17 Burst results for "Haskell Indian Nations University"

"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:22 min | Last week

"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. Tonio gonzalez on friday president biden signed a proclamation restoring protections for bears ears national monument in utah secretary deb holland joined the president. Tribal leaders and other administration officials at the white house or songs are languages and our cultures are strong at many people from many indian tribes have sung and spoken in unison. To protect the sacred place. Bears ears is a living landscape. When i've been there i've felt the warmth enjoy events sisters who've cared for this special place since time immemorial it's a place where you can stand in the doorway of a home where a family who lived thousands of years ago left behind a legacy of love and conservation for a place that sustained them for countless generations. Stories of existence celebration survival and reverence are etched into the sandstone canyon. Walls sacred sites are dotted across the desert mesas cultural heritage in the form of ancient pots arrowheads clothing seeds and evidence of lives. Well lived are as inseparable from bears ears as the air. We breathe at this moment. Protections for bears ears were established in two thousand sixteen and removed by the trump administration in two thousand seventeen tribes native organizations and environmental groups are praising the administration for restoring protections president biden on friday also issued a proclamation to celebrate indigenous peoples. Day events are taking place across the country to mark indigenous peoples day many celebrations were held over the weekend leading up to monday including in kansas by an indigenous group showcasing native art rhonda volvo has more lawrence kansas indigenous community center. I c c hosted indigenous day art show along with other informative events at sacred ground campus ministry. Which is off of haskell indian nations university. i see chair. Robert hicks says they wanted to support the art community. When we wanna do this event we wanted to be able to make a space where artists come together comfortably within copay times and be able to display their work and advocate for their work and create that community of of people coming together. And for the of our you know and also talk about like. We have mozzarella farms here. And he's indigenous farmer here in lawrence and so be wanted to promote that other indigenous. You know stuff that's going on. Although the event was about. Art aglow lakota. Artists took kia watchi- you. Richardson said it was important. To talk about the impact of indigenous peoples day after all the years of hearing about columbus and everything and then you know for everybody to kind of come together and recognize like the what kind of person he was and just kind of like Come together that nature and educate themselves. you know. i think it's important to recognize the beings that that did have a backbone or play and.

president biden Tonio gonzalez deb holland sandstone canyon administration for restoring p national monument rhonda volvo lawrence kansas indigenous com haskell indian nations univers utah white house Robert hicks kansas lawrence kia Richardson columbus
"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:31 min | Last month

"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Tell us what happened. Yeah so student. Journalists we're learning all of the tool sets to go back to our tribal communities and do everything That are other speakers opt about today In having any depress And that was something. I was learning when we had a a student rights issue And that was something. I'd never covered before we had multiple is on the piece before it was produced including Legal advice since it talked about violation of students. Fifth amendment rights And that he's got national attention. It gained a scrutiny on our school. not following their own policies And that was what really showed me. What the power of journalism was like But we did see repercussions from that and other critical coverage Where we received a directive that characterized journalism practices as i lay shins of the code of student conduct Where we couldn't conduct interviews federal officials Record our interviews or do other newsgathering efforts and we couldn't be critical of the school and so that challenged What the role of journalism was like i school and with the help of nausea and other groups We were able to push back challenge at directive and start things Legally moving forward to correct Those oversteps sterling since nausea helped with What jared just described. Can you talk about that involvement. Yeah i mean any time. We hear something like this. We i mean you get to work of course contacting them. I'm getting a hold of other advocacy organizations in this realm then starting to formulate a response usually that involves release and also the exploration of stuff like do they need legal assistance etcetera They did the same for me. During the muskogee repeal and i was just a a member and you know this is one of the most valuable services not really provides that we care about this and when we see someone step out there seven out. Rs to their own person and their own career and we owe it to them to step up and support them and make sure their voices heard and make sure the actions of the people oppressing them are made public. You sterling jared. How did that support from nausea. Make a difference in the outcome It was absolutely critical. I think Has students really impressionable. And as your journalist is work that we are taking on for the first time So i think it's really easy to catholic students to teach that mentality But i think a lot of high school students come to university that Inches issues mentality. And i think that Kind of scares a lot of students and potential journalists away from working and travel media indefinitely has a chilling effect on free speech on campus So having that support. I think kind of gave me the strength compete telling the story and following the next The next process and getting a free speech restore students on campus and making sure that when i leave the university that i've set up the tools for the indian leader to continue that long legacy Haskell has to offer. Thank you jared and if someone wants like someone in anchorage or i am wants to read the indian leader where would they go We do have online articles. Our website is www The indian leader dot com And we were going back to print issues this fall on our campus And so we should be able to start taking subscriptions again to mail Those issues out. Thank you. We're going to talk more with our guests after the break again. We have sterling cost membership manager for the native american journalists association. Jared nali editor in chief of the indian leader at haskell indian nations university and tom rv so junior ceo of the navajo times publishing company and publisher of the navajo times on the line You can also call in. We'd love.

nausea sterling jared jared muskogee Haskell anchorage american journalists associati Jared nali the navajo times haskell indian nations univers tom rv
"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on Got Science?

Got Science?

05:59 min | 2 months ago

"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on Got Science?

"Because i think it's important to recognize the the differences and the many different tribes and the the richness of all of them. the al. thank you for asking. I wanna talk today about traditional ecological knowledge. I wonder if you could give a definition. Well here's the interesting thing. I i don't know that there's a agreed upon death initiative. That might not be a bad thing. But i'll give you a definition that i have distilled from the incredible people. I've worked over the last three and a half decades as result of being at haskell indian nations university that kinda defacto tribal university in the united states. I always tell people that. Tk is knowledge. Traditional ecological knowledge is knowledge. That was born of a long historical symbiotic relationship between a particular people and a particular landscape. There's no mistake about it that the way in which particularly our physical and material cultures were representative of they came really from those places are food are clothing the materials in which we bill our houses in our forms of lodging from all came from a particular place. This this was pre the mega big box stores. Where you go to get everything so we we went out. You know into the land around us into the forest on the lakes if you're on the coast on the oceans so. Tk ultimately is knowledge that is held by people because of their long standing interaction. with a particular landscape or seascape and it is transferred intergenerational. -ly through stories ceremony song and actual ways in which people went about living customs and habits so really. That's what traditional ecological knowledge is very practical is very much centered around particular people's and their relationship to a particular place. If there was a problem in your community say a blight on a species of tree or dying. Off of a species are animal. How would that be handled do you. Do you adapt to that or do you take corrective action. Well i think that would depend in the case where this is something that you've experienced before it might be very likely that people will have figured out a way to address a particular bligh or maybe you got a particular kind of insect infestation..

haskell indian nations univers kinda defacto tribal universit united states
"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on Got Science?

Got Science?

04:10 min | 2 months ago

"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on Got Science?

"Welcome to the got science podcast. I'm your host colleen mcdonald today. Were exploring the ways that indigenous people accumulate knowledge and understand the world around them. I hope this doesn't sound blasphemous from someone working at a science based organization but science isn't the only way to make sense of the world. It's just one way that turns out to be pretty reliable but there are other ways and science can coexist and even complement these other ways of understanding our world one. Such way is traditional ecological knowledge the evolving knowledge acquired by indigenous and local peoples over hundreds or thousands of years through direct contact with the environment. I was lucky enough to hear. Dr daniel wildcat a professor at haskell indian nations university in lawrence kansas speak about traditional ecological knowledge or t k earlier this summer. And i feel even luckier that has a podcast host. I was able to get him to continue this conversation with me. Dr wildcat is the co director of the haskell. Environmental research studies center an author and an accomplished scholar who writes about indigenous knowledge technology the environment and education. He's a ut member of the muskogee nation of oklahoma through twist of federal tribal classification fate. That will get into in our conversation. He joined me to talk about people's lived experiences and observations t e k in concert with climate science. How much has been lost by the genocide and colonization and whitewashing of indigenous people culture and language. And how we should never pass up the opportunity to celebrate nature and its beauty dr wildcat. Welcome to the podcast. Well thank you for the invitation. Yes really great to have you here. You're a ut member of the muskogee nation. Yeah what would you like our listeners to know about the ut people well this is a. We could do a whole program on there. So i'll give you the short version. The yuji was we would refer to ourselves our language. Zoya ha i am so yamaha a ut person a child or people of the sun we were one of the small groups of people are nations. That were in the southeastern united states along with the chickasaw choctaw cherokees seminoles and obviously our muskogee relatives and as you know from history at the time of removal we were pretty well decimated we. We had really been hit by european diseases. Victims of all the dysfunction that went along with the rump trade in that kind of saying and so at the time of removal we were really included as part of this creek. Confederacy the muskogee confederacy. So we've never been recognized independent of the muskogee people. Although we were different were we have our own language. We share some things quite a few things as you might imagine. Culturally given we came from the same area and our cultures very much embedded in the places. We called home but the u. cheese were never recognised independent of the muskogee nation or creek nation of oklahoma. So i always jokingly dell people they've heard of federally recognized tribes they've heard of state recognized tribes. The zoya are a federally. miss recognize. Try we recognized as part of the muskogee nation and we got a lot of relatives. Good relatives in that. We're thankful that we have but we are a distinct people with a culture and in our own language. Great will thank you for that explanation..

muskogee colleen mcdonald Dr daniel wildcat haskell indian nations univers Dr wildcat dr wildcat Zoya ha lawrence oklahoma kansas yuji united states dell
"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:45 min | 3 months ago

"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. I mean antonio tony gonzales. Descendants of the wounded knee massacre tribal leaders members of the national buffalo soldiers association and some members of congress took part in a recent ceremony in washington. Dc descendants of buffalo soldiers. African american cavalry presented a proclamation showing their support for the remove the stain act legislation to revoke medals of honor awarded to soldiers for their participation in the eighteen. Ninety massacre of lakota people on the pine ridge reservation in south dakota buffalo soldiers association members touched on reconciliation and acknowledging past wrongs. Tara cooks let this be the first step in honoring the commonality that unites us rather than the fear which divides us we march together not to force a perfect helium but to achieve the promise of a less imperfect one manny iron. Hawk is a descendant of the wounded knee massacre. We have to have healing. We need fuelling one hundred thirty years. We carried it from generation to generation. My mother read. The store tells the story if she cries. And so i said some day it needs to stop and with the help of our all of our allies than our brothers here. We have hope hope for children and grand jury to continue and you remember what happened in wounded knee representative kyko. Haley says he was honored to reintroduce the remove the stain. Act in the house. As a proud veteran twenty year veteran and a member of the house armed services committee the medal of honor is the most prestigious and the highest award and recognition that the united states military bestows on those that have served and make no mistake. There was nothing absolutely nothing honorable. About the actions of those soldiers legislation was also reintroduced in the senate. Totem pole is making its way from the lemme nation in washington state to the nation's capital. This summer it's making stops along the journey and was recently in lawrence kansas at haskell indian nations university as rhonda nevada reports carver say it's raising awareness about native american issues. The house of tears carver's holy five thousand pound. Totem pole made from four hundred year old cedar tree to raise awareness of many issues native americans face freddie lane of the lemme nation says that includes boarding schools like where they visited at haskell. Sure there are sacred sites and sacred mounds and burial sites around here. The message of murdered and missing indigenous women the indian in the moon. Every stop is different. The totem isn't sacred. What sacred the gathering of the students the faculty here but one other important message is to support department of interior secretary and laguna public citizen deb holland in addressing these items says lemme citizen 'em master carver of the totem pole jewel. Praying wolf james..

antonio tony gonzales national buffalo soldiers asso African american cavalry buffalo soldiers association house armed services committee washington south dakota buffalo Tara congress haskell indian nations univers Hawk rhonda nevada house of tears carver Haley carver senate united states lawrence
"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:58 min | 4 months ago

"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. Tonio gonzalez to catholic churches on reserves in british columbia. Canada have burned to the ground as dan carpenter chuck reports the fires come in the wake of the discovery of remains an unmarked graves on sites a former residential schools. Two churches went up in flames on the silk mean reserve in british columbia. The ann's church built in one thousand nine hundred ten and the pocket church built in eighteen ninety seven burned within an hour of each other a week ago to other churches one on the reserve. The other on the penticton indian band reserve. Were also burn down. The chief of the lower milk mean indian band says there are still christian and catholic followers in his community and the impact of the fires has been devastating and chief. Sandra laron of the first nations spoke out against the incident. We don't tolerate our sent. We don't tolerate criminal activity whether or not we believe in formalized religion or we believe in the creator we believe in both. This isn't the way Begetting violence with violence is just not gonna get us anywhere. Police investigating the fires would only say they were suspicious. And officials are not suggesting any connection to the recent grim discoveries at former residential schools in may the remains of two hundred and fifteen children were found in unmarked graves near the former indian residential school and less than a week ago. Seven hundred and fifty one unmarked graves were found near a former residential school in saskatchewan for national native news. I'm dan carpenter. Totem pole is making its way from the lemme nation in washington state to the nation's capital. This summer it stopping along the journey and recently in lawrence kansas at haskell indian nations university ronaldo has more the house of tears carver's five thousand pound totem pole made from four hundred year old cedar tree to raise awareness of many issues native americans face freddie lane of the lemme nations says that includes boarding schools like where they visited at haskell sacred sites and sacred mounds and burial sites around here the message of murdered and missing indigenous women the indian in the moon. Every stop is different. The totem isn't sacred. What sacred is the gathering of the students. The faculty here but one other important message is to support department of interior secretary and laguna pueblo citizen. Deb holland in addressing these items says lemme citizen m master carver of the totem pole. Jewel praying wolf. James added james's presentation encouraged students staff and faculty to be more involved in native. Who's the group plans to make it to the capital at the end of july. This is rhonda for national native news. The yanks are regional association and the alaska. Native village corporation association welcomed friday's us supreme court. Decision that alaska native regional and village corporations are recognized as tribes under the indian self determination and education assistance act and are eligible to receive shares of the eight billion dollars and cares act. Funds set aside for tribes and march twenty twenty more than a dozen tribes sued arguing alaskan native corporations are not federally recognized tribes and are not entitled to the funds and a statement the alaska group said congress established the corporations to serve the health education welfare and cultural needs of alaska natives and they're pleased to see the court affirm their eligibility for cares act funds to help recover from kobe. Nineteen tribal plaintiffs. In the case have expressed disappointment. Hundreds of millions of dollars cares act funds. Were being held back by the treasury. Department.

Sandra laron James Deb holland washington Tonio gonzalez Two churches congress saskatchewan four hundred year old Nineteen tribal plaintiffs five thousand pound dan carpenter both two hundred and fifteen childr british columbia james a week ago less than a week ago friday Hundreds of millions of dollar
"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on LGBTQ&A

LGBTQ&A

08:13 min | 4 months ago

"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on LGBTQ&A

"Representatives cherise david's is often celebrated as one of the first native american women in congress. And that's because it's true right. She is she was elected in two thousand eighteen and along with deb haaland who is now secretary holland. They became the first two native. American women ever elected to congress. And i want to acknowledge and celebrate that but at the same time. I think it's deeply clearer flying and sobering that this happened only just a few years ago. It's progress definitely but it's bittersweet. I think so. Today's representative david's is here to talk about how she got to this place. How even is her sometimes in what experience has been like as an out member of the host of representatives at this moment. She's one of just nine representative. David's also tells her story in a new children's book that is called cherise is big voice in its out now so without further ado. I'm jeffrey masters and from the advocate magazine in partnership with glad this is lgbtq. And so in your children's book called assurances big voice in right that when you think about winning your first election one of the things you think about is. How amazing is that you won but also that you even tried to win. Can you talk about that second part. The fact that you even tried to win why that's amazing to you. I feel like i have a life experience. That's not necessarily unique being raised by single parent working. While i was in school there are quite a few of my experiences that i feel safer just not uncommon experiences but they certainly at least growing out probably shaped what i imagined. I would be doing as an adult. Or what scope of opportunities or abilities were. It just didn't ever crossed my mind. That i might one day be running for congress. I mean you mentioned your education. I've a question about that. Actually you went to cornell for law school but before that you attended haskell indian nations university university of kansas johnson county community college and the university of missouri. Kansas city was trying to figure out like what you wanted to do. Was that financial. Like explain all those undergrads. It was a combination of all those things i think. Definitely some of it was financial. Johnson county community colleges one of the best community colleges in the country and says very fortunate to be living in the place. Where john's county community college at haskell indian nations university is in addition to the to the cost. It doesn't cost that much to go there but the experience of going to school with other native folks was very appealing to me and then some of it was that i just didn't know what i wanted to do. I feel like it was a combination of all of those things. I mean many part of your identity makes you stand out in congress. But i also have to assume that not. Many people have community college on their resume in congress. Yeah i think there's more now than there's ever been before. I remember talking to john hayes about it. I'm fairly certain that john hayes who you know before she came to congress was the teacher of the year at one point. I'm pretty sure that she went to community college as well as an adult. You are one of a handful of native americans in congress. You have native american attached to name but as a kid growing up. How much was it. A part of your identity. It's interesting to think about that. And try to parse that out because it's a piece of me that's always there. There's a story. I share about coming home one day when i was very little in saying no mommy what. What am i and she says. Well why are you asking that because the other people are asking me. And i don't know what to tell them. You know it's one of those things where i think there's probably a lot of kids who get asked like what are you and it doesn't feel very good but i do remember as as a kid my mom saying. Well you're ho-chunk and you should like tell them you're you're native. American tribe is ho-chunk in our people from wisconsin. And you know when you're growing up you're just absorbing these things and it's like who you are so it's hard to. It's hard to know because it's the only experience i've ever had as one of only four native americans in congress you represent your district and kansas but do you feel like it is also your job to work for and speak for all native people in the us. I would never say that. I speak for native people or even my tribe or i'm wondering few don't have that choice because you're often the only one in the room. Yeah so i think i can. I think i can bring things up on behalf of other people that i'm just really careful about the concept of of speaking for other people even talking about it in that way like like any group. Native people are not a monolith. And i think it's helpful to constantly remind people of that and make sure that folks know that i might be an expert on my experience on my lived experience or certain parts of like legislation or policy or that sort of thing but especially as in my role as a member of congress. I have to spend most of my time listening to other people who are talking about the issues and concerns that they have so. I'm doing that for sure for third district and when it comes to tribal issues tribal communities. It's both a responsibility in a privilege to be able to be the person that room that said that. Ask asks questions like i get. I can ask questions that other people might not even think of because of my experience and that's pretty cool dude example of when that's often recently it's interesting because because i i'm native but i'm also an attorney who has practiced law with tribes. I've worked on some of the very big issues that we have to deal with. Now that i'm dealing with as a member of congress. There's been quite a few times where i've looked at a piece of legislation and the intention is there in. It's a really good intention like oh we want to make sure that tribes are included in this. Because it's a very complex area. They'll be plenty of times from like all. Let's set up a meeting with that member who's introducing this piece of legislation whether it's related to voting rights or during the pandemic tribes and indian country has been hit pretty hard and the paycheck protection program was intended to be for all like small businesses. Who fit in date. Some you know specific categories but certainly tribal organization should have been included in that. The law was that way but the sba and the treasury department put out regulations. Basically saying tribal organizations aren't eligible. And so i basically led an effort with it was bipartisan. Republicans democrats in the house and in the senate and we were able to get the sba the treasury department to change the guidance and so tribal or could access that program like that sort of thing. That's why i say it's a responsibility. And it's a privilege like i. I got the chance to help for legislation. That you introduce or co-sponsor. How much thaw or effort do you give on making sure it can pass in the senate the most effective thing. I think i can do. As a member of the houses work through and try to pick up support policies that i think are going to be really effective whether it's for the third district or for tribal communities or for the country is Is to really focus on my colleagues in the house because they're so just the process to get things through a committee to the house floor. It can be a long process. I guess they use a specific example. Like i'm thinking about the quality act which would change allies of so many people in america and now past two terms in the house it stalled in the senate and right. Now it's like functioning to me as a lovely signal to the country of our priorities but it can't be.

john hayes David david congress deb haaland america two terms Kansas assurances big voice Republicans one Today second part john's county community colleg jeffrey two thousand few years ago both American nine representative
Rep. Sharice Davids: The First LGBTQ Native American in Congress

LGBTQ&A

02:07 min | 4 months ago

Rep. Sharice Davids: The First LGBTQ Native American in Congress

"So in your children's book called assurances big voice in right that when you think about winning your first election one of the things you think about is. How amazing is that you won but also that you even tried to win. Can you talk about that second part. The fact that you even tried to win why that's amazing to you. I feel like i have a life experience. That's not necessarily unique being raised by single parent working. While i was in school there are quite a few of my experiences that i feel safer just not uncommon experiences but they certainly at least growing out probably shaped what i imagined. I would be doing as an adult. Or what scope of opportunities or abilities were. It just didn't ever crossed my mind. That i might one day be running for congress. I mean you mentioned your education. I've a question about that. Actually you went to cornell for law school but before that you attended haskell indian nations university university of kansas johnson county community college and the university of missouri. Kansas city was trying to figure out like what you wanted to do. Was that financial. Like explain all those undergrads. It was a combination of all those things i think. Definitely some of it was financial. Johnson county community colleges one of the best community colleges in the country and says very fortunate to be living in the place. Where john's county community college at haskell indian nations university is in addition to the to the cost. It doesn't cost that much to go there but the experience of going to school with other native folks was very appealing to me and then some of it was that i just didn't know what i wanted to do. I feel like it was a combination of all of those things. I mean many part of your identity makes you stand out in congress. But i also have to assume that not. Many people have community college on their resume in congress. Yeah i think there's more now than there's ever been before. I remember talking to john hayes about it. I'm fairly certain that john hayes who you know before she came to congress was the teacher of the year at one point. I'm pretty sure that she went to community college as well

Cornell For Law School Haskell Indian Nations Univers John's County Community Colleg Haskell Indian Nations Univers Congress University Of Missouri Johnson County Kansas City John Hayes
Senators to consider Deb Haaland’s nomination Thursday

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 8 months ago

Senators to consider Deb Haaland’s nomination Thursday

"The national native news. i mean antonio gonzales. The senate committee on energy and natural resources is scheduled to hold a business meeting thursday to consider the nomination of deb holland for secretary of the interior. The business meeting follows a two day. Confirmation hearing last week were holland. Answered questions from committee members including being repeatedly grilled about the oil and gas industry and her views on climate and the environment as key lawmakers publicly announced their support or opposition a number of tribal leaders directors of native organizations advocates and allies are urging congress to confirm holland making calls writing letters promoting a petition and using social media with the hashtag deb for interior the cherokee nation is including all household members of cherokee citizens and any federally recognized tribal member in phase three of its covid nineteen vaccination plant health officials. Say protecting the community means vaccinating everyone. The oklahoma tribe has administered more than twenty seven thousand vaccine. So far those who meet phase three criteria are being asked to make an appointment with the health center other tribal health clinics across. The country are also expanding. Vaccinations this week. The alaskan native southcentral foundation anchorage cove in nineteen vaccination appointments to alaskans forty years and older. The vaccine clinic is also open to educators and childcare workers as supply allows in bristol bay communities in alaska one feature of daily life that has stayed constant during the pandemic is subsistence. A school recognize that and decided to incorporate it into the classroom l. Brian vanua spoke with teachers and students. About how that's changed learning this year. Audrey penna mary off is a senior at chief. Ivan blunkett school in new studio hawk. She's one of the students in the schools new subsistence class and says it's a great opportunity to learn about and practice subsistence skills. That the class is operatives. -tunities students who or aren't able to go at home another student junior gusty blunkett junior says he appreciates the opportunity to share stories and learn more about his culture. I'm hoping to learn more about what are people doing. Maybe we were told in one day. Tell my stories teaching. Help others bypassing pass on. Josh gates is one of the teachers. He says the classes another way for students to learn and practice a wide range of skills related to subsistence. The obvious ones are mike Knowing how to properly use a chainsaw or knowing how to make an ice fishing pole knowing how to tie fishing hook but the less obvious ones are You know how to maintain your tools and machines that are necessary. Principal robin johns says. It's a way to better align the school's curriculum with the community's traditional lifestyle. Nothing makes me prouder as a principal then to see how eager students are to share stories and pictures of their hunts with me because they know i will be so incredibly proud of them in dealing him. I'm brian van wall. The foundation for individual rights in education filed a lawsuit against haskell indian nations university. And it's president. Ronald graham on tuesday on behalf of the student. Newspapers editor the lawsuit. Alleges student jared natalie's rights were violated in october. The president sent him directive trying to restrict journalism and free speech now he told the lawrence journal world allegations also include the tribal college located in lawrence. Kansas withheld more than ten thousand dollars for the papers us. Graham did not respond to comments about the federal lawsuit. The directive has since been rescinded. I'm antonio gonzales.

Antonio Gonzales Senate Committee On Energy And Deb Holland Holland Alaskan Native Southcentral Fo Brian Vanua Audrey Penna Mary Ivan Blunkett Josh Gates Bristol Bay Oklahoma Congress Blunkett Robin Johns Alaska Brian Van Wall Foundation For Individual Righ Haskell Indian Nations Univers Ronald Graham Jared Natalie
Kansas voters overwhelmingly pick Navajo woman for House seat

Native America Calling

03:52 min | 1 year ago

Kansas voters overwhelmingly pick Navajo woman for House seat

"This? Is National Native News Antonio Gonzalez voters in. Tuesday's Kansas primary elected a Navajo woman for the Democratic nomination for the Kansas State House of Representatives district ten Rondo of Aldo has more Christina has would twenty six years old is set to become the third native American and youngest member in the Kansas legislature as the race will be uncontested in the general election three other. Native women and Kansas all won their primaries. Tuesday has what graduated from both Haskell Indian nations university and the University of Kansas and felt her presence was needed to represent everyone in Douglas County which includes Lawrence Kansas a lot of these issues that happen at our level. The people don't really experience this particularly like me I've grown up in not the best neighborhoods I've grown up on like wick in section eight housing reduced lunch programs, even tribal clothing from nation living here, and I don't really hear that much stories of like like that this wasn't like fifty years ago. This is pretty recent And just seeing that type. I WANNA see that type of representation statehouse and And I I believe I'm qualified to do this. Believe our voices I'm voice that you know a lot of us feel like that wasn't her being heard of and I hope I can bring that to the State House. has would one unofficially with two thousand, two, hundred, thirty, nine votes compared to Brandon Holland five, hundred, five votes and AJ Stevens. Four hundred fifty, five votes. This is Rhonda Nevada for National Native News. Native American US congresswoman cherise. David's was unopposed for the Democratic nomination for the Kansas Third District seat. She'll face Amanda Adkins November who in the Republican race Tuesday. The American Indian Graduate Center has received a twenty million dollar donation from writer Mackenzie Scott ex wife of Amazon's at CEO Christine Trudeau reports the American Indian Graduate Center or AIG see received an unprecedented twenty million dollar individual donation of unrestricted funds from Mackenzie Scott. Scott. said in a recent announcement tweet that the contributions following up on a commitment she made last year to give away a majority of her wealth in her lifetime she continued in opposed to be a medium that of the nonprofits elected that quote every one of them is telling complex challenges that will require sustained effort over many years while simultaneously addressing consequences of the Covid nineteen pandemic AFDC Executive Director Angelique Albert we are just a mess like. To be a recipient of this incredible generosity really honored that she's just trusting us to do the work that promotes equity and justice in our in our society. At the time she says, students were hit hard last spring enough for the organization to create a designated Student Emergency Fund that started in. March. So far the additional fund has distributed over two hundred thousand dollars to Aggie students emergency needs because of the pandemic. Cova fill impacting our communities and our students have a hard time. They still are having a hard time. So going back to school has created additional challenges because some universities are doing remote but some are not heading into the fall semester. Albert says funds will address student needs covering housing utility bill, and household item costs along with technology access. Scott's donation is the largest individual donor gift in unrestricted funds over Aig sees fifty year history the solutions journalism network who funds this reporting was also included in Scott's nonprofit donations. I'm Christine Trudeau and demand Honiara

Kansas Mackenzie Scott Lawrence Kansas Christine Trudeau State House. Kansas State House Of Represen AIG Angelique Albert American Indian Graduate Cente Kansas Third District Christina Antonio Gonzalez University Of Kansas Haskell Indian Nations Univers Student Emergency Fund Aldo Amanda Adkins United States Rhonda Nevada Douglas County
"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on Native Trailblazers

Native Trailblazers

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on Native Trailblazers

"And we're spread so far apart and does a been things that have been passed down since forever everywhere that are for indigenous people all over the place so. So Yeah but let's let's go ahead and still. Hanging Chads? Brenda. Jen Michelle and Jennifer to. Yes he is Parker. My little nephew, who's not little anymore? He got paid without asking my permission. We'll bring them on for a second later but yeah his voice. You'll hear the at the end of the. Yeah, that's that's him there, okay? Trailblazers. Now. Stop that then you hear him now and he's like rural like good Lord. I hung up on this child little. Here's called me on my click because I think some old guy and attempt, and he's only eighteen I'm like Oh, great, and he's like seventy five feet tall. He's really like what is he six four? Oh No, he's just so tall like. Exercising. He didn't ask permission for any of the growth. All right, so let's tell you about our guests. who have quite a quite a Them, yes, and Mariam Taco is peruvian-boarn Cheese language rights advocates, and how how cool is that? A language rights advocate rough on. And completed coursework and doctoral. At New, York University and her work focuses on language parties, language ideologies, decolonization of knowledge and power, and she's part of a group of digital scholars and activists that worked to Ford, the aims of native American and indigenous sovereignty resurgence. Presently she's in external research, associate and university dot. Nazi knob married the son Demarcus in Peru, if butchered that. Dr Daniel Wildcat is you? She member of the Muskogee nation. As a faculty member indigenous in American Indian Studies Program at Haskell Indian Nations University in Lawrence Kansas. And in two thousand Thirteen Years Gordon Russell visiting professor of native. American studies at Dartmouth College. He's the author and editor of several books, power and place. Indian Education America with find Loria Amazing Race Dogma find lorries, legacy and intellectual America was Steve, Pavlovic and red alert, saving the planet with indigenous knowledge. Co Author on southern. Great Plains chapter of the fourth.

Parker Mariam Taco Haskell Indian Nations Univers Indian Education America Dartmouth College Great Plains Jen Michelle Dr Daniel Wildcat Muskogee nation York University Peru Demarcus editor America Gordon Russell faculty member Lawrence Kansas visiting professor Steve Jennifer
Unofficial results show Oglala Lakota voters approve legalizing marijuana. Coronavirus concerns halt large gathering of tribal colleges and universities. Rally planned outside of U.S. Capitol to protect Oak Flat from development.

Native America Calling

03:37 min | 1 year ago

Unofficial results show Oglala Lakota voters approve legalizing marijuana. Coronavirus concerns halt large gathering of tribal colleges and universities. Rally planned outside of U.S. Capitol to protect Oak Flat from development.

"The National Native News Antonio Gonzalez the Oglala Sioux tribe held a vote Tuesday on legalizing medical and recreational marijuana on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota an official numbers as of Wednesday morning show a majority of residents are in favor of legalizing. Both with more in favor of medical marijuana marijuana is completely restricted. In the State Oglala. Lakota citizens also voted on whether or not to legalize alcohol only at the tribes casinos the unofficial count shows. Voters are against allowing alcohol in the casinos. Meanwhile Julian bear runner. President of the Oglala Sioux tribe on Tuesday declared a state of emergency on the Pine Ridge Reservation due to cove in nineteen the declaration outlines threats to Lakota way of life pointing to five corona virus cases in South Dakota with one possible death linked to the disease and cases in neighboring Nebraska. Bear runner requests federal assistance including test kits for the Pine Ridge Indian Health Service. The declaration seeks to protect elders and asks people to restrict visitation to the LAKOTA nursing. Home the emergency declaration follows tribal preparedness. Manning's health and safety concerns have led to the cancellation of a large gathering of students from tribal colleges and universities officials of the American Indian higher. Education consortium announced Tuesday. The annual student gathering planned for next week in Albuquerque will not be held due to corona virus concerns students from Haskell Indian nations university in Kansas are disappointed Kayla pointy was excited to participate. I understand the reasoning behind it. But I'm still very disappointed A lot of my team members have been saving up for the summit like myself. We stayed back. We didn't go in here for spring. Break 'cause we're working on. Our projects are art projects or studying for the knowledgeable. Or just saving money in general We've all really been looking forward to this event in our just kind of like you know don't want to do now a little heartbroken about it student. Sarah Pearl Hall. It had been canceled. This year is Kinda disappointing because I was going to submit a film In this was my first film that I had done in about two years after picking backup short films so really to submit it and see where it goes as far as they hit. Film Festival Troy. Waterson is finishing up his time at Haskell and was hoping to win big at the conference was my last day hoping to do. Last did some of the best pieces of arch which are now going to go relatively unnoticed and for my hand game team as well as part of my lavender. Try Bring home some goal for for Haskell. The annual event brings together nearly one thousand people from tribal colleges and universities across the country. Student show their skills in athletics. Knowledge Bowls Traditional Games and other competitions in recent weeks some tribal colleges announced. They would not participate this year. Due to health and safety concerns and tribal government travel bans a sacred sites rallies planned Wednesday to be held outside the US Capitol Tribal leaders advocates are urging for protection of Oak flat in Arizona from a proposed copper mine. The rally is planned day ahead of a hearing on the issue by the subcommittee for indigenous peoples of the United States. Oak Flat is located east of Phoenix. And is a sacred area to a number of tribes members of the San Carlos. Apache tribe have been leaders in the fight against the copper mine for years. I Man Tony Gonzalez.

Oglala Sioux Tribe Pine Ridge Reservation Marijuana South Dakota Pine Ridge Indian Health Servi Antonio Gonzalez Haskell Indian Nations Univers Haskell Kayla Pointy Apache Tribe United States Tony Gonzalez Oak Flat San Carlos Sarah Pearl Hall Manning Phoenix Nebraska Official
Canadian police arrest activists at Wet’suwet’en anti-pipeline camp, Haskell to partner with indigenous university in New Zealand , $100 million solar facility project approved for Pine Ridge

Native America Calling

03:57 min | 1 year ago

Canadian police arrest activists at Wet’suwet’en anti-pipeline camp, Haskell to partner with indigenous university in New Zealand , $100 million solar facility project approved for Pine Ridge

"This is National Native News Antonio Gonzalez in British Columbia Canada arrests are being made at a demonstration site on wetsuit attend territory the CBC reports people are camped out near an access road in opposition of construction of a natural gas pipeline hereditary. Chiefs has said No. I know to the project and talks with the provincial. Government have reportedly broke down conflict over the project has lasted years. A court ordered people to stop preventing renting workers access to the area. Police announced Wednesday. They would enforce an injunction. Demonstrators are taking to social media saying they're prepared for police action. The coastal gasoline pipeline is a six billion dollar project which supporters say will create jobs and boost the economy in a first of its kind for a tribal college and International Exchange Program is in the works for Haskell Indian nations university and Emory University in New Zealand educators recently Matt Lawrence Kansas to work on an agreement Rondo. Baldo has more efforts to establish advanced degree programs and more research opportunities Haskell in Lawrence Kansas met with chief executive officer of the Mari Indigenous University in New Zealand the CEO Doherty met with administration nation and students to discuss the possibilities US starting in exchange program and what they could learn from each other connections here in the US with the different town nations. That have a history very very similar to Alice. Talk about the issues that would challenging but more importantly look at the things is that we want to do in around the expirations off. We want to be in the in by US working together. Collaborating together That place where we want to A. B.. Is it much more cheerful. If doing together Alan Parker a Chippewa cree from Montana and faculty at them. Our University talked about the impact of taking students students. Down to be the first cohort twenty nineteen the I two of that group received their PhD. So it's a it's just to powerful experience in the potential is just wonderful. Haskell interim President Daniel Wildcat says a memorandum of understanding running is being written that he hopes to be signed within a couple of months. Haskell currently does not offer any graduate degree programs this is Rhonda Nevada for for National Native News Approval has been given for a solar project on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota as Roz Brown reports. The Pine Ridge Indian reservation in southwestern South Dakota will be the site of a one hundred million dollar solar electricity generation project. The State's public utilities commission approved the lookout solar the park this week for property about eighty miles from rapid city to build the state's first large-scale solar facility. A German company will lease the land from the rap family. Lynn Lynn rap is a member of the Oglala Sioux tribe who has represented the family and hopes the historic project will be an example for other reservations and then we know that when a dollar is spent it turns over seven times in communities words used and our reservations talents are desperate for cash. The lease agreement is the first first of its kind for the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The company involved to build the solar project has agreed to follow thirty-seven conditions during construction related to restoration threatened an endangered species cultural resources reporting and other requirements the Pine Ridge project capable of generating up to one hundred ten megawatts of electricity will how five hundred thousand solar panels in arrays across two hundred fifty acres. Wrap says there's more than eight hundred acres at the site and eventually she'd also like to see a wind farm built out there. The solar facility is expected to be complete by the second quarter of twenty twenty one. I'm Roz Brown and demand. Tonio Gonzales.

United States Haskell Roz Brown Matt Lawrence Kansas Haskell Indian Nations Univers Mari Indigenous University South Dakota International Exchange Program New Zealand Antonio Gonzalez Pine Ridge Reservation Chiefs Bureau Of Indian Affairs CBC Canada Pine Ridge Tonio Gonzales Lynn Lynn
"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"On always day Jane Goodall next week his story about northern New Mexico college basketball game in the now up in a giant fight eleven members of northern the eagles in northern Mexico college up in Espanola eleven members of the men's basketball team to spend it three for the rest of the season and this season basically just got under under way there's a big brawl a week ago Sunday they were playing Haskell Indian nations university don't ask me where they're from Ryan Cordova head coach in northern and the athletic director by the way so the national association of intercollegiate athletics with the college is a member issue suspensions this week ranging from one to five games four eight players and season long for three the eagles were schedule plate last Friday night a university Colorado Colorado springs with just seven players Korda said on Friday he did not know what happened to the house go players and if they were disciplined however how school is forfeited its last two games according to its website probably for lack of players and they're AT declined comment now ric Bailey president ric Bailey doctorate daily press in northern Mexico college could not be reached for comment I tried in as well just pensions down from a fight that occurred during the second half of an association of independent institutions conference game which they belong good Cordoba said the frustration level for both sides grew throughout the game as referees issued several technical fouls the ball teams a brawl began according to the coach when two players battle on the floor for loose ball and then a scrum in sued because they didn't see this situation everyday players don't know how to handle the situation some people are engaging in the altercation and others came off the bench because trying to pull their other players their teammates all back to the bands that just got ugly and it's not something I am real proud of our team was real proud of it not real proud of it is not something that reflects well on our program and the game was ended the game was called with eight minutes and fifteen seconds left in the game and the referees at the time gave the eagles a win sixty to fifty to let's not call but it got heated maybe the referees did not take control soon enough or maybe getting a bunch of hot heads from ball teams I the store is talking about and and I don't know if you read the science section there's a Mondays instead of like local metro kinda news in in there in the on the Mexican they do sign give me science and education in today's stories is especially kind of cool at least I thought I was it plastic article two story from New York times written by Kenneth Chang it talks about a a a probe there was a launch by now so by the way now as they had a weird weekend now with with Boeing and and the yeah starliner and and the CEO of Boeing got fired ereli the starliner not meeting the docking with space station did have anything to do with it it was the seven thirty seven supermax can all that is continuing anyway NASA's had a interesting couple weeks so they launch this Parker solar pro now the Parkers solar pro I don't know how to escape but three times three times the solar probe has died towards his son and reached a speed faster than anything ever human made heading towards us and I don't know how it pulls out glances offer you know how to how it doesn't get burned up we've done this three times to go down and collect data about the sun now the cool thing about.

Jane Goodall New Mexico
"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:27 min | 2 years ago

"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Our conversation with Michael Powell role Mendoza and sunny clutches trilogy sunny I'd like you to react to an email from Jill land who writes I'm so glad this conversation is happening with the national audience I grew up on a reservation in South Dakota and while I am not native American myself I played high school ball with several native teammates we were constantly accused of winning games by playing resume all which two all white schools was synonymous with playing dirty real rest ball is just as your guest described mesmerizing and impressive I hate that where I grew up it was used as a racist term Sonny what about that I think that it's a that's more common than people think or know what having worked on the Navajo times in trouble to many gyms across and you're the reservation racism as well and alive especially in border towns and you will hear that a lot when full full or full Navajo teams or more teams from the Navajo Nation play teams outside of it there will always be in an accusation that all I do is run and gun and there's no set plays and things like that and I don't I don't know that it's I don't think that it's something to kind of hang hang your head about in fact I think that brings a sense of pride it frustrates teams and you can see why you know they would they would refer to it in that way as as cheating but can't do much about kids who can run fast Laura emailed would like to make the point that rose ball is not just a male thing I'm a fan of the university of Louisville at the women's basketball team had two sisters who are native American and made a huge impact on some of our most successful recent teams show me and Jude Shamil I believe they were from a reservation in the Pacific Northwest but played a style very similar to what you are describing Laura I think you're right a quick Google search shows that show any and you are Jude are in the from the Pacific Northwest they come from the confederated tribes of the U. Mattel Indian reservation in mission Oregon Sonny what about that dress ball being a girl support as well as a voice for I like this question or this comment I think Clarence in in my opinion and having covered basketball for the for the EM reservoir rather for the Navajo times for so long I would go as far as arguing that female basketball players on the reservation or a lot stronger than perhaps the male basketball players on the right and the reservation I think that they're a lot more dominant in the sport at least when it comes to hearing here you will I think you'll see a lot more sold out crowds when female basketball players or teams on the reservation are playing in fact in New Mexico the winningest team regardless of class and regardless of classification is a border town school in northern New Mexico that has a long history of having novel players on it so it's it's very competitive when it comes to female teams on the reservation in in and I think that a lot of the time they're the ones that are able to withstand the state tournaments a lot of the time in our last one standing for for for for awhile I guess so I think that the idea that maybe there'd third female players are just kind of off of the site is is actually is is is extremely wrong it's very popular here I think of the majority of student athletes who get recruited in basketball are female basketball players now Sonny we've talked about how some of the young men who play rest ball are doing it in some ways to escape some of the challenges of living on a reservation being kind of so socially and economically disadvantaged what about young women how do the challenges they face compare I think that the main in fact be I think that they're they're equally for equal in that sense historically and and even now I mean then the Navajo culture women are the matriarchs we are the ones who are the keepers of our families of our culture of our language and so there's a little bit more responsibility in that sense so you know we might feel a little bit more pressure to withhold that and when we leave the reservation and and make things happen for ourselves or we win strain athletes do that I feel like perhaps they have a little bit more feel they have a little bit more responsibility because of that they're the ones who carry on the culture in and have a good grasp of it and should Michael Powell when you were starting to understand the Navajo Nation before you put the book together what was your learning curve like whether certain things for you coming from outside tribal culture that you had to acclimate to or certain assumptions that you had to drop or certain land mines that you stepped on well yes yes and yes and and you know people like soon we were one of were essential to may I spent country I rhythmic several pieces for The New York Times when I traveled out there several times for a couple weeks at a time in preparation for the book and I sat down with folks and spent a lot of time asking asking questions and trying to understand this in a really ancient and very rich culture and an incident when I mean to say the least so he's absolutely correct I mean the you would see I mean the women's basketball is an enormous thing there and and by the time the women varsity girls varsity came on I mean fans were you know as crazed in errors as focused as they were for the boys I'm but more broadly I mean one of the things that fascinated me was the sort of traditional traditional believe and the power of history I mean the sense and an oral history and cultural history and the way in which that plays through you very much to the current date was something that both fascinated me and also took quite a bit of time to at the very least try to avoid looking in a foolish when I sat down and eventually wrote about it because it's it's something there is these are the the Navajo live smack in the middle of lands they've occupied for basically a millennia and that when's a sort of a a sense of rooted in as so when we talk about the difficulty in leaving and all that that's all very real at the same time it's an enormous strength to have this way and that is there is there not the they've not been forced often and living in another part of the country or whatever so that was something I think that that you had to just kind of live and be there for a while the other thing I mean frankly as a as a born and bred New Yorker is you just have to kind of shut down that part of your brain that says things are gonna happen you know I've got to do this interview with the next eight minutes or the next day or the next week right things happened but it's just you had to kind of you know the less linear less type a way when you get to a few more of your comments T. C. emailed I am a Muscogee creek nation citizen I am an alumni of Haskell Indian nations university what was once a boarding school for native Americans is now university for tribal people to obtain a higher education red ball is there in the courts and in the gym and you're the streets they still have basketball games with students versus teachers rest Paul has some form of magic attached to the ball he sunny we've heard about boarding schools a couple of times in this conversation can you talk a little bit more about that are these just independent schools are they religious your parochial boarding schools and what's the cost like I imagine that there's a there's a cost component to send some off to boarding school can talk about how that factors in actually the cost to to in terms of boarding schools is more in a negative way to the the people who attend them boarding schools were initially put into place to assimilate now hope people when they first return to their homelands after their the long walk which is a historical trauma for our people and boarding schools were put in place to again and to assimilate into essentially read the the Navajo people native people of their culture and their identity and so it's it has a very dramatic it's a very traumatic experience for a lot of people and what is interesting because for some it was a very it was a positive experience because they learned how to function in the world outside of the reservation but boarding schools are it's it's a topic of its own really and the as of the early late actually the late nineteen nineties early two thousands they stop to being they started being boarding schools and turn them into community schools they were boarding schools because students were novels tunes were shipped off to them against their will a lot of the time in in may to assimilate so when you hear of boarding schools it's you it's really where the point in which Navajo people or native Americans first got the taste of what western society in life was like some of you have also commented that the spirit of the sport plays out in other ways as ray emailed it is worth noting that for other students rest ball takes other forms including volleyball and even chess but many of the same things you're saying about the significance of basketball hold true across other activities the Reds can be a hard place to grow up in the poverty is an ever present issue but thank you for also highlighting the beauty of life on the Navajo Nation Ellie emailed my great friend Kenny Pemberton grew up in multiple foster care homes in northern Minnesota he is chip wa and African American he got a basketball scholarship to Haskell Indian nations university in Lawrence Kansas and later was part of the early European basketball league it opened many doors and experiences for him and as he always says changed his life for the better I'm Joshua Johnson you're listening to one a Hey role as were winding down I know you've been coaching for a long time for decades on the reservation for years at chan Li's specifically how have you seen things change over the last four decades for players either one or two big changes that you've noticed over time I thank the chair I one of the things I noticed that the as far as in the in the years to since I stopped that I can be as well the the teams are more more structure I think I can believe that the the key is able to be able to play more destructive forms and there's one day when I first started coaching you forty years ago it's safe to say and and and and I think the key is understand to get better and able to realize that you know that that does a lot more to the game besides what they use that you know what what was described earlier as well you know well there's there's more to the date the date was to play the game at at a at a higher level as far as understand the game and I think that's probably the people because distance in that I've seen and that in the overall I think this the reservation schools across the gardener ought to coaching course you level up to discuss a lot better and that I think is great for a QC eight the for those who are going to go on to college just like the next level the they're better good character to play at the next level because of that what's next for you role do you see yourself continuing to coach are you thinking about a change what's next for you why I really don't know I I I did get one year the timing of this at this time I'm just only culture I'm not working and I was tired it's the fourteenth so I I usually what I do and so basically I really don't know what I mean what what I would do without basketball so as long as it generally will allow me to coach you I'll stay here and then when that comes down I think I don't know what it is to be honest which you roll suppose somebody listening to this wanted to come to one of the game's a chin Lee high school they wanted to make the track but they want to do it in a way that's respectful that doesn't step on toes but they're really eager to see it what would you say to them why I would invite you to come because we because a document a white hat individual from LA that wants to come here share just to be a part of the program and all that other people make comments about having to come in just to watch a game or just be part of the the the to see.

Mendoza South Dakota Michael Powell Jill eight minutes four decades forty years one year one day
"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

13:44 min | 2 years ago

"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"R. G. we'll get back to our conversation in just a moment but first we wanted to give you a quick update on the house impeachment inquiry this morning house speaker Nancy Pelosi announced that house Democrats will move forward with drafting articles of impeachment against president trump the president has engaged and abuse of power undermining our national security and jeopardizing the integrity of our elections his actions are in defiance of the vision of the founders and the oath of office that he takes to preserve protect and defend the constitution of the United States sadly but with confidence and humility was allegiance to our founders and a heart full of love for America to date I am asking our chairman to proceed with the articles of impeachment that was house speaker Nancy Pelosi speaking this morning reaction has been swift including from president trump among other things he tweeted quote the do nothing radical left Democrats have just announced that they are going to seek to impeach me over nothing they already gave up on the ridiculous smaller stuff stuff in quotes so now they hang their hats on to totally appropriate in parentheses perfect phone calls with Ukrainian president this will mean that the beyond important and seldom used active impeachment will be used routinely to attack future presidents that is not what our founders had in mind on quote we're keeping an eye on these developments will spend time breaking them now tomorrow on the round up in the meantime you'll get updates from your NPR member station and online at NPR dot org back now to our conversation with Michael Powell role Mendoza and sunny clutches chili G. luck would love to get to more of your comments and sunny I'd like you to react to this one first Laura emailed would like to make the point that red ball is not just a male thing I'm a fan of the university of Louisville at the women's basketball team had two sisters who are native American and made a huge impact on some of our most successful recent teams show me and Jude Shamil I believe they were from a reservation in the Pacific Northwest but played a style very similar to what you are describing Laura I think you're right a quick Google search shows that show me and you are Jude are indeed from the Pacific Northwest they come from the confederated tribes of the U. Mattel Indian reservation in mission or again Sonny what about that dress ball being a girl support as well as a boy sport I like this question or this comment I think parents in in my opinion and having covered basketball for the for the AM as far rather for the Navajo times for so long I would go as far as arguing that female basketball players on the reservation or a lot stronger than perhaps the male basketball players on the right and the reservation I think that they're a lot more dominant in the sport at least when it comes to here and here you will I think you'll see a lot more sold out crowds when female basketball players or teams on the reservation are playing in fact in New Mexico the winningest team regardless of class and regardless of classification is a border town school in northern New Mexico that has a long history of having novel players on it so it's it's very competitive when it comes to route to female teams on the reservation in in and I think that a lot of the time they're the ones that are able to withstand the state tournaments a lot of the time in our last one standing for for for for a while I guess so I think that the idea that maybe there'd third female players are just kind of off to the side is is actually is is is extremely wrong it's very popular here I think of the majority of student athletes who get recruited in basketball are female basketball players no Sonny we've talked about how some of the young men who play rest ball are doing it in some ways to escape some of the challenges of living on a reservation being kind of so socially and economically disadvantaged what about young women how do the challenges they face compare I think that the made in fact be I think that they're they're equally they're equal in that sense historically an uneven now I mean the Navajo culture women are the matriarchs we are the ones who are the keepers of our families of our culture of our language and so there's a little bit more responsibility in that sense so you know we might feel a little bit more pressure to withhold that and when we leave the reservation and and make things happen for ourselves or when I'm certain athletes do that I feel like perhaps they have a little bit more feel they have a little bit more responsibility because of that they're the ones who carry on the culture in and have a good grasp of and should Michael Powell when you were starting to understand the Navajo Nation before you put the book together was your learning curve like whether certain things for you coming from outside tribal culture that you had to acclimate to or certain assumptions that you had to drop or certain land mines that you stepped on I'm well yes yes and yes fanned and your people like Sony were wanted were essential to may I spent actually I rhythmic several pieces for The New York Times that I traveled out there several times for a couple weeks at a time in preparation for the book and I sat down with folks and spent a lot of time asking asking questions and trying to understand this in a really ancient and very rich culture and and incidently I mean to say the least so he's absolutely correct I mean that you would see I mean the women's basketball is an enormous thing there and and by the time the women varsity girls varsity came on I mean fans were you know as crazed and errors as focused as they were for the boys but more broadly I mean one of the things that fascinated me one is the sort of traditional traditional belief and the power of history I mean the sense and an oral history and cultural history and the way in which that plays through you very much to the current day was something that both fascinated me and also took quite a bit of time to at the very least try to avoid looking in a foolish when I sat down and eventually wrote about it because it's it's something that there is these are the the Navajo live smack in the middle of lands they've occupied for basically a millennia and that when's a sort of a a sense of rooted in as so when we talk about the difficulty in leaving and all that that's all very real at the same time it's an enormous strength to have this land that is there is there not the they've not been forced often and living in another part of the country or whatever so that was something I think that that you had to just kind of live and be there for a while the other thing I mean frankly as a as a born and bred New Yorker is you just have to kind of shut down that part of your brain that says things are gonna happen you know I've got to do this interview in the next eight minutes or the next day or the next week right things happened but it's just you had a kind of in a less linear less type a way when you get to a few more of your comments T. C. emailed I am a Muscogee creek nation citizen I am an alumni of Haskell Indian nations university what was once a boarding school for native Americans is now university for tribal people to obtain a higher education red ball is there in the courts and in the gym and you're the streets they still have basketball games with students versus teachers rest ball has some form of magic attached to the ball he sunny we've heard about boarding schools a couple of times in this conversation can you talk a little bit more about that are these just independent schools are they religious your parochial boarding schools and what's the cost like I imagine that there's a there's a cost component to sending some off to boarding school can talk about how that factors in actually the cost to to in terms of boarding schools is more in a negative way to the ana the people who attend them boarding schools were initially put into place to assimilate Navajo people when they first return to their homelands after their the long walk which is a historical trauma for our people and boarding schools were put in place to again and to assimilate into essentially read the the Navajo people native people of their culture and their identity and so it's it has a very dramatic it's a very traumatic experience for a lot of people and what is interesting because for some it was a very it was a positive experience because they learned how to function in the world outside of the reservation but boarding schools are it's it's a topic of its own really and as of the early late actually the late nineteen nineties early two thousands they stopped being they stopped being boarding schools and turn them into community schools they were boarding schools because students were novelizations were shipped off to them against their will a lot of the time in in may to assimilate so when you hear of boarding schools it's you it's really where the point in which Navajo people or native Americans first got the taste of what western society in life was like some of you have also commented that the spirit of the sport plays out in other ways as ray emailed it is worth noting that for other students Raz ball takes other forms including volleyball and even chess but many of the same things you're saying about the significance of basketball hold true across other activities the Reds can be a hard place to grow up in the poverty is an ever present issue but thank you for also highlighting the beauty of life on the Navajo Nation Kelly emailed my great friend Kenny Pemberton grew up in multiple foster care homes in northern Minnesota he is chip wa and African American he got a basketball scholarship to Haskell Indian nations university in Lawrence Kansas and later was part of the early European basketball league it opened many doors and experiences for him and as he always says changed his life for the better I'm Joshua Johnson you're listening to one a Hey role as were winding down I know you've been coaching for a long time for decades on the reservation for years at chan Li's specifically how have you seen things change over the last four decades for players either one or two big changes that you've noticed over time I thank the chair I one of the things I noticed that as far as in the in the years to since I stopped that I can be as well did the teams are more more structure I think I get I believe that the key is able to be able to play in a more constructive form is and does one need when I first started coaching you forty years ago it's safe to say and and and and I think the key is understand became better and able to realize that you know that that there's a lot more to the game besides what they used to it you know what what was described early on as well you know what I would do it there's more to it the day it was to play the game at at a at a higher level as far as understand the game and I think that's probably the big the biggest distance in that I've seen and that in the overall I think this the reservation schools across the gardener the coaching Goshen level I think it's gotten a lot better and that I think is great for a QC committee the for those who are going to go on to college is it to the next level the date they will do better prepare to play at the next level because of that what's next for you role do you see yourself continuing to coach are you thinking about a change what's next for you what I really don't know I I I take the one year the timing of this at this time I'm just I'm only culture I'm not working and we started to fourteen so I I usually what I do and so basically I really don't know what I would what I would do without basketball so as long as it generally will allow me to coach you I'll stay here and then when that comes down I think I don't know what to get to be honest which you roll suppose somebody listening to this wanted to come to one of the game's a chin Lee high school they wanted to make the track but they want to do it in a way that's respectful to doesn't step on toes but they're really eager to see it what would you say to them well I I would invite you to come because we because a document it what hat individual from LA that wants to come here share just to be a part of the program and all that other people make comments about having to come in just to watch a game or just be part of the the the the date.

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"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

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"haskell indian nations university" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"Everyone. This is Brian Edwards, and I'm cat Brooks. Weekday mornings, we host up front two hours of conversation about what's in the news. And what should the politics technology presence police what's happening in city hall and at the state house in Washington in the streets that starting at seven AM right after democracy now on up front. Police in Congo broke up a crowd waiting to hear a speech by presidential candidate Martin flew who says election officials conspired to defraud him of his win in this month's election. A spokesperson said dozens of people gathered outside fare, you lose headquarters in key Shasha before police arrived in cancelled the event, she dismissed calls by the declared president-elect Felix tasted Kaby to work together for reconstruction of Congo constitutional court on early Sunday refused for you lose requests. For a recount and reaffirmed the victory of teasha catty and their presidential race saying he received thirty eight percent of the while Fay Lu received thirty four percent in this legal challenge. Fay, Lu said he won sixty percent of the vote, according to leaked commission results, the forty thousand person Catholic church observations. Mission. Also affirmed that results. From polling stations showed that Fay Lu was the clear winner. The African Union had noted serious doubts about the vote and made an unprecedented an unsuccessful request for Congo to delay the final results. Katie's inauguration was planned for tomorrow, but was postponed. A government spokesperson did not give reasons for the delay. But said it will likely take place on Thursday. Zimbabwe. President Emmerson Mnangagwa arrived in the capital Harare today after cutting short his fundraising trip. So we could address the country's economic crisis and crackdown Gagua returned after a weeks long absence. And when the government launched a widespread clampdown in which twelve people were killed. Human rights groups, say troops shot some and dragged others from their homes and beat them. The president told state broadcasting that his trip to Russia and Kazakhstan was fruitful and will benefit Zimbabwe in the long run during his trip mnangagwa's met with Russian President Vladimir Putin and asked him for a loan earlier today the government intensified its crackdown on dissent by charging the leader of the country's largest labor organization with subversion courts ruled that the shutdown of the internet was illegal Zimbabwean police, arrested Joffe Moyo secretary general of Bob way. Congress of trade unions and charged him with subversion for his role in organizing last week's national strike they arrest and mnangagwa's return come after a week of turmoil during the strike, some people went into the streets to protest the government's drastic increase in fuel prices. The government said the demonstrations degenerated. Into riots and that prompted it to launch a sweeping rate wave of repression. The government also imposed an internet blackout across the country. Some Bob ways high court today ordered the government to restore full internet to the country government has alleged that apps like Facebook, Twitter, and what's hap- have been used organize violent demonstrations. According to a report released today, North Korea has a secret ballistic missile site, the basis one of twenty of North Korean government, undeclared missile sites. That's according to a report by beyond parallel project. Sponsored by the center for strategic and international studies the base, according to the report is likely not part of denuclearization talks between the United States and North Korea because it is undeclared Harry Horton reports North Korea has never disclosed the existence of its scenery missile sites. The report claims the base has these medium range ballistic missiles, capable of reaching Japan since President Trump met with Kim Jong in last year. North Korea has decommissioned one of its missile launch facilities, but critics say that was largely for show and its nuclear missile program remains active. President Trump says he's looking forward to he's second summit with Kim Jong. Which is expected to happen by the end of next month. Hurry in Washington. A group of five African American men shouting vulgar insults while protesting centuries of oppression. Dozens of white Catholic high school students visiting Washington for a rally to end abortion and native Americans marching to end injustice for indigenous peoples across the globe. Who is seen their lands? Overrun by outside settlers, the three groups met for just a few minutes. Friday at the base of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington and encounter captured in videos that went viral over the weekend at first the focus was under short video showing one of the high school students Nick Sandman wearing a red make America great hat again hat and appearing to smirk while a crowd of other teens laugh derisively behind him. As a sixty four year old native American Nathan Phillips played a traditional chant on a drum. Our verse separate video shows members. Of a group calling itself. The black Hebrew Israelite. Taunting everyone on the mall that day calling. The native Americans who had gathered there for the indigenous peoples March Oncle Tomahawks and five dollar Indians. And the high school students crackers and worse, it was an ugly encounter that speared epithets, but one that nevertheless ended with no punches thrown or other violence, but still the videos were all over social media. And Tony Gonzalez of national news has more. Nathan Phillips was honored Sunday by members of the native American community days after a viral video showing a confrontation between Phillips and high school students wearing make America great again. Hats in Washington DC, Covington Catholic, high school officials investigate and one of the students singled out in the video says there's misinformation and lies about the incident. Phillips in Omaha elder and veteran was in the nation's capital taking part in the indigenous peoples March Friday, the March was wrapping up near the Lincoln Memorial. When Philip says he inserted himself between the high school students and a group of black people to diffuse a tense situation. Clips of the moment went viral Phillips drumming and seeming inches from the students. Phillips spoke about the incident on the radio program indigenous foundation, where these these chaperones for these young people were and how why they allow them to. Two two. Mistreats disrespect that they were giving to other people on the video sparked outrage online and prompted statements from tribal leaders native, American members of congress and heads of native organizations who say the students showed disrespect Nick Sanmen students singled out released a statement over the weekend saying he was confused and did not intentionally make faces or interact with the native Americans. The students from Kentucky were reportedly on a trip for the March for life rally and a statement the school said it's investigating the incident has sparked nationwide controversy. I'm Antonio Gonzales. In addition to the March on Washington indigenous peoples marches and rallies were held across the country over the weekend. Rhonda lavala reports from Lawrence Kansas on the March by Haskell Indian nations university students. Students wanted to raise awareness of issues facing America's that is why they marched to city hall in downtown Lawrence. Cullman that she felt it was a success. I think the mind self task. And I'm so glad.

Nathan Phillips Washington Fay Lu president Congo America North Korea Emmerson Mnangagwa Zimbabwe President Trump Kim Jong city hall Lincoln Memorial Bob Brian Edwards key Shasha African Union Antonio Gonzales