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35 Burst results for "Hatch"

A Long and Winding Journey For Some Drinking Water

Bay Curious

04:47 min | 5 d ago

A Long and Winding Journey For Some Drinking Water

"Thousands of years before Checchi was a reservoir, the valley was home to several native American tribes. The name Hetch hetchy probably derived from the me. Walk Word Hatch, Hatschi, which means edible grasses, the valley floor would have been full of them, and they were important food source, but in nineteen twenty-three those grasses were buried under billions of gallons of water when the reservoir was finished to find the answers to the rest of Alex and heath questions, reporter Sara Craig, found herself someplace unexpected in the hills of San Bruno. We've arrived just in time to catch some action at the Harry Tracy Water Treatment Plant. Really, high. Spillover! VERICOSE OH, wow! Drinking water from all over is getting filtered here to move large and small particles, but water from hetch Hetchy is so pure. It doesn't need to get filtered although it does get disinfected with chlorine, an ultra violet light. Let's start at the very very beginning where the water starts, that's. And she's joined by Suzanne, Goatee. They work for San Francisco's Public Utilities Commission and a ton about Hetch hetchy water. They tell us it all starts high in the SIERRAS so high. The water isn't water. It's snow. The snow that we're talking about. Is this know that falls on the Twala me. River watershed, which is four hundred ninety two square miles. That's about the size of this city of La all the snow in that watershed Melton to the TWALA me river and three smaller creeks which empty into the Hetch hetchy reservoir. On average per year at San Franciscans consume would be equal to a foot of snow covering that Ptolemy River watershed. To put this into perspective, it takes five feet of snow to fill the hole reservoir once-melted that water leaves the reservoir from o'shaughnessy Dam. And then so look at this map. It travels through a whole series of tunnel so here we're moving through the mountain tunnel. In along the way it goes through hydroelectric dams that generous about seventeen percent of San Francisco's electricity. Did you know that the power from Hetch hetchy from water. That's what actually powers your school. Yeah, I. I go to Jefferson Yeah, it probably yeah. Yeah not even the the Muny Light Rail that you've seen San Francisco Yup. I ride on those sometimes. The water travels downhill the whole. Rushing through tunnels drilled through solid granite. PIPELINES LINED WITH CONCRETE Picture a giant underground waterslide, twisting around mountains and under rivers, and then it takes about three days for the water to get over here all the way into San Francisco. Is. Kinda long, isn't it but yeah, okay only three days sure. It would take a long that do like four or five as maybe a week will need. It's not a bad guests. How do you know that it takes three days? Did you send like some kind of a probe in the water to to time it? We have flow meters throughout the system. and. Yes yes, it'll tell you how much water is moving through what pipeline so we do a little bit of math and you say one hundred sixty seven miles. At three feet per second equals about eighty three hours, but those eighty three hours are rough estimate because operators are always releasing different amounts of water, depending on how much people use. Okay any takes us outside to where some of our drinking water is stored. We're standing on a hill, looking down at a huge tank that holds eleven million gallons. So this is one of those places where we regulate shifts in demand on a daily basis. It's white. Sheen reflects the bright sunlight making it hard to look at so maybe for the water bottle to huge giant water bottle for the whole bay area. Alex suggests we stand on top of that water bottle. Over there now, okay, don't look down. And coaches himself over a narrow meadow footbridge, fifty feet above the ground

Hetch Hetchy Reservoir Hetch Hetchy San Francisco Harry Tracy Water Treatment Pl Alex San Bruno San Franciscans Sara Craig Checchi Hatschi Reporter Mountain Tunnel Public Utilities Commission Muny Light Rail Ptolemy River Sierras LA Suzanne Sheen
"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

07:18 min | 2 weeks ago

"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

"All right okay. Everybody, thank you for joining us for another down the hatch podcast about swallowing on es. Humbert your co host, and of course we have our other host Dr Aleisha votes. We have a special guest Dr Phoebe mccray, and what they both have in common. Is that at some point I played a role in their training Dr. phoebe McRae is was my very first post doc at. Johns Hopkins University and Dr Aleisha Vos was my very first doctoral student at the University of Florida. So I'm going to ask each of them to introduce themselves. The topic for today is experience dependent plasticity. It is the second installment in our series about swallowing neuro physiology. Alicia. Do you WanNa? Start out just reminding everybody who you are. Sure, so like you said. Manning's at least Vos I am a postdoctoral fellow at the, University of Florida McKnight Brain Institute and have spent the last five years dedicated to research, but still very clinically oriented research. Cool CB radio. Yeah Hey I'm Haffey mccray. I'm based in Neon. I did my training here I grew up in New Zealand and I. Trained to be a speech language. Therapist is what we call them here. The and I did my phd here new. I come Verron as being two years as a post doc. And then I moved back home after my talk. The Aaron I'm working for the University of Kabri in Christian. Museums on a simulate trachea in my research lab is by State Saint George's hospital with purpose Magli Huckabee and he away look at a number projects related to. Rehabilitation swallowing your physiology and my area recently and could have granted look at S.'s cough. Rehabilitation Seen Serie modulation stuff. Graham. Read almost overlap. Yet you were as they were commissioned the as to tell the story when I first meet you as a clinician Hawkins, and you're telling me about how you've just seen a patient who had a gunshot wound in hit the highway blown off. I'm outside. I want that job. Baltimore Baby. The wire was real. A. Lot of trouble. So, we are all sipping a little something. Some caffeinated alcohol will. You'll know maybe in a few minutes. He's drinking. What because you know? It's a different time of day. It's morning one of our time zones in his evening. Others and we're GONNA. Let you guys decide who is morning and WHO's evening? WHO's drinking caffeine and who's drinking alcohol just to supplement? That I'm a west hold. That sounds like I've been drinking, so it's a fierce. Okay so we decided that we wanted to have a podcast that is continuing in the series about swallowing neuro physiology, but the first podcast that we did last month focused on some basics about what the neuro anatomy is. What's a basic basic related to neuro physiology? And for this podcast? We wanted to talk more about what speech pathologists may have some control over. Over and what they may not have control over when it comes to feeding and swallowing, so it was obvious to me that the paper that we wrote together that you'd lead on experience. Dependent plasticity would be agreed start. The title of that paper is exploiting experience dependent plasticity in dysphasia, rehabilitation, current evidence and future directions. It was published in the current. Current physical medicine and rehabilitation reports in two thousand thirteen. Can you believe it's been so long that this paper has been written, but we were invited to write this paper by Ruth Martin. Who One of the editors on it and it really goes into rehabilitation, exploiting experience, dependent plasticity, and where their literature is right now and I'll let everybody know that we will. Will Post a link to this paper, so you can read the full text at your leisure so I hoped that you could start this podcast out by telling us what the gist of this paper was. What were we? What was the main message that we were trying to share with? Everybody? Define experience dependent plasticity away to to to jump off this topic. Sure, will you just did? Must that but I'll. Fleshed it out a little. experienced a peanut. plasticity is if you break it down by the city is just changes essentially, so you can have changes anywhere. You can have as you mention euro today, so you've seen true changes related to the brain where in event nervous system in Japan also changes related to behavioral staff, so the way that you execute things, physiology can medics differences in how we have? We actually execute something so experience dependent facility is just describing changes that come baddy, the neural behavioral because of what we experience as you mentioned. There are two forms two broad categories of things that we can experience in. They ask things happen because of internal endogenous factors like aging injury What they can occur because of exogenous external factors that manipulate our experience so if we think about treatments where. Exercise. Yet. Exercise those types of things so things they feel how we execute things because of what we're experiencing so by society, experience is just describing those changes associated with experience. And just so everybody understands. This is a paper that is focused on experience, experience, dependent plasticity, and swallowing, so we think that this is specifically interesting for clinicians. Because this is what speech pathologists have some control over. You have control and sometimes. Complete control over what a patient experiences when it comes to eating, especially the time that there are endogenous things happening because they are in your facility, because perhaps they've had a stroke, or they've had some structures removed. 'cause had cancer, or perhaps they're frail and very old, so they we have the endogenous things that are happening. Therefore you're called in, and perhaps you are influencing their system with the exodus experiences you decide for them, based on the Diet and the therapies. YOU PRESCRIBE CETERA leash. Did you have anything to say? So I was just curious just to kind of elaborate on that the. Exogenous plasticity. Because relevant in swallowing I, just WANNA clarify. Would you consider. Swallowing, swallowing itself to be. An. Example of..

Dr Phoebe mccray University of Florida Dr Aleisha Vos Dr Aleisha Dr. phoebe McRae Johns Hopkins University Verron Aaron Baltimore University of Kabri Alicia Magli Huckabee caffeine postdoctoral fellow McKnight Brain Institute Hawkins New Zealand Graham Saint George Manning
Crew Dragon astronaut reveals what he loves most about spacewalks

CNN 10 (video)

03:20 min | 2 weeks ago

Crew Dragon astronaut reveals what he loves most about spacewalks

"It's been a couple of weeks now since the amazing historic launch. What surprised you the most about the journey I think just in general the. The the biggest surprise, probably for both of us was just how different the rocket felt than what we experienced with shuttle I mean we expected some of that to be different. Just because it was a liquid fueled rocket, and the shuttle had solid boosters, so that was going to be different, but it certainly was a great ride. It was just different very exciting all in all I would say that was the first big highlight, and then the second one was was getting space station and. Three Smiley faces when we came through the hatch. It was just great to see those guys and I I think they were happy to see us. Get you know. Get a little change of scenery, onboard station and a little bit more help now. Bob We know you've been busy training for an update spacewalk. Can you tell us a little bit about what you'll be doing during that? Walk in at this point, you know you're a veteran spacewalker, so what is? Is your favorite part about spacewalk we'll be changing out all of the batteries on one of the channels on the space station from my perspective, adding done a few spacewalks and being a veteran, I really look forward to the views of the earth. When we get a free moment, and and this time they'll be dragon vehicle pointed on the forward into the space station, instead of the space shuttle, and so I'm looking forward to that something new new view. View that I can capture and share with the world. Some might say that the most dangerous part of the mission still lies ahead the journey home and this time you guys won't be landing on a runway when you land back on Earth, you'll be splashing down in the ocean. What are you anticipating? The ride back home to be like an? Are you guys at all nervous? No I don't think were nervous. We watch the Demo one flight. The test flight the. The crew test flight in the vehicle performed very well. We've seen the flight aboard tests and the vehicle perform well again. We have full confidence that the vehicle will perform just like it's supposed to. That being said it's a it's a completely different entry profile than what we are used to or had been used to in the space. Shuttle will land in the water. As you said, we'll land under parachutes much more dynamic entry. They'll be much higher, Jeez and That's just part of the unknown as to. We have prepared port, but we can only prepare so much, and we'll see how the vehicle does, and we'll see how we do when we get back now says I s program manager. Kirk Sherman is down, and this comes after Nastase head of human spaceflight resigned in May. How do all of these changes in leadership affect you guys and the other astronauts that are currently living on the International Space Station or I think if you look at who is. Replaced some of those positions you'll you'll, you'll see. People from within moving up and stepping into those roles, and just doing an excellent job and so That's one of the strengths of an organization like NASA is that? We don't rely on a single individual to drive the entire assessment and evaluation and management effort. We use a team of individuals to do that. And and the team is strong enough to be able to recognize their role in assisting that new leader, and and coming into their own as they take over the organization.

International Space Station Nasa BOB Smiley Kirk Sherman Program Manager Nastase
Astronauts describe first ride aboard SpaceX Crew Dragon in press conference from ISS

America's First News

02:09 min | Last month

Astronauts describe first ride aboard SpaceX Crew Dragon in press conference from ISS

"All newly arrived in NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and dog Hurley joined by astronaut Chris Cassidy in a press conference from the international space station on Monday the new shuttle giving off that new shuttle some held a few well almost like a car the astronauts say they will be returning to earth with a very important flag was a little bit of of space smell in the vestibule then when we've got the that hatch open you could tell it was a brand new vehicle with smiley faces on the other side smiley face on mine just as if you had bought a new car the same kind of reaction it wonderful to see my friends and wonderful to see a brand new vehicle one of the things I was most excited about was being able to make a phone call home you know with it's been a long time since I launched into orbit and I've got a little boy who got a chance to watch me do that for the first time in his life and I just wanted to understand what his experience was ensure that a little bit with him while it was still fresh in his mind he was able to make the trip back to Houston after watching the docking from down in Florida and was pretty excited about the the whole thing so that was a wonderful for me the short answer is Chris had it right on the hatch where we left it nine years ago and it's right here and I think he's got a note do not forget to take with dragons so depending on how long we stay up there and you can bet we will take it with us when we depart back to earth from that standpoint I think you know we we've talked about this flag before many times over the last nine years since we left here on SS one thirty five and I think the important point is is as I said before just returning launch capability to the United States to and from the international space station and that's what this flag really means and and I think a little bit more it's it's said that thousands of people that made it possible

Hurley Chris Cassidy Houston Florida United States Nasa Bob Behnken
SpaceX Crew Dragon delivers two NASA astronauts to International Space Station

KIRO Nights

00:32 sec | Last month

SpaceX Crew Dragon delivers two NASA astronauts to International Space Station

"Night to a big day for space the SpaceX dragon capsule on Sunday successfully docked with the international space station your CBS news correspondent mark Strassmann through to open hatches astronaut Bob bacon floated into a space station welcoming from astronaut Chris Cassidy and two cosmonauts then came astronaut John Hurley completing a flawless trip from Florida into space history well everyone welcome aboard dragons under nineteen hour flight from earth the astronaut shut off the SpaceX capsule they've named it

Mark Strassmann Bob Bacon Chris Cassidy John Hurley Florida CBS Spacex
Stocks slip as markets await Trump's Hong Kong response

BTV Simulcast

09:10 min | Last month

Stocks slip as markets await Trump's Hong Kong response

"Hong Kong security law and the U. S. responses to later on this Friday and setting up a pretty gloomy end to what's been in next month for Asian stocks Menton has stalled after April registered the strongest surge since twenty sixteen that's crossover to Frankfort and twine queen a CIO of emerging markets at Deutsche Bank wealth management so I think this week we saw a little bit of a a preview of what could be the calm here when it comes the rising U. S. China trade tensions market so it seems to be taking it in stride for now but what could be the next driver for markets in the next couple weeks or so in June after we saw a pretty decent last two months exactly so I think now given that we have seen quite a strong rally from the lows in March and now that a lot of countries in the world but no stopping in the U. S. with the exit strategy stock market that turning a little bit more to of feed now and of course as you read he said China you attention would be one of these but the thing that is more of the election recall a kia as you know we are of course not in the middle of the election campaign to with the election in beginning of November and and the the approval rating of president trump has falling quite choppy he had of course now to two district case border he and now directing to China is maybe one of the possibilities and of course as I mentioned with the exit strategy we also have to watch now how this is going to play out if there's a second wave which could trigger a potentially old sold a second knockdown I think these are the main themes we are looking at and then of course how the economic data will also then follow we know and we have been to one date which was bad but of course everyone should be aware that cute too in your role and within the U. S. would be even worse than Q. one yeah I let you see this divergence right of what the real economy is seeing versus what I meant financial markets have outperformed essentially how do you think this all gets resolved will stocks eventually catch downing and get a dose of reality or do you think that the economy are we're gonna see a decent enough bounce back to justify the hope that's been priced into markets yes well I think what the markets are currently pricing in it is exactly that story fifty economies are open again we don't see a second wave and that things are slowly returning back to some sort of normality maybe you can call it in you Norman but if we compare then of course the reality is he right he said with the expectation as I mentioned it is also of course so a lot of pride in so when I look at a lot twelve month target for example bought the S. and P. five hundred we think that if not much upside potential and the reefs at this level is Robert to the down side from our perspective to let go fast you Melis from China out of four point eight percent of GDP veces the likes of the U. S. at fifteen percent Japan at twenty percent how much of a risk is that for eons we don't think it is much of the race because when you look at the data and the we how China and also about Asians and countries have said to deal with the virus I think of the if not the need to be so aggressive in terms of to Malaysia the markets with maybe a little bit disappointed with the the number of the stimulus measures also compared to other developed markets but the I mean China is we know has been the vehicle two months ago in January and and February but since then the economy is open again we have a team of course the the data recovering not at thanks to the previous level but of course China and the rest of Asia at least two months ahead of the rest of the woodlands that he's not that kind of needs for such a big stimulus but I think the old so that if need be then the the government here will that also increase the similar so from that perspective we are not worried at all what I want to take a look at the bond market sell these Asian bonds in particular have had a great time best performing in Asia in Q. one are you still finding Indonesian Thai Filipino bonds attractive at current levels on the elective bases yes broader market as you rightly said the performance has been great already so we are still recommending clients for Camry but it tends to be much more selective especially now the run we have seen so it's not just by the whole market like when they see it September but now it's more on the collective faces and also in terms of conviction calls right now what what do you see the most opportunity it seems like we're or seeing the last couple weeks or so this rotation out of out of quality into value and and it and people are pricing as you mentioned this this recovery but then you're flying of course the risks of all the second wave as well so how do you hedge your bets at this moment yeah you read me that so we have been recommending recorded quality goal here because I think in such an environment where most of the companies are not able to provide guidance it's even more important to look at both companies with a strong balance sheet with total visit the business model and that's why we have identified especially the technology but also the head Catholic thought to be for Indies quality growth area if you ready said we are also seeing it in the last one or two weeks I would be some rotation into value but we think this is maybe not the numbers we still think the win in the pot supposed to be the winner in the future as well but of course they have called to reach now valuation levels which not cheap anymore so can you also again have to be selected if a lot of you offer continuous recovering would not play out then of course as the hatch we still like gold on the other side I think he with interest rates being still very little we don't really see much in creation I think because gold is the to have a meaningful with a location in now hold clients but for years we've seen at least when it comes to global GDP estimates that things perhaps of bounce are these bottoms for twenty twenty one do you think that's still looking a bit optimistic because I seem to be the reason are catalysts for many bowls to really continue to track cases rally if I were you is and I think as I mentioned in the beginning of the year a GDP would drop quite massively and half of it Q. two will be the worst quarter since the second World War we are expecting corner me in the U. S. to read cover back to end of twenty nineteen level in twenty twenty two so but bounced bank will happen in twenty one but it won't be enough to be back at the level from Lafia so it would take another year in twenty two in order to be back then two levels of nineteen eighty and you roll depending also on Khan three the eight my take likely long maybe then Q. two of twenty three and at the same would be for earnings and this is I think what the market is looking for and stopping now also to discounted twenty win from don't your bank wealth management speaking to us from Frank but thank you so much

Hong Kong
SpaceX launch delayed to Saturday due to weather

Dave Ramsey

00:32 sec | Last month

SpaceX launch delayed to Saturday due to weather

"With with the the threat of lightning is what postponed yesterday's SpaceX launch until Saturday yes and SpaceX's historic launch a crew dragon was scribe just sixteen minutes and fifty four seconds before its scheduled lift off of four thirty three local time the president and the vice president were here when that's from the current ticket travel to Kennedy Space Center to witness what everybody hoped would be a historic launch astronauts Bob Behnken and Joe Curley were already strapped into the capsule the hatch door had been closed when this scribe occurred correspondent Rachel crane

President Trump Vice President Kennedy Space Center Bob Behnken Joe Curley Rachel Crane
The Little Known History of Japanese Internment on Angel Island

Bay Curious

04:20 min | Last month

The Little Known History of Japanese Internment on Angel Island

"Months before the coronavirus outbreak bay curious received a question from a listener wanting to know about what happened on Angel Island during World War. Two turns out the island played a very specific role in the internment of Japanese-americans. Though very few people know much about it reporter. Cecilia lay headed to the island to learn more. It's a picturesque pre pandemic Sunday morning in San Francisco when a border fairy to Ireland under way. The last time I visited the island was during middle school field trip. They learned about the Chinese exclusion. Act Saw the poems that Chinese immigrants had carved onto the walls. But I didn't learn anything about the Japanese being held here during World War Two. So I'm on my way to meet the only expert who knows this part of the island's little known history house and me any and that's what the immigrants were classified as and also a number of the drop in on Grant Din who is teaching Angel Islands Own tour guides about the internment of Japanese residents. That happened here my name is Scranton. I'm a volunteer with the Angel and the Immigration Station Foundation. Seventy eight years ago after Pearl Harbor had broken out and president. Franklin D Roosevelt signed executive order nine. Oh six which authorized the rounding up of Japanese immigrants and Japanese Americans who were citizens into relocation camps in one thousand nine hundred eighty two Japanese residents all along the west coast were arrested because the US government suspected that many of them had allegiances to Japan and could secretly be working on their behalf. Fishermen had every opportunity to watch the movement of our ships. Japanese farmers were living close to vital aircraft plants. So as a first step all. Japanese were required to move from critical areas. Such these more than one hundred ten thousand Japanese American civilians including children hatch abandon their homes and businesses. We're taking two racetracks fairgrounds for the army. Almost overnight had build assembly center. They lived here until new. Pioneer communities could be completed on federally owned lands in the Interior. They were relocated to remote camps throughout the US surrounded by armed guards and barbed wire. They lived like this for the duration of the war. About two thirds of them. Were born right here in the US and then there was another group people the US government considered to be the biggest threat and the most dangerous. This is the group that grants researched all the people who are rounded up during this program by the Department of Justice by the FBI were Japanese immigrants and so by that means they were considered enemy aliens. Unlike the other Japanese civilian internees a majority of these quotes enemy. Aliens were men who were born in Japan. They faced interogations and were separated from their families during their internment. These men were singled out because the government had been keeping an eye on them for a while as far back as five years before Japan. Bombed Pearl Harbor even before World War. Two broke out. There were dossiers being kept on Japanese immigrants who are in this country both in Hawaii and on the mainland the FBI was watching anyone who had close ties to Japan or held prominent roles in the Japanese community. Buddhist priests language schoolteachers shopkeepers. Newspaper editors anyone who was considered a leader or expert in Japanese culture especially martial arts. I found several cases of people who are in Kendo or judo and so they went to Japan for meats and so they were often put on the list of potential saboteurs. The rounding up of these Japanese residents happened very quickly. Homes were raided without warrants. Papers were confiscated about seventeen thousand. Total Japanese immigrants were arrested and seven hundred of them were from the West Coast. Mostly from Hawaii sent here to the bay area to Angel Island.

Angel Island Japan United States West Coast Pearl Harbor Hawaii FBI San Francisco Reporter Cecilia Franklin D Roosevelt Immigration Station Foundation Ireland Scranton Grant Din Department Of Justice President Trump
Ariane Goldman, founder and CEO of HATCH: Building a brand that means something

Skimm'd from The Couch

01:28 min | Last month

Ariane Goldman, founder and CEO of HATCH: Building a brand that means something

"So in listening to you. It's very obvious like we both are smiling. When you're talking about growing up ambitious and kind of the natural hustle that you very clearly had an. I think like an authentic sense of confidence. I WanNa understand what your mindset was in the early days of hatch. Did you know that it was gonNA take off and it was going to take time? Did you have self-doubt around it? I'm curious kind of where you were from a head space standpoint. I went at it with nothing to lose so I let myself a few hundred thousand dollars from two birds to build the website and to get samples but I didn't know what I didn't know which was the blessing because if you understand what a big beast it is to build a business. I would have gotten started so the way I approach. Things was just to kind of build from ground up. I didn't have kind of an end goal because I don't know I didn't know how to grow at the time million dollar company a two million dollar company. I was just trying to get product in front of women who wanted it and so that's just day by day ground up and that's been my approach to growing hatch from the GECKO. I'm not necessarily trying to work backwards from this end goal. I'm trying to build a brand. That means something to women where they can look when you hear the word hatch smile because in someone's life we made a difference whether it's beauty or community or fashion. We mean something to people that to me is what it's like to build a brand so when you start that every day is different Challenge experience failure but because you're building from ground up. I was building kind of support underneath me every time I fall. I wouldn't fall too hard because there was nowhere to

Ariane Goldman, founder and CEO of HATCH

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:07 min | Last month

Ariane Goldman, founder and CEO of HATCH

"Is it about your upbringing or the people around you you had or even your education that you think made you. WanNa take the leap into doing something different. You Know Amax is a beautiful organization. It was almost like golden handcuffs especially as entering your thirty s and potential motherhood. I mean they treat women so fantastically maternity care at the whole bit. I have a certain thirst for life and I've always. I was born ambitious after spending eight years growing growing on this journey. I wanted more and I needed to kind of use my hands to make something happen. I'm daughter of to entrepreneurs my parents work together my whole life so we would be at the javits center and I'd be kind of those booths with them and I just you know I would nowhere. Their factories were in India in New York and I kind of knew the language and the recipes there and I just a little claustrophobic in the corporate safety and you live once and I want to take risks and I was searching for a way to express my creative my creativity and I. It wasn't necessarily something I was able to do it Max so I went to Parsons at night to try and kind of cultivate something and I thought Interior design might be that and then I fell in love with a creative filmmaker. You didn't understand any of the ACRONYMS that was talking about American Express and he urged me to kind of really chase. My creative dreams and of us are born with talents and arts and some of us have to find it so I was searching for mine having a business school education and also kind of being savvy in the fashion front when I was getting married and realizing that nobody was kind of fitting that void of why do you have to hate your best friend for buying a bridesmaid's dress one like there should be a celebratory. You great you want to feel hot and sexy and awesome at your friend's wedding. Why do you have to suffer and spend money to do so so that that kind of light bulb and off? That's where I really knew that there was something there. And that's what kind of urged me to take the chance to jump ship. So let's talk about that moment. You went into what the idea was for two birds but you were experiencing a lot of changes kind of all at once getting married thinking about potentially leaving Amex. What was going through your mind. I was searching for something to hold onto to grasp onto something that gave me the momentum to kind of say. It's okay to take this chance. This risk my parents wanted me to stay safe. I remember talking to my mother-in-law. She said absolutely do not quit your day job area. You'd be nuts and yet it wasn't good enough for me because I couldn't imagine the next ten years of my life climbing this ladder higher and higher so for me. I was using the transition as time to ask the questions and kind of get comfortable with the change because my life was changing. So why not throw something else into the mix because if we're GONNA start a fresh really start afresh. But I wasn't that bold what I did was. I was fortunate enough to sign on with Amex a consultant. Which allowed me to get incoming. Y- dollars a paycheck while I was able to kind of build two birds and go to the factories. And do some of that stuff so I was able to. Kinda work both where it wasn't lacquer white all or nothing I want to understand. Can of your poached to side. Hustles. Especially right now. In a time where a lot of people need to be creative about thinking how to turn their side hustles into their main hustle. Choctaw US just a little bit about how you treated. Your Company Aside Hassle. I think anything that inspires you on the side like starting a business recreating something. That wasn't there if that passion is inside you and you can feed it daily somehow one way you know designing your logo putting it on a business card sending it to anything. That's kind of low lift to get that snowball rolling. I mean that's when it's building in. You're not necessarily doing a one eighty and shifting everything but if you can build something that has value enough to make that change Safer for you. My advice would be to do something every day. That just kind of drives that forward because before you know it you're going to build something really beautiful or you're gonNA ask your questions and find out the hard way that maybe it's not. It's not viable but at least you're doing it on the side where you're not you don't have everything on the

Parsons Javits Center Amex American Express New York United States India Consultant MAX Interior Design
"The future is here": ISS commander on historic SpaceX launch

Midday News

01:57 min | Last month

"The future is here": ISS commander on historic SpaceX launch

"For the first time in nine years American astronauts will be blasting off from U. S. soil on Wednesday the historic SpaceX crew dragon mission is the culmination of a six year multi billion dollar program by NASA a NASA to end the agency's reliance on Russia for transportation to and from the international space station astronaut Chris Cassidy is already aboard the ISS he spoke with CBS this morning co host Tony da Copel about this week's flight how big of a deal is this mission it's a gigantic deal I mean when we retired the shuttle for very sound reasons when that decision was made with the aims to move towards the future and now the future is here one of the questions when NASA teamed up with commercial companies to try to do something like this was how will the culture of safety at NASA match up with the corporate ambition of a company like SpaceX how confident are you that is your friends get into that capsule they're gonna arrive there safely I'm very confident they're smart engineers at NASA they're smart engineers at SpaceX all with motivation to do the same thing and that's fly missions effectively and safely I think it's been healthy for both the commercial guys to faster faster and cheaper and NASA with a more decades based of safety culture I think it's been healthy for the growth of both organizations are you worried about coronavirus as these additional astronauts arise well certainly were worried about it we worry we have confidence in that the testing in the program in the region that that the medical folks are are putting Bob and Doug threw in the protections that they have will mitigate that is low but have a probability as we can I was joking around my colleague my crewmates last night and said Hey maybe we should have them come in through the hatch and and make a hard left and will isolate them here in the corner for a couple weeks before we'll we'll treat them to a meal I SS commander Chris Cassidy with CBS's Tony to

Nasa Russia Chris Cassidy CBS Tony Da Copel Spacex BOB Doug Commander
David Sibley on Being a Bird

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

07:30 min | Last month

David Sibley on Being a Bird

"I believe you began the project that became this new book and the full title and subtitle. I should tell people is. What's it like to be a bird from flying to nesting eating to singing what birds are doing? And why believe you began as a project for children at first? So tell us a little about the book. Yeah so the idea. It was a slow evolution of the idea. It started as an idea for a kids book. almost twenty years ago and and that initially the idea was to do a guide to backyard. Birds a guy to familiar birds. Ask a field. Guide simplified for kids. And I want it to be I wanted it to be big and colorful and eyecatching and those are the things that I really remember enjoying about bird books when I was a kid and and also to include a lot of information about what the birds are doing Because kids are I find kids are. They're interested in the names of the birds somewhat but more interested in what sort of what the birds superpowers are in a way. What what are the amazing things that the birds are actually doing and as I started researching those things I learned so much I was. I kept running across information in the literature that I didn't know that I things I thought I knew a lot about birds but a lot of it turned out to be wrong and the truth is even more amazing so I just as I did the research on those that aspect of the book that then became the entire book. I just that was so fascinating and so such a wealth of interesting information that I decided that would be the whole book so a guide to familiar birds. It is in the sense that I've illustrated most of the the most familiar species in North America and written their names next to them. But it's not a guy to identification. It's just Election of exciting facts about birds. Well and that's what made me happy. S Navy about spend time with the book. These recent weeks is despite all your great expertise. You acknowledge that you're still curious and still learning and still asking why. And that's just so important for those of us who are lay people you know relatively speaking You know Burgers to be and so forth you know you're encouraging us to keep asking and learning. I think it was Ken Kaufmann. I think who said to me once in an interview that he hopes the on never goes away and the curiosity never goes away and I think that's so important and that comes through in this book of yours. Yeah I think I mean that's what keeps me excited about studying birds every day. There's always more to learn and come up with new questions all the time and and the this surprising things that I learned in this in the research for this book just I I get so excited about working on the book I would come. Go show up at dinner every night and talk about what I learned today. You won't believe this right right. Ripley's believe it or not from David civil so even to allay. I knows I said such as myself a couple of things about birds that are you know distinctive right off most. Obviously they have feathers and especially that they're capable of flight. But I learned a lot of new things in your book about a bird's body design. That might be so obvious as their wings but nevertheless support their ability to fly so things I didn't know like laying eggs figures into their ability to fly. Tell us some of those things. 'cause that was kind of mind-blowing so yeah there. So a lot of the the adaptations of birds shape in their their anatomy is has developed for flight so their feathers. Obviously but they're very strict aim lined and the best way to to design a flying machine is to have the the center of mass the the most of the weight being very compact and suspended below the wings So and I think I have a line in the book that if you build you make a paper airplane and then try taping penny to that plane in different places the only place you can put a penny and have the plane still fly properly is centered. Yes under the wings And that's the way bird's body is designed. They're all of their muscles are in a very compact mass in the center in their body. Very compact central body mass and the wings are all feathers and slender bones. The legs are just slender bones. The muscles that control those are part of the central body mass and then the head is a lightweight lightweight skull and the the bill. All birds have a bill instead of jaws and teeth because the bill is really lightweight and Getting rid of heavy jaws and teeth and Allows them to move all that or eliminate weight from the extremities of the body so the head is really lightweight and without teeth then they have to have another way to chew their food so they generally swallow their food whole and they have really muscular stomach again in the center of their body and they swallow sand and gravel to act as teeth so when the stomach muscles squeeze it grinds the food up with this gravel and that crushes the food and essentially choose it. But that's all happening in the center of the body instead of teeth way out at the front and so the the female the reason or that she's evolved to bear to lay. Eggs is so that she is able to not be heavy with eggs with these big eggs inside her. During that long time periods each breeding season. She can move about once she puts them in the safety of the NASCAR the hoax for safety of the nest. Yeah Yeah So. That's one of the advantages of eggs. Is that instead of carrying? Young and most birds lay multiple eggs and raise Two or four eight young each in each nesting and so those eggs they take about twenty four hours to develop inside the female's body then she lays the egg in the nest and she's back to her normal weight and Able to fly and gather food and And then she just sits on the eggs to keep them warm for a couple of weeks and they hatch and then it's then lots of food is delivered and hopefully there if they if they're not discovered by a Predator that the young fledge it all takes three weeks or four weeks for most birds.

North America Able Ken Kaufmann Nascar Ripley David
A Whole Lot of Home Cooking

Bon Appetit Foodcast

09:35 min | Last month

A Whole Lot of Home Cooking

"We've been sort of in quarantine now for about two months and I think as trying as these times have been for everyone I think one of the I don't don't call it a silver lining up side. Whatever is that we've been in this nation of Home Cooks and personally speaking. I can say without question. I've never cooked better food or more consistently than I have in the last eight weeks and I'm kind of astounded as someone. Who's you know? Food Industry Professional Yada. Yada like how much I've learned in how much I've gotten better as a home cook I. Is that a fair statement. Carl. What's been your take. I have never in my life. Cook dinner as many times in a row as I have been quarantine we've ordered in one time. Yeah it's interesting because you know worked at a test kitchen gather for years but there are so many days of the week by the time I get home. It's either too late to make dinner or are those certain days where you get home and you're just done and I imagine gauge to this being in the entertainment industry where just emotionally mentally physically. You're just spent by the time you walk in your door. It took it took maybe a month for people to become accustomed to this new way of working these of zoom etc etc. My wife and I in the same small space rolling zoom calls screaming over each other coming up with hand signals waving at each other. Give each other the finger trying to keep trying to tell each other to push both of us not realizing that we are in fact screaming over the zoom and and that's all day every day and it's and things didn't really slow down and now things are really kind of picking up with work. So yeah you're on zoom calls. Maybe like ten hours a day and then you gotta figure out dinner so it definitely it definitely makes you do some planning and for me and I don't want to spend too much time talking about it but obviously sourcing alike. Light Carla. I've we ordered in once during this two month period and for me the idea of sourcing. Fresh food has been a super challenge and that I spent a lot of time doing and something that I realized how much we take for. Granted are access to great food and how much thought it really takes now and and I also think about people that don't still have access to the same level of products that we have and it's actually changed my entire thought process about food about sourcing about groceries and consumption. In general I would say a couple of things on logistically. The daytime thing is interesting working from home because like when I'm at home if I have a window between two and two thirty I'm like oh I can start marrying that chicken or I can start prepping this so that when it is time to cook dinner at six o'clock. I've already got a lot of that. Legwork done but on a regular workday you. You don't have the ability to do that. You kinda starting from scratch every time you get home and then also. I've never used my freezer this much and in terms of like. I know we're all making an effort to not go out to the store all the time so I actually. This is the first time I use my freezer with all sorts of different frozen prepackaged meats as opposed to the freezer in the past. Always been that thing. I just threw stuff in and never saw again like a freezer graveyard and now it's like a treasure chest. Yeah no it's like what's in here Carlos. Because you're you're more organized than we are. We have you evolved in that sense in terms of storage and freezing and stuff ingredients. My only complaint is. I wish I had a chest freezer or like now. I get it like the to fridge. Households I wish I had the garage with the other fringe because I holds me back. A lot is just feeling like their fridge. When I stock up is so full that with the let between the leftovers the condiments the fresh stuff like gave us talking about if you're only shopping once every week or ten days like that that that space fills up so fast so we've got a cooler on the back deck and just the rotation of freezer packs into that and it's not a huge one. It's like It's just a ordinary coleman cooler but rotating the freezer packs into that and then figuring out what kind of produce will stand up in there so like citrus is out there and cabbages and things that don't need to be quite as cold as the other stuff. So it stresses me out a little bit. Because I really don't want to waste anything you know we early on we. We do. Have a Coleman Cooler where we put a lot of Greens in sort of sturdy vegetables and just kind of keep them cool but simone early on in this thing. She bought a chest freezer like medium small side medium size one and I thought she was crazy and like being like a bunker mentality nuclear war sort of person but it has been absolute game changer. And and then I went and bought a bunch of meats from Dixon's Farm San and Chelsea market and individually one pound packs ground beef and some dribs and this and that and I got a list on my phone everything in that freezer and I sort of adjusted as we go. Wow that's very organized for me. It's been a little bit like relent as well because we you know we're trying to figure out how to get stuff delivered here and try to do as little you know. Irl shopping as humanly possible. We signed up for with a farm in riverhead New York and Long Island that processes animals It's dairy and also beef and pork in inhumane. Awesome Way So I was like excited about that but basically it's it's they you kind of like order a wishlist. Every week of what you'd like to get. And then they just send you what they've got and so it's been like it's been open up the package. It's like okay. What am I doing with Pork Loin? I don't really. I don't really deal with pork loin housing here here. We go more now having abundance of Yogurt. I'm not a big yogurt guy. The other day I was like. Oh Pork Loin. I've got some yogurt. I'M GONNA make like Euros. I'M GONNA I'M GONNA. I'M GONNA like I've got some cucumbers. I never have to numbers. I'm GonNa make some Zeki. These are freestyle things. I wouldn't do Olympics. Global pandemic forgave to get cucumbers. I mean it's not a thing it's not a thing that we normally have. I don't I don't love cucumber. I don't know we don't usually put in Salads or whatever you gotTa Peel it all right. Let's talk about some cooking Carla. What is something you've cooked in these last several weeks that either? You've never done before that you were just so stoked about how well it turned out. Well there was one week early on when I really wanted chicken and I could not get ticket like it was one of earlier weeks where everyone. I don't know what it was like. Toilet Paper Lysol and chickens grain whole chickens. The American brain is like survival. What can I not live without teepee and chicken? So that's like the most American thing in the world so I wanted to chicken. Couldn't get but the place I I was ordering from had whole ducks and I was like well. I've made your dot com fee recipe. Which I swear by but I've never ever cooked a whole duct before and I personally would be intimidated. So what did what did you do? Yeah the thing. A whole doc is like it's actually terrible to Whole duck rate but I I was like birds bird a bird. Just have to deal with this but I knew that roasting a whole doc is actually very problematic the way roasting a whole. Turkey is problematic because the breast in the legs or like on a completely different Optimal like setting. So what it came. I was kind of annoyed because I was like. Oh Jesus Christ I forgot about this whole dock now I have to butcher it. Because roasting at whole is actually not a great way to cook it but then it was this really Validating sort of process of being like first of all happy that I knew how to butcher a duck so I was. I was sort of like it had been a while but I took the Brasov. I took the legs off. Then you have all this fat. So separating keeping the fat you know in one area had the breasts I seasoned up the legs to do comfy. I scored the fat on the breast and the little cross hatch because that's just really good pan roasted and then I had a car guest so in and this whole duck gave me stock roasted the bones I made stock. I had Duck brass one night. We had dot com for another night. And then I just have all of the duck fat which I put into like everything else that I made for the next three weeks and it was sort of like what gave is saying this way that you're pushed out of your comfort zone in your ordinary way of shopping where. I ended up buying something because it was what was available and good instead of what I thought I wanted to have and it was

Pork Loin Carla Home Cooks Carl Coleman Cooler Brasov Turkey Coleman New York Farm San Long Island DOT Simone Chelsea
Anthem 2.0 is Underway

What's Good Games

01:58 min | Last month

Anthem 2.0 is Underway

"Our first story Brittany. I don't know if I was ever going to be prepared to talk about anthem again. But here we are here. Would you like to read this? I would love to you. Are you ready? Let's I'm going to be anthem to Plano. Don't expect the overall update anytime soon. This comes from Aegean has issued an update on the state of amp of the anthem. Overhaul noting that the revamp still in the incubation period and that the creation of a new version of the game will be quote longer process. And it's on the Bio our blog project lead Christian dailly outlined the current state of anthem two point noting that regardless of the current circumstances. The team is committed to the project. The thirty strong team behind the game are currently working from home. Do the due to the impact of the Kobe. Nineteen pandemic but daily notes that the Games incubation phase has kicked off that incubation just makes me think of like an egg hatch tastes my brain somewhere else. All right in his own words daily describes the incubation phase as a prototyping period we are signs validate our design hypothesis daily statement reads. We're going back and experimenting slash prototyping to improve on the areas where we believe. We fell shorts and to leverage everything that you currently love about anthem. According to daily the nature of this approach means that anthem two point. We'll be longer process. So don't expect the new version of the game to arrive anytime soon. Quote the team is small but the whole point of this. Take our time and go back to the drawing board daily notes. A small team gives us the agility a larger one can't afford daily also talked about transparency in assured fans that they would see things that look awesome but end up on the cutting room floor. Things that you might think suck that you feel. We are spending too much time on in the spirit of experimentation. The team wants to bring those interested in anthem along for the ride but daily notes that scene. How the sausage is made is not always pretty something. We're very familiar with here. The anthems overhaul was announced in February with manager. Casey Hudson admitting the game quote needs a more satisfying lewd experience better long-term progression in a more fulfilling and game.

Casey Hudson Christian Dailly Kobe Aegean Plano
Barn Owl Babies Can Be Helpful Hatchmates

60-Second Science

02:22 min | Last month

Barn Owl Babies Can Be Helpful Hatchmates

"Robin Hood. Famous leaf soul from the rich and gave to the poor young newly hatched Barna. Al's do something similar on average barn. Owls raised six six at once and sometimes as many as nine. But they don't all hatch at the same time which means the older outlets are generally larger and healthier than their younger brothers and sisters as long as the Little Owls. Remain in the nest. They're completely dependent on their parents for food. The problem is that the small rodents they eat. CaN'T BE SPLIT UP. So and mom or dad returns to the nest to feed their offspring. Only one chick can eat. At a time and many bird species the oldest would simply outcompete the youngest but barn owls are different turns out the older healthier birds sometimes donate their meals to. They're hungrier. Siblings adults in other animal species share their food. It's mainly observe. The Way may want to reproduce female soldiers. Many exchange of food are in primates series many exchange between food and grooming but only biologist police decor from the University of Lausanne in Switzerland and in cheeks. It's really rarely observed so it's quite impressive. Teens especially there is so many cooperative behaviors. She and her team wanted to know how this unique behavior evolved. It could be explained by the direct benefits game through cooperation such as trading food for grooming or it could be explained by the indirect benefits gained from helping others that share your genetic heritage also known as kin selection. They found that the answer was both younger. Birds groomed older ones more often than older ones. Groom the youngsters and in return. The older birds fed their younger siblings. In addition older Alex preferentially offered food to their hungriest siblings. Even in the absence of grooming but food sharing only happened when the researchers artificially provision the outlets with extra food so it's not that the owls risk their own survival help their siblings but when there was more than enough to go around they shared instead of hoarding.

Little Owls Robin Hood Barna AL University Of Lausanne Switzerland Alex
Jerry Stiller, veteran comic and Ben's father, has died at 92

Charlie Parker

00:24 sec | 2 months ago

Jerry Stiller, veteran comic and Ben's father, has died at 92

"Or Jerry Stiller a classically trained actor who became a comedy star twice has died at the age of ninety two dollars death was confirmed this morning by his son actor Ben Stiller to tweet who said his father died of natural causes Mr still as accomplishments as an actor were considerable recently he was best known as George Costanza's father on Seinfeld my George isn't clever enough to hatch a scheme like this you got that right the hell does that mean

Jerry Stiller Ben Stiller George Costanza Seinfeld
All large summer events in Boston canceled, Marty Walsh says

WBZ Afternoon News

01:18 min | 2 months ago

All large summer events in Boston canceled, Marty Walsh says

"The the mayor's mayor's biggest biggest announcement announcement yesterday yesterday was was the the cancellation cancellation of of large large events through Labor Day I means festivals no parades no fourth of July fireworks here's WBZ-TV's to Shawnee willow we do not envision at this point this summer when all makes sense to have large scale crowds gathered in close contact for any prolonged period of time that means the Boston pops will not take to the hatch shell this is the most popular so we're disappointed that due to COPD in nineteen we are forced to cancel this year's appearance they instead will perform a TV and online concert honoring frontline workers and those who lost their lives to the virus with the uncertainty over the virus's spread the mayor decided to cancel all major events for the next several months popular gatherings like the Caribbean festival St Anthony's feast in the north and feast on hiatus watching the red Sox at Fenway remains unknown even the league's himself having committed to coming back and playing so there's a lot of discussions left to happen the city will look at smaller events on a case by case basis already organizers of concerts with road races and flag raisings urge to look for alternatives the pops will instead present a virtual tribute to the frontline workers and honor those who lost their lives

Copd SOX Boston
"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

14:51 min | 2 months ago

"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

"Okay so we are back to another down the hatch podcast and if you'll recall last year we had a Swallowing physiology series and we talked at the time about the basic events of swallowing. We talked about oral compulsion swallow trigger during the bus closure etc and at some point this year or maybe it was last year. Aleisha had the great idea to suggest that we do it again except focus a little bit more on the control systems of swallowing. So that would be things like the brain especially Nervous system central nervous system and this is the first in that series. We will eventually get too hot topics like neuro. Plasticity motor learning biofeedback motor control etc. But we wanted to start out today with talking about the basics. The general concepts associated with how swallowing is controlled and partly. Because it's really easy for many of us who were trained in speech pathology to know what the structures are not the cranial nerves are and then it's like these cranial eras go up into the distant land and don't quite connect to anything and while we know that swallowing has to happen because of neural control from the brain. We don't always understand how that happens. Normally we don't always understand what the rehabilitation implications are so today. We're GONNA talk about some broad concepts in normal swallowing control such as the CNS first pianist. Ladder -ality Bottom up versus top down controls the brain stem sense reverses motor central pattern generators. What any of this might mean for decisions. You make every day as speech pathologists in Rehab poor swallowing. So I thought that what I do is start out by just talking. Generally about the central nervous system versus the peripheral nervous system and giving them very the very broad definitions that. I'm sure everybody's aware of but before I do that. I just wondered if a leash if you have anything else to add to the introduction in terms of why he wanted to talk about this yeah I guess I'll just add in that if you're worried that this is gonNa feel instructional fear naught we are not deviating from our usual platform of this podcast. Which is that. It's unscripted and we really don't know what we're GonNa talk about other than we just decided that Neural control of swallowing was an interesting topic and We both feel pretty passionate about Getting into the nitty gritty about some of those topics. So if you're interested in more of an instructional Basis for this talk then. We'RE GOING TO POST THEM. Articles that are recommended reading before the talk. This isn't meant to just regurgitate information. That's already out there. It's more to just theorize about What any of these topics can mean for Rehab and what we personally just find interesting and unique about swallowing and what's kind of fun to talk about so we're going to start in one place in who knows where where we will end up And just in enjoy some learning out. Yeah I do think they're going to be a lot of people like all. I loved the brain so much. And hopefully they'll be sticking with US toward the end But let me start out with some broad definitions about central nervous system versus purple. Never system the central nervous system is comprised of the brain and spinal cord The central nervous system is the place where neurons have cell bodies. Where's the peripheral? Nervous system are going to be primarily the axioms that extend into the periphery outside of the central nervous system to various locations. It might be organs. It might be muscles. It also includes the cranial the cradle nurses final words. That begin. In the periphery in terms of Where they are taking information from such as receptors and then extend to the central nervous system so that we have a sense of what's going on in our world So that's the broad definition of how the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system are different as I mentioned before in our training. We Focus Lot and the final end organ or termination point which we're going to be the muscles and the cranial nerves that to the brain stem or to the spine. But we don't really go too far beyond that we may have taken a course in your anatomy and physiology but you those courses actually talk about the neuro anatomy neurophysiologist swallowing. And that's often because we're still figuring it out some of the earliest studies where he studied normal swallowing in healthy people really only date back to the eighties nineties. So for that reason That's partly why we didn't get a lot of information anything to add there. I think that it's nice to start with a delineating between the peripheral and central nervous. Because really when you interesting thing about swallowing is that when patients have dysphasia. It's a symptom of a underlying other disease. And I think one of the first things you have to ask yourself is where are where we targeting rehabilitation so is the deficit within the muscle. Purple Nervous System or is this more of a central disorder because the way that we target Rehab in the way we think about neuropathy issues and to be quite different Depending on where the deficit is so just to give an easy. Example is if somebody has any type of surgery say have thyroid ectomy and they completely sever the Vegas nerve or if you have a sucks craniotomy and they sever the TriGem owner. That's going to be a very different. We have approach than somebody. That's had a cordial stroke Would you agree with that? I would have really first place to start is about. Where is the injury? Yeah I one? Hundred percent agree with that and the analogy that I recall giving you a while back when you were a brand new doctoral student and it's not that you didn't know this information it's just that I thought it would work well in a talk. You're giving was the lamp apple at an ocean. If you remember that I sure do but basically. You're giving a talk about brain stem function of swallowing. And I wanted and I say this to my Class A lot I want them to understand what it means when you approach a patient and you're trying to understand where the problem is now. Obviously if somebody was totally fine they have surgery in the peripheral region and the indication. Is that a nerve with severed versus this person has had an MRI. And there's obviously a stroke you already know. Basically what the issue. What were the original problem is right? But it's still important to be able to approach a patient and think about how to troubleshoot if you walk in a room and there's a lamp that's supposed to turn on you. Hit the switch and nothing happens. Usually the people do as third person. People do is mess with the bull because the ball is often the that goes bad. I right so we constantly Bible because we know they're going to blow it anytime but if you go and get a bulb within the bulbous the muscle if you will you go and get a bulb and you get a new and you plug it into a different lamp at works with the lamp. That didn't work. Originally that ball was going you go. Oh it's not the bulb. Maybe the court. So think of the cortisone cranial nerve. It's a thing that connects the actual muscle to the control system in the wall so that would be something that obviously if you cut nerve. It doesn't matter what's happening in the lamp. The lamp is not getting any any electrical circuit any electricity from wall. But of course we know the control panel within the wall actually controls many different outlets in her house so that you can think of that as a central nervous system so when you think about how much farther away from the Bulgar getting you already know that the control system is even bigger than you can go to the grid so you can get so far away from the ball that you realized the level of control is so big and complicated and that it's a network type situation that a stroke it's going to impact networks that impact swallowing so you can get far bigger range of problems whereas with just the court itself going to lamb you know it's just GonNa Affect that one particular lamp it's not going to affect the TV in the microwave. Because it's just the cranial nerve Ortho the core that goes to that specific lamb as you get closer and closer to the structures so with using that analogy all I can think of because obviously my brain goes a central pattern generators already that the central pattern generator for spelling and then analogy is like the program that programs those holiday lights that like. Have a certain pattern to music that they you know they What's that that orchestra? You see this all over. During the holidays. Their Halloween Lights. The lights are flashing to beat. Yeah like to Jingle Bell Rock. Yeah and there's like a very to make it look good. There has be very specific timing in patterning in coordination for it to match with the song. Yeah because you know the late in an analogy to swallowing. It's not just on and off for a certain pattern and timing associated with it so it just makes me think of Christmas lights that I'm black. You said that because what you've done is will first. Let's do this. Let's assume people we've already talked about last year in the swallowing physiology series. We talked about the muscles that we talked about the nurse K. But what you've done is you've taken us to serve the first level of brain stem cranial nerve nuclei By saying Central Pattern jeter pattern generators. But we haven't defined it. So do you mind to finding central pattern generator? Sure so I mean globally so. The central pattern generator is not unique to swallowing their central pattern. Generators that are present for different types of Rhythmic Motor Outputs such as walking and swimming and chewing breathing and swallowing. They're really just neural circuits. So one thing that drives me crazy about the central pattern generator in swallowing. Is that people sort of talk about it. Like it's this. Anatomical localization like this is the area. This is the central pattern generator. That's not really what it is. It's a neural circuit. And it's composed of different types of insurance that are responsible for integrating sensory and motor information in to define it. It's really just a circuit that produces a rhythmic outputs. Swallowing would be in that umbrella in the absence of a rhythmic input so the way they always define central pattern generators is that they can there can be a rhythmic stereotyped motor behavior without necessitating sensory input. Now it's it's kind of confusing. I feel like that definition because it implies that sensory input is in Doesn't matter and it absolutely matters. All they're saying is that when they do these basic science experiments. If you actually cut off the sensory input to the neural network you can actually still get an output in a program to response. The sensory input isn't necessary to initiate it. But we all know especially in swallowing that sensory input. Highly modulate the central pattern generator to get accurate timing in coordination information to get a to get a programmed motor output that That we see that so beautiful when you look following you look at a sequential swallow the sensory information feeding into that central pattern generators critical So if you look at the if you look like on the Internet a definition of a CPG I think it can be a little. Bit Misleading So basic definition right so what I like to say to people what. I'm trying to explain this. 'cause I mean that was obviously the classical definition it's about a stereotyped slash rhythmic response rate so walking rhythmic chewing his ruth mick or stereotyped meaning. The cascade of events are very are stereotypical sequential. It can be a sneeze it can be. Enga- can be a cough. It can be swallow. When you think of the cascade of events that are gonNA happen but if you think of a piano that is going in a very rhythmic way. It's because somebody's hitting it. Rhythmic way you're hitting the keys. Rhythmically did Edited very sort of like Percussion mechanical if you're not hitting it in a rhythmic way. It's not producing anything in a rhythmic way. And what she's saying is that we don't have a When we walked we don't have these sensory inputs of the floor hitting our foot every time it's making everything happened so think of a knee jerk response. You're the reason you have a reflexive knee-jerk responses because some the physician or whoever has hit your patellar tendon stretches and then you get the research the motor response if you hit it rhythmically. Of course we know that these reflexes extinguished. But if you could hit it rhythmically you would get a knee-jerk every but what if your knee jerk was happening just because you hit it once because you that wouldn't happen unless you had a central pattern generator in your central nervous that Hugh stimulated once it triggers this network of activity that causes a rhythmic outcome So that's that's what the differences with central pattern generators and the purpose of them is so that we don't have to think about every single step. We take every time we breed everytime you swallow. We don't go come on lyrics. Do your thing come on you. Es you're next go barracks. It happens sequentially. So that we can just live right especially. That's why it's considered an insult if somebody says you're so dumb you can't walk and Chew Gum..

Aleisha US Chew Gum TriGem Jingle Bell Rock cough apple Hugh Vegas ruth mick Enga
Climate change isn't just shifting how the world feels, it's changing how it sounds

Climate Cast

04:16 min | 2 months ago

Climate change isn't just shifting how the world feels, it's changing how it sounds

"His climate change changing the sounds. We hear nature. I'm NPR chief meteorologist. Paul Hutler here with climate cast. Close Your eyes and listen to a spring day in Minnesota. That's the sound of nature coming alive again. We know many animals are adapting to climate change. Some are shifting range or habitat but changing environments may also be changing the sounds. Animals make science journalist and author. Emily anthems wrote about the changes for the New York Times. Emily welcome to climate cast. Thank you for having me. Why did you want to write about animal? Sounds and climate change precisely because it was such an unexpected effect of climate change. I came across a paper that outlined how climate change might alter the way. The whole planet sounds and that was in effect. I had not read about or thought about. Here's a sewn from your piece I love. Let's hear the King Penguin. Emily King Penguins can actually change their calls based on win conditions. Is that right and they do. If you've ever seen a documentary about penguins you may know they nest in these big large colonies and when one in the meeting pair goes off to get food and they come back. They have to find their mate in their chick and they do that through. Acoustic cues and if the wind is really strong it's hard for them to find and hear their partners but scientists have learned that they can adjust to these conditions by issuing more calls and they also draw their calls out. And what did you learn about the cookie? Frogs of Puerto Rico So researchers had known for several decades that these frogs vary by altitude. So if you start at the bottom of mountain where it's warmer. The frogs are relatively small. But as you go up the mountain of the frogs get bigger and their calls change along the way so the small frogs at the base of the mountain of these sort of tiny little squeaky calls and as the frogs get bigger and you travel up the mountain of the calls get sort of lower and deeper and slower but scientists have now found that as the temperature and weather conditions change halfway up the mountain. The frogs are now smaller than they used to be. Which means that they're calls are Sort of faster and squeak year. We know that the oceans are absorbing a great deal of the carbon that we're putting into the atmosphere and that makes our oceans more acidic but emily. I didn't know that shrimp snapped but found some Australian research on that. Yeah so to be clear. Not all species of shrimp Snap but there are some species known for really loud snaps that they make when they quickly closed their large claws. Scientists have found that as oceans. Get MORE ACIDIC. These snapping sound seemed to be getting quieter and quieter emily. Some people might be listening and thinking. Why do changes in how animals sound matter? What's the case for that one? Is that a lot of species. Use Acoustic cues to find mates and so one concern with the Puerto Rican frogs. We talked about. Is that if you have a call? That's changing but the animals say inner ear doesn't change then you could eventually get to a scenario where there's a mismatch there and animals can't hear potential mates calling. In the case of the shrimp larva alike fish larva used. These sounds to help themselves navigate and to find suitable habitats after they hatch in the instance of the penguins if they have to call longer and more frequently and louder in inclement weather than that takes energy. And it's already precarious to survive in the wild. If you have to put a lot more energy into trying to produce sounds that can be heard That can be costly from survival. Perspective Science Journalist and author. Emily Anthony's thanks for sharing some sounds of climate change on climate casts today. Of course thanks for having me.

Emily Emily King Emily Anthony Puerto Rico Chief Meteorologist Paul Hutler NPR Minnesota New York Times
"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

06:00 min | 5 months ago

"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

"More than just at the surface can we. Can we say something that might be helpful to everyone in that is done in the three of us when a patient is presented in front of us. We don't have a checklist that say oh they do this and they do this. And so we're going onto this and we're going to do this. Every patient is a study of with an N. of one and so we just sent the size the information that behalves and and do the take the best that we know and maybe even Dialogue with some of our colleagues who have better experience than us or may have treated this kind of case more than us. But we don't have a checklist that says if they do this than we do this and if we do this that were playing in with this track figuring it out that we don't have the answers that this is an ongoing experiment and it's okay to say I don't know and and that it's okay to not know but try to figure it out trying to help to figure it out and not just pretend that you know and that's okay. It's not it's doesn't mean you're Rabab person that's where learning begins and that's where we all are really. I think we all need somebody in our life to say. Why do you think you know that? And you might find that you do know it but at least you will have gone through the exercise of validating invalidating. What you think you know and putting aside the things that you don't But importantly I think that this is a good discussion that were. I'm happy that I think we got to the heart of not so much. Just Jim's case ace. It's not wasn't her goal to just talk about Tim case. But it's more so to talk about the system that led jim to go through down this path and that's why we're talking right now because there is is a system that we're all part of and Far More intimately involved in his particular case that and that led jim to be in this circumstance. And you know they're going to be a lot of people who aren't happy about this discussion. It's like you're beating upon the speech pathologists and you're saying all these mean things and you're not giving US solutions. We haven't even all agreed that there's a problem. This is my big thing. We're not in a place where everybody's not because they're they're defiant and don't want want there to be validated their job because they don't even know if there's a problem so we're still. I feel like our three years on this podcast. SALESIAN has been trying to arm waving and saying this place is on fire. The House is on fire and some people it is but and to what everything seems fine. And there's people like Ed who was like yeah. I've been screaming that for a long time. I mean there is a certain certain you know central theme that we Kinda come back through in every episode. But you know it's important to me that that we say I guess what I'll say. Is that to your point that some people don't like to hear it. I think we're still going to keep saying it. You know and I think that it's so so important because at the end of the day we want our field to move forward in the right direction and not the wrong direction and sometimes sometimes it takes conversations that are uncomfortable. Jeff love but but really the end goal of a positive Outcome and I think we are moving in that direction. I think that there's been a lot of positive change in our field over the past couple of years. Not Saying that's due to us but I think gets due to people being more open about having these types of conversations. I hope that we played a small part in that. I like to discuss these things. I think that if we don't discuss these things then we're going to stay stagnant in our field somebody else is going to take it over. Oh yeah I I agree. I think that the conversation has shifted a lot in the last a couple of years and I think that your podcast in combination with a lot of other PODCASTS and conversations had really hoped to move the ball all yeah and I think because the first step of any program is to relate to have a problem right I'm Charleston first step is to acknowledge you have a problem and I think that yeah after all of these years very close to acknowledging that we have a problem there is January. So we're in step one. which is acceptance right? Isn't that the first one your holiday up this afternoon. You guys were talking this same time. What leash I don't know I think except you have to acknowledge the problem before you can accept I right yeah? So is Acceptance Stage two. So I still think we're kind of on stage one. Oh so acknowledgment is the first one like hey I have a problem or just not being. The hardest is is the acceptance days. Yep Yup A and report back. We need this class outside of our field. Understand this concept so that'd be comply. Yeah well guys. This was really a good conversation and I'm really hoping that the you know the kinds of emails that and messages that we've been getting about his case I hope it resonates in a way where people take action because again people are looking for a hero and in the words of Tina Turner. We don't need another hero. Actually what needs to happen is everyone needs to take a half step forward. This grassroots idea is so much more important. Just really looking at what you're doing doing an asking if you're doing the best that you can not the best we can because we're bigger than the system we're in if we fought away claude away to get in while we're here. We have the capacity to do better while we're here we're at this. Is the perfect place for us to succeed. We're not climbing our way into speech into swallowing the way we used to be. Let's take advantage of this opportunity to make the best something that people love to do which is eat we get to be the gatekeepers.

Jim US SALESIAN Tina Turner Tim Jeff love claude Charleston Ed
Colorado man arrested, four pipe bombs found in his home

KYW 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 8 months ago

Colorado man arrested, four pipe bombs found in his home

"Federal authorities arrested a suspected white supremacist who plotted a bomb at a historic synagogue in Colorado US attorney Jason Dunn says twenty seven year old Richard holes are accused of hatching a plan to detonate explosives at temple Emmanuel in the city of pueblo this past Saturday that coordinated with undercover agents to obtain various types of explosives during these conversations Mr holder also stated that he was not concerned about any loss of life from the attack because sex victims would be Jews done says holes are made it clear he wanted to wipe the synagogue off the map

Jason Dunn Richard Holes Temple Emmanuel Pueblo Mr Holder Colorado Us Attorney
"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

"I think that there's a gray area between what is volition. And what's not? And how I think of it is. You can't I I don't think that you could say that. It's doesn't have a volition component to it. I don't I mean, if you want to argue with me on that been part of and means that you can initiate it at will you don't need a sensor sticks initiated swell air. So I think. As long as you're in the early stage that I've described at the time compressing up in forward towards the veal ridge. And the moving the bolles backwards in the mouth about is Felicia lend, it's also modifiable, right? But I think the minute you, then let go of that the minute you changed direction and the minute you let go of generating pressure mean when your tongue recovers back after this is now in the Barents. Well, when the now the the the bullet is I think probably position right at the cliff. Our just over the cliff, and then you no longer to generate that that anterior directed pressure as you change direction and start chasing down. I think that point the volition l- and modifiable part is. Probably questionable. Diminishing Haas gets like, a, you know, it's a clear cut line. But as having these conversations all keep thinking about is how. The importance of sensory integration piece regular so much sensory information that we're gathering, you know, the even that we're not aware of right the tongue sensing what's happening in the oral cavity were not so super aware of it. It makes me wonder, you know, what do you guys think about patients that have sensory impairments in the oral cavity? Or they're processing of sensation is impaired is part of the having dysphasia meaning that in the oral phase, you're having to use more of that volition component. You don't have the sensory mechanisms that are intact to just sort of. Well, wait questions segue into why I asked the question. Let me just say the reason I asked you guys that question is because when we do the perturbations where we direct list right into the Feerick pure forms in healthy people meeting. We bypass the as yeah, they don't get to push it back. I squeeze the bullets interfere forms induce. What we call an irrepressible fringe will slice Elit. Saint always have poster potion even though it is not necessarily necessary for guiding the bolles. But I think they can't turn it off because it's still plays a role at airway protection the way to get the epic Ladas to at least horizontal ask her Pearson study is still needed. You still have to protect your airway, even if there's not a boneless that needs to be pushed back. So that's perhaps why and I can posted video on the down the hatch Twitter account and Facebook account because they always go. They're still using your tongue. I don't buy much in that they would still use their. Chung shirt. I'm not sure. I see I think because in initiating the parental swallow. They would still need to have upper in for removing the highest rental complex, and I think the tongue would probably fall still facilitation at and then still come back down as it's recovering from that. So I doesn't surprise me that yet see things there. And you know, what to support that point? Is that in those squirts well as it should we call them yet? The highway rental movement is identical to the volition swallows yet. Right. Furthermore, the other thing is in patience. We've had a couple of patient with oral proxy after and leave squirt swallowed them. They could not induce volition lingual movement when we put bullets in there until we did this word swallows they had a beautiful swallow yet. So I think in my opinion, this is if I had to guess these kinds. Of experiments suggest that it's almost like the the crux between the truly completely volition things if you're just chewing, and like I said, you're an actor on TV pretending you're doing something just air all the way to the far more volition things that you ES opening what you can't say..

Haas Barents Felicia Saint Twitter Pearson Chung Facebook
"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

"More court regulated as well. And I like the example that you give about comparing it to blinks how you can make a conscious decision to blink your eyes. Which is volition you make that choice or you could have a reflexive blank or somebody's poking you in the eye and something that you can't control or in the middle. Yes. Spontaneous blinks that we do all the time to prevent corneal dryness. Right. So the thing is with oral preparation. There's no reflexive. I'm just gonna start chewing. Right. I can't stop thing. I mean, it is a little bit of a continuum in that. It's volition, but it's not like we have to be conscious of every single chew and say to again bite down by down by done move to the left move it to the right? There is a level of not that it's reflexive, but there are different levels of heightened corrigo awareness of what's yours levels of control. Right. So it's not like you're gonna throw a dart where you have to put all your thought into it. Right. It's not a background. It can't it is a background tippety just like walking, which is it's in. It's an insult tell someone you're so dumb. You can't walk into gum. Right. Because it's like those should be able to be background activities, and you should be able to have a conversation or think about something when that's happening. So some people think of those spontaneous or stereotypical background events. It does have a central pattern generator for masticate. Right. Meaning that there's a part of your brain network of of of parts of your brain in this in this case say the cortex instead of getting too deep where they regulated rhythmic movement in the absence of some kind of rhythmic input..

"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

"They can't be protective, but that's one of the things that we talk about to, you know, just in providing strategies like, what can we do as field to address some of these issues? And one of the things that's been looked at quite a bit in academic medicine in the business world is this idea of, you know, unim- big are. Ambiguous criteria for promotion or advancement. So the criteria isn't clearly laid out. We automatically go to those types or those operating implicit bias. We, we just don't know what to make of it. And so we have to lean on something that's familiar and that and that may be protective in some situations. So you know, it's really about bringing making clear criteria that are unambiguous but also making some of those assumptions more at the forefront so that we are, we know they're operating and we can overcome. And there's some things that both men and women can be guilty of for areas where women have no other option. So if you are women of child rearing age, we know on one hand, you cannot ask an interview. It's a legal to ask anything about their married or if they're planning on having kids because that's ever really got in favor of women on the other. If you you already know that they are childbearing age. You can't anew that and you can't think. Okay. So during this period I'm gonna need so and so and if she does get pregnant Bo about. So the thing is people can think those things, and that's the area where it really is important for people to understand what by sees they're they're entering situation with into what at. Absolutely. And that was one of the key pieces for me of the course that I took in delving into this literature a bit more is just that, you know, initially, my response was, well, if this is our common socialization experience and everyone has these vices, what can really be done about it. I mean, it just is just something I'm going to have to fight for most of my life in my career, and you know, that can be really discouraging place to be in. So it was just really empowering to hear the strategies that can be taken to approach situations in just realizing that there are these biases operating that it's not. It's not always in many cases, intentional and. You know, as a woman going into a situation, what can I do to really minimize those biases and approach it in a way that I'm aware this is happening, but I have strategies to deal with it and that I think that can be really impounding for women, right for sure. I do think in this metoo movement era were things like man's blaming and whatnot are becoming things that we both say and sometimes laugh at, but also really, you know, people have a, they didn't know that it was something else. Somebody, it was something somebody else was experiencing like, oh, my God is this is radiology really explaining the EPA Gladys right now, like not leave. He's telling me that the flap is the reason for everything..

Bo EPA one hand
"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

"You know a hundred inches they see a million in these cases you'll be back out there walking again that's that's gonna be issue so that's the ranger dealing with and we love it when we're on the restoring functional swallow range and we hate it when all we can do is tell someone that they need a tube like that we hate that right but we have to remember that there's an assumption that compensatory strategies don't have any rehab attentional and olma new vers have rehab potential right so what do i mean an example is if everyone listening puts their chin up and swallow saliva you'll see how hard that is to do and if you put your chin all the way up and swallow a big bottle of water it's often more difficult and challenging actually than drinking water in the neutral position so the idea of challenging the impairment versus facilitating it is really a difference we need to be thinking about and so if we say that somebody has a delay and we tell them to attend down because we think that it'll take a little longer for the bullets down there that woodson idea facilitating that particular impairment if you wanna challenge that impairment you tell someone with swallow onset delay or poor oral control to put their chin up now you're challenging it and a lot of people just like left do state in their underwear hearing that ideal they're so afraid like oh my god who would do that who would tell somebody to put their shit when they have a delay but what does that tell us about our approach yeah i think i think the most interesting part of what of everything that you just said was that the way that you categorized things as facilitate for challenge was not based on why paper by so and so in two thousand whatever that said that this is a challenge it's based on understanding the physiology and understanding what these types of maneuvers could do to the.

woodson hundred inches
"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

"To investigate whether drinking thin liquids with safety strategies increases the risk for pneumonia as compared to thicken liquids in patients who have demonstrated aspiration on thins there was no significant difference in the risk of pneumonia in aspyring patients who took thin liquids with safety strategies compared to those who took thickened liquids only and of course these these patients happen to have a low risk of pneumonia but even if you're like okay gosh i don't wanna be the thick liquid police why not thin liquids with strategies and yes if they maybe didn't tuck their chin as well whatever this study suggests in many of our patients not we think that the vast majority of our patients everybody's at risk immediately frustration ammonia and that's not necessarily case i think the vast majority of our patients are actually on the lower end of risk for monja and this study is saying if you can't bring yourself just saying ben then with the strategies just as good as thick prefer i mean some strategies don't work but you know what aspiration is not the worst into the world's athletes okay yeah patients aspirin like it's okay it doesn't mean that we're rogue therapists or anything like that but good lord when it comes to rehab don't you want somebody drinking what's more natural yes i'm you drink something that was nectar thick liquid i think i had like a mango smoothie thing the other day but i chose to do that because it was still like very pulpy orange juice that's my thing but that's my decision you know i'm i can decide i want to chase it down with a clear glass glass of water right after well i think that there's this these thicken liquid challenges that are everywhere and always funny to me about that challenge is that the challenges to drink once i know vick and liquids and it's called a checklist like oh my god grows really if your therapist that is recommending thicken liquids spend a day yeah spend a whole day where no matter what you drink you have to get it to liquid that will give you some perspective yeah for sure i had to do that when i was a student and it really gave me a sense of what i am subjecting my patients fully be more effective than the five pound bag of flour or challenge that they.

pneumonia vick aspirin five pound
"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

"And then when we swallow the es opens up so we think that happens in three different ways the crackle faring krecko fringes muscle relaxes the high alert joel complex move up and forward in the throat which physically stretches the the us and then also there's pressures within the bulls itself which can from within stretch open the that singer region so we kind of think that maybe both evolving and driving pressure so fells open to let the boas pass through into create that area of sub atmospheric pressure was helps pulled bo is down but then it also helps drive the tail of the bullets because he actually contracts patillo the bullets and then as the the yes it self lowers down in the ferrings at helps drive the boss and and keep the bullets in there so would you say i don't have as much experience working with the objective measures of swallowing pressures but this is rather new concept not a new concept and new tool that's used to measure swallowing pressure in swallowing and i have two thoughts one is that maybe from a historical perspective the idea of using for ringe manama trie sort of birth from its use in the asaf ag ass because that's more typically seen in safa jill studies to measure off pressures in also i feel like clinically a lot of what we have observed about quote swallowing pressure has been by looking at the bolles so looking at residue that's the consequence of reduced pressure would be residue.

us bulls bo bolles manama
"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

"Welcome to another down hatch podcast and today we have a special guest cringe on soon to be dr jones soon to be she is actually finishing up her phd has submitted her dissertation for review by the committee just a few days ago and she's now here in sunny florida from wisconsin madison where they had seven inches of snow last week we did we probably had seven inches of rain last week okay so every were complaining probably more exactly those in wisconsin about the snow exactly but my turns did really well very nice yeah so why don't you introduce yourself yes so as i said i've been current jones from the university of wisconsin madison a lot of my research background has been using high resolution manama tree in the fairbanks to measure pressures during swallowing but i also spend a lot of my time during my phd dancer and dance teacher served me out of that realm and another fun fact about myself as i have a penetration pattern so due at least when when there's manama tree catheter in catering's i have a penetration pattern i have not been flowed without the catheter well guess what you are here this weekend for the normal swallowing workshop that starts tomorrow and as part of that workshop on saturday all the apiece we'll get to floor themselves and get to see if they're part of the ass raiders penetrators or even deep penetrator group right or no or none of the rate we're not gonna eat anything to somebody.

dr jones florida wisconsin fairbanks university of wisconsin manama seven inches
"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"hatch" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

"Right exactly yeah you're just giving them food it's not what is causing them to deal with every problem no other frequent meals that's what i hear from the trish in right smaller pretty clinton meals yes everybody that's like a joke among some the traditionalist i believe that it's like that's what like treat all the problems yeah have to be careful not to our our or down the hatch you can say whatever you want you mentioned that swallowing there is a lot of strength training but nobody does endurance training they give someone something just swallow just over and over and over again so so there's a couple of answers to that question endurance training can happen couple ways you can use the structures they're involved in swallowing in a non swallowing task and do something like time to fill which i've done in my lab recently a master student did this used i okay ball and push the ball to the roof of the mouth at i think it was fifth twenty percent of their max like eighty percent of their max to understand time to task failure so that's just isometric and we've also done sort of ice ice oh tonic type of movement where they needed to see how long they can maintain that but when it comes to swallowing the problem is the stomach the stomach it's full before someone structure gets tired so you could chug and chug and chug in your oral.

clinton eighty percent twenty percent
"hatch" Discussed on The Rusty Humphries Rebellion

The Rusty Humphries Rebellion

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"hatch" Discussed on The Rusty Humphries Rebellion

"Joe hill over deplorable for the next seven years from texas alija is in freezing west florida thank you global warming brian is a checking in carman is there kansas alicia brendan is there roger says glad you of sound of this time usually iaaf sounds of you have to click on the post so you can hear the sound orf if you miss it you can always get the podcast in an hour so joe checking in mark in arabia louisiana rainy says will p repeal obamacare i think we can done that leicester says deplorables role yerupaja sean ishai is from utah okay sean a let's ask you this so we just talking about orrin hatch retiring now i am nice and i said this on the hear me out app earlier today some repeating myself but it's good stuff i am not a guy that says just because you're getting a little bit older we don't want to hear from you anymore that is kind of what has happened in america by once you get it's it's almost like once you get got to fifty year too old you're too dumb especially this era of the millennials and so if you're fifty and over you're done for i'm i don't believe in that however orrin hatch got into the senate in 1909 seventy seven i was in sixth grade i'm fifty some years old orrin hatch got in the senate when i was in the sixth grade the a think may be he's been there a little too long the answer is yes so it is good that orrin hatch is stepping down the bad i'm sick these career politician romney really we're gonna have romney again i mean come on and by the way utah you guys shouldn't fall for the romney thing when you read rufi yes he was governor of utah but how faster he get out of that state as quick as he could get the hell out of utah he did and he's going he's living on the east coast here that house with the car elevators that look like iron man's house in in san diego this guy's bet everywhere except for utah and now he wants to be your senator don't fall for it just don't i'm sick of people like that in speak in the senate here's some you should support did you hear.

romney deplorables arabia louisiana alicia brendan global warming west florida texas senator san diego utah Joe hill senate america orrin hatch sean ishai leicester roger kansas brian seven years fifty year
"hatch" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"hatch" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"The i mean there's plenty of people who believe things the constitutional things and are married to the constitution in utah just as married his mic lee is and it would be nice to have them run for office but i would take mitt romney over orrin hatch every day of the week so let's hope that somebody jumps into that race and takes it takes the bull by the horns triple eight nine hundred thirty three 93 at least we we're not going to have apparently not going to have a hatch intimidating somebody out of the race because he's a he's retiring 19th seventy six the man entered officer was elected holy cow so forty i mean you're it's going on fifty years now 18th seventy six good heavens that is forty one forty two years ago rate forty two who years in the us senate seriously that inits so obviously why i now favour term limits that goes to your point yeah yeah and i i made this point on on glenn show earlier today i used to believe that elections were term limits because if you didn't want them anymore you just vote him out of office but nobody does that for some reason it just doesn't happen and so these guys are continually put back in there because people know their name and they don't know the other person and they don't do the research and so they just send orrin hatch is back over and over and over and then they start to be convinced that well we'll lose lose our funding if we don't have somebody there who is powerful enough to fight for us in office.

utah mitt romney orrin hatch officer us senate glenn forty one forty two years fifty years
"hatch" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"hatch" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Is unbelievable the legislation he crafted with people like ted kennedy is unbelievable you can't have the kind of friendship he had with kennedy and be a conservative you just can't is it's virtually impossible because you disagree on too many things you've got too little in common how are you gonna how are you going to respect and admire and love the guy that you disagree with on every issue while they didn't disagree that's why i'm saying looks like gear good ourselves a senator mitt romney omit romney coming up here yeah this uh this clears the path because romney said if orrin hatch retires he'd consider running and so orrin hatch is now made the announcement he's he's going to retire in so obviously that opens up space for mitt romney even though president trump actually air urged him to run again eight i mean the guy would be like a thousand in three by the time his term was over in two thousand and two please don't exaggerate so it'll be interesting because it opens it up obviously for romney and others who who might want that senate seat now a couple of years ago when several years ago this ben two thousand nine or so before he was reelected for the eighty six timer however however many terms he is served and and jason cheif its was brand new and hadn't been coopted by other powerbrokers in washington we has now but yeah and and now he's gone now he's gonna be you know yes he's left as well but when he would when he was going to run for the us senate he would have won that seat yeah and orrin hatch sought to it that a jason shave its did not run against him and i mean ripe the day before he was going to make the announcement that he was going to run for the senate against orrin hatch he was convinced otherwise.

ted kennedy mitt romney orrin hatch trump washington us senate senator president jason cheif
"hatch" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"hatch" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"Hatch whoa armie hammer sure so yes details h the news offers jon stewart avaaz sure the last man with the oregon is gone.

oregon jon stewart
"hatch" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"hatch" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"Concerned about the republican a stylish meant dammit and taken by the heads and knock them together you're the leader do something about your party at your party now it's not my party right it's not it's not it's not our our party even though we may be members of it he controls the party we don't control the party right any so he needs to do something about it and what's he doing about it nothing nothing faqih icee says he in alabama he he uh he bent over backwards now mcconnell's guy does that make sense to eu anti and not at all in that i scratch my head on that in turkey regardless of politics and he down on out because he takes it personally because the ah the two republicans running did endorse him in the republican primary save figures you know screw them are back this guy itself selfdefeating i'll give you another example when you look at the orrin hatch orrin hatch said very nice things about trump early on orrin hatch will never support the trump agenda never and orrin hatch his best friend of the senate for decades was ted kennedy orrin hatch came on my show got my endorsement last time around promised he was a conservative said he would never run for reelection in now i'll decide in january that guy is contemptible as far as i'm concerned he lied to me lied to my audience look it happens i'm not perfect either but that said he likes orrin hatch and hill indors orrin hatch now that's not how you make changes the problem is if you're not a conservative if you don't have a a cerebral or at least in instinctive feeling for what's right and wrong as a matter of principle and you're willing to cut deals with schumer you're willing to see this luther they're strange guy you're willing to back hatch well then you're not going to get too far unless you lurch left and that's the problem andy great call i appreciate it i'll be.

icee alabama orrin hatch senate schumer mcconnell ted kennedy orrin hatch andy
"hatch" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

WJNT 1180 AM

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"hatch" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

"Leader do something about your party at your party now it's not my party right it's not it's not it's not our our party even though we may be members of it he controls the party we don't control the party right any so he needs to do something about it then what's he doing about it nothing nothing fact the ice age in alabama he he he bent over backwards now mcconnell's guy does that make sense to eu anti and not at all in at that i scratch my head on not in a vague turkey as a harvest of politics and he doesn't know know know know because he takes it personally because the the two republicans running did endorse him in the republican primary suv figures you know screw them are back this guy it's selfdefeating i'll give you another example when you look at the orrin hatch orrin hatch said very nice things about trump early on orrin hatch will never support the trump agenda never and orrin hatch his best friend of the senate for decades was ted kennedy orrin hatch came on my show got my endorsement last time around promised he was a conservative said he would never run for reelection in now i'll decide in january that guy is contemptible as far as i'm concerned he lied to me lied to my audience look it happens i'm not perfect either but that said he likes orrin hatch and hill indors orrin hatch now that's not how you make changes the problem is if you're not a conservative if you don't have a a cerebral or at least an instinctive feeling for watch right and wrong as a matter of principle and you're willing to cut deals were schumer you're willing to see this luther strange guy you're willing to back hatch well then you're not going to get too far unless you lurch left and that's the problem andy great call i appreciate it i'll be right back month over mm thai summer thaw passion and this is.

alabama orrin hatch senate schumer mcconnell ted kennedy orrin hatch luther andy