroit's fourth loss in 5 games Kate Cunningham was one of 11 from the field and scoring a season low four points I'm Dave ferry

Jayson Tatum Jaylen Brown Sam Howser Celtics Tatum Pistons Hauser Brown Kate Cunningham Jade Detroit Dave Ferry
Brown has 30, Celtics hit 27 3s in 133-118 win over Knicks

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 3 weeks ago

Brown has 30, Celtics hit 27 3s in 133-118 win over Knicks

"The Celtics set a team record by nailing 27 three pointers in a one 33 one 18 shootout win over the Knicks Jaylen Brown and Jayson Tatum each hit 6 trays while backup Sam Hauser set career highs with 16 points and 5 three pointers Brown pays Boston with 30 points Tatum added 26 Guys in the right spot getting the shots that you know we want them to shoot And you know he's knocking shots down so that always helps Julius Randle scored 29 points and RJ Barrett added 27 for the Knicks who have lost four of their last 5 games I'm Dave ferry

Jaylen Brown Jayson Tatum Sam Hauser Celtics Knicks Tatum Julius Randle Boston Brown Rj Barrett Dave Ferry
Dodgers pummel Brewers again, Heaney 10 Ks in 12-6 win

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 3 months ago

Dodgers pummel Brewers again, Heaney 10 Ks in 12-6 win

"The Dodgers beat up on the brewers 12 to 6 Andrew he allowed two runs over 6 innings with ten strikeouts his catcher Austin Barnes He was really good you know his fastball has had a lot of life on it They threw a slider really well today too We got a lot of swinging mask I think he had ten punches so it was a really good start Barnes hit a two run Homer and had four RBIs max Muncie Cody Bellinger and Joey Gallo each drove in two Milwaukee's Adrian Hauser was rocked for 5 runs over just two and a third innings Hauser drops to four and 9 Mark Myers Los Angeles

Austin Barnes Dodgers Brewers Andrew Max Muncie Cody Bellinger Joey Gallo Adrian Hauser Barnes Homer Milwaukee Hauser Mark Myers Los Angeles
Why You Have to Watch Apple TV's "Blackbird"

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:45 min | 3 months ago

Why You Have to Watch Apple TV's "Blackbird"

"I didn't want to buckle and subscribe to Apple TV. I'm sick of paying $10, 8 $7, $12 for all these different streaming services. I said, the hell with Apple, I'm not doing it, but I did because I wanted to see two shows I really heard a lot about. One is a series called blackbird. With taron edgerton Ray Liotta in his last role, in which he so great in, but I have to say he looked very ill in this series. And Paul Walter Hauser, this kid, this guy Hauser, doesn't get enough credit as an actor. He plays a serial killer in a way I've yet to see be done. I mean, the choices he makes are incredible. You might have seen him play the security guard Richard Jewell, the instant hero after foiling the bomb attack on the 1996 Atlanta Olympics. He was amazing in that. But on this series, he's, I mean, this guy is otherworldly. He's one of those actors. He's very heavy. He can only play certain roles, but Jesus Christ, he's he's so good. Doesn't get enough credit. Plays a serial killer in a way I've yet to see be done. The choices he makes are incredible. This is a guy who comes from a comedic background. But he steals every scene he's in with Taron Egerton. And that's not easy because edgerton, especially in this film, is really great as well. Don't base your opinion on him for how he portrayed Elton John in Rocketman. Dump. It's night and day. And to add to all of this, this series is based on a true story about a guy who gets a ten year prison sentence for selling cocaine, but then he's offered to have his sentence greatly reduced if he can become friends with this serial killer and make him admit to him all the girls he killed and where the bodies are buried. The feds took a shot, they tried something in a bag of tricks to see if this kid was a star football player in high school could go to prison and befriend this serial killer and have him open up to him. It's great. Great. I love outside the box thinking like that. Many people thought it was a crazy idea. It was wrong, you can't do this. Fantastic.

Taron Edgerton Ray Liotta Paul Walter Hauser Richard Jewell Apple Taron Egerton Hauser Olympics Edgerton Atlanta Elton John Football
"hauser" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

The Essential Oil Revolution

06:54 min | 4 months ago

"hauser" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

"Let's do it. And just in the end, we're much happier coming out of that experience. That's amazing. I have not heard that, but I'm going to use that now. So thank you for that. Yeah, I love. Love kid power. I have the big. It comes, I don't know if it's, I think it still comes in the 15 mil bottle, but it's a big, I call it the big mama bottle, and I'm always so happy because I use it. I use it plenty in my diffuser. It's one just in my kitchen every morning, not every morning, but I just sometimes will grab for it. So especially when it's rainy and we need some uplifting things going on in our homes. So next, the final one to talk about well, I didn't really talk that much about sleepy eyes. I feel like it's pretty self explanatory, right? Self explanatory. I'm trying to describe the sent to you if you've ever smelled tranquil, it's kind of like a mild tranquil smell. And which is really nice because tranquil only comes in a roller. So I think tranquil is lavender Cedar wood and Roman chamomile. So let's see what this one has. This one also has geranium, which has, is that citrus or cystic. Oh yeah, bergamot, which is very common, tangerine, and valerian, yeah. In it. So it's like a lavender root of Bala mix, but it's very, it's not overwhelming. Ruta valla is a little intense. And this does have road of ala in it, but it's one of the last ingredients in it. So it is just a really lovely oil. So it's good for kids and adults. I mean, it's easy to put in the little, my favorite, of course, my kids have the owl diffusers. So we love sleepy eyes and the owl diffusers. And we go through, we go through the bottles fast. But if you're going to buy sleepy eyes, I recommend that one in the dropper bottle, the 5 mil bottle. I mean, you can roll on the sleepy eyes as well. It's great to roll on, but if you want to diffuse, which I just love diffusing oils for my kids at night, I feel like it goes on for a while. I feel like it diffusing for bedtime is like a little more effective than rolling it on. I mean, rolling it on is great, especially for some that maybe you want to put on the bottom of the feet, but diffusing for creating that atmosphere and really getting to that emotional center of the brain faster and more consistently, I agree is the way to go. Yeah, and it's a great bedtime establishing nighttime routines too and can help them do that when they go off to college and stuff like that. So just doing that every night is such a good rhythm to have in their lives. And then genius, genius, I use this in the roller bottle and the dropper, either one you get is great, but my I have a daughter with special needs. With emotional special needs, major ADHD. And through discovering her ADHD, I realized that I have it as well. Just really struggled with focus for a lot in my life. So this oil is great. They call it genius because it helps you focus and concentrate on what you really need to do so that you can become a genius or brings out the genius in you. And I really like this one for both of us. I like to roll it right at the base of the brain stem. It's just a great one to help you. Get to work on things like homeschool my daughter, which she isn't a huge fan of doing homework. So this does help. I'll diffuse it or roll it on when we're getting some work done. And it's just really helpful. I love it too for work. I actually put some I put some highest potential on today. And some genius before we got on the call, just to help with my focus. You seem very focused. I'm very impressed for someone with ADHD. That's great. Yeah, and genius for those curious, you spell it GE in E, why you S kind of an interesting spelling. Yeah, they just, I think they like to change up the spelling. So it's not, you know, it's more like just a play on. Plan. I don't think they people sue for so many reasons. But I can imagine someone being like, I'm suing you because this oil did not make me certified. Yeah. And I love how it's like Jean as in the human gene. Helps with your just helps with your brain and your focus. I love it. And this one's got a bunch of oils in it. So we don't have to list them all but at the top of the list is sacred, frankincense, which is such an amazing oil for the brain, especially and just grounding. So I feel like especially for those that struggle with focus, you know, just that sacred fragrance going right into the brain and just helping ground and focus is so important. Yeah, it also has cedarwood, which was great for a brain support and genius is also part of the reconnect line. Genius and sleepy eyes are both part of the reconnect line, which is a special collection for bringing health and for kids that need some reconnecting neural pathways in their brain. So just if that's something you're interested in, that's a great thing to look into as well, but important to know that. What's the name of that collection again? It's called the reconnect collection. And so it's very helpful for kids that have struggles with focus or how else would you use that one? Yeah, I'm trying not to use uncompliant language. Right. I'm trying to be compliant with kids that might have some neuro diverse things going on in their brain. That's great. I had the pleasure of interviewing doctor David Stewart once. He wrote the chemistry of essential oils made simple. Which was great. I actually was never able to actually publish the episode because the entire thing was just uncompliant. Every second. In the end, stopped taking notes of like, okay, cut this out and cut this out. I was like, you know what? This was just an interview for me. But one thing he told me a trick for using oils that you are specifically trying to target the brain, focus, attention, or just trying to up your study game, really.

Ruta valla ADHD cystic GE Jean David Stewart
"hauser" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

05:57 min | 5 months ago

"hauser" Discussed on Untangle

"I'll either listen to meditation studio because I love the two or three minute guided meditation, which really is great for me. I'll do that or sometimes I just do some stretching, which is also just like a really great way to feel grounded and to connect with yourself. Sometimes I do a little gratitude journaling. Sometimes I do a combination of the three, depending on how I'm feeling, but the point is I have to do something before I look at my phone and before the kids get up, I have to do something where I'm just really feeling like I'm connecting with myself and feeling really grounded. And it's such a beautiful way for me to start the day. It sets the tone for the whole entire day. It just puts me in the right mindset. Yes. And in one of your chapters, you discuss breaking down what you love versus what you dread in your work. And I was thinking, aren't there always parts of our jobs that we dread, whether it be administrative stuff, or how do we identify what we can change versus what we need to adapt to? Yeah, it's such a great question. And we're always going to have the administrative stuff. We're always going to have stuff that we don't enjoy doing. Maybe it's tedious. Maybe it's not. We don't feel like it's helping us grow or develop. And we're always going to have that, and we're going to have to do that. It's just like a part even me like working for myself. I always have the administrative stuff that I just have to get done. I think it's important then to think about, for example, if there's a part of your job, the big part of your job that's requiring skill sets that you don't have and you don't have any interest in developing, that's kind of a big deal. I actually start the book with a story about this woman joy who started out in a job that required a lot of number crunching and she realized that she's not good at number crunching. And she doesn't enjoy it at all. And what she realized that she really did like doing was she always loved onboarding new employees and doing stuff that was more office culture related. So guess what? She ended up migrating into a human resources role. And that's what she's been doing for 20 years. And she loves it. That's I think a great example of looking at your work and looking at what do you dread? What do you love? And can you either integrate more of what you love into your current role, and that usually requires a conversation with your manager, or is there a different role for you? It could be within the same company. It could be someplace else, but being really honest with yourself about that. What was your thought process to do this book as a workbook? And to have coloring and meditation and encouraging soul searching and free writing. What were your thoughts on that? You know what it is. It's so interesting. My, I guess personality. Yeah, personality type. You know, like the Myers Briggs personality test. The few times that I've done that over the years, I always over index on the last one, the fourth trait, which is perceiving versus judging. I'm a really high judger and what that means is that I love closure to things. I love being able to move through things quickly and check things off the list. And I did not want people to do that with this workbook. I didn't want people because that is something that I would typically do is, oh my gosh, I just have to get through it. Just have to check every box, make sure that I do every single exercise and speed through it so that I can feel accomplished. And what I really wanted was to encourage people to take a minute, take a breath. So that when you get to the end of a section, you're not rushing to the next section. But that you're really just taking the time to reset. So that was really important to me and I feel like it's also self awareness on my part because I know how I operate. And I think there are many other people out there that operate the same way. So I really wanted to make sure that I was giving people the opportunity to just press pause and take the time to reflect and reset. I loved your question and this seems relevant to the pause, the question is, what do you want to be known for? And how difficult is this for people to identify especially women in their 20s and even early 30s? Is this a little bit complicated? Because we're so driven by culture and other influences and parental influences. Yeah, it can be really challenging. And one of the things that I always encourage people to do is to ask their colleagues and their friends. What words come to mind when you think about me? It's really interesting to get a perspective on how others see you because that is your personal brand. And sometimes that can be surprising. Sometimes it can be really positive and might make you feel great. And other times, oh, that's what people think. That's not what I want to be known for. But look, I do think this is a really important concept. I work with a lot of founders, entrepreneurs who own their own businesses and having a personal brand is clearly really important to them. I think it's equally important if you're working at a company to have a personal brand because you want to be the go to for something. You want to be indispensable. And I can tell you when I was in my 20s and I was working at Coca-Cola, would I became known for,

Myers Briggs Coca Cola
"hauser" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

The Rich Eisen Show

02:00 min | 5 months ago

"hauser" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

"It's <Speech_Male> not like every team <Speech_Male> out there <Speech_Male> won't be working <Speech_Male> right now. I'm just going to say <Speech_Male> this to you. <Speech_Male> And I know <Speech_Male> Chris, it drives you nuts <Speech_Male> when I make things about me, <Speech_Male> but it's <Speech_Male> too bad. <Speech_Male> It is the rich eisen <Speech_Male> show. <Speech_Male> Just saying, <Speech_Male> if I win our <Speech_Male> fantasy league, <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> guest <Speech_Male> properly, who's going to win <Speech_Male> the NBA title called <Speech_Male> Durant to Miami <Speech_Male> and also <Speech_Male> told you for <Speech_Male> weeks, <Speech_Male> why do I keep for <Speech_Male> some reason my Spidey <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> sense has been saying, <Speech_Male> what is Riley <Speech_Male> up to? <Speech_Male> So why do you get <Speech_Male> to call you a basketball <Speech_Male> guy? I <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> might be wrong. I might <Speech_Male> be way off all I'm <Silence> saying is <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> keep Durant <Speech_Male> is now in play. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> as of <Speech_Male> one <Speech_Male> hour ago, <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> you're <Speech_Male> like, okay, <Speech_Male> June 30th. <Silence> What's going on? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> College football <Speech_Male> and the NBA <Silence> have just been completely <Silence> upended. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> 'cause <Silence> Kevin Durant is <Speech_Male> in play. <Speech_Male> And that <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> beyond <Speech_Male> significant. <Silence> Beyond. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Significant. <Speech_Male> And that means <Speech_Male> Kyrie Irving will be <Speech_Male> in play as well, <Speech_Male> because they're not just <Speech_Male> going to hang on to Kyrie <Speech_Male> and his one year of <Speech_Male> opt in in. So <Speech_Male> Kyrie hobson and <Speech_Male> Durant says I'm out. <Speech_Male> Yeah. <Speech_Male> Yeah. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I love this. By the way, at <Speech_Male> this point, the nets in the <Speech_Male> Knicks should just merge. <Speech_Male> But Doran is like, <Speech_Music_Male> just like to <Speech_Male> pack 12 in the big tent. <Speech_Male> Just merge and make <Speech_Music_Male> one team. And then maybe <Laughter> <SpeakerChange> something that <Speech_Male> can come up. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Being like, <SpeakerChange> I'm not here <Speech_Male> for Kyrie's BS <Speech_Male> anymore. Or <Speech_Male> they're going to go somewhere <Speech_Male> together. Maybe <Speech_Male> they will. <Speech_Male> I don't know. 'cause <Speech_Male> Kyrie's going <Speech_Male> to be out. <Speech_Male> Durant's at play. <Speech_Male> UCLA <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> USC are joining <Speech_Male> the Big Ten. The <Speech_Male> NBA's taking notes <Speech_Male> from the NFL and I <Speech_Male> love it. June <Speech_Music_Male> is suddenly the <Speech_Music_Male> month. Rich <Speech_Music_Male> eisen basketball <Speech_Music_Male> gone. Big basketball <Speech_Music_Male> guy. And I'm <Speech_Male> pleased to say we <Speech_Male> are on the air <Speech_Music_Male> tomorrow to talk about <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> tomorrow. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Wow. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> For <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> over three decades, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> nobody has had a wrestling <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> career like arn <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Anderson. <SpeakerChange> Conrad <Speech_Male> Thompson gets <Speech_Male> all the stories with our.

NBA Kyrie hobson basketball Durant Kyrie Irving Kevin Durant Riley Miami Knicks football nets UCLA USC NFL wrestling Anderson
"hauser" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

The Rich Eisen Show

05:00 min | 5 months ago

"hauser" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

"But it's rough and tumble that flag football. Evidently. Certainly if you're getting your tower buzzed by you and your James van der beek, Paul Walter Hauser is heckling you who went for it for the whole thing. Joe Manganiello was there. Yeah, it was like a really, there were some very athletic people that I was like, these people could play. All right, football. Very good. And man, you've played some 90s folks. I mean, from Sean eckert. And Richard Jewell, did you meet the real Richard Jewell at all or no, not really? No, Richard regrettably he passed. I didn't feel that. 2007. All right, so then I'm a dumbass. So then what did you know? I know you do a lot of research. I never met Sean. I never met Shawn eckhart either. You cast away in O 7, the same year. Damn. Bad year for guys who are famous in the 90s. And involved in the Olympics. Yeah, also there's some weird crazy Jay Leno story where Jay Leno said about Richard Jewell on late night. He said, this Richard Joel guy, he kind of looks kind of looks like the guy who helped Colleen wack on anti Kerrigan. And it's like, I ended up playing these two guys. It was so weird that that's like a thing. That's funny. And one of my heroes is Chris Farley, who I talk about AD nauseum, and Chris Farley played Sean eckhart in a sketch when Nancy Kerrigan hosted Saturday Night Live. And then Richard Jewell did weekend update with Norm Macdonald in like 97. Another icon of yours, I'm sure. Oh God, I love Norm Macdonald. I haven't watched his new special because I know that when I do, I need to be like my phone on airplane. I need no interruption. That's enough to have a spiritual emotional experience watching who are your other icons that you, yeah, I showed you, I got them on my arm. I got a tattoo that you're wearing a very nice cardigan in the back. You decided not to rock the cardigan on the show. I like the orange cardigan. That was a $100 cardigan on sale in Macy's for 30 bucks. You know, as you know, I like a good cardigan. Every now and then, which is a fan of it. I do not find records. I know I have this stylist Jack Manson who's awesome. He works with Jamie Foxx and he always makes me look cooler than I am. Which I appreciate very much. Oh, but I'm trying to own the whole hip hop chic thing. I have an EP coming out July 8th. Yes. I go under the name Signet ringer, Signet ring, of course, like making a stamp of approval. Yes. And then ringer in sports, somebody who's good at something, but doesn't look like they would be or appears not to be. And so what are you so you are what started on the ringer and hip hop. I think people wouldn't expect me to be any good at it, but I'm really proud of these 6 songs I'm putting out. Okay. And here's some bars. Album is called murder for hire, but higher is felt HIG HU. Very good. I appreciate that. Did you sample any for taron edgerton? I mean, he's a hip hop fan. You know, both love run the jewels. We listen to that quote. What I'm just saying is that Taryn is somebody who's work is, in fact, associated with music. That's what I'm saying. Did you bust any of that out for him? If I did it was when I was inebriated. I don't think I would so really try to make him listen to my stuff. Why? I don't even ask him for his opinion. I mean, if you're putting it out there, I should. I should. No, I think I played him some rough cuts when we first met. And yeah, we had a lot of fun working together, man. I bet. Really good dude. But you say you sound like Paul. I mean, the way I compare myself, I am like a Jesus dude, so like, I listen to some gospel hip hop, I call it like if lecrae said the F word a bunch. I don't know. I very much, I don't like this sort of overly sterilized wannabe pure Christian entertainment stuff. I think they need to keep it real. Okay. And so I'm kind of doing the gospel meets meets hip hop in a way. And that is called, what did you say? It was called Signet Signet ringer. And the EP murder for hire murder for hire. That drops the same day as blackbirds. It drops the same day as blackbird July 8th. What a double dip for you, man. Blackbird available for streaming on Apple TV starting next week, July 8th, and then everybody check out Paul Walter Hauser's new EP dropping on the same day. Thanks for coming here, man. Hey, thanks for having me, dude. I really am a fan of your show. Thank you. And you always do such a great job. And you always bring on people I want to watch. Fantastic. Hopefully that includes you. I think. Okay. I think it does as well. And then a new convert to the mug is yours to keep, by the way. Oh, thank you, man. Mugg is yours to keep. It's a rich eisen show. What's the rich eisen show? And also.

Richard Jewell Paul Walter Hauser Chris Farley Norm Macdonald Sean eckert Shawn eckhart Jay Leno Richard Joel Colleen wack Sean eckhart James van der beek Joe Manganiello football Jack Manson Nancy Kerrigan Kerrigan taron edgerton Saturday Night Live Olympics
"hauser" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

The Rich Eisen Show

04:59 min | 5 months ago

"hauser" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

"You're kind of infiltrating this group of people and trying to bring them to justice in the sense that Larry hall could have been let out. You know, he did the confessions and he recanted his confessions. The very messy situation in which you need something to nail somebody down. And the real Jimmy Keane did that, which is, you know, thank God. This is based on a true story. Based on a true story happened in the 90s in the Midwest and yeah our cinematography and our locations and the design of the show it really does feel like that place and time even though we shot it in New Orleans. And I know your character in real life again had something to do with Civil War reenactments, which is why we're seeing you in mutton chops. Yeah. That's not in your, that's not in your contract rider poem like I demand to be in mutton chops. No playing a psychopath. Make me look like a sadistic Muppet, please. That's what I said to them. No, the guy was really into this reenactment stuff. So he had what our, I guess, known as burnside on his face and you got to know. As a 246 pound man while shooting that, wearing a prison jumpsuit with a wig on with those mutton chops up. I didn't sweat at all, red. I smell really good. So you didn't grow that. Every day. Yeah, yeah, these women Catherine nana and galaxy. They're my hair and makeup team that came in every day, 90 minutes to two hours. You're known for committing to a role, Paul, you didn't commit to the chops. You didn't go and grow those out or you have no ability. Because I would have no ability. The sides of the mustache and the beard need to sometimes be drawn in for me. I don't have that ability. Rick, rich. You're a beautiful man. Thank you. I appreciate that. I appreciate that was your first point. Thank you. Listen, you can buy all the hormonal pills possible on Amazon Prime. It doesn't mean you're going to wake up with those mutton chops which I've found out. Paul Walter Hauser here on the rich eyes and show Cobra Kai also man. By the way, today the anniversary of Karate Kid three. Yes, which is the last prequel to Cobra Kai. I can't believe we're even working on the anniversary. What is wrong with us? We should have observed today. We are observing that. Yeah, no, that show came out of nowhere for me. I got a call where they were like, yo, the guys who did Harold and Kumar are doing Karate Kid and they liked you an I Tanya, I want you to play a role and I'm like, this doesn't, this is a real thing. It's like a mad lib. It's just one proper noun after another that you wouldn't think would be in the same sentence. Yeah, it was a little. I loved you in I Tonya. Yeah, they thought they were comparing me to like John Goodman and big lebowski 'cause the I tiny characters. In that lane of self belief, which is so funny. But I did it because they were so funny. Me and the guys who created Cobra Kai all we would do is quote dirty work in Billy Madison and make each other laugh. And I was like, even if the show isn't great, I'm gonna have fun making it and then lo and behold. It goes from YouTube to Netflix and becomes this like huge show. It was really cool. I mean, I assume you saw Karate Kid as a kid yourself. Definitely. Yeah, I had seen the first one I hadn't seen the sequels and then I brushed up when I got the part. So then why would you observe Karate Kid three day if you've never seen it? Did you ever heard of a born again Christian? Some of us come to the party a little bit late. I'm so sorry. Good God, man. Convert. So did you watch Karate Kid three in advance of your skip that? I think it's okay if you skip that. It's funny how some of these guys that come back on the show and revive their characters. They kind of look back like, oh, that's silly looking back on the thing. But it's like, dude, you gotta own it, you know? You gotta own the fact that people love this thing. A lot of people sometimes make fun of creator nickelback that's become a weird cultural thing, but it's like, dude, that music makes people happy. Yeah. You should be able to not knock on it and make it a thing. Like it's somebody's favorite band. Paul Walter Hauser here on the rich eisen show on Instagram at Paul W Hauser Graham right here on the program. Where are you from? Where are you from originally? Originally from Saginaw, Michigan. Okay. Scary little town full of beautiful people near Flint, Michigan. Yes. And my dad was a Lutheran pastor. And we lived in kind of a rough neighborhood. So it was a really interesting upbringing where money through Saturday kind of felt like the wire. We knew gang members and we had police in the neighborhood all the time and stuff. But then on Sunday we'd go to this Protestant church and I'm wearing a boat sign eating donut holes and talking to senior citizens. So I think that upbringing really made me the weird, dark, darkly comedic character actor that I am. Was that 38 mile? Is that what that is? Is.

Cobra Kai Larry hall Jimmy Keane Karate Paul Walter Hauser Catherine nana burnside Midwest New Orleans John Goodman Billy Madison big lebowski Rick Tonya Tanya Kumar Harold Amazon Paul
"hauser" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

The Rich Eisen Show

05:34 min | 5 months ago

"hauser" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

"Rubik's Cube to figure out. Again, I'm just talking about college football here. Because that is what drives the bus economically for every athletic program in the United States of America. And you best get on this bus on the boat, whatever mode of transportation. You want to say before it ends and the faster you just get to the realization that the world of the galloping ghost newt rockne, my Michigan era, both sham backler, you know? Those worlds are done. Over. Again. School that is just down the road from here. We could get to the campus at UCLA, barring the four O 5 acting 405. We could get there in 20 minutes from here. Oh yeah, less than. Just depending on that. But I'm just saying, right here. And then, yeah. And then a school, like we could take a flight from LAX across the street from here, land in Newark, 5 and a half hours later. And the teams that are closest to those airports are UCLA and Rutgers. And they're in the same conference, collegiately. Please, and you're going to talk to me about, wow, it's about the kids. It's about the students. It's about their test. It's about their scores. Give me a break. Give me a break. And then, you know, you know what the Big Ten can be? The Big Ten can be the ten teams that are the biggest in the Big Ten. Those are the teams that Michigan will play. Another team that she can play. That's all right. You'll still wait. Whatever the best teams from the PAC 12 are going to be, that's who Michigan is going to play. And then every now and then Ohio State will get to be get a year off from that. Wisconsin. They don't have to play. Well, Wisconsin have to put USC. Mister want an easier schedule. You know what? No, no, no, no. I want a fair schedule. I want an equitable schedule. I already saw big cat tweeting out that USC is going to go on the Big Ten east, right? Because Wisconsin is in the Big Ten west. He wants things jokingly saying. Take the best team from the PAC 12 and put it in the other division. But they should both be in the west, right? No, I'll be in the Big Ten east, right? Because that's where Michigan is, Michigan's got to play Ohio State area, right? Got to play Penn State every year. Got to play Michigan state every year. Has to. Right. Do you say that about Penn State? Penn State's got to play Michigan state over here. Yeah, okay. Maybe not. One year they can have off. But they don't have a rivalry. It's great. It's great. I just want a fair one. That's all. That's all. That's all. But what does the PAC 12 do? Do they go to get Boise state and San Diego state? The spot. If this happens, PAC 12 is over. It's over. Or the PAC 12 in its entirety joins the Big Ten in its entirety, and you're already two fifths of the way to where I'm talking about, where it's an entire Super League of the college football, the power 5, which I know schools that are currently in the power of 5, they hate that. I'll just join one. Right now. This is it. Train is leaving the station. I mean, Oklahoma and Texas are going to be in the SEC. But at least that's at least that's close to the southeast. The gulf south is closer to the southeast than the Pacific Ocean is to the Atlantic Ocean. It's been a while since. This totally isn't lift the kimono, it just rips it off and burns it. Done. Okay. Let's take a break from this conversation for a moment and we will talk with our friend Paul Walter Hauser here on the rich eisen show and a fantastic actor who is going to be coming out to talk about his new show blackbird and more. Paul Walter Hauser back here on the rich eisen show talking about blackbird Apple TV plus. Also in this show is rightly oda. The rest in peace. What was that what was that experience like for you? You got any good stories. Rest empowered to that dude. He's attending a much, much greater premiere than us last night. He's had a much better party. I mean, owns every scene he's in every space he's given. He really gives one of his greatest performances in the show and my personal opinion. And he plays the dad of Taron Egerton who correct. Plays a father who was kind of, you know, as a cop was on the take and wasn't the most what wasn't the greatest cop and obviously Terrence character Jimmy keen wasn't the most honest person either. So there's kind of a bit of a generational sin portrayal and the father son relationship is really complicated but beautiful in the show. Taryn and Taryn and Rey are just really, they have really believable chemistry. Ben taron winds up in scenes with you by the president. He kind of does the undercover thing like the departed or Mississippi burning..

Michigan PAC UCLA Penn State Wisconsin USC Paul Walter Hauser football United States of America Ohio Rutgers Newark Super League gulf south Boise San Diego Pacific Ocean Atlantic Ocean SEC Oklahoma
"hauser" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

The Rich Eisen Show

06:59 min | 5 months ago

"hauser" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

"Eisen show. I like that they have personality. I'm living my life man, the grass is so freaking green here. You have no idea. Live from the rich eisen show studio in Los Angeles. But Freddie Freeman, he still has an adjusted to life here in Southern California. The rich eisen show earlier on the show. Senior NBA writer for the athletic Sam mamet ESPN college football analyst, Robert Griffin the third. Coming up from the Apple TV plus drum of blackbird. Actor Paul Walker Hauser and now. It's rich Isaac. Yes, indeed. Welcome to hour number three of the rich eisen show on the air live on peacock SiriusXM 85 that's terrestrial radio affiliate of the rich eisen show, our Odyssey app, our podcast, audience, YouTube dot com slash Richardson show for anything that you may have missed just when you think, what is there to talk about in sports, right now on the last day of June? I mean, there's nothing to talk about just when you think about that. This happens. The actor Paul Walter Hauser will be joining us on the program in a matter of moments. He's here and he's going to come out and chat with us about his Apple TV plus show blackbird with what a cast Taron Egerton who a lot of people might remember played Elton John in Rocketman. Also, how about Ray Liotta? Is in this and he's got a good Ray Liotta story and this is a man who has played not only he plays a serial killer in this show, but he also played Richard Jewell in the movie Richard Jewell about the guy who was wrongly accused of planting the bomb at the Olympics in Atlanta. Years ago, also he played Sean eckert in I Tonya. And speaking of whacking something into submission, the hell of a transition. Apparently, here on the rich eisen show pour one out for the pack 12 conference. Poor one out. Just moments ago, reporting from the athletic secondarily, but first, a college athletics reporter John wilner reporting out that UCLA and USC are planning to leave for the Big Ten as early as 2024. This is right around the corner. They might join the Big Ten sooner than Texas and Oklahoma, join the SEC. Right? Our friend Bruce Feldman and Nicole auerbach of the athletic confirmed they're in the same thing. Bruce Feldman reporting that he hears that USC and UCLA are the ones who reached out to the Big Ten. It's not like the big tent saying, okay, we've got to keep up with the SEC getting Texas and Oklahoma, they're growing. It was USC and UCLA reaching out to the Big Ten. Now, when the Premier League and the good folks who love their football over across the pond, not just the Premier League, but so many iconic franchises of what we call soccer. In Europe, you remember the Super League when they decided to leave the construct of their Premier League or Siri ah, right? Remember they decided to just, we're leaving behind the construct of football to create our own world. When that happened and it lasted just a little bit less time than Bill Belichick spent as the head coach of the New York Jets. It started and then it was over. But in that interim, when it was blowing everything up, figuratively. I said, there is only one entity in American athletics. In American sport, you know it's serious when you say sports, same thing when you talk about film or cinema. In movies, only one where that could happen here in the United States and I said it was college football. And it is happening. If this happens, and USC and UCLA right down the road from us, if they leave Southern California to join a conference that is mostly two time zones away, that's the ball game. Folks. And you know if USC and UCLA are doing it right now, somebody in the athletic department or the president's wing of the university of Oregon and possibly Washington right now. Everyone else too, I would say in the PAC 12, but certainly Oregon, they are calling up, they're calling everybody up. They're calling up, they're calling up, Phil knight. They're saying, Phil, what can you do to help us out here? They're film might be the one making the calls. To say, wait a minute, if the PAC 12 is disintegrating, we got to be on that lifeboat too. And if it's a conference, mostly based on the West Coast, the Pacific time zone, taking on a conference that is based mostly in the Eastern Time zone, and the Midwest part of our country, a national, Super League, is going to be formed and whatever this entity is going to be. And whatever entity the SEC is growing into, it's only inevitable that they join forces too and the accelerant of all of it is the name image and likeness deal that has caught everybody off guard, I believe it was one year ago tomorrow. When it first on July 1st, 2021 first came into legal existence, the name image and likeness deal that nobody in athletic departments were prepared for. Nobody in administration offices were prepared for. Certainly nobody in the NCAA was prepared for. Nobody..

Richard Jewell Bruce Feldman UCLA USC Freddie Freeman Ray Liotta Sam mamet Paul Walker Hauser Paul Walter Hauser Taron Egerton football Sean eckert Premier League John wilner Eisen Robert Griffin Nicole auerbach Apple Southern California SEC
Bassitt goes 8 innings, Mets blank slumping Brewers 4-0

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 6 months ago

Bassitt goes 8 innings, Mets blank slumping Brewers 4-0

"The med school three first inning runs in Chris Bassett through 8 scoreless frames as the mets knocked off Milwaukee Ford and nothing Bassett allowed three hits struck out 7 he picked up his 5th win his first since May 8th Pete Alonso continued his hot hitting he had two hits and drove into to increase his RBI total to 59 Jeff McNeil added an RBI Milwaukee started Adrian Hauser now three and 70 lasted just four and two thirds brewers grounded into three double plays and was shut out for the 8th time this season Mike mancuso New

Chris Bassett Pete Alonso Milwaukee Bassett Jeff Mcneil Mets Adrian Hauser Ford Brewers Mike Mancuso
Nola sharp, Phils hit 4 HRs, rout Brewers for 6th win in row

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 6 months ago

Nola sharp, Phils hit 4 HRs, rout Brewers for 6th win in row

"The women continues under interim manager rob Thompson the Phillies got a strong start out of Aaron nola and plenty of offense in a ten zero route of the brewers The Phillies are 5 of those since Thompson took over for the fire Joe Girardi second baseman Bryce Dodd had four hits of the two run home run says the mindset has changed since the managerial switch I think we were kind of not mad all the time but it was a little different but I mean it's been tons of fun and everyone's having fun and everyone smiling Nola was superb he went 8 innings on four hits the Phillies supported him with the long ball Reese Hoskins or Dubois aurea and Bryce Harper hit home runs three of the homers came off brewer's starter Adrian Hauser The brewers have dropped 5 in a row Check Friedman

Rob Thompson Phillies Aaron Nola Bryce Dodd Joe Girardi Brewers Thompson Reese Hoskins Dubois Aurea Nola Bryce Harper Adrian Hauser Brewer Check Friedman
Gorman homers, drives in 4, as Cardinals rout Brewers 8-3

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 6 months ago

Gorman homers, drives in 4, as Cardinals rout Brewers 8-3

"The Cardinals ride a pair of first at another big day from Paul go Schmidt to an 8 to three win over the brewers Nolan Gorman hits his first major league home run and drives in for while Matthew liberator records his first major league victory after pitching 5 shutout innings the lefty pitcher says the day was made more special sharing it with childhood friend Gorman I think that's a very fitting way for it to have gone down today and something that I look forward to seeing a lot more of You know he's going to go out there and produce even on the days that I'm not pitching but if he can do it on the days that I am on the mound and makes it all that much better Coach Mitt goes three for four with a three run home run and four RBIs to extend his hitting streak to 19 games kesten Hera and Victor Cara TD go deep for Milwaukee Adrian Hauser takes the loss he's now three and 5 Mike Reeves St. Louis

Nolan Gorman Matthew Liberator Cardinals Schmidt Brewers Gorman Paul Coach Mitt Kesten Hera Victor Cara Adrian Hauser Milwaukee Mike Reeves St. Louis
"hauser" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

08:17 min | 9 months ago

"hauser" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Thought, you know what, let me just try it and see how it feels. And I started talking to people in tech that I knew whether they were founders or venture capitalists, just people that I had kind of met through the work that I was doing at timing. And I started putting it out there. I just started putting it out into the universe. I'm starting to look at companies with the idea of potentially investing. I was also really interested. I'll never forget learning that women were only getting at that .2% of venture capital dollars were going towards female founders. So that's something that I became really excited about changing the ratio there. You start this as a side hustle, Fran. How do you figure out that you have the stamina and the potential for the potential to be successful? Because the thing is with angel investing, it's not like you know right away. Some of these companies are going to take a long time to grow into whatever they become. Like what makes you brave enough to feel like you're capable of stepping out and into this. I think to be honest, a big part of the courage for me came from the fact that my kids were three years old and 18 months old at the time. And I have to tell you, Jesse, I just wasn't seeing them enough. And I wanted to see them more. I wanted to be, you know, you know my story I adopted both of my kids at birth. My husband and I adopted them, and we worked so hard to have a family. And I kind of like took a step back and I just was thinking, we worked so hard to have this family, but I'm only really seeing them late at night during the week, and then on weekends. Because my job was so demanding. So I knew that I really wanted to make a change for my family. And I wanted, I wanted a career that was going to give me a lot more flexibility, and I really felt like investing and advising was my best shot at it because I had the network and because I really enjoyed it. You know, like I actually enjoyed, I enjoyed meeting with founders, helping them solve problems, even if eventually the company ended up failing. I was enjoying the process. Yeah. That for me was a really big part of it. I really want to tease out the combination of influences that went into the career path that you chose. You chose something that you loved, and also something that enabled you to have the larger life that you loved. And you probably couldn't have made either of those decisions in isolation. They needed to be paired. And I think a lot of us are trying to think about our careers in that way. How do I get to have both? The other big part of this that I was really struggling with and making this decision is when you talk about bravery. I was really scared to go out on my own because having the time ink gravitas, you know, and the fact that I could pick up the phone and call anybody and get a call back, like really, that's how I felt at that time. And I was going to leave all of that behind. That really, really frightened to me. The idea of would I be relevant if I went out on my own, you know? Could I carry it on my own? And I think that's also why it took me two years to really leave. It took me two years, right? I did that side hustle for two years. So I wanted to I really want to acknowledge that it's not an easy decision. You know, the way that I'm talking about it, it might seem like it was an easy decision. It wasn't at all. France workbook focuses on tools for reflection, reflection so critical, because we have more choices than we have ever had. You know, you used to pick one thing to do, maybe you changed jobs, but those jobs were still fairly prescribed. To find, now we can create our own jobs or stitch together several identities, and it all sounds great, but we have to be disciplined about how we approach this, or we'll be stuck on the hamster wheel of life, running faster and faster in place. I feel like there's so much more of this kind of multi hyphenate approach. And I think it's okay to be more than one thing. You know, I'm an investor. I'm an author. I'm a speaker, right? There are different parts of my career. And I think even if you're working for a company, you could still be doing other things. I feel like sometimes we're so black and white either or, but maybe the answer is you stay where you are, you really try to focus more on the parts of the job that are really fueling you and you take on something else. Maybe the things that you love most can be hobbies, they know necessarily need to grow into revenue streams as well, or maybe if you are capable, you can take a step back and step forward again. We have so much more wiggle room than I think our parents did when they were at this point in their careers and navigating their careers. You do talk to just a ton of young people and young women, people who are early in their careers. What are you hearing people ask most? What do they need? Yeah, I think so one of the things that I'm hearing a lot of from younger people is they just really miss the in person, the socialization. Remote is really hard for them. It feels very isolating. And I do see that as a difference between younger employees versus sort of my peers, a lot of my peers are actually really loving the fact that they can work from home. It's giving them more flexibility. They're not missing the kind of the socialization as much. So that's a big thing. Yeah, I think they're also struggling with, especially if it's like their first job, how do I develop relationships? So it's a little bit harder because you have to be more proactive about you're not going to run into the person in the office. So being proactive reaching out, asking if the person wants to go for a walk or, you know, grab a coffee. So being very intentional about that, it's so important to build these relationships and it's hard to do that when you're on a group Zoom. Yeah, that is really true. I do think that there are really amazing ways to do this digitally. In fact, we just did an exercise with my team this week where we were divided into groups of four or there were three people in the organization. I don't even know. Two of the three of them are brand new. It was great and spontaneous and intimate in the way that I feel like an in person lunch would have been a couple of years ago. But the thing about those events is that you have to plan for them. They don't just happen. Yeah, you do. A lot of it is, it goes back to intentionality. Mindfulness is a big part of the book too, you know? There's a whole section on just how important it is to feel connected with yourself. You know, because when you're connected with yourself, then it allows you to really be more present for others and to react to situations in a way that you can feel good about. So for me, even just building in a couple of practices, mindfulness practices a day, I know myself, they have to be short and they have to be very easily integrated into the day. You know, like the one thing I do do every morning is I just take a couple of minutes and I have my little morning ritual even before I look at my phone where I just do a little bit of gratitude and a little bit of just sort of like a one or two minute guided meditation, it's hard to do the reflection work. If you don't have the mindfulness piece. That was Fran Hauser, her latest book is embrace her work, love your career. You can find it wherever books are sold. And this week on office hours, we're going to talk about career goals and what to do when they change. Join us for office hours on Wednesday afternoon at 3 p.m. eastern. You can find us on the LinkedIn news page or email us for a link at hello Monday at LinkedIn dot com. And as always, if you like the show, please rate in review us on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen. Hello Monday is a production of LinkedIn. The show is produced by taisha Henry with help from Wesley wingo. Joe de Georgie mixed our show. Is head of original audio and video. Dave pond is our technical director. Michaela grier and Victoria Taylor embrace the work. Our music was composed just for us by the mysterious breakmaster cylinder. Dan Roth is the editor in chief of LinkedIn. And Sarah storm remains forever are fairy godmother. I'm Jesse hemple, see you next Monday. Thanks for listening..

Fran Jesse France Fran Hauser LinkedIn taisha Henry Wesley wingo Joe de Georgie Dave pond Michaela grier Victoria Taylor Apple Dan Roth Jesse hemple Sarah
"hauser" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

07:47 min | 9 months ago

"hauser" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Be starting to think about or to do. It's really important to think about like, what are the things about your role that you dread? What are the things that you start worrying about on Sunday? And really kind of like making a list of those things. Because a lot of this Jesse is about how can you take the initiative to have a conversation with your manager where you can talk about here are the things that I really enjoy doing and I'm really good at. I think it can really add some value there and then here are the things that are quite they're not quite working because the ideas like it's not to leave your job, right? Like if you could stay in your job and just make it better and do more of what's working for you, ultimately that's going to be better for the company too. So I think doing this kind of this reflection and then also thinking about another big part of feeling fulfilled is are you being appropriately valued for the work that you're doing? And that can be monetary and non monetary, you know? Do you feel like you're getting the recognition? Do you feel like you're getting put on the highly visible projects, the ones that everyone's talking about? So let's unpack that one a little bit because I even feel my own chest seize up a little bit when you ask the question, are you being properly valued? Because it sort of runs into you. I think a number of gender influenced thoughts I have about what it even means to be valued or valuable in an organization. How do I begin to objectively answer that question for myself? Yeah. I believe it is so important to be having conversations with people outside of the company that you work at to try to get some market intelligence around what other people, what your peers at other companies, what their compensation, total compensation range is, and you know, I remember even when I was a time Inc, I would meet with executive recruiters, often just for coffee. And ask them these questions. I remember meeting with peers at other media companies, and we would share that information with each other. Think about the power that that gives you, right? Like information is power. So not being afraid to talk about it with others. I do believe it's really important. And I literally just had this experience with someone who was working at a company, only been there for 6 months, but her boss got let go, and then the boss's boss left. So all of the work fell on her, and she was doing such an incredible job. And I really encouraged her the end of the year to ask for more money. And she was so hesitant. She waited, she waited a while. She was really nervous about doing it. But do you know that she asked and she ended up getting a 50% 50% raise? 50%. Yeah. And I can give you like 20 other stories like this. I mean, I literally can. What's the worst thing that can happen? You get to know, right? And maybe you can negotiate something else. That's not financially related, but something else that can make your job feel better for you. Oh, but Fran, I think it ties into like ability. I think that people are sometimes afraid to ask because they're not sure if they quote unquote deserve, which that's a scary word. And so they think, well, okay, even if they say no to me, I can live with the no, but I don't know if I can live with the fact that maybe they will think less of me because I ask. They won't like me anymore because they'll think that I'm arrogant. How do you address that? Yeah, and I think that is common and I can tell you as a leader, when I look back on the 20 years that I spent in corporate, it was mostly men that came to me men on my team that asked me for raises. It was, I think I'm not kidding, I think I had three women over the course of my whole entire career that asked me for a raise. I think it's about the way that you have the conversation. I think if it comes from a place of having the market intelligence, I think it's really important showing that you've done the work to really understand what other people at other companies and similar roles are banking. And talking about if there is an extenuating circumstance, like this woman who took on all this work because the boss and the boss's boss, like talking about that, talking about how have you created value for the company. And doing it in such a positive way, talking about how much you love working for the company. I think about how different people have approached me over the years, and I feel like when people have approached me from a more in a more defensive and almost angry way, that's a really hard conversation to have. But if it's someone who's like sitting in my office, smiling, telling me how much she loves her job and how much she loves this company and then talking to me about what she believes she's worth. I actually think more highly of that person because I think that, you know, they're being conscientious, they're being thoughtful about the way that they're approaching me, they're confident, but they're not being arrogant, right? So much of it is about the nonverbal you we know this. I want to underscore something that I hear you saying, which is that we tell people what we're worth. So when you tell me, even if I have to say no to you, when you tell me, I believe I'm worth this much. I'm going to walk away from that conversation, believing that you're worth that much. Absolutely. And if I can't do something for you right now, trust me, when it comes to end of year, the performance reviews, I'm going to remember like, oh, I had that conversation with Jesse. I know what her expectations are. Like, is there a way that I can take a little, you know, you get that pool at the end of the year where you have to figure out the raises, is there a way that I can take a little bit more and give it to Jesse? Because I know what her expectations are, right? And they're valid. We'll be right back. After the break, friend tells us how she changed careers. Hey, it's Jesse. I wanted to tell you about another podcast from the LinkedIn editorial team. It's hosted by our editor in chief Dan Roth, and the show is called this is working. And we have Dan here in the studio right now. Hey, Dan. Hello, Jesse. So tell us about the show. This is working is a show where we sit down with incredible business leaders and we take a very wide view of who is a business leader. And at the heart of it, I'm trying to figure out how they manage themselves and how they manage their companies. This is a topic that I've been interested in since I knew I wanted to be a business journalist in high school. I think that we spend so much of our lives trying to make sense of what we do every day. And you've had so many incredible guests, tell us who you've had. Diane von furstenberg, Bill Gates, Richard Branson, are some of the big names in business you would expect, but other people who have been incredible to talk to and who are not typical business guests, like Judd Apatow, or patty Jenkins, the director of Wonder Woman who talked about how she negotiates her salary and why she does it really in the open. So take a listen, if you like what you hear, feel free to check out dance podcast. This is working, which is available wherever you get hello Monday. Thanks, Dan. Thanks, Jesse. The LinkedIn podcast network is sponsored by IBM. Welcome to a new age of business. One powered by creativity. Picture a world where you can create automated systems that make work, less work. Security that trusts nothing and verifies everything. Cloud management that requires less management. Where developers, data scientists, CIOs, and CTOs work, prototype and adapt together. Let's create something that changes everything. IBM, let's create, learn more at IBM dot com..

Jesse time Inc Fran Dan Roth Dan LinkedIn patty Jenkins Diane von furstenberg Richard Branson Judd Apatow Bill Gates IBM
"hauser" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

06:49 min | 9 months ago

"hauser" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"LinkedIn news. From the news team at LinkedIn, I'm Jesse hemple and this is hello Monday. Now when I was at the beginning of my career, long time ago now. I knew exactly what I wanted to do. I wanted to be a writer and I wanted to write specifically for magazines. I was lucky that way, to have that certainty, but also for a lot of us that's just how the beginnings of our careers often work. We start out with a big goal. And then sometime in the middle, for many people, including me, things change. Maybe you make partner land the big title and ask, well, what now? Or maybe somewhere along the way you just lose interest in the path. Say, there's a global pandemic and it shifts all of your priorities. At some point, you look up, and it's time to do something new, but then you have to ask yourself, okay? But what? Today, I'm talking to my friend Fran Hauser about that question. I first met Fran when we both worked for time Inc. Her job was to help titles like People magazine build their digital presence. And she was great at it, but her job kept expanding, and she kept growing as a person until one day, it just didn't light her up in the same way. And so Fran, orchestrated a change. Today, France and angel investor, she invest in women owned companies. And all of these years of talking to women, along with that personal experience of her own, made her somewhat of an expert on careers. For so many people, friends that person you call when you're just at a crossroads. Now she's translated that wisdom into a workbook. It's called embrace the work, love your career. And we're going to unpack a lot of that advice. Fran and I started our conversation by talking about the point of it all. Here's Fran. Feeling like what you're doing matters, feeling that you're making an impact, and I do think that joy is a part of that. But I don't think it's all of it. You know, I think it's bigger than that. And I think that's like the best word that I could come up with in terms of how, you know, when I think about the best career experiences that I've had, it's that feeling of just really being fulfilled in the work that I'm doing and the people that I'm working with. Well, what's interesting to me is how that equation can work for a long time for someone and then stop working. So I wonder if you can talk a little bit about your own experience in media. I mean, when you got to 8 years at time Inc, my guess is that for a good portion of that time, it fulfilled you. Maybe I'm wrong, but you could talk a little bit about what changed. It did. It's a great question. I found so much of my tenure there very fulfilling because I was mostly in build mode and creating and launching new digital products, mostly for the women's magazines, people and style, Entertainment Weekly, real simple. And we should say, and this was a time when the magazine brands that you're working for were very much in the center of conversation, right? This is a time when timing was a word that anybody that you met in any place in the United States or probably around the world would know. Right, those brands were so relevant at that time. To the point where, you know, in the beginning, it was, it was hard to convince the print side of the business to even care about digital, right? The brands were relevant. It was so much fun because I really got to work on innovation. I got to work on, you know, what are the extensions of these brands digitally? How can we connect with consumers in different ways? I loved the education part of my job. What digital could do for our business. So it was so rewarding. And so fulfilling. And one thing that happened was my job got a lot broader where I started taking on more and more and more and more brands. I had 20 brands at one point. Remember, I started with People magazine. And Fran is that about the change of an industry or is that about gaining seniority? Is that the price that you pay when you climb up the career ladder in any industry? Well, for me, it was both. There was definitely a seniority thing for me because of course I wanted more responsibility. And of course I wanted more power and more money and everything that comes with that. That was all really appealing. But what I didn't realize was that it wasn't going to be as much fun. It wasn't as fulfilling, going back to the word fulfilling. I felt like I was doing more like paper pushing than really rolling up my sleeves and building something that consumers really cared about. So that was that was something that was really surprising to me, you know? Because I'd been working my whole career with the idea of just taking on more and more and more and more responsibility, but then I didn't enjoy it as much. So there's another piece to this friend, which is that in the more traditional way that our parents built their careers. When you would enter an industry, and if you were lucky enough, a company, the path forward, the way that you should progress and attain seniority and make more money was prescribed for you. And your job was to take the next step up the ladder. But in the career world that we live in today, it doesn't work like that at all. And in fact, you really can't rely on your company or your industry to show you that path. And I think what you're describing too when you describe being 8 years into your role in looking up and feeling dissatisfied, is hitting that point when you realize it's time to stop looking to somebody else to tell you what to do. You're going to have to figure out what to do. That is where your tool book comes in. So how do we do that? I love that. And I do like the one distinction I would make is that I feel very fortunate that I do have a wonderful support team and network that I can ask questions of and they'll give me some input, right? And I'm going to take that input. But at the end of the day, I have to figure it out. What I see a lot of is we're in this autopilot mode. And we don't take the time to take a step back and reflect and reset. The metaphor I like to use for the book is you know how you'll do a food cleanse like you'll take like the 5 days or the 7 days and you schedule it out and you go through the whole process, right? Right. I feel like the book is very similar to that, you know? It's sections, give yourself one section a day, set aside the time to do the work and I really do think that you'll come out of it with a vision and a plan, right? Because the plan is a really important part of it too. It's not just the vision, but how are we even execute on it? So one of your exercises, which you mentioned earlier, has to do with looking back at your calendar and just circling the things that you can remember that brought you energy. Tell us a little bit more about things that we might.

Fran time Inc Jesse hemple Fran Hauser LinkedIn People magazine Entertainment Weekly France United States
Donald Trump, Ivanka and Don Jr. Must Testify in Letitia James' Probe

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:11 min | 10 months ago

Donald Trump, Ivanka and Don Jr. Must Testify in Letitia James' Probe

"The New York attorney general has gotten court authority to depose former president Trump, Ivanka Trump, Donald Trump Jr.. Now the last two will be matter of fact. There's not that it's hell. The accountants withdrew their bank statements. If you think that the Trump kids or the president looked at the bank statements, okay, you can believe that. There's no evidence of that. I'm not sure what the book show, I don't know if they're cooked. I don't know if they borrowed money against fake assets. I don't know any of that stuff. Neither do you. All I know is I could prep Don Junior. I could prep Ivanka to do a deposition. I'm not even good at that, but I could do it. I could be the greatest lawyer in the world. I could be federal judge dick Leon, really one of the better litigators I ever saw work. I could be, I could be dick Hauser, but you'd have to get him off the golf course. And he doesn't do that anymore. Basically, at a restaurant, at home or in a golf course. And I get the best lawyer in the world. I get Stephen Larson in LA. That's the guy I'm calling whenever I get in trouble. And say, you've got to do depo prep with former president Trump.

President Trump Donald Trump Jr. Ivanka Trump Don Junior Dick Leon Ivanka Dick Hauser New York Golf Stephen Larson LA
Is Cole Hauser Gay?

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

00:30 sec | 11 months ago

Is Cole Hauser Gay?

"I can't tell any female in my life that there was a rumor a long time ago that Cole Hauser is gay and is even a further rumor that his boyfriend was Vin Diesel. I know it's impossible to think of two of those guys with all that much cheese mo being gay. Look, it was a rumor in the same vein, John Travolta, Tom Cruise, Paul Newman, deal with that what you will, but that was the scuttle butt. Emphasis on but,

Cole Hauser Vin Diesel John Travolta Tom Cruise Paul Newman
"hauser" Discussed on Culinary School Stories

Culinary School Stories

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"hauser" Discussed on Culinary School Stories

"D- Dish room is normally controlled. By the hispanics. The bakery is normally controlled by basilica islanders. It's like each group hauser. Their own partha. They they kind of manage and being a white gay male. I was at the bottom of order. And i really. I had to be good to make it through a out eat. One of those groups learnt how to respect me in how to Admire what. I could really bring to the table because it it was. It was unheard of for somebody of my caliber to actually be in the cooking. Part of it. I really had prove. I could be there in that. Should be there. And i was trustworthy enough to be. There didn't automatically get in because of a member of that now group. Now you had to prove your worth to get into those positions. i approve. myself Chewed up and you know. It's crazy like i had some friends that i have maintained from some friendships Since prison dumb one of them's this one guy. And he calls me up occasionally. He's got he got some friends that go through some troubles in everything in. He calls me up and he says you know i've got another friend is going through something. He helped him out. He just talked to him. And tell me about your experience in how you did things. Because i think you can really help this person. And that's because he's going into prison and just kinda give them a road map what to expect less than so much that he's going. These aren't in prison. They're just they're just hammering hard times with lives And i don't know what made me this beacon of a person that people come to talk to i. It is what it is. That's good. i mean that that they seek you out in that the value your opinion your advice and guidance. maybe.

hauser
Held Hitless Into 7th by Houser, Pirates Top Brewers in 10th

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Held Hitless Into 7th by Houser, Pirates Top Brewers in 10th

"The brewers continue to lead the NL central by seven and a half games over the Reds after Milwaukee wasted a four nothing lead in an eight five ten inning loss to the pirates brewers starter Adrian Houser was pulled after tossing hitless ball over six and a third innings Hauser walked five and left with a four nothing lead after tossing one hundred four pitches Gregory Polanco singled home the tie breaking run in the tenth and Brian Reynolds followed with a two run single at the site Garcia tied the game for the brewers with his third hit and third run batted in the game an RBI double in the seventh I'm Dave Ferrie

Brewers Adrian Houser NL Gregory Polanco Reds Milwaukee Hauser Pirates Brian Reynolds Garcia Dave Ferrie
"hauser" Discussed on 20 Minute Fitness

20 Minute Fitness

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"hauser" Discussed on 20 Minute Fitness

"Are you stop working out in the gym. You know like your body. You're going to tell you buddy. Hey you don't need as much muscle mass and your body's gonna be okay to actually remove some of it in the process. Yeah i think what most people mess up about as like you said you have to go deeper. You have to understand why you personally wanna lose that right and it's not just a number that you and ahead but you actually have to like big. The bike rides import on for you. And then you can introduced changes and then you can find the motivation to do it and also introduced changes that you can have as a lifestyle change and not just do the seventy five heart and go back to whatever you were doing before so yeah i see what i feel. I guess that you really need to find the meaning behind your goals. While you wanna hit those goals i have to add. Of course is a little bit harder when when you're losing where it right because you have to be in calorie deficit so it it gets a little bit easier. I mean once you want to maintain maybe you want to gain some muscle mass. It's going to mean that the very least you're gonna be at your kadoorie maintenance level or better yet you may actually want to be an academy surplus so of course like losing weight. That's the toughest because you really have to be extra strict thing like to really achieve those girls but at the same time nothing. That's the problem when he goes really hot. Or when you wanna lose like three or four pounds a week you have to make drastic changes and those are just gonna be maintainable so that that's why i really enjoyed equity going forward slow pace of losing. Just hauser pound two point seven pounds per week because it was actually maintainable. Like i said i didn't feel hungry i. I didn't feel like i was doing like that much exercise. You know like we talked about how..

hauser
Amazing Jellyfish Facts!

Wow In the World

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Amazing Jellyfish Facts!

"Which of the following statements about shelly. Fish is the one true scientific. Wow is it a shelly. Fish have three hearts or is it be jellyfish have been to the moon or is it c. They were shelley fish on earth before there were dinosaurs when you think you have the answer right it on a piece of paper and put it in your sock guar. We're gonna take a quick break to give you a chance to think and when we come back we'll find out if your row is the winning while what we'll be right back grownups. I messages for you. That's ed now back to the show hauser's time is up time to reveal but the four we do. Let's do a quick review. We gave you three scientific statements about jellyfish and challenged you to guess which one was the one true while a shell have three parts or was it. jellyfish have been to the moon or was it seed. There were jellyfish on earth before there were dinosaurs and to answer. Today's quiz joining us by phone. It's albert from raleigh north carolina albert. What's my wound. The world is that jelly says gloved before the dinosaurs. Telly albert. that is correct contestants. If you guessed the answer see that jellyfish were alive on earth before dinosaurs were. You found the winning. Wow

Shelley Fish Shelly Hauser Telly Albert Raleigh Albert North Carolina Jelly
"hauser" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"hauser" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"It's a two ball one strike count here to his counterpart. Adrian Hauser. Gray works quickly. The short step back pitch to the plate popped up, right field. Castano's He's got it one down. Uh, you know, you would actually think. This is going to be a weird thought here. But you would think that pitchers would have a halfway decent approach at the plate because you would think they'd be able to think right along with the guy that they're facing. Well, I don't think it's the think right along. I think it is the ball coming at a high velocity. And it looks like it's coming toward you. And there has never in the history of this game. Besides Babe Ruth, I guess I should say In the history of arbitration, a pitcher that has gone to arbitration and said, Well, I hit really good this year. I know my er A was eight but I hit really good. I hit 2 67 and I hit five home runs. You do not get paid. For getting hit, and to be honest with you that that's really where the rubber meets the road. You take things seriously. When you know you're going to get paid for it. It's Whether you like it or not. It's just the nature of the beast. It's too and oh, now here to Luis Luis, Furious. Struck out in his first did that No, we'd all like to believe that everything is about the winning and losing. It's not always about that. It is most of the time but it's not always that way. Groundball left side diving effort from farmer and that wall will invading and roll right onto Jesse Winker. And left field and that will be a one out single for Luis ODS and Daniel Vogel walk will step to the plate..

Adrian Hauser Daniel Vogel Jesse Winker Luis Luis Luis eight 2 five home runs two ball first Gray this year Castano Babe Ruth 67 one strike count one single
Gaylon White  Author of The Best Little Baseball Town in the World

Discover Lafayette

03:04 min | 1 year ago

Gaylon White Author of The Best Little Baseball Town in the World

"Our guest is gaylon white author of the best little baseball town in the world and historical account of a minor league baseball team. The crowley millers in the nineteen fifties gaylon was a sports writer for the denver post arizona republic and oklahoma journal before working in the corporate world. He is the author of various books highlighting careers in baseball minor leagues including the bilko athletic club. The story of the nineteen fifty-six los angeles angels singles and smiles. How artie wilson broke. Baseball's color barrier. He also co-authored handsome ransom jackson accidental big leaguer of local interest to us the crowley millers were the talk of minor league baseball in the nineteen fifties with crowds totaling nearly ten times crawley's population and earning crowley the nickname of the best little baseball town in the world and gaylon white. I've done some research on you. I'm really excited about not only talking about your book but learning more about your love for the sport of baseball. And what led you to write these books and in particular the best little baseball town in the world. So thank you for joining us here rumor. Yeah we're taping along with my daughter. Kelly he's gonna be helping us. She's in for the summer. And i had the opportunity to read your book and it's well written and through it. All it's peppered with statistics about minor league major league the evangeline league which was really interesting to me. Because i didn't realize our background here. How important minor league baseball was in this part of the world. One of the reasons for writing the book was to keep alive. The legacy of the crowley millers the ballpark that they played in that still here. In fact it's looking better than ever and The storied past of the evangeline which was established in one thousand nine hundred eighty four and lasted until nineteen fifty seven. There was a little time out for world war two right but just a colorful league. In fact it was known as the best literally in baseball and of course that was before there was literally it was classed d and it produced a number of major leaguers a hall of famer named how new hauser who won over two hundred games in the majors and virgil firetrucks coach nicknames. In those days he was a teammate. Of how new housing virgil trucks. One hundred and seventy seven games in the majors and then you go on edlow pat. Who was a yankee great yankee pitcher in the fifties. He came out of the evangeline. So produced a number of major league players prior to the war after the war it didn't produce as many. It was then a class sealy but in the last two years the teams became affiliated with major league teams and so several major league players came out of the league. And i write about one of the book george

Baseball Gaylon White Gaylon The Denver Post Arizona Republ Oklahoma Journal Bilko Athletic Club Artie Wilson Crowley Millers Evangeline League Los Angeles Angels Crawley Crowley Jackson Kelly Hauser Virgil Sealy Major League George
"hauser" Discussed on Red Wing's Oil and Gas HSE Podcast

Red Wing's Oil and Gas HSE Podcast

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"hauser" Discussed on Red Wing's Oil and Gas HSE Podcast

"Transported through pipelines. There are quality standards related to oil and anderson. Hauser works in oil and gas with lots of liquids but spectra centers equipment is all gas and we do also work in ellen g applications which is a liquid but it's -sidered be part of the gas side of the industry and we do compositional measurements in ellen g but on the oil side we do a lot of level pressure and flow measurements to keep. There's a huge safety topic behind that as well absolutely absolutely this and as we always say anderson hauser is your reliable source for all these sorts of things so us specifically are natural gas and lng and then of course there. Anderson house has applications for the other liquids it. We're talking about correct going all right. Hey russ me break in their fellow second essentially just want to talk about the acquisition of spectra sensors in twenty twelve session. We know that there were a leading global provider of laser based process instrumentation. We knew about the jpl. And you know we want to be utilized that technology in our portfolio and anderson hauser is widely known in many industries for being a provider in flow meters in pressure sensors temperatures level and one of the thing that makes his great is the investment in rnd so the rnd has specialized not only in the measurement a fluids of of contaminants but also in the way that human interfaces with the technology. So the pro. Mouse uses a proline transmitter. Which was then adopted to the j. Twenty two so swatted. Add that in there that not only do we have the powerhouse. Laser based technology spectra sensors provided a we combined with the anderson hauser proline transmitters so we're able to magnify that human machine interface with this technology. So let's get stuff. So spectrum sensor was in their technology and all this was acquired by anderson hauser correct southern company acquired in twenty twelve and essentially has been part of anderson hauser guests. This has been very interesting anything else. You wanna add before we start signing off here. That's me asking questions. I don't know the answer to i. Guess the thing that i would add. Is we talked. Mostly about the j. twenty two in moisture. And thank you allen for jumping in because that was a really good point that we are taking advantage of a third-generation controller that we wouldn't have been able to do as quickly ourselves and now we've got the benefit of our technology in the benefit of the proline but we also do h two us in oxygen measurement nco measurement in the same applications in. They're all equally important to do those measurements for gas quality control for the same reasons. It's all about corrosion protection in public safety and asset protection absolutely absolutely especially age to assets. That's deadly stuff. All right well gentlemen again. I appreciate you coming on the show. As i said has been very interesting as i also said we'll be sure to include your linked in contact information in the show notes so anyone listening can contact either of you directly for even more details and i wanna thank everyone for listening and again remind you this. Podcast would not be possible if it were not far sponsor anderson hauser. Please tell them. Thank you for sponsoring the show by going to our. Og anderson hauser website. Which you can find a linked to the show notes and register for our monthly giveaway. There also follow us on linked in and twitter net contact info. You can find. It showed finally and confined in a show my linked in contact info. Or you can message may please let me know what you're enjoying about show and suggestions for content. You might like to hear. Also if you're looking for a speaker for conference or meeting you can contact me about having one from our og jian speakers bureau including mark liqueur and yours truly please tune in again next week for another episode of interest in houses oil and gas hse podcast to production of the oil and gas global network. Innocent houser is reliable. Us-based partner for measurement instrumentation services solutions. We are your people for process automation. Please leave us a review on. I tunes like us own link in and use all of your social networking to tell your friends about us and we'll see you next time ex. Russell hey everybody it's vanna from obgyn and here are the events on deck for may twenty twenty one this month. He had four events. But if you'd like the full list you can click the link in the show not to sign up for our online event newsletter. We send it out every month and includes more info about the events. Talk about here. We even include events that occur two months ahead of time. So if you're interested in always stay in the loop about oil and gas events make sure to check that out. I stuff we have our in person. Event wishes twenty why the os networking mixer at the houston club on may twenty fifth. We have our three online events. The post industrial summit series from may fourth to june twenty second the data fabric and data ops webinar on may fifth in the maritime career day hosted by women offshore on may twenty first other than needs event. Og and has a livestream this month titled fighting evaluating advantage oil projects on maitha. So make sure to check that out on our facebook lincoln. Og dot com for more information. You can also find more information about that or any of are events. We have coming up. Also on facebook linked or otd and dot com. If you have any questions about these events or any of our shows make sure to reach out to me through my email in the show notes. That's all for me. I hope you guys have a great and thanks for tuning in hsun in next week for another engaging episodes at the oil and gas. Hse podcast a production of the oil and gas global network lhamo at og dot com..

may twenty fifth Russell twitter may fourth facebook may fifth next week two months twenty june three online events anderson hauser may twenty twenty one four events mark liqueur otd dot com one twenty twelve session may twenty
"hauser" Discussed on Red Wing's Oil and Gas HSE Podcast

Red Wing's Oil and Gas HSE Podcast

08:22 min | 1 year ago

"hauser" Discussed on Red Wing's Oil and Gas HSE Podcast

"Industries across the globe including a focus in oil and gas industry hauser. The people for process automation in along these lines. We have on the show today to experts from andrews in houser. The first one is allen garza allen. Thanks for coming on today arrests. Thanks for having me. We'll as said you are with anderson house. You're actually at the. Us based home office correct correct. Correct out of indiana it's Round bloomington right. Yes sir so tell us a little bit about yourself in your title and function definitely. So i'm a product marketing manager at anderson hauser specifically focusing on the malices bounce analysis. I have the pleasure of working with tuna bowl down laser absorption spectroscopy fluorescence and a little bit of robbins. Be cross quickly so really cool innovative technology. Yeah it really is. We're gonna talk about some of their today. Showing us is. Sam miller same. Are you sitting next allen for this interview. No actually. I'm in california right now in california southern california yup. What's the weather like. Maybe a little better than it is in bloomington. Weather's really nice right now after. Go to the beach actually. Oh yeah well. It's not quite beat. Well at almost is beach. Wailer here in texas is what we call a chamber of commerce day here in southeast texas you bring people in from all over the place new site pay. The weather's like this every day. Not will say thanks for taking the time as well. I'm especially excited about having you on the show today. Because i want everyone listening to know that while neil armstrong was the first man on the moon i understand. You're the first man omar marsh while not quite cut from the company does come from. Gpl spin off way What's a gpo spinoff. Jp jet propulsion laboratory from caltech nasa entity and nasa. Actually because it's funded by tax payers. They want to spin off technologies that are developed. A are a success story of that actually. And so what you told me. Is you just from this jet propulsion of height. You dropped into the own gas industry. I didn't come from j. p. l. but when i came to the company and we were just a startup and the company had just formed and become its own entity after student off of the gpl technology and it was formed by people from jpl. Okay so you dropped into the oil and gas industry actually with a great safety. Analyzers specifically related to natural gas pipelines right. That's right well. This is significant folks because of how battle natural gas is we all of course. No but natural gas is transported through pipelines. in unfortunately there are sixty three hundred pipeline incidents per year including oil liquids and gas. Fortunately these are not all explosion so many of them are environmental issues rather than safety one but there have been devastating explosions in recent history and often a contributing factor to pipeline. Ruptures is moisture. Isn't that right. that's exactly right. That's an event that big one happened early history of spectrum sensors and the fact that the company involved was working with us at the time helped them a lot to prove to the government that they had been doing everything they could to improve measurements in the natural gas pipeline. Okay and so. Let's talk specifically about how you do that. Well we used diode laser. Absorption spectroscopy which is a long word. Wait a minute say that again. Typically refer to his td l. a. s. it's a spectrometer that uses a laser so it sounds very complicated because it comes from nasa. But it's actually a pretty simple device. You have light source. It's like a laser beam that you see on a laser pointer but it's wavelength that you can't see so it's an infrared laser beam. You shine that through a tube. The gas is passing through. And you analyze the light. After it passes through the gas from that you can determine how much moisture is in the gas or h to us or c o two that same technique for different analysts that we measure and so that that moisture obviously that's what contributes to corrosion aspect of it all exactly so if you have a little bit of oxygen and moisture niche to us and co two. Those things can combine in the pipeline of acids will eat the steel create. An eventually could cause a rupture. And if there's a ignition source nearby then you have a fire and you have severe danger and potential loss of life. And so this is why the department of transportation controls the limits of those contaminants in pipeline gas and y contractual agreements between buyers and sellers of gas to prevent those ten minutes from being the gas. Yeah and especially age to us is a deadly gas. They can leak out yes h to us. Typically you don't have enough h two us to be poisonous but it does happen. You can get h two s levels right out of the ground that are deadly to people so it has to be removed for that reason as well and then you also have bio-gas in biomethane yet bio bio method. The difference between those is bio gases. The gas that comes out of for example digest. Her digesters is where you put in by material from farm waste and wastewater in that kind of thing in emits methane. Once you've cleaned up they call it biomethane and that methane can be injected into a pipeline. But before you inject that bio methane into a pipeline that's going to go and be used for public consumption. It has to go through the same stringent up and quality analysis. Before it's allowed into the network okay so this. Tda l. a. s. or whatever that acronym was used since since we can't pronounce what you just said. You actually have. A safety analyzer. In i think call it. J twenty two is that right. J. twenty two is the model number of a new analyzer that was launched this year and it does moisture measurement in natural gas. Yes that's right of course. Moisture measurement at the end of the day is for purposes of safety public safety and asset protection as well okay. So let's talk about what makes a. Great safety analyzer. So talk to the easy service. Ability for j twenty two. Let's talk about the recent launch of that. What's shirt well one of the things that you really easy to take care of when you have analyzers all over your pipeline network. Hundreds of miles apart from each other a company can have a fleet of fifty or a hundred of these analyzers in so being able to check. The health of the analyzer diagnosed. Any issues that are happening is really important. You wanna be able to do that remotely or on site. You want that to be fairly easy and straightforward thing to do so the j twenty two. Has maybe diagnostics ever seen before. This is a new product with new technology. And you can connect a laptop or a user or tablet or something like that to the analyzer Has its own web server and with that web server you open up a standard web browser and you can get into the analyzer. Do health checks you. What's going on make adjustments. In some cases that's required on a monthly basis by the department of transportation in for customers to document those health checks on a regular basis and filed. Okay so when you say you can do this remotely. Is this some kind of app you put on your computer you put on your ipad or what. It's not really an app so to speak. It's more of the communication protocol. Used by the analyzer. Natural gas companies. Typically something like either. Maude bus are to you or mold. Bus tcp in that all that is a protocol or a language that is spoken between their computer systems. Or they're the dc s which is distributed control system and our allies another instrumentation. So it's basically communicating over a network. And that network can be wireless at some points. Or it's commonly done over satellite where you have communications going out into the field because remember your headquarters in one place but your assets are all over the state or interstate an in satellite communications..

california texas neil armstrong ipad anderson house bloomington caltech anderson hauser Sam miller today hauser Hundreds of miles sixty three hundred pipeline i allen garza allen allen fifty j. p. l. indiana first one southeast texas
Ozuna, Albies Go Back-to-Back as Braves Beat Brewers 6-3

Clark Howard

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Ozuna, Albies Go Back-to-Back as Braves Beat Brewers 6-3

"Losing to the Braves starting pitching matchup in this one. Adrian Hauser on the mound for the crew. Drew Smyly going for Atlanta would be the Brewers, who would strike first in the bottom of the second inning. Avisail Garcia leave the inning off with a double A Travis Shaw ground out moves Garcia to third. And that brings up Louise Aureus. Now the pitch swinging a bullet hit after global Dansby Swanson in the left field on Gloria's will get the runner home sound. They score that one. I think it's gonna be in areas should have caught it. At least for now. That's being ruled a base hit. Although Dansby Swanson would commit an air later on in the inning, But the Brewers weren't able to take advantage of it. They get the one run on two hits. They strand two runners there in the second and say one. Nothing game going into the third. This was a neighboring houses would start to a run into a little bit of trouble. Very angry and so would lead the inning. Awful. They walked and Freddie Freeman with line out a wild pitch from Hauser would send Adrian's a two second. Then they walked to Marcela Zuna that puts runners on at 1st and 2nd. Ozzy al Bees, then lines out. But then Dansby Swanson walks so that loads the bases for Austin Reilly swinging a bouncer off of Hauser. Deflection. Maria's can't get it. One run is in house is going to come in. Ozuna scores to make it a 21 Atlanta lead It deflected off of Hauser. Horace was going over to get it and he might have had a chance to get it if it doesn't hit Hauser That would push wants into third than William Contreras is hit by a pitch so multiple walks a hit batter there in the inning. Hauser would get out of it with a strikeout to enter and see our days. The Braves leave him loaded. They put do put two runs across there in the third, and it is a 21 game. That would be it for

Dansby Swanson Adrian Hauser Drew Smyly Avisail Garcia Travis Shaw Louise Aureus Brewers Hauser Braves Freddie Freeman Atlanta Marcela Zuna Ozzy Al Bees Garcia Gloria Austin Reilly Ozuna Adrian William Contreras Maria
Ten years after Fukushima, Japan remembers 'man-made' nuclear disaster

The World

06:52 min | 1 year ago

Ten years after Fukushima, Japan remembers 'man-made' nuclear disaster

"Japan then caused a nuclear power plant in Fukushima to go into meltdown. It was a traumatizing event, one that left the Japanese public and the world wanting guarantees that a nuclear disaster like that would never happen again. But can Japan make that promise? Some of Japan's most prominent earthquake, experts say. Not really the world's Patrick win has more. Okumura. Koji is a paleo seismologist. That means he studies earthquakes, old earthquakes that may have shaken the earth. When wooly mammoths were still around. It's like archaeology off course Quake. Archaeology of earthquakes. Sounds really nish on Lee. It's not. It's actually a matter of life and death because if they fault erupted even 10,000 years ago, that's a sign that it might erupt again in our lifetime, and you really shouldn't build a nuclear reactor anywhere near it. Because this could happen. In 2011 tsunami created by an undersea earthquake that squeaking noise, those air buildings crumbling in a torrent of water. And at the Fukushima nuclear plant. Waves pounded the power plant, causing a meltdown. It happened on March 11 and Japanese people still call it 3 11 shorthand for catastrophe now, Okumura. He is one of the top earthquake experts in Japan. And before 3 11. He was on a government safety panel as a caveat. He wants to say this. Nobody knew and nobody could have predicted kid. What he means is no one could have predicted this earthquake at this specific time. But Okumura and a few others were warning the nuclear industry that some of their reactors were sitting on potentially shaky ground. In those days, nuclear companies were almost regulating themselves. But after 3 11, Japan started over what they knew nuclear watchdog agency one with an unofficial motto, the new nuclear regulatory regime in Japan must be the world's strictest, which tracks with an acknowledgement that seismic risk in Japan is among the world's worst. Drew Richard is an author whose new book, Every Human Intention follows Scientists struggling to figure out how to prevent another Fukushima because that's what people want to hear. Alice that this will never happen again. Okamura, the seismologist says. That's almost an impossible request. We cannot tell when underwear a big Oscar eco cars, he can tell you this, like it or not. No nuclear problem. These profit pretty save Every nuclear power plant, he says, comes with risk, especially in Japan. Here's the deal. Japan just doesn't have much oil or gas. So starting in the 19 sixties, with lots of American help, it went heavy on nuclear to power, one of the world's biggest economies. And they did this. Knowing Japan as a lot of earthquakes again. Here's Drew Richard nearly all of Japan in nearly all the sites where nuclear reactors are built, our seismically hazardous. It's a nation that faces a level of seismic risk that's almost uniformly comparable to Seismically active areas of California on Lee, California has one nuclear plant. Japan was running 50 Woz after 3 11 that nuclear watchdog shut down all of them. It has since allowed only five to reopen. Watchdog is so strict that even experts who were advising the government before the disaster are effectively not allowed to join. That includes scientists like Okumura, Koji. And others who were warning the government, Okumura says. They just scrap the whole system for them, or the system was useless and I'm used to, and I'm useless to, he says. Other Japanese seismologists, who could join the watchdog agency won't because well, scientists don't want the spotlight the immense political pressure Okumura says. Right now, the agency actually does not have a solid team of earthquake specialist say Don't Tall, you know, professional scientists. Yes, it's a big laws. Drew Richard says. Most earthquake experts agree seismic safety is a real blind spot in a real weak spot for the current regulatory agency. And that's glaring because the Fukushima disaster was a seismic event. That's bad, Richard says. The current top seismic safety regulator isn't really an earthquake expert. He's more of a geologist, so it's a little bit like asking an influential kidney doctor to operate on your heart. Richard says most officials mean well, yet they face a traumatized public. Still looking to scientist for peace of mind the expertise of these earthquakes, scientists has been applied to Ah, fundamentally impossible question that question. Are any of those dozens of reactor sites absolutely safe from earthquakes. And as it turns out on the basis of the limits of human knowledge At this time, the answer is maybe we don't know. At this point half of all Japanese people just don't want nuclear power at all. Nuclear companies are pushing to reopen their reactors, but keep getting denied. Try again, Regulators say, Make it safer. Meanwhile, with most nuclear plants closed, Japan has had to import way more coal, dirty polluting coal warming the whole planet and people aren't happy with that, either. Just listen to these protesters. Follows at US. I'll call, you know, Call Japan. They're chanting, Okamoto says. There are no easy solutions here. He knows the public. Just want scientist to tell them their energy source is safe. What science can never be published again. It's the nature or not. You're Hauser. I admit he also admits that actually, he wants more nuclear plants to open up. That's coming from the scientist who foresaw Lay Fukushima like nuclear nightmare. Look, some of Japan's plans should clearly never open again, He says. They're just too close to fault lines. For others. The odds of another earthquake seem low enough that Japan should take the risk. He says. The country needs power. Yes, I'm afraid people against nuclear power may be hungry after me. Just try not to be too angry at me, Okumura says. He's just a guy who wanted to study prehistoric earthquakes, never imagining that pursuit could affect the fate of his country. And the entire planet. For the world. I'm Patrick Quinn.

Okumura Japan Drew Richard Undersea Earthquake Fukushima Nuclear Plant Koji Earthquake Okamura Fukushima Tsunami Patrick LEE California Oscar Earthquakes Alice Richard Okamoto Hauser
Sister of D.C mayor dies of COVID-19 complications

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Sister of D.C mayor dies of COVID-19 complications

"The Cove it 19 pandemic has hit home for D. C. Mayor Muriel Bowser and her family the mayor sharing that they lost her sister to complications from the coronavirus. Muriel Bowser says in a statement that she and her family are mourning the loss of her 64 year old sister Mercia. Quote. Mercia was loved immensely and will be missed greatly as she joins the Legion of Angels, who have gone home too soon due to the pandemic, thousands oldest sibling and on Lee, sister work to care for Children and seniors and those with behavioral disorders through Catholic charities and DC's office on Aging. Hauser. Thank the doctors and nurses at Washington Hospital Center who quote heroically treated her for covert 19 related pneumonia until her death.

D. C. Mayor Muriel Bowser Muriel Bowser Mercia Legion Of Angels LEE Hauser Washington Hospital Center DC Pneumonia
"hauser" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"hauser" Discussed on WJR 760

"Back to warrior lawyer's gonna go down the lane, A passing the wing to Joy Hauser. Nothing there. Ball circles the wide wide open for three bucks a little on the short side, but he gets a long rebound. And bounces air off the leg Johnson of Rutgers, and that mess you will get into the base line with a fresh 20 on the shot clock. Another good hustle play by Michigan State on the offensive boards to create this extra possession. But one thing for sure is you. Look at what's going on down there. Right now. This Michigan State team do not let that awful start Get to it. Now we lost. So here we go. Welcomes into foster lawyer with 8 52 to go on the half Rockers Records had scored in about four minutes. Lawyer dribbling Oh, a beautiful pass to Kidd here of who made his spinning. Move down. Lane. Miss the shot rebound. Rutgers out the Geo Baker Baker's not much They're not gets over there to Harper. Harper working on Joey Hazard Nice D by Hauser can't get anything done there so they'll try it again. Back to Harper. He's working. Working. Here Comes this step back. Jump shot good. There's no way to defend that. Harper's really perfected that fadeaway jumper out of the post really difficult to defend. First bucket for Rikers and four minutes is now 19 9. Scarlett. I buy 10 with eight or nine to go in the first half. Lawyer kicks Not Aaron. Henry. How much you're Hauser Wide open for 30? No, but keep your saves it keep your savior right back to Hauser, A price 29 for Michigan State. Joey could not.

Joy Hauser Harper Hauser Wide Michigan State Rutgers Geo Baker Baker Michigan Joey Johnson Kidd Scarlett Henry
"hauser" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"hauser" Discussed on WJR 760

"Of three in the last four games, but he put a lot of minutes last time out against Purdue, a career high 26. But at the end of the day, he only took one shot in those last two starts. Anything that he can deliver out from would really be good. Yeah, in what Having him on the floor does is allows both rocket and Aaron Henry to play off the ball a little bit more. And allows for another playmaker Tonto be in place, So it's not. It's not as important that AJ shoot the ball as much as he limit turnovers, create plays for others and create some of those inside out looks through penetration and rounding out the starting five. You have Thomas Kit here, starting in center of 68 £230 junior from Clarkson, Michigan. Coming off a career low, I should say a big 10 season low against produced. He only played eight minutes because he was in serious found trouble. Yeah. Which is just over three points a ballgame. He's a pretty efficient player and these guys job but taking on one of the best big guys in this conference, and since there's so many big guys, I'm saying a lot. He's got to do something one mile John Miles Johnson. Thomas has got to stay on the floor he's got. He's got to avoid the tiki tax policies ghetto. Avoid the careless over the back over the back files. We're going to see Ah, lot of the lot of Michigan State Biggs tonight. But Kitty has been a guy who has really embraced in play this role really well. And rounding up a five joy Hauser's 69 to £20 redshirt junior from Stephen's playing Wisconsin comes in average about 12 points a ballgame. He is the team's top rebounder. He's also the team's top double double guy, but he had had one of those in about four games. Having fifth one today would be a good thing. Yeah, and Hauser struggle a little bit offensively and.

Thomas Kit Stephen joy Hauser Michigan Purdue Aaron Henry Tonto John Miles Johnson Clarkson Kitty Wisconsin
Missing Lowell Woman’s SUV Found In Merrimack River

WBZ Midday News

00:24 sec | 2 years ago

Missing Lowell Woman’s SUV Found In Merrimack River

"Missing Woman's SUV is found in the Merrimack River and low but the woman is still missing. Police say Kim Kelly Overhauser Was last seen in Lowell around 10 45 Monday evening, driving the 2016 Block Range Rover. The SUV was found Friday in the river across from their regatta field. Anyone with information about Kim Kelly over Hauser's were about is asked to contact local police right away.

Kim Kelly Overhauser Merrimack River Lowell Range Rover Kim Kelly Hauser
Washington, DC Mayor Bowser requests DHS heighten security measures in District ahead of inauguration

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

Washington, DC Mayor Bowser requests DHS heighten security measures in District ahead of inauguration

"D C Mayor Muriel Bowser is enhancing security measures in the district ahead of the inauguration. The measures include extending the time period around the national Special Security event, extending the perimeter of the secured area requesting a pre disaster declaration to get quicker federal assistance and canceling all public gathering permits for D. C for the period of time around the event. Hauser has also asked DHS to coordinate with the Department of Justice, Congress and the Supreme Court to create a plan for the defense of federal property so that D C. Police are better able to focus on the

Mayor Muriel Bowser National Special Security Hauser DHS Department Of Justice Congress Supreme Court