20 Burst results for "Hastings College"

"hastings college" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:22 min | 5 months ago

"hastings college" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"To mandate or not to mandate that is the vaccine question for a whole lot of companies. The roger giants uber and lift have made the increasingly popular split decision employees. Who want to go back to the office. Gotta get their shots. Drivers obviously don't have to go back to the office proper but what to do about them reveals the question behind the question for a lot of companies. What they've got the gain and what they've got to lose marketplace met levin reports lubang lift have spent hundreds of millions of dollars on ballot measures and lobbying to keep drivers classified as independent contractors. So basically go question. I can a gig economy company for a gig economy worker to get the vaccine. Of course they can view. New ball is a professor at uc hastings college of the law. She says rideshare companies already mandate a bunch of things that car has to be maintained in a certain way you know. The drivers have to wear masks. Both lifting uber said they strongly encourage drivers to get vaccinated stanford business school professor. Paul lawyer says anything stronger could backfire. Just when ridership was approaching pre pandemic levels. They're going to be a bunch of drivers out. There who are vaccine resistant will therefore not be able to drive for them and given that right now. They're having trouble getting enough drivers that a big issue on the other hand or your says a mandate that includes drivers and riders could boost business in some places where passengers are looking for reassurance carrying rank. He drives for uber. An lift in san antonio cheese vaccinated..

roger giants lubang uc hastings college of the law levin Paul san antonio
"hastings college" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"hastings college" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Kind of wonder just how we end up here? And how all these questions and popping up every two years? Well this year, there's an added rub right. The propositions come set against the dark backdrop, which is, of course, the pandemic out of growing concerns about the deadly Corona virus officially hitting the US Here's what we need and civil unrest in the coffer Rachel just in Washington, D C protestors, setting a large fire just blocks from the White House. Accelerating climate change. We begin tonight with millions of Americans in the path of multiple natural disasters. Economic collapse the Labor Department is out with, of course, one of the most contentious presidential races in history even has a 10 point. National Advantage over President Trump. Some of these questions are going to gain immediacy like you know the repealing of the ban on affirmative action, any cash bail or changing up the structure of property taxes? Other questions? They're a bit harder to understand. For all the noise like changing dialysis, clinic regulations and the reclassification of uber and lyft drivers, or maybe allowing 17 year olds the right to vote, So we're gonna get started here. In this episode, we'll tackle the history of the ballot question in California will dive into the criticism of the process. You know, it's not exactly something that's universally adored. And along with came Alexander. I've said some legal help to kind of guide us through this journey. It's the the grill in the room in California politics, Okay, My name is Michael Salerno Ah, clinical professor emeritus at UC Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco, and the California initiative process has long been a process. I've had a great interest in and worked. You might call Salerno Ah, critic of the system and generally opposed to the California initiative process. Because it's the Wild West. I think initiatives could be done in a more Thoughtful way We're gonna be hearing much more from slaughter. No. My name is Mary Beth Moylan, Me associate Dean for academic affairs. An experiential learning at Nick George School of Law were part of the University of the Pacific in Sacramento, California oil. It's got a certain expertise in this subject. I teach a class called The California Initiative Seminar, and the students in that class produced the California Initiative Review, which we produced online every lap. Ction cycle. So every two years we produce the California Initiative Review We provide objective and neutral summaries of each of the statewide ballot measures that appear on the general election ballot. Of course, the election comes here in the cove it age, which complicates our campaigns typically get the word out How we discussed these questions with each other. We don't have the culture right now of Gatherings of spreading the word at farmers markets and at concerts, right. That's not happening so much. Well, I am concerned that people Are not having the chance to interact casually with people who they trust. Normally when we get to election time, you know you have the campaign messages coming at you on TV. If you're a likely voter, you also have people calling you on the phone. You're going to have mail Coming to your home. Isolation tends to be a good breeding.

California California Initiative Review Salerno Ah California Initiative White House Washington President Trump Rachel Mary Beth Moylan Labor Department associate Dean for academic af Wild West Nick George School of Law Alexander San Francisco UC Hastings College University of Sacramento
"hastings college" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:43 min | 1 year ago

"hastings college" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is for my Michael Krasny. Do you have questions about the life and legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsberg? And really, we're asking a question. What did she mean to you were talking about her life and legacy and Joining us now is David Levin, professor at UC Hastings College of Law. Welcome, Professor Levin. Morning, Michael for the record, I want you to know I'm drinking coffee with my notorious RBG. Coffee mug, right? Glad to have that. I want to mark it. Russell. You have won a CZ. Well, Mark Russell come. Professor Law at Santa Clara University joins us as well. Both With their RBG coffee cups. Boy, there are become such a cultural icon there RBG socks or RBG T shirts. She was really beloved and a woman of great rectitude and a woman really of meticulous and discipline. Shaping of the law. In writing of the law. She was influenced that Cornell by Vladimir in the book of No less told that she could write on bright in pictures and Margaret Let me begin with you. Let's talk about really Let's hear a cut first, because this kind of sums up a lot about Ruth Bader Ginsburg when she was asked a question about how many women should be justices on the court. That cut any People ask me sometimes. When? When do you think it will be enough when well? Will there be enough women on the court? And my answer is When you're alive. Yeah, well, let me go back to you on this professor Russell because the reality is that in and you teach courses in gender in the law, and I know that studying justice Ginsburg and studying all of her decisions, particularly in some ways, maybe her Descents is well. Has given so many young women inspiration. What's the boats? At the heart of that? Absolutely. And before we begin, I have to say that both David and I have something else in common with Ruth Bader Ginsburg. And that we love civil procedure, So that's actually and I do, too. Oh, terrific, Professor. Really great. So I'm glad you asked that in terms of what she means to women because I see her influence. Generationally by comparing women lawyers of my generation with hers, and then now teaching the youngest generation of lawyers and gender and long constitutional law. I graduated from law school 25 years after Ruth Bader Ginsburg and and this is how I tell my students the significance between her time and mine. When she graduated. She had trouble getting a job. Even though she was at the top of her class was a top performance student. She and other women were regularly ask questions like and openly. Why are you taking a spot? That really should be for man. You're gonna get married. Have Children. You're taking up space. She She was trying to start a family and work very hard. Something that my women students really worried a lot about. How do you juggle that? And she did it so Prodigiously. I think that it's a little all inspiring. But what I what I mentioned to my students is that in this, you know sort of passing along of the generations. She shines as someone who who cares about justice. That's a sign in her chambers. Justice, Justice Shall you pursuit? She was very aware of the hardships in her life and also the privileges in her life. She was very unpretentious in describing them, and I think she was very resolute in moving forward through life right to the end with race and determination, So I think she is not just a seat on the court. Obviously, she represents so much more. Let's talk about what he represents, particularly in terms of cases with you, David Levin. I mean, we have to go back to 1996 1st of all thinking about most significant cases because it was a real turning point with the Virginia Military Institute. Sure, absolutely Michael because it was, in a way the culmination of that strategy that Professor Williams was starting to tell us about where Justice Ginsburg as a litigator so brilliantly found the cases to bring the issues to the four to the Supreme Court justices and lower court judges. Essentially all men could understand it. So one of the brilliant things that she did is that she found cases those early ones where men were to disadvantage on DH. She was able to show the discrimination the stupidity of the discrimination that way and then with the FBI, where she was able to write a 7 to 1 majority opinion, she really and trying that because of the M i n all male institution. Off with that, with the very rigorous physical standards and all to go into it, Virginia when they were challenged, actually set up a weak or program for women talk about separate but equal and justice. Ensberg was having none of it. Even a very few women would be able to meet the particular standards Of'em. I might be interested in that kind of a life you needed to be open. And so that's what I would say what she did. Fishing helped us to knock down stereotypes in all sorts of areas where there was disability, whether it was women's rights and also, I think she was very proud of essentially creating men's liberation as well in the sense of equality, one of her clients with somebody who was trying to take care of his kids and wasn't getting a benefit. And she was able to use that as a case to show the unfairness. So I think it's not just that she's a role model for women. But for men who want tohave Ah, life encompasses all sorts of parts and that there is no discrimination of Syrian types against anybody. David Levin is professor You see Hastings College of Law. Wendy Williams again is professor emeritus at Georgetown Law to go back to you, Professor Williams says. We're evaluating Justice Ginsburg's career and looking at it from a broad perspective. One has to say she was not only this. This is a word that's been unfortunately. Put in a well, George Orwell wrote about this word being overused so much that it lost. It's meaning, but she was a leader of what we could describe his liberalism, whether it was gender discrimination or whether it was Abortion and report reproductive rights. Affirmative action workers rights. I mean across the board. What used to be the best of many people's minds with liberalism was and she was a liberal leader on the court. She was a remarkable and her ability to in the early days on the court..

Ruth Bader Ginsberg professor Professor Levin Professor Williams UC Hastings College of Law Mark Russell Michael Krasny Supreme Court George Orwell Georgetown Law Virginia Virginia Military Institute David FBI Santa Clara University Ensberg Cornell Margaret
"hastings college" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"hastings college" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Makes a point. Executives that lived in uber make constantly drivers love flexibility, and the companies say if forced to hire all of its drivers, as employees say goodbye to the flexible schedules. That's absolutely bogus. That's California Attorney General Javier Sarah. It was his office that took lifted Neubert to court. And it should be noted here that both companies are financial supporters of NPR. The companies have told this lying if we have to treat you like employees and offer you rights and benefits, then we won't be able to give you flexibility. There's nothing in the law that prevents them from providing the flexibility to their drivers that the drivers might want. But the ride healing companies insist paying for all of that would mean shutting down in California, at least temporarily. But Sarah doesn't buy any of that either. They're supposed to be innovative companies. I'm surprised that they're saying that the only way they can do business is by shortchanging workers of their rights and their benefits. But why, then an interview after interview Did drivers themselves tell me? They want to stay? Independent contractors? What you're hearing is Fears that have been instilled in driver's by the companies themselves. Veena do Ball is a professor at the University of California, Hastings College of Law, She studies the gig economy. She's interviewed hundreds of lifting uber drivers, and at first she heard the same thing. Drivers fear companies will reduce their hours, meaning they'd earn less money. But when she followed up with them and did deeper interviews, she found that drivers would actually like both flexible hours and benefits like unemployment insurance. If you're laid off like worker's compensation if you're injured health insurance if you work for the same company for over 30 hours a week, but Dobel says drivers are already at the whim of the powerful tech firms. So they doubt the companies will give them benefits without taking something away back with lift driver Maya When business sunk like a rock at the start of the pandemic, he started doing deliveries for FedEx. It was a job with benefits pretty quickly, though he missed making his own hours and.

Attorney General Javier Sarah California Veena Neubert FedEx NPR Hastings College of Law Dobel professor University of California Ball
"hastings college" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"hastings college" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of its drivers, as employees say goodbye to the flexible schedules. That's absolutely bogus. That's California Attorney General Javier Sarah. It was his office that took lifted Newberg to court. And it should be noted here that both companies are financial supporters of NPR. The companies have told this line. If we have to treat you like employees and offer you rights and benefits, then we won't be able to give you flexibility. There's nothing in the law that prevents them from providing the flexibility to their drivers that the drivers might want. But the ride healing companies insist paying for all of that would mean shutting down in California, at least temporarily. Sarah doesn't buy any of that either. They're supposed to be innovative companies. I'm surprised that they're saying that the only way they can do business is by shortchanging workers of their rights and their benefits. But why, then an interview after interview Did drivers themselves tell me? They want to stay? Independent contractors? What you're hearing is Fears that have been instilled in driver's by the companies themselves. Veena do Ball is a professor at the University of California, Hastings College of Law, She studies the gig economy. She's interviewed hundreds of lifting uber drivers, and at first she heard the same thing. Drivers fear companies will reduce their hours, meaning they'd earn less money. But when she followed up with them and did deeper interviews, she found that drivers would actually like both flexible hours and benefits like unemployment insurance. If you're laid off like worker's compensation if you're injured health insurance if you worked for the same company for over 30 hours a week, But Duval says drivers are already at the whim of the powerful tech firms. So they doubt the companies will give them benefits without taking something away. Back with lift driver Maya When business sunk like a rock at the start of the pandemic, he started doing deliveries for FedEx. It was a job with benefits pretty quickly, though. He missed making his own hours and not having a boss. So I was doing that for two months, and I hated that job, man. I mean, it was more work for less money. The judge's order. Switching the status of drivers takes effect in days. But if the company's stick to their word and close up shop in California,.

Attorney General Javier Sarah California Veena Newberg FedEx NPR Hastings College of Law University of California Duval professor Ball
"hastings college" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"hastings college" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I just take Maya makes a point. Executives that left an uber make constantly. Drivers love flexibility, and the companies say if forced to hire all of its drivers, as employees say goodbye to the flexible schedules. That's absolutely bogus. That's California Attorney General Javier Sarah. It was his office that took lifting uber to court. And it should be noted here that both companies are financial supporters of NPR. The companies have told this lying if we have to treat you like employees and offer you rights and benefits, then we won't be able to give you flexibility. There's nothing in the law that prevents them from providing the flexibility to their drivers that the drivers might want. But the ride healing companies insist paying for all of that would mean shutting down in California, at least temporarily. Sarah doesn't buy any of that either. They're supposed to be innovative companies. I'm surprised that they're saying that the only way they can do business Is by shortchanging workers of their rights and their benefits. But why, then an interview after interview Did drivers themselves tell me they want to stay independent contractors? What you're hearing is fears that have been instilled in driver's by the companies themselves. Veena do Ball is a professor at the University of California, Hastings College of Law, She studies the gig economy. She's interviewed hundreds of lifting uber drivers, and at first she heard the same thing. Drivers fear companies will reduce their hours, meaning they'd earn less money. But when she followed up with them and did deeper interviews, she found that drivers would actually like both Flexible hours and benefits like unemployment insurance If you're laid off like worker's compensation if you're injured health insurance if you work for the same company for over 30 hours a week, But Paul says drivers are already at the whim of the powerful tech firms. So they doubt the companies will give them benefits without taking something away. Back with lift driver Maya When business sunk like Iraq at the start of the pandemic, he started doing deliveries for FedEx. It was a job with benefits pretty quickly, though he missed making his own hours and not having a boss. So I was doing that for two months and I headed a job, man. I mean, if you want more work for less money, the judge's order switching the status of drivers takes effect in days. If the company's stick to their word and close up shop in California.

Attorney General Javier Sarah California Veena Paul Iraq NPR FedEx Hastings College of Law University of California professor Ball
"hastings college" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"hastings college" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"The Hastings College, part of the University of California. She's author of the book Yesterday's month. Look now at some publishing industry News, Donald Trump Jr has announced that he will release a book next month. That's critical of presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden of self published book titled Liberal Privilege will be available at the end of August to coincide with the Republican National Convention. Andrew Weissmann, a former prosecutor for a special counsel, Robert Mueller, plans to publish his account of the two year investigation into Russian interference of the 2016 presidential election. The book where Law ends will be published by Random House and for sale on September 29th. In other news publisher's weekly reports on how authors air getting creative for the release of new books during the Corona virus pandemic, first time novelist Melanie Conroy, Goldman has invited readers to attend an outdoor driving event. Well, that's selling thriller. Author Daniel Silva is working with several independent bookstores to Livestream. His book launch. That'll include a virtual tour where he writes also in the news, according to NPD Books can print book sales are up almost 3% for the first half of the year, with 322 million copies sold. The rise in sales is led by young adult nonfiction books, while adult nonfiction sales are down by about 3.5% for the year, and the National Book Foundation has announced that due to ongoing concerns over the Corona virus pandemic, the 71st annual National Book Awards will take place online on November 18th Book TV will continue to bring you news. Programs and publishing news. You can also watch all of our archive programmes anytime at book TV dot org's Next on book TV on C Span Radio doubled You CSP from Washington. We'll hear from to Boston area writers Casey Sherman and Dave, which they report on the capture, imprisonment and death ofthe Boston Mafia figure. Why do you soldier? This is a virtual event which took place on May 28th. Everyone Thanks so much for being here. My name is Bradley Trump Fella. I'm a bookseller and events host at Brooklyn Books. Defies in Brookline, Massachusetts, Because now it's sort of not limited to geography anymore. We could be anywhere on guy want to just get started again by thanking everyone for being here this evening eyes everyone who was supporting these amazing journalists and writers and as well as our bookstore by purchasing their copy of the book through us or about using to pay your way through the events after the event. Everybody does really make a difference, especially in times like these. We can't overstate how much we appreciate it before we get started just a few things about sort of how the event is going to go tonight. Just about crowd cast platform. Ron, as you can see, you're free to use the chat function as we've been doing throughout the event. You know, it's not a disturbance at all. If you have any thoughts or anything, if you just wanna Give a shout out She'll free to not of your servants at all. Um I of course encouraged are going to be kind and respectful of the authors and each other, but hopefully that should go without saying So I'm just going to give a short introduction here than hand. Things over to the case didn't off After that we'll have after the conversation will have some time for questions from the audience so you can start sneaking about any questions. You have these these guys now, at which point I'll just come back on screen just to sort of repeat the question. Be like a vessel for that. Um yeah, So if you have any questions about how the function works, it's just a little button right there. On the sort of in the middle of your screen to the left of the chat box, seeking his punching your question there. It's relatively straightforward once you find it. Yeah, I think that covers about all the street of side of things. So tonight were excited to welcome Casey Sherman and Dave Wedge there, one of the premier nonfiction writing teams telling stories out of and with the city of Boston together, that co wrote the definitive story of the Boston Marathon bombings in Boston Strong the city's triumph over tragedy, which was adapted for the Mark Wahlberg film Patriot's Day. Tonight they'll be discussing their new book Hunting Whitey..

Boston National Book Foundation Casey Sherman Donald Trump Jr Dave Wedge Joe Biden Ron Hastings College Republican National Convention Random House Bradley Trump Brooklyn Books NPD Books Boston Mafia Daniel Silva Robert Mueller Brookline Washington University of California
"hastings college" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"hastings college" Discussed on KQED Radio

"S. You know, even though I know a lot of people out there hate Trump. I'm not happy with the decision either, But I think a lot of people need to remember that the US does throw its dollars around. Get other countries. Whether it's foreign policy, too kind of, you know, look in the best interest, not just in the U s, but oftentimes their their interest of the of the world, too. So I don't think that's you know. I don't agree with the decision, but I don't think it's uncommon to have the US kind of used its use its money, whether it's pulling in pulling out, rather putting in money, Tio influence Geo political decision. Brenda. Thank you for that call that you got your opinion in there, and we have to say goodbye to you, Kelly. I'm afraid would so good to have you with us and much appreciated. Thank you for the invitation. Michael. Best wishes Kelly again is Canada Research chair in global health governance for Simon Fraser University in British Columbia. And now as promised, we're going to talk about these two Supreme court decisions that were rendered Earlier this morning and a 7 to 2 vote. The Supreme Court ruled this morning in favor of two California churches, arguing they should not have to face employment discrimination lawsuits brought by former teachers. The ruling makes it so that religious schools are exempt from most employment discrimination claims, expanding religious freedom, and the Supreme Court today also cleared the way for the Trump administration to expand exemptions for employers who have religious or moral objections to Complying with Obama's care, Obamacare's contraceptive mandate and we're going to talk with David Levin, Professor. You see Hastings College of the law about these rulings and other Supreme Court decision is expected to come. Welcome David Levin. Always good to have you with us. Good morning. Good morning to you and well, we got a couple of examples here. The court, citing with religious groups and religious liberty, don't wait. We sure do. I think this is gonna end up being a trilogy with one from a couple weeks ago involving those private schools in Montana, where the Supreme Court said that Montana and many other states could not limit public school funds. That school's off school funds to go to religious schools and in these two as you, said, the one involving two schools down in Southern California, where 11 plaintiff alleged that she was the victim of a discrimination. The other plaintiff alleges that she was Victim of disability discrimination because she had told the school that she had breast cancer in both cases is to teachers were not given new contracts well, the Supreme Court said that under was called the Ministerial Exception. The's teachers who are primarily secular teachers. They teach things like English math spelling to fifth and sixth graders, but they also letter daily prayer. They also at least from a workbook did some religious instruction that that was enough for them to come within the ministerial exception. And basically, it's for this for the institution. In this case, the Catholic schools to say who it is, who is responsible for inculcating students with faith, etcetera, and that the government shouldn't second guess that opinion by seven to to the Supreme Court agreed with that idea, so it blows a huge hole. Ian Discrimination Law your number earlier in the term. That was the case about protection of lesbian and gays in transgender under title seven well in the religious school contacts that's gone this morning. And then if you want to go into the second, we're going to the 2nd 1 I want to. I want to break them down with you. But okay, we'll come back. Alright. The other one's called litter Sisters of the poor, and this has to do with the contraception mandate in the affordable care act and this causes. The statute requires contraception to be included among the health. The kind of Procedures that are available under the affordable health care under Obamacare, and that's caused some consternation. We've had other cases the famous hobby lobby case, saying that well if a privately held corporation and religious scruples they didn't have to offer contraception and then the Supreme Court in the year that Justice Scalia died. I asked the parties, the Obama administration and the parties, including the Little Sisters of the Poor, the lead plaintiff here to try and come up with some accommodation because the little sisters even objected to the idea that they would have to tell their health insurers that they didn't want to give the contraception. Coverage. And so instead, the by this point in the Trump administration was involved because of the change of administration in the Trump administration, came up with a very broad exemption was for religious and moral reasons that you could just as an employer. You could just say we don't want to provide contraceptive. Coverage. And while there's some nuance to it, basically as you stand by 70 to Justice Thomas for the majority said that was okay that we could have this big big exception. In the affordable care act both for religion and for moral scruples. So so, what do you want to know, Michael? Well, the moral was one caught my attention because I understand this from a religious perspective, but And it's very delicate balance between religious freedom and women's health that we're talking about here. But you know, someone could say, I don't want to pay the 600 to $1000 ever paid for women. They have contraception. About 70,000 women were talking about her, too. Maybe 126,000 would lose contraception covers. They could say I'm doing it for moral reasons, I guess And I don't know. Now No one said has to be. But let me first of all invite listeners to weigh in on either both of these decisions we do want to hear from you and hear your thoughts on him. And if you have questions for our guest, David Levin, please feel free to bring them forward on again. Professor Levin is Professor of law You see Hastings College of the Law, Our tollfree number 8667336786 We do welcome your involvements with police Feel free to join us now. Again the number 8667336786 or get in touch with us on Twitter and Facebook. We're at Kiki de form or email any questions you might have or comments or responses to these two cases to form at VT. Dot or GE. Let's talk first, about what you just talked about last. And that is the sense of Ah, contraception. A zit goes back to the affordable care act of Little Sisters of the poor, Because what this essentially means is A Zay said..

Supreme Court Professor Levin US Hastings College Michael Ministerial Exception Geo Kelly Obama administration Justice Thomas Simon Fraser University Montana California hobby lobby Twitter Justice Scalia Obama Professor of law Southern California
Supreme Court upholds exemptions to Obamacare contraceptive mandate

Forum

04:15 min | 1 year ago

Supreme Court upholds exemptions to Obamacare contraceptive mandate

"And now as promised, we're going to talk about these two Supreme court decisions that were rendered Earlier this morning and a 7 to 2 vote. The Supreme Court ruled this morning in favor of two California churches, arguing they should not have to face employment discrimination lawsuits brought by former teachers. The ruling makes it so that religious schools are exempt from most employment discrimination claims, expanding religious freedom, and the Supreme Court today also cleared the way for the Trump administration to expand exemptions for employers who have religious or moral objections to Complying with Obama's care, Obamacare's contraceptive mandate and we're going to talk with David Levin, Professor. You see Hastings College of the law about these rulings and other Supreme Court decision is expected to come. Welcome David Levin. Always good to have you with us. Good morning. Good morning to you and well, we got a couple of examples here. The court, citing with religious groups and religious liberty, don't wait. We sure do. I think this is gonna end up being a trilogy with one from a couple weeks ago involving those private schools in Montana, where the Supreme Court said that Montana and many other states could not limit public school funds. That school's off school funds to go to religious schools and in these two as you, said, the one involving two schools down in Southern California, where 11 plaintiff alleged that she was the victim of a discrimination. The other plaintiff alleges that she was Victim of disability discrimination because she had told the school that she had breast cancer in both cases is to teachers were not given new contracts well, the Supreme Court said that under was called the Ministerial Exception. The's teachers who are primarily secular teachers. They teach things like English math spelling to fifth and sixth graders, but they also letter daily prayer. They also at least from a workbook did some religious instruction that that was enough for them to come within the ministerial exception. And basically, it's for this for the institution. In this case, the Catholic schools to say who it is, who is responsible for inculcating students with faith, etcetera, and that the government shouldn't second guess that opinion by seven to to the Supreme Court agreed with that idea, so it blows a huge hole. Ian Discrimination Law your number earlier in the term. That was the case about protection of lesbian and gays in transgender under title seven well in the religious school contacts that's gone this morning. And then if you want to go into the second, we're going to the 2nd 1 I want to. I want to break them down with you. But okay, we'll come back. Alright. The other one's called litter Sisters of the poor, and this has to do with the contraception mandate in the affordable care act and this causes. The statute requires contraception to be included among the health. The kind of Procedures that are available under the affordable health care under Obamacare, and that's caused some consternation. We've had other cases the famous hobby lobby case, saying that well if a privately held corporation and religious scruples they didn't have to offer contraception and then the Supreme Court in the year that Justice Scalia died. I asked the parties, the Obama administration and the parties, including the Little Sisters of the Poor, the lead plaintiff here to try and come up with some accommodation because the little sisters even objected to the idea that they would have to tell their health insurers that they didn't want to give the contraception. Coverage. And so instead, the by this point in the Trump administration was involved because of the change of administration in the Trump administration, came up with a very broad exemption was for religious and moral reasons that you could just as an employer. You could just say we don't want to provide contraceptive. Coverage. And while there's some nuance to it, basically as you stand by 70 to Justice Thomas for the majority said that was okay that we could have this big big exception. In the affordable care act both for religion and for moral

Supreme Court Ministerial Exception David Levin Obama Administration Hastings College Barack Obama Justice Thomas Hobby Lobby California Montana Professor Southern California Justice Scalia Obamacare
"hastings college" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"hastings college" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It ride out there so they'd ask for briefs on this which suggests they're interested at least some of them and so we may see the court trying to sidestep these historic cases we're talking with Rory little a professor UC Hastings college of the law former attorney with the US department of justice about some of the biggest cases before the court including trump's financial records cases the subpoena cases and about how the Supreme Court is changing and adapting in the time of covert nineteen to try to hear cases while staying safe from the corona virus we'll take more of your questions and comments about the supreme court's term after the break I need to can stay with us Michelle Hannigan here reminding you that this is a rebroadcast of this morning's form program so the producers are not here to take calls tonight there's an accident in San Francisco right now though Michael Bennett's here to tell us about it Hey Michael J. Micheli indeed this is northbound to eighty I don't know how many Boulevard we have three cars involved and they're they're getting everything out of the roadway now moving it over to the shoulder but traffic is still at a stop from Monterey Boulevard and only the left lane at that interchange main shut down crews working to open up those new northbound lanes by three o'clock tomorrow I'm Michael Bennett for KQ weedy the new documentary takes an unflinching look at George W. bush mission under estimate my son his presidency was profoundly altered by nine eleven the defining characteristic of bush's compassion and deep empathy for the Americans who died and their families and they led him astray in some ways that conversation.

Rory UC Hastings college attorney trump Supreme Court Michelle Hannigan San Francisco Michael Bennett Michael J. Micheli professor US George W. bush
Coronavirus: Missouri sues Chinese government over virus

Morning Edition

03:43 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus: Missouri sues Chinese government over virus

"Greene the state of Missouri is doing something unprecedented it is suing China over covert nineteen the suit claims that China concealed the corona virus which led to deaths and economic losses in Missouri we should say the state of Mississippi appears to be getting ready to file a similar lawsuit but states typically don't sue foreign countries Frank Morris of member station KCUR joins me to talk about the possible motivation behind this long shot litigation hi there Frank Hey David I see have Eric Schmidt the Republican Attorney General of Missouri filing this lawsuit start by walking us through what they're alleging China did here bush is laying the entire blame for the pandemic every bit of the death the financial pains caused in misery squarely on China he says that at the onset of the virus December and January China destroyed medical research interested whistle blowers and it allowed thousands of people to leave Wuhan after it was clear that a highly infectious disease it broken out there Chinese authorities engaged in a campaign of deceit that directly led to this virus spreading around the globe in Missouri is not immune to that all right so it sounds like a lawyer who sounds angry and is laying out a case but I mean what's the law here can a state like Missouri just sued China not normally turn Ginsburg allow professor at the university of Chicago says the case raises a huge jurisdictional issue Robert Munich that's the word that we use for the principle that states can't be sued in each other's courts governments cannot be sued in courts of other governments the real the statue here is the foreign sovereign immunities act and does have exceptions so Schmidt isn't just suing Chinese also suing three Chinese government agencies province city of Wuhan lab science agency and the Communist Party and that's where some of the exceptions to the foreign sovereign immunities act come in there's one for commercial activity Schmidt says the labs were engaged in some kind of commerce there's another exemption for non state actors like the Communist Party but even if the last two clears the sovereign immunity hurdle there are others Missouri would have to prove that what happened in China at the onset of the pandemic directly cause pain and suffering in Missouri and even if the case gets past all that and wins there's no clear way for Missouri to extract money from say a lab in China or the Communist Party well then what do we think might be the real motivation here politics critics say it Liz Schmidt an elected official do something about the pandemic it also fits neatly with Republican efforts in the Senate to strip some of China's sovereign immunity protections and also keep the focus on China and its culpability for the pandemic and keeps the attention off what critics would say we're trump administration missteps that worsen the outbreak here downplaying the virus the sluggish rollout of testings bocce allocation of medical equipment shouldn't Kuttner at the university of California Hastings college of law is a former state department lawyer she says that there will be a reckoning for China's role in the pandemic that US courts are not the place and now is not the time are we going to engage in a blame game now while the command and it could still reach one or are we going to focus on our domestic respond and they did turn things are when people are back to work and not having to wake up every morning wondering if they're going to catch a potentially fatal disease as of the latest update here in Missouri we're up to six thousand one hundred and thirty seven code nineteen cases and two hundred and eight

Greene Missouri China
Harvard Professor's Arrest Raises Questions About Scientific Openness

Short Wave

10:37 min | 2 years ago

Harvard Professor's Arrest Raises Questions About Scientific Openness

"So it's May of Twenty fifteen. And a researcher named Chichaou. Shing is at his home near Philadelphia. She is a physicist at Temple University who studies SUPERCONDUCTIVITY SPECIAL MATERIALS. That can sometimes lead electricity flow through them with no resistance. There's a ton of applications for it and all of a sudden there's a knock door very very loud and urgency rental open the learns Esau arm agents outside and pointing their guns to my wife and daughters into an Tokyo in Hong Cups and I had absolutely no idea why okay. So why was he arrested? Like what was going on what the. Us government accused him of sharing a special piece of equipment with researchers in China. But here's the thing he did. Do it prosecutors. Were confused because well it turns out. Superconducting technology is just really complicated. But what about the idea that he was helping? The Chinese developed superconducting technology. Just in general. Well Dr she says sure. He works with scientists in China all the time and sometimes he spent summers over there doing research with them. But as you know Mattie one of the basic pillars of fundamental research is openness nothing. He shared was classified or restricted in any way. Qadam ICK espionage. It's a contradiction me. Everything we are doing is fundamental research. There's nothing to steal can. Just sit there and read your paper and sure enough about six months after this whole thing starts. The charges are dropped against doctor she. The government admits he's done absolutely nothing. Wrong I mean honestly it sounds like he just had collaborators which is like a major thing in science unless there was some weird money. Thing being exchanged or going on this is what scientists do. Yeah I mean. They're technologies that are restricted for example stuff to do with rockets that could be used in missile development say. The government has very strict rules about sharing that kind of information but generally scientists open collaborations. Happened all over the world. The thing is China is getting a lot more scrutiny. These days so fast forward to twenty eighteen attorney general. Jeff sessions is really concerned about the theft of scientific knowledge and intellectual property by the Chinese so the Justice Department launches what it calls its China initiative the goal is to crack down on the transfer of US knowledge to China and in the academic community the focus. False really quickly. I'm one program in particular. It's called the thousand Talents Plan. So our understanding is that originally. The purpose of the thousand talents program was to reverse the brain drain. That's Michael Lower. He's deputy director of extramural research at the National Institutes of health. And he's the main guy at NIH dealing with thousand talents. When he says brain-drain an example of that is like scientists. Go abroad to study and then end up staying in whatever country instead of coming back home. Exactly the Chinese government wanted to bring back outstanding scientists to China so as to develop their science and technology and the way the Chinese government does is by offering money so researchers set up labs in China and they spend at least part of their year over there Doing their work in exchange for grants and expenses paid and the program grew pretty quickly to include non-chinese scientists as well right and I think there are these kinds of programs in other countries to yeah. It's not uncommon. Canada had something called the one hundred fifty research chairs. I mean. That's kind of the less ambitious Canadian equivalent. Chevy Sega but with lower says is the thousand talents program has gone too far in the real problem from his perspective is that in a number of cases researchers are not telling their home universities or the. Us government for that matter about Chinese funding and not disclosing that Chinese funding. That's what's actually against the law. Exactly the types of behaviors that we are seeing are not subtle or minor violations What we're seeing is really quite egregious and that brings us back to Charles Lieber. The Harvard Chemist We were talking about earlier. Who is arrested back in January the complaint alleges Doctor Lieber signed a contract with the Chinese University in Wuhan and was paid to fifty thousand dollars per month plus up to one hundred and fifty eight thousand dollars in living expenses and awarded more than one point five million dollars to set up a research lab at the Chinese school and work there on researching nanotechnology that is a lot of money. Jeff that is like ten post docs full of money. At least I love that. Your brain calculates prices in post is seen but the bottom line is. It is a lot of money in the criminal complaint. Alleges not only did he get all this money. Lieber lied about being part of the program to Harvard to the NIH in the Department of Defense. Which together we're also giving him many millions of dollars in research money. I should say Lieber attorneys declined to comment about this case. They didn't WanNa speak to me but Mike clower from the NIH says there's a larger pattern here other scientists have done the same and it's a real problem. Collaboration does not involve offshore offshore bank accounts. collaboration does involve undisclosed cash payments. It does not involve undisclosed employment agreements or undisclosed contracts. It does not involve double dipping. Where a person is being paid salary to work in China and to work in the United States at the same time several scientists and other institutions have been fired over this he says the NIH is currently investigating around one hundred eighty other scientists. He thinks this is a systemic problem. So if these cases involve lying failing to disclose information which we do know is against the law. Why are scientists doing this? It's a really interesting question and I don't have a great answer as I said. Liebers attorneys have declined to speak to me In other cases other scientists who've been fired don't talk to the press generally now lower says. In some cases the thousand talents contracts scientists sign actually come with a nondisclosure agreements. So they're actually told by the Chinese not to say anything which is illegal but there's also more going on I mean it may be then some cases they fear if they disclose money from the Chinese. They are going to get more scrutiny on their work and then something else to consider is the possibility of just plain old greed the criminal complaint against Charles Lieber alleges and I should say alleged here that he was receiving cash payments from the Chinese. That some of this money was just coming straight up cash. Okay so the sounds problematic for sure but is it espionage. Maybe I have like an outdated old timey spy version of espionage but it doesn't necessarily feel like that to me no I mean. It isn't really espionage. I think it's really important to say that. Lieber isn't technically being accused of espionage. The government this is about the money and I think it's very telling the US government's going after the money rather than transfers of technology like you remember that superconducting case earlier. It's really hard to tell of. Someone's doing something illegal when they're collaborating scientifically and that's also got some people wondering whether these sorts of cases really deserve criminal treatment so frank who is somebody I spoke to. He's a professor at the University of California Hastings College of Law and he tracks these espionage cases and says arresting people for issues around what they disclosed for their grants. It just feels heavy handed to him zone. The past if there was a problem somebody would talk to you. Maybe you would face disciplined from your employer but you wouldn't face being fired and going to prison and having your name dragged through the mud as a spy in fact the same day. Lieber was arrested the Justice Department announced the arrest of two Chinese nationals. They say had lied on visa. Applications and illegally transferred biological samples. These aren't exactly the same kind of case. But you know it's the same general flavor. It sounds like a lot of people who have been accused are Chinese nationals or ethnically Chinese. Does we think that racism plays a role in this well would midst. There are some real espionage cases that involve Chinese people and they have been convicted. But they're sort of larger tone around all this. It sounds very familiar to him. No matter how assimilated. You are no matter how much you think yourself. I'm an American just like any other American winner of Chinese background. There's that risk always that people will look at you and suspect you're actually communist agent now. I should say. Us officials categorically denied. This has anything to do with race. I interviewed Andrew Leveling the federal prosecutor. Who ARRESTED LIEBER? And he said this if it was the French governments that was attempting to steal. Us technology in a massive decadelong campaign. We'd look for French people. But it's not it's the Chinese government and he actually points to the Lieber case as an example of how they're willing to prosecute anyone they think is broken the law by lying but even if the government doesn't think it's racial profiling it's definitely having an effect on the Chinese research. Community your remember. Chichaou shing the researcher who was falsely accused that we talked about well. I asked him. Does he still work with colleagues? In China. The short answer is yes but the more Ah Longer answer. Is that to my research. Now is much much smaller than used to be. And that's because he doesn't want to apply for federal grants anymore. He's afraid he'll do something wrong so every time I do all this conflict of interest floor alright to all these Grant applications and check boxes and also I I I I shake I I. I'm scared that if anything I didn't do exactly accurately I could be in

Charles Lieber United States China Researcher Chinese Government Chichaou Shing NIH Esau Justice Department Philadelphia Chinese University Superconductivity Special Mate Chinese School Physicist Hong Cups Canada Temple University Tokyo Mattie
"hastings college" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

14:33 min | 2 years ago

"hastings college" Discussed on KGO 810

"With attorney Erica my kid out of a can I bring in a wall that creek Kerr Erica thank you again for joining us Erica is in California real estate and business law transaction attorney she represents small and mid size businesses and property owners and and all in all of their business is a real estate needs including general business council any formation restructuring mergers and acquisitions finance in lending due diligence and real estate property leasing transfers in acquisitions Erica's ed too much like me a bear it bay area native as she attended Berkeley's Haas school of business and services goes UC Hastings college of law as she's been practicing in the East Bay since two thousand eight and she recently co founded a new law firm of McKenna brink signal your T. L. L. P. R. boutique law firm Waller creek focused on business law real estate and construction Erica thanks for sticking around with us why don't we go out to the phone lines Terry's been patiently waiting Terry why do you need an attorney what yes thank you Greg and Erica for taking my call I do have a horse Terry guarding I think ever hi you may have answered my question at the end can a person be even better and the final numbers or the owner is moving back into the home a rental good question so first you have to look at whether that type of property falls under this law there are many that do and many that don't and we haven't really gotten into that but if your property falls under the law then what it says is that a landlord can Vic to you if someone in their family is planning to move into the property is that reason is listed in the lease meaning your lease has to say that this lease can be terminated if the landlord wants to move in a family member if it doesn't say that then they can not of the queue for that reason show that may be safe to do that in all of your lives if you fall under the law if your property laws under this law than the recommended practice would be to update your at least to include that provision okay so Terry do you have a lease in place with this family member not yet but I have a couple people that are in the process of separation song numbers okay okay is this doctrine is different like to stop them along yes it does yes it does yeah okay thank you for your welcome Terry thank you thanks for call Terry great question yeah Hey you certainly I think your phone lines you gonna be busy Erica because he just opens up so many questions out there when we got the phone lines before we get back into the nuances the law Donna why do you need an attorney yes thank you for putting me on I have a a single family home with an eighty you so it falls under fourteen eighty two I have left the single family home vacant since June because of the spending I now have a prospective tenant on a month to month basis for the guest house with the knowledge of the disclose knowledge that the property may be put for sale and if so I will give her a short term lease my question to you yes is this a viable strategy and does it one of the reasons for just because the vixen is that the property is removed from the rental market would fail at these homes are our main goal family with the price structure in the bay area today they will go to on a user's therefore they would be removed from the rental market is is that correct good question so you had to main questions there if I understood you correctly right so you have the property it has what people refer to as an in law unit of some sort are you occupying the property yourself now it is they are not in rentals okay okay so you have the correct analysis that yes this brings it on her under the control of fourteen eighty two but I do believe you have the right analysis as to what you are going to do about it in the interest your industry we do believe that if you include in a lease a short term lease that selling the property which is a reason to affect we do think that is the recommended approach that being said this is the new law also we don't know how the courts are going to come down on that boat in the legal industry we are recommending that that is what landlord to do that they update their leases to include that clause in hopes of making it so that you will be able to terminate the relationship upon a sale and then you're second question regarding remind me your second question eighty use they use well no it would would with the sale of a going to honor users there for removing the property from the rental market constitute a just cause good question so two different things there say Ole are not being deemed to count as just because but going to an owner user is being deemed just because so I would think that because it's me transfer to an owner user regardless of whether you're selling it or not I would guess that that is just caught something that people need to remember is this is the new law and we're gonna start to see how courts interpret this but I do think that you have the right analysis here so please repeat the clause for in the event of a sale to put in the lease how you ordered I think is recommended that in yeah that the parties agree that upon assailed the lease can be terminated you'll probably have to include some sort of compensation to the tenant in order for that clause to be included but I do think that that is how we're going to start to see new leases didn't drafted thank you so very much thanks your call Donna thanks for listening so Eriko eighty you units until you dwelling units those are all the rage to help the one create income because prices are so expensive but those are part of the property the I I'm assuming the new law has it really dress that and and this potentially could be a a problem for for folks rate so it no where in the new law did they specifically refer to eighty years but how we are interpreting it is that if you have one piece of real property even if it is comprised of a couple different units for example a main house and in in my unit if you are renting those out separately to different parties and the owner does not live in either of those properties then you are bringing that house under the control of this law okay okay okay all right interesting but if I were to sell the property and I sold to an owner user who plan on using both units that that new owner could in effect for on that on that level potentially right at I think there's a one you're going to have to look at do you already have a term lease in place if you have a term the someplace you can either sell the property subject to the term lease if the buyer agrees to take that on or you can try to terminate the tenancy before you sell it if you are trying to terminate before you sell then you want to make sure that you have at least some place that allows you to do that if you were at least doesn't say you can do that and that's not a reason to affect under the new law I something that's coming up here is it's different as saying you're selling to someone that will then be owner occupying it verse two you transferring it to see one of your family members who will be occupying it I I don't think that you can just say okay I'm going to sell it to someone who says that they will owner occupied that doesn't then give you the right to evict your tenants well buddy in that example I don't I would think if I sold the property then it's up to the new the new owner to then E. Vic the tenet which will make you want to make a check a difficult challenge gene at a certain level exactly if if you're selling it subject to the current lease agreement and that tendency is not terminating then it's up to the new landlord the new owner to have to interpret how what to do with that if that the term lease that's in place they won't be able to terminate it unless there was a provision in there that said owner occupation is the reason so if you're at least doesn't have that in place and the new owner is assuming that lease then they can only affect the tenant if the least says that they can okay deal we'll just go all the way to the end would since this is educational I want everyone to be listening so we'll skip the commercial break coming up so so Eric K. so in that example I'm trying to think here so it's a single family detached is is a single family detached home is not affected by the new law but anything to units in greater is but if you have a two unit a single family within an eighty you unit on it that you're you're interpreting that dal forces you into the categorization of a to a two unit or more is that correct that is correct okay so easy to then take a step back the law applies to who great question so generally the law applies to a unit of two or more for example apartment building duplexes things of that nature all and the properties need to be fifteen years or older if the property was built in the last fifteen years then it is not subject to this new law okay okay and that's it that's it there are exceptions to it for example hotels don't fall under this new law school dormitories don't fall under this law you know the school can continue to in charge of Renton board room and board however much they want logical law logically properties okay okay perfect all right so then what about the landlord who raise read before January first because they heard the law was coming what are they to do it good question so a lot of land lord heard about this new law and they were gonna do and yep and may increase rent as much as they thought they could that may or may not have been okay what the law says if you raised it before March fifteenth of twenty nineteen then it's okay but if you increase that after March fifteenth you need to now adjusted back down you need to adjust it back down to what the rent was as of March fifteenth twenty nineteen plus the allowable capped zero as in that example if I was before March fifteenth and I was at a thousand dollars a month and then I raised it to twelve hundred eat that landlords gonna have to go back in and now it just it to a thousand and eighty dollars in that example right eight out in our in our section eight percent five percent plus three percent inflation okay that's correct but the landlord does not need to return that money anything that the land are collected from March fifteenth to January first they get to keep okay okay all right I'm okay hurry interesting okay so let's just have a tenant moves out then came the landlord then can raise it increased the the rent pass the cap yes once you get a new templates you can set rant that market rate whatever a tenant is willing to pay okay okay and I'm let's see here Alameda Berkeley Beverly hills east Palo alto Hey were Los Angeles Los Gatos Bellevue Oakland palm springs Richmond San Francisco San Jose Santa Monica west Hollywood are not affected by this.

Kerr Erica California attorney
"hastings college" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"hastings college" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The footsie in London is up six tenths of a percent down s and p futures are down less than a tenth of a percent. The Dow futures down eighteen points, NASDAQ futures up about a tenth of a percent and the ten year treasury yield is a two point five two percent. A jury has decided that one man's cancer was caused by Monsanto's roundup weed killer Monsanto and parent company, Bayer's liability is being decided in a separate case. But the trial has put a spotlight on how courts assess complex unsettled scientific questions. Marketplace's Michael Lipkin has more does roundup caused cancer. Scientists disagree on that regulators in different countries disagree. But jurors and San Francisco had to decide as weird as this case might seem there's really nothing unusual about it. Jennifer Lawrence is professor at the university of Texas school of law. There is debate over whether courts are equipped to handle complex or murky scientific questions. Judges usually decide which evidence is admissible, but they depend on lawyers arguments to do. So you don't have anyone in court whose actual function. It is to present evidence in an objective, light and courts. Do get ahead of the science example, Gatien evolving silicon implants. In the nineteen ninety s David Fagan is dean of the UC Hastings college of law five hundred thousand lawsuits were filed alleging silicone implants caused a tissue disorders where the research finally caught up. It turned out that it did not cause connective tissue disorders and the cases ended up being dismissed, but that can take years after a case is settled signs and the law are on very different timetables in New York, I Michael Lipkin for marketplace. Marketplace.

Michael Lipkin UC Hastings college of law David Fagan university of Texas school of Jennifer Lawrence Bayer San Francisco London professor New York five two percent ten year
"hastings college" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

04:06 min | 3 years ago

"hastings college" Discussed on WTVN

"Information. Download Sean Hannity and the breaking news. You might have missed today. Shawn's insider information is on right now. We are aghast that he wants. This giant thirty foot wall to be the symbol of America. I tell President Trump told him to his face. We want this. Symbol of America remain, the statue of liberty freedom equality divisive. I don't support a wall. I believe in border security. I think a mall is not a smart way to make us isn't in Iran leading. It's not who we are as a nation. Immorality or you just signed off on one point three seven five billion dollars of immorality and Chuck Schumer such a phony because in Mogammad second term on the wall. For we needed a wall. When in walls. Everything for them as political now. And it's so absurd. Watching these twenty twenty candidates. I thought it was really funny. So you have Kamala Harris did an interview on some radio show called the breakfast club. And the host asked Carris if she ever smoked marijuana and she gives an answer. And then they ask a well. What music you talk to play that also. And I know the answer to they say you oppose legalizing weed. That's not true. I know. And look I joke about it have joking my family's from Jamaica. Are you kidding me? Maybe so mad you have you ever smokes. I have ochre anti anti inhale. I dated. It was a long time ago. I just broke news. Within college. As a giant. Hey, remember, I do. So if it was legalized. Would you do it? Listen, I think that it gives a lot of people joy. So then they ask her all music. Did you listen to when you smoked and she answers? Oh, I listened. She goes. Well, yeah. Yeah. I listened to snoop into park for sure. All right. Well, she graduated Howard University in hundred eighty six and she graduated the university of California Hastings college of law in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine. To pox. First album comes out in nineteen ninety one and snoop Dogg's first album comes out in nineteen ninety three. So either she lied about when she smoked lied that. She smoked or just light in general. But she just wants to seem hip and cool. No. That was a big thing with Obama. Bob bomber tried to make it really really hip really, really cool. And we may have to do this for Kamala Harris with his interview, I'm just thinking. I discovered that it didn't make any difference. What are you smoke free in the white classmates sparkling new van in the dorm room with some brother you've met down at the gym? I spent the last two years of high school in the days. Rumor. I I inhale. I would enough time to get to the rest of this. But you will do one. We.

Carris Kamala Harris America Sean Hannity snoop Dogg Chuck Schumer Shawn President Trump university of California Hasti Iran Obama Mogammad Jamaica Bob bomber marijuana Howard University three seven five billion dolla thirty foot two years
"hastings college" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

03:33 min | 3 years ago

"hastings college" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Sean Hannity on news ninety six point five. The are aghast that he wants. This giant thirty foot wall to be the symbol of America. I tell President Trump told him to his face. We want the symbol of America to remain the statue of liberty freedom equality, not divisive support. I believe in border security. I think a wall is not a smart way to make us safe. Isn't Aymaran living. It's not who we are as a nation immorality or you just signed off on one point three seven five billion dollars of immorality and Chuck Schumer such a phony because Obama's second term from the wall to wall when walls. Everything for them as political. It's so absurd. I'm watching these twenty twenty candidates. I thought it was really funny. So you have Kamala Harris did an interview on some radio show called the breakfast club. And the host ask Harris if she ever smoked marijuana and she gives an answer. And then they ask what music you talk to play that also to they say you oppose legalizing weed. That's not true. I know. And look I joke about it have job my family's from Jamaica. Are you kidding me? Have you ever smoked? Okay. I didn't. It was a long time ago. Just broke news. Join as a giant. Hey, remember, I do. So if it was legalized. Medicinal. Would you? Listen, I think that it gives a lot of people joy every. So then they ask her all music. Did you listen to when you smoked and she answers? Oh, I listened. She goes. Well, yeah. Yeah. I I listen to snoop into POC for sure. All right. Well, she graduated Howard University in nineteen eighty six and she graduated the university of California Hastings college of law in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine two pox first album comes out in nineteen ninety one and snoop Dogg's first album comes out in nineteen Ninety-three. So either she lied about when she smoked lied that. She smoked or just light in general, but she just wants to seem hip and cool. No. That was a big thing with Obama bomber tried to make it really really hip, really, really cool. And maybe we may have to do this for Kamala Harris with his interview, I'm just thinking. I discovered that it didn't make any difference. Whether you smoke Reefer in the white classmates sparkling new van in the dorm room with some brother you've met down at the gym. I spent the last two years of high school in the days. I I inhaled. I would have time to get to the rest of this. We'll do one. We.

Kamala Harris Sean Hannity Obama Chuck Schumer America President Trump snoop Dogg Jamaica university of California Hasti marijuana Howard University three seven five billion dolla thirty foot two years
"hastings college" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

04:06 min | 3 years ago

"hastings college" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Information. Download Sean Hannity and the breaking news. You might have missed today. Shawn's insider information is on right now. We are aghast that he wants. This giant thirty foot wall to be the symbol of America. I tell President Trump told him to his face. We want this. Symbol of America remain, the statue of liberty. Freedom equality, not a divisive. Support a wall. Security. I think it's not a smart way to make us safe. It's not who we are as a nation immorality. Well, you just signed off on one point three seven five billion dollars of immorality and Chuck Schumer such a phony because Mohammed second term oriented on the wall we needed to wall within walls. Know everything for them as political now. And it's so absurd that I'm watching these twenty twenty candidates. I thought was really funny. So you have Kamala Harris did an interview on some radio show called the breakfast club. And the host asked Carris if she ever smoked marijuana and she gives an answer. And then they ask a wh-what music. You talk to play that also. And I know the answer to this too. They say you oppose legalizing weed. That's not true. I know. And look I joke about it half joking my family's from Jamaica. Are you kidding me? Maybe so mad at you. Have you ever smoked, okay? I didn't I didn't. It was a long time ago. I just broke news. Was in college. As a giant. Hey, remember high. I do. So if it was legalized. Medicinal would you? Do it. Listen, I think that it gives a lot of people joy. So then they ask her all music. Did you listen to when you smoked and she answers? Oh, I listened. She goes. Well, yeah. Yeah. I I listen to snoop into park for sure. All right. Well, she graduated Howard University in nineteen eighty six and she graduated the university of California Hastings college of law in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine two pox first album comes out in nineteen ninety one and snoop Dogg's first album comes out in nineteen ninety three. So either she lied about when she smoked lied that. She smoked or just light in general. But she just wants to seem hip and cool. No. That was a big thing with Obama bomber tried to make it really really hip, really, really cool. And we may have to do this for Kamala Harris with his interview, I'm just thinking. I discovered that it didn't make a difference. What are you smoked Reefer in the white classmates sparkling new van in the dorm room with some brother you've met down at the gym. I spent the last two years of high school in the days. I I inhale. I would enough time to get to the rest of this. But you will do one. We.

Kamala Harris America Carris Sean Hannity Shawn President Trump Chuck Schumer snoop Dogg university of California Hasti Jamaica Obama Howard University Mohammed three seven five billion dolla thirty foot two years marijuana
"hastings college" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

03:32 min | 3 years ago

"hastings college" Discussed on WSB-AM

"News ninety five five AM seven fifty WSB. Depend on it. We are aghast that he wants. This giant thirty foot wall to be the symbol of America. I tell President Trump told them to his face. We want the symbol of America to remain the statue of liberty. Freedom equality, not a divisive. Support. Order security. I think it's not a smart way. Isn't immorality. It's not who we are nation. Immorality. Well, you just you know, signed off on one point three seven five billion dollars of immorality and Chuck Schumer such a phony because in his second term on the wall. We need the wall within its walls. Everything for them as political now. It's so absurd that I'm watching these twenty twenty candidates. I thought was really funny. So you have Kamala Harris did an interview on some radio show called the breakfast club. And the host ask Harris if she ever smoked marijuana and she gives an answer. And then they ask a what music you talk to play that also to they say you oppose legalizing weed. That's not true. I know. And look I joke about it have joke my family's from Jamaica. Are you kidding me? Have you ever smoked? Okay. I didn't. It was a long time ago. Broke news. See I like stuff. Giant. Hey. I do. So if it was legalized. Listen, I think that it gives a lot of people joy. So then they ask her all music that you listen to when you smoked and she answers I listened. She goes. Well, yeah. Yeah. I I listen to snoop into POC for sure. All right. Well, she graduated Howard University in one thousand nine hundred eighty six and she graduated the university of California Hastings college of law in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine two pox first album comes out in nineteen ninety one and snoop Dogg's first album comes out in nineteen Ninety-three. So either she lied about when she smoked lied that. She smoked or just light in general, but she just wants to seem hip and cool. No. That was a big thing with Obama Obama tried to make it really really hip, really, really cool. And maybe we may have to do this for Kamala Harris with his interview, I'm just thinking. Discovered that it didn't make any difference. What are you smoked Reefer in the white classmates sparkling new or in the dorm room with some brother you've met down at the gym. I spent the last two years of high school in the days. Marie. I I. I would enough time to get to the rest of this. But you will do one we to do a new.

Kamala Harris America Chuck Schumer President Trump Obama Obama snoop Dogg Jamaica university of California Hasti Marie marijuana Howard University three seven five billion dolla thirty foot two years
"hastings college" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"hastings college" Discussed on KCRW

"And middle class families most voters here in southern California now Harris primarily as well. The state's two US senators, and perhaps from her previous position estate attorney general, but how about her life before that KCRW saw Gonzales fills us in Kamla Debbie Harris was born in Oakland in nineteen sixty four. Her mother was a cancer researcher originally from India and her father at economics, professor who immigrated to the US from Jamaica when talking about her childhood Harris says political activism was part of family life, let my sister. And I joke we grew up surrounded by a bunch of adults Smith fulltime marching and shouting after high school Harris attended Howard University. And then you see Hastings college of the law after serving as a deputy DA in Alameda County. She successfully ran for district attorney of San Francisco in two thousand and. Three in an interview last year Harris reflected on why she sought elected office. Yes. There is an important role to play on the outside. Banging down the door on bended knee trying to change the systems, but we also have to be inside the room where the decisions are being made as San Francisco's DA Harris Wharton increase felony conviction rates and created a hate crimes task force focused on crimes against LGBT youth. Some critics though, criticized her tenure as DA has being too pro law enforcement in two thousand and ten Harris was elected California's attorney general becoming the first woman African American and Indian American to hold the job. She was reelected for years later as the state's top law enforcement officer Harris often focused on prosecuting financial crimes such as predatory lending in the wake of the subprime mortgage crisis. She also negotiated in eighteen billion dollar settlement with banks to reduce the financial burden on California. Homeowners facing foreclosure, here's Harrison a two thousand twelve press. Conference announcing the deal. This issue has never been about anything other than allowing homeowners hardworking people to be able to stay in their homes, and we were very determined to make sure that California would receive its fair share in two thousand sixteen Harris was elected to the US Senate there. She's emerged as one of the sharpest critics of the Trump administration on such issues. Civil rights and immigration interpersonal. Life Harris, married, California attorney Douglas, m Hof in two thousand fourteen the couple keep residents in Los Angeles. For KCRW Unsal Gonzalez support for NPR comes from visiting angels, professional caregivers assisting adults and bathing, dressing, meals and light housework.

Debbie Harris Harris Wharton US California San Francisco attorney KCRW financial crimes Hastings college Alameda County Gonzales Unsal Gonzalez Howard University Oakland NPR Los Angeles Smith
"hastings college" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"hastings college" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Whom he thinks Trump could pardon. I Trump himself Katie better. Well, he did he said a couple of things on pardons that he he believes that the president can part part of whom he likes. But that doesn't that the act comes zero repercussions. Right. So I think he can target family member. But he could pay the price for it. He he doesn't he gives the president the letter of the law power. But he makes sure to say with caveats, you know, there are consequences for doing things that other people's people. Well, here's a skepticism view from Adam who writes, Donald Trump's other nominees have been violent unethical. Why would Trump nominate someone who appears to be normal like Bill bar? What's being hidden from us? Well, let me I gotta say that. I think somebody else in the new cut his skeptics made a decision here. I'm not sure this was picked by Donald Trump sort of personally. This was more the staff said, you know, we need somebody to right the ship in the department because the morale in the department has been terrible for the last year and a half. This. You think Trump would have preferred maybe having Whitaker? Seriously. What he of course, you have preferred have Whitaker. Do you think it could get confirmed by the Senate absolutely up? Well, there it is in the nutshell. Thank you. Katie benner. Good to have you with us. Justice department reporter for the New York Times, very little good to have you with us. Thanks nice to be here. Roy Lewis professor of law. You see Hastings college of the law and professor constitutional law and former federal prosecutor when we return we're gonna talk about housing again. But with some new light.

Donald Trump Katie benner Whitaker president professor of law Roy Lewis Hastings college New York Times Justice department professor Senate Adam reporter