34 Burst results for "Hauer"

Lew Cirne on founding Wily Technology and New Relic

Software Engineering Daily

03:50 min | 2 months ago

Lew Cirne on founding Wily Technology and New Relic

"Lou. Welcome to the show scrapes video. Thank you you started new relic awhile ago and before that you started a different company wiley. Both of these companies were focused on what we now call observability hauer software applications today different than from when you started new relic. Well yeah you know. I'll talk about what's different today but also talk about what the same and i guess. It's what's the same as so long as our software there is going to be bugs and they're going to be problems that happen only in production and that's that'll be true forever. I think so as long as humans create software and just like in the medical field are so long as people get sick. Then there's going to be a need for doctors. And so i think so. Long as there are software. There's going to be need for tooling and visibility capabilities to help understand. Soffer behaves when it's running under load in particular and take that understanding to improve the performance availability stability and the customer experience of that software. So when i started wiley twenty-three years ago the idea was this brand. New thing. At the time in ninety eight was java and the idea was let's see inside. Jvm without asking our customers to change any of their source code and put that visibility to production low overhead and captures much data as possible and presented an easiest way possible to help customers debug their jvm's and fast forward to two thousand eight. When i found new relic the thought was well. It's a multi language world now and applications aren't running on two or three physical servers are running on twenty or thirty or so back in that time. Virtual hosts and it was very early in the cloud but people those hosts for running increasingly in new environments like amazon web services. So the idea was. How do you put visibility into that are composed of say a half dozen services running in a virtual environment where. There's multi-language in that. That really was the sweet spot. If new relic when it was founded through the first several years and now here we are in two thousand twenty one what an application looks like today is often hundreds of services thousands of containers more and more in coober netease incredibly complex. A lot of a synchronous work a lot of stuff going on systems like kafka and so trying to make sense of a really complex system is more challenging than ever and it seems like what's behind all of this complexity is imperative to help developers be more productive to first of all have smaller more independent teams who can deploy with pretty good isolation and rely on good. Api's and things like that to allow lots of those teams to collaborate on a large effort at high velocity but so that that increases velocity but it comes at the cost of increased complexity on how that whole integrated system works and the solution to that in our opinion is complete visibility into all the application micro services all of the infrastructure and the end user experience. All into a common platform that operates at massive scale and really the guts of observability. If you understand the difference between observability monitoring i'd say monitoring is about telling you when something's wrong but observability is having access to all the telemetry need to answer. Why is something wrong which you don't even know what question you need to ask next to get to the understanding of what's wrong in today's world it just like collecting a massive amount of data and trying to make sense of it. Is you know as rapidly as possible.

Wiley Soffer LOU Kafka Amazon
Can You Use Vinegar Mixed With Water to Get Rid of Black Spot?

Your Gardening Questions

05:03 min | 5 months ago

Can You Use Vinegar Mixed With Water to Get Rid of Black Spot?

"And she says some of the plants that i'm bringing indoors from my deck have black spots on the leaves now. I read that apple cider. Vinegar mixed with water can be brushed on the leaves to kill the fungus. Have you ever heard of this. Yes definitely I have never done it. However i know people that do it. It's it's what i call a home remedy I would only cautioned the amount of vinegar in the water. So i would stay with one maybe two tablespoons in a gallon It will become Well if you if you get it too. Strong vinegar can be a weed killer. So let's go to that point but to To go one or two at the most dealers bones of vinegar in water and she could even dip them or brush it on or however you can do it but it should work to. At least it won't stop that black spot but it can stop the fungal bodies from growing and getting to be seed well into what it called. They're seen stage can stop the disease. But i don't think she can cured and make those leaves green again now. If you if fred hauer has black spot on some of the plants that he's going to bring inside what do you do. I don't bring them in now. Let me explain that I try to not foster things like blackspot however it is a fungal body is so very tiny. We never know it. We're breathing it. All the time is it. Lands as anyone Spore lands on a leaf of peony or a line lock or or whatever it may be I have one one peony. That is absolutely beautiful. Gray right now has nothing to do with the plants nature. So i won't even think about bringing that in I will cut it off at one inch above ground. I won't even put those leaves in the compost pile. They'll go into the trash And she can do the same now. sure what leaves she would be trying to preserve if she's trying to get a given plant seed head and leaves and all to come along if she wants to make a bouquet and and etcetera because i i use dried bouquets here She could indeed dip or use that solution to stop the disease from well from advancing on the leaves that she's bringing in and it certainly could stop it from carrying over into the next year is just reduction reducing the chances of one more sport case but as i say Next year that's going to be those little spores in the air. Everything that can contract a fungal disease which in this case is Well anyhow it is is just one of those things where next year the very plants that she's taking the cuttings from and so on. She should start in the spring knowing that they are susceptible to the audi mildew start spraying them to keep that from getting to be a problem during the course summit. Needless to say when. I mentioned that i totally beautiful great. Dna it's not good It's it's attractive where it stands and so on but i. I don't even want to think about that. Carrying over. because that means that plant unto itself is susceptible and. I want to get all the sports. I can't wait from it so it's one of those things where yes One of the one of the things that she can even do is along with the cider. Vinegar she can use one or at the very most tablespoons of horticultural oil. Now that's just it is We well it's a horticultural. Oil is listed such on the in the garden center on the shelves and so on. It's very highly refined so it's not like oils that are used as a Well pre grow season situation for other things but It will stop both the carryover of insects and insect eggs by using the horticultural oil. The vinegar will hopefully slow down or stop the black spots and so on and go from there now Backwards to black spot. I have very few roses anymore. One of them is. It never has had a touch blackspot. One of them is almost killed every year And i just kind of let it happen but Well prevention is the key to bomb insect problems and disease problems.

Fred Hauer
"hauer" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

06:24 min | 9 months ago

"hauer" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"Have you heard of Lady who? I have not heard of Lady Hawk. Sell me on it under first off. I don't have to sell you on it later. Understand something, Lady Lady Hawks. Legend and lore is already in place, though. How? I can't even believe That you have not seen Lady Hawk And this is the period in which you like to dwell. Lady Hawk was a film directed by Ah young Richard Donner. You might know Richard Donner is the man that brought a Superman. One of the greatest comic book movies ever also gave us the lethal weapons franchise. Richard Quite quite a few other interesting films and a couple that were fluff, But Richard Donner was an A list director. Lady Hall stars a young Matthew Broderick. As a thief. But the main stars are Rutger Hauer from the greatest movie ever made Blade Runner and a very beautiful Michelle Pfeiffer. Now there is a There is a witch off sorts that puts a curse on them. They're there. They're lovers, they but they're for their forbidden lovers. And so the curses And I don't make sure I get this right because sometimes I reverse it. The curses Rutger Hauer is a wolf by night. And Michelle Pfeiffer during the day. Is A hawk. Ah Hawk right. That explains the title deed. Yes, yes, And it's a It's a very cute C. It's a very like record. Howard, if you know him his presence. I mean, alright, His presence on screen is just phenomenal. And Matthew Broderick is his kind of whimsical, smart Alec. You sell, and Matthew Broderick is the one Rutger Hauer puts him in tars of watching her. And and and I want to say, Yeah. Matthew Broderick eyes put in charge of watching her when he's a wolf because he can't protect her. So he starts calling her. He starts calling her Lady Hall and that's an and Rutger Hauer likes that, But that's where the title comes from. So but but the curse of it isthe They can never touch each other. They can never lay human to human eyes on each other s O. They are they are destined to never, you know, be able to consummate their love. They're destined to never be ableto have a romance. There's one scene in particular. And it is my favorite scene from the movie, and I think if anybody else watches it It always points out to be their favorite scene. There's one scene where you get to see that you get to see the transformation. Rutger Hauer Ah, is it And it's It takes place in Ah, snow covered region, So it's just absolutely stunning. It's absolutely beautiful, but Rutger Hauer Is the wolf. And Michelle Pfeiffer is Michelle Pfeiffer and The wolf starts turning back because the sun starts coming up. And Matthew Broderick keeps Michelle Pfeiffer keeps the wolf at his side and the wolf protects them at night. The sun starts coming up. And you start to see the wolf starts to turn into Rutger Hauer. And now Michelle Pfeiffer, who is Michelle Pfeiffer and not the hawk at this point is looking at this body of the wolf starts to morph in back into Rutger Hauer. And The Wolf's eyes. Wow, it's transforming is looking in myself. Five human eyes. It's really It's really, really touching and Brazil with five. It's looking at him and he's He's like 2/3 storing the transformation that he starts to transform from myself. I've been to the hawk, but there's still enough form of her toe where you're looking at it, and you're like, okay, this is gonna happen. They're going to be able to do this. They're going to be able to touch They're going to be able to a human eyes on each other again and in the end and and and the music is building That's just a really poignant scene and in the fraction and when I say the fraction of a second you couldn't sly the sliver of Hair through it. It looks just like they're about to do it and see Turkey as Rutger Howard now becomes a man and he's laying on the ground because it was well. He reaches his head out for as he flipping turns into a hawk and flies away and he buries his head into the snow. And he goes. What do you gotta do, Teo? Make a witch man. Put that kind of curse on you. That's just I have to be out of which there though. There's a lot of the movie that I forget. I will tell you this Matthew Broderick, it's hilarious. The fight scene in the end is brilliant. Rutger Hauer was born TTO play at night. If there's a There's a There's a there's a very old film. Call it Don't to dare. Don't you dare play off Rutger Hauer with music that you gonna pull that music down, You know also that time understand some when I'm when I'm in my eighties movies bag don't ever interrupt me is where I live right there is there's a movie called flesh and Blood that was directed by their who, even whom was just this really blood and guts Director German Director, which put Rutgers How on the map, So you want to go back and you want to look at flesh and blood. But Rutger Hauer was born to play a night is beautiful. The one flaw and I have to say this. The one flaw of Lady Hong is that there's it has. It has a very organic To the times to the era soundtrack, which is beautiful a score, which is which that scene that I told you about with score to, But then there's also this tangerine dream score..

Rutger Hauer Matthew Broderick Rutger Hauer Ah Lady Hawk Michelle Pfeiffer Lady Lady Hawks Rutger Howard Lady Hall Richard Donner Lady Hong Director German Director director Turkey Teo Brazil Alec
How Hiroshima survivors helped form radiation safety rules

Science Magazine Podcast

06:53 min | 9 months ago

How Hiroshima survivors helped form radiation safety rules

"Now, we have contributing correspondent Dennis normal. He wrote this week on how seventy five years later. The survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki have transformed understanding of the effects of radiation exposure on health. Hi, Dennis Arthur we're talking about study. Now. Run by Ari are asked, which is the Radiation Effects Research Foundation this is a very long-term study as I mentioned almost seventy five years. Years and included many many survivors over one hundred thousand. How exactly did this study get started all those years ago? Virginia's Harry Truman authorized launch of the study was in nineteen, forty, seven. They were pretty much should have a full team on the ground in Yoshii Nagasaki. By nineteen, forty, nine, thousand, nine, hundred fifty. The US Navy realized that there would be a bathroom studying the acute impact and. And the long term impact of what happens to humans when they are subjected to the detonation of Tom These survivors involvement in such a long-term study has yielded an amazing array of results, important results for health for anyone who's exposed to radiation and work or an accident. What are some of the key findings from this work us? Not just one study. They actually have a collection of different studies. Studies, they have carried out the most notable one. Is this enormous life span study where they have as you mentioned one hundred twenty thousand people who were enrolled at the outset? If you put together the combination of number of participants and the length of the study, there's probably nothing else like the RRF in his predecessor ABC city simply gathered data on how radiation has long term effects on health. Health of those who were exposed to radiation the Rif previously ABC gathered that data mix epidemiological connections between the amount of radiation. Someone gets and their risk of developing cancer later in life, other or decisions take that data and data from other studies as well, and they turn those into recommendations for the amount of exposure that people should be allowed to get if they are patient for medical imaging. Imaging, or if they are, the technicians were if their nuclear pact workers this gives away how old I am, but I went to the dentist pornography child. You sit in the dental chair and the dentist would real office machine thick x rays of your teeth, and those were go bouncing all over the room these days for dental x Ray. They put you in a special room which shielded technician. Technician is wearing a badge to track how much radiation he or she is exposed to. You're also wearing that vest to protect your organs from straight X rays all those recommendations shielding around the x ray rooms, dosimetry badges with technicians, where and the vest the patients where they all grew out of basic data that was produced by the long term studies by RRF INC with the survivors we talked. Talked about how this research got started very soon after the bombings, US government, Edna Japanese, government, and boasted research with survivors, but with different purposes. How are they different? Hauer their intentions with the studies different. The ABC was very much an American stony when the ABC's got started was so under America's occupation, and the Japanese scientists had difficulty publishing their observations amount of information that was released Japanese. was very much controlled by the occupation of Nargis, so there were real restrictions on what the Japanese scientists could do, but that initial collection of data by the US groups was over within a few months later there was a decision to set up a long-term study of the effects of radiation and at that point yet. Of the Japanese scientists in the American scientists were pretty much aligned. You mentioned in the story that the survivors weren't treated by the US scientist when they were involved in the study. Initially, that's right. Basically for political reasons, the decision was made that the ABC said he would not offer any treatment to the people who were being examined by the ABC physicians. They concern was that if the ABC city which at that time was very much? American funded American. If. They offered treatment. It might be taken as an admission of culpability in their condition, because misunderstandings and friction between the survivors, many of whom believe that they would get some help for doing with their illnesses with their injuries. Yeah, why would a survivor become involved in the study? If they weren't going to get treatment, even decades later if that was the history of the study. Initially. There was a hope that they would get some sort of medical benefit from participating in the study, the didn't get zero. In particular children that were born to survivors got medical checkups that there would not have received not been part of the study later as one of the survivors told me he has continued to cooperate with the study because he hopes that it will help the world recognize how devastating, the effects are of attack using atomic weapons, and so that is what motivates him to continue to cooperate. It's not clear whether there are. Are Health Effects for the offspring of survivors, but this survivors children are obviously concerned about their health. Can you talk about about this tension with the scientists say is that their studies so far have not identified any affects the question is. Are there no effects or are statistical data simply not detailed enough to spot affects the friction arises. Is that some of the children of the survivors? But we've that they are facing health issues that are not faced by big response were not subjected to the. It's on bond radiation, so the children what? As survivors as second-generation survivors, and they now have to court actions going forward, try to force the the government to recognize that the children of survivors should be recognized, says survivors as well, and that should also be entitled to medical support it just as their parents are

ABC Radiation Effects Research Fou Technician United States Abc City Us Navy Yoshii Nagasaki Dennis Normal Dennis Arthur Hiroshima Nagasaki ARI Virginia Harry Truman Tom These Edna Japanese Rrf Inc Hauer Nargis
FCCs Ajit Pai is tackling suicide prevention with a 988 hotline

The 3:59

06:20 min | 10 months ago

FCCs Ajit Pai is tackling suicide prevention with a 988 hotline

"Me. Senior reporter and regulatory expert Maggie Ridden. Thanks, thank you for joining me. Thanks for having me so tell me about the SEC's nine eight eight initiative, so the FCC is GonNa Vote next month on. Some rules to establish nine eight eight as the number that you call if you wanNA reach the suicide, prevention, hotline, or lifeline, and right now it's a fool. One eight hundred number. The thinking is that if it's a shorter nine eight eight number that will be something that sticks in people's minds, and they'll know to call that, and it will be easier to reach, and you actually had a chance to talk to SEC. Chairman Ajit Pie about this I mean what is what is he hoping to accomplish here in like the House he personally invested in this 'cause well, he is very passionate about this issue and says. You know that this is very personal for him that. He feels you know a connection to this issue and. As I think most of the commissioners do. They, all are in support of this, and he really hopes that by using nine eight eight. It will again really stick in people's minds. It's obviously a professional obligation of the se for me, but it's also a personal 'cause for me. I think a suicide, prevention and mental health affected so many people in our daily lives, and especially when it comes to suicide alone so I mentioned, the rate is now coaching levels. We haven't seen since world. War. Two and bumble oscillations are especially hard hit A. we've seen for example veterans that some twenty veterans every day die by suicide. LGBTQ, you are also at Gress they. They contemplate suicide a much higher rates some one point. Eight million LGBTQ used think about suicide every year for African American. Teens report recently came out showing that self reported suicide attempts among black heeds increased by seventy three percent between nineteen, ninety-one and twenty seventeen, and a lot of these statistics come afford current pandemic, when of course so staying at home in other types of protocols, if greed sense of isolation for those who may be struggling, and so to me at least the ability to connect those who need help more easily. Those who can provide it is absolutely critical issues, not stranger to me and. while. It's difficult to talk about what I will say that I think about it every day. Antibiotics affected those who had loved the end. I don't want anyone to have to go through that and Yeah, and so he hopes that nine eight eight becomes a a similar thing for people who are in a mental health crisis that right like everybody teaches their kids and we learned his kids that. When you're in an emergency, you cow nine one one. People know that it's just second nature. You know. They don't really have to think about it much that they can just pick up the phone if they need help and reach out to get that help and. How how big of a problem is suicide in America, it's it's a growing problem and it in a serious one The the Centers for Disease Control have done a study that said they've looked at data and suicide rates have been on the rise for the last two decades so it's a real problem. There are a lot of people in our country. Country who are experiencing a lot of troubles and you know in the FCC wants to do something about it. Right imagined the coronavirus and our lockdown situation has just made things worse. l., absolutely, in fact, you know the dispatchers. The counselors who feel these calls are seeing spikes in calls to them since the pandemic and I think it it really. It speaks to the fact that people are isolated. They're at home. people are losing their jobs. We have a lot of civil unrest and the black lives matter stuff the happening and we're seeing all these images on our. TV's and I think it's really taking a toll on. People yeah I know that I regularly sit downs on Saturday mornings or on the weekends and run through my facebook. Feed my news. Feed ends. It's pretty depressing so that the news that's out there right so I get it and I can see why that would be a bigger problem in current environment. I'm curious if there are any folks who are opposed to this as odd as that sounds, I mean I know. The FCC is typically divided by party lines right? Usually Democrats vote one way Republicans voted. Another neutrality is a great example of this kind of. Divided issue is there is everyone basically on board for this or are there folks who have? Concerns or issues with this proposal you know everybody is on board with this initiative and you know I think that really speaks to. The fact that this is an issue that that crosses party lines right whether you're a republican or Democrat I think everybody. Knows people in their lives who have struggled or they may be struggling themselves in so I think this is. This is really an issue that that touches everyone, but what is the next step of this? Because I know right now? It's a proposal but hauer. When does ninety eight become a reality? So the FCC? They've been working on this issue for you know for several months now, and so now they're at the point in their process where they're coming up with some final rules, and they'll be voting on this at the July, sixteenth meeting and. Now, it won't go into effect on July. Sixteenth Twenty, twenty. this is you know they're voting on the rules and establishing what needs to happen and they're giving the carriers two years to to comply with this and Chairman Pie said he realizes that's not soon enough really for for many people, but he wanted to make sure that the number was ready across the country, and that everything was in place so that there was no confusion that you know when it's ready, it's ready. It's GonNa. Launch everywhere.

FCC SEC Ajit Pie Chairman Gress Maggie Ridden Reporter Centers For Disease Control America Hauer
Mary Paier Powers Discusses What Family Caregivers Should Consider During the Pandemic

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:50 min | 11 months ago

Mary Paier Powers Discusses What Family Caregivers Should Consider During the Pandemic

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host David Intracom also. With me, today is elder law attorney Miss. Mary P- higher powers founder of the Powers Law Group in West Springfield Massachusetts. During this podcast discuss what family members should know or consider. They've a family member residing in a long term care facility. During this Kobe. Pandemic Mary Welcome to the program. Thank you very much David I appreciate the opportunity to speak with you today. You're very welcome. Miss Firepower bio is of course posted on the podcast website. Briefly on background, as has been widely reported, the Kobe nineteen pandemic has had particularly harmful effects on seniors in the failed elderly particular, moreover, those residing in long term care facilities for example, skilled nursing facilities or assisted living facilities as of last week approximately four intend Kobe. Related deaths have occurred in these resonances. For example in my state of Virginia as of mid-may approx sixty percent of all COVID, nineteen related deaths have occurred in a skilled nursing facility. Beyond long-term care residents being immuno-compromised federal regulations concerning sniff skill. Nursing facilities have once again proven to be. The question begged here is what can family members those with parv attorney or serve as medical proxy. Can do during the pandemic to protect. Their frail senior or frail family members living in these facilities, particularly, if the facilities lockdown or preventing family visits with me again to discuss these questions, elderlaw attorney Ms Mary pyre powers before beginning I will recognize I probably, if not, in fact should have scheduled. This topic several weeks ago, so that Mary on background I'll go into the questions. However, do you have? Did you have a common relative to my intro? I know I was just going to say that that is you I've discussed before that. This is certainly an unchartered territory and. These questions are relevant to what's going on now. Now that we know that we could face these pandemics. And it might be coming a wave of the future. We need to be aware of what we should be asking. and The nursing homes I think were not prepared and certainly one of the questions that many of us have is how come they didn't have. These drills are practices in place. But for right now we have to look at what we can do for for elders in our family members, and then deal with the question is to how or why. They weren't prepared at another time. No absolutely I agree that's A. that's a topic for another conversation. and you're right This pandemic doesn't seem to be will won't. will persist rather for quite some while, and we should expect others so this conversation. Should have legs for quite some time, so let's go to the questions I prepared. A in context of the pandemic. What should family members know about the long term care facility in which their relative resides and I will say. Most people may know that there is a good deal. Federal guidances out the CDC for example has APP a guidance on facilities. Specifically and I will post this or the link there of. A formerly CDC's guidance title Covid Nineteen Guide for shared or congregate housing. which they! Defined quite broadly including apartments condos housing. And then as well a concrete housing. Specifically regarding those seniors living in assisted living in elsewhere so again, question, what generally should members know about long-term facility in which their relatives reside? I, think number one is. How was their facility communicating with family members about their procedures and One of the biggest issues that I have heard from individuals around here is communication, and if there's no communication that's going to lead to more stress and and heartache, so how how will the facility communicate with family members is key. The other very important factor is what procedures do they have in place for? Testing employees and other healthcare professionals that go into the facility whether it's an occupational therapist physical therapist, the nurse practitioner are and and then. How also are they testing residents and Hauer that what? What is their plan? Are they segregating residents by floor by section and and what the procedure is for keeping the residents who have tested negative or whoever covered what is their procedure for keeping them continually safe, so those are some of of the beginning questions. I think that a very important question is. Does the facility have enough protective equipment for their staff? I know that some nursing homes were not prepared for the n ninety five masks. They don't have enough. To have their staff go in and out of rooms. So that's a very important question. They gotten the proper protective equipment, and what is the procedure about changing the equipment on on a patient to patient or day to day procedure?

David Intracom Attorney Mary P CDC Powers Law Group Virginia West Springfield Massachusetts Ms Mary Founder Hauer
"hauer" Discussed on Voice First Health

Voice First Health

06:07 min | 11 months ago

"hauer" Discussed on Voice First Health

"I'm Dr Terry Fisher, a physician and voice technology futurist. Voice Technology is rapidly becoming the operating system of our lives, and it will completely revolutionized the way we experience healthier. Let's talk voice. He there and welcome to the podcast episode sixty six of voice I health I am so pleased to have you along for today's podcast. Speaking with Alanna mayor, who is one of the leading experts when it comes to we design voice, user, interface, design, and specifically at the intersection with healthcare. She is a chapter contributor to the recently released book voice, Technology and healthcare, and she comes on the podcast today to speak about expertise, provide some tips about voice, user, interface, design, and really share so much. Much of her knowledge with us, so if you are looking at potentially creating some type of voice experience, whether it is for healthcare or otherwise, you're going to want to listen to this podcast episode, because there are some real nuggets in here when it comes to designing your voice experience so without any further ado I'd love to welcome Alannah onto the podcast. Okay welcome Atlanta. It is a real pleasure to have you on the podcast today. Thanks so much for being here. Yeah, it's good to be here again. Thanks for having me. It's been a long time since we chatted on the on the PODCAST, but we have chatted on and off over I. Guess it's almost a couple of years now since we first met I think at one of the earlier voice conferences. I've been following what you're doing. And you certainly are an expert in design voice user interface design, so I was really excited to have you back on, and as well a lot of listeners will know you are a chapter contributor for the new. Book Voice Technology Healthcare and I wanted to chat with you about that as well so before we get into all that money, if I could ask you to introduce yourself a little bit to the listeners. Sure. I'm automate year. A voice, interface, designer or conversation designer. And I specialize in healthcare I've worked for a number of pairing provider organizations clients of mine I helping them specifically with patient. Wonderful and I'm always interested. Any listeners are to. How does one get into voice design? Like what's what's the background there? I was just thinking about that this morning and I think that the way people have historically gotten into design into voice design is different from how people are currently getting into it or will continue to get in in in the future so historically. It attracted a lot of linguists and linguists is still important, but now gratuity of people are coming to the. Fields from places like like interaction, design or you ex design those. Places for me I came to the field from anthropology and psychology and Marketing Akrons at the about strategic communications and The. Understanding of people's inner workings also. the cultural systems that they act with it so really there. There are a variety of pads in the ice that I always give people. Is You have your unique strengths that you're bringing to the field? The new should build on those strengths and pitch the strengths. That's great and so, what was your first little? Your entrance into the voice designed specifically for you then was there. was there something that you experienced that me think? Oh, I want to be part of this voice technology industry, or is there any particular little story there? I. Fell into voice design I really wanted to be a product designer of really any sort, I was working in marketing. I WANNA make wanted to make the transition into design and. Ended up in voice design, which happened to be. A good combination of things like my singing background. My my marketing thing about the strategic communications again background. And a nice combination of logical thinking in creative thinking that I really enjoy. That's great and the seniors are interesting, because there's so many people that I've spoken to in voice in the industry that have some some sort of creative background and I think just really lends itself, so that's that's really interesting as well. So. You're an expert designer. As I mentioned in this chapter, and hopefully we had a little bit about the content, but also your take on voice, user, interface design, and why that is so important, because no, you're passionate about that, so maybe we can start there, and like why. Why is this an important area and particularly for healthcare as well? Often. People think about design as the pretty Bo that you put on a present. And ready ready for handoff, but I think that's a that's a big misconception, a missed opportunity. I design. Is really the last mile logistics that get this thing that you put so much thought effort into where you want it to go, and so you wouldn't have this amazing idea in. And then just haphazardly put it together and put it in the mail without any protection, you know it's possible that conducted the recipient unharmed by it's much better ally and to align strategically with your organization. better to think about who is the recipient tower. They going to receive this and make sure that everything is built. To? to forge that relationship between the sender in this case, payer provider organizations and and the patients. You need the right packing materials you need the right building materials, and you need the right box. You need the right track to make sure that it gets tale. That that patient.

Hauer
Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue, on Mentorship and Speaking Up

Skimm'd from The Couch

02:42 min | 11 months ago

Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue, on Mentorship and Speaking Up

"I WanNa talk about the concept of mentor ship because it sounds like from your story and from what you've said in the past you didn't necessarily have it earlier in your career or you've talked about the lack of being able to see people and be like. Oh that's someone that looks like me or has the same background as me. How do you think about that? Now that you are in a position to obviously be a mentor. What do you think about the importance of it? I feel like when I learned about mentorship. It was like okay. They're going to take you out to lunch and then you're GonNa do this. And it was a very strict idea and euro idea. I think of what I thought it was going to be but I think over time now I realize it. It really is a two way street in has to be more of a relationship with somebody that really feels like they're also getting something out of it can't just be you asking this person for help recommendations all of those things even though that is very valid. I think it really has to be more of a two way street of that person. Feeling like okay. I'm investing in this for these reasons or this person really adds value. Or you know all those things I think it just it has to make sense and I think they I've been blessed to have really good bosses and those people have become mentors to me because I think the over time in working for them and understanding them them getting understanding of me. We were able to come to a place of okay. I can reach out to this person but I think it's hard like I wouldn't have had that relationship with them from blind emailing them or just damning them like there were reasons and there was a method to Hauer relationships. Developed over time. You obviously work for someone. That's a legend. Now in the business that you worked for Sela be before that you've worked for women that have had huge impacts in careers. You also talk about. How what you. WanNa do requires pushing boundaries? Change there's a certain sense of fearlessness. Just hearing you speak. Would you describe yourself that way? Everyone says that but I don't think of it that way. I just think that if I'm not doing this no one else will do if I don't do this work. Honestly I've looked and searched for other people in it's just not really insight and I think they a lot of people can get to positions like this and just be grateful and super comfortable and not push into see like I got the job or I got access to this network or I was able to make this amount of money. So I'm just GonNa sit here and enjoy it because I've worked hard but that's just not the way that my parents raised me. It's time to work even harder and so I don't really think is fearlessness. I think it's just the way it is

Sela Hauer
Anxiety Bytes: Am I Doomed by My Genes to Be Anxious?

Not Another Anxiety Show

08:18 min | 1 year ago

Anxiety Bytes: Am I Doomed by My Genes to Be Anxious?

"Hey guys autumn to not another anxiety. Show I'm your host Kelley Walker and joining me. Today is my co host Eric. Lay them head low. This these days I now and we get to do a little Anxiety by segment today. I know and I'm still angry about the it yes B. I t I s you. Don't all the grudge It's been a year more than a year it's been I think you have some exciting news. I'M GONNA share it for you okay. There are guests who knows how to sign into the show's instagram page. I do I know signing instagram. I even made a fun. Little time lapse video that I'm figuring out how to upload so stay tuned. It'll probably be like a week or two. I'm toying with doing once. We can like put it together. It makes us look like we're professionals. Yeah I'm not there yet. I'm just learning. I don't honestly we could talk about this after. I don't even see where you like. Start a new post or something so overwhelmed by. I like we're just GONNA TAKE BITES ICE says around coaching advice. Which is gonNA take fees Where you start a new post where you start a new post. Yeah we'll talk right after that will take that off. Line okay so anxiety by its. I'm kind of pumped about this one. Because I have had this question many times we we had a really great up that I can't remember the which one but it was sort of towards the beginning of things where we talked about We talked about this and it's one of it was when I was going through panic attacks. That was one of my biggest fears in the things. I got stuck on the most common questions I get asked. Okay really. It's like it's got to be like top five most common questions just in like my personal kind of one on one coaching experience. And I know it was a big question for me when things were really when things really felt like a big struggle. And we're really sticking well challen. Let's do it okay. So wait are need to set a timer. Is it going to be? Siri renew us all right. I'm GonNa see if I can do it with my voice. He Siri set a five U. Two's flower girl. God Oh my God all right. Forget I'm going to be hearings. A man you know what? Don't judge not that's okay. I've never heard man. Siri is my Syria. Identifies AS A British man? That's better than regular Siri. But you can tell me how to do that after two regular series. Okay ready so the question is am. I doomed by my jeans to be anxious. Ready go answer is now and that's the end of this segment. Thank you so much for tuning in today if you want to. Why do we do no no? None of us are doomed by our genes to be anxious In fact according to an article published in the advances in experimental medicine in Biology Peer Reviewed Journal Genome five times fast fast. You know when when you cited. It's nice abbreviated. But saying it. Out Loud so mouthful But you know. According to this study Genome Wide Association studies have failed to identify any genes significantly associated with anxiety diagnosis so You know this was published by the National Health Institute. I think it's like on the APA website too but They're very clear that we really just haven't been able to find any genes associated with an increased risk for developing anxiety But some recent research suggests that like epigenetics may be playing a role here so if you remember from old episode epigenetics can be thought of as genes that are more flexible so they can be turned on and off throughout our lifetime and they're also influenced by Environmental factors and environmental factors or like a very broad-based charm for like influenced by all sorts of things And this is really quite a bit different from how we used to think of jeans. And if you kind of want a quick review about genetics EPI This is a quick little anxieties segments bite. But you can listen to episode one seventy two With Dr Sarah Circus where we go into a bit more detail about Epigenetics and now apostasy by her so much much longer so much. Allah for so much But Anyway so preliminary research animal studies. Only there's no human studies yet but in animal studies suggests that some epigenetics may play a role in regulating our HP access which we talked about in episode fourteen so basically may influence. How sensitive are flight or fight response is under stress? So what happens is when we're feeling resilient on top of things good our fight or flight response may work absolutely beautifully but if our system is under stress which can be caused by external factors like financial strain Or internal factors like worrying. You know like certain behaviors or habits. We may innocently have But when our system is under stress epigenetics may kick our fight or flight system into higher gear a little faster than it would in someone else with the different genome but the great thing is there are genetic factors that positively influence the sensitivity of our HP Access Aka fight or flight response. So just some other factors that really like you can think of like enhance or late or you know. Increase resiliency with our fight or flight response. One factor is exercise. You know impacts this system. Positively nutritionally dense whole foods impacts this system positively human connection impacts the system positively A regular mindfulness practice can impact the system. Positively one of my favorite studies found you know just to go off. That is one of my favorites that he's in the world found that mindfulness practices. You know different. Mindfulness practices reduced on. Ibs symptoms in in study patients and and more importantly which shows sort of like the nature like a micro like a microcosm of the nature of epigenetics It also reduced these mindfulness. Various mindfulness practices also reduced expression of a gene associated with. Ibs Flare Up. So people were experiencing reduce symptoms and we were able to also see this in their genome so in short recent preliminary research suggests like there may be an EPI genetic factor here and also you know what we do know Have Known for little while there are so many EPI genetic factors that influence hauer fight or flight system behaves right like stress is one that can kind of tilted towards the unfavorable Paul. And there's so many other behaviors or habits that we can cultivate or have control over which is nice to know that. Can SORTA on nudge it back towards a more favorable place. Some right right right. I love that you keep learning things. Yano I'm like I told you Erica. Scientists forever yes mate just made it

Anxiety Siri HP Kelley Walker Biology Peer Reviewed Journal Eric EPI Genome Wide Association Yano Dr Sarah Circus Syria APA Hauer Erica Paul National Health Institute
Coronavirus and golf: How the professional tours are affected

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

08:32 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus and golf: How the professional tours are affected

"Let me ask you this about the tour and like all this stuff is going because you talked about the guys being on the golf course and. I really don't blame these news. We try to play golf because if they look if I stay away from people doing nothing else then I might as well get at here but like how do you think the tour is going to be affected by all of this there are affected a bunch of one? They still haven't even postponed or canceled events. That scheduled may twenty first the ink at colonial. And you know one of the events that that they're talking about trying to move since they moved. Somebody majors the US Open now where it got moved. Its date is open. So Jack Nicklaus tournament the memorial wants to move out of its slot into where the US Open was but it's still scheduled to go on in. That's the last week of. May which doesn't seem possible to that's going to happen. They hope and help or like the idea that the US Open is saying. Now we're not going to be here. Is somebody else's like that all right? Yeah or tournament like the open championship which isn't scheduled till July is like we out all next year in. May there like an eighty news like Nah. And that's the thing Bo you know man. I'm I'm optimistic. I try to see the silver lining. I tried to look at the good in everything but realistically to think we're going to be playing in June is just it. I don't see it happening. I just don't see us being ready to play golf in six weeks when there are still places that are on complete lockdown. I don't understand how they think that they're going to pull this off now even in my opinion first week of August which is when the PGA championship is supposed to happen. Even that seems to me as a more hopeful than realistic thing. Not only because we don't know where we be as a country as far as where this pandemic virus is by then. We have no idea whether it is going to be a phase two or phase three and the fact that the PGA championship is still scheduled to be held in San Francisco. Yes I if xactly Gulf has never been the first to do anything so to think that golf would be the first sport to come back. Golf is a sport that is more image conscious than the NFL. That I know that sounds crazy but think about this. You are not going to hear the golf as Elliot Nothing. Have you ever heard of a Golfer have you heard of a Golfer getting a DUI other than Tiger Woods? 'cause it was tiger so he's bigger than just the Gulf News but have you ever heard of a PGA tour pro given the Dui. Like you think it ain't happened right exe- so the thought of Gov being the Guinea pig like man. We'll bring all our guys back. Because you know golf will be the easiest thing for social distancing. Yes inside the ropes. It's easy for social distancing Hauer player's GonNa get tournament how litter power. They literally getting from the airplane to hotel. Where we're staying. Where are they going to empty? Who who changing the sheets right and then when you get to the gut like getting a rental car you can rent a car from somebody. I'll be working rental counter and then when you get to the golf course you just pulling out in the Congo and straight to the driving rains. You're going into the locker room who's WHO's opening locker room door. Who's working in you? Go to the bathroom cleaning up. Who changed sort of paper or you won't eat. Who's WHO's GonNa Food? Who's bring the food who stole in the trash out like? Who's doing the dishes like those? And that's not you ain't got to the courts yet now. You get course okay. We're GONNA put this on TV. Well who's filming? You've got to have a camera do. Okay Yeah we got a camera guy but the camera guys not the producer. Oh Yeah. Where's the camera picture on bow to? We need court to go to the trump who's trump who drove the trump who's producer who's directed where those people at Lake everything that goes into a production of a golf broadcast. Ken Be even bigger than Football Basketball Baseball and hockey. Because at least those venues are all a one static place so you could put cameras up in a stadium and field ain't GonNa Change. It doesn't work like that with golf when one week. The golf course looks like this in the next week is completely different. Everything gotta move is a traveling circus so to think that golf would be the one to go. Hey we'll come out. I will do a I. The Gulf was the second to last the shut it down. It was golfing NASCAR so in the long run when Gov comes back there I think of is gonNA come back without fans like I think every other sport will at first and I think golf will do okay in the long run. But I think we're GonNa wait longer than what we think for golf to come back. But and here's my silver lining. This is also where I love. What the Masters did where the Masters said we're coming back in November. The masters is the last thing on the schedule. Movember Ninety two fifteen and again talk about buffer nate. Just out not only did they come back. And we're GONNA do this in November. They also have already said. If you've got a ticket Komo come on in you know other sport has been no other waning. Tried to say only Augusta will be like not only. Are we putting the masses on? We're letting the Patriots into but we won't make that Egg Salad. We're going to make those divisional tea. Sandwiches come gifts on and I think November. Not only is realistic. But I love that. The masters is at least for me. The biggest beacon at the end of this dark tunnel. I tell you this though. Y'All come back I ain't GonNa meet you there right like they say like they just go be somebody out there. That's like now I'm good is somebody's wife. That's like yo you ain't going out on this trip like his eight nine. This ain't the Olympics though. That's what's funny. I remember when Owen down for the Olympics. Zeka you know guys were like I know plenty of dudes whose girlfriends and wives would like if you go. Don't come on you know. He you know he might put us in. The spot and jazz were like. I'm not even going to go I. I'm any worth you know. I'M I won't be happy home really but the masters though let's say right now there's plenty of dudes if that came down at the masters they are going to be like. Yo suitcases right over. She she she she. She want me to call Uber. Or because I'm going to the mass you don't WanNa go. You Ain't gotta go but one of us is going well. That tate is last thing I would ask you because I just thought of this while we were here. Are these golfers paying their caddies out like how I still pay my housekeeper? Even though she's not keeping the House I got the same thing Nancy so most golfers yes are trying to take care of their caddies in some way or form. We have to remember how cat is get paid. Caddies get a weekly paycheck and then you get a percentage of what the Golfer wins. But if the government's not winning anything where it becomes difficult is for. We all know the big super rich dude by all the big name guys like rory no Tiger Dustin Johnson of Brooks Kapka you name it Jordan Speed Rickie Fowler just Thomas Jon Rahm like those dudes of yes. They're going to be taken care of their dude with the guys who have a tough time on rookies. So the guys who came from the korn-ferry tour or the guys that this is only their second or third year on the PGA tour and they made them millions like those they could be struggling a little bit to one of the guys who I'm friends with a WHO's academy and doesn't caddy for a big named guys told me that his guy is sending them a little bit just a little bit every week just to help everybody still got bills and whatnot. So I'm sure that there are some guys that are not in a position to do that so there are probably some caddies that are hurt. But that's the world we live in right now so everybody's anxious to kind of get back to work pay

Golf Masters United States Producer Jack Nicklaus Gulf News Tiger Woods Xactly Gulf San Francisco BO Augusta Nascar Congo Olympics Hauer Guinea Tate Rickie Fowler Elliot
The Science of Mindfulness with Thorsten Barnhofer, Amit Bernstein and Dave Vago

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

06:59 min | 1 year ago

The Science of Mindfulness with Thorsten Barnhofer, Amit Bernstein and Dave Vago

"Our guest. Today are David Vago. They've welcome to the PODCAST. Good to see you again Ted. Thanks so much for inviting us. It's really a pleasure it to be here with you. So much and Thurston Barnes Thurston. Welcome to the PODCAST. I said thank you for the invitation says present here and Amy Bernstein. I mean welcome nice to meet you I thanks very much. So let's begin by just talking a little bit about about how the three of you connected for this special issue of current opinions in psychology. What happened? How did you guys connect about about this? Particular topic. Wants to take that one who wants to take that one or you have to start amidst I should. I should start when you were the originator. I'LL START I think we'll talk a bit about The how the idea for this project came about and also how it really grew and changed and evolved after David Thornton. I started to work on together after we reached out to the field to to think through it developed a just initially. I had just sort of looked for two colleagues that I knew in respected did and liked I thought would ring. Perspectives that More commentary and that represented sort of different different not only this disciplinary perspectives but also sort of different communities of global. Mindfulness research in practice optus community. And so that's it was really just sort of sort of to a sort of thing. And they were nice enough to agree the little bit of convincing but the arm twisting on this guy I remember you saying something like Oh it will take much of your time is is out about something like that and how it went. When did I was telling talking earlier about when we actually met? I don't know in the two of you met. I remember meeting Thorson in Birmingham remember. Thurston your two thousand third scene. That was an impressive member of the year in. Did your your number either Hauer when you and I met. I can't remember I do I think it was the SP SP meeting and the sex Anak Society of one of those Social Sidka meetings that everyone goes to which was that one call the. It's or a clinical on that day fresco organized a table and And there was a meet and we were in a panel together new Judd and Oh yeah Oh yeah. ABC He'd be ready to yes. Ruth Bear Myself Judd. And you it yes in Chicago veteran Chicago you look it up or may have been actually Nashville Nashville. I go to Nashville thinker. So this is what happens. You get a video target or the oldest oldest chat for long and that's part of the intent of the guest is giving voice to him so great and Thurston Hubbub. That would probably I don't know how many years ago that was me but that was a while ago and that's when I I we I think we what we connected on on was The dialogue you had a nice way of teasing out answers to some of the difficult questions at thought. And that was you. I'm that that struck me as being You know a powerful tool in this discussion that we're having really about how contemplacion's good thing for us us in terms of mental health physical health right so that was the first time I thought that we we could potentially work again together. And then you reached out again I think or we reached out to get together. We saw each other at the mind and life Concluded studied and Thurston. How about you you and David touted you to meet you? RECALL THEY SA- longtime buck. Actually we must have met said minded knife some research institutes on so I remember exactly the it is through this community docks. We met since Michigan's Michigan's and kind of state and dialogue. I think thoughts does the networks thoughts cantonized allotted for war. We've we've reported on in the current opinion machine so let's talk a little bit about that and wondering how the just the idea. Hi Dear for this special issue came up well. The editors of the strengths as its current opinions ecology the Journal. Oh and that it's unusual in that it has is kind of like Meta chief editors. They tried identify special issue. Editors Editors who really across a very very wide scope of ideas and methods and questions and they they thought about an issue on. Mindfulness would be timely and interesting and they reached out and I said no a few times because because just wasn't convinced that another special issue in another group of papers really merits asking people to take the time it takes to right. He's kind of academic papers. But I sort of wanting this kind of fantasy and sort of condition. Were we able to do something of scale and scope that would really be unique and would really potentially have impact. I'm on the field Something that would really involve field. Then that could be a really cool project. And I knew that I could but not do that would not be able to put that together Not Intellectually but also not in terms of connections to this community so that was the sort of initiated the first conversations with David Thorsten which was well. If if we if we did this how might we go about doing it. So that it really actually mattered really had meaningful impact in the field. Do

Thurston Barnes Thurston Ruth Bear Myself Judd Nashville Thurston Hubbub David Vago Thurston Michigan David Thornton Chicago Optus TED David Thorsten Sex Anak Society Amy Bernstein ABC Thorson David Hauer Contemplacion Birmingham
Can we trust Amazon with our health records?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

07:03 min | 1 year ago

Can we trust Amazon with our health records?

"Health data is big business. Google of course it just announced plans to buy fitbit for more than two billion dollars. Apple is positioning its devices as the portal medical records and Amazon is trying to do everything else. The company bought a couple healthcare startups that ranged from prescription drug distribution to telemedicine it setup haven a consulting group that wants to bring down the cost of healthcare. It's echo devices can sync with fitbit for fitness sleep data and it's filed for patents on Tech. That would let Alexa detect when when you're sick and recommend medicine but people want to give their medical data to Amazon and if so is it worth it. Joshua mcnichols is co host of podcast about Amazon called primed from K. U. O. W. in Seattle and. They looked into it. We talked to a doctor. WHO's looking at the echoes ability to detect attacked? You know the rate of breathing. Based on sending out supersonic signals like a bat or a dolphin might and they're using this in neonatal intensive care unit at at the University of Washington did detect how babies are breathing by setting an echo outside their crib. For example we've also seen them training Alexa Alexa to recognize what's called agony breathing which is a kind of breathing associated with heart attacks for example so that they might be able to detect a heart attack before it's happening. This raises the kind of obvious question though like how big a hurdle would that be for consumers to say yeah just beyond all the time listening to have a heart attack and everything else. Yeah there is is a really strong tension. There between the echoes potential. Use as a medical device and Amazon's desire to sort of lock it down so that it can't be vulnerable to being hacked act right. I mean when you look at smartphones. An APP can just take over. All kinds of parts of the smartphone Amazon makes it much harder to take over the actual internal attornal mechanics of the ECHO. So at some point Amazon's GonNa have to decide. Do we want to open this device up so they can serve consumers in this way that researchers are exploring or do we WANNA keep it locked down and maybe look at getting some of that personal health data from other sources such as through wearables like the ear. Abud that they're developing or the glasses that they're developing. What do you think the health landscape starts to look like as you get Amazon? Google apple these fairly early non traditional sources of health related information. Could it hamper Amazon's efforts if it can't control the entire ecosystem like what do you think this competitive landscapes are still look. Thank you know Amazon is at a bit of a disadvantage. Because you've got Google and apple already have smartphones but Amazon. Doesn't have a phone phone so it's really having to rely on getting Alexa into more and more devices so this idea of Alexa everywhere is is really important to Amazon because the more they can get Alexa indifferent wearables the more they can start to collect the kind of information that other companies like apple and Google already have a beat on so you talked about how doctors and research do seem to see real potential real health benefits in this data but that one of them referred to the idea of having too much information about your fitness or breathing. You're sleeping so much so that it turns into quote the worried. Well tell me about this idea. You have the data overload and how useful it could really be. Yeah and this is something really interesting to me because these devices have incredible power to track our lives in our health health and fitness in granular detail. But when you just see the raw data we don't necessarily know how to interpret that as patients right. We're not very very good doctors for ourselves. So you know one thing that becomes really important is. Is there a plan for there to be some kind of interpretation. Haitian of this data that will help us turn all that overwhelming raw data into useful ways to live our lives and that's one thing that Amazon seems to be positioning -sition itself to do because Alexa when you think about it has some of the same qualities as a doctor but Amazon is investing testing in technology that could help give Alexa a broader understanding that would enable it to not. Just be answering stupid. Trivia questions are calling up a song for us but could help us sift through you know excel spreadsheets with all kinds of information about our heart rates when when we're getting exercise and Hauer sleeping and sifting through that and coming up with specific recommendations as to how we might change our lifestyle the way you're describing sounds like it would create massive liability though I mean that is really a very specific medical all role in some ways that you're describing. Do you have a sense of whether this is going to trigger some regulatory response. Well I mean the first stages as of this that we see suggests that Alexa would actually be still complementing. A doctor not replacing Dr the technology that we've seen gene in use by NASA for example to help mission control understand what it's astronauts are doing and how they should be focusing on this task or that task because they're running out of oxygen. You Know Mission Control Surgeons are still making the final decisions but if the connection is has lost for example this intelligent agent can help the astronauts stick to the plan that the doctor set out even though you know they may have lost communication for a little bit. So how early do you think this is. I mean is that you know. I think we've heard a lot about the promise of artificial intelligence in terms of predictive capabilities in lots of different areas specifically medicine. Is this the kind of technology that is actually. Currently being used by medical professionals not necessarily from Amazon but from other places and do you think that there really is proof that it works. Yeah well in terms of whether it's used right now we're seeing we. There's just a small handful of skills on Alexa that are truly for the healthcare industry and they tend to focus on some basic things like scheduling doctor's appointments for example but when you look at fitness trackers for example most of them now have premium versions their service where there is something like an intelligent agent that helps keep you on track with your fitness goals. Right so that's actually already happening. And it's not not too much of a stretch to imagine how that could then be expanded a little bit to take more health kinds of data into account than just what your workout Out is so we think it's kind of a small hop from the kind of fitness tracking. That's happening now to something that takes into account more the health. Data

Amazon Alexa Alexa Alexa Google Apple Echo Seattle Joshua Mcnichols University Of Washington Nasa Mission Control Surgeons Hauer K. U. O. Two Billion Dollars
How Google Came to Dominate the Digital Ad Space

WSJ Tech News Briefing

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

How Google Came to Dominate the Digital Ad Space

"Google is by far the dominant player in digital advertising when companies buy online ads or bid for online ad space. They invariably use google technology and tools Google's being investigated by the Justice Department and State Attorneys General over whether it's abusing its power digital advertising including as the biggest broker Oakar of digital ad sales across the web Hauer online ads typically bought and sold. and how does Google fit in. Let's bring in the Wall Street Journal's Keach Hagi to answer that Keach you start your story about one company that tested what would happen if it stopped using Google's AD technology to buy online ads.

Google Keach Hagi Wall Street Journal Justice Department Hauer
'Sontag: Her Life and Work' by Benjamin Moser

Bookworm

11:15 min | 1 year ago

'Sontag: Her Life and Work' by Benjamin Moser

"Today I'm very pleased to have as my guest the very brilliant Benjamin Moser who is the author of two biographies of Women Writers The I was a biography of Cou- reese the specter which did a good deal of bringing the Specter a writer who spent a good majority of for life in Brazil to the attention of American readers and the second is the biography of Susan's son tag her life and work which has been a controversial book as if a biography could be controversial but nevertheless this is the way it seems now what do you think of the controversy that seems to have surrounded this book well I think a book about Susan Santa that wasn't controversial would not be a book about Susan's contact I think she's somebody who elicited very heavy very visceral and sometimes violent opinions all through her life and I don't really see this controversial this book I see it more as just I hope it's something starting a conversation about an author that I think is more essential than ever Monsanto was always associated with fashion she was associated with with photography associated with being on the cover of Vanity Fair and the only possible American intellectual who could have been on the cover of Vanity Fair I think the real writers that we actually care about are the ones who go on after their deaths and who have these chances to be reevaluated I can remember the first time I read Susan Sonntags First Book which was against interpret Tation can you remember the first time he read against interpretation yes I can't because I actually hadn't read it until I started working on this book really I know I had read the Auger fi stuff mainly and then I had read essays from against interpretation I think I hadn't read the whole book I'd read notes on Camp I'd read the title essay I'd read some of the film essays but what was really exciting about going back to read it now is that you see a world you see this time which is quite again it feels contemporary but it's all most sixty years old you know against interpretation but you get this whole Panorama of culture and ideas that feels very adding to me I have to tell you it was the first of her books that I read I was astonished by it because Some of the enormity of range of what she's read I mean just when she makes a list of the books that she thinks of you think Oh my you'd already read that in the early sixties choose only in her early thirties to thirty when that book came out before it became fashionable to avert Arto Susan cared about our toll and in fact you know she seems to no that the time she's living in as opposed to the time she died in was a time when p do new things I- slivered out some quotes from Susan let's hear Susan people want to be moved on is a writer want to move people I was very moved cried even a couple of passes that I was riding this one line that made me laugh grimly where I wanna say I say but I don't feel it's me the book says it was a time when knowledge was fashionable Philistinism was unfashionable and I wrote that line with a great deal of Glee and grimness has a time we live in as a time in which knowledge is unfashionable Philipson as it was very fashionable I'm talking to Benjamin Moser son tags biographer that what you just heard was the very first time I sat face to face with Susan from our first conversation and You considered deeply the subject of knowledge and Philistinism and Susan's almost desire to attack the Philistines can you talk to me that I think it's really funny I think it's one of the great American questions I think we're living in a time when Philistinism seems triumphant we don't have to name names but I think we all know who I'm talking about and I think that there's a kind of feeling that we're always being engulfed by the gold escalator and the the all the things in her lifetime worse symbolic of Middle Brow Ism whether it was life magazine in the book of the month club or elevator music all these kind of things Santiago always stood for the opposite of all that crap now you seem to think she becomes as she lives longer and longer harder and harder on the people around her tell me what you mean tell me what that means a lot of it might have had to do the fact that she was physically ill a lot of her life when she was forty two she got stage four breast cancer and it almost killed her and she was subjected to this very gruesome horrifying treatment that did end up saving her life and that's nineteen in seventy five to seventy eight so she's in her mid forties by then and it seemed to me that something did change in her where she got more impatient she got more intolerant of certain people but I think that it's something that's interesting to try to understand what happens but then AH dwell on it too much because what I'm really interested in in Santiago and what I think makes her relevant is her writing and her ideas I think that what we're talking about is a person who wrote in the introduction to against interpretation that we need an erotics of art not a her renewed ix of art and she writes about her fondness for the supremes which at that time you take some on won't take any number of someone's whether it's Irving Hauer Saul bellow they're not listening to the supremes they find it be quite a surprise that a highly thought of intellectual is talking about the supremes by the end of her life she's not talking about the supreme sending more and she's not talking about neurotic criticism no well I think it's very important again to think about how old a lot of this is this is again it's almost it's more than fifty years ago in that time and in that year that was really shocking and it's absolutely really hilarious to see the reactions that she got because the thing about the supreme it's not like she wrote about this frame she said something about how she likes the supremes in one line nobody it followed her the whole life but you point down very well and intelligently and correctly in this book the Cultural Conservatives awesome is has very little to do with political conservatism. Well this is another idea that I think has been forgotten sondheim comes out of a world where out of me education where what she means a small C. conservatism is starting off with Plato and Aristotle and going up to Dante and Shakespeare through the great modern poets and that love that syllabus that Canon that became extremely unfashionable and now I think we're in a world where people aren't reacting against Beethoven you know they don't even know who Beethoven is Dante Shakespeare and so both the people who wanted to modernize that and expand it for example to feminist African American authors those people lost out just as much as the people who wanted it closed for political reasons from the right wing and what happens in that song tag is very perceptive about time and time again it said it all lose out to money it always is out to consumerism and so what happens is you know famous a great painting becomes an expensive painting a great song becomes a song that gets a lot of play on the radio a lot of clicks on the Internet and that's the thing we're in now come talking once again to Benjamin Moser Susan Sonntags biographer in a book from Echo called Sawa tag do you think that you're writing a biography of Susan or in addition a biography of her times well I think both the book is called Sante her life and work and those are two things that are complementary but I'd really there's a lot I'd like people to remember that people don't remember people don't member for example that it was quite common for women to write their husbands books as happened to attack yes fascinated yeah I had no idea will I didn't either I've inhabited this world of the great female intellectuals having done Clarissa Specter before and then Sante it's a world that generation of my grandparents grandmother's generation that I'm familiar with and so about three months ago this piece came out in the Guardian announcing that I had discovered that Sante had actually written the book upon which her husband's career was based book called for the mind with moralist and this piece went viral everybody was talking wrote me and they said are you kidding this happen to everybody nobody wire people so surprised and the reason they're surprise is that I think feminism has made so many gains is that people have forgotten what it was like so when you're talking about a history of her life and times when she applied she's got Souza's very brilliant student and she comes into the World king world and she applies for a job at a magazine and her friend a male friend says well the fact that you're a woman is a real problem but we're going to try to help them get over that and that was a totally normal thing to say to a woman at that time now you would get sued and you know rightly so a lot of the ideas that we think are able in in our culture whether you think about the position of African Americans do you think about the position of women are homosexuals or all these things they've changed really radically and one of the things I think a book like the biographies and Sonic can do is trace the evolution of these ideas so that's the part that I find fascinating because sometimes she's ahead of things and somehow she's behind wind and sometimes she's struggling to understand new ideas as they come into the world it's a fascinating

Specter Benjamin Moser Writer Sondheim COU Three Months Fifty Years Sixty Years
Data Science Teams as Innovation Initiatives

Linear Digressions

14:29 min | 1 year ago

Data Science Teams as Innovation Initiatives

"Got an email from this person has a company makes widgets doesn't have any data science presence in their company and they found our podcast and they're totally sold but they don't know how to start yeah how to in how to think about making data science successful at their company right. Yes that makes sense well. That's because it's actually can be really hard to start a data science initiative from scratch especially in a big established company and that's worth thinking about <hes> explicitly if you are one of the people and there are lots of them who have a have been date like that awesome well. Let's sir help out are definitely not fake which it maker you are listening to linear decorations so i think rather than diving straight into data science case it might be worth just taking a step back because while data science initiatives at big established davos companies are relatively new there you know new ish <hes> certainly not brand new companies in general have been trying trying to innovate for basically as long as companies have existed right and so there's a lot of research into what makes innovation initiatives in companies succeed or not what which i think is pretty useful for thinking about what makes a data initiative succeed or fail or anything like that so having works at facebook a no net flicks. I don't know i don't know how this applies to the these humongous companies that are kind of generally generally on the leading edge probably had data science departments pretty early on in the process <hes> but it's worth saying that every big company used to be small and and so probably every company has to go through this at some point with some role whether that science or something else yeah <hes> and so i think that even big established tech companies like netflix and facebook or two examples of companies that have really made it their business from from from their inception to be very aggressively innovative around especially like technology and and data science and things like that so this comes up somewhat somewhat more often i would say at older more established companies that are not inherently technical companies but that recognize that they need to check up in order to succeed against new entrance so if you make consumer packaged goods or if you sell insurance durance orange shipping yeah like all of these things there. Are you know big really really good established companies that are finding themselves needing to kind of kick start innovation initiatives and very often. They're turning data especially to try to say like okay. What's what's the data strategy that we're going to a start up here and then hauer. How are we going to foster at the right way. How are we going to be the right amount of aggressive right so i guess <hes> to my my earlier point. Yes startups have to do this but it seems like you're saying that this might be a little bit more difficult in companies that are very established and have very specific well-worn paths in processes yeah so depending on yeah if if you if you're a person like me who reads too many business books looks then this might this might be reminding you. Actually there's a really famous business. Book called the innovators dilemma and this came out. I want to say a couple couple of decades. Go now sort of a classic but the general idea is that <hes> in these established companies that have been very successful in whatever their line line of businesses there comes a point where there's actually it becomes really challenging for them to innovate and that's because they are so well optimized optimized so finely tuned toward just like making money hand over fist which with whatever their current business model is that the idea of disrupting that internally with some kind of innovation is actually really unappealing right. They've spent all of this kind of time and effort to set up this big engine and this just performing and performing performing and innovation initiatives almost by definition are going to make that more challenging but at the same time in the long run you need to like it sounds really dumb. I'm cringing even as i say this but like disrupt yourself in order to stay relevant i know now i know i'm sorry i'm sorry the worst but it's it's better than somebody else coming in and eating your lunch so like yes. It's no. It's very true though <hes> i'm thinking about. I guess i'm thinking about things like where where large companies so. I i wasn't involved dan any of this stuff but at at over facebook history it has changed its homepage multiple times for example the the time that they introduced the news feed lead. Everyone hated it right. That was definitely a big hit to the company <hes> to perception of the company <hes> but it was something that i guess the people at facebook at the time decided. We need to do this because we believe the world ahead of the losses. We're going to incur or the lack of efficiency for a big polished machine or something like that. We believe that the benefits are going to sue <hes> severely outweigh the short term losses <hes> <hes> and that's really hard to see when you're in a place where you're really doing well totally yeah so if you are one of the people who who is a data scientist say at one of these companies and you're getting the story from very often like this these sorts of an innovation initiatives i should've are seen by senior executives as what the company needs to to foster in order to evolve and continue to be relevant relevant long-term. The folks who are kind of in the middle can sometimes be somewhat more resistant to it because it's more can be more disruptive to their day to day life right. That's a really point funny. Yeah i guess some sometimes i fall into the idea of thinking of companies as people since i guess but <hes> but yeah companies are not people companies have one opinion you've got all of the people between leadership and the people in the trenches writing code or or doing whatever all of them have opinions about whether this is a good move or a bad move or whatever and so that means that each company even if the leadership hip says very clearly everyone's aligned. We're going to go in this direction the company itself just because of the people inside of it has a massive opponent and moreover like when you start at data initiative. It's not like you know on day. One what the final product looks like a you might have some idea of what an outcome is. You want to achieve that like how you get. There is very often what the data science team needs to spend a lot of time like studying and doing proof of concept and doing user interviews and and figuring out like how you're going to get there and so it's it's also that's kind of what the innovation initiative live is is not. We just decided that we're going to be data driven one day and then the next day we are. It's just magically all there but instead. There's a bunch of work that you have to do and that's what but the initiative is and so the question is what are the things that you can do you. What are the ways that you can structure that work so that it's the most likely to succeed in the long run of course there's no guarantees but <hes> there are ways that you can think about this in ways that you can structure it that can help or hinder that that eventual getting it into the main sort of production work stream of the performance engine so when i talk about the performance engine let me back up here for a second 'cause. I'm slightly ahead of myself. I'm thinking a lot about a really good book that i read recently called the other side of innovation and have a link to <hes> like the amazon page where you can check it out. It's a pretty good book and so what this book is about. Is it takes us a foregone conclusion at the beginning that you wanna have an innovation initiative and then it talks about. How do you execute on it. So there's a lot of places is that spend a lotta time deciding if they want to do innovation and then they decide that the answer is yes then kind of forget about how they you just think that like having made that decision is the hard part and of course that's as anyone who's done one of these things. The hard part is doing it and doing it well so the other side of innovation is a really good book. It's just a it's about innovation initiatives in general so it's not super specific data but i think anybody who's tasked with doing disrupted data science especially in a big a big highly. <hes> highly automated <hes> organization. Let's say like an organization that already has like a performance engine up and running. I'm stealing that phrase from the book will appreciate this <hes> and so the general idea is it the book tackles a few of the most important decisions that you have to make in setting up one of these initiatives so i is recognizing that is not just about deciding that you wanna have one of these initiatives ads and putting somebody in charge of it but you also need to assemble a team and you need that team needs to have a plan in a set of metrics that are unique to the goals also they're trying to achieve and then take that plan and that set of metrics and be able to execute on it relatively autonomously of the rest of the company because the whole idea is that they're supposed to be going out and doing something with different from the way that the company is operating right now and so not allowing allowing them to break out on their own or having them be people who have lots and lots of existing remaining obligations to to to their to the main like day to day work at the company means that it's going to be really hard for them to like break out of that cycle. Yeah that makes a lot of sense and i can. I can totally see see a large company falling into that that whole i guess yeah yes so it's really easy. This is something that the book kirsch early on is like well. What about the idea of just asking people to be innovative as part of their day to day work and to a certain extent that you can get some changes that way but like the really transformational stuff is really hard to get out of folks who are also doing day to day work and then the second a second piece that i thought was pretty interesting. Staying was as that team is operating day should not in general be optimized for actually producing in kind of like business results like if they do an experiment and the experiment say ends up making a bunch of money for the company or something like that like they introduced some little prototype product and then it ends up being successful like that's great that's fine but that's not the way that their success should be measured because what's what's more important is did they learn something along the way and do they have a process for a very quickly testing hypotheses and figuring out what it is they need to learn and iterating quickly and then one last thing that i thought was really interesting. Is that the hardest part sort of innovation initiatives. Come at the end when you're trying to merge them back into the mainstream of the day to day operations of the business. Oh oh interesting because that's where you have to yeah you've got that's when you're dealing with the inertia because like you could take a brand new team and you could kind of insulate letham from the <hes> the heavy-handed operating procedures of the company that are really optimized for one thing not optimized for the new stuff but then when that they'll think tank that you've made comes up with something that you want to integrate now you actually are forced to interact with the <hes> huge gosh tanker that doesn't turn very fast exactly so there are choices that you can make even at the beginning of the initiative about who do you involve and certain types of communication channels and decision making and you know how do you present to them what it is. You're doing so then when the the project is ready to merge back in. It's not like this thing that's coming out of nowhere and that's gonna meet a whole lot of resistance but hopefully you've been sort of cultivating from the beginning winning those relationships with the people that you're going to need to be like you're the other side of the handshake right. When you start to hand it back off and you can work you can start to work with them much more closely to figure out like okay now. We know what it is we want to do. The last step is figuring out how to how to get it merged back in yeah. Those are three really <hes> good things to remember. I guess if you're in this situation and all of them are hard. Yeah i mean this is not. This is not easy stuff but it's the stuff that many data scientists i think find themselves grappling with although maybe they don't always think about it this way which is why i thought <hes> this book was the other side of innovation. I thought was a really good book and then you know the greater context like innovators dilemma just thinking about how you even get to these situations situations in the first place so we'll have links to <hes> to those books on linear aggressions dot com if you wanna check them out and and hopefully if you are a data scientist especially one who's in charge of transformational change and trying to figure out what that means and then do it <hes> this is sort of helpful for are you and gives you some a little bit of guidance about what are some of the hard decisions that you have to make and what's maybe some hints one way or the are the other about. What's most likely to work

Facebook Scientist Davos Netflix Hauer DAN Amazon Kirsch One Day
Dutch Blade Runner star Rutger Hauer dies at 75

News, Traffic and Weather

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Dutch Blade Runner star Rutger Hauer dies at 75

"He made a career out of playing bad guys in the movies Dutch actor Rutger Hauer Rutger Hauer died Rutger Hauer is probably best known for playing a rogue replicant in nineteen eighty two's Blade Runner telling us he was really proud of that role you know I'm really happy the way it turned out in the way people carry me around you know for like a lifetime the Dutch actor's Hollywood movie debut was in nineteen eighty one night hawks playing a terrorist bomber opposite Sylvester Stallone and Billy Dee Williams with over a hundred and seventy credits to his name how're had five projects in the works when he died but how're was seventy

Rutger Hauer Rutger Hauer Sylvester Stallone Billy Dee Williams
"hauer" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

The Jock and Nerd Podcast

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"hauer" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

"It's called Trivia Geeks. It is a trivia game show podcast and I am. I'm the host let host the show. It's a lot of fun. I linked to an episode that is a trivia geeks jockey nerd mash up. We have mad del Hauer going up against Jimmy graven none other than this Jimmy graven. I A love this movie and that was a lot of fun. I was geeking out to Jimmy. graven Jimmy was geeking out that he got meet Matt and myself being a listener being awesome listener that he has <hes> so he knows a lot about sports and he proves it in that episode <hes> getting all these questions right so check the show notes which you can find a chocolate dot com slash two eight three or a anthony. That's it any final thoughts for the lovely listener. Hello Friend DOC INERT BODYCAM that I wasn't asking you to do my job. What come on guy gotTA rally? We gotTA donate to the show coming to you about Tony. Twenty ruins lives stop ruining lives to give us some money your money tell all your friends all the social media's thanks for I read the Geek rejoined the empire of stupidity there. You go everything listener. Do it now do it now. God My Hond. Thanks for listening to the judge podcast. My name is Imron. My name's Anthony. He's the chuck. He's the narrative..

Jimmy graven Anthony Matt Imron del Hauer Tony TA Jimmy.
"hauer" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"hauer" Discussed on Mixergy

"And when I when he bought my stuff he was zero he'd never sold on Amazon. It's for so Hauer. Those stories answering your question. I my hope is that when you see people who'd never done a thing before, then they go and get extraordinary results. It kinda makes them wanna keep taking very systematic approach to their business because it's really really working, and I know in my case, I don't like to be bogged down in details of the day to day operations. I like to be up higher. So if I can't delegate that means, I'm going to get sucked into all this stuff. So I don't have to remember and then I go back to the culture thing again, I- policies. I sound like a broken record. I don't have a better answer. But it's, it's just so loeven into our organization that it would be really weird for people to not use them. All right. Fair enough. Wanna know what? We'll come back. I've got so many questions. I'm trying to figure out like what's the next question? Because I think the fact that you started selling SO Ps as that you started your software company with info'products essentially was really interesting. I wonder how you got your first sales. Let me talk about my second sponsors, a company called top towel. Do you know top out for hiring developers of heard of? You have what did you find your developers? I have a CTO who's been through the ringer is built and sold us off or company already. He's very frugal individual. And so all of ours have been hired from India Bangladesh. I think and he's been in charge of that whole process so how he finds no idea 'cause I just don't can vault. So let's imagine this. Here's where I think that a company like topped. How would help a company like yours your site is really good? But the mobile app, the mobile version is a little bit tougher to operate, and I understand why. Because most of your people are on desktop. They're not looking for us. Oh Ps on their phones. Correct. Imagine if it's some point, you said, no, I do actually need a mobile app, and what do you do to get a mobile app? You go and find people from India, who are going to be building a mobile app. Maybe. Or maybe what you say is I want to foundation to be really good. And so I want people who built multiple mobile apps and specifically apps, they're very similar to mine, and to do that. What you can do is go to top talent. You say, here's what I'm looking for. I sensuously want something like and maybe give them a list of competitors that are like what you're looking for you. Tell them how you operate, everything. So p you tell them what, what software use to, to communicate and they'll find somebody who's done software like you and whose intellect documenting their stuff, especially well, so that they culturally fit with you, and who can communicate. It using whatever software. Quirky thing that you do like for me. It's base camp. I don't want someone who's a high chatter person. I want someone who's more sit right every company has worked. So they'll find all that the get you the one or two or three people that you need you can work with them with your CTO, managing the whole process, and then once they're done, you've got the foundation, you can say great. Thank you. It's been a good month with you. And god. These, we worked well together. I'm glad that you're here, but it's time for you to go totally fine. And my team's gonna take it from there and since they've documented well, and since they've actually organized everything, right? You now have your mobile app. Maybe it's two different laps. One franchise one Freia s that's where topped out comes in for companies like yours. And I remember it was David Hauser, the founder of grasshopper, who's now moved on after sold his company for one hundred seventy million.

Ps CTO Hauer Amazon India Bangladesh India David Hauser founder
Backlash grows for police use of facial recognition (The 3:59, Ep. 562)

The 3:59

05:09 min | 2 years ago

Backlash grows for police use of facial recognition (The 3:59, Ep. 562)

"The. Welcome to three fifty nine I'm Ben FOX Ruben, I'm as actually on Tuesday, San Francisco became the first city to ban. Police use of facial recognition tech proponents of the ban say the tech offers a slippery slope for Massar Valence while proponents facial recognition say that it's a useful policing tool. I as guess, do you expect more cities to follow suit with San Francisco? I think the outright ban is a little bit much. I don't think cities will do that right away. I did see somebody talk about a moratorium maybe they don't use it as, as, as primary method of dentist. Maybe it's the secondary. Or maybe it's used in a very light way. But the outright ban, I think, is a little bit much. There must be a different way to regulate something like this. Well, it's also interesting that this is obviously, not a federal ban. It's still being used in a variety of other places right? Yeah. So I was looking at an article about this, and this does apply to San Francisco police and agencies, but the San Francisco, please does not use this currently. So nothing's changed. There plus facial detect is available at airports, international airports and ports. But that's jurisdiction, which means this ban has no effect on those areas, which means that if I went to the airport, and San Francisco, San Francisco International airport, they could use facial recognition in theory. So it's not like the entire municipality everything in your, the federal you can't can use this. So some additional information about this. The Georgetown Law Center on privacy and technology, which has been looking into facial recognition technology for quite some time came out with a study today, this morning, saying police are using flawed data to run facial recognition searches those include using artist's sketches editing images to add is in lips and searching for look alike. So to me, this seems like if people are already a little shaky on the USA facial recognition tack, this is obviously another point to say, hey, maybe this isn't the best thing. I mean if you were. Night witness go. Hey, get a little, Ben FOX Ruben, this should be able to show a picture of Ben FOX and since he's so well known. Maybe of course, one of the cases actually was Harrelson, David Schwimmer look, lot of people like that. So the idea of saying, this person looks like another person would be usable in the police sense. The idea that computers doing it and potentially getting wrong. Again. It's that final step if, if for some reason, the police are deploying arresting drones. Yeah. I think there's a real problem there. But if there's a person Dan going, this is completely wrong, or this is completely right? At least it should be due process after that. Yeah. I think that, you know, the, the idea that this was proposed in the first place is facial, recognition tech is supposed to be more accurate or more credible than the human, I'd sometimes or it's able to pick certain things up, like, for instance, if you're wearing a different pair of glasses if you have longer hair, dyed, your hair. There are all sorts of different ways to maybe mess with the human eye, which facial, recognition tech is expected to be able to just kind of. Sift through unfortunately with this study seems that, you know, hey, maybe they're messing around with it a little too much. Next up one. Switch to a different subject. We are happy to report, the no Facebook, certainly not listening to your conversations. Not that important seen it actually tested out, this urban legend. I was forced to talk into my phone for about a week and a half trying to get advertisements about chainsaws. And no. I didn't get any advertisements about chainsaws new found no evidence that this is actually real love. The article about this, the point that this would be crazy illegal. Let's not forget that illegal, forget the idea that oh yeah. This would be creepy. It would cost Facebook trillions of dollars and ruining their model entirely that have been breaking the law, this Hauer amount of time that would be just amazingly bad for Facebook. When it comes to the press. So if they're crazy enough to do it, then, yeah, they should be. It's a good point that you mentioned that this would actually cost the company, a lot of money, and there would in fact, be some sort of footprint to show that Facebook is digesting that information that it's actually gobbling up audio recordings from two billion of its users you even several hundred million of those users, there would be some sort of data process that we, we would be able to notice, and unfortunately, security, researchers haven't found that if the accuracy aspect of these ads. I think that's what makes people scared, but it's links to your friends searches that you're, you're looking for, because your friends are looking for friends of friends that kind of weird amazing profile that can create all this data on top of that just reminds me I was going to buy car. All of a sudden it's thinking about buying a Honda Accord. They were everywhere, didn't mean that they weren't there all the time. I just didn't notice them as much right? Wonder if there's a psychological element of I was just talking about cookies and others ads for cookies. But you might not have noticed it before because you're talking about pizza. Yeah. And it's a good point. Alfred ING in his story talked about the. Fact that Facebook doesn't actually have to listen to you at already has a ton of data about you already. But anyway, if you want to read more about these stories, check them out on CNN Ben FOX river on that bridge. Carey. Oh, jeez. All right. You threw me off. Thanks for listening.

Facebook San Francisco Ben Fox Ruben Ben Fox San Francisco International Ai Massar Valence Georgetown Law Center USA CNN Alfred Ing Carey DAN David Schwimmer Harrelson Hauer
"hauer" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"hauer" Discussed on WTVN

"His name is James holes Hauer, and he won a hundred thirty one thousand one hundred twenty seven dollars during the show that aired on. Well, it would have been last night. And he broke the record that the viewer saw him set last week. So he broke his own record. So his last record was seventy seven thousand. Well, no that was the last record before him. I guess I should say. But anyway, the records are actually set one day apart is the way they this should actually be, you know. Talked about it was a a new high score which occurred on February twelfth from that. So anyway, yeah, this is actually crazy when you think about one day somebody winning that kind of money because you're going one hundred thirty one thousand that that is a lot of money. If you've never watched jeopardy, I mean that is a lot you that you're winning for that. And also just a side note, Alex trebek's who he revealed last month or two months ago. Actually, it was last month that he was diagnosed with advanced pancreatic cancer posted a message yesterday, and he was thanking fans for their well wishes, and such when I first started reading that go this probably isn't good. But he continues with his therapy. And he is saying despite what you're hearing despite rumors despite all of these things listen to me say that I'm feeling good. And I'm continuing with this therapy. And so far so good with it. So that's great news as well. Obviously for Alex trebek's and for everybody, traffic.

Alex trebek James holes Hauer one day hundred thirty one thousand on two months
"hauer" Discussed on The MMQB: 10 Things

The MMQB: 10 Things

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"hauer" Discussed on The MMQB: 10 Things

"And so they're all these different things that were going wrong. And so things get sideways, and no one was there to kind of pull things back together and to rain the team in. And so you wonder now like you see the Marcus Peters thing in like the video right? It's like when things are going poorly. Hauer those guys going to react because this is really the first time. I mean, they lose the game to the saints earlier in the year. I mean, that's look it was a shootout they played pretty well in that game. Like that's not as certainly not the same as what's happened. The last couple of we know Marcus Peters is going to react to sell it on the news. Halfway into the stands. Well, I mean, you know, the question goff's numbers I saw PF at a post the last night. I think it was and his his raiding the last three weeks is lower than any starter in that range. I think except for Sanchez obviously is no longer a starter. So I think that's going to be interesting to exactly what's going on there. And with the offense. What are some of the reasons I think the line play has been a reason they've been struggling up front. There's always been the question with golf. It's like if everything's clean around him. Like, he's majestic throwing the football. He just looks like he was one of these guys looks like he was born to throw it. It's when things get muddy around the reputations always been like that's when he struggles is true for a lot of quarterbacks. But like I remember hearing that was sort of the difference between once golf when they were coming out was like if you make things muddy on him, and you knock them around a little bit like he's not the same. And I think we we think we going up against teams where they clearly like the defensive. Front had an advantage over the offensive line. The bears defensive front is better than the Rams offensive line. The eagles defensive front is better than the Rams offensive line. Like, that's like it's like draw it up like that. That's the circumstance where he struggled and he struggled..

Sanchez Marcus Peters goff golf Rams Hauer bears eagles three weeks football
The local, national, and global fight over 5G infrastructure

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:11 min | 2 years ago

The local, national, and global fight over 5G infrastructure

"The. The fight over five g. infrastructure is about the digital divide corporate handouts city, and state's rights and China. So basically hot mess from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying. The digital economy I'm Ali, would. The whole multi trillion dollar promise of five g. and its millions of jobs and new businesses is all just a pipe dream without infrastructure. Unlike four g. which can be delivered through a relatively small number of tall towers, five g. wireless service relies on lots and lots of small receivers placed fairly close together and installing all those little five g. cells is turning into a big fight, booze being done at the expense of cities that are already overburdened, trying to deal with homelessness and host of problems cross the country. This is Pete Holmes, the city attorney in Seattle, Seattle's one of several cities fighting a new order from the Federal Communications Commission that puts a federal cap on how much city can charge. When a company wants to put a five g. receiver on public property, we have to essentially give up our property rights are property values to benefit private. Companies that will be doing the expansion. The FCC says, cities like Seattle are charging excessive fees and the flat rate would save telecom companies about two billion dollars. So they could afford to build infrastructure all over the country, including traditionally underserved rural areas. Here's Brennan car, the FCC Commissioner who initiated the new order. He says, it's also the key to beating China trying to beat us to five g. what that fight looks like is largely infrastructure battle right now. They're deploying small sales cell sites out the building block needed for five Jeep, somewhere around twelve times the pace at we've been doing it in the US and largely that was due to our outdated permiting processes and regulatory red tape. Look, we can cut all the red tape we want, but there's no way that the US is going to compete with China in five g. that's Mike, Dana editor in chief of the wireless industry publication, fierce wireless. He says, China, indirect way, more government resources and. Double up way more users than the US ever can. Our biggest obstacle sustain. Oh, is that the rollout of five g. has become shockingly politicized? You've seen it argued as a national security issue because if the United States doesn't deploy five g. fast enough than China will and that will put China ahead of us in terms of technological capabilities, give seen it argued as a national security element in terms of, you know, having a nationwide five network will will make things safer. You know, we'll we'll support Thomas cars and that'll that'll reduce traffic accidents. But all this raises the question, if five is such a big deal economically and in terms of security, should the federal government pay for it here? Seattle, Pete Holmes. Again, you know, our whole interstate highway system was underwritten by the federal government. That's why we have such good heads such good infrastructure back in January, the Trump administration actually floated the idea of secure national five g. network Brennan car from the FCC. Says, there is no way that's going to happen, but he said there are already existing federal funds to build out internet and five g. access, especially in rural areas. Although those funds are small compared to the four hundred billion dollars, China has directed toward five g. over just five years. And now for some related links, honestly, maybe we don't want so much internet a story in the Atlantic yesterday, terrifyingly details all the ways that teenagers are using Instagram to bully each other. Like by setting up anonymous profiles, just to hate on someone or sending a constant barrage of messages or tagging each other with bullying comments. Now, reading it, I did feel like you could substitute the word internet for Instagram in a lot of those places actually substitutes smartphones, and then you're really getting to the heart of the matter. But I can't say I don't see potential problems with how my tweet son is using Instagram mostly because yes, he and all his friends are using it parent company, Facebook actually announced earlier this week that it will use artificial intelligence to scan photos to detect bullying that has had mixed results in the past. I don't know. I mean, I don't know the answer, but I gotta say it doesn't feel like five g.. Going to make us nicer and speaking of name calling around about way. Lots of you wrote in after I talked about the dilemma yesterday of whether to call myself a nerd, lots of you do support the idea that we should let our nerd flags fly, but I thought about how I've used it in the past, and it's true that when I said it, it was sort of self mocking. So from now on, I will only call myself a nerd when I'm feeling really awesome about it, which to be honest is pretty much all the time. I'm Molly would, and that's marketplace tech. This is APN. Hi, I'm Zach and I listened to marketplace in Arlington, Virginia. I think what I appreciate the most about marketplace's their ability to take the economic news of the day issues such as tariffs rate, hikes, tax reform, cut through the political noise and clearly and concisely explained not only how these issues affect our country in the rest of the world. But how they impact people like me. I hope you'll consider joining me as marketplace investor and donate today at marketplace dot org to help make their work possible marketplace. Podcast is brought to you by Amazon web services. Do you ever wonder how we're streaming millions of movies on demand, turning homes into hotels, Hauer, watching live missions for Mars, smart business minds dreamed, these ideas and Amazon web services is how they built them with the broadest functionality. And the most experience leading enterprises trust the AWS cloud to build the next big idea. Are you ready to build it? Learn more at AWS is how dot com. Slash podcast.

China Seattle United States Federal Communications Commiss Instagram FCC Pete Holmes Federal Government Amazon ALI Brennan Atlantic Thomas Facebook Hauer Virginia Commissioner
"hauer" Discussed on Millennial Money

Millennial Money

03:33 min | 3 years ago

"hauer" Discussed on Millennial Money

"Just starts with being mindful of hauer feeling like because a lot of the personal finance stuff teaches us logic at teachers like rules in strategies and stuff but an says like to do that you have to ignore your emotions just overcome your emotions or as my mentality approach to this which i find has been very effective for me and my clients has been known embrace those emotion sion's like us those emotions to your benefit so like if you feel scared us that to your benefit if you feel happy use that to your benefit like pursue how you wanna feel changing how you wanna feel rather than like trying to act like a money allott and make your financial decisions around like logic and as if you're not a human because ultimately ornament so right yeah it so do you think like you stressed you know he says something like somebody should earn all about or like how they keep track of you know what are the things that make you feel good or don't make me feel good so that they have like some way to to reflect on that or have some sort of awareness of really what those things are over some given period of time i recommend like tracking your spending and or tracking all your expenses even like all your bills and that stuff how you feel like if you're feeling grateful for that if you're feeling resentful of it if you're like this mistake doing like doing that in the moment and then like coming back to that thirty days in seeing how you feel about that again and i've done this with expenses they're things that i bought a target that i was like this is life changing so exciting it's use the journal i just got to me last week i got a new microwaveable journal that you can scan onto an app and i'm like oh this is gonna change my life now like actually penna came with like this is not i'm not joined this also on my sending tracker it's i have two very different state of mind coming to i on this funding tracker i was very grateful for announced like kind of neutral at this point so seeing that and then like you know it's like collecting data and like going back to your data and zoom like okay like this didn't actually pan out as much as positive as i thought it was going to so maybe the next time when i'm in the journal of target i'm gonna like keep my cool and remember that how many journals have i gone neutral on over the us right there so addictive though aren't they they've got like all the clever sayings on them like you just wanna reach for them they're so pretty it's so so hard i totally it target is just a hard place there's so much stuff you know and like a point in that discussion that you know there are so many blogs i was just looking up the other day and i think on google there was something like eight hundred thirty six million search results came up when i typed in personal finance boggs so obviously there's not that many personal finance blogs but you know a lot of articles about the top fifty the top hundred you should read that one you should read this you know there's there's just like so much information which is good it's great that there is i mean when i graduate college there wasn't this type of information so you had to either find somebody.

hauer thirty days
HBO’s ‘Watchmen’ Pilot Casts Regina King, Don Johnson, Four Others

/Film Daily

01:43 min | 3 years ago

HBO’s ‘Watchmen’ Pilot Casts Regina King, Don Johnson, Four Others

"The kid who played young ben in the movie so based on looks alone he's a good choice just hope like that his his performance bears that out as well yes yesterday on the podcast we talked about damon lindelof watchmen each series which is not a sequel not an adaptation but kind of like a follow up in some way a remix i think is the word to use today we get a bit of casting for the series chris who is joining the show a lot of people so regina king don johnson tim blake nelson louis gossett junior atalay clemens and andre hauer indra howard sorry are have all been announced to join the cast and an interesting lineup i mean regina king was on the leftovers viz damon lindelof other show don johnson is a very well known actor tim blake nelson he's a great character actor and i know it's very interesting lineup the only thing is we have no idea who they're playing because like you said peter this this isn't a straight adaptation of the comic it's actually it's more like a sequel where it set decades after the comic so everyone who died in the comic is still dead so it's it's hard to really even guest who they're playing damon lindelof has said there's going to be a lot of new characters on the show so for all we know all these people are playing brand new characters we've never heard of before i do like the choices in this gassing there's a lot of kind of coal character actor kind of choices don johnson who is probably most famous for what miami vice.

Chris Atalay Clemens Regina King Peter Damon Lindelof Andre Hauer Indra Howard Don Johnson Tim Blake Miami
"hauer" Discussed on Elite Man Podcast

Elite Man Podcast

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"hauer" Discussed on Elite Man Podcast

"Are there things like you do every single day to implement into your life to make sure you get past that and kind of break down those layers over time we'll dow was at its core looks at us as sort of on three models we have a physical body we haven't emotional body we have spiritual body we have a density of ourselves as a physical being emotional being end up spiritual being and so you what you try to do is to identify each of those things where we get stuck and then seeing the relationship between them how to my emotions affect my physical health how does my physical health effect my motion health how does the physical trauma impact me socially in a relationship level and so there's a component of chinese medicine of dallas medicine that is working with either any of those bodies and trying to see the relationship in that can be cognitive therapy that can be journaling mind mapping that can be meditative practices that can be the use of what taoism calls external alchemy using microdosing doubt stimulate an awaken certain things in ourselves it can be treated with acupuncture herbal medicine really like the it's more the philosophy that guides it rather than the tools that we use a good practitioner of chinese medicine can draw from any tool so like say you really love meditating they would give you a practice that would involve meditating but if you hated meditating but you like drinking herbal medicine than we would take the same principle just apply that to urban medicine and true to herbal medicine rather than meditation but it could be exercise it could be massage it'd be acupuncture or it could be dietary therapy the the tool isn't a path the philosophy is the path and if you're good at it that you can you can apply any tool to make it work how does how does the like herbal present i mean that's a very interesting point how does the herbal component compared to say like meditative component hauer those to getting you the same results.

hauer
"hauer" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"hauer" Discussed on Here & Now

"Mechanisms and accountability in the places like race tracks casinos have a long history with like self exclusion programmes some work more than others but if the states don't require evaluation and accountability like we have in new jersey for online there's no way to find out if these people really do have these resources so that's my primary worry for tickly at a race track where you go there to to bet on a horse and then you then you're betting on sports and then you're doing it on your cellphone the more things you do the more likely you're get yourself underwater and so just again what if some of the speed bumps you'd like to see i would like to see a standardized protocol for educating people on what options there are set their limits and i would like to see what whoever offers the sports betting that percentage be dedicated not just to treatment but also to evaluating the outcomes of these responsible gaming programs every year meaning that the venues have to keep the data and then the data is evaluated on who is playing who is opting for these different limit setting mechanisms hauer they working and how can we improve them so that it's a very dynamic system aimed at harm reduction pool that gets into some privacy issues though doesn't it i mean if casinos know when somebody's regularly going over the limit that they've set for themselves what do you do contact the family i mean what do you do there's a lot of different countries in an states that have different ways of dealing with this some people use popups i mean in a sports arena understand that these casinos all know what people are spending and that's what's used for marketing purposes already nine more money and and so they can use this for good to help educate the person hey you.

hauer
"hauer" Discussed on IOT Podcast

IOT Podcast

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"hauer" Discussed on IOT Podcast

"Hey everyone welcome back to the internet of things podcast this is your host stacey higginbotham and today i have not one but two guests i am here at headquarters in elmhurt sweden and i am learning the correct pronunciation for trod free and eating meat balls you guys so let's get started we've got two guests we've got rebecca told him on who's in charge of the todd for products okay i'm gonna let her say two products wow okay and then after we talked a little bit we're going to talk to leanna kovach who is in charge of designing manufacturing products in sustainable way so i am super talk about all of this so rebecca by the end of this may be pronounce this correctly tragedy so close all right so i purchased the lights in apparently a couple of weeks ago i put mine away for a while because they weren't working but for all of those they've been out in the market for a year so let's talk about what you've learned since they've been out in the market hauer customers finding them do they come in asking for them at the store do they just couldn't buy them by running across them what does that process i think my we start to develop a smart thing wrench we developed it for it to fix the normal i can't customer that he's not so take gate usually end this aware about all of this in quantity than the a cyst and what we learned is we attract many new type of customers so many customers that have been i care for a couple of years and now they have actually rent that we have something that connected and they are coming but we also then attracting our normal customer base the one that doesn't know that there is something that is called sixty or connected lighting did just won't stain there not so i think that said have been very fun.

stacey higginbotham sweden rebecca todd leanna kovach market hauer
"hauer" Discussed on The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"hauer" Discussed on The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

"Hey everyone welcome back to the internet of things podcast this is your host stacey higginbotham and today i have not one but two guests i am here at headquarters in elmhurt sweden and i am learning the correct pronunciation for trod free and eating meat balls you guys so let's get started we've got two guests we've got rebecca told him on who's in charge of the todd for products okay i'm gonna let her say two products wow okay and then after we talked a little bit we're going to talk to leanna kovach who is in charge of designing manufacturing products in sustainable way so i am super talk about all of this so rebecca by the end of this may be pronounce this correctly tragedy so close all right so i purchased the lights in apparently a couple of weeks ago i put mine away for a while because they weren't working but for all of those they've been out in the market for a year so let's talk about what you've learned since they've been out in the market hauer customers finding them do they come in asking for them at the store do they just couldn't buy them by running across them what does that process i think my we start to develop a smart thing wrench we developed it for it to fix the normal i can't customer that he's not so take gate usually end this aware about all of this in quantity than the a cyst and what we learned is we attract many new type of customers so many customers that have been i care for a couple of years and now they have actually rent that we have something that connected and they are coming but we also then attracting our normal customer base the one that doesn't know that there is something that is called sixty or connected lighting did just won't stain there not so i think that said have been very fun.

stacey higginbotham sweden rebecca todd leanna kovach market hauer
"hauer" Discussed on AppStories

AppStories

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"hauer" Discussed on AppStories

"That's interesting i wanted to ask you to about third party developers because we've talked a little bit about apple how hauer third party developers doing from your experience better i save your still work to be done with like many but i finally on the apps said i us work just fine i'm gonna lay spotlight row quickness see like for example starbucks up because you get my coffee in the morning and that works fine with voiceover instagram social media i think we'll talk about that in just a second but uber works greats transportation of choice youtube i usually fine works just fine and then i have the two brads scriptures so i can just like listening to videos thorough again podcast audio only without my phone wasting its battery on the screen but will i wanna find with social media like instagram and twitter is the self might be a little bit accessible scrambler still some areas like bill released new features and it won't be voiceover sessile right away like for example they introduced the messages like the instant stories and all that they didn't quite work very well for some reason it always take me into the camera part when i'm trying to look at it conversation is a little buggy i think it's gotten better but the problem having visual content obviously instagram is built upon photos right like what is the blind person have on instagram other than captions maybe some flurry like we have pinch zoom now on skirmish took them a long time but finally that but for people who can't really make out anything i do think on 'em subscriptions in this my own effort where my captions describe what's happening in the image what visual content i want someone to see and i do seal the people within the disabled community to that as well his it's great but it'd be nice if i know twitter you can add image descriptions but it's it on will be nice if they had that on a fault into sort of had a little thing like abe is the help visuallyimpaired people instead of like people who just aren't aware of it already having dig through settings because they're not looking for it so when not just present it to them if they wanna turn it off and not contribute that's their choice so it'd be.

apple starbucks instagram twitter abe hauer
"hauer" Discussed on Cults

Cults

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"hauer" Discussed on Cults

"And quote so the cult was over with their guru stuck in america what happened to ads followers with their leader gone the cult began to disperse the cat was really ought to the bag and many of the members feared legal action should they remain connected with the organization remember they were upper middle class they knew how to protect themselves legally despite this not all of them escaped completely unscathed hauer whitaker's practice was disgraced his license stripped for its continued use of psychedelic drugs similarly dr rainer johnson's reputation took a deadly blow he had defended the family very publicly on television and in print after the cult was exposed to the public his contributions to physics no longer mattered he was blacklisted the 'aunties lived out their lives and freedom but all have since died they will never be brought to justice what about an wish ever extradited to the children get justice i'm afraid they didn't the family still exist today though its numbers have dwindled to a mere handful the australian government did coordinate with the fbi to get an sent back to australia for trial on august 17th 1993 however the courts didn't have any evidence to charge the cult with it was decided that the children have been traumatized enough and that to use them at the trial would be unfair strain ultimately not worth it without the children's testimony the only charges the victorian magistrate's court could bring them up on were conspiracy to defraud and commit perjury for false registration of triplets when sentencing was done in 1994 annan bill walked away from the courthouse free people the only repercussion they got for all the pain and misery they 'cause it was a five thousand dollar fine each.

hauer whitaker australian government fbi perjury america dr rainer johnson australia annan five thousand dollar
"hauer" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

The Adam Buxton Podcast

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"hauer" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

"Really story wise but you'll so enjoy ably immersed in this world that has been completely realized down to the tiniest detail and you believe in it totally and there's so many charismatic performances in it and this if you know the several in the new on as well but not quite the same you know there's no one quite as good as there's no one quite like grandpa to sorry there's no one quite as good as daryl hannah or rutger hauer or shoe on young all the guy that place jf sebastian williams sandison you know there was this so well draw on those characters i think and they don't rubbish in in the new trump just know the notice memorable but maybe this just because i saw when i was thirteen and it made such a huge impression but the other thing with the new one was that the music i don't think did the same job jobless that original van a skull and i haven't read too many reviews of the new on so i don't know if i'm just pirating stuff that all the reviews have said or not but i really missed the van gallis music that's just one of the best scores ever really it's like a whole character i think in the original movie that score enables ridley scott to get away with so much because the atmosphere creates his completely irresistible when the opening shot of los angeles all darkened infernal plumes of flame in the distance beautiful models skyline that they created so brilliantly and then you hear that that main title theme that van gallis theme the sweeps of synthesizer that resolve into this very stirring quite simple theme this tune and call it up for my firm.

rutger hauer los angeles daryl hannah ridley scott
"hauer" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"hauer" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Movie lady heart by any chance rutger hauer yeah now you have seen it i have seen as a pretty cool movie matthew broderick i think that was right after fierce buehler members right before fairest buehler ronnie i really cool about the i don't know someone a which or someone and put a curse on these two lovers michelle pfeiffer and then rutger hauer and by day the lady was a hawk by night she was a woman by night rutger hauer was a man by day he was was he a wolf or something on your remember it's been so long you don't remember i don't remember either i think we've got a video that that andre jeff chronic liar for that you know these are coming back these youngsters are light light plane vhs and cassette tapes right so go i have a whole bunch of them hanging around my how cool let's do something a we spin that eightball it's a radio topic magic eightball that i gave you would go ahead shake that thing and see what it comes up with let me take a look go ahead how you now no no i got it and i just i'm show woodward were linked up via a video connection here died all right you said do something random high cool got it right here hey allan parsons in the music year allan parsons is the guy from a who did produce short side of the moon for this states and he also did that syria song that the bulls come out through that is garbage man 1985 i don't miss you after all right nineteen rules that make no sense but everyone follows anyway are these uniquely american reserves this everybody melissa smith i don't know and some of these kind of these are more relevant than others i think oh you're right now i i don't do that yeah but some of them are like get on okay i got one where is it hold on i gotta go over here i got it here knock on wood she you wanna know why we knock on wood dea her i am happy to tell you well tse knocking on would obviously such superstition i don't.

matthew broderick rutger hauer woodward allan parsons bulls buehler michelle pfeiffer andre jeff syria melissa smith
"hauer" Discussed on We Paid To See This

We Paid To See This

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"hauer" Discussed on We Paid To See This

"I you need yet if you haven't seen the original see the original because rutger hauer and daryl hannah i mean wrecker how is incredibly is one of the best antagonise of all time going to say something controversial know there's a line in the original film that always puts him so cheesy was loses his last lionia cat dammit he's a great antagonist do you know that the original cut of the movie i believe you know the there's a driving sequence at the end no i didn't know whether there's no no it's in the movie there's a big sweeping like it's the movie that the students the end at the studio wanted is a big driving sequence at the end yes suggests leftover footage from the shining i believe bryant they asked kubrick for during footage again not drone god elegant afford it i a couple of big illness comey had that we will not be seeing one is koji years storm with gerard butler and jim sturgis i mean there's a there's a number of things and sarker sorry i dunno well but you know it's a big satellite it's so funny to me it's a big satellite that's supposed to control global warming so we can still live on earth but someone's using it to create all these natural disasters which is what every bond villain has ever wanted to do an unusual to control the weather a giant satellite centered around let me ask you about the snyman okay it's coming out michael fast bend lack ferguson icy in this it the trailers for this look like a joke on snl it looks like snl made a fake film and just win the snow man haha booking it's a best seller am thing yet i now i love michael bender.

rutger hauer kubrick gerard butler jim sturgis global warming snl michael bender daryl hannah bryant
"hauer" Discussed on The Weekly Substandard

The Weekly Substandard

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"hauer" Discussed on The Weekly Substandard

"Uh it's it's i mean it's obviously willful and naive and all that but it's nice and then the first line of dialogue basically the first real line of dialogue the first like x x position is rutger hauer coming on screen and saying this space station is to have you were going off into the deep breaches of space and make it kind of goes off on its own so then the second seen the second sequence is basically a short film it's a short film that is kind of an avatar knock off you have these aliens were like big and kind of gangly and they they have their own uh uh you know uh culture and society in its essentially a short film that is also a silent film it's very well done it like you can you can follow the action without quite understanding exactly what's happening you see these aliens living in peace with their their society in you know the eu they are in harmony with nature you know they're thereof they're they're all getting along together and they're they're replenishing what they take from the sea and cetera so this is all very well that again and this all comes to a crashing end when ships come smashing into the planet like wreckage of ships come smashing into the planet and destroys everything there's very touching moment where the like daughter of the queen of the society is trapped outside of the ship where these people have kind of um uh a cordon themselves off and again this is actually a very solid piece of filmmaking it is just a it is a show don't tell masterpiece it is you know here is here is how everything works they could have gotten rid of all the subtitles and it would work just as well.

rutger hauer the queen