20 Episode results for "Hashim"

Virtual Primary Care:  A Cornerstone of Value Based Care with Ray Costantini, CEO & Co-Founder at Bright.md

Outcomes Rocket

24:55 min | 2 years ago

Virtual Primary Care: A Cornerstone of Value Based Care with Ray Costantini, CEO & Co-Founder at Bright.md

"Hey comes Reckitt listeners. Thanks for tuning into the podcast. Again, tired of your businesses healthcare costs unpredictably increasing every year healthcare costs are typically businesses second or third line item expense. And if you're like most employers it's an expense that's growing faster than your revenue. Luckily, for employers novella health has the solution Nevada health is a full-service healthcare consulting firm with proven strategies to lower your healthcare costs by up to thirty percent or more. They operate on a fee for service, model and never Mark up any of their medical or pharmaceutical claims, none of your employees have to leave their doctor or pharmacist, either their health captive and pharmacy benefit manager, are the most cost effective and transparent solutions in the whole country. What they do is not magic. It's just honest. So if you're tired of overspending on health insurance, and wanna learn more, visit outcomes rocket that health slash save. For a free spend analysis to see how you too could save by switching to Nevada health. That's outcomes. Rocket dot health slash save. For your free spend the now service outcomes, rocket dot health slash save. Welcome back to the podcast today. I have the pleasure of introducing Dr Ray coastal, teeny. He's the CEO and co founder at bright, MD, raise a pioneering healthcare business leader. Innovative, physician and seasoned entrepreneur, who's passionate about healthcare prior to founding, bright MD. He led the design build deployment and operations of three groundbreaking Telehealth and digital health products at one of the largest health systems in the country. He also previously founded three successful companies, and is a national speaker on healthcare innovation Telehealth and patient engagement. These topics are all core to the operations and outcomes. Improvement efforts at many of, you're listening to at bright MD. He oversees marketing sales, partner, success, engineering and clinical contents. It's a true privilege to have ran the podcast today. Ray welcome, thank you. So looking for with you likewise, so that I miss anything in the intro that you wanna highlight for the listeners. Before we continue, I suspect, there's more interesting things to talk about the my background, but I guess, the, the things that always me where that is a combination that you really hit on. I've been on both sides of the rail bed rail. I've been both physician and a patient and the family member of patient. And I've been privileged to be on both sides of the business table on the health system side, and that was a solution provider. And I think that combination of perspectives has really helped me look at things differently, and hopefully be better partner to the delivery system that we work with the nation providers that we help. Now, this is a really great, great point to bring up the lens to be able to see it from from all those angles as important. What would you say got you into the medical sector to begin with it was definitely a passion for healthcare, and for doing good in the world. I started much earlier in my career as an entrepreneur, I come from a long line of entrepreneurs, one of those funny, things might my dad was an entrepreneur. And my grandfather was an entrepreneur, and I started down that path very early as well. It was very different industry did well, but I didn't didn't love where what I was doing and well enough that I could play the field and look for something that was less of a job in more of vocation or calling, and the health care was definitely that it was actually a funny thing told my dad that I was going to go to med school, and he said, why? He ended up in his he was very supporting. It was interesting to start from a different perspective. So that's definitely been the right choice for me. That's cool. Ray it sounds like you started on the enterpreneur road, one and a find more meaning did the bedside. And now you're you're back at it. But now with this new specialty given their experience in healthcare. Yeah. It was. And I had I had experienced my, my mom had multiple sclerosis from when I was very early on a child. And my dad struggled with healthcare issues. And so I think that, that's part of where that Hashim and calling came from Indian passion comes from personal experience. And I think they've continued to build we all experience healthcare. Not totally true. Now tell me a little bit more about bright MD, and what you feel a hot topic than needs to be on every health leaders agenda today. Josh, you know, I think the the thing that we found is that it's easy to focus on some of the hot topics out. They're the ones that people are really aware of those no consumerization of healthcare or. Provider burn out or patient access or transition to value based chair, a lot of really important things are happening in healthcare right now, pounded, the moose interesting and Bowyer, you'll problems to solve are often not those ones that people are the most aware of, but the ones that are underlying those issues than people are aware of the ones that are so the problems that are so big and ubiquitous people almost forget, that they're there and they see the symptoms rather than the disease and me. I mean what what I've seen is. You know, there's this terrible supply-demand small that we're struggling with in health care where we've got thirty percent less capacity to deliver care than there is patient demand. And that's getting worse every single year because of a whole lot of reasons because of the increased means from patients that they get older and are ovulation grows and also because the provider burn out factor providers are actually leaving healthcare. And then we start layering on. On these other challenges of unlike every other industry as we brought IT to bear in healthcare. I'm like every other industry where it's actually made things more efficient. We've actually seen a reduction in productivity and efficiency from IT in healthcare, and that's contributing to all those things. Well, so fixing that, you know, we have this huge ocean of provider, capacity. It's really on tap to. It's all these all this time that providers are spending doing things way below top of license practice, spending, even conservatively sixty plus percent of their time on low level administrative work, and that's not what clinicians spent more than a decade going to school for, and it's not the best way to be able to use their time. And that's really the, the core issue that we're trying to help it, this, we wanna make access to care cost of care provider, burn out quality of care. All better by tapping into that ocean of capacity. That's really being underutilized, clinicians to great. Great topic to focus on. Tell us a little bit about what you guys are doing at bright MD. Maybe some examples of how you're creating results or making things better. So what were you, we often get lumped into the Telehealth cat, which it's not unfair in that we help enable care to be delivered remotely? But more importantly, what we do something very different. It is automated. So we built a platform that really automates that charity livery process. It supports providers in less than deliver that care that only remotely, which is great for patients, really convenient help lower costs, but we're letting providers deliver care much more efficiently instead of spending all their time administrative work. We actually we interviewed the patient for the provider. We gather information from the our system and incorporated that into that interview process. We write the chart note for the provider. A third provider time is just typing these notes that they have after every single inner we do that, for the we do all the order entry with all the prescription writing. We'll do. We'll the downstream referrals any specialty services that are needed or diagnostics, finish the billing files. So by doing all of those things, or the provider, what we do we let them focus, all of their time and attention where it should be, which is on that patient care. It's on providing diagnosis and treatment, and that means that they're able to do that, in about two minutes of provider time as compared to the twenty that they're spending on all of the things that they shouldn't have to and that means the care's expensive. It means that providers are spending time where they want to. And I mean, the patients are able to get that more. They care more affordably and much more quickly than a more delightful way. And the other thing that's really need as a clinician. No, I hear care two minutes and the. I place my head goes as well. What kind of quality gets deliver? And what we're seeing actually better here instead, but face best practices, because we're not time constrained, we actually be more thorough in the interview of the patient. So we're actually seeing better outcomes through the smart exam platform than you see in person or the video, because we've removed those time constraints, and we've been able to be more consistent and more thorough in that care delivery process than we've allowed our providers to be in those other settings fascinating Ray, tell me a little bit more about who your customer is you working with provider, organizations you working with the individual physicians a little bit more about that. Yeah. We're primarily at this point focused on health systems, larger health systems. We work across the gambit with working with three of the five largest health systems in country of the nonprofit health systems. We are also working with integrated delivery. Works that are small as a single hospital and we're working with some large independent physician ambulatory practices. So we were able to do that whole gamut, and our focus is primarily on those ideas. The hospital plus ambulatory practice groups what we get some breath in there as well. Love it. Yeah. There's there's no doubt every week. You see posts and articles and information about physician burnout the quadruple aim sounds like the work, you're doing is very much targeted toward that, but going to the core of it, right? I mean and oftentimes, the core is not necessarily sexy. You gotta get there. And it's beautiful that you guys are focused on, on the problem. Not the symptoms. I love to hear as you've built the company and you've, you've rolled out implementations what's an example of a setback. You've had and what you learned from that to make you better. Yeah. Why would think about two different ways the direct answer? In a setback that I've personally had as we've continued to grow and be successful as a company. It's been a challenge to let go up. Things is interesting to go from being the founder and one of the small handful of people who are the company to really talented team of executives who are each better at their area expertise than I am and the process of letting go is that might been call it a setback but certainly a challenge. Yeah. And then in terms of industry is interesting. We're by our nature in our DNA is that innovation. So I think some of the biggest setbacks that we run into are, when we're, we're outpacing the healthcare industry's capacity for that. So, you know, we, we are out there were constantly pushing the envelope into different areas of care, and, and helping people think about care, and the care delivery process differently. And sometimes we step a little further than people are comfortable with so. I would say, that's the most common setback that we run into. And it's what I found is that it's important to be able to recognize those and then take that step back. Keep that thing that was pushing further than people were ready for in the hopper, but help people move along that half at a pace, that's only a little bit uncomfortable. But that they're ready for. Yeah. No. I, I'd say that's a really good problem, right? Yeah. Struggle high-class problem to have in the spectrum of things. I'm not really complaining, but, but it's still thing about high quest problems, there still problems. And you do something about so without a doubt. Right. You see what it could be. However, there's definitely some as you call it capacity to implement challenges and yeah, you just got up play with the market and the appetite. I think that's exactly right. And the other thing has found is understanding people's incentives built around. And in healthcare, we start talking about this a little bit before in, but it's a complex space and those incentives can be they can be less transparent than people would like them to be. But building a product that actually helps people do what they're looking for makes a big difference. I mean, if you if I went in and told clinicians, we got this great product that will help you deliver higher quality care for the two percents of patients that are really complex. And you don't know what's going on with them. But it's going to cost you one percent of officiency on all of your other visits. That's a tough sell as a while. It may it could make things better for some people is acting matters. We're still humans clinicians, or acumen, and that's not the way that we built our industry today and be interesting to keep an eye on that. But understanding what people are looking to be able to get done, and helping them do that. I think the continuous challenge of building great product. So great insight. So how about the other side of the coin Ray. What would you say? One of your proud medical leadership experiences has been todate some ways, it's harder to talk about things. You proud and things that you learn from, I suppose, you know, I think it's I feel a lot of pride. When I see clinician reaction to what, what we've built, no, we'll show them, what bright MD can do. Actually, I will tell them that, you know, we have this exciting new platform that helps them deliver high quality care. In less than two minutes, and you can see the skepticism set in and they're like, sure, then we show them, what we built and how it works and not only do we get these audible wows, but it actually catalyze the change in how they're thinking about how healthcare can be delivered. You know, we've taken away all the, the Scutt part of their job. We've made it. So instead of spending thirty two clicks to order a flu shot. They can actually deliver care and three and not only do they get excited about what we're doing. They start to get excited about what we can do together. I think that's that moment where I feel closest to our, our mission of transforming health car also increases my risk of doing the same thing. We were talking about earlier innovating ahead of where folks ready to go. And especially when I get enthusiastic clinicians, who are like, oh, my gosh. There's so much more. We can do. Men that plays into my natural weakness of wanting to do more faster now. That's really great. That's a great example. And definitely, I think something that a lot of product development, folks, as well as entrepreneurs business leaders are always looking for us that moment that. Yeah. You know, user sees the value, and this is the feedback yet. Yeah. And I think it's one step more than that. Honestly, it's even more than that. They see the value of what we done is that they gone from being a sceptic to being a collaborator like they want to help us do more. And that's when you're not just United. It's just pride of ownership in what we build what like it feels like we're catalyzing change, and that, that even more. So I mean that's, that's my passionate enthusiasm for making healthcare better, it, it really lights fire under that when I that, that moment of shift for sure Ness. So. Right. Tell me about an exciting project that you guys are working out today. I feel like we're doing that every day, you know, we're continuing to build out bright MD so that more health systems can serve more of their patients were now accessible to eight million patients thirty thousand providers and we're letting them get that high-quality affordable, accessible efficient tear for almost sixty percent of primary care. Nice was saying now, we're we're now growing into these adjacent spaces, so we started out in episode of care, so conditions that happen and need care, but are time limited, but we've now grown into some of these adjacent spaces and that's really exciting. You know, we just want our back pain module, and that's no. It gets patients timely access to care for a condition that can be really debilitating and difficult and not only helps them get a diagnosis and treatment, but it connects them. With the resources that they need to better manage their low back pain, and, in fact, even helps combat some of the challenges that were Beijing on the opioid crisis rather than getting somebody pills, we get them connected with skills, and I suppose, on a referred downstream into physical therapy, get the tobacco report, they'd be and then on the very related note. You know, we're now also we just want our first mental health condition coverage. So we're now supporting care for depression and anxiety. PTSD adjustment disorder. These are things that underlie, not only are they important in and of themselves because this is stuff that people really struggle with. And in fact, struggle to get access to get care. Huge numbers of people are either, either struggling to the stigma of mental health. They're not comfortable coming in and talking about it with the provider. They struggle with the lack of capacity. We don't have enough providers to get them the care that they need. So I love that were helping on both of those fronts. But that same thing. Connecting patients with skills. Not just pills. It's important. Antidepressants are important parts, according care and enabled that we're also connecting them with digital and traditional human downstream services to improve their management of their mental health as well. And then that is both an ongoing condition and underlying, a lot of the challenges that we see in on his ease management of other areas. I'm really excited about us being there and helping to court batch. That's a really exciting area for us to be getting to definitely exciting Ray. So folks, if you guys are one in. Learn more about what Brian MD is up to rail. Definitely provide you with a great way to access their work website here at the at the end of the podcast, getting to the lightning round of our show Ray and then we'll conclude this section we're going to build a mini syllabus for the listeners that got a couple of questions for you. Ask these are brief answers, followed by a book that you recommend. To the listeners ready been. So lightning around, always make me nervous. Let me see what we can do. All right. What's the best way to improve healthcare outcomes? It comes back with that, same thing of recognizing underlying issue, and then building tools that help actually address that rather than taking solutions and going looking for problems. So I think that the it's critical. No, that was the biggest mistake or pitfall to avoid so for healthcare, as a whole rather than myself, then talked about that one. I think it's I feel a lot of healthcare continuing to think that our industry can move slowly into consumer digital and not be disrupted and SUN Microsystems and Kodak and blockbuster, and Sears. All are you otherwise and health systems, and starting to recognize that I'm seeing tonal hicfa and, but it, it's a, a mistake or pitfall that I think people have to be figuring this out. How do you stay relevant despite constant chain? Wjr. Read a lot and listen a lot. And listen for those underlying needs, not the answers higher. Really bright talented. Open minded, passionate people and build a culture of innovation where I deals and insights valuable where failures are embraced where nobody needs to be. Right. But then everybody is responsible for ensuring that we do the right thing. It's a hard question to answer probably longer one than deserves for lightning round that nine that's a to the point. I love it. What's the one area, focus that drives everything in your organization, our mission, our mission to transform healthcare to empower providers to deliver better care for patients and their values the values that we as a company aspire to constantly, I suppose, it's too. But hopefully that hopefully that works at does it does does Ray and the last two here, a little more on the personal note. What is your number one health habit? I have most relatively recently. In the last year taking up pretty actively meditation. And I think that it comes back to one of those challenges that I had mentioned earlier in the interview as I'm aspiring to let go of things and let my really talented team, move them forward better than I could have being self. Reflective taking that time to just sit has been a very powerful habitant in new one for me. That's great. Right. And what is your number one success, habit, knowing, what you're aiming for being very clear about what the end points are, and what matters? And then letting go of the things that don't be disciplined about the process of my dad used to say license of series of stacked rankings and knowing what's most important, and putting your energy towards that. What you can make the most impact towards and recognizing that best way to make an impact of it pretty message and what book would you recommend the listeners? Right. Caught me. I I reading a lot. I could go through a litany of them. I read a lot healthcare civic anything in general. I mean, whatever whatever pop verse to the healing of America's fabulous primer on the different ways healthcare can happen just read a great book called switch about, it's how to drive change when changes hard really excellent teamwork around that we've been using is a classic but lynnfield, east five dysfunction. The team brought that went back out recently been working with doesn't funny thing to say about your team. But if you read the book, it's less about dysfunction, and more about how to be more functional, and actually, my wife got me back into science fiction recently. It's always fascinating to read science fiction and realize how many idea that we have. Now that we take for granted came from the creative mind of science fiction writers, is pretty amazing. Yeah. It's stunning. It's like, oh my God, there's something interesting. I is. How do they, it's create kid? Vity. It's cool. It's really this book is written in the sixties. And this thing just came out in two thousand nineteen. It's, it's while it's really wild so yeah. That was not one book, I suppose, that it's it would be hard for it'd be like trying to pick my favorite music or favorite song. I on pens on. I'm trying to do or what depends cancer example, folks, there's a collection of readings from Reich Constantini, custom teeny and, and take a listen. Check those out, you could check out all these links as well as a full transcript of our discussion and a short version. Go to outcomes rocket that health in the search bar type in Ray custom teeny or type in bright MD, and you'll find the show notes there before we conclude. Ray, I'd love if you could just share closing thought and then the best place listeners, could learn more about you, and your company really enjoyed talking with you as fun, a hope that a little bit of what we what we get to talk about was impactful provokes and. To drive velocity of outcomes in healthcare. So thank you, appreciate the time saw absolutely Ray. And if the listeners wanna check you out the website for your our website is right? Dot MD your I g h t dot MD or they could Email us at info at bright dot com. Big outstanding rate. Thanks again, for your time really appreciate your carbon out for us and sharing your insights, pleasure. Thanks again. So. Thanks for listening to the outcomes. Rocket podcast be shoot. It is it us on the web at WWW outcomes. Rocket dot com for the show notes resources inspiration, and so much more.

MD Ray partner Dr Ray Reckitt Nevada Mark CEO Beijing Hashim adjustment disorder Bowyer Josh Dot Brian MD Reich Constantini founder
Beautiful You with Special Guest Sammi Rreyes

Beautiful You

48:11 min | 11 months ago

Beautiful You with Special Guest Sammi Rreyes

"You have to realize that you are in control of your own life. You are the only one who is able to move things forward and achieve those goals you want to achieve. I believe inside everyone of us is a beautiful year waiting to be fully revealed and fully expressed to the world around us. I'm Miriam smout family of Redemption Mama's. Beautiful You podcasts showcases everyday ordinary women like you breaking free from unhealthy relationships with themselves and others women who have processing kind and disappointments in life. You will hear stories that inspire encourage any palace, so you can become your beautiful you regardless of the circumstances you face, and the value treasury loved for who you really are. I support women through mentoring and life transformation, so they can be healed and whole from the inside out and live out of their true authentic genuine beauty. have. You been suppressing your beautiful. Be inspired to step into your beautifully here journey this way. Feud I'm Miriam snap and this is beautiful you. Welcome to the beautiful. You podcast my guest. This week is actually the youngest guest I had ever spoken to. On a beautiful you podcast. It is semi raise welcome semi to the beautifully podcast. Thank. You I'm so excited to be here. Well I'm pretty intrigued and interested to find out about your story. Twohey semi is a youth. Speak Up. She hosts the fashion, your passion podcast, which is being broadcasting now for a year and a half. She is a writer working on her own book. She's a college student and listen to this studying journalism, counseling, psychology and ladies. Chip Justice small mix of interesting things there for. Two to fashion her life then and the passion that she has a head for her. For the past year and a half, she's been transforming her life to become the best version of this, so check this out. She is nineteen years of age and has come to realize that her life passion is to help young women transforming our lives by curing healthy habits and binding de Hashim. Semi then is a really awesome way to be starting. You live at nine hundred nine years of age congratulations. Thank you thank God. I am I'm growing courage to to make somebody like new is just aspiring to do everything you can easily stages of your life. You never get those years back if you if your wife's them high exactly. So. Tell us a bit about fashion your passion podcast. Yes so I call it. My child I mean it is something that I take you know the most pride and joy in I started about a year and a half ago, it really started as sort of a preparation for a speech I was doing my public speaking class, and then my public speaking teacher, who is currently my mentor in every area of my life, someone who is the most influential on me? Every single day has pushed me. You know to live out dreams. I didn't even know I had in the beginning that sort of deep within me and she was like you gotTa. GotTa do this podcast official you know, go out and get it on apple podcast, Google podcast, spotify just do the damn thing, and so you know starting January third I created this little graphic. I had no idea what I was doing. I created this graphic in from there. I found teachers in my high school. My friends I'd had coming on record my own episodes, talking about sort of what I was dealing with through my own personal journey, and then you know sort of evolved into. Let's pawn guests who are expert in certain areas. You know sort of my friends who have these experiences that. May stand out amongst the high school sort of crowd. And then going into high school I decided to you know. Moving am I go to college halfway across the country I'm from new. York GonNa go to college in California? So the whole transition was just crazy for May and so I started. You know finding people and connecting with people who you know could shed some light in some tips for people who have that same transition and it really just is something that makes me so happy to bring guests on and have them share their stories, but also once in a while on myself and chair. Of Insights that I've learned throughout this process in this journey, because the journey is going to be everlasting, but it just so happen to have started at the beginning of last year. Now that's that's exciting, so you'll connecting with the students. I guess that had that same experience as you I it's a little different in Australia about in the US you, you basically high, don't you? You stop. Again as the student in a new place. So what did you have to? Take Yourself. What did you have to learn? What was the things that you had to really Hainan on to? To bring out the best in news at such a young age. Yeah, so I think you know. For me like, don't get me wrong. I love my parents, my grandparents. They're the most people that have ever met my entire life, but I think that you know they hold on to certain sort of values and beliefs that have been in the family for years on end, and obviously this world is ever changing until I sort of had A. Break free from that and realize that I am not going to become a teacher. I'M NOT GONNA. Come A- therapist after break free from. Sort of the conventional careers at people might do and so I just I started to explore other careers, but also I had to sort of learn how to take care of myself. Develop Habits that actually prepare me for succeeding in life you know developing. A good friendships and developing a social life on top of the on top of working at a job and Experiencing extracurricular activities and doing school, and so I think the biggest biggest piece I had to learn through. Definitely, the very beginning of my journey was changing that mindset of you know whatever is happening like it's not happening to me happening for me and I have to take it. You know clearly with a grain of salt and just sort of react in a different way that how I was reacting previously. While that's powerful, not happening to me happening full me, so you'll mindset changed in that instead of looking at maybe the challenges and the disappointments, the struggles that you faced as being. Something, a personal. They became something. To give you feedback and help you to grow. Can you give examples of what some of those things would? Yes, for sure so I'll go in I'll take the story back a little bit You know seventh eighth grade at my middle school years. I really. Started to experience something that I didn't know what it was. I wasn't excited about anything anymore. I really you know sort of wasn't my cheery go. Lucky South, who? was talking with everyone in the hallways and stuff like that and I wasn't really getting assignment done the way I used to get them on. And this you know moved into ninth grade tenth grade this beginning of high school and I didn't really know what was going on with me. Because I was just so young, I didn't really feel comfortable. Opening up to anyone pretty much about it and then you know the middle of like tenth grade, my Sophomore Year of high school. I was just like researching online like what I was feeling. They're like these words. In depression started coming up and I was like wait. Maybe that's what I have and I went to my school counselor year. Hey I think this is what's going on I'm not really sure how to handle it all like you know. What should I do and she's like to tell your parents and like you defined a therapist. Klotz the that that's the easiest way for you to sort of cope with all of this because i. Had, believed that it was really just affecting entire life until I started going to a therapist and figuring out what was going on with me and then I the first fall semester my junior year. I had taken a semester abroad I lived in Israel for four months. you know August to December, and it was a great experience, definitely eye-opening experience, but I just. You know there are certain things that have happened and I got really really anxious when I came back. The culture shock was something I had never experienced before, and it was a whole new threat of reinvention of myself, because the whole, the whole world here in New York that I knew once before was kept going as I was in Israel and it didn't stop for me. I'm Anne Soy. SORTA to readjust like what what's going on. What's happening so like that? And that's really where at that point where my Zayed heightened and when I came back I started meeting with therapist and stuff like that, but going into senior year. There are a lot of things happened this summer before. And you know the previous year that I hadn't sort of finished Kobe. finished figuring out, and so I was so so so anxious. Most of my fall semester, my last year of high school and one day like my mentor. She came to me and she's like Samya Late I. Want to help you figure this out because this isn't the way you should be living and it. That incentive was such an eye opening sentence for me, because I personally thought that this was the way I was going to deal with my depression and anxiety for the site life I thought this is just. There wasn't any other solution because I thought I. Put put enough work already, and there just wasn't anything that was working for me. I. Remember having meltdown after meltdown for five years straight was so done with. Pretty much everything in my life and I felt like I had no purpose in that the minute she said that you know I felt in my mind, and my soul I remember walking out of classroom in almost in tears, because I was like this woman wants to stand right beside me and walk with me down this path of healing down this path reinventing sort of warning who I am as a person who semi raise is as a person i. I think from there. That was like November the time November twenty eighteen from that moment I met with her everyday after class everyday during launch an hour two hours a day. sort of Rift Rafeh different things. We became really close. And I started helping her with her staff and Cheer Start, helping with my staff in her, just as amazing amazing relationship in bond and bat really was a turning point for me. It's like I need to like. I can't let my Zayed's my depression control me. I have to control it. It can't rule my life I after roll my own life. wow. I you know this is so common anxiety and depression in your generation at such young ages. It is psychology and. Do you, think you understand maybe why. Yes so I've had a few gas on my podcast. Come on and talk about this. I thought therapists. I've had the life. Coach is also bad because I'm so curious about it. One of the my my big final project for my sophomore year English class was all about mental illness and teens and white teens are so prone to it and white. House affects their family and their friends, and you know what is really the stigma around it, and for me I personally think the one of the biggest factor is. You know as much as I love social media to grow a brand to. Really catch people I think one of the biggest factors in social media as well as a sign of norms and those combined really just do an injustice for teens young adults, you know people pretty much under the age of twenty, and even over the twenty, but most visibly under the age of twenty, because that point in your life, your so so so prone to sort. Sort of You're like a sponge at that age. You know from about twelve to twenty your sponge. You're taking in anything. Anyone says you're taking things that you don't know are right or wrong, because you don't know what you definitely right or wrong right now. Because you're still developing, you know the brain doesn't. It doesn't fully stop growing until you turn twenty one to. Finish developing until you turn twenty one and so in the years before that you're still learning. You're still growing and if you're if you're getting fed these things that are right and wrong this time that are contradicting themselves in your reading. Both you know hand in hand you're not going to which is right, and which is wrong. You're not going to know what's what sort of you know in good more morality, which sort of in bad morality. Morality you're just GonNa have it all together, and then you're not going to know sort of you know what your own stances I think. That's the biggest piece but I. Think also. There's this I hit the. There's this notion it's. We're sort of breaking away from it, but it's this notion of you know you have to do exactly what your parents are doing used to do. Exactly you know like women have to become teachers or therapists or Whatever nurses, or whatever like that? All the men have to be in business, and that's so untrue, and I feel like you know we're doing such a great job at as beginning to break that stereotype but I think that there's so much work to be done with that and I. think that's such a big thing I know I literally get so like my like my heart's on fire are talking about breaking away from what your parents are doing what they're telling you to do because at the end of the day like you. You are the only person who's in control of your life of your thoughts of your feelings, and if you're allowing anyone else or anything else to control that you just, there's nothing left for you to do. You have to begin to take back control and that's what I learned, also you since the beginning of my journey was I have to take back control I think those are the two big things that are really affecting teens, but also you know adults in children as a whole in terms of mental health and mental illness. Yeah I'm hearing. The would identity. Coming through in what you're saying, it's not. That age particularly in attains. You are framing up your identity your up who you think you are and so. That is being overshadowed by feelings of anxiety and depression. Then clearly, you're not going to come out of your tainted with a really good idea of who you are. What your identity! Nanu Singh to have managed to do that you you have managed to count through, though, is you're you're nineteen? You're hitting out of you chains. Do you feel you know who you are. Not One hundred percent. I think I have sort of. A Ginning and understanding of partially what I wanted. You dress my life and who I am, but it's evolving literally everyday. You know the the whole thing with me. Helping women is something. Young women is something that I I just sort of realized in the past three months of being in quarantine has like you know what Lemme? Knocked on my niche, you know better and make it more specific because I was just gearing towards high school and college beforehand but I realized you know what now I really need to focus on young women because they are someone you know who I can relate personally to and also someone who you know, Not. Necessarily not necessarily needs more help, but a group who you know is a minority, and also you know they don't really get the same attention that young men do in terms of societal norms. And I think that you know it is so important to sort of find some sort of purpose or some sort of you know something that gives you a sense of self. That's sort of the main partly if you pull the big picture of the purpose of my podcast is really to help. Young women find at least one thing that makes him happy or be. They find purpose in in order to have them guide their days at that and take that energy they get from activity and bring it into other areas of their life. While that some. That's very powerful and across the alien that we find a purpose and I have to say on nearly sixty mile. Circus in life has has definitely morphed into different shapes and wise, but it's just beautiful the why it builds on the last stage your face to the next into the next and so. Coming into your twin now. Pretty Good Framework Open on entity I I love the way you said not one hundred percent. Of course I'm still not one hundred percents of it. You know you have a good framework. You've got a good skeptical. The to to move into your twenties are remember. This when I went with women at the twenties. Is this time way you really build on what you've learned your chains, but you just pushing yourself to find out what you can't abilities. I, you know how strong you at that at. That have great. Are you at this and and it's a very exciting time of life. You said something interesting as well that you take control. and. I want to ask you what you think about. The Not just control responsibilities sounds line hugh. Responsibility, like control. This is one thing that then you're taking responsibility youth. You said that no one else is going to do it for me on the one that's GonNa. Do it for myself. What? Helped you to really come to that point of going you know. My parents aren't gonNA. Do It for me. I don't want them to ongoing to take responsibility and and figure things out for myself. How did you get there? And what was the process for that? Yeah, so I want to say. Put on the record like it was not easy at all like I. Think you know sometimes isn't a podcast episode. We listen to you know you know videos. Read blogs that like. Oh, it's the three set process. It's so easy to do no way there were. I shed more tears in the past two years, and I ever have in my entire life by I have also learned the most. I've ever learned about myself in the past two years to but to answer your question like I remember the first moment that I decided to do this I. Remember it so vividly. It was November nineteenth twenty eighteen at I. Adjust my one of my. Teachers? Who I'm lucky to call my friend now she had gifted me. Rachel Hollis Book Wash Washer face, and not your. If you heard of it before more when it is yeah, Rachel, Hollis is a motivational Speaker Entrepreneur She started out doing sort of personal development work for women, and then has moved onto sort of the greater good of the adult world and does a bunch of different things. She has coaching. You know live events in something like that and she's. seven books to nonfiction and. Fiction, and she's just a really sort of influential person, all over social media like that, and so her first nonfiction book girl Washer face was fourteen sort of lies. She had told her for the past for the first thirty two years of her life. And in the last sentence of her introduction is you know? She says she goes? You have to realize that you are in control of your own life. You are the only one who is able to move things forward and achieve those goals you want to achieve and obviously I'm paraphrasing. You know gory the bug. If you want to read, you know the actual coat or just look it up on good reads. It's literally right there. It was my senior quote for high school. But that was the pivotal moment of my entire life I was like. Oh. I was like you know what she actually right like that. That is right like I am in control like no one else is. I have to start controlling things because I just let life happen to me like I, said before life happens for you and not to you. I was letting it happen to me I said I was telling myself. Whatever is thrown my way. Screw it like that's just what's going to happen. Happen I can't do anything about it. But in actuality there are so many things that can do about it. There are so many different you know. There's so many other ways that I could have reacted to it and that one sentence short of chains of director at my life and then from there really what it was. Was You know just again? Just hang my mentor sort of enhance it every single day. Really, push me to be migrated south. You know there are so many quotes that I have. You know. Saved in my phone from her is. Remembered because it helped me grow so much. You know I think that You know part of taking control responsibility I think it all comes into one because again like there are a lot of teens who have the psychologist call helicopter parents where you know, they'll just be in their every move there. Every thought there every sort of way these teams have no way to think for themselves or you know we'll have. We even have adult to have helicopter parents still and their parents are always sort of you know in their in their You know sort of in their business. And, they have no way to think still. Enjoy I think that if even if you have a helicopter parent of sorts, there really is a way for you to say you know what no like I'm GonNa. I. Can the just tell me what you want to say to me, but I'm going to do what I'm GonNa, do and there's no way you can stop me. Yeah, and how did your parents feel about? That was the relationship it was the attention there. Did they just go yet? Goodbye the best. Work the yeah so I am the oldest of three daughters, and so really I sort of set up. Their expectations for my two sisters. And so I think that I'm so lucky that I was sort of. Dealt the more lenient card because they really weren't as involved in my life, like they they they were involved, but they weren't. Sort of you. Know helicoptering like I mentioned before they were you know. If I failed the test, they would say okay Sami. Like what are you going to do next like? You know how to make this better next time and I recognize myself that I had felt that task. You know I didn't really feel many tests, but when I did I you know I, sort of knew what I'd done wrong and I sort of took. Action towards that and I've done that all my life. You know I I consider myself sort of an old soul I. People I say people have said that I'm nineteen going on thirty five minutes I think that a lot of my thinking that I have now. You know I started to begin when I was twelve thirteen because i. just had that sort of you know. Municipality of? Intellectual Maturity at at that age and continuing to now and I think for them. It was really just they were. They were happy that I was getting happier because they knew. I was upset. They knew I was sad, but they didn't know exactly what was happening. Because again like I mentioned before. I didn't really open up too many people on I still don't open up, too. Many people you know. I don't really trust many people, but they were just happier that I seem happier happier that I was. One of you know taking care of myself again at doing things that were productive in society again. And really sort of you know caring about a lot of different things that they had it really. Taken so much Karen before. Yeah Wow so when when you're making that break when you're making that transition away from. From being dependent I guess and and cleasing and fitting into the family expectations, and then you make that break in you. Step out of the. Once, that space like you know, explain to us how you navigated that space. Yeah, it's super uncomfortable. It's you know not the most ideal again like I said before you know my parents, grandparents have been very You know not traditional, but very you know fixed way of thinking about things, and you know it's either their way or no way and so when I came in with this new way of thinking. They were sort of they were open to it and you know. My Dad took me everyday like he that he so inspired by me. A lot of his work that he's doing currently is based off of my own work. But at first, it was very like like what is that going on like? When I had so my entire senior year, I wanted to become a rabbi you know I'm I was so passionate about my Jewish faith, and I want to be a therapist, a life coach and a teacher and I knew that I can sort of put all this gathered in becoming a rabbi and all of my senior year. That's really what I wanted to do until I started the podcast, and then when I started the podcast. I was like we can sort of credit. Career with this podcast moved to speaking move to coaching move to. Live events and becoming an author and stuff like that, and when I I told them about that, my mom was like maybe you should major education to just in case, and I was like housing mom now like I I again I taught you know for six years so when I from thirteen to. Twelve or thirteen to two might last days of high school and I knew that at that just wasn't something. That I want to pursue the rest of my life. I love to teach I'm don't get me wrong. When I get the opportunity to teach them one, I will teach them but teaching. In the education field bureau just wasn't what I want to do anymore. But my mom, she was very like. Can Happen if it doesn't work out what's going to happen if you know all these things like just don't go away, you say, and I'm like Idaho plan, B. So half. Make work you know I set myself up so I. Don't have a plan B. Because I have I have to work even harder to make sure everything works out. That's that's awesome. You know you. You have taken responsibility in a very dynamic and pathway. I guess we kind of have give grace two sides of this equation, don't we? Because life has changed so incredibly dramatically even in the last decade. There wasn't settling, KKOB podcast back then, and now let's say you can actually generate an incumbent and a career and amazing things can can come, but you know my the my generation and your parents as well I'm I'm guessing. This is such a foreign foreign concept. It just goes against all those years of experience and and. All the things that wavelength as as mature age people, and so you've embraced this new generation of of this digital world by starting your podcast na-ngoen create year and a half. Congratulations on I know that it's just not a small. Bit of effort you putting. Out of of what you've been you putting in? Something, you said before was an come at a couple of times that. You've found a mental and this mental walked alongside of you they. They seem to brave some. Some some inspiration some clarity. Tell us about that relationship, and how you think that has contributed so much to wear you out today. Yeah for sure I cannot say enough good works about her backstory. I've always been a teacher's pet. I've always been closer with my teachers in my peers or my parents grandparents. Whoever my family! Again because you know I'm an old soul, so I relate more with adults and stuff like that but teachers you know has been sort of my my constant for as long as I can remember and I. So This Swiss woman was my my public speaking teacher, so I had her the fall of twenty eight teens, the beginning of my senior year of high school, and she was act. She's actually best friends with another teacher who I have become closer with You know in previous years. Really you know sort of bonded over our spiritual pads and stuff like that and you know like her name is most perched I will give her shot up because she's probably listening to this. But you know so when I got into public speaking costs I. You know we'd met before. Because I knew all the English teachers and I. You know I came up I came up to her like one day after class or the middle of October k. like you know like your friends like. Gave me this book, and it was Universe has your back by Gabrielle Bernstein and I was like i. she told me you read it and I. You know I wanted to chat with you about it into your thoughts on it, and that was the start of this amazing relationship from there. You know we were we. Began, to open to her and she, you know sort of telling me you know her experiences and stuff like that and you know Ben in December when I did so that the final speech of the public speaking class was a motivational speech. That's when I retired really started like the mock part of the PODCAST, so had recording myself every diet before my speech, so the fifteen days before my speech I recorded myself every day. I'm just saying some some sort of motivational rant. I showed it to her. She was like Sami like you need to do this. As as an official thing, and so in January, I started you as an official thing and then. In shorting January was the start of my senior project, so in my school, every senior to do an internship or a project to some sort that they do for the final semester of their school year and so I of course had asked her to be my mentor firm I my senior project You know I'm abroad so so nervous to ask her. Because I was afraid, you'd say no but usually tenure you crazy. Of course I will, and I was like all right here we go. From there, you know I I went her. Almost every single day in. We talked throughout the podcast about my life and stuff like that and they were just you know because she is also currently writing a book. She's writing a I'll give her little plug. She's writing a self help book for teenagers. It's all lessons that she's learned her life, and it's all the stories that she usually tells to students between the VAL between concerts. And so. We have been working hand-in-hand with developing instagram's developing our books in reach out to different podcasts and on podcasts she will be on my podcast. twice won last year, and then one coming, and she just has mindset in these these ideas new stories in these lessons that she has inside of her. The I have never heard any other person before my entire life. For some reason when the come from her just gives you this little bit of like. To me, and like it gives you the taken the bought that I really need every time I talked to her. and I think I've had mentors somebody mentor stuff years. This is just something else because. Not only, does she? You know she will be older Mesa. She has to our experience, and I. She can help me sort of in my personal life, but be we're sort of peers in the business side of things so with her book about a bunch of things and you know we both try to reach to different podcasters to get to get you each other on different podcasts than I just finished up her website for her. That so we're you know? Hand in hand in that process and I think that's really what. Brought us together later on, but I think that also like just having a mentor in your life or someone who you can look up to you and say hi. I had this problem like comey work through this we talk about this is show Selah so important I cannot just enough because this woman has changed my life, she is saved my life countless times, and literally is the reason why I started everything that I've done today. Wow that's just so powerful. In reflecting back to you what you just said to me, you reached out to her. You went to her. Read this book of Heard. You've read it as well. I found an intriguing new reached out to her. She identified something in Yeary. She she identified there was something in you. That needed to be fed that needed to be. Needed to be nurtured a needed to be put out to the world. Then you responded. I'm. I'm really loving to hero of on wanting to hear. What was it about her? Here. She signed you Sami. You have a voice. You've gotta get your voice out there. You responded. Why do you think you trusted her? As opposed to other people that were in your life? Yes so I. Think it really just was. How she trends how she helped me transform my personal life before I even started the podcast because you know like I, mentioned before like she had that one statement of like I wanNA walk side by side with you and sort of be able to help you in certain things and you know I think that before then when I had from when I first talking to her sort of after classes and stuff like that, and from then on, she just kept I felt myself teller the same story in a different situation. And she recognized. She's like one day she was like saying like you're telling me the same story over and over again about the same situation just in a different context and it's like she's. She was like you can't keep doing. It's like there's no way that you haven't figured out a solution to you like if you haven't figured as well. Let's figure out. Let's work on this together. Because you know, you can't keep living like it's healthy for you to do this. I think with that transformation that had started I was sort of you know. I have always been someone who you know when I sort of believe in something for myself I, just go out and do it like moving to California for college like I. Just didn't. I don't really care what anyone said like. You know like going Israel for four months like no one wanted to go to Israel four months, but I did it anyway and so I. Thank you know. Having my own validation, which was really important, but also having her validation of like. Yeah, like you can do this because I've seen you grow in progress and just having her as someone who I could go to any question that podcast about my own podcast with just you know seeing her receiving her light every day was something that. Allowed me to. Trust her and believe that she believed in me. Yeah can certainly here that and the last part of the crisis Toby for you stayed connected. Yeah! It's it's not easy sometimes to stay connected, and sometimes we do nate tonight von, and and find the new person at a different level, but she said to I wanNA walk side by side with you, but then you said something interesting that you took the bat on assuming that means that she was coming down a little bit harder on you, and and really challenging you. Is that what you meant when you said I talked about? Gay Aso so she does not you know. Give things to easily like is sort of like definition of tough love. If you put you know if you find tough, love the dictionary. It's her picture right there. and. You know for me. I think I was really giving myself sort of the leniency of Oh. You know it's it's mental. Illness it a depression anxiety like em easy on myself and stuff like that, but for some of the things in my life I just knew that tough love that sort of you that kick in the butt of like Samuel. Just get up and do this like what are. Are you doing sitting here for like moping about the same things over and over again I think that was really you know sometimes I walk out of there crying I, but that doesn't make sense, but then a half hour later. I was like Oh. Wait, that actually does make sense. That's why she's best. We're GONNA. Get it now. You know, and so I think that that really you know. That's that's part of what change thinking was like as much as I wanted to disagree with her. You know thirty minutes later. It was like Oh that actually is is what into what I needed to hear and that's what I should do, so let me go do that. You know so I think that's really the biggest thing. For me because I think just myself I was just so lenient with myself because I didn't really know what else to do and I think you know. I didn't really have the energy in me to push myself. Our needed someone else to do that I. think my parents as. As I, love them like. They just didn't know how to push me forward because they were too. Too scared to you. Know what what if she blows up like? What if she bursts like what? What if I upset her I? Don't want to upset her and stuff like that and so I. Thank you know just having her. Being able to do that was just so such a game changer for me. Yeah, and then you stayed. Connected in is in difficult times with it. Was it hard to stay connected? Did you really have to let yourself round to do that? Or did you have the sort of relationship way? You felt like you could trust to. And even though she might challenge you and and not. You didn't understand maybe what was going on behind that. How do you feel that you manage to stay connected throughout the process? Yes, so just to backtrack so like. Fall Semester of so I WANNA came back from Israel, so it was January of two thousand eighteen when I came back into school. Something that I did was to sort of get acclimated back to sort of. Agreed with the culture shock and Catch up on school. I didn't really talk to any of our friends. Except if they are classes for about a month and a half like I all I did was I woke up went to school went to my extracurriculars. You know came home did my homework. I went to my job that had twice a week, and that was all I did because I was just sort of like sort of realizing like what is the new normal for me here? Like what are things I do hear that I do I lived in Israel and so I think moving into senior year. One of my biggest goals was to not sort of shut. People out was to not. have these periods of time like I didn't talk to anyone and I think that is part of it where it was like I need to be more social. I can't relations people out. But also it was like I. Trust this woman with entire life and you know she for some reason. I can't really put my nose on it. She just lost her sort of more than anyone else. And I was just sort of able to I. mean for the first four months of my senior year of high school. I saw her every single day, and then a for a little bit more because I was her final class of the day, and so I had her for forty five minutes for our class period for public speaking costs period, and then I'll talk to her for fifteen twenty minutes afterwards to in. Our that day, and then as we became closer, I began to inner. Stop in at lunch your question and then once seconds faster started. Now's work in the podcast for my senior project. I would go to her. During lunch I'd go after school to ask you different questions with the podcast, but my life and stuff like that and. I have shed so many tears in that room I shed. You know happy tears. Sad here is you know whatever it was? Also? There are so many your laughs and smiles rim, too many podcasts record in that room to. Make that just all of that. Is really something that I hold socal so close to my heart. I think it's something that it's an experience that not many people have it is so so so rare and I'm so blasted honored to able to have that experience. Yet definitely you certainly are on I'm wondering what would life have been? Do you think if he had not had the mental and the support to her? That you had what where do you think you might be? That is a great question. I literally the other night I was up until like four am and I had I wrote her literally a six page letter but I'm going to give her when graduate from college in three years and it's talking about you know I. Don't know where I would have been if it wasn't for her. I don't know you know sort of like what my life would look like. I no one has ever heard this before, but really every single birthday that I have I from from sixteen on I just I wake up and so much gratitude, because I'm so lucky to have lived another year I think there was many many small moments where I Dang I was going to make it another day. I didn't think I could handle everything that was going on in my life I was just done I was emotionally exhausted. Mentally exhausted exhausted, and I didn't know how choose one of my life any other way and I think with her, and with all this other stuff I mean she doesn't give her. Credit? She just tells me that did it, but I don't really believe that I think you know part of it. Was Her nagging yellow time but I think that you know because of Har I, am you know I'm able to see another day? Able to sort of you know thinking myself think of myself. In this good light of you know I can influence others and I can be proper member society. I. Could you know really sort of Be Like you know. Attend to this higher power in attempt to a bigger thing that myself. Wow will I am very inspired and encouraged that at such a young age you have either coming Zaindy and and depression you are finding your identity, your purpose you taking control of your life and responsibility for framing up a future that is going to be very powerful and. I just I'm sorry, thankful semi for you sharing your story with us today. Yeah, it was so so so nice to my story. I'm like so like. I'm smiling and I'm just I'm really happy right now. Because I started my story, something that I'd take so much pride in I take. Action out it and some so happy. That I was able to do this. Love to chat with you again because I didn't even get into some of the things that you doing with young women today so. We know. That, we can chat a bar. I. Really would love to do that down the track so. If you're listening today and your situation maybe in your team's oil Niger. Experiencing Dodd in depression. Quite frankly it's it's a massive percentage of. People as dies, and you want to. Be inspired or being courage or connect with semi Where you can connect with her in the description of the podcast. Semi. What would you? What would you like people? To Nouri as we as we conclude now people who may be struggling with what you struggled with or parents who are struggling with with teenagers that are experiencing anxiety and depression. What would you say to them? Yeah I think that. You know whatever you're going through right now. It will pass and I remember my mentor. Mentor ivine she would always say to me. You know it to shop has a too shall pass. I never ever ever believed her And then you know it did and I. I was able to sort of creating your life for myself so i. think you know just as hard as it is as many meltdowns in just crying sessions disbelief in yourself at it's GonNa be. Have the the patients develop the patients to really realize that it's eventually gonNA pass. The time will get better. You know. Develop that faith in that higher power that this you're experiencing because you're gonNA learn so so so so so much from it and you know if you are struggling really bad. Please don't be afraid to reach out other me through Instagram, or you know the. The crisis text line, which is you text help to seven, four, one, seven, four, one for the United States or if it's the suicide, you know hotline, call, hotline, or whoever it is family member, friend, teacher, whoever it is like. Please please please get help. I think that's the biggest thing that's sort of transform like help my life and being able to permit to. Save my life. Will, thank you so much for sharing your story and sharing the journey that you've been on and and that it is possible to overcome. These negative emotions, these negative feelings, and and at any stage of life I think what you shared today. Semi isn't just a quicker bowl to people your age going on today twenties for any of us at a point in my life way with feeling that anxiety and depression. Thank you so much. It's been such a privileged sharing your story and talking with you today. Thank you so much for having me. If you know, it's time to take action, and you want to connect with your beautiful you then I want to connect with you. Find me on FACEBOOK DOT com forward slash redemption Mama's or drop me a message. You will also find any links for my guest on the facebook pages well. You can be empowered. You can be equipped and inspire others and embrace true courage by becoming your beautiful new. I'm Miriam Smith and he is to being the beautiful year. and. Making. You feud. Now.

Israel depression official instagram California Zayed United States FACEBOOK Miriam smout Miriam snap de Hashim Rachel Hollis writer York apple Rift Rafeh school counselor Idaho
Ep. 26 One Year Anniversary

Beyond the Wheel

55:37 min | 1 year ago

Ep. 26 One Year Anniversary

"This episode is brought to you by battle born batteries the best name and the RV Marine Industry these lithium batteries are designed and assembled in the USA backed by a ten your warranty the best solution for your battery anxiety so go check them out at battle born batteries dot com attack. You're listening to be on the wheel a podcast about the people ideas that drive the Rv community for I everyone and welcome to a very special episode. Today is beyond the wheels one year anniversary and Sean and I are taking a walk down memory lane discussing why the show was started and we are going to chat about each each episode and discuss our favorite takeaways from each one so let's just jump right into it well Kenny. I can't believe it's been a year already since we started this. I know that when we started I didn't really have expectations that it would even last a year. I wasn't sure how it would how how it would work out so it's been surprisingly fun and busy year actually for the podcast so been really great start. Yeah I think the busy part. His wife doesn't feel like it's already been a year. I think like you said I was just thinking this morning. Knowing that we were going to record this episode today and talk about the year in the highlight rid of the year but I was just thinking back and I started scrolling through our all the episodes that we've done and had all the guests that we've had on and I was like man. We did an awful lot and one ear and we had like awesome guests all the time too. I think the PAT ourselves on the back. I think we did ourselves. It's our exceeded did what my expectations were and I think I mean. We didn't even expect to have as many Monthly views are listens as we as we do you now so yeah. I think a lot of it's been the guests that we've had on have been really good and we always say whenever we hear an episode that it's our new favorite episode Assoc just because I think our guests are have been really good throughout the year you just had good opportunities to meet people and talk about their businesses which it's something we both like you know behind the scenes type staff yet. It's been great. I really really enjoyed it. Yeah we definitely have to give a big. Thank tour thanks next to our guests because they all been really good on the show and they've always seemed very well prepared and they're so quick to answer our questions and have maybe not the right the answer. I don't know if that would be the the right way to say it but they always have a great answer for our questions that that always opened up new conversations and taking the conversations and maybe a direction that we weren't even expecting sometimes yeah and I think they're usually more prepared than we are so I'll agree with with that but I will say that there are there when they should be prepared to talk about some of them. Some of you know that's their babies. Some of them have been in at the very start of the company or something started even the company so I think it's been key to get to talk to the right people in the companies that have that Hashim whether they were the ones that started or have taken it over or have a key role. I think that's made really all the difference in how good the interviews have gone. Yup and like you said earlier when we were really able to get that behind the scenes look what it took to get their companies off the ground and to the market and what the response on suspended from consumers. I've been really enjoying hearing all that stuff and maybe I should ask you because maybe some people do know and they don't know but this you know beyond the wheel podcast was your idea and you had asked me to be part of it we gave you the idea to come up with a podcast about the RV industry side and not the lifestyle side well. I've always been interested in business and especially niche businesses like like the RV industry industry and I've also been a huge podcast listener for many years. I knew if I was curious about how the businesses worked in in what went on behind the products that other people might enjoy it too so that was the whole idea behind it and then it was just had to find find somebody that balance out my sort of boring tone of speech and so when I met you at the RV summit a couple years years ago now right. It's been what a year and a half probably and I said Oh that's I in that would be perfect or the podcast. I always take offense when you say you're boring because when I'm listening to the episodes I never feel like when I'm listening to your parts as boring at all. I'm always interested in the questions that you come up with. I think we have a different wave speaking for sure. I'm at every station all over the place but you're very more you know just more directed and point but I wouldn't call that Orene. I think the best comment comment that we've ever received feedback that while for me the best feedback that we've ever received has been one of our more recent comments on I tunes somebody said that we balance each other out really well and I think that is another key behind what's made doing this so much fun on and it has made it what I consider a success in the first year and that is that we balance each other out so it makes the show a lot better better yeah. I think when I when I listened back in and like you said from feedback at that balance the episodes have a good amount of flow to them and end. Your Voice compared my boys in the guests voice. I think does really break it up. Nicely and keeps keeps it interesting throughout the entire hour or however long. It episode may be yeah. That's another thing too is. I think we're keeping them at the right length so we're not overdoing it in. We're not giving listeners too little information. I think we really SORTA found that balance and you know we work a lot behind the the scenes to come up with the questions that we're going to ask and do a lot of editing because we mess up so I think we do that. Purposely provide just the right information. Yeah I think so too now. It'd be a good time to for anybody listening leaving the comments. What do do you like about the show. What would you like to hear. Maybe more of or less of or do you have a question that maybe you wish that you could ask every person that comes on here about their business sir about are being or anything like that we love to hear from you and I think that would help us to as as the show progresses to to constantly not. You're not constantly change it but you know keep afresh. Keep it keep it. We won't we don't WanNa keep asking and I think we already do a pretty good job at that. We don't always ask the same questions everybody I know both of us when a guest is about to come on their websites and we researched the person we researched the company and we try to come up with questions at are designed just just for that. I do have a couple of ones though this role in there as well so we buy. This might be a good time to jump into some of our previous episodes throughout the year just highlight some of the the cool parts of the episodes that that we thought the first episode was actually pretty pretty cool. I was thinking about it this morning. Our first guest was from was RV snap pads not only were they they're really we have RV company make a great product but they're also leadership every company is actually in Canada even though they're manufacturing it takes place in the US so it was not only our first episode but it was actually our first international guests. I thought it was really cool. The one cool thing I took away from that episode was that they had stuck with this product for like twenty years in the family. I mean it's a family business in they haven't been working to develop something like this. For many many years they came up with this product. They started manufacturing it and now they have multiple all products and multiple designs and it just shows that you're not necessarily going to be successful in business right away. It took them a long time time. Yeah longtime definitely not an overnight success. I enjoyed that interview. Do and I remember. I don't get nervous anymore. I realized but I do remember remember being very nervous on that very first interview with Devon when would snap which I'm glad now has has when aside and went away and I really I couldn't even tell you what casse about but I guess just fumbling words and you know what it what would the finished product sound like. Devon was a pro with that he I think he said Oh yeah I think he said that was was his first podcast that he ever did and you would never know it was really on point and really helped us alone for I yeah and then he definitely the passion I think what they were doing really really came out and we've had the opportunity to work with them and talk with them since what's that. Yup and it's exactly the same yeah and they're good people and then from there we went from like a physical product then we went over to a digital product which was winnebago life which is like blogging. It's the number one blog for our ears and we talked to bomb the editor there and and she was explaining to us why winnebago wanted a blog like what what was so important for Winnebago to have this blog and why did they want to try to build a community and I write for Winnebago life and I remember while we were interviewing Brooke. She was talking about stuff that I didn't even know about learning. I thought you know for me. I thought while during that interview I was I was on like cruise control because I already knew everything but I I didn't. I didn't even realize some of the talent that we had of writing for Winnebago life or you know how many articles were going going out but I was very invested in that interview who that was a good one too and I like the contrast like right off. The start we had started with a physical product then went into a digital product and that was one of the things that we wanted to do. We want to talk to people services and end the in the products that they make. We wanted to try to console that said I thought that was a really good start yeah and if you look at Winnebago as a company you know they really are. I think more than most customer focused RV company. They really do accept feedback from their customers and actually change products based based on customer feedback. Yeah that was a great episode to really highlight that part of the company. Yeah I agree with you. Every time we go to a show or an event. The winner Bagel is at we see the changes that they're making in there are based on customer response. I think they do a very good job not just listening by making those changes ages. I'm not a winnebago owner so but I still see it. They really are the best I think right now in the RV industry has are as accepting customer feed-back in really seeking customer feedback and then implementing added their products now that was a great great great to and we have more from Winnebago. Go later on in the yard so that you minutes then our third episode is probably one of the game changer episodes for us that that was with the Shaun Nichols from battle born batteries he came on and talked about not only lithium batteries but also solar her and Burgers and really all the components that you need to be self sufficient or unhooked from the grid so I thought that was a really good episode and it it actually got us of sponsorship from Battle Born batteries which was awesome something you never expected and I was just with Auburn a couple of weeks ago. FMCSA rally and they actually recommend our podcast to people that are curious about lithium batteries and a couple people at the fomc a rally came up and said that they were going to purchase at the show batteries based on are episode yet what they learned from our episode so I think that was good because not only wasn't educational about lithium but it it also is one of those companies that started in the garage and has grown into this huge company now that wasn't incredibly audibly educational episode for me because before that episode. I didn't really know a whole lot about batteries and I Bryan ever really thought too much about the batteries except for the fact that I had to keep on maintaining them doing the work on them every month making sure their levels are still and stuff like that but man. Sean taught me so much during that episode and then I remember listening back to it after after you take it in you edit and I listened back to it and I thought to myself while listening to it as I this is exactly what Sean you sean and I are trying to do. This is a game changer type of podcast for me. That episode was the episode that I realized that we are doing something different. This isn't really so much the lifestyle but we're we're getting a indepth view of what it took to build this company starting out in the garage with they did for for marketing in for testing and quality control of how the battery works and how Lithium batteries different than a lead acid battery in that episode just blew me away and that was the episode I went on and on and on. We got something on her. It was really good. Yeah that was a really good episode and I'm glad they still recommend it. The two people who are curious about the batteries and how the batteries work in what they can learn from that episode but aside from that I just thought it was will be here the story about how they started in their garage. They met in business started in their garage in the it's grown into this huge company yeah. It's it's hate to say that. I have a fever. It is definitely one of my top shows since one of my favorites one of my favorites yeah me too and then are episode after that. I guess we should let people know that we purposely designed the flow of the episodes said that we would do three podcasts with the business some RV type of business and then one would be just the two of us talking about various subjects check so that's kind of the flow of how it goes in. We've maintain that since the beginning and I really enjoy doing the epicenter when it's just the two of us so oh that's a fun part of it too just to get to talk about are being because I know Julie doesn't like to sit and talk about being all the time. It's good to have somebody that you you can just sit in bs with and I think because both of us are so involved with RV industry as well when we're just chit chatting on those episodes that don't have guests. There's usually a lot that's going on on on my side with Serena and then there's a lot going on your side. I think they they're always find for us to sit and chat about what's what's going on and then share it with everybody else to hopefully some of them are even educational too. I won't sure they are. They're educational me. I mean I learned all about Eve bikes from that one man you buy their educational for me. Hopefully yeah people do get something out of if not just some entertainment value anyway yeah exactly a little bit of everything then we went from two actual products to sort of an e business with the winnebago life and then we we did our first camp ground which was four paws kingdom which I thought was an incredible episode. I mean I know are saying that a lot but this one was definitely one of my favorites. The owners were just so much fun. Yeah they were grand. You know that's such a unique campground in North Carolina. There that really puts the focus on the pets. They designed that whole business around pets yeah and and letting pets have fun on vacation. I think the way they worded boarded like the campground or the resort is designed for pets and pets are allowed to bring their human companions with them and it's really is set up that way I mean this is a camp the ground I've I've never seen it since where you can park your Rv Open. Your door and you have a private yard for your for your dogs to play in like I've never ever seen anywhere but it is such a great idea and so many people in the RV world I mean they travel with with dogs. It's it's a very popular at to have is definitely have a dog with you. Then they have to eight different ARCS on the pond the exercising parks a leisure park and just all kinds of dog parks and one thing I thought was unique with them. In a big risk that they took that I might not have taken myself was that they made it. No children allowed at just so they could in cater to all breeds of dogs. Yeah I mean that's huge and it's it worked out for them and they really talked us through it about lie. They made some of the decisions they made to really focus on the pets and booked months in advance. I think it is so it's they really made it successful. It's tough to get in there. It's tough to get a reservation again. That was another episode that really gave us that behind the scenes look because the two of them worked so hard at the campground you think online by a campground probably on just austar raking in the money but they work long shifts every day not only are they working in the office but they're out there doing breaking running the heavy equipment to for the gravel role in the stonework. They're making new trails at the park. It is not a sit back and relax type of position but they really enjoy as they really love it good for them. I really enjoyed that episode. They were fun fun that was that was a lot of laughing on that one yeah and then was our. I think our next episode was with Tom at. Jj Lubricants yet wrecks that was a good one too it was something that I had done on my Rv for we interviewed and it was a fluid analysis where we could take a look at cooled samples for my engine and transmission and Wilfred Generator now's able Senate into whom I actually just ordered another kit this morning forgetting just ordered today so I'm on test our transmission again the engine and our cooling this time but you know our Arby's getting up there and miles. It's got like sixty some thousand miles. We've been sitting for a little bit but we're about to do a ton of miles again. I just WanNa make sure everything's looking good and then like I said set your sixty thousand miles. I'm I'm curious about that. Transmission Fluid. I I could probably look it up and see when I'm supposed to change it but I would rather have the flu announces. Tell me if it really does need to be changed changed after that episode. I ordered a kit from Tom and did I found a problem with my coolant system based on his analysis so Mike Coolant wasn't dude to be flushed or change and I went ahead and did it based on that analysis. So it really is an effective product. I think yes snow and I think we talked about it as being similar like when we were talking to Tom. About being similar to have blood work done and like you said you you saw that issues with your cooling so you flushed changed it and replaced it so that down the line you know a thousand miles from now two thousand miles down the road. You're not going to run into some type of big issue. You Cardiac Audet caught it early in able to handle it when he started that business. I think it was really the only people that were doing that sort of exclusively or are veers yeah I think you're right and then we moved into our first business run by Ole time our viewers which was Eric and Tammy Emme from techno RV and since you talked to them they actually started another business pal. Check no trucker. Yup which I think he at during our episode yeah that he hinted at that now that's out again. They told us the whole back story of how they were working in corporate environment and how they found around this business that they can do from the road funny people try to at and it was just a great great episode again deep behind the scenes look at how it got started the reasons why they chose this business to do yeah and I. I thought their business was very interesting too. Because it was a business ahead already ready started. They found it online some way he goes into more detail of how they founded and then they purchased a business as you know it was already up and running making a little bit of money but then they took it and really they really devoted their time in Ford in a lot of effort into the turn it into a even a bigger stronger business which I found really interesting yeah yeah again. It's not another one of those lessons that you can have a business. It's not easy to to make it successful. It takes a lot of work. It's not just sitting back and the leading things happen now. I believe that they they put a lot of risk into starting nap business as well yeah and I think recently they just opened a new warehouse new offices offices for their employees so definitely growing and really get episode now. Listen to to see how it's done yeah yeah it was fun as one and then we we jumped into another online service friendly dot com with Amy Barker. I I really enjoyed that too because when I think of family dot Com um I think of this like a massive amount of workforce and I was so shocked when amy said well it's really just me at the she just recently like hired a couple of freelance glance type of work to help to help with blogging and stuff like that but for the most part like ninety to ninety five percent of the companies just her all by herself living in you know she lives in the RV and get building this database for people to be able to travel with pets and yes. She does live in an RV but it's it's for more than just our beer's. It's anybody anybody has a pet and they WANNA travel. It's finding the hotels that are pet friendly and restaurants and parks and everything and then she talked about how she she got started with writing her book and why that important and and I wanNA say the struggle but at what went into trying to write a book in house chief in our our mind she thought oh I got all these logs on tournament. Oh Book and she thought I never thought it was going to be so that that was a fun story to like the four pounds kingdom they really are passionate about pets earn so it's very good a business for them to for amy to have and I know her husband helps out a little bit but he also does his own business doesn't help for anything for Gopro cheesy and he also was very proud to say that he has never driven the RV either. Oh that's right. That's right out. She talked about that on the episode and there are via's hard to minced because it's they got it wrapped in go pet friendly probably the one one of the most unique paint schemes on harvey out there so they're hard to miss when you see. Annette School and actually the funny story with that episode is right before we recorded it we had already booked her as a guest and Julian. I pulled into this small. RV Park down in Big Ben Texas where like nobody would think of running into anybody else and they were parked there. A couple sites down from us so that was really cool small world. It's unbelievable how that happens where he's running the the people and then maybe I'll run into again and right before the go pet friendly episode. We did another company that sort of unique to travel trailers first and that is hitch port. He's just a again a small family business mostly him in his life. They were tired of lifting up of the pieces pieces or the tow bars and such or hitching up travel trailers so he designed a new product to make that easier for storage and for moving living in a unique product that I probably would have never thought of very simple product Mary inexpensive but works great for owners of Travel travel-trailers. Yeah I was GonNa say the same thing what I loved about that. Product is just what you said. I mean it's as simple as it could be but it works so well that it doesn't need to be eh you know the products don't always need to be complex over thought and over designed but yeah they're just little brackets and you're able to screw them onto your tongue of the eight free what I liked about every two is when we were both home and we sat on our our episodes usually forty five minutes he's like. I don't know Howard on get that. He said that much to talk about but you and I together. I mean we were able to come up with questions. He probably wasn't even thinking would be interesting but it was a great episode and I think that other memory I have of that episode is that was the first guest we had that asked us has to be on the show that was a big moment in our beyond the wheel business yet if somebody found us and was like it was still relatively early on maybe halfway through our the first year but that somebody had actually found us and contacted US instead of the other way around was definitely a big youth and then after go pet friendly was a business that I absolutely love after getting it which I had it before we talked to them was micro air and the easy start products for the RV air conditioners. I think we're both curious about why air conditioning companies manufacturers there's don't automatically add this onto the AC's but they don't and this company came up with a way to to allow you to run your AC. We see for a short period of time off of your inverted and solar panels and batteries. It was a cool product one. That is needed if you're GONNA had do any sort of offered camping in that in the hot weather we have it on Ara a C. Unit and I'd like to say at we don't use it too much off grid but we like it on on grid because at night with the AC run all night. We don't hear a kick on kickoff as doesn't have that harsh loud bang. It's actually one of the things that I love the most about it. We're actually having some services on recently and the guy was checking our generator and a C. and I don't hear your AC kicking on and I said Oh that's because we have but micro era easy start. I have no idea what that is. I said well I said it's usually may for like off grade purposes that you can start your ac off a three thousand watt in. He's like that's genius. He's like he's like any no something like that. It's just these like yeah. He's like I'm in here listening and I never hear you their presser kick on but I have my meter setup and I can see it dropping down or kicking on through the meter. He's like but I never heard of kick on. I was like I know it's great yeah and although they don't make the claim that it actually helps the longevity of the compressor. I can't help but think that it does just because it doesn't have that jerky rapid rapid start yeah. It's a harsh start without wanted. I mean there's almost like Bang Tillich. I know they say that they have no proof of it helping the longevity but like you you said. I can't imagine that it does or that reason what's next Sean. We had wholesale warranties in that was I think another company that actually contacted us about coming on the podcast. I think you're right and they were really good too. They were big time eye-opener for me their educational yeah they were really good on on the show like you said educational and I think the thing that grabbed me. Lakefront away was the extended warranty and believe this. I'm saying that wholesale warranty. They said they could put a warranty on a vehicle. That was twenty years old. Even is that right yeah and that blew me away. I was like oh I thought for sure. It couldn't be more than just a few you know. I was thinking a couple years because you know you've figured your your warranty that comes with a brand new rb one years Pretty Standard Dander if you're lucky maybe you'll get a two year but these guys are offering extended. Warranties won't vehicles that are twenty years old. I'm like manner taking a big risk right there in my book and the other thing that I thought was neat about them is if you're thinking about buying an RV particularly a used RV I think if you you are thinking about getting a warranty through them or the they'll pay for the inspector to come out and take a look at the RV that episode even if you're not considering an extended warranty this moment in time. It's good to listen to just for the education about how these products were and EH. What coverage is you should be seeking and it was just a again much like the battle-worn episode. It was very educational so now's Jamie we now. It's Jamie yes I Jamie episode so we had Jamie Sorenson on the show and we actually have Jamie on twice now Jamie so he was such a great gas. We brought him back but Jamie works for Winnebago. He was doing the specialty beagles which is why game on and the first time which are the the accessibility enhance vehicles and when it bego things that we learned was that one when Bago was doing it for forty ears we had no idea that they were making vehicles like that for so long but he was really coming on the show to let us know that they were making them available for dealer stock and that you would now. I'll be able to walk into a dealer and actually see it in person and have this bill and buy it because before that the wait time was over a year of you wanted to get started started in our being and if you were in a wheelchair or something like that you had a long time to wait before you could have this product designed made and now because of the dealer stock option you could walk right into a dealership and pick one off the lot. I know that you and I really enjoyed it because we're like now. They're trying to make are being for. Everybody made accessible everybody. They still had the option. You know if if the one on the Latte did not work at they still could make the the custom ones for you as well. That was still an option. It's not like they did away with the custom ones and we're just doing dealer stock though they can still make you one of you if you need it as part of that episode so when we went to RV show in Salt Lake City is that where it was Salt Lake's Salt Lake City Utah that was a lot of fun to Yup. We actually got to get a tour with Jamie of the accessibility enhance or zero four thirty four t and that thing was awesome is. Oh nutty. It's annoying favorite Arby's. I said I remember saying the Jamie like these features that you're putting in these. RV's I would like some of these features. It had a huge bathroom. Have a shower was humongous. He's like a spa in there. It was easier to get around the bed. that dining the dining table that Kinda slid out and made room for somebody to be able to use their wheelchair at the end of the table but I was like well. This would be nice. Just add more chairs it you know yeah and the cover over the stairs where you enter. Asha that was nice actually made more floor space now and that was another thing. That's very simple but man. What a difference you. We'll have a little bit extra floorspace now. It was it was good. It was nice meeting him in person it was it was great to have him on the show. I really enjoyed that episode a lot and we did bring them up and we did bring. I'm back again to talk about the electric vehicles which is an episode that you and I think look forward to her mum or the effort very long longtime when we were finishing up the interview was the first time we said. Oh we would like to have you come back on for the all electric big on he was like Oh sure and you and I were like we're coming away and I think even at the show when we saw him a Salt Lake City. We started asking him questions in person about the all electric vehicle then we were like I will make it. We should save some of these for free actual show. I think we asked him about twelve questions on person yeah and I think the thing with that electric vehicle is even though it's not for recreational vehicle use yet winnebago really is making a lot of progress on perfecting that all electric capacity yeah so I think soon we'll be able to see it in recreational vehicles because I mean right now. They're using it for lead donation. I and a lot of different medical uses I think they also have some educational vehicles like classrooms and things so again another that episode on the electric vehicle I thought was very educational as well about how they're building it and what modifications Asians they're having to make to to get that chassis built right for that again. One of my favorites was cool also to see all the partnerships involve a partnership with Ford and with motive. I believe it was an now. They're partnering up with. BMW for a different style style battery in and push things a little further and like you said you know it might not be for recreational abuse today but because they're doing all this on commercial end yeah you're right. I you know I agree that. We will see it in the recreational side as well. It's also good. That's also a good episode like you said that'd because they he talks about the partnerships any talks about the challenges that they had with with making it that it just goes to show all the work that goes into making some of these vehicles for us to go out and play with it has a lot of time goes in Bob the NFL and that's true for every I think for everybody that we talked to is very surprising to hear how much prep time goes into a product before we even get to the first rendition of it yeah and then probably our most unique interview and I think the first interview that we ever did together in person Hurson actually sitting side by was with toby the CEO Koa when we were at the RV vets and that was just to I don't even explain it. I mean we're just sitting on the floor in the Koa booth at our vieques and having a conversation and it was almost like we had talked to her several times before yeah very it was a very relaxed setting. It's actually my favorite episode because we did get to do it together. In person and we never that never happens. It hasn't happened since it never happened. I enjoy just sitting with you and actually and having the guests to with all all at the same time the kicker for me is definitely that we have the CEO of Koa sitting on the floor occur at the RV show but she was so great to have on she was so relaxed and like you said it like a conversation. Eh with somebody that we we spoke into before and we'd never met her until that day and you're like five minutes before we started the interview and we never talked to her before for that before that day and even our emails with Koa weren't with her. They were with somebody else. So I mean that was right. There was the first time we ever met her. Solar Solar Stoke spoke to her and it went so well it was just so fine and what I guess what I learned from from that episode. I always try and take something away from. I'm from all of our episodes in that one was how much. Koa is doing not only to accommodate more our ears but also other tights of campers like tent campers and motorcycle campers and for me. I didn't realize that the campgrounds on Koa were concerned with the environmental impact as well. You know that they were building sites that have shade with panels and the panels would be you know solar color and and to be thinking that far ahead with their interactive -ness of the campground being able to make more comfortable for people by ordering things on our our website and you would have your products instead of going to the Camp Store and picking up your firewood in your it'd just be there waiting for you when you arise from you checked in yeah and then I guess the other the other thing that I learned that I should have already known or as long as I've been are being is that there's three different types of Koa and the amenities amenities differ based on the classification of the Koa. I never knew that I thought that was good too because they made a different type of campground for every the type of travel whether you're on a long trip and you just need that one little quick overnight stay if you're looking for a destination type of thing where you want to be there and feel. Theo have that real resort feel like you had at Tucson with the far and the hot tubs in the pool whenever I mean just everything you could ever want to do you know be in that spot and and then they have a little bit of a something that's like in between that young you got the pool and hot tub but maybe you don't have to walk. I think it's cool that they offer so many different choices that was yeah definitely in Mike Chop twenty-five episode what it off the market then after that we had on a a unique business that has been family run for many many years and that was the escapees organization may actually have on Travis and Melanie any car just talking about the history of escapees about lions started and how it started with a their grandparents how they worked worked in the company and eventually were able to take over the leadership very interesting to hear the history of that company and all the years that it's been going yeah. I really liked that one a lot too especially the starts of it how it just was a newsletter to begin with is it that's all escaping was when I started it was just the newsletter and now to go from that to what they are today with all the services they provide and then not just the service they provide but they go to battle in a sense. I guess to our viewers with legislation and make sure that a land is not being taken away an Roy fight for the RV is. It's an amazing company. It's amazing and do you know your company. When people are getting your company logo tattooed on their body. I know several people that have escapers tapers tattoos didn't know that now so I can discuss to show that you are very big influence in the industry when people are getting your your company tattooed on their body. That's a new one for me. I didn't know that show that was brought up in the interview but now it was I wish was what was next after that was adjacent arose from better for your it was Hutch Mountain Okay Clayton Hutchinson who we met at court site. He does this really cool thing where he can take Honda Generator and he made a conversion kit that will allow ought to run off of propane so it's more environmentally friendly. It's actually a little bit less expensive and you don't have that generator smell when you running it. I know that's a big problem at a Lotta can't sites. If your neighbors running one of those portable Honda generators you can smell the fumes. I remember Kenny Court site. You were actually standing right behind the generator incident smell at all not at all. I mean we were outdoors but even still uh-huh I couldn't smell it also transfers to the idea that it's Ernie cleaner so it's not coming up your carburetors or anything like that so it's on like increase or decrease the amount of maintenance needed and probably increase the life of the the generator. I thought that was very cool very creative fix it also sobbed an issue issue of gasoline goes bad and you're using your generator as a backup emergency and filled with gas and everything and your guests goes bad that your generator won't started started. I never even really thought about that too much right. It would cost that but the program won't do that so when you need that generator to work it's going to work. You don't have to worry about carrying in gas cans. I mean almost every RV unless you have one of those high end. Electric Electric argues almost every RV has propane yet and again. This was a business that he took a risk in created this product and it's a growing business catering to not only our viewers but he talked a lot about ice fishing and and other areas where this could be applicable de that was a good episode and that was another episode that was a lot of fun for us because that was at the rex also and I sat down we were at a table talk directly in that was fun just to be be together in that that room then it was better for your now. It's better for your okay. So then we spoke with Jason Rose from better for your and they'd make actually I'm drinking out right now. They make. I always have this. Ma with me yeah well. This one's the tumbler but I have some learn. I have their mug. They it makes stainless steel. Drink wear and you would think oh what's the big deal. It's just a Mug or cup but man sure remember how much detail went into and how much thought went into the cops crops in how how the felt on your live and how much it should be shaved to and what it should be the Diana when you grab an old old aqap house hall. It should be a the weight fact that it's like hollow inside for the installation. I was completely blown away when he was so when he's talking about all this the crowd it's incredible how much information he gave us about all the details that go into making a cup credible unbelievable the handle and how the handle shape should be where your fingers and wellbeing and off it was just it was ridiculous. Actually just how much went into it and this could media company. That's completely. I know some people are saying well. Has that related to art. Being it basically can replace all your other drink wear. It's never GONNA go bad. It's pretty lightweight it does you know keeps things hot and cold and they really loved the RV industry they we lived in Australia but they come to the US and RV Renton RV and travel the country so they just really loved the RV RB industry and have connected with several RV organizations and really are advocates are being again interesting company yeah and I think it's a great product for for rbm three and I both liked the mugs lot and like you said they're they're lightweight. They're very durable. I know weight is something that we'd certainly we just had Arbi Wade the other day. We're actually luckily five hundred pounds underweight but that's not always the case so you know the fact that they're light and and not only that they go on hiking with the cup. You can clip to your your waist in the so light. You don't even know it's there yeah that was that was a very technical interview. Interview was very educational on what goes into cut manufacturing and ends and they were a little different too because they used at Kazakhstan. FBI program they're manufacturing it and then Amazon. I don't even to be honest. I would have to go back and listen to the episode again because can't remember all the details of how that program worked and and how an Amazon company operated yeah and that was our longest episode as as well yeah well. There's a lot in a lot of detail on that episode. It was a lot of fund is funny to because rose it said said oh a genius citizen the interview she said this privately or separately she said. I just loved that American accent 'cause Jason. Arosa in Australia and Angie site compared to our boring way as as you gotta become you guys sound then then we we talked with RV with me. RV WITH ME is to meet was a very unique service because he was providing not not just locations make it a little easier to find a campsite to stay but he was also providing areas where somebody would have an Rv e and you could kind of rent out their rbm was like Airbnb you would contact that person they would have the RV in location already. You would just drive your car to it and ran out there. RV for the weekend or week. I thought it'd be a great way for people to almost like do test runs with are being if they've never done it before be like Oh. I can test out this RV. I wouldn't have to have the stress of drive in it or setting it up for. You know it'd be in. It's the thought you'd have to I know that but at least you didn't have to tow it behind you or that was a class-a or try to maneuver it down streets if you're on weary of it and I thought it was is a pretty cool service yeah and if I remember right the owner of Rv with me he had owned two golf courses or two he sold them and he just decided added the start up this website with the service and it started growing yeah because it is very frustrating to try to book campsites online. Monday usually have to call or leave at e mail and then they get back to you but his site allows you to connect with the campgrounds and make reservations all all online and make a little more more streamline a little easier golf courses wineries farms okay so after rb with me we we had on another very cool product that was started by a young man who was actually given this idea by family friend Dan. He just took off running with that was trailer ballet. I remember we saw him. The first time we've ever seen this was at the show we were walking by hi and he was operating the small little what looked like a tank but it was towing a trailer but it was so little I mean it was bigger than a shoe box but it was was tony around this little travel trailer and we stopped and had to talk to him about it and ask them about it and we learned that they did more than just that they had ed. I think it was called exile crow. I can't describe their hard to describe them but it really makes the weekend. RV`er the part time our beer it really makes their life much easier when it comes to storing their RV at their house are in tight places or having to move of it and be able to see all around you because this product really makes it easier than having a hooked up to your vehicle and backing at around yeah I thought I I think it made it safer as well. I like the way that it connects sets out and like you said that it gives you a very good visual view of of where you're moving it and I think he he said it was able to the one that's motorise was able to go up some ridiculous incline deeper than we would not and it didn't even have to be a smooth it could be gravel or or yeah yeah. That's pretty amazing. What and people are just way smarter than me. I don't know how they think of these. The thing that I thought was like I said a family friend gave him this idea and he like made a whole company out of his rank with yeah. I thought that was very cool to another application. I wonder how we should've asked them. I guess but I didn't think of it at the time but I just saw somebody here at the campground that we're at Saratoga win their car on on a Dali after they get the car off the Dalai they unhitch the Dalai from the RV and then move the car in front of the Dalian and used the car to move the the Dalai. You know what I mean really doing a lot of net gain connecting and thought about how people move these Dali's these car Dali's afterwards and the last time they make you you can't leave him in the same spot Jarvi so you have to push mops separate yeah. That's a good point. They had to bring this one over off to the edge the campground are they weren't allowed to have it at their site so yeah just like you said. I would imagine that their product work for something like that because it worked for not just your Veenstra but for boat anything with a trailer two car trailers every all types of errors and we're pretty cool product who we have on after that Sean. Your your memories better mind Joe Russo Go. I liked having Joe and that was a lot of fun and I think people when they hear the name Joe Russo if they don't connect the right away he's from Worthy Rousseau's and they have a popular youtube channel. He wasn't on to talk about the Youtube Janet he he came on as an author and I don't think this is something that everybody knows you've written one book writing his was in the process of releasing the second book. I know I read the first book founded very inspirational and the book is about Rv life you know what motivated them to get into the RV and I I just Their story was very inspirational very helpful to other people about are being but he came on a really talked about again like behind the scenes of what it took to write that that I look what he learned from the first Lok implied the second book we talked about marketing and how the editing process was so different from the fun did the second one because the first one is wife. Did all the rereads getting any so that any was. I was driving her nuts. I guess so then one he hired somebody. How do you know who to hire. The got a lot of great information on the strategies and tips for a first time writer compared to season writer. It was just fun to have on. We did a lot of Joe and I think the cool thing about that episode. The one thing that I took away from it as sort of a learning principle was the the importance of a mentor because he said he had been working on that book the first book like toying with it for a while and then he met somebody who sort sort of took him under his wing and he ended up writing the book very quickly after you've met that person I think that shows the importance that so you know you can't sometimes it's not possible to do it all on your own. You need a little extra motivation or education to get something like that going an I remember him saying I think it was like within ninety days or something after meeting with that other writer he finished that first draft of the first a game changer for that's that's a good point where you said you know you can't always do everything on your own and I think that's something that he learned on second book also because the first book him and take everything on their own and on a second folks he did hire helped yes so even something that you think is a one person job. like writing a book. It really does take a team of individuals to make it successful yeah definitely and then we talked to Jamie again. We've discussed the electric vehicle episode which I'm sure we'll have Jamie on again because he's just a lot of fun to talk to you. Then our our last guest or the year it was pro tanked the fire suppression product this product was actually born out of the race car industry as as a way to help put out fires in race cars they found the application works or different parts of the RV so we have these propane refrigerators that are prone to fires in burder our engine compartments lots of different areas areas where you could have a fire and this product is sort of. I think of it as a set it in forget it type of product. I mean you install it and it's a special type of chemistry that expands as it heats up and it's in a plastic to once he gets hot enough that plastic ruptures and that's out the fire takes care of it immediately and the thing I like most about it is that it's something that you don't even need to be be aware of or be there for it now. There's no everything's automated and again another very simple design. It's not like it's the chemical were or anything like that. It's just you listen to the episode. You'll hear more about it but it's so great at work. You're sleeping at a work of your away from the rb it. It just works all whenever whenever needs great if you have like you if you have Bell Union Sabrina ran out and bell's home and something happens. It takes a little bit of worry away so that was our year. Kenny and it's amazing. I think not a bad episode in the bunch so far. We've learned something from every every each episode. It's my favorite thing about doing. The show is just how much we learn and. I also feel like we're because we're talking with these people we almost almost got our our fingers on the pulse and sometimes we know about products that are coming down or or or maybe just about to get up here like this fro- tank. It's very yeah very very new to the market trailer valets very new to the market. I'm trying to think of some of the other things that were very. I think even battled born batteries was still very very new and they're a hot item right. Now I mean there are like everybody talks about about a warm batteries now everywhere we go. We see them so it's it's. This is just a lot of fun to see everything that's going on in the RV world and you just it's amazing. Just how much is going on. That was our our first year. We had twenty four twenty eighty five episodes and we already got great guests lined up to start our our new year her so it's just amazing how much goes on all the products out there services and things like like that. I love learn like it's gotta be my favorite well. We hope everybody enjoyed the episode and we will catch you next time. Safe eight travels everyone this episode is brought to you by battle born batteries the best name and the RV and marine industry these lithium batteries are designed and assembled in the USA say backed by a ten year warranty the best solution for your battery anxiety so go check them out at Paderborn batteries dot com.

Rv Winnebago USA Jamie Sorenson Sean RV Marine Industry Arby Kenny Court Ford Rv Open RV Park Hashim Orene Lithium Jason Rose FMCSA Shaun Nichols North Carolina flu
S4E9 - Hashashin's Creed

Pressure Points

54:01 min | 2 months ago

S4E9 - Hashashin's Creed

"You guessed pressure points with your favourite sneaky hosts. I'm d and mrs my supersecret spy. Aj we're hitting season four episode nine hashim's creed now sponsored by ubisoft. Podcast enterprise find us on instagram and twitter at point so fresh damn you tried really hard not to make the double takes there fantastic. I threaten me again to put it on the on the podcast. Now you're double takes jahmai fuck fuck. Fuck don't turn. We really should though couple of i mean we have like a cache of twenty videos of fuck ups and oh shit. Great there were like. Oh let's put this on youtube and we never never have if i can make a robot convert the audio clips into video. Then i would do it. But i'm too fucking lazy will the makes two of us. Yeah so how is your last Week or whatever it was good not not too bad since we last record it Anything nothing new got fucking got land offer offer to buy some land was sold. We're going to buy. Ppe headquarters in the middle of a desert. Yup we're going to use it as our front. Yes our laundry laundering front for the like six dollars making. Hey they want those taxes. They want those taxes Nothing that i can really think of. Yeah it's because you don't fucking think. Yeah i mean i also don't do anything. Yeah oh i bought a gopro charging just fucked around that a second ago. Yeah it's You know probably never going to nothing that we record is ever gonna make it out there but if it does you'll know and trust me. It may be lad maybe record some p p adventures which should be Let's say every every month every couple months we'll throw some pictures or videos. Whatever the fuck we do. At least while the weather's good will try to go out to some some abandoned places some minds and shit and you know what the fuck else are. We doing this. Hellscape I did do something slightly adventurous today. I'll really yes so. Aj is you know. You ordered groceries and Somebody somebody switched out god that already list. He coconut coconut creamer. Yeah like like an almond joy. Coconut creamer They said oh wasn't available so they grabbed the next closest thing to almond joy. Coconuts and aj received fruity pebbles. Creamer we put it in a coffee is that what's it called. It's klatches house blend. So we see fancy coffee. Remakes fucking fruity pebbles with closures house. Blend coffee and it tasted more chemical than if i were to do fucking lipids with a butane lighter. It was fucking terrible. Oh my god oh tasted like dog. Shit i don't know what the fuck you would mix that with Thirty pebbles maybe. Instead of milk creamer can mix it with in soak some bread. Yeah oh god. Oh i don't know maybe mix it with water and have some water down milk looking this like normally the substitution are fine. You guys want me. Let us know. We'll miracle in an envelope was but you need some critical thinking skills like one of the substitution was instead of shredded sharp cheddar. They got me mozzarella in you know like go. I i guess. I'm just too. I guess i'm just too buji. I haven't gone through any pebbles sweetener ditch. I haven't gone into a store in like a year. So maybe i'll boozing time you and i went to a store is when we get stuff for the. Pp cider yeah. I think so. That's gotta be it up but damn it was. If you guys are curious. I recommend not buying it. just read. how bad it tastes was not worth paying money for the garbage so now that we got all that out of the way now the moment. You've all been wanted one you've been waiting for christ. Oh there's a yes. There's been some leaks from from soft about their next game. 'hashassins reno no no none of that at all a no. We're we're actually making a large switch. Where becoming a gaming podcast gain. What would you even talk about like I really liked halo. Two's dual wheeled 'send. Jeez that's that's all the my knowledge. There was no better story than barbies. Granted venture on. Ps one no. No even better was the captain crunch game. That came in the cereal box for no no way that. Do you wanna know better. What the fucking checks mic checks makes the checks game. You got the cd. Cd-rom yeah The like it was your breaking into and trying to protect checks headquarters from an evil slime of brain slugs. I don't know what the fuck. Irc's s no. I got game was credible. Probably a pajama sam with the carrot. The carrot with the mask on honestly if if it runs on dos. It's fucking. Jim have already pro alone. That's the only line that is bend drag onto my head from me and my sister which is to each other and pajama on end for hours hours. So now i just remember that. I think you're playing with a toaster. And you say have already. And he says provolone provolone. Yeah kettle of that is not what we're moving towards okay. So we're going deep on this one. Let me zoom into my notes a little bit more. My grandpa is can't do this. This area google god. Two hundred historically accurate episode. We've ever done potentially find out. I think so. And i think this is the oldest that we've done so far really okay. I think so. I can't remember any ancient history well to be fair after we do an episode. We both clear for more memory. Oh yeah you can ask me Question about any episode. We've done before this. Even if it was last week she go. I can't remember what we did. And i go. Oh that's what it was the second night. What's ex raft really. Oh i swear. I do a podcast. I just don't remember anything about it. None of it all right so today. We're going to be talking about the hash shushing pretty much. This is where our modern day term of assassin comes from. It started with a term hashing. All right. so we'll we'll we'll show. Yeah how it gets there. Hopefully you know what hashes how she she. Yes yes she so in ten ninety lou. Old on yeah. Ten ninety zahn ibans. Saba was fleeing from the turks setting the scene. I like to imagine that he's running through the desert just q. Epic music he. just sprinting. Is the the start of three hundred perfect exactly sweet now that we're in in the mood so the because of all those apps zack snyder. This is this episode of directed. By zack snyder. So he basically. The turks saw this dude as a religious earth saw him and his religious group that he had started as a threat. Because this dude was recruiting some other people kind of from the common religion in the area. And at the time i thought you were gonna sneeze. Non william back all lean back. Lean back bola wires. Just just do a quick not june so they don't hear anything that's fine so basically. He was running away with a small group of followers when he came upon the citadel up in the mountains on the top of a mountain and he captured it like it wasn't super well defended because they're super hard to get to. Yeah and it wasn't really from the middle of the fucking desert well. He was on top of a mountain And yeah it was called Matt allen not a auto l. a. l. a. m. a. ut almonte. let's call it almonte alam. Its in northern persia. It's pronounced the alamo and he called it his best. I have a little note. Here that says hitler had no creativity was about to say. I mean that's cool. And all. But hitler did it. I did it. I in the ninth hours in my thirties later. He definitely did it. I oh and sixty to ninety to ninety. Yeah so it was his eagle's nest super well defended Citadel seventy five miles west of tehran at ten thousand feet above sea level so he uses and pretty much immediately earned the name the old man of the mountains because he lived there. I wish i could be called that. Oh yeah he would. He began to recruit at this point. Basically the turks were like all right. Fuck this guy. We're not gonna we're gonna try to seize your fucking castle. Ten thousand feet above sea level. It's pluck the turks had higher army was me like i have to fucking hike up their nat me wins defeat i've admitted it. Our it surrendered where are white flags so he started to recruit from the area some Shiite muslims to join his won't will soon become a fanatical cult. Oh it's also a colt episode. Oh hell yeah. So his he named his. Dot's the fettuccine fate. Again they were at holy warriors. Kennesaw there's some little bit of indoctrination going. We'll go into that a little bit. They weird this is the middle eastern crusaders so they actually work with the crusaders and against a lot. In fact i'll start off so one of the very few times they actually worked with the crusaders. The hashish were basically. Okay count henry of champagne visited their stronghold basically to negotiate a deal the crusades were going on and they wanted to knock off a couple of people locally and so he. He's walking around with us and he says you know he basically says hey are other rumors about your dudes true. Like half fucking crazy they are. Is this true and instead of answering he's just said no that's ios these not a part of it. I actually this part is one of the scenes in assassin's creed the first one. Oh see. I don't know i've only played one and we're not gonna talk about it it. Yeah it's fine because this is in one while you're good i'll get hate mail so he Instead of answering hassan just points to a watch tower with two assassins or hasha sheen to fade again. Walk out and jumped to their death. What yeah in the game. You jump talk hay bale but they were just completely ready to put down their lives for him No at a point actually happened was they had slid the bale of hay underneath and they were like. You're good to go. We'll we'll be set for tomorrow and he comes out he goes yet. You see those two guys over there. They're going to jump to their deaths. They turn your other like we got this and then they landed in a hay. Bale snap their necks just at that moment. A farmers like oh my god free. Hey takes the cart boom to did 'hashassins definitely. That's that's what happened. yeah. I'm i'm bogart ing episode. Yeah hey that's fine. You always do. What's new so always had you with those hypotheticals pop the hypothetical that wasn't a hypothetical with my historical facts interpretation of there. You go all right. You're revisionist asshole. Vipul re wrote. Rewrote perfected coby king translated. So he would you know that. That was kind of one of the one of the stories. I wanted to throw an early about them. Just to show you the level of indoctrination that were building. Yeah so has has on would go down into nearby towns. Basically by poverty stricken boys. Oh from their family and he would put them into camps all together and train them as suicide. Commando would you say. He groomed them. He one hundred percent groomed him. If he was on youtube he he would have grooming charges. They could stop at the same time as training them as soldiers he would spiritually indoctrinate them. He slowly would convince them that. The teachings of islam were incorrect and they were misled about the teachings of mohammed. And that the only way that they could reach paradise is in obedience. Blind obedience to hassan. Because he is the true incarnation of god on earth. You know where we fucked up. Where did we fuck up. We should have called this episode. The middle eastern. Joseph smith bah. I told you we should've done the episode before the intro now. We're you know what put in the tags we don't be the it'll be the subtitle. Oh damn that pretty good all right so so he basically convinced. I'm just double checking He convinced them that their god still existed but it was a wrong interpretation of it correct. Basically he is the incarnation of god on earth. That he was he is located carnation of god he early on it was basically just a some camps around and then if they kind of went down the path of this if they tried to pursue his path and they believed him then he would bring them up to the to the citadel. Oh okay but at the same time. He was training them suicide bombers essentially without bombs like he was training them to fight until they're dead bombers and that that's a really big part of it like this is basically where the idea of suicide warriors came from. Oh there's not a lot of documentation of it before this. Oh wow jesus so we can blame this guy for nine eleven there. We did it here. I what god okay. So moving past that hot take. It's a spicy. Take this episode very spicy take. I'm sorry i haven't even even better. So yeah he unfiltered raw opinions of aj one one of the things that he would do to indoctrinate some people to convince them that he had these powers are fantastic. Like we could have thought this shit up. He would have little to no effort or he had one of his assistants. One of the fettuccine. Who's already very devoted. Dig a hole in front of his throne. Okay then that fettuccine would go into that thrown into that whole k. Hassan would throw a carpet over them with a hole cut in it and poke his head out and then put like a tray that was cut in half for the whole cut in it so it looked like it was a head on a tray. Then we pour blood over it. So he's egging like that just allusion. Yeah he's like okay now just you can breathe but don't do it loudly exactly. You're not god dude your nose. Oh my god. that's amazing. Really hilarious so then he would bring to. This guy is like this. do it on my back. Oh yeah all across the back. Yeah so he would. Then have you know five to ten new recruits. Walk up to the while. He's sitting on the throne. And say i have all these powers given by god. Because i am the incarnation. I can control the angels and death itself and then he go whoever could ever whatever and the guy would wake up. Come back to life just the head and say where's my body. He'd say this is the paradise that i saw. After following this man that he has cartons of milk and honey rivers and women everywhere in willing to do whatever the fuck you wanted and and you can only do it. I learned from the angels. And from god that you can only do it by following this man. The only problem mesa the afterlife. You're just you're round from the neck up. That's the only problem. I don't know if i'm sold. So then they go and then he goes all dead. That's what he said but dedicated and that has to be like here is i. Here's my proof to you. You want to join and they'd be like oh my god. Gosh we're in one hundred percent in we would have. We would've been such fucking scam artists. If we were born five hundred years ago yeah easily. I mean we still are currently sorry for those of you. That are actually paying for episode. I appreciate it. We appreciate it but you got jinked. So we At this point all the people are like oh yes. We're joining they're talking like. Oh my god this is crazy and after they leave the gets out of the whole fills a back in and then gets beheaded and then they put his head on a stake so that they don't see him around laser giveaway. Oh that makes sense rather than just saying you fused head back onto his body he to be honest with you. If i were running this. I would have just made him put on like a fake mustache. Right yeah easy peasy. If they're going to believe that. I brought a head back to life. They're going to believe that. I was my brothers twin. And he fucked up fantastic so already. This is the kind of level of indoctrination that you get away. Will i love this. Oh another thing that he did and this was so extra. And i love it because remember seventy five miles from the nearest like big city essentially ten thousand feet above sea level and this dude created a secret garden in the eagles nest. Ooh okay. it had rivers of honey and milk no passed down the rocks and then he would just pay a bunch of prostitutes to live in the secret garden so far so good or a. My question is what's source of the milk. I don't like this prostitutes in the guard. Errol's just barrels and barrels milk the bring with them about pack mules. Sounds like some milk. Maybe i don't trust it. Well some nice some nice warm body warmth afternoon bilk. Ooh nice in the sun with some honeyed. It's drizzle riverbed. Just spit out. The big pieces spit the pebbles chunks. I got true we gotta chunks chewing on so you know i made this beautiful paradise on earth little oasis that oh yes mountain so basically he would say oh. You know those five to ten people who are like yes. We'll join. he'll say okay. Come back this evening and author feast for you so they would be sitting down. They'd be feasting and he'd break out the hookah booking blazed on somehow sheesh just out of their mind until property much poppy seeds and a poppy and we'd poppies and we'd yeah and he would basically get them to smoke until they patched out sold. I in does this already. Make me apart of the hush hush she well yes yes way. Do you fall for simple parlor tricks. I mean i was mormon for okay. Perfect you're in eighteen years. So they had this fantastic feast. They pass out hassan. And the fettuccine that are already part of it. Pick them up and carry them and drop them off in the middle of the garden. Oh i thought you were gonna say off. The side is like fuck was appointed recruiting up now into garden. They wake up and suddenly they're in this paradise and all the women are there and they'll do whatever the fuck you want them to do this christ and there's a literal rivers of milk and honey and there's fruit and just like superwealthy so you know they'd party for a couple of hours and the process would then produce they would produce I guess not prostitutes. That's not the right term for it. Escort seductresses okay. Whatever it is whatever the women would produce would would bring out more hash and they say are at get smoking until they pass out again and then they take him back they bring him back in and then they wake up and they think no time has gone when really a day is past. Twenty four hours is god by and he has been fucked of. Yeah and hasaan basically says hey. That was paradise. Joel's allowed me to show you give you taste home of paradise so if you to me you follow me and you go on these missions that are if you die during a mission you go there if you survive one of those missions that you're supposed to die on i. My angels will allow you to go back to this heaven on earth this paradise on earth this paradise for a couple more hours of basically hat right there so whether or not they survive the mission they thought they were gonna go back and if they did he would make him smoke until they pass out do the same trick cheese the old switcheroo not bad smart sky knows what he's doing. I'm impressed like there's quite a bit is doctrinal will no longer insult him and say that. He's joe smith because this dude got him beat by tenfold you. Anyway you got no women in eighteen. Yes no women. No drugs was no money. Yeah no breast milk. What the fuck. Maybe no no breast milk from outside the family. I doubt god nothing like mother's breast. Really wake you up in the morning put in my coffee. Grandma's breast milk richer cottage. She saw butter butter at that point. Grandma's butter i should start. Butter company called grandma's butter grandma's breasts. But i can't believe it's not grandma's butter. I know this. So he basically had them in a vice. He was able to convince these guys. Honestly what convinces people better to join your cult. The drugs sex rock and roll like fucking. I'm gonna use it fell khawla. Essentially we've been sponsored official nowhere scout the email we do legally have to say not sponsor that cease and desist. We are waiting for a season and desist but luckily we don't put our address out there. So i don't know how they get it to us. We bought that land. They'd avenue should've into our that would have meant so good. We'll find more art. Okay so Let's see so this point. They were around for over one hundred fifty years this order so in that time basically from the beginning they they never had an army and they were feared by crusaders kings shakes sultans basically any level of nobility at all so his is he still recruiting more people or was he just got like this handful and was like yo be my dedicated dudes at their peak. They had two thousand. Oh shit yeah. I was thinking just like a small coalition of like fifteen guys. Now see the thing is they never had kingdom and they never had an army. They weren't after land. They were just doing missions for people like some guy would come up and say. Hey i want you to kill this guy. And they'd and hassan or one of the other men of the mountain would say okay. Give me money and they just kept doing this. And the thing about the two thousand dollars. There weren't two thousand people like at the citadel. These people would be like a cross ipe undercover working as peasants. Working as guards were as Just any faithful servants for six years. She's just all infiltrating every kingdom in the area like jaw. He was so smart. That's awesome and because hasan convinced the fettuccine that death in the line of duty was an instant transfer to paradise. They fought with no fear of death. They fought with with almost happiness. Like zealotry of sweet. I'm gonna kill the fuck out of all these dudes. Because i'm literally working for god jet and i mean on top of all ready know. Well they believe they know what the afterlife is like. I don't have anything to fear. I've already had gone zero doubts. I've seen it Why the fuck would i be scared of losing my life and it completely gets rid of any kind of questioning because you've been there and and the person who brought you there says you need to kill these people and then you'll go here and you are moral question. Three sticky honey hand jobs like fuck. Yeah seventy hand jobs should have been. The title fucked up the episode. Oh but yeah they make sense that you would put your life on the line if you've already seen what you perceive to be the after and you don't have any moral qualms about killing people. You don't care that you're killing these humans. This is because you were there. Fuck up as we wouldn't think that far ahead. Yeah we just be like oh shit. They're all so baked. And i'm recovering. I'm not gonna pick them up. Falcons hungover asleep them. We'll tell them that was the good night's rest they just too lazy that that is val hala. so yes they. They fought sleeping a beautiful. I i want that so much. Exactly what it is beautiful. Just imagine dirt. Nap your best to sleep ever for eternity. Sounds great bring on the sweet release. Oh yeah so they yeah. They fought without fear death. They mastered disguises. Languages like they would meet together because they would occasionally meet back up at the citadel and different groups and at different times but they would exchange knowledge. They'd say oh you hear about this local culture. I'm going to teach you about this local culture. She's going to teach you this language. I'm gonna teach you this language so these members at the same time as being completely religiously indoctrinated were extremely smart. Well above what they should have because of the just the exchange of knowledge that would happen. That's i mean the should is impressive. I know i've never heard about it because of where it comes from. But it's like it's just crazy. Yes i'm cool shit it's they. I never thought that the that the ss creek games had any kind of historical accuracy to besides like the major events. Of course that you go through or like of course i knew the crusaders were the templars crusaders. Shit were were a thing. But like yeah i don't know the assassins were like the creed of assassins he said. Oh i see what you did that It was obviously not crazy. Historically accurate definitely skirted the religious zealotry based society. Even just the castle the citadel that they start at fine now on you you sound dot com for its injuring are promo code. P p fifteen fifteen fifty nine any any low brightening on sale game Beautiful honestly we should now. You know how good we were to. We would do so good with ads. it's coming. I doubt kmart big lots savers. I wouldn't mind now. Say if i if i get a discount buck. I'm we should try to get sponsored by the church. Wouldn't happen and we should just and see just submit a request just a couple of middle fingers. Canny church legally sponsor is doubt it. But i think would be hilarious. Deadly senator request. Let's do it all right something up. We'll type it up out. Go to best buy yes or target. I'm thinking about target all right. So they basically. Of course assassinations had happened before. This human beings have been alive for who knows how long of course people have been assassinating each other. Just what we do is what sets us. Estimated the monkey brain but the thing that the the fate of did what. They turned assassinations into art. Ooh they would. They would time it perfectly to line up with like a large public event. Oh i was thinking. Like ed gained style. They wouldn't chop people up too much but they would definitely leave a leave a warning their corpses. Sometimes they would just do horrible things like disembowel them horrifically just to scare people because your controversial view husband gets assassinated. He come home from the grocery store and for some reason you have this nice cereal tan colored couch the you'd never had releases beautiful. Oh my god. I recognize that in the Fettuccine fagin yeah mean it's just like sitting outside rubbing sands together. He's like well. I hope they enjoy it. My handiwork has once again been successful. Boom let's go to paradise so the make artwork like they were like eight became. Oh are like it was so well done. I see became art artful and at this point. They're infiltrating estates as peasants as servants as blake. They held basically every position in society below. No nobility o. So they could be anywhere and you knew what would happen. You know where they were when they would strike Let's see so jellinek cancer exactly like cancer. The reputation of the order was so strong that monarchs just everywhere would be terrified to even talk bad against them o- or even acknowledge them because a lot of times they would you know. They don't want a ten year debt because they never knew who was going to who in their. you know. Close friends who. They've been friends with for five. Years would be assassin. Ignorance is bliss. So i've got a couple couple examples You you you you young number now their signature weapon dad. I shouldn't have asked son of a bitch well next week. It's just going to be one host so we're transitioning power change. I'm giving her a placed. Step is so by microsoft. Sam microsoft sam so Let's see i'm not going to go to these names as you all already now but celtics sultan sanjar was talking shit on the assassins publicly when all sudden one day. He just up and made a truce with them because he woke up in his locked bedroom with a dagger in his pillow. Oh right next to his head way. Way more lame than a horse-headed in his bed bundle. It is but but i remember this was years. let her. pp. This was this prior to godfather surprisingly enough. Yeah you most of the stuff that we do is post yeah Let's jesus so dagger in the pillow next to just boop in his royal chambers with guards outside all the doors just stabbed in the pillow. Who've now let's see. There was a theology professor. Who was talking shit about the sex because they were considered extremists and his best student confronted him after class knife to the throat and said take this bag of gold and shut the fuck up or i will murder you in front of the classroom to. I wish at ball set big right. God i could get so much more shit done. Just go get so many more sponsors you talk. Show on pressure points ever again. I will face you on the episode. I will comey saw channel. I will peel europe as Yeah episode. I will heal your face off on our patriae on now. I wouldn't say i will not do that. I have too much of a bitch. And even if i wasn't that much of a bitch i still wouldn't do it unless you push me too far you don't wanna see me with a main god god damn do so i i mean i guess it makes sense. He gave him gold but like then supposedly should. I am art of it. Don't don't talk shit. Don't do we will kill you Bad decision and one of my favorite things about learning about this group was they would pretty much all the time. Play sides of the conflict. Ah whatever it was if they were to sultans fighting over land there'd be assassins in both sides. Oh shaikh because they're not going to assassinate their own people so like their assassins on one side and they're supposed to go kill off this sultan and that sultan pays the assassins and go kill off the other sultan they just kill both who gives. They paid either way like prophet. Yeah exactly stunks stunks up so one one part. During one of the crusades they were really useful because there were there were a couple of internal struggles that were happening in any kind of conflict. Their internal struggles and the sausage were perfect to end it. So like if you are a ruler and one of your nobles is talking shit and you don't like them and you want them to go away but you can't banish them or kill them yourself. It would look bad against the ability to hire the assassins. Yeah come in set him. Set him on the right path. Kim that's what i mean. So the they assassinated. Allot of the crusaders. A lot of them shoes. I love it. Obviously because of their religious stuff but also because there was a lot of power struggles that different christians would correct. Christians would never have our struggle here. I i'm so glad we have otherwise that would have sounded like a good good good. So let's see. There was one event where the assassins were hired to kill. Conrad of mont ferret. What he was a noble started out. Promising until you finished mont for montafir out there and so these two assassins basically put on christian monk's robes and went to a convent and became monks for six months to they lived there for four six fucking months until they finally had an opportunity to kill this dude. They murdered him in cold. Blood in front of a bunch of people made it super obvious that it was them and then during the escape they actually got caught and they were tortured. And through the torturing who the fuck sent you essentially and they fessed up. 'cause they didn't give a shit because they're going to heaven. Yeah his dying in the line of duty so they get funding about to get honey hand jobs forever. Yeah the set so they said okay. Well the people who sent us to kill this guy was king. Richard of england. The lionhearted gaw. Yes so the king of england hired these guys like these. Were fucking legit. Hello yeah it always surprises me. How how far reaching it's like. yeah. I'm the king of this entire country that hates your entire religious group and is currently raising. Your you know the land or near and around. You raping and pillaging all of this stuff. But i'm going to hire you to to clean up my own trash. Wow dude that's oh okay go love. These guys are shits impress. Yeah so so. They had people in syria. Iran persia and parts of europe. Light all over the middle east and europe. They were huge super spread out so between ten ninety when they were officially started at the citadel in the bay probably started a little bit before that and twelve fifty six. So oh god that's like yeah about one hundred fifty years a little little more than a hundred fifty years. They were eight grand masters of the mountain basically when when he died. The entire was on was the incarnation of god on earth so he will reincarnate to his chosen person when they got close to death they basically show is one of the fettuccine and so i will reincarnate into you okay. I was like so. Did he pass along. Hey here my sneaky little parlor tricks yeah ok straight up in fact a lot of the more indoctrinated fedayeen were completely aware of the tricks. They didn't care because they were so indoctrinated That they would fall blindly no matter what they knew. They were digging a hole in front of his throne and new. The secret garden existed because they kept having to go to town to purchase barrels and barrels and barrels of milk. and honey. yeah every week cheeses leasing. There's there's no way the upper like group was going to give shit a new. Didn't know actually there's no way the the upper echelon of these fettuccine didn't know about the shit because somebody had to buy the milk and honey on the process and the and the sex workers like they had to know but They were either too indoctrinated. Didn't give a shit or they were just in on it. Because they knew they had a chance to become the next grandmaster. Hoya like who knows. But i i love it. There were so they were eight of them in twelve fifty six. The mongols invaded the area. No they. They ended up destroying the sects within iran and syria. Not everybody okay. But quite a large group of their people as interesting because they had a lot of similar enemies they could have made extremely useful allies to each other. Yeah the mongols were like. Nah fuck these guys because among were extremely anti-religious. Yeah so they could event like. Could you imagine the mongols with the assassins. She's christ i would have been unimaginable already. More unstoppable than the mongols work. Oh my lord do and two point they actually did work together a couple of times gangs comes a mongo correct. Yeah my wrong. No imagine that son of a bitch fedayeen. I think at this point. It was his grandson. Who was leading the mongols. Okay but even then. I think like he's got some gang. It's oh yeah. I mean we all have. Some blood will fair but yet you. That shit's yeah. Can you imagine that shit. It'd be different planet. go fuck. yeah so they basically. They lost a lot of their shit there other fortresses like at this point if they wanted to they takeover a fortress suddenly. It's assassins out out. Boom like they could do that any time and they did that multiple times. Sometimes they would just be paid in. Here's this four here. You go go sas innate seventy five people fuck yeah the like just kill them and you can take their area because pretty much. Just don't cause problems with us. Yeah or you'll kill us. Well it's it's also a level of Please please take this. I hope this isn't a payment overpay you so that you don't think i'm trying to you. Are there like the like you can take the castles payment. Just please please. Don't come after us. Please so at this point they launched a two year attack on the eagle's nest because it was so well defended it. You know throughout history. This castle has been attacked multiple times but as always super easily defended without fucking high up at high up it is and how like they couldn't light it on fire. Yes i'd also assume that it's like a one road to the top and it's the worst fucking road yeah drawbridge over a crevasse. Yeah good luck getting an entire army across like all the way up there. I think it was two years after the end of the assassins. Marco polo learned in wrote a lot about them. So a lot of this information comes from him. She's but like he. He wrote that they would have to. They would try to use hammers and picks on the roof or on the wall and it wouldn't even dent it wouldn't scratch. It was so strong cheese. The rock in the area was so strong nothing could be lit on fire and there was. There was just a had water and had a shitload of areas the basically throughout the last couple hundred years they had been carving into the rock to make vessels for water and food and all my been stocking up on shit. She's so across those two years they still had plenty of food and supplies and provisions Left to last over five years which is crazy like a lot of reasons. That's a lotta raisins but they That the thing that the mongols had on everybody else who tried to attack the castle as they had the chinese engineers sarin jenner's and giant. Fuck you so. the chinese. The chinese engineers had modern siege equipment. They knew they understood so much. More about engineering about how circumvent this old construction is see but they didn't actually get to that point. They launched some attacks and stuff but they weren't super successful. The thing that got him is the mongols captured the mountain lord just before the siege. They treated him extremely well. Okay extremely well. The mongols were like no. You're you're good like slightly out of fear. They're like actually. Yeah a little bit. We won't completely fuck with him because there's a chance we have some funding sneaky. Boys our infantry. Yeah they were. Uh oh. I totally skipped over this part. When the mongols were invading syria and iran they kept running into people wearing mail chainmail under their clothing every time. They asked him about it they said. Oh it's because the assassins they strike anytime oh my people would just wear chainmail under their regular clothing. She's because they figured anytime. I go into public a target cat. That's wild. yes so they. They captured the mountain lured and they were like hey retreat the people in the cast were like we don't need to even though you have him even if you kill him he'll just reincarnate he's a god who gives a shit so they they kind of held out for a little bit. Eventually they did surrender. It's not super clear. Why because survived for years and years. More it is. They think related to the leader has been captured. Even though they knew the leader was like. Listen i know that this. I know awesome actually a thing so Yom take the l on this and they yeah they. They survived under the mongols. For a while she lost their citadel fucking impressive. yeah. I've been wanting to do a an episode on gangs kong and King kong genghis khan Supachai his little buddy Right hand man. It's it'd be go now. Yeah the episode. Yeah it's it. That's why i've been hesitant but Yeah the they were just fucking ruthless like when you think about Obviously it's only the exact same level but the level of like Ragnar ragnar right ragnarok. I don't know the fucking crazy ass. Viking that they just burned through villages raped their way to like the top. That level of gist savagery in like refusal to stop. Well that was the fucking mongols to. When they captured the mountain base the eagle's nest they killed every assassination there including infants. They don't give a they everybody and you know they they were really good at making a statement but yeah they they ended up surviving beyond. Good the moment. The mongols who were eventually defeated by the egyptian mamelukes okay. Those mongols went fucking far. I never realized that they went all the way. They're all the way to the All the way to egypt lying. I had no idea they went that far. That's crazy i didn't either. I thought they were mainly just like the chinese empire just east. Yeah right but no they. They made it all the way to the gypsum. Mama looks when they were defeated pretty soon after that they were defeated by the mameluke sultan so monologues a bit closer. They were finally weakened enough. That assault could basically say fuck all a you and even though there's not really. It's not really at this point. There's just hiding your like they don't have a citadel. They don't have forts anymore. They're just like in society so they say they defeated the rest of the assassins. There's no way you know they weren't just writing as a peasant somewhere. i mean. it wouldn't surprise me in like they went under covering that Monastery for six fucking months six months yeah applied by the way totally opposite of where they can get different languages yet. It's a wouldn't is if it. Obviously i don't know if it continued to the extent because they didn't have such a fortified Like citadel continued for a couple of generations. i'm sure it was just extra sneaky. Yes super stealthy sneaky shit. I love it. Yeah so fricking cool flip flipping awesome awesome on. That's frigging bras appropriate. Dude brother brother fucking kubrick blue god. Let's go get harleys fucking kill me. That's that's some wild shit and they're still around and they're still around to this day sponsored by ub sometimes if bag flab you go into a dark bathroom and whisper seventeen times. Your house will spun into blocking mountain. Ten thousand feet above sea level. Get into your of one of them. You become one of them. You learn all the languages so the moral of the story is if you're going to start a religious colt get really good at like. Magicians tr- Just simple allusions. Erase everything about joe smith. Skip that shit and go straight to this much. Better cool ship. Oh yeah wake willer. Yeah fucking awesome. Hell yeah. I drink some lesson river honey and sucks him some milk titi titi river milk. This is why we're never going to be so shit like we're never going to get around to it but yeah that's yukking nuts. I love it the assassin that you heard it here first the next assassin creed game. It's going to be based on this. I mean the first assassin's creed game was based on this. Yeah they're going to remake it. I mean i wouldn't mind. I'm pretty sure they already did. A re master. They're going to remake the master out of did play as a man on the mountain. Yeah you just get to recruit What do we decided. They were not prostitutes but really hot bad bitches. Sex workers is that the acceptable term. I i ask every time. We'll i thought seductresses. Yes that's the entire game is up by wander around What persia and gist tehran. Yet you want around iran and recruits seductresses. game is. yeah. Yeah i like that. I'd pay for that. I'd say sixty bucks aaa. There's a leak leak here. You hear it here first. We'll be released. A gameplay footage next week oh god i got three seconds. Twitter's shares up physics by the way My girlfriend is playing. What is it code vein. I don't know some. I don't know what that is It's like a japanese anime styled game and within the first like thirty seconds. I just turn and i was like. Are you fucking kidding me. Because the person like helping her along. Is this big titty chick who her boobs are shaking win. The wind blows. Wow it was just like strong gusty. I mean of course. They're just like it was like they were doing. The wave ten out of ten. That's great oh goodness well yeah. Thank you guys for Listening send us any slide into them. Dmz i hope you can hear my chair when i'm leaving back slow slide into the dmz if you advice questions I shouldn't ben cnn. Couple people message us. Thank you guys who love it. Always feel free to reach out feedback. Even if you think we're idiots by all means tweet. Yeah if you want to. If you're a an editor for the daily mail or no an editor for the daily mail. Sent him away will interview or the new york post. Yeah any any actually any kind of publication at all you finish their own publication. I don't care. I don't care if your own newsletter family newsletter. Talk to you so you can search your mother. Send us your mom's emails and We'll get we'll get back to her. Yeah so You know special. Thanks to all our patrons. You can get a separate. You can check out more pretrial now. Patriots dot com at four slash points. Oh pressure right. I'm pretty sure that's sure and especially things to these nuts. Nordic thunder Dark runner haley. Casey mcface and i'm sure sexual vanilla. We'll be right back. He's not on the list today. He's got he's out. But i i actually know that. He's between paychecks. Right now is a little poor boy. I'm gonna call him out on it right now. I'm going to do things but thank you guys. Appreciated finance on you know insoles liter instagram fug twitter at points old pressure and we will catch you bitches next monday. I don't think you're a bitch.

hassan zack snyder hashassins reno Matt allen ut almonte almonte alam hasha sheen bogart ing Vipul coby king angels army hashim youtube khawla
Expressive Meditation with Pragito Dove

Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

34:50 min | 6 months ago

Expressive Meditation with Pragito Dove

"Welcome to live love. Engage the podcast where we share practical advice from a spiritual perspective on how to create a life and business with more impact influence and income. I'm your host. Gloria grace rand the inciteful copywriter and founder of the love. My mission is to help. Stop doubting yourself. So you can live fully love deeply and engage authentically nama stay and welcome to live love engage. I am gloria grace rand and delighted as always to have a guest on the program today and we are going to have a lot of fun i can just. I can just tell you that that's going to be my sneak. Preview is that we're going to be having a lot of fun talking about meditation. Believe it or not so. My guest today is prog- eacho dove. Who is the global authority vigo authority. I maybe putting words in her out or at least a global authority on expressive meditation and she's also founder of the number one expressive meditation training school and north america. She's an internationally recognized author hypnotherapist coach speaker with over twenty years experience and she helps entrepreneurs leaders and ceos align their mindset to allow more peace time and financial freedom. She shows you how to change your money. Blueprint reconditioning your mind for automatic abundance and use spiritual laws to create real world success in She's been on the stick into luminaries like on gray. Who wrote the mars is a metaphor mars. Women are from venus books. Yeah she also just recently recording this in august she just actually released her newest book called lunchtime enlightenment expressive meditations for manifesting. Peace prosperity and hashim. So with that. Welcome for gaito. Well i am thrilled to be. Hit a damore. Yeah thank you so much for having me why. I'm filled the have you because when i Someone someone recommended me are recommended you to me on the show. I thought this sounds like a really could person to have on. So i'm excited to talk about it so i thought well we're where we would start is to tell me a little bit about expressive meditation. As i've i've done for passionate petition on done just guided meditations. But i've never heard of expressive meditation. So can you explain what that is. yes absolutely. So it's about expression so the expressive meditations take the laughter meditation as an example than. Because i know you wanna talk about laughter as well The idea of the expressive meditations is to express out of audie mind any repressed sadness grief showy laughter anger frustration. Thea because what happens is we repress olie's emotions many of us do i did is how i go into these meditations because i had i had a very difficult childhood an eye repressed my anchor my fair and my sadness and decided to live in my head. It was you know. I just didn't wanna get hurt anymore. But because i deal a lot of suppressed emotion in my body because already acts like his show so and will and will absorb list for us but if we're not careful owning reaches a point just by could come with a cooks where it can't absorb any more for us and that's when the body then goes into this and illness happened to me was because i was also smoking about thirty cigarettes a day. That was another -nother way. I was repressing. Everything is. I just kept having his terrible recurring back pain and it was tension. You know because we tension we claim shop like this. The bodies all chance secrete saugus pain. So when i found these expressive meditations. I was absolutely thrilled. Because for example with the laughter the first stages we laugh. We just laugh off up up up you know. Just start laughing like and What happens is like energetically that opens us up and it starts to release all these. Tensions laughter is incredibly a physical body in terms of releasing tensions. And you can try this show. You will know how to laugh so we don't have to go into that but the more you laugh the more tensions you release in the body and also the more you laugh. The more attention he released from the mind. You can't be worried and laughing at the same time. it's true so so laughter erases worry. Anxiety and fear in those moments when you are totally laughing you become free of the mind and that is that is very exciting idea because you know. Most people with the difficulty with meditation just with their lives is the mind is just constantly sending these judgements comparisons and oh that's never good a were kind of negative. So it's like a sin so when you make laughter a practice every day just pretty easy you know going loot youtube by things to laugh about a comedian or whatever laugh helps to do is break up to dominance of the mind because the mind cannot be putting you in this fiscal grip. When you're laughing it breaks it open because laughed of powerful energy so the first stage of laughter. Meditation is just laughing like yeah. Just don't laughing no reason. It's easy maybe get yourself started with a youtube. Video was some friends and then the second stage is sitting in silence. So it's a very simple technique. What people find is how easy it is to draw down to your center downhill Blow the naval to down to your center silence of peace very quickly after doing a bunch of laughter. It just makes it easier. So that's an example of an expressive technique. Where you express out your energy and then in the second stage is much easier and quicker to joe down to your in silence from that makes so much sense. I because i know when. I've let say ben challenged by something. Something's happening in your life and and yeah and you get all worked up to try to be able to. Then you know they say okay. Just sit quietly and that getting make your mind go blank like that's not that's impossible to do yes it know. Let's say your top you get really angry and frustrated so this two techniques. I'll tell you the easiest one. Judging from is the gibberish. Technique needs to rule in my book. By the way. Could he listening what you do is you closure is put on blindfold is better so the ice don't fly open and then speaking in gibberish jeopardy padilla do any kind of nonsense sounds but not words that you understand right. Just get charlie angry. You just get into the energy of it because what you're doing is you're jumping out. You're releasing it in a meditation context. Because as i know you know if you don't express your anger wanted two things is going to happen either. You're gonna go dump it on somebody else round just to be passing by down the street now. Oh you're going to repress it a neither of those is good so what the gibberish technique office and. This is an ancient technique from the sufi tradition. Actually again in my book is you. Don't how your anger in the second stage when you sit in silence you like taking the lid off the pressure cooker. Vented it all out and then it's very easy to down to your in a silence. And then what happens. Is you get to that. Com- clip place where solutions awry And creative ideas arise to whatever the situation was making you so his stall you though again expressive expressing out first and then dropping down to your silence so it's expressed don't regress your emotions airy good how then just reminded me of i did take like a laughter yoga class one time and it was very good. Very good What oh again remember now have have you ever heard of that. One was something they would go very good very good. Yeah or something like that. Oh but it was. It was a way to be able to kind of get you into doing that. Yes joyful positive energy. Because it's really it's the words report but it's it's releasing the energy from the body mind. That is what needs to happen. You don't get sick and you get you quickly. Find your silence. Absolutely what tell me about the title of that. Because i like how you said. It's lunchtime and enlightenment. So where where did that idea. Come from. A great story This was quite a few years ago. Because this is the second edition of this book along. Maybe ten fifteen years ago. I was invited to give a presentation at a bookstore in the financial district of san francisco. And i almost didn't go. Because i thought will who in the financial district's gonna interested in meditation at lunchtime. You know but i got that there was about thirty people that site okay so i gave his presentation and the The bookstore was so impressed with my presentation that she asked me. If i do a monthly series and we cooled the monthly series lunchtime in light but very nice okay yes and then and then she had to go to new york and she was telling all the big publishing houses about this and I go to col- from ballantine books in new york asking me. Are you gonna write a book. Said yes and so. I wrote the book and there was a bidding war that book actually and i got a very very big advance gets you. Yes thank you so it's just a great story of say yes to opportunities. I always say. I always thought realistic. This is not going to happen. Why bother to go right say yes to opportunities because you never know what leach else for sure. Well good for you. That's that's tremendous. I writing a book myself right now. But i I don't know that. I'll have ballantine books calling me but that would be awesome. So maybe i'll just set intention. I saw you never know right. Never know tell me a little bit about why you believe. It's important for an entrepreneur in particular to invest in themselves and especially a perhaps in investing in in taking the time to learn. You know meditation techniques. Oh well. I'm an entrepreneur. Urine entrepreneur. yes i think. It's extremely important to invest in yourself in your own growth and expansion costs of Ua the business and it's it's actually Amazing how much conditioning we have in mind. Which is not supportive of us being successful entrepreneurs to clear as women you know because we inherit kinds of conditioning and judgments from from our lineage from our ancestors doug and this is this is an easy way to sell sabotage in stub ourselves. So you know. I'm speaking from my experience. And from all the women that i work with. 'cause i i actually only worked with women entrepreneurs in my private practice with hypnotherapy in the trainings. Meditations is the first of all we have to become aware of only conditionings and he'll them change them transform them because we can change the blueprints in the subconscious that will witness so for example. I had really bad conditioning route money. When i was growing up we actually had money against my family. Was just sort of in the middle middle. My mother somehow believe we didn't have anybody. She lifted incredible fear and feel. I can scarcity about everything. Which of course i absorbed and it was only when i started doing the meditations which bring insight and understanding and when i started doing the hypnotherapy words that i realized oh wait a second we did have money. So that was the Lucia the i had earned it. So i had to clear rowlatt out of my subconscious that i was able to take my business. Six figures include all that stuff out of the way. Now you gotta have good content. Feel business to six figures That i have found with entrepreneurs is the main thing that is in the way these old wounds that need a healed and these old patterns of i don't deserve it. I'm not good enough. Which is very common man. especially in women's. I say because women. We have been put down for centuries as class citizens now and we have really claim power back and our creativity and our sense of self worth and self deserving the weakened step out and off what we have the list because women have incredible wisdom to offer absolute. Boy i can. I can relate. I think our mothers were cut from the same cloth because he well. I know one part of it. I understand she grew up during the depression. But again we you know we had a middle class life we She worked as well as my father did but she was always crying poor to her mother and yet i had dance lessons. I had music lessons. I went to girl scout camp in the summertime so we for all intents and purposes and it's interesting. I was actually just writing about this book real lately just realizing that. Yeah my sister fat. I was spoiled. I was in what. Because i did have a lot of advantages and yet at the same time i did. I took on the same types of leafs that were not mine. to hold onto Which and you mentioned one thing about at me we do. It is important for us especially as women. I think to be able to start tapping into that. Inner wisdom and intuition so what do you find is the best way we can do that. Well certainly is expressive techniques for example the laughter. Meditation is the best meditation. I recommend for unleashing your creativity so it because it releases your joy and high vibrations that helps creative ideas come through. So that's something high. I highly recommended for people. I can't sorry. Could you just say the question again was just. How do we tap into our inner wisdom and oh yeah she wants to cultivate it. Yes so definitely. I recommend laughing at free. Jaded really cultivating that. Because it will help you and the other thing it helps with as i as i've mentioned i think is it raises your hibernation for the attraction. And so you want to be in a high energy so with lower attraction say like scale of one to ten one being very low negative vibe. Ten being the highest fide. You want to try and keep us up eight nine ten and laughter. Look it's free. It's a great way to do that. When you incorporated into your day and and the other thing is to become a witness to the mind. This is a very powerful technique which you probably know if you've been doing. The asna increased by the buddha twenty five centuries ago to learn to decide densify from the mind to sit back and simply watch the thoughts. Go by just let them go by. Because thoughts shadows. They are not real. They are figments of the imagination. And the other thing is that they are all from the conditioned mind which is very limited kiss our ari go mind only has information in it from the past and so it will not be supportive of anything that is new or outlandish as it goes into exile. What you doing good work you know. And so two lund. Become a witness to the mind. I have a whole chapter on this in my book is is a very powerful thing and you probably already experienced that so that you're not the at the efecto what the mind is saying. And so what. I learned that your heart and your soul of the master and the mind is servant of the heart that sorry i just wanna. I just want to stop there for minute. Say that again. The the heart and soul of the master and the mind is the servant of the heart and the soul. Yeah that's so important to remember. 'cause our mind definitely can lead us astray into just places that don't serve us. I think is the best way to say. They're really just actually. Yeah even though it's of the best intentions thinks it's trying to protect us but often especially with women in particular and people. I've talked to and myself Case in point it just see serves to keep a small and light which were are. I believe were all designed to do. I mean we totally all i see. We have fair in grade and comparison and judgment live in the mind and those of the four. I call him are false friends. The full false friends that do not serve us and one thing. I always like to mention to people is to watch the judgments the mind because i think the number one cause of suffering in the world is judgment and the person we pick on. I is a cell area. So then we're so busy judging ourselves. And then that. Lois self worth self deserving to help us step out assange preneurs so Acceptances the key. And i have a chapter on my i. It's a chapter in the book. Yes Because i think that the move we can accept yourselves for who y'all and just let judgments go by than the move we can accept others imo. We judge ourselves when we judge of us and the ball and also it's important to have compassion for ourselves. Yeah and then we have more compassion for others and that's what the world needs more compassion more acceptance kindness love but we have to start with ourselves with def. Thanks you know absolutely late. Ripples out for sure if someone is hasn't been meditating before and now they're hearing isn't hopefully they've they're inspired to star. What's the best way for someone to get started and cause some people think well. Oh you know this is nina. Have to sit for half an hour. Not necessarily i think anyway but what is what is your advice to someone who well. That's a great question. Thank you thing is to understand what meditation is and what it is not. Education is not a technique like sitting in silence for hours or three hours or something. That is a technique. But what is meditation. Meditation is awareness. Meditation is being in the present moment. Either you are in the present moment or you on not so the mind will take you to the future or the past right and with a win you keep bringing yourself back to the press with always with compassion because the mind is you know it's the habit of dragging us off track but it's a very simple thing it's free. I suggest people start there because then you don't have to do any sitting or anything if you don't want to of course you can if you want to write just understand that. Meditation is awareness self awareness and you present with yourself and the person you're talking to of situation you in or not an. It's pretty simple to know you know and then just come back to the presence because what happens. And i'm sure you know this over time. Bring that quality of presence into your life into every every relationship into every conversation into every action you take is always with his quality of press and that transforms everything. Presence contains love. It contains contains joy. It contained pace creativity wisdom. Everything is contained in the present moment and that is the gift we all have. It's it's amazing. it's something that is so what you said. It doesn't cost anything. It's just cost time. I suppose of just taking the time being intentional. And just saying okay. Let me be present with you. Like right now is a as opposed to thinking about you. Know twelve other things. And that's one thing i've learned in doing this. Podcast is probably from where. I started at the beginning. Where sometimes i'd be thinking about what's the next question. I'm going to ask. But i really have an. I made myself learn to be more intentional about really listening to the guests. So i can just be present with you and then trust that something you say will trigger. And then i'll be able to come up. Yes and that's a fantastic example. Because in the conversation flows from that quality of presence on tena asli and then the wisdom flows from each of us. And so then it's perfect. Everything is said that is that is meant to be said in that particular interview. The that's how i feel about out the interviews. I just trust. I'll say whatever is the right thing to say that this particular day with you and your listeners and everybody will benefit absolutely i. I'm definitely trusting that for sure. Because i know that you've in just a short amount of time have dispensed a a lot of wisdom and i really appreciate it if someone actually let me talk. Just mentioned her actually mentioned but let me ask you briefly because you did mention that you do work with women entrepreneurs so how. How do you work with people do work. When i want you to group programs do i work. I work one on one. With the hypnotherapy works some licensed sitting therapist and coaching so i have programs to that nuts on the phone so it doesn't matter where people live and then i also have group programs small groups four and they usually also by wanna one clients because women like groups and healthy. It's amazing how they can help. Each other by one has problem here. One says only now. I have to do that. And then. I have the meditation trainings. Meditations which are in the iraq I do training so. I have a laughed. Meditation has its own because it's so incredibly important. I think in its session. Easy thing so there's a lot to learn about it actually and then i'm going to be doing in In the guinean next year. I will start a level two of the training. Which is the nine main shaft of the book. Go through those like. It's a nine week online class with me. And then in toba off twenty twenty. One is the six day in person practitioner certification training where we do the expressive can't jolie's expressive techniques zoo. We can do. The laughter on sube arrested them students in person in tucson arizona where i live so people can get a certification From my company discrimination training in meditation and can go out agit to the practice to the business. Already have or start a new business. Whatever they want to do i. I'm very keen to train people. Because i think we need a lot more meditation teachers out there and a whole planet needs meditation. is no shortage of clients out for everybody. Absolutely absolutely while i am. I love to song. I've been out there many times because that's where my sister used to live. So who knows. Maybe i'll even check this out. Next year would be wonderful to not have to worry and to be able to travel next year again would be wonderful so yes. I think by october of twenty twenty one i thin. That's why just i didn't do it. I just moved it to. I'm sure we will. You know by then absolutely well one last thing before i let you go is i wanted to ask For our listeners. If they want to be able to find out more information about meditation trainings or working with you one on one. Where is the best place for them to find you. Well my website discover meditation dot com. And i do have a free gift for everyone when they go. There is a free gift and when you can sign up for my newsletter laughing buddhist network newsletter a cute and so you can And you can stay out today on everything i'm doing. I also have laughing buddhist network facebook group as well if anybody refers to find me on facebook right. Well make sure. I have all that information in the show notes and i just wanna thank you so much for being here today. I really enjoyed our discussion. And i look forward to my head to pick up a copy of your book. So i can take a look at it and learn more about all the expressive meditation. But i love the idea of laughter. And i know that there have been studies about how good laughter is for lia so i'm one make it a point to start making sure that i am laughing day especially i want to be more creative. I i've already been getting into doing more than any way. But you can never be creative enough. I think oh absolutely. It's like endless isn't yes absolutely. All right well thank you again for being here and thank you all of my awesome listeners out there and who's who's ever watching on youtube as well i appreciate you and until next time i encourage you has always to go out and live fully love deeply and engage authentically one more thing before you go as valued listener of the live. Love engage. podcast. I want help. You shine your light in the world. Not only while. You're listening to the show but all day every day of the week. that's why i created. The would love engage spiritual awakening community on facebook place for you to gather with other business professionals and entrepreneurs who are committed to living the life of their dreams. If you wanna be a part of this candidate pan receive free trainings from me. Go to live. Love engage dot com and request to join. that's ally l. o. beaten angie a. g. e. dot com.

Gloria grace rand gloria grace rand eacho dove global authority vigo authorit olie ten fifteen years hashim youtube asna twenty five centuries ballantine books padilla twenty years north america new york Lois self leach charlie ben san francisco
How to Best Market Your Book and Yourself as an Introvert - BM263

Book Marketing Mentors

31:18 min | 2 months ago

How to Best Market Your Book and Yourself as an Introvert - BM263

"The qualcomm we believe in staying connected and you can see us wherever five g is helping transform telemedicine supporting remote education empowering mobile. Pc's the invention ages here. Learn more at qualcomm dot com slash invention age. If you're an author or plan to be one get excited because this podcast is for you book. Marketing mentor is the only podcast dedicated to helping you successfully market and sell your book. If you're ready for empowering conversations with successful marketing mavens then grab a coffee or tea and listening to your host international bestselling author susan. Freedman book marketing. Bentos the wiki. Podcast where you learn proven strategies tools ideas and tips from the masters every week. Introduce you to a marketing vaster. Who will share their expertise to help you. Market and sell more books. Thank you for tuning in to today's show. And before i bring on today's guest i want to share with you an offer that a you may be interested in and that is one hundred twenty five point checklist to uncover profitable income streams from your book. I know that many of you are looking to make money with your book. Here are some ideas that you may not have thought about. If you'd like a copy of us then email me at susan at but marketing mentor dot com. There's also link below in the show notes so make sure that she grabbed your copy and also subscribe to this podcast. Because you don't want to miss an episode of a great experts who shed their wisdom with you. Now let's get on with the show today. My special guest is hailed as a champion for introverts. Jennifer con while a phd is one of the top global leadership speakers on introverts. She's an author and certified speaking professional her best selling books. The introverted leader quite influence and the genius of opposites help introverts throughout the world expand their leadership capacity and they've also been translated into eighteen languages. Latest book is creating introverts friendly workplaces how to unleash. Everyone's talent and performance. She's been featured in the wall street journal forbes and fortune jennifer takes enormous joy and pride from being a mom and a grandmother as well as serving as a mentor to many professional women. She's one of my favorite national speaker association. Colleagues jennifer real pleasure to welcome you to the show and thank you for being this week's guest expert at mental susan. I love your work and it's been a pleasure to be a colleague of yours for so many years. Now actually thank you for having me. Oh it's my pleasure. We love having exports on this show. It's all about different people's expertise experience in life and what they can share now. Your hailed as a champion for introverts. How did you get that title. That's a common question. And i'm glad you asked it susan. I got interested in this topic many years ago. When i was introduced to an assessment called the myers briggs and there were two propelling forces that really got me going on this and it where it became. Almost my life's work at this point and one was My husband and understanding that back then. I was married to an introvert. I still am. I see still the same husband. He's still in at your word. I didn't even know that term. It was the kind of the experience. If you've ever taken an assessment like that when things start to make sense and so it really did help our relationship and a lot of ways and sort of having another lens to look through to understand each other. Because i used to get so frustrated. I didn't realize at the time that i was an extrovert which i learned over the The time of taken the assessment so that was one Definite reason. I became hashing about this and i took that hashim and when i was working in organizations i was a career coach leadership development person in. Hr many roles helping people. That's always been my my goal. Susan and like you member of this national speakers association a lot of speakers are there to help folks as well and that was my driving force in what i kept discovering as at my career was unfolding was that i would come across so many people that i knew or had been identified as introverts which turned out to be you know half the organizations actually between forty and sixty percent and they were so frustrated and overlooked and ignored in many cases and i would observe it. You know all the time and it really had tremendous impacts that. I was seeing on those individuals and as i really dug further into the research looking at the impacts on teams and on the workplace. And that's sort of where the journey has taken me writing books about those topics fantastic. Let's sort of start from the beginning and look at. What are the some of the major differences between an extrovert and an introvert. So an everybody understands. Because i'm sure as you rightly said on taking an assessment you see things differently like you. I'm also married to an introvert. And it was only when i started studying some of these different characteristics that i got to understand my husband a lot better and why he does what he does. And you know. When i discovered that was a term i used in one of the boys called except the alien kind of jess but once you realized that you can't change that other person. Although at times we all still try to change people at work and at home. But if once you realize that though you're in for a lot less stress ya so let me know address. Some of the differences is in store. Surely you know it really is. We've learned this also through studying the concept of introversion and extroversion. It really is like many things. Susan spectrum think of it as a bell curve. Most people are clustered sort of towards the middle and really what it's about is energy and introverts get their energy from being in solitude taking quiet time they like people it's not like they're antisocial but they can only take so much of being out in the world before they need to decompress get inside their heads where they get re-energized again where the creative inspiration occurs where they're just recouping themselves a lot of people talk about the term stimulation you know if you've ever seen an introvert get over stimulated they've sort of get this look on their faces just too much. It's just too much now. Let's take a look at the other side which are extroverts who get energized by being out in the world and stimulation and so their batteries get charged up and they kind of need more of that and there's even a biochemical research that says that dopamine is more pronounced that they have a lot more of it that they are stimulated more in their minds and in their hearts when they are with people and they need that. It's like a fix that they need. So we think about the pandemic now. It's been challenging really for both sides but extroverts particularly have to get those people fixes in some way or another there's are just some of the general themes around the differences now if we talk about strengths that both have an x. Really in all of my work. I come from a place of really looking at how introverts can build on their quiet strength because for too long they had to adapt and they still do very so to taipei extroverted world. My specialty is the workplace. It's absolutely true that most companies most businesses most professions do a reward the extroverted temperament. Now what is the extroverted temperament. It tends to be more or some of the strengths. Let's say we'll start with extroverts. Extroverts can really get a term schmooze that she get people talking they liked to have conversation me with probably more people than just less they like a lot of Breath versus depth. And in what. They're doing with their work as well as their relationships. They like to have lot going on in that way. And then they kinda get deflated if they don't have that they're very much out there and they're connecting and they're bringing people into the conversation. They are really excellent. Facilitation meetings happened or when their programs. Oftentimes the extrovert will be the one that steps up and get things going. There's a lot of strengths from that standpoint. Introverts said that they're in their heads. They go for of depth versus breath. So if you think about projects they go deeper. Let's say you work with clients who are writing books right so the introvert one way. They might write. The book is kind of dig into it go deep and then right whereas the extrovert might get an idea from here from there have sticky notes all over the wall and then kind of make it diverged into a chapter that makes sense. And i'm thinking to myself when i've written with parts and that's the difference in the style is just one example. We really have focused so much on the extroverts. We look at. What are the strengths. That introverts bring in addition to really what i talked about. You know the taking the quiet time and in influencing in leading they really use those strengths of listening engaged. Listening is one of the hallmarks. You know that people will talk about their leaders as being people that were incredible listeners and they were introverted. Another key differentiator from extroverts. Is they do a lot more preparation. That really makes their contributions very long lasting. They have really given things thought. And so there's focus extroverts tend to just to flip to them a minute. They contribute as well but they do it in a way. That's more like described in the writing. It's more brainstorming. It's more thinking aloud. Where's the introverts again. Thinking their heads. So those are some of the strengths are also very introvert. Sir very calm and they would show you think about introverts like one that just popped in my head. That i've been reading about lately is fred rogers. You know the wonderful host of a children's television program and if you look at videos of him or of others who are introverted influencers. You'll just hear this calmness That just kind of gets everybody kind of calmed down. Just like he did millions of children around the world. I hope that gives to sort of a picture of some of the differences in certainly. My four books have gone into detail but giving you a couple of the hits absolutely an unthinking she's been in my office with all those stickies place so i was like. Oh it's so funny because as you were saying all these different things i'm thinking. He has relate to that. I think that in some ways that i'm an extrovert but in others feel women introverted. And as i get older i feel. I'm becoming much more of an introvert. Never i was. Is that possible. Yes it is possible. In fact carl young. Who was the originator of this in the early. Nineteen hundreds of this theory definitely wrote about that and he said that in the second half of life like fifty above we start to move in more into those other traits and we develop those and if you think about it you are through life learning how to function in the world. You know you realize that you know. Maybe i don't need to as i get older be socializing every weekend friday and saturday. You know as you get older for instance. I rather stay home and read a good book. You know and just curl up and just relax and where i got in touch with my introversion was when i was doing a lot of traveling up until lately there was a few years ago and i was on the road alone. I'll for a lot of the time. And i started to get to know myself better if we could put it that way and actually realized that when i got off the road that i really relish that time alone that i really enjoyed just being with myself. I didn't need to have people around. You know that was a big lesson that i've experienced as well as other extroverts. But i think that's important to realize an introverts on the other hand become a more adept at social skills and social interaction and stimulation. But yet they still need to go back to their center. And i think that's the key. I suggest that people don't you know try to obsess about well am i am i am i not is a term ambivert. That's used like ambidextrous. And some people relate to that but i find that the more we learn about the profile most of us as i say are towards the middle but we can usually identify more with one than than another again. It's not a big deal if you don't either it's funny because i often get this. Introverts sort of very apologetic about the fact that they are an introvert. Have you found that yes. I have found that ended one of my thoughts about that is that i wrote about this in my last book on creating introvert. Friendly workplaces is that they're still tremendous bias against introverts in the workplace and in the world. They'll say no. I'm not i'm definitely an extrovert. And then they take an assessment or they learn more about it and they say no. I've been trying to be somebody. I'm not and that's what's been very exhausting. I hear this like every day from clients from readers. They're still this tremendous. Because as i mentioned earlier we live in a tie. Bay extroverted a world. And so it's just normal. That people are going to feel that way but definitely something we wanna change. And that's my mission now is to have. Everybody embraced these incredible qualities. You know there are some tremendous tremendous drinks in being introverted. Let's turn the focus onto the authors. And what i find so often is that authors don't like to promote themselves and unthinking that may well be a characteristic of an introvert. Talk to us about that. And what advice would you give to an author who really sort of feels very self conscious about going out there promoting themselves and they think it's sort of yucky and not the right thing to do. Well you know. I did a program for my fellow authors on this few months ago and and if i can i can just share with you a couple of the steps that i recommended that have been my ways of getting my message out there. I'll put a qualifier out there that i actually liked to market. That's been something that i find is a challenge. You know and i've always felt that way i built my other. I've had several businesses. You know. And i've always looked at the pr in the marketing is something that i could try to figure this out. Try to find the right angle so for me. This is something i enjoy. But i think the basic message is susan that people need to find the ways that work for them and it's not every strategy is not every tool not every tip so let me just share with you. If you can indulge mouse. I'll give you the ones that i said in there. Maybe we can. If you have any questions on it. We can do that. Absolutely i call six. Levers and one is the website now. The website needs to be easy to find. You know a landing page on the book community very practical kinds of things. These aren't things that you need to do to get out there and talk to people you do need to though have a a presence online rights. Find ability factor. I think it's called and you know with your website and your book. It's very helpful and you probably advise you people to do. This is giveaway. Chapters giveaway excerpts. Speaking of giving away several years ago. I reached out to a second book. And i was trying to look at some ideas for how to get it out there and i talked to a person who said to me was successful author lisa macleod and lisa is sales expert. And she said you know what jennifer. I give my book to anybody who shows even a glimmer of interest and so the next time i had a book come out. I ordered more discounted copies from the publisher at the outset. When you can get a better discount. And that's exactly what i did. I mean anybody that. Sit home and she soon. The book got it in their hands. Because that's what i wanted to do. So the websites one way to kind of get that free stuff out there but also to give books away. The second thing. I do i recommend to. People is to build your communities and if we think about introverts and how you deeper introverts have deeper relationships. We all can do that. And you know share an any kind of way that makes sense for you whether it's on social media or if you have a list to start building your list is to make people a part of your journey as you're writing the book and i did kind of a funny video with my husband on the last. The last book where he was being a real introvert wasn't very interested when my books came and i was all excited so it showed the difference. It was kind of just a humorous thing. Got like tons of people looking at it. You know that was something where you could do as an introvert. You don't necessarily have to be out there talking to you can make a video you know. That was something. And then of course press which i know you've had some great people on their back getting her writing articles and getting them into a so many of the online outlets now. I did that a lot on this book. Because it came out in june on june sixteenth. Right in the midst of the pandemic that were still in and getting articles out there gets more of an audience and you can take articles from your book and just adapt content from your book. So that's kind of third thing. The website build your communities. Have your press going. And then you social media like i found in Quiet influence when i looked at how people made a difference who are introverted. They said that they used social media. If they did use social media and some didn't they use it very thoughtfully for instance one of my friends jesse stone has leadership blog. That's immensely popular and wanna key strategies. She uses to grow. Interest in her work is sharing content from a wide scope of leadership experts. So she gives voice to others you know. She mentioned some in her blog. Post and i think now she has her. Blog gets more than a million views a year you can think about. How can i share the wealth and support other people in. It's gonna come back to you then of course Speaking is away and now with virtual speaking their opportunities for introverts. Who aren't that comfortable. You know such as doing maybe like a fireside chat. You can have the questions ahead of time or you could do an on demand program right where you're prepared and you can redo it and practice and have it available and then the last tip i would say was to consider partnering with outside firms like yours and others and You know we have them do some of the work that you're not comfortable doing. There's a lot out there. I i would suggest to people as folks told me when i got into the more of the keynote. Speaking businesses in was. Don't try to do it all. Will you told that to purchase. No you always overwhelming right. He's overwhelming and every expert have on here just like social media. It's like don't try and do it all find something that you feel comfortable with and just do that so yes i mean. The point is to do it right. Great and setup. So i would make the case that there are a lot of introvert friendly ways now especially with our virtual platforms to market your book. I don't know what are you seeing now. Susan with a endemic. You've seen people you be creative with how they're doing it. I think that being very creative and much more so and that thinking of online programs which seemed to be hit at the moment right and obviously social media is probably gone crazy with everything. I don't do a whole lot of it is sort of little scared of it but Sort of putting my toe in the water but articles. I think you're absolutely dead on with that. One and yeah i mean i think there are opportunities out there that you don't have to feel icke of bow They call self promotion. Because it's more about you'll message and the value of you bring with that. That i think is most important and one of the theories i have seen introverts be concerned about doing is kind of relates to what you said earlier about bragging on yourself in the south in atlanta where i live. They say there's an expression don't brag on yourself but you know you you have to do some amount of bragging but can you do bragging with and i totally get that you know. It can sound very conceited. And you're arrogant and all of this but how about if you work on building your relationships and you as i mentioned jesse's example you are giving and you are supporting other people and you will find. It comes back to you. So when it's time for your book to launch and you send your email out to your launch team is why call it. You are going to be getting great responses back. People are going to your to say. Here's how you can help you know. These are the ways. You can write a review. Would you mind just putting this on your social media or mentioning your newsletter and you ask for the help and it'll come back to you much more so than you even expect and it's all because we're helping each other and i. I truly believe that. I want to tell one quick anecdote about that. If that's okay. Go for your podcast. I wanna make some people might know the name. Susan cain susan wrote a very famous book called quiet with about the same time that my book came out and i have been introduced to her and we had some correspondence we stay connected and my book was the introverted leader was the first book came out. It's now in its second edition. That came out last year but it was the first book in the workspace. You about this topic and you know. Now there's like hundreds of books. Senators always good to be there early. People said to me. Oh my gosh. Aren't you going to be concerned. Ca susan is a big name in this and it was incredible. What happened like she and i began a friendship. You know colleague ship and we shared ideas then. I was sharing about her book. Which i really didn't have to. Consider tedtalk had probably the most views of any talk practically bud. Slowly you know astra time went on. I was sharing her content and she would be very kind and share a chapter of mine when it came out were promoted on social media in last book. The introvert creating introvert friendly workplaces. Just i mentioned this just because this is the importance of connecting with people who could be considered competitors but i like the term collaborative competition. You're becoming better because of that other person you know if you think about two tennis players play with each other just as they get. Better and susan elevates my game. And what susan did for this topic is she broke. Open the floodgates and she allowed many of us to really then sees that because people didn't even talk about introversion before and send. Her name is big in that space. And it's so lovely to hear. And i love that word colleague ship. That sounds better than sort of like. Jv joint venture partners and that who laboratories competition because yeah and and that she opened dole's argue that allow people to embrace your work and hers as well so what we realized about when we have colleagues like that and by the way i wanna give credit to the collaborative competition term. Which is catherine mayor. Who wrote a book about that when i give her the proper attribution but what we realized is that we all complement each other. Another dear friend of mine now is sophia deming. Who wrote a book called introverts in love and she wrote the introverts way to fabulous books and she is written for psychology to get jay a lot of your authors. Wonder how do i get press right. I reached out to her when i was in dallas. Just visiting a few years ago we had a drink and a we got to be friends. And we've really have become for good friends and she has covered my work. We will brainstorm ideas and she'll just put it on psychology today. She does a call him right and recently she was having some challenges and so i recommended her for a a writing at editing assignment and now she's got a lot of work with this company. It's all about give and take and you know. I think that's so beautiful when authors can support each other. And that's why i'm really pushing this is kind of partnerships or the way to building your community and then you will find if you're truly invested in it's not just a transactional kind of thing pat your back your path. You know what i mean. It's more like a a rich. Reciprocity that is happening between you. Then you will see your book. Start to really take off because you're going to people who have themselves influential communities and that's really critical. I just don't think in this day and age. With how many books come out every business books. Like every week suits indians. It's like hundreds thousands research staggering right now or lodge larger. You know that. So how do you get seen. How do you get visibility. And so right. You gotta find that way. And my way has been really connect and i think it's a very introverted friendly technique particularly when you can start a lot of those conversations on email and through link gin and get to know that person follow them. It's cool and i must say i just want to say that that also that approach has landed me some really fantastic endorsements people. I didn't even know. Like arianna huffington. Adam grant daniel ping. I have followed them. I've reached out to them and they didn't know me at all and so except daniel pink. I did meet him once very briefly and so it was really cool to see that endorsements can happen too because you are connecting with people in your sharing their work and that's really the key it's beautiful and it's lovely to hear that those names are also willing to share. Because you think sometimes oh. I can't approach that person. They've never on semi but actually the human beings like everybody else and when people say to me. Oh you on your own phone. As like. Of course i do. You should answer it. My father used to say they put their pants on like everyone else. One exactly exactly if on listeners. Wanted to find out more about you books. you'll services. How can they do that. Well thank you. I'm very proud of our new website. And it's kind a lot of rich information on there that people can check out so it's jennifer con wiler dot com and. I'm sure you'll put the spelling in there. It's all one word. J. e. n. n. i. f. e. r. con wiler k. h. n. w. e. i l. e. r. dot com and. We have four different quizzes on there. That only take five minutes each. You can just pick one to take that each lines with the books that i've written the introverted leader and the latest one creating an issue for friendly workplace and they all align with that and you can see where you stand where your team stands and it's just a good way to get started on the journey of really being more introverted inclusive nevada if you were to leave a listeners with a golden nugget what would that be janatha in these times. I think i would go back to my quote that i love and i don't remember who said it but i i will have to look that up. It's worry never rob's tomorrow of its sorrow worry. Never rob's tomorrow it. Sorry so. I'm worrying lessons especially in these times one minute at a time. Exactly and that's all we can do is take one minutes to right. That's always got. Yes exactly exactly jennifer. You've been amazing. You shed some wonderful wisdom gotten some incredible ideas and you and i need to talk about something. We'll do that offline but thank you. Thank you for sharing that wisdom and thank you for taking time out of your precious day to listen to this interview. And i sincerely hope that it. Spot some ideas you can use to. Salma books is wishing you much book marketing success and before i sign off completely for today. Remember the hundred and twenty one point checklist to uncover profitable income streams for your book. Email me at susan at book. Marketing mentor dot com. It's in the show notes as well. The link get your copy next week. The time is now to take action and finally build your book selling empire and the great news is that susan is here to help you visit. Fook marketing mentor. Dot com sign up for a free fifteen minute book marketing strategy session with susan. She'll help you discover your first steps to marketing and selling your book only those who take action or rewarded so visit book. Marketing mentor dot com. And we'll see you again next week. This podcast is a part of the c. suite radio network for more top business. Podcasts visit c. Suite radio dot com.

susan qualcomm Jennifer con jennifer Susan carl young myers briggs national speakers association Freedman hashim lisa macleod fred rogers the wall street journal jess taipei jesse stone Susan cain susan Sir catherine mayor
The year in design and architecture

Monocle 24: Section D

29:31 min | 5 months ago

The year in design and architecture

"You're listening to monocle. On design in association with visa visa provides twist perfection for your home for more than one hundred years visa has made it a mission to make everyday life easier through high quality innovative household appliances as the swiss market leader visa lives by swiss values but people all over the world can experience these tube. Visa developed swears from within imbuing them with timeless elegance and creating appliances that integrate seamlessly into the home user. Interfaces on products are precision engineered to deliver great complexity and power in a simple and intuitive way these attacks commitment to innovation ensures the highest level of precision in every product delivering swiss perfection for your home visit visa dot com to find out more fees uc perfectly at home anywhere in the world. This is monaco on design. Monaco's weekly look at the best in architecture craft furniture and fashion. I'm nolan giles. Now with the almost at its end we thought that we would look back at some of the bigger interviews. We produced on monocle on design so with this in mind. The team selected three picks. That best represent the in design and architecture. Do stay tuned to hear them earlier. This year monocle spoke to design academic and creative director elsa crawford speaking at the beginning of the pandemic while the uk had just gone into lockdown. She was at home in light filled apartment which sits above the south london studio a firm shooter elsa he is elsa on how she thought the pandemic would affect design going. Forward design is always respond to racial cultural crane. Was exactly that you know. It was a response to sit of late. Victorian pandemics Ted's the century pandemic response to this digest. Industrialized cities and vented. This fresh new reality basically was behind a lot of what was conceived. Have the first half we talk about it being the machines but the machine h. was caused with coach will soon ken of it all night. Fright honey way. Maybe wicked woman cope thing. I'm will reflect. Could mean basically say so. Favorite didn't make clean spaces and the trust ability as as faces but then on a more intimate level. I think we will realize how this quite simple things. Masterson much so in that sense. I think it's such a hug. Kasan small things we care about where both rational unemotional beings think. We will start to be very care about the places that we trust that the isn't and we can't control everything i think. That's one of the interesting outcomes of what's happened is definitely challenge. Are i did. I'm how tearaways on two problems. Every problem can be solved to debate like at school. Actually hold on is cisco on that journey together. Used to not knowing. And that's coming up. I think culturally. We quite the only way really that you can create troughs in that context is to trust specific individuals. Neighborhoods where you know who they take care. Issues really highlighted the great divide in. How actually i think good housing to be a focus off to this reportall for people and also thinking about housing are changing tire. We really need to use the periods of having to think about what housing means for all the different people in our society just having conversations roussin pool with some of the younger designers. I know let's not always in a place because easy to work. Because that's like sharing kept coleman place to work or maybe they're even prosperity that's keno mate but then again were still think that the people who were living around who nope i know feeding really rely and so on so i think actually just looking at new jersey. It's very interesting as a whole would off to this when you all leaving plan hours in the same place thing he'll come down to intimate things of everyday lives on. Marie always talk about making the noble special and not take. That really comes through in the situation that we're all in our find the shooting to people no matter what aid that they've got kids living their own comes down and everything but just way go time doing nice things so the end that you do them hristo to mexico with the most no value those things you instinct. Start very different focus. I would say from if i was developer. Right now i would one hundred percent think about how to make spaces you know. Really good places to be knocked down and in a way but if they're great to be in all the just think maybe it's time to come up with some line. How amazing would that be. And i think it is interesting. Because it's the lands to look at contemporary society served. Yes it's a couple but also how could you potentially create parts of the building right. Let's say group could create their own important team together. Because i think one of the things. That's been highlighted this time. Is that the definition of household. At least right now. He's quite narrow from the most smart sedition have been groups friends who've decided to just get together and be a household how clip that clock in terms of development in terms of making the normal special making extra life rewarding through a building. I mean it's a great. I think for developers who are sensitive enough to the things that really matters to people today to integrate back into housing. So i think that they're not gonna lose to that and it's interesting when you look at the both the segel's projects where it's all for the conditions they were in today about using this opportunity to re look at how we live in the city recreate lot of housing. But say think of how communities perhaps could be supported forced the community but you can create the conditions where it's easy to help each other because oversea online has been amazed. I think there's nothing like being in physical proximity and to create the possibility to help each other physical. Timoteo i think is still Thanks to elsa crawford their next up we revisit a book that's challenging designers to look to the past for inspiration of creating the products and cities of the future. Low tech design by radical indigenism is published by tashin and dedicated to a design movement that builds on resilient and sustainable natural technology rather than everything having to be shiny new here. I am in conversation with the book's author. Julia watson to find out how we can live and build alongside nature. The book is a completion. Seven years of research looking at indigenous cultures from all over the globe and trying to understand how they their ecosystems crystal stones as nature based technologies that we could potentially sink spending al lexicon of technologies which we use in the built environment today. Just opening the book and flicking through it. I guess the first thing before you even get into the text is just kind of how strikingly beautiful the whole project. Is i guess from photography. Too graphic design illustration. Can you talk us through the form of the book a little bit and why. It was so important to do it as a book. The idea was to credit tool kit. That designers could flip book and they might be familiar imagery in the form of different cultures but then transforming that imagery into something that could actually be used as a bit of a construction drawing to recreate some of these systems so there's really detailed sections in exploded metric send clan views which talk about materiality as well as ecological process the same time. The book design is very intentionally a physical and tactile manifestation of the concept of low tech. You can see the construction of the book you can see sort of the way that the binding is exposed and and how might fold open that you would use very simple materials that are honest and authentic in their the way they're exposed to the book cover doesn't have printing It's screen printed with an image but it's the basic greg cardboard and i'd love to hear some thoughts on how architects can apply. What you present in the book to the arm practice from from teaching technology which is book came from. I would look at particular technologies like green roofs and understand that these come from long lineages probably of older technologies that have been progressed broke through time and through contemporary material technologies to the way they ought today and so this book was really to question. Like what else is out there. There's it potentially that could happen so while this is more of documentation and analysis of Technologies as they are right now the intention would be the day could also potentially be hybridize. So there's a future compendium of other books that would come off to this. And other thinking and other designers adding to this type of thinking where you could hybridize with contemporary material technologies contemporary construction methods systems. I think the direct translation especially for the rice terraces would be for example that if for gal in the philippines who have figured out how to tear form mountainsides that are eighty percent slopes and that's pretty synonymous with the scale of the skyscrapers. We would have been environments. But they're kind of like a closed loop system in terms of how water moves through the system management and so. Is there a way that we could start to think of how we address greening our urban vehicle landscapes that might be more in line with the type of closed loop systems thinking rather than the facade application. And it's amazing as you look through the book it is so rural and in a way you you said the word primitive before but it's still is is kind of hyper complex when you kind of unpack it and the way that you have but like you were mentioning before these ideas and work in urban environments. How much thinking about the city. When you're kind of exploring fifty percent of it is dedicated to understand that nets the world that i work in i also work and teach in developing countries so when i when i'm teaching columbia we teach table studio which is really focused looking at developing countries in assisting them to come up with strategies. That would help them. Combat climate change. So i feel like there's the city in a developed country to the city in a developing country. And there's a periphery of those cities. And i think more than the center built up urban density these would be applications. That would be in a second and third growth ring. So the potential new grounds of the that might be transformed to design around these of nature and based structure so there was not the translation into city scape bill environment within the book more alluding to the potential and kind of like a story of like this is an example of how people still live with natural systems still produce still evolve have economic systems somewhat similar to economic systems that we are surrounded by. But they're doing it in a way which is not compromising the integrity of the natural systems. It's like a completely different form of development. So is there a way that we could understand how human development and progress and cds could think around those types of systems and landscapes transform. How where moving to the next generation of acids in the next generation about green technologies. Maybe a bit of a short question but looking at some of these examples. I guess the reduce in peru. Everything has a practical reason behind it in terms of design but sometimes they can just be kind of amazingly beautiful as well. Some of the solutions is that just a consequence of the practical solution. Or were you kind of learning along the way that these indigenous cultures did have focus. A little bit on aesthetics in these creations. It's interesting because i think a lotta people might go to some of these landscapes and see them as just beautiful landscapes not understand that they are really highly adapted in highly managed and recreated. But i think rather than I was a rather than recreated for the essence of aesthetics and beauty. It's more functionality. And performance and perhaps our understanding of aesthetics duty translates really well onto the type of engagement and the type of subtle interaction and complex engagement with ecosystems so that the systems on decontextualize from their environment so for us as designers type of aesthetic relationship is how was formulate our ideas of beauty. But i think for me. The beauty does come into the system and so to create a floating on in the last twenty five years out of a single raid. That you also eat that you will grind into flour that you feed to your water buffalo that you create canoes out of watch towers houses that type of way that you can change the use of a single piece of material into so many variables. I think that incredibly sophisticated and beautiful in itself. And that's something that i think. We have a look to learn from like the really sustainable and sophisticated use of materials to to achieve discuss completely different types of performances whether it's floating to stacking to bundling to weaving julia watson there and lo tak designed by radical indigenous is published by tashin and available to buy now just in time for christmas. Now let's catch up with this week's design events latest releases and the most important industry news with mongols maili evans. We start in switzerland where the long-awaited extension of house zurich has finally been completed. The fill to the design of david chipperfield architects. Who won an international design competition the expansion back in two thousand seven. The new space makes us the largest art museum in the country connected to the existing building by a seventy meets a long underground passage. Extension is a compact and classically proportioned construction. Who's your limestone. Clad facade is reminiscent of the architecture of the old policy of the cornstarch and the surrounding historic cityscape to new york now where a new retail space with a novel design reflects swiss performance running brand on's ambitions to shake up its industry collaborating with renowned architect and designer dress. Bazaar fennell shop is a spacious gets minimal affair with metallic finishes and deliberately exposed ceiling elements. The setting provides a spot in canvas new technology. That on hopes will at an attractive dimension to the shop. This includes the magical costumers can joke passed. The woolwich is fitted with hidden foot scanner. The in built technology hit will analyze their technique and provide advice on the perfect trainers for their gate to japan. Next where tokyo's nagging capsule tower. An incredible residential and architectural feat remains in danger of meeting the bulldozer. The again castle tower building conservation and restoration projects. So known as the safe group won't drop more attention to its cause so have released. A new photo book navigate capsules style title contains interior design photos of twenty capsules ranging from his second times as well as the stories of those who occupy them a chance to glimpse into other people's lives whilst also helping preserve an architectural beauty and finally to china where italian high fashion brand. Valentino is unveiling an interactive experiences. Week resign a five part. One shanghai will be held at the city's contemporary art museum power station of the arts and in the process demonstrates a move away from reliance on traditional runway show. Valentino is the latest of the high fashion joints to focus more of its attention on asia in the last few months following in the footsteps of brands like louis vuitton. Experience run from nineteenth this year to january seventeenth. Twenty twenty one so for me this week back to. Thanks mainly the more design news. Subscribe to our monocle on designed newsletter. It hits inboxes every wednesday and finally the venice architecture. Biennale a is one of the most important events in the design calendar every two years one special architect is appointed to curate it for twenty twenty. That was hush sock is dean of the school of architecture and planning at mit and director of his opponents are studio which has offices in boston and his native. Beirut in august mongols deputy editor josh caught up with soccer is to find out more about this year's event which will now happen in twenty twenty one. And why the curator's manifesto. How will we live together is more important than ever. And i look at your career your Might be a nice way of thinking about it. You'll work it spans kind of the proportions of a polymath scholar. You're an architect an editor of books. And i suppose the idea of knowing when something's finished is something you've developed over the time but tell me about the idea behind how we will live together. Which is the theme of this venice. Biennale which is now happening next year is not the product of all of your many decades of work or is that a very site specific mount specific topic that you wanted people to discuss. I think it was pulled valery. Who said that poem is never finished. Its on the abandoned. And i do feel that about books about buildings about exhibitions and there is an aspect of diverse bonaly in terms of its completion that has to do with the way architecture and in our practices as i mentioned earlier. Sometimes you feel like you wish you had more time. You had a possibility of revising idiot. Today think craft is they synthetic brings many ideas and people together and every project is resolution rather than the solution meeting given the circumstances given the set thing given the means. This is the best you can do. And you always feel that you can do better in a way. The postponement of the benalla has given the participants that possibility yet. Another iteration in improvement. And i'm hoping that the outcome would show that there's another dimension to this. Also that is different than other knowledge by virtue of the postponement. We have been communicating with the participants collectively and because of the way that we have framed the project in two just sub-themes but in two rooms each with its own discussion or polemic. We have been talking to the participants together so that the development of the projects is happening. I wouldn't say in sync but at least in the full. No of who else is in the room and what this project is doing in talking to other projects. This is a benefit of the postponement. Which we're trying to make the most out of. I was struck by the wording of a lot of your declaration. Your manifesto if you will you use a lot of generosity like ray ration- like dignity you even touch on this idea of you. Demoniac flourishing architecture can be rather an intellectual discipline particularly when architects to talk to each other about rather than maybe the end user. How important was it for you to get these really rather humane emotions into the brief an encourage who can often intellectualize a subject. But maybe less often talk about how it makes people feel. How important was that to you as the director. The hospitality of architecture happens at many levels by virtue of it being about space that is inclusive it does require us to include others in our profession itself is by necessity dependent on other professions. And therefore we have to be orchestrators. We have to conveners of contracts engineers programmers artists. And this is what. I'm trying to remind everybody off that possibility and indeed. It's a strength. That increasingly other disciplines are turning to us to help them learn about. How do we bring together. Different skill sets in order to answer the urgent problems of today. I feel that this is inherent in our training as architects and in the way we conduct ourselves in our profession. I want to highlight that. I wanted to put that up front especially in consistency with the question of and when i look at your own career to pull the lens back a little bit. You're originally from lebanon. We've spent a lot of time in the us. Do you think. I suppose having a foot in two different continents internationally. That's giving you a different perspective. On how certain problems be. They density togetherness community cohesion social exclusion. Has it given you a bit of a broader perspective on how you approach things definitely eh to settings. But i'm always in a beirut state of mind the chaos the livelihood and the pulse the energy has always been for me very important dimension of the way. I think i do want to say that. In lebanon when i was starting my practice it was with non-governmental organizations working in brutal development. Interestingly the question in development today is no longer whether you're in the mountains or in the city meeting how do we improve the rural areas so that it stops urban migration rory migration to cities but it was about whether you're in south lebanon working in a fisherman's village or you're in melbourne australia. Where you fall off to your cousins who emigrated during the civil war so the tension between being tome in one place or in another is no longer within the national boundaries but within the global bundy's we're witnessing a global hinterlands emerging versus global cities. This is the new condition that we are all in. We are all nomads. We are all refugees. We our own citizens of the world and so while maybe my fourth excellent of the united states because of the civil war in lebanon back in the nineteen eighties makes that condition. The little bit harsher. I do feel that my situation is not unique. It's actually probably the prevalent condition today. Think architecture thinks about itself as a practice that is cohesive. We've seen over the past few years that there are lots of for one for better word. Tzedakah attacks but very individualistic an individualized styles emerging. Is there a bit of a case for thinking a bit. More carefully about the global unified need of architecture as well because obviously the The biennale as divided up by nation at some points but do we need to think pan nationally. A little bit more about the the issues that you've raised in your manifesto as well because they already global problems as well. As national ones architecture is burdened with the responsibility of expressing place and over the past century. The idea of place tend to the idea of the nation. State it has evolved has become more complex. It has become more diluted and with the advent of globalization and the inability for places to produce their own images so quickly naturally to content and to compete and sit on the global map they have relied on the individual signature of architects in order to give them that visibility. That using that identity again here do not see that as being solely in the negative lens the star architects have adopted this role to be able to give places a signature. It is that signature not the signature off the users not the signature of the setting but in that sense they have also inadvertently perhaps empowered architecture and given the world a better sense of how important architecture is in shaping identities in shaping the imagination and hashem you speak very passionately and very knowingly after a long career in architecture but i just want for my final question to seize on one aspect of the the manifesto which was this idea. That architecture is a fundamentally optimistic discipline. you're always building. You're always adding you're always imagining. Something is better than before. You fundamentally optimistic that we have in our hands the answers to these seemingly intractable questions which you're posing and you know most notably or theme. How will we live. Together is an open question. Are you optimistic as we sit here and slightly straightened times with a lot of problems In front of architects in front of all of us that we need to straighten out. I am still very optimistic. We have no choice. We have no choice as architects. We have no choice as human beings. The future is in front of us as a space to imagine possibilities. That's how propel ourselves forward in every day. Maybe it's my deeply ingrained romanticism. That drives me in that direction. But i truly believe in the power of the imagination to help us get out of all situations wouldn't including this one. That was hashem asakusa director of the twenty twenty venice. Shopian speaking to monaco's josh fan hurt and sadly that's all the time we have on today's show. If you're keen even more designed related listening though. Do catch off five minute mid week. Sister show monocle on design extra that as every thursday. Today's show was produced and edited by merely evans. Thanks to a research as nick. My knees and charlie phil mccord's. I'm nolan thank you very much for listening and goodbye.

elsa crawford Julia watson nolan giles roussin Timoteo Masterson south london elsa lo tak segel maili evans monaco david chipperfield Monaco Bazaar fennell Valentino coleman Ted
Biennale special  part 1

Monocle 24: Section D

30:06 min | 9 months ago

Biennale special part 1

"You're listening to multiple on design powered by maserati History of Maserati, is a history of the pursuit of innovation and the preeminence of design battalion tally mark has grown from humble beginnings in a little workshop in Bologna to the present day in modern, it's home since the nineteen thirties more than a century of inspire, designing, cutting edge money factor of supreme performance and racing pedigree. This is a mark like no author that has come to symbolize the very essence of a sports car company timeless and elegant silhouettes effortless performance, true racing spirit combined with comfort and luxury. That is what makes Maserati Maserati the fines distinction and desire since nineteen fourteen. This is Monaco on design Mongols Weekly Look at the best in architecture craft furniture and fashion I'm Nolan Giles over the next two weeks, we will be focusing on the brilliance of Vienna's over two part special exploring why they hold such prominence in the Texaco. Linda. We will hear from the curator of. Delayed Venice Biennale Hashem Circus sometimes you feel like you wish you had more time. Wish you had the possibility of if icing idiot today thing craft is. Plus we take inspiration from this unique exhibition format to imagine what the inaugural monocle Benalla could look like inviting practices too shabby. They would do if they were in charge I would look at the idea or will look at the materials. Water Seawater is fast becoming into scarcity all over the world all that coming up right here on monocle on design. Hello and welcome to the show I'm Nolan Giles the Venice. Biennale. Of Architecture is held in the highest esteem within the architecture world with many in the industry building. This spring calendars around attending this very special event, which is held once every two years I took some time to write down my thoughts on the matter and shed some light on the value that this global spectacle has for both editors and architects. For architects to lengthy lead periods and developing projects that might take a decade or so to build two years probably doesn't feel like too long of a time before design journalists used to daily deadlines. The quick metabolism of publishing two years is something of an eternity. So perhaps, it was the critics who felt the most pain when the two thousand and twenty eight Venice Biennale of architecture the once every two years spectacular was pushed back a year in the face of a pandemic yet there's little doubt this frustration was felt across an entire industry. Whether it is those pending stories on the built environment is heading those architects and urban drawing up a future cities. This event is a key marker in all of their career trajectories global point of Focus that an entire industry checks in on to gauge where the world is heading and to absorb inspiration from a global cost of creative minds. It's a thrilling that an event of such magnitude highlighting we all need now in terms of buildings planning design and urban is Asian takes place in a city where time feels like it has stopped. For visitors being in Venice with its ancient canals and gothic architecture growing almost impossibly out of the Adriatic. Sea puts everything into perspective centuries ago people defied the odds to build this enchanting place and in centuries to come out designers and builders will continue to create epic accomplishments here. Well at least we hope. So Venice is sinking and the ideas that emanate from national pavilions at the city's Grand Joe Dini during the. An installations which bring to life a sprawling barracks building in the knowledge section of the ones that could offer options to save this place. The Biennale is a socially conscious event giving the world's best architects academics a true international platform to highlight the changes we might need to improve life on this planet. This takes on a more significant tone as we race against the clock we've cast upon ourselves through climate change. The sheer ambition and both the critical and blue sky thinking that is associated with the Venice architecture would be away has never been more vital and finally let's not forget the other reason why everyone from architects Australia to property surveys in Peru invest in a flight and ticket to the way it's a splendid place to be especially in the Italian spring with the sun warming back and the Venetian seafood and wine filling your belly. Something of an Olympic Games of architecture entrance are after all competing for the coveted gold lion awards the energy and Venice is inspiring irreplaceable and the talent levels extremely high. which brings us to the role of the curator, probably the toughest and most important role associated with the Venice Biennale of architecture. That job is to channel the disparate voices of global design community into an event. That's enjoyable to a diverse audience jetting to Venice and expecting only the best. And it's person we'll all be thankful to have steering this event back to normality in the coming months making the weight we've all enjoyed in twenty twenty all the more rewarding when the Venice Biennale of architecture kicks off a year delayed in two twenty, twenty one. In lieu of this year's event being cancelled, Venice organizers have instead prepared an exhibition on the most significant events in the Biennale as history running from August twenty ninth until December eighth at the Central Pavilion. In Venice visitors, we'll be able to view materials and documents from the. Archives. In the lead up to this Monaco's a deputy editor Josh was joined by Hashem. SOCK is the curator of the twenty twenty Venice Architecture Biennale A. Director of is upon us all our studio with offices in Boston and his native Beirut sock is, is also the dean of the School of Architecture and planning at MIT. Josh. Asking where shame is hunkering down under these unusual circumstances in which they speak I am. In Boston Massachusetts close to my office close to mit but only spiritually close because we cannot access either. I'm healthy. Well, you as well. I hope yet things aren't so bad in London, a little bit of a doom and gloom, and as we speak, there is a global reframing of how we forward and how we get out of this unenviable situation that none of us really saw coming if things were different Hashem you and I may have been talking in the body or the beautiful arsenal over in Venice of which the curator of the. Eminent Biennale it's not been moved to May twenty twenty one. But before we start to unpack your role as director I wanted to ask you more broadly want you think Biennale as and architecture exhibitions are important things to do and to spend time doing because they bring us together and they bring us together around the architectural experience. Architecture is to be experienced in person even though it has a very rich virtual dimension, but at the same time. Architecture is about. People convening together in space and there are many art knowledge. There's a proliferation of them and one could say that recently they have been a few new architectural knowledge which are all. Very, enriching and welcome. The has been alleged to stands strong as being the venue where everybody meets and not just to see exhibition, but to have discussions seminars. Educational, events, around which becomes really the most unique of platforms for catcher today? This is one of the KITTIES is why we ended up postponing it instead of, for example, replacing certain aspects of it with online displays, but the other dimension why Catcher Bernales are important is because architecture takes time to build. An. Architecture is place based. And having a simulated experience of the architecture in the installations and the presentations that the architects may conventis allow us to see A. Head of time out of place in a different context. which concentrates that experience in one piece this is a unique you don't have that. Possibility in any other venues Hash mentioned experience and I think that's really crucial point. The architecture needs to be needs to be seen in needs to be felt you need to see the pattern the texture in need to see arches soaring above you in and get a sense of place. But if I think about your personal experience, you have attended be a as a participant and as a judge and now as a curator. Did doing these things before help you to understand how these events come together and did they kind of inform your approach when you tap for the top job? Absolutely there's no question about that. When you're a participant, you're in the midst of rushing to make the deadlines and the. Shipping it. You're rushing to make sure that everything is that and you haven't missed on a detail like the lighting or the sound or the shape of the table. And you're in the details in the weeds as it were, and then you get there and you say had a week or a month more have spent more time on this or that. Almost. Like any architecture project when you judge you step back and you try to I, relate the projects to the theme and see how relevant and how really insightful they are about exposing an aspect of the team and you don't get into the weeds except after it catches your attention that level. You also as a judge on able to see relationship to each other. When as a participant, you only see your project in relationship to your own work. These are different dimensions that definitely helped in I when you're curator. Being able to identify the participants that truly speak in their work to the theme already. And are able to both address, the big picture and. The. Quality of the work. And that you're able to not just present the process each in an of itself but projects that do develop a polemic were a dialogue. Among themselves when you put them together. And when I look at your career your. Might Be Nicer Web thinking back to your work. It spans kind of the proportions of a polymath scholar. You're an architect, an editor of books. I suppose the idea of knowing when something's finished is something you've developed over the time but tell me about the idea behind how we will live together, which is the theme of this Venice Biennale I which is now happening. Next year is not the product of all of your many decades of work or is that a very site specific moments specific topic that you wanted people to discuss I think it was pulled valley who said that the poem is never finished only abandoned. And I do feel that about public buildings about exhibitions. And there is an aspect of the Bonaly in terms of its completion. That has to do with the way architecture and in our practices. As I mentioned earlier sometimes, you feel like you wish you had more time. You wish you had a possibility of that advising the today think craft is. They synthetic brings many ideas and people together, and every project is resolution rather than a solution meeting given the circumstances given the setting given the means this is the best you can do. And you always feel that you can do better. In a way, the postponement of the Benalla has given the participants that possibility. Yet another iteration in improvement. At I'm hoping that the outcome would show that. There's another dimension to this Bonaly, also, that is different than other penalized. By virtue of the postponement, we have been communicating with the participants collectively. And because of the way that we have framed the project into not just teams, but in two rooms each with its own discussion or polemic, we have been talking to the participants together so that the development of the projects is happening, I wouldn't say in sync but at least in the full, no of who else in the room and what this project is doing in talking to other projects. This is a benefit of the postponement which were trying to make the most out of sure an architect by trade a often at the mercy of other parties whether it's developers whether it's planners whether it's compromise on behalf of a client architects always have to take that on board, and as you say, it's an iterative process you mentioned in some of the interviews that you gave about the all before the every generation asks this question or a similar question about how to live together how to structure their cities. But do you think a lot's changed over? The past six months it strikes me that your question is probably more relevant when answered next year with a view to addressing what's going on with the pandemic the huge changes people have to make life physically and mentally could this ad renewed vigor and a people updating that plans to I don't know to take into account this strange new world we live in where we have to live together but it doesn't always mean we can shake hands or give one another a hug or a kiss on the cheek I, have the participants reacted to that you think. I hope that by next may be able to hug and kiss but putting that aside I do feel that. The present condition, the pandemic has made the question one level ironic at another level relevant. But I do hope that it doesn't confined. To just addressing the current condition. In a way. When I came up with a question how would we together as a team? It was driven by circumstances like climate change like. PG crisis like extreme inequalities among social groups. Like extreme polarization in our politics like different attitudes that are developing towards the family towards the household towards the other species that we living with. That require us to stop and think how would we be living together? If you think about these are the same circumstances that led us to this pandemic. Climate Change. Border issues. Social inequalities. Put it to. Cook. So the theme and the pandemic share the same causes. and. That's how would like to think about it not as a question that addresses the president's condition directly but that chairs the grounds for. And in that sense, I feel like the participants are in that exa year to rethink the projects. At one level, they are going back to the original questions or parameters of the question. And in other cases, they are staying the course because they feel that their projects are very valid. In. Other cases, they ought expanding the scope of the project to include a reflection on the pandemic. At another cases, especially projects that do require human contact, they are trying to rethink those illegitimate. But I would say having. In the past two months we've been meeting with every single participant to find out how they're doing. What they're thinking is on the one, I've been reassured that the finale as it's laid out and as it is divided into rooms seems to be standing strong, even acquiring more solidity because of that. And with the exception of a few adjustments and calibrations. I think it will stand the test off the post pandemic is one great. You don't want to make it about a single issue which I can understand. But when I think about issues, I was struck by the wording of a lot of your declaration, your manifesto, a few of us a lot of. Generosity like consideration like dig not you even touch on this idea of you Dimona flourishing. Architecture can be rather an intellectual discipline particularly when architects left to talk to each other about Roth than maybe the end user how important was it for you to get these really raw the humane emotions into the brief and encourage architect who can often intellectualize a subject but maybe less often talked about how it makes people feel how important was that to you as the director, the hospitality of architecture happens many Levens by virtue of it being about space that is inclusive. It does require us to include others in it. But our profession itself, his by necessity dependent on other professions, and therefore we have to be orchestrators. We have to be conveners of contractors, engineers, programmers, artists, and this is what I'm trying to remind everybody off that possibility and indeed it's a strength that increasingly other disciplines are turning to us to help them learn about. How do we bring together different skill sets to answer the urgent problems of today I feel that this is inherent in our training as architects, and in the way we conduct ourselves in our profession. I want to highlight that I wanted to put that up front especially in consistency with the question of the That was Hashem Sark is director of the twenty twenty Biennale of architecture in Venice speaking with Monaco's Josh. To. Hear the rest of that interview and Hashes thoughts on diversity and the role of the architect please Choon in two part two of Monaco's Biennale e special next week. Now with the absence of physical of this year, we came up with an intriguing challenge for some of friends. In the architectural field we asked four practices with the challenge of dreaming up a theme as if they were curator of the inaugural monocle architectural Biennale A. Thanks to the wonders of the medium of radio with no limit on funding or worrying about logistics or practicalities. We asked what they might set as a provocation and in doing so how they might answer their own creative brief. Let's hear from the first of our invited practices S R d. a. the Mumbai based studio works across architecture interiors and product design and runs research that looks at how information and data can be used to inform design Samir. Rotterdam ease the practices founder and she explains her concept for the monocle Biennale a take it away some era. If I had to curate I would call it spiraled graph Colin. Shifting gears. It's this whole idea of being able to move in circles, creating patterns and going forward in a manner the directly going backward. If I were to say that the Westerners Stink of time as lear concept and to moving forward is always online. But eastern philosophy talks of time as cyclic there for moving forward would be on socal and if you're moving on a circle moving forward is in some sense moving backward and if I were to translate this metaphor them, it just means that mowing forward for me is to get into the cost look at what we been doing traditionally in architecture, which is always in the past historically been about sustainability. And speaking about climate resistance and it's being about being one with the environment and so really if we looked at this idea of the spider graph and said moving forward with ideas taking our history with us. Applying contemporary lifestyles and new ways of thinking that we now live with and all of that together into an idea. Then I think the future will be far more sustainable. And for me, that is the case that means shifting. And if I were to answer my own brief, I would look at the idea or will look at the material. Water seawater is vastly becoming into scarcity all over the world. It is an important resource that we are taking for granted. Water also is a very beautiful element. So it's really an element that has so many different forms so many different facets, and at the same time, all of us eighty percent of our bodies is made of water. The planet eighty percent is made up of water again, and so really it's almost biggest to us. It's like as good as having air around us if I were to take this water and make it into an element with which I can build. And consume the water in its various life-giving forms, but also consume so that it can become a common insulation. and. I can harvest within the walls of my building than I have a building that is a water tank, but also a space to use this whole small little wall, which contains water can actually become a water hose which can actually become a community of houses build with what was that are all connected. And then the poetics of water could be further used to celebrate this whole containment harnessing and harvesting water. In the way in which it recalls out into a little water fountain or sprinkles from Sprinkler on bills or just makes his lovely rhythmic sound as it bores itself out from spout. The whole idea of water as life giving. Water as poetry and you have water as music and how do I use all of this as an architectural element that would be institution That was Samir. From S D there we'll hear from final practice of the day in just a moment. For our final participant today, we called on Australia's Christophe a Sydney based architects studio that rose to prominence in two thousand following their win of an international competition for the design of the t t s booth in Times Square New York Crow Fees John Choi is an adjunct professor at the University of Sydney, a member of design review panels in the city and has a seat on the board of the Four Center for Contemporary Asian Art. In short, he's very well qualified for this job he he says his pitch and concept for the Monaco Biala. Have chosen stage as the theme for the Denali. It's way to word stage comes from and I was delighted to find that it means dwelling residents, position situation condition a fantastic platform takes lord of play and staged thing. Much of what we do. is about structuring relationships. To get a different a more valuable, interesting productive come in the built environment and culture all that's certainly what we now practice fascinated since day one is always made a tension between making beautiful craft projects but also realizing at the end there us have any other dimensions sometimes. The object of the act H. doesn't really need to be that particular. It's kind things around that maybe. More. Important. What comes to mind is something that is going beyond the traditional exchange happens to be now the. You know the things that you might have done it. There'd be Nali, you might have set up my have a more permanent or long-term effect in the place that it sits in there may be particular industry relationships or academic research relationships that gets formalized through that. Or even the way that you've we'd maybe nontraditional finale kind of programming to get away to be now programming allows I've lacking between different audiences that possibly could come together in ways that other people have imagined before. It's just trying to explore and be curious and see how what agency and impact of the inelegant had beyond the traditional ways plays out. The pavilion copy a simple space with rotating scenes in which the visitors themselves become part of the exhibit. Sometimes, they'll be large sets physically defining how visitors will interact with the space, and sometimes there will be no set at all but scenes established by curation of activities that visitors enter into and become part of. This will allow cokie raiders to experiment with both set and use different ways. It could be quite fun and revealing to mix program and set in unexpected ways. These interactions could be recorded, analyzed and exhibited in real time as part of the Bonaly, but a life of the pavilion becomes the exhibit as well. Using a metaphor architects instead designed for some time in it's sort of being quite useful. And Arctic sometimes. Set. Designers obsessed about the set without save that? For the play. Sometimes. The play needs strong set sometimes none at all and often just enough to set the scene. But broadening the perspective, you can help check the play rotted in set. or be really set designer who understands the saddest thing into the play? And taking that kind of bigger picture thing you can have practice in a manner that always sounds. That the project of itself has them valued really looking to find where the points of agency that project you have whether that's even in a spatial sense or whether it's in time of how it can influence other things that follow on from that in the way that people interact or the nature of had typology evolves were out of the kind of things have played out over time. That was John Choi of creepy there. Thanks for that John. Sadly? That's all we have time for in one of our Biennale a episode extravaganza. Next week, we're going to rejoin the conversation between Hashem soccer's and Josh Bennett plus we'll hear from more practices putting forward their ideas as curator's of the inaugural Monaco. Architecture. Biennale. A if that's still not enough designed for you our week sister show monocle design extra as every Thursday and for more designed to lights pickup monocle on a newsstand near you or online at Monaco Dot com today's episode was produced and edited by Mail Evans with assistance from Louis Allen. Thanks to a research is Nick Moonies and Charlie Film Court I'm Nolan Giles a thank you very much for listening and goodbye.

Biennale Venice Venice Biennale of architectur Venice Biennale Hashem Circus Nolan Giles Josh Bennett Benalla Boston John Choi Bologna Maserati director Linda Mongols Massachusetts Joe Dini
Biennale special  part 2

Monocle 24: Section D

30:22 min | 9 months ago

Biennale special part 2

"You're listening to multiple on design powered by Maserati. History of Maserati is a history of the pursuit of innovation and the preeminence of design battalion tally mark has grown from humble beginnings in a little workshop in Bologna to the present day in modern, it's home since the nineteen thirties more than a century of inspire, designing, cutting edge money factor of supreme performance and racing pedigree. This is a mark like no author that has come to symbolize the very essence of a sports car company timeless and elegant silhouettes effortless performance, true racing spirit combined with comfort and luxury. That is what makes Maserati, Maserati, the fines distinction and desire since nineteen fourteen. This is Monaco on design Monaco's weekly look at the best in architecture Kroft furniture and fashion I'm Nolan Giles. Welcome to the second installment of our. A. Themed Monaco on design in this episode, we return to a conversation with the Venice Architecture Biennale curator for twenty Hashem sock is and we hear from two more practices in our very own imagined. Monaco has several away all that coming up right here on monocle design on Monaco twenty four do stay tuned. Now of you got in touch last week to say how much you enjoyed hearing from practices crow fee and s D on what they would dream up if they were given the task of curated, the inaugural monocle architecture Biennale, a we're continuing to imagine and this week we will hear from two practices who have accepted odd challenge. So without further ado, he is part two. First up today resolve collective, an interdisciplinary group whose work combines architecture engineering art and design all to address social challenges. Let's hear from co-directors, Seth and Kill Escape Smith on what they would dream up. The title for. Being on I slash lurker fairies is starting from the If you curate. And I'm tempted to say that we probably couldn't be because maybe he needs to be someone under eighteen maybe we just. Coordinates. Is curated. Participants to respond to this idea of local value and. Use neighborhood and other resource. Materially, and culturally. In London, your ended the neighborhood would be. Important philosophical indication to starting from your neighborhood from where you are and where you live because it's a, it's a way of embracing evaluating tested knowledge. So if it is a, we've actually not called. A local fair. So it'd be starting from the end just because the people in the ends aren't but understand Bialy is. Each to be list in terms of the format and medium in which responding but really thinking about how we can revalue local knowledge neck really celebrate some of the ways in which we in the SOC- young people understand the knees and neighborhoods. And if we were to respond to in brief the fair with. Only be for people who are under eighteen. If you're if you're university student, you can apply in a formal sense. There's also restrictions. There is no central space for it. So no kind of central. All big. Exhibition Center few which places take power or even a central neighborhood or city where everything that's it exhibited. The idea is at the Biennale, a accident infrastructure, which to enable these young people to make their design, make their installations, express themselves and stop from the end. Voters as curate would be to facilitate that process to make sure that that appropriate funding that's been race to make sure that we're linking them up with with kind of local stakeholders and say professionals as well. He can help them realize some of these designs by positioning in this way then position like professional institutions, academic institutions of resources to us to realize what's happening in these neighborhoods. I guess trying to use the power that being is have internally. So within the architecture design industry trying to kind of dissipate a little bit recreate not an encourage participation within local communities and start to kind of discuss and explore themes that are important local areas. The same way that be as kind of discuss themes and situations are important on a global scale but within choir, why would say squire kind of exclusive community? I always trying to think about when we're walking there's Quite a childlike approach design in the sense that it is really about encompassing, you know who you know and just trying to expand as much as possible and trying to learn as many new things as possible. An imply many as many new like positions as possible. Say why starting with just under eighteen It's going way way back to when design isn't as much kind of concept that people are familiar with is just a process that you can enable. So we're saying is you know an enabled that design process and usually resources that we can provide and use that knowledge that you have in the connections that you have. I. Think it's important to think about festively being something that could happen nearly I think it'd be important to embrace like medium structure in that way in that the way the most of us even ninety nine percent of people who interact would be knowledge anyway see it through the Internet. None of us are kind of global scale to Venice really, and in this way that this something ends fair would be different because that like to hit is that someone in your neighborhood has tried to respond to the I think imagine it more like the kind of thing where it's like you're walking home and on that abandoned of land has just been vacant for as long as you can remember something's. been started by a younger person in collaboration with local organization or local architect or design fans paths even with the help of life volunteers from the nearby university but it could take any form. It might be like a pavilion using local materials. It might be a small exhibition, the wool it could be a sound insulation piece, but really the experience happening across something that I think starting ended really let to cure. Idea like you coming back carrying. Out to the shop? So we going to link you'll make finding the calf and that's is in that vicinity that you experience it. All thanks to appeal and set skiffs. Smith. Of resolve collective. And the final practice to throw their hats into the ring is chat architects. Here's chat pong to Ramal calling from Bangkok with his take on the Biennale format. When you're a curator I think you have to pose a question almost like a game. This question has to invite you to play the game. You want to set up these rule so that everybody can play and have fun in their own way. For me, I want to be accessible to normal everyday people because I feel like. Architecture has been put on a pedestal and sometimes we speak too much in the same language that only designers understand and. If we want to empower architecture. We have to make it more accessible and relatable to other people choosing the theme for Bonaly I think, has to have residents to architects and on architects. That would be my a preface to how I would approach what I think for me is very pertinent. I. Don't know how architect it is. I feel like in Thailand at least there's kind of a backlash. To not only the disaster that are happening because of covid but there are natural disasters, long term and short term happening because of overbuilding. Even, before covert hit. We had been used to wearing masks. Already. But. Not because we are overly sensitive and want to protect neighbors from germs. But because the past two or three years, microdots pm two point five has entered Bangkok to level so high. China, India that we literally have to wear masks to protect our lungs and it's been a shock. So it made me really think about Oh. My Gosh I have began in this because. The three big components are auto pollution, forest burnings well, but definite rampant unchecked construction of buildings infrastructure that puts into question our whole profession. How do we? Still find value as architects if we can no longer build. I think that would be my my question at the Bonaly. Do Architects still have value. Or we only defined by building physical things. Do we have value in other aspects? It makes us try to redefine our roles as architects so that it isn't just a high end designer and builder of things but perhaps a wait a person who can solve solutions and ingenious ways. I will participants away. I would approach is rethink the idea of adaptive reuse recycling building so that you don't have to construction, but it has to be done on a massive scale to really make an impact in Bangkok than a lot of developing cities. The idea of shop house everybody identifies. Oh. Shop House. You Know Asian Urbanism Right, there's kind of a nostalgic feeling. Oh, we want to save the shop house because it talks. About living on the top commercial in the bottom use. But that type of lifestyle has gone nobody lives in a crowded street where the also sell stuff because of pollution because of overcrowded nece. So what's happened is the shop house has become neglected and it's become abandoned where people only maybe you know sell out the bottom levels and the top two, three, four levels seventy five percent are abandoned vacant and if you look at Bangkok. shophouses make up at least thirty percent of whole building stock space for millions of people of a city sixteen, million people. There's empty buildings at accommodate millions of people that isn't being used. So my answer would be I would upcycle fifty thousand shophouses on a massive scale. Without building quote unquote. The way I work is I research a lot, and so reprogramming shop house is in just about inventing new programs or New Society with the research that I do I go and look at Real Street vernacular and how local citizens manipulate an adjust existing structures to they're very unexpected way of life. What we found is that not all shophouses are Bandon but. Claimed by migrant workers. So that we have a lot of secretive rental units on the bottom or contractors and employers have rented out these top levels of shophouses Burmese Cambodian Lao workers. It's amazing that this has become a new informal public housing without the government even having to put one hand into my entry would be to reveal the truth that is already there that is more innovative than anything could ever design and show it in a way that's provocative and truthful and authentic. Chat Pong Rudy Mall there thank you for that. We'll be reflecting on the four proposals that are international practices have put forward later in the show but first, we return to a chat with Hashem Salk is director of the twenty twenty Venice architecture. Biennale a he spoke with Monaco's deputy editor Josh. Let's rejoin that conversation with Hashem it talks about the diversity of this year's cohort of participants, a great number of which come from Latin, America Africa, and Asia. If we are to be true to the diversity and plurality of ideas of imaginations, then we at a cost, the net wide otherwise it's not diverse enough. But I do have to say that. While we did make it a point to make sure that we have equal representation and broader representation. By asking the questions we were asking it wasn't hard. It was just opening up possibilities for us to look elsewhere and with it and. I wouldn't say that it wasn't automatic that the bureau was equal representation of men and women or broader representation across the globe, but it was much much easier and more natural than I thought. It's when you ask the right questions that you get that kind of representation. I'm when I look at your own career to pull the Lens back a little bit, you're originally from Lebanon who spent a lot of time in the US. Do you think oppose having a foot in two different continents but as well as working internationally, that's giving you a different perspective on how certain problems be they density togetherness community cohesion social exclusion has it given you a bit of a broader perspective on how you approach things. Definitely, I may be into settings, but I'm always in a Beirut state of mind the chaos, the livelihood, the Mediterranean, the pulse. Energy has always been for me a very important dimension of the way. I think. I do want to say that in Lebanon I was starting my practice it was with non-governmental organizations working in rural development. Interestingly, the question in development today is no longer whether you're in the mountains or in the city meeting how do we improve the rural area so that it stops urban migration rotary migration to cities, but it was about whether you're in south. Lebanon working in A. Fisherman's village or you're in Melbourne Australia where you fall to your cousins who emigrated during the civil war. So the tension between being a home in one place or another is no longer within the national boundaries, but within the global boundaries were witnessing. Global. Emerging versus. Glue Open cities. This is the new condition that we are all in our own nomads. We are all refugees, we our own citizens of the world. And so while. Maybe, my forced excellent United States because of the civil war in. Lebanon, back in the nineteen eighties makes that condition a little bit harsher I do feel that my situation is not unique. It's actually probably the prevalent conditioned today that's very potent image as well as being from two different places feeling the heart, the heart beat the sole democracy on Martyr's Square, still echoing in your ears. But then being in another place entirely, you think architecture thinks about itself as a practice that is cohesive. We've seen over the past few years that they're not solve for want of a better word starchitect but very individualistic an individualized styles emerging is there a bit of a case for thinking a bit more carefully about the global unified need of architecture as well because obviously the the biennale divided up by nation at some. Points but do we need to think pan nationally a little bit more about the issues that you've raised in your manifesto as well because they already global problems as well as national ones architecture is burdened with the responsibility of expressing place and over the past century, the idea of please tended to be the idea of the nation state it has evolved has become more complex has become more diluted and with the advent of globalization and the inability for places to produce their own images. So quickly and naturally to content and to compete and sit on the global map, they have relied on the individual signature of architects in order to give them that visibility taught using Chrissy that identity. I again here do not see that as being solely in the negative lens I think the Star architects have adopted this role to be able to give places signature. Signature, not the signature of the users, not the signature off the setting. But in that sense they have also. Inadvertently perhaps empowered architecture and given the world. A better sense of how important architecture is in shaping identities in shaping the imagination and Hashem, you speak very passionately and very knowingly after a long career in architecture. But I just want my final question to seize on one aspect of the manifesto, which was this idea that architecture is fundamentally optimistic discipline. You're always building. You're always adding you're always imagining something as you mentioned earlier in the interview that better than before you fundamentally. Optimistic. That we have in our hands, the answers to these seemingly intractable questions which you're posing, and you know most notably your theme How will we live together is an open question there's no definitive answer there's no there's no yes. No a you optimistic. I'm as we sit here in slightly straightened times with a lot of problems are in front of architects and in front of all of us that we need to strike out. I am still very optimistic. We have no choice. We have no choice as architects we have no choice as human beings. The future is in front of space to imagine possibilities. That's how we propel ourselves forward in every day. Maybe it's my deeply ingrained romanticism that drives me that that action. But I truly believe in the power of imagination to help us get out to. All situations within. Including this one. That was Hashing Sarkis Director of the twenty twenty Venice Architecture Biennale a speaking to Monaco's deputy editor Josh Fan. Well I'm very happy to announce that I have Monaco's Nick Denise in the building with me to discuss the monocle architecture. Biennale. Nick comes from a very unique position because he's not only a great design writer he's also trained in architecture. So I think we should be able to get some some pretty good info out of him today. So Nick, we've heard from all of curator's there, and it's quite difficult to kind of pick them apart and discuss all of the topics that they've presented because there is just so much variety there but I thought it'd be really nice to kind of start with shot. He says something that's really interesting to me, which is why architecture So. Covered in architecture talk sometimes, they can feel a little bit too academic sometimes even myself you know as a design, I can't understand what's on the placard. How'd you feel about this as someone that has training in architecture feeling on this I'm going to be honest I love it i. think it's really really good I mean like you said a studied landscape architecture. So I have a background out of design school and I'm going to be on US didn't do barely any of my academic rating purely because it was just even somebody studying trying to break it down and understand what people are actually talking about when they're riding in an academic language I think is really really difficult even for me. Running about design as well being, I would've speaking a language that people can understand I think is really important. So chat mentioned that there but you SORTA got picked up by a few of the other curator's as well and other the guys from resolve sort of mentioned a similar thing about making architecture a little bit more accessible and and I guess in a way as well. John from Kofi similar thing that's really important making that accessible and breaking down those barriers and making it a little bit less intimidating for sure and. I guess at the end of the day, these events are very important architects but really if they want to create lasting change in something that's memorable from these events, they've really have to have a bit of a broader appeal which kind of leads me back to chat who talks about this idea of how do we find value as architects if we build, it's a super interesting question and you know it's a topic that we cover and Monaco from time to time he looks at it through the Lens of Reuse but I'm going to. Ask you to put on your architects Patnaik and maybe interpret his brief in a way I'm putting you on the spot here. But how would you kind of look at that topic of you know being an architect but unable to build I think that's a really important point like what role can I play beyond just construction I think if we go back and perhaps we even pedal back to I, guess an architectural education it is about design thinking it is about understanding systems and processes shots perhaps talking about re making and analyzing the. System of making I think it's that sort of thinking where we can apply and breakdown systems that perhaps architects can be most effective. You have on the spot trying to think of an example. Yeah. That's really really good. I also think leads nicely into what the resolve guys saying, which is kind of like if we start looking at architecture through the eyes of a child, the concept of the knowledge through the eyes of the child, we get something very, very different and I was thinking about it when was listening to that lovely piece. I literally have not spoken to anyone under the age of eighteen four as I can remember, and maybe when I did it was not for anything important or. Anything that's really more than just being superficial I think there's a lot that we can probably glean from their. Starting from the end, how would you see that coming to live? What they're doing is celebrating the way that young people might understand or see their neighborhood and I think beauty in that i. think that's really Nice. It's maybe not naive at he, but it may be more the fact that their perception of the built environment isn't being clouded by perhaps restrictions on cost or practicalities of actually making things and what can come out of that a really interesting unique ideas something that might push boundaries. Not, necessarily, as adults in the room thought of because, we immediately put barriers in close ourselves in of been on community consultations. What we've worked with kids and they wanted foam pits store for them to do backflips on there. Bam. xbox in the local park and and that might not necessarily be something that you could practically cute on but it highlights perhaps a demand and something that again, the adults in the room can look to execute on an and make your community that better serves the people in it, and it's important to remember that children are part of that community. So serving them is important and I think with children. There's a lot more urgency to the way that they think about tackling the problems that we have at the moment going forward with regard to sustainability. You know kids are just basically I mean we don't want to go on about Greta too much but you know her attitude is like we need to fix things right now on that topic of sustainability probably the person that talked most deeply about it with her be a was semira Radford from Asada who was featured on last week show. Now, she looks at this idea of the spiral off which. Is a bit conceptual but I think at the heart of it is this idea about how we can take things from the past ideas and our history and move forward with that. There's already enough here that we can learn from it. We can take from and that we can kind of structure into more questioning and creating a proper way around that that is actually a nice one that maybe does work in the Venice construct being a lot more international in its re-met, an alarming different people from different parts of the world to take that approach to it. Now, I'm really interested in from you if you're looking at this Monaco. How do you see the difference between a local Biennale, which is probably more led to this starting from the ends where we're looking at specific neighborhoods and something more global like s Rda's approach, which is there's a concept and you can take it kind of however you like, what do you prefer? What am I? I mean at this Meriden both and I think if we start off with that global perspective and Samir is approached the spark graph the idea that time runs cycles I think that's really nice and architects across the globe that obviously a to you know particularly, if you want also take that and I guess transposed onto the ideas of the circular economy and Architecture becoming more important I. think that's relevant. Using materials and building in a way that's authentic and tied to place it draws upon your own heritage, but it also comes back and places that people love that feel unique that you care about. So you can obviously then like that approach and over more local event and and for me personally I want like this idea of having it set in local communities. I think that's really nice and it comes back to big threat about discussion right now has been about making architecture more accessible and moving into these local communities. You can take those global ideas like circular architecture and apply it to local context and I think doing that is perhaps the most effective way of celebrating architecture biennale a form, and maybe the question to ask is like, what do we want from? We want something where it's exclusive and it's in one place and maybe we've got the best of the best there and that's brilliant or do. We may be one something that's more local. That is more digestible, more approachable that more people can connect to and not to sit on the fence I think is married in both but I think for a person organizing event it's really asking what purpose a day trying to serve I'm only asking because I just think the responses we got was so great that why not try for a real physical Monaco Biennale next year? What do you think about that? I'm into our to and I've got an idea here pitched. And born off listening to these discussions about making as of said architecture accessible if we were going to do one at Midori house where we H. H have our own installation or I would be calling on the universal curriculum and I think I'll be hopefully working a multidisciplinary team may be working with the commercial guys upstairs on a little bit of advertising working with the team and really looking at a why that we can perhaps make the best public education campaign for what good architecture is and maybe using that to help inspire whether it's developed to understand the importance of investing in design or just. Two children have they're impacted by design and probably adults too. So it's quite a far-reaching concept you proposing. I'm ready to do it. If I can just dedicate a few hours awake. I think I. Think we can get a going I mean do you have any thoughts? What would you like to say? I really appreciate things that are quite visual. When you go to these events, I don't like reading the placards and I also don't particularly like being put into an environment where I don't fully understand what's going on. I prefer to have something that I can respond to quickly but think about for a long time afterwards the Swiss. Pavilion at the loss architecture was a really good example of that where they created what was essentially like highlight of all of their kind of monotony of the building industry in Switzerland but also the perfection of it. So it was basically an apartment which had all the fittings of normal Swiss apartments when they're built but all the scales are all skewed. So you kind of felt your allison one design walking around and you're seeing the same stuff but in different sizes and scales and it was a bit discombobulating but at. The end of it you learn something you enjoyed it as an experience and you didn't feel like you know you completely dumbfounded by the concept because you just want smart enough to understand it. So if you can kind of fit that into what you'll planning nick, I think I think we've got something good going on here i. think that sounds good. My thanks to nick. MINNIE's there for joining me to discuss Monaco's textual. Benalla. We look forward to rejoining the topic next year and sadly that's all the time we have for today's show. If you're eager for more do listen to our five minute mid week sisters show monocle on design extra. As Thursday and do subscribe. So you don't miss a beat for more delighted to seek out or subscribe to Monocle magazine on newsstands on line. Also, if you want to drop us a note, you can email me Nolan Giles MSG monocle dot com. Today's episode was produced and edited by Lee Evans with editing assistance from Steph chun-goo. Thanks to our research is Nick Minnie's and Charlie Phil mccord's I'm Nolan Giles. Thank you very much for listening and goodbye.

Monaco Monaco Nick Maserati Venice Architecture Biennale Lebanon Bangkok Nolan Giles Venice Bonaly Hashem Salk United States Smith Venice Architecture Biennale deputy editor Bologna Monaco Biennale Josh Fan
Tax and Regulate and Waterways Cleanup Program

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

1:25:55 hr | 2 years ago

Tax and Regulate and Waterways Cleanup Program

"The pro. Vermont. It's Dave Graham show on WD. It's your show about the people places and the issues that matter the most to you now, here's your host, Dave Graham. Well is still out sick. We're hoping to see him back soon sitting here in his place is John Walters political columnist for seven days, you can find my column in all our coverage at seven days of ET dot com. I'm here at the state house live this morning as the legislature continues to move toward a German to scheduled for two weeks. From now believe so we will be talking about issues around the state house later in the show nine thirty will be talking with Julie more natural resources secretary. I imagine a lot of that conversation will be about clean water. Maybe green up days. Well in the ten o'clock hour first half hour, rob LeClair who is the deputy Republican leader in the house. The he's he hails from Barry town and at ten thirty. Sharon regard, the I. Year lawmaker she is from Berkshire up in Franklin county. She faces the challenge of being a democrat who represents a predominantly Republican district and in the first half hour today. My guest is not her shame. Who's another first year lawmaker from dumber Ston democrat serves on the House Judiciary committee and has been a state trooper for several years. So and he brings that perspective things. He's learned as a state trooper to his work in the house, particularly on the judiciary committee where he has a seat. Too Representative hushing good morning morning. Thanks for having and reminder to our listeners we do. Take phone calls anytime anywhere to four four seventeen seventy seven toll free one eight seven seven to nine one eight two five five and I'll try to remind you of those every once in a while during the show so almost through. First term in the legislature. What's it been like, it's been a really outstanding experience? I mean, it's a lot of it is what I expected in the way that it's very frenetic in you're going from point to point B. There's barely ever any time to sit down and actually. Take a breath and just pause for a moment. But you know, the days start basically at seven in the morning and go until eight PM typically on average and you're far away from home about two hours. Did you did you want to serve on House Judiciary as as a state trooper? Absolutely. That's that's that's what I was hoping for from from the very beginning. And I feel as if you know, the perspective, I bring is. Is looking at social Justice, racial Justice. And so on those those are some of the most important issues to me, and I think that bringing the law enforcement perspective to judiciary and how law enforcement plays in that arena. I think that's been very helpful for the committee. Yeah. And and what people might not expect is that you take from your experiences on on the state police is you have a pretty progressive you point. It's not sort of the traditional law and order type thing. It's it's more. It is more. You know, balanced, I guess you would say. And wanting a policing the law to be forces for Justice and equity. Yeah. You know, I think that law enforcement is supposed to be so much more than just people who sit in their cruisers and right people tickets. I mean, yes, tickets are a part of the job. But in my opinion, the community that an officer works in they tend to look at officers as the sort of foundational safety net in their communities in that whenever something is going south. You'll call the police whether it's a fire low you call the fire department, the police will show up to, but you know, if it's a fight or a burglary you call the police in you, expect stoicism and you expect. Compassion, and empathy as well. And I think that is what needs to be emphasized more. So than the punitive measures that historically the quote, unquote law and order mentality has taken one of the things that. That I always think about, you know, police tend to not be well paid especially in local forces, but they are really sort of the first line of response, not only for crimes and for accidents. But also for a variety of situation. You're you're kind of a social worker in a way. Yes. Yes. A lot of what we do is really social work, and you have to you have to be prepared for that. You know, a lot of a lot of folks come in that line of work, tending to think that it's all car chases and shootouts, and it's it's not at all a lot of it is having to learn how to talk to people and work through their problems. You know because you can't arrest your way out of every problem. You can't ticket your way out of every problem sometimes sitting down and taking the extra time to converse with somebody who's either going for mental health crisis or. You know is struggling with their family members taking that extra time. I think makes a huge difference in the long term. Yeah. One quite often when law enforcement is in the headlines, it's because of an officer involved shooting, and I would think on the one hand it seems like quite often police go a little too far on the other hand. That's got to be a really difficult snap judgment to make. Yes. Yes. It is. I. I take the mentality that you know, I'm I'm not at all of these shootings. So I can know be morning quarterback or anything. But there are there have been a few times where the thought has crossed through my mind, I can probably five or six times in my whole career where I've been in a situation where I've had to very quickly ask myself, am I going to have to use a weapon in this scenario? And it's it's not really something that I can articulate how it feels to be in that scenario because all your other thoughts, go out the window. And you're just thinking about that moment because you know, one you don't wanna make a mistake. You can't make a mistake in that scenario, and to you also want to preserve your safety in your life as well as the life and safety of everybody around you. So it's it's it's hard to articulate what those scenarios are like, but it's it's difficult. Imagine. I can't imagine. I actually honestly. And. There was an interesting exchange on Twitter earlier this week that I noticed it was someone saying, you know, if you ask someone in any sort of first responders situation flying work, if you, you know, quite often one of the questions, they get asked. And I'm not going to ask you, what's the worst thing you've ever seen, and this this this tweet was you'll never get the real answer in you retweeted. Absolutely. Or something to that effect pretty much. It's it's a very common question that I've done used to especially in this building. Because everybody wants to know what's the craziest thing you've ever seen a Cup. And I made that mistake of asking of veteran cop when I was brand new what the craziest thing that what the craziest thing was that he had ever seen. And he told me, and I was like, oh, maybe I shouldn't ask that question. And then I realized that people reliving the trauma, exactly exactly. People generally expect a quirky or whimsical story when they asked that the specially with the whole super troopers trope. But the. It it definitely brings back. The absolute worst thing that you've ever seen at least it does for me. And I know it does for a number of my colleagues eventually get a prepared answer that you can just sort of. And I made a prepared answer to. Well, right now, we're going to turn I guess to cannabis legalisation which part of that Bill was was before your committee this week. And we say all we could say all sorts of things about being up to your neck saliva. But basically the debate in the House Judiciary committee was all about roadside saliva testing. Correct. We focused primarily on roadside saliva testing. We did have a second second element which actually kind of disappointed that we didn't talk about enough which was regarding disparities and individuals who were previously disenfranchised by four selling cannabis. And now this industry is being created the same one that they used to participate in but we're penalized for it. And now this industries coming in the spirit is primarily with people of color, and we didn't really talk about that at all. But we did talk predominantly about. Saliva, aren't they? Barred from participating in. No, the the actual the idea is bringing them in to allow them to participate more so than the individuals who generally create a monopoly on these sorts of things, which I think it's good to bring in the people who were previously disenfranchised. The real question is logistically, how do we how do we do that? So saliva testing. It is the governor Phil Scott has made it a condition for signing a cannabis Texan regulate Bill, and you were discussing this quite a bit the last couple of weeks and. What I mean, what were the parameters of the debate? There were a whole lot of parameters here for a long time. If we're talking about all of them, the the main issue was having a was creating a roadside saliva test. That's what the governor wants and through our research and extensive testimony and committee, debate and conversation. The concern is the roadside saliva testing is not as accurate as the governor may think the Michigan state police recently had a pilot program, which they scrapped, and they said we need to perform more studies before we continue forward with us. Because it wasn't reliable enough. Correct. Yes. Yes. And the part that is. Concerning for me is the fact that the legislature received this was I think a year or two ago the legislature received a report that roadside saliva testing was ninety eight percent accurate. They sampled I believe fifty three people, and I talked to Dr Trish, cog up to scientific standards for three people, and I talked to Dr Trish content. I said, I'm not a toxicologist. I know you are but fifty three seems like a pretty small number, and she agreed that it was a small number. There was another study that was performed believe in two thousand fifteen and I think it was Chicago where about one hundred and three people were sampled and the accuracy rate was eighty seven percent. And so now, my concern is when you expand that number to the general motoring public in Vermont who will be subject to the saliva test will the accuracy rate drop will it increase. I think more studies need to happen before it is. Foisted upon the people over month. Well, you are giving a substantial discretionary power to law enforcement officers to decide whether to pull someone over and administers saliva tests that may or may not be accurate from your experience as a trooper. How do you make those calls if you're driving your patrolling the highways, how do you decide whether to pull someone over? Well, a lot of it has to do with manner of operation or defective equipment typically. Right. You know, we can we like you said we have a wide discretion on when and where we can pull somebody over somebody's speeding. If somebody's not staying in their lane if we can articulate that there's reasonable suspicion that a violation has occurred. We can pull somebody over right? And and the fear among some is that a Grateful Dead sticker on your bumper might turn into a pretext for pulling someone over. So the judiciary committee did come up with a compromise. What was it? And what do you think of it? So like, I mentioned the main concern is the accuracy of the test. What we have create let me let me back up, and that's the bell rings. I have to go soon, but I'll get through this. But currently everything that the police do regarding D wise is governed by nitsa and the ICP nitsa stands for the National Highway Traffic safety sociation, and the I p is the international association of chiefs of police. Neither of these associations have given their their blessing so to speak on the saliva test. And they've said more studies need to happen. All the other things that we do for you is the field sobriety tests. The preliminary breath tests, those have been given the green light by these associations. I would say that if we're going to add another element into this process. Let's let it get the green light by these associations. I for it being accurate, and then we'll revisit it. And then maybe we can have roadside saliva testing. But not until it's accurate and reliable, and we can say that it can find a threshold of a psychoactive metabolite that would be indicative of impairment, which will be hard to find. But science advances at a steady clip, you know, five or ten years. There's there's now a market for such test. So maybe the research will the better-funded from now. Exactly. But right now, I know to roadside saliva testing, fill those standards are met. Whether it's what's in the Bill. I believe is. Saliva test with a warrant at the police station rather than on the roadside much more accurate. Yes. The the evidence test. So there's two tests. There's the roadside evidentiary which happens the end of the processing. And the evidentiary would require a warrant, and according to testimony that we heard saliva evidentiary test is as accurate as a blood test and so- relying on that testimony. They both go through the same machines that measure metabolites in the blood of drugs, and according to the testimony that we heard because they're accurate. They're both equally accurate, and you have to get a warrant. The saliva would be less invasive and the person would be in custody less amount of time. And so we put that on there for the evidence airy tests, but not on the roadside tests. The just for clarity. There is no roadside test now until the standards are met that we've described the other thing that we've created is allowing EMT's to draw blood at the police department this saves time in a number of ways. Diori DUI process is very lengthy four to six hours. Hours. The blood draw happens you have to take the defendant to the hospital driving their interrupt the ER driving back. Instead, we can have a paramedic or Mt. Come the barracks. Draw the blood it's done save. The cops time it saves the defendant time they're detained less, and it doesn't disrupt the hospital. So there are. There's one or two more provision. But I know we're almost at a time and the bell is tolling for the the houses going into session now, and you need to be on the floor, and that's not far away. But I will let you go. And thank you very much for being on the show today. Thank you very much. State Representative Nodar how sheen you can take off your headphones. Thank you leave. State Representative Nodar shame of dumber Ston. He's a democrat serves on the House Judiciary committee. Very nice discussion this morning, and he is off to the house floor the houses going into session. And a lot of people are scurrying around right now where outside the cafeteria at the state house, the Dave Graham show with guest hosts, John Walters, political columnist for seven days coming up after the bottom of the hour break news break, we will have Julie more the the natural resources secretary member. Governor Scott's cabinet. She has been deeply involved in the water cleanup plan, obviously. And we will talk about that. And anything else that comes up with her your input as always welcome to four four seventeen seventy seven toll free one eight seven seven to nine one eight two five five also reminder the day Graham show is brought. Uncast daily from nine to eleven. It is also available on livestream at WD radio dot com. And we put it up as a podcast, and I hear it's a pretty popular podcast. So if you can't listen from nine to eleven check out whenever it's convenient for you. We will we will have more Dave Graham show or live from the state house where things are happening here. John Walters sitting in for Dave. And we'll be back after the news. Spring long-awaited much celebrated upstairs at the almost world-famous. Warren store you will find colorful clothing for men. Women and children bulls, mugs, candles cards and gift wrap. Puzzles toys and games jewelry CBD products, local soaps, more that's one stop shopping for months. According to Yankee magazine, come for lunch on our deck and enjoy a fun funky and friendly world class shopping experience in the beautiful mad river valley. Warren store in Warren village opened nine to six every day. Listen to the day Graham show, your time that w Devi radio dot com. Click on the program tap, then day Graham show to listen to the podcast of Pasha. Now back to Dave live on WD, FM and AM. And we are back here at the state house as you might tell from the sound of voice. I am not Dave Graham. I'm John Walters political columnist for seven days, you can read my stuff in the print paper and also online seven days V, T dot com. Seven spelled out. And don't forget the because we were not the first to try to get seven days dot com, and that did not work out. So we are seven days AT dot com. And we are live from the state house this morning, and we have with us natural resources secretary, Julie more from governor Scott's cabinet. And she is I am Agean. You are mostly monitoring the debate over the the waterways cleanup program that is front and center for us, this legislative session view, and there was some movement last night on the financial end of it. And you're not the tax or finance expert in the Scott administration people for that stuff. But but you are following what the what the legislatures is doing. Finding a financing source which has been the sore spot for this thing ever since we got this mandate from the federal government and the inception of months clean water act back in twenty fifteen one of the commitments in that clean water act was to a dentist long-term source of funding. This port our work, and it's been four years of of intense discussion and debate that has gotten us to this point. But it does appear like there is likely to be a path forward. This session House Ways and means yesterday was discussing redirecting a portion of the rooms and meals tax to the clean water fund believe they were were talking about four points overall, which translates to roughly seven point six million dollars the governor's budget when he proposed. It contained a a line for eight million dollars from a different source. He had proposed to use the estate tax. But but of a similar magnitude ticks revenue would have been moved out of the general funded into the clean water. Yes. And so as a means came up with almost eight million dollars. Exactly. I don't imagine you speak for the governor on on on fiscal issues. But. I have to ask does that sound like an acceptable funding source. I think it's it's a good starting place for that conversation in that it is relying on an existing source of funding in the rooms and meals tax. I think there's concerns about if and how much of those four points would be offset by by potentially a new fee on. We're hearing pre written softwares, soft cloud based software solutions. I don't have the argument. There would be that we already we already imposed sales tax purchased software, non cloud based software. But now more and more software is in the cloud. So you are more often renting softer than buying it. And so you could make the argument that we are only extending tax into a new sort of like what we did with online retail and online lodging reservation services. We are now extending tax into a new area. Not raising a new techs, right? And. That's part of the argument. That's that's being made. And and I'm not sure yet with the governor's perspective is on it as you indicated this is work that really sort of came to fruition. Just yesterday late yesterday afternoon. I would not expect him to have a position on it. It's clear though. I think it's fair to say that the legislature on this issue as well as others. Is really trying to find ways of doing things that are acceptable to the governor. And I have seen when the session started. I was very skeptical that there was a new atmosphere in the building. And and a new wanting to be connected by on the on the on the on the side of the governor in his administration really wanting to reengaged legislature. But it really has happened this year, and the Democrats are at least trying to find things might be acceptable to even a stray shin which step in the right direction. Anyway, there's been a lot of really constructive conversation s Ninety-six which is the Bill in front of House Ways. And means right now, not only includes the funding piece, but also talks about implementation and how we're going to ensure a number of these projects get done on the ground, and it's been a real collaborative effort. I with the Senate natural resources committee and more recently with the house natural resources committee and the administration as well as our partner. Whether it's watershed groups environmental NGOs conservation districts regional planning commissions. Everyone's been really engaged in these conversations. And I think we we've built a really robust infrastructure to to ensure that the clean water work gets done. Once the funding questions are settled. And this is an issue where you know, it's it's in businesses interest to get this done as well as the environmental community, you know, they want cleaner water, but you know, the the business sector realizes this is crucial for Vermont's future. And water-quality bluewater green mountains are sort of an economic driver, not even sort of. They are an economic driver for the state. The governor would tell your environment is our economy, and so making these kinds of investments in Vermont's environmental really essential to the overall health of Vermont. I'm John Walters sitting in for Dave Graham, the day Graham show on NewsRadio WD EV our phone numbers. Two four four seventeen seventy seven I say picking up my notepad and reading one eight seven seven to nine one eight two five five if you'd like to talk to natural resources secretary, Julie more about anything to do in that show resources. But right now, we're talking water quality. Now, the state's share well, first of all I should ask, you know, ways and means came up with seven point six governor proposed eight that's only four hundred thousand dollars. But is that close enough or do we need to top that off somehow? That's a good question. So we put together clean water budget for the coming year that totals just shy of fifty one million dollars. It includes about twenty seven million dollars worth of of direct state appropriations as well as some additional resources that are largely visible to us by virtue of the state's appropriations we're able to pull down federal funds. Whether it's for to address stormwater runoff from our roads through the federal highway administration or to draw down funds from EPA that allow us to make investments in wastewater treatment facilities. So the total investment we're looking at this year is is on the order of fifty one million dollars at the end of the day. We would have to make some hard decisions where we to come up four hundred thousand dollars short. But at the same time, it reflects only about one percent of the total spending. We're anticipating on clean water in the coming year. I hadn't realized talk around the building has been eight million dollars all session. I hadn't realized how much money is coming in from other sources and how. Big effort. This is going to be. We're talking talking about a twenty year effort with fifty million dollars a year. It's a total price tag of two point one billion dollars based on the treasurer's two thousand seventeen estimate. So it works out to be about one hundred million dollars a year. The feeling was that the state's portion of that needed to be in this fifty to sixty million dollar range, both in direct resources, but also resources that become available by virtue of the state making these investments in we've tried to put forward a budget that does that in addition to the eight million dollars. That you've been mentioning we have seven million dollars. It's already dedicated both through the surcharge on the property transfer tax and soon the sheets the unclaimed bottle deposits that. Currently go back to the beverage manufacturers. The state will actually reclaim those. Dedicate them to to clean water. We expect that to produce about seven million dollars worth of resources. So for a total of fifteen. In addition, the state makes investments through its capital Bill largely targeting again, wastewater treatment facilities, but also best management practices on farms. So it all adds up. I'm John Walters sitting in for Dave Graham on the Dave Graham show here on WD NewsRadio. We are talking with Julie more head of the agency of natural resources in the Scott administration. And we have a call from done and Elmore. Good morning done. Wanna take cover today? Glad to have a chance to raise. The question would Yuli. We for years have been trying to protect flood areas along rivers to the state and not allow building. In those flood plains. However is seems to me almost every wastewater treatment plant. We have is located in a flood plain. And I wonder if we haven't made a serious mistake and not sought that out better. I frankly, don't have enough expertise in that field that have any idea. How else we would do it unless we could find a way to process all waste on site? But I I give the number of times we've seen Burlington spill over and flood the leg given what I remember on Ludlow in the seventies. When they lost the whole plant in the two floods that we had that spring. What else can we do is was this a mistake to construct such plants in river flood areas or what else could we do? That's what my question is that that's a great question. I would say as a starting place. Our motto is to avoid future conflicts. Right. So to not build new infrastructure in the ways of rivers where where they're likely to come in harm's way. So we learn. It makes sense. The put the treatment plant at the lowest point we've we've really like things to flow by gravity it both insurance. They head in the right direction, and it's significantly less operationally expensive and complex than having a whole network of pumps, which is why most of our wastewater facilities end up right down at the water's edge. I think it's also a reflection of just sort of what we've learned over time. There was a hubris of NAN thinking we could just pick up and move our rivers and put them where we want them and they'd stay put clearly that's not the case. And as we learned that our our best bet our best strategy is to give rivers the space. They need to move. We're trying to do that in places where we have already built things to the extent we have built things not only here in mount pill. Your today would I point to the wastewater facility, but probably the entire city of Montpellier is largely within the flood plain. We have and we're looking for places upstream and downstream to let some of those floodwaters come out of their banks access their historic flood plains with the idea to Ford's some of our already built investments a degree of protection, the the wastewater treatment challenges are real the caller looted concerns with sewer overflows. They certainly have a very well deserved factor in that they do include an amount of untreated wastewater, but at the same time when they're not overflowing. They are providing a high high degree of treatment for wastewater, but also for modest amounts of stormwater that the systems can treat, and we need to be very thoughtful about how we approach our wastewater infrastructure and make sure we're not trading a wastewater problem for a storm water problem are there ways, if a water processing plant is on low lying grow are the ways to flood proof facility they are. And so I in the New England council of the environment. So it's the environmental commissioners from. All of the New England states, and frankly, our facilities are a little bit better off than than some of the ones, particularly in place coastal areas, Rhode Island, I think has some of the most pronounced challenges. There are absolutely ways to to harden the facilities and try to protect them from floodwaters. But also to build an operating them in a way that assumes at times, they may be flooded and to make sure that we're not having these these significant releases to the environment that could really compromise public health. Clean water. But you've also been involved in. A very long legislative debate over testing a school water supplies for let and this this actually someone was telling me recently that this is actually something that touches on about four or five different state agencies. But it's education natural resources. Services as well. As the agency of digital services that we're anticipating testing more than twenty two thousand fixtures. Statewide as part of this initiative, and obviously needed data management system capable of handling all that information every tip at every school plus childcare centers track there about four hundred twenty five schools public and independent schools. Statewide, more than nine hundred fifty licensed, daycare facilities and under the legislation s forty as it currently exists all of them would be required to complete testing. What do we know of the problem right now? And why are we why are we doing this share Soza agency natural resources and the Vermont department of health work together? Back in twenty seventeen on pilot program. We tested every fixture in sixteen schools. So about nine hundred taps in total. And we found that at least one fixture in every school had led a Atta detectable level. So above one part per billion in five schools, we found fixtures where they were above the action level, which is fifteen parts per billion. We know that there's no safe level of lead exposure, particularly for young children, and that drinking water can be an important source of exposure. And so then working since we got that initial feedback to to stand up this statewide initiative, something the governor Scott came out on day one and said, we gotta do this. It's taken the legislature some time, and there's been some differences between the house and Senate. But I got to think this is going to get done and. Then you would be able to test all the taps during the summer. We'll take it'll take longer than that. You can't do it during the summer. Somebody was telling me that you have to test at a time when the taps are in active use you do. So you want to get their first thing in the morning before they've been turned on for the day. But during a period of regular use so sort of over the course of time the last thirty to forty years, we've made a number of advances in plumbing that have really phased out a lot of lead in our fixtures as well as in the solder that holds copper pipes together. But as water sits in those pipes for extended periods of time, the the leg can Leach back into the water. We wanna make sure we're being health protective, and therefore looking at sort of a not necessarily the absolute worst case scenario, but a regularly experienced worst case scenario, which would be whoever happens to take the first drink from a water fountain in the morning, probably not the person who takes the I drink after an entire summer where the school sat. Yes. So this some of this might happen before school lets out but more likely it's going to be this coming fall. That's our hope that we will collect a significant number of samples over the next month. Or so in addition the legislation s forty expands the testing to include licensed daycare facilities, clearly many of those facilities operate year round there. And so our intention would be to continue with that work over the summer, and then pick back up in the schools in the fall, and one issue that has been brought up on the house side in this is that well great. We're testing for lead. Because we know we might have a problem there at least some schools have a problem, but that leaves out a whole suite of other potential environmental issues in school building some of which are pretty old in Winn. We don't have a system where we're regularly testing for potential environmental safety issues and local schools try their best, but it's it can be an expensive proposition. And it's not always on. The top of the list. So there's a need for some sort of broader approach. Right. I mean, we know that as a former school board member, I know that that local schools face challenges, not only with with water quality, but also specis with on with even just the the quality of the air and the buildings themselves. And so yeah, exactly and trying to make sure that that kids have safe in healthy learning environments really is is a priority and something that we're engaged in across the board. But this this led initiative seems like a fairly narrow place to have a significant impact. I guess it's fair to say Julie more natural resources secretary is with us here on the Dave Graham show on WD radio. I'm John Walters sitting in for Dave where at the state house live today and. I've still got the stakes on my driveway to guide the snow plow in the winter. But it is spring. I think it's safe to say I think we're out of the danger zone. And there's a bunch of stuff. Punches stuff starting to happen. Saturday's green up day, and and things are starting to move into the outdoor season for those of us who don't ski absolutely are. So a team from the governor's office actually be heading out on route to this afternoon to participate in some green up day festivities and picking up trash. Also, the Sunday is the heck's co fishing festival, which is down in Rockingham on the Connecticut river, this is a great opportunity for people who maybe don't regularly fish to get out and experience a little bit of life on on a water's edge in Vermont. And also part of the agency of natural resources is our network fifty five state parks that are in the process of opening up for the summer season. And we recently launched Vermont venture program, which is a great set of activities trying to get families out trying different parts and pieces of what for Mont has to offer on our our wonderful landscape of think, they're certain. A number of people in Vermont who are aware of the state parks and regularly used them. And then there are a lot more people like me, I have to say that kind of it's kind of a blind spot for us. We just don't think about the fact that they're how many state parks fifty five state parks last year was I think only the second or third year in our history where we had over a million visitors to Vermont state parks there, certainly a well loved and utilized asset by Ramachandra, but also a really significant attracted for for out of town. Visitors to come to the state, and they're sort of a state park for everyone. Whether you want to be on the shores of lake Champlain at a place like grand dial. You wanna be in a more reclusive, perhaps canoe access only area like green river state park as well. As some riverine ex- experiences and opportunities down south. It's just there's a fantastic network of parks state life. My dad. My dad died last year. He was very he he lived a very long life. But in his last years, he was not terribly healthy. But he he loved to go to the listens in another state. So it's not a state park that he loved to go to a park nearby a regional park that allowed for you know, as well as full on recreation opportunity for somebody to get out in the sunshine and sit on a bench along the river. If that's all you're capable of. We've been trying to create opportunities for for all levels of campers. Certainly there's traditional camp temp tent camping sites. We also have lean-to's, but more recently have been investing in cabins with the hope that it may encourage folks that are otherwise a little nervous about getting outdoors to to give it a try and have built several extremely popular cabins up Burton island state park in particular and Saint Albans bay. Well, I got to start thinking about the outdoors again, haven't quite maybe after German. Well, Julie more. It's been a lot of fun to talk to you. Thank you very much. I stopping by. Thank you for having me pleasure. Julie more natural resources secretary taking a half hour out of her. I'm sure very busy day today to be with us here on the Dave Graham show. I'm John Walters sitting in for Dave and Julia you need to get going feel free to take off slip off your headphones and move on. John Walters sitting in for Dave Graham, Dave Graham, show on NewsRadio W D E V. We'll be back with Rob Lowe, Clare state Representative from very town and one of the Republican caucus leaders after the top of the hour. Stay tuned. Spring long-awaited much celebrated upstairs at the almost world-famous. Warren store you will find colorful clothing for men. Women and children bulls, mugs, candles cards and gift wrap. Puzzles toys and games jewelry CBD products, local soaps, more that's one stop shopping for months. According to Yankee magazine, come for lunch on our deck and enjoy a fun funky and friendly world class shopping experience in the beautiful mad river valley. Morin store in Warren village. Open nine to six everyday. It's the day Graham show, WD FM and AM. And we are back. I'm John Walters sitting in for Dave Graham, day Graham show on WD EV NewsRadio two four four seventeen. Seventy seven toll free one eight seven seven to nine one eight two five five usually at this time. We take a few minutes to talk to. To talk to one of the reporters to talk news media is I believe what they call it these days and Thomas Terry is on the line. Good morning time. Good morning. Happy Friday Friday. Yeah. All right. We're already to get out of town. Did I get the name of your organization? Right. Talk media news. He has often media news. Okay. Yeah. We all keep changing our names to keep up with the digital age. So what's what's your beat down there? What are we can't be gone? So. So I want to ask you about Bill bar so bar. Go ahead. I wear what happened. What is going on your beat? Well, a doll often a lot have yesterday. For example, we had two different reports vastly different. Both troubling one shows the rise of China's military, not a surprise then gone. The other shows the rise in sexual assaults within the US military ranks which was a setback obviously for the Pentagon of because they've been trying hard to reduce this issue within the ranks. And it's a voluntary system of reporting. So you don't know what goes on reported, of course. But even that voluntary aspect of it, they do serve every two years. And there was a dramatic almost forty percent rise in reports of of sexual on one in sexual behavior, which could range for any for me on and wanted touching to two great. Yeah. And I suppose we could at least hopefully assume that part or most of the rise might be due to a more open culture in a more. Open attitude toward people reporting incidents the military's getting worse. Actually, I'm sorry to disagree with you on that. But that as as a critical factor in the rise. That's why disturbing that that reading was true like two years ago when there was an increase in the number of reports dramatic increase in the number of people reporting. So the, you know, that's a that's a dangerous metric, they they're very careful about not to blame the increase on the numbers of people who decide to report because of that factor. So that's why they're they've always taken seriously. But now they're gonna make sexual harassment, for example, a crime a military crime. Which is is a big deal. Okay. And they're gonna try to have people who now look for those who could be sexual offenders. Within Iraq and bring them to attention of the military before they can. Harm or attack or bother their their fellow enlist, the most of those who have been targets of this have been female and with these young team with the eighteen to twenty five range and over sixty percent of the cases that report involve alcohol, which of course, is troubling factor in most of the people knew their attackers the person who was arrested. Yeah. And that that is a disturbing piece of information. I I was reading yesterday. The this has started to Spurs some action in the Pentagon and in congress. Yeah. Congress has been upset about it for a long time. And you may have remembered a few weeks ago of Senator from Arizona. She's now Senator she was a fighter pilot, and she talked about how she had been raped while in the military as an officer. And she's been pushing very hard for the Pentagon, take more concrete steps sooner. You know? So that that's you know, that's that's obviously an issue. Yeah. And it's it's really unfortunate because for a number of reasons, but you know, the military is seen as a character building experience at it is for I think the vast majority of people who serve that they come out of it stronger and more capable than when they went in. And if we don't have that kind of environment, particularly for women wanting to serve our country, then that's sort of you know, w Tripoli disappointing. It is. Well. But the good thing is military's not pretending not existing and they're trying to take steps to deal with it. They have less of own ability to deal with China's rising military strength. However would subject the other report, that's that's much more out of their hands. And it puts him in dilemma because China's strategy is to build up defenses in the near waters off its goes as well as to be able to increase or submarines, which of course, could be used the counter in a US aircraft carriers ships, and that's that's very disturbing to the Pentagon. And there's really nothing they can do that. You can't another country not to build weapon yet away. Considering China's economic money over a number of years, I suppose you could say the only surprise was they didn't do this sooner. Right. I think that this low plan, and you know, what of course, is really troublesome that depending on much of their technology, the Chinese have stolen through, you know, us espionage to take technology United States others have and then apply it to their own militaries that saving development time and costs, right? Yeah. Great things to things that weren't even on our radar before your call that we need to be concerned about and worry about so way great way to kick off the weekend. But I really appreciate your insights on. We'll have a great weekend. I'll talk you Bye-bye. Alright. Terry from talk media news got the name. Right. This time. They check in with us every weekday at this time on the Dave Graham show on NewsRadio WD right now, we are joined by rob Clare state Representative from Barry town, Republican and deputy leader of the Republican caucus in the state house route thanks for joining us today. Good morning, John. And thank you for inviting me before we get to deputy leader stuff. We have to take a step back to your committee assignment, which is house government operations, and they were here. Well into the evening last night discussing the tax and regulate Bill full legalisation of cannabis, and I guess did finally come to an agreement on the remaining issues. We did we spent a lot of time on that Bill upwards of three weeks, and you know, like with anything that happens underneath here. Nobody gets everything they want. I time out of. Sausage factory. Yeah. Nothing comes out the way it goes in and it can be kind of an ugly process to watch. But it this is not the end of the journey by any stretch of the imagination. But we did voted out of committee knowing that it's going to go to other committees have to go to the floor. And then because of the fact that this particular Bill started over on the Senate. We've made some significant changes to that piece of legislation all making it better, obviously. And we're sure we're gonna end up having conversations with them as well. Yeah. So the remaining well, the the really crucial issues governor Scott has indicated that he would be willing to sign this Bill or let it become law. If certain conditions are met the most crucial of those is roadside testing for impairment of he has said throughout that he wants a roadside test for saliva test for presence of THC the ingredient in cannabis the committee tried to sort of split the baby on this one. I guess you could say we did we did. And you know, there's some of us that are still very committed to that. And that there's no question that as we legalize well, it's already legal. As cannabis use and some other things become more prevalent. We do need to do have the ability to some roadside testing. And you're right initially. I'm not gonna say there was a total compromise here, but language did get inserted in there where we can have more what they call eight air. These are law enforcement officers that have gone through a sixteen hour training. So that when they do have the roadside stops that they're better trained more quipped to recognize people in our impairment, the saliva testing is much as it's not on the roadside. Yet. It is in the process where they can use it as evidently it does require a warrant. But like I said earlier, this is still a work in progress. And you know, there are some of us that are looking at this that have somebody should get pulled over and say it's later in the evening, and they've had a long day kinda tired. Noor is might be a little bloodshot that we're looking for the ability for the law enforcement officer to. Give that person the opportunity willingly to take that swab test. And then if they find that there's nothing on board than it expedites the interaction for both person that got pulled over and law enforcement. You don't have to wait for a warrant or you don't have to take them to the to the barracks. Exactly exactly now on the flip side. If there is something on board. We would through a demonstration yesterday and law enforcement made it very clear that there is not one particular thing that that they look at to determine whether somebody's under the influence or not it's a series of things from tests, you know, as far as dexterity to just following directions to talking, and yes, if you had a roadside tests, and it came back that it showed that somebody had something on board. It would be another piece of the puzzle that they would be looking at to determine whether they should proceed or not. So I think that it's something that we will eventually work it out. Yeah. I think the ideal for everyone would be a roadside tests that was actually accurate in in. Measuring impairment rather than just the presence of a drug, you know, that would be ideal. But I think most are clear that even the blood test. Now does not show level of impairment. It does show that there's something on board and certain tests can tell you how much like say with THE how many nanograms you have in your blood. But yet there's no establish threshold out there to determine whether you're, you know, impaired or not that's still boils back down to the DR ease or the drug recognition officers coming in pest the firing and based on their observations that you were you weren't. Yeah. And and the fear is you're giving officers discretion. I guess this comes down to how much do you trust police because if you think that police are there to do their job and to find impaired drivers than you're probably okay with roadside testing. If you see instances where police pullover people for no reason, or there's a racial element to it. Or, you know, if you have, you know, Grateful Dead and fish, bumper stickers on your car than you know, if you're scruffy looking than people worry about about being pulled over, and you know, you can have THC in your system a long time after you've actually imbibed. So then, you know, the the false positives. I think are what people are worried about. They are however based on testimony we've taken and some of the stuff that I've seen that one isn't an enormous issues, far as false positives. Again. It's only a very small piece of it. And the demonstration we saw yesterday, they were the law enforcement officers very clear that you could have a positive test, but not be under the influence. So it's all. Part of a whole process that they go through determine as to whether or not somebody is impaired. You know, I've I've heard this whole thing about profiling and people being pulled over and quite honestly, I have a lot more faith in our law enforcement officers than that. I think they're very professional. They're very clear that this is not their objective is to just go out there and randomly try to pick up people very often when they're pulling people over it's because they've gotten phone calls from other motorists that somebody's out there on the road driving rather radically. Yeah. So, you know, more often than not they're actually reacting to information they've gotten or things that they have observed. And I would think if you know a police chief or or a supervisor had a particular officer who was running a huge amount of saliva tests that that might be a red flag in that might be reason to step in and say, you know, you gotta you gotta be a little more choosy here. You're absolutely right. You're absolutely right. When you have outliers those stand out quite quickly. And I think that they're dealt with and you know in today's environment. I think everybody's very aware. We don't want to have any racial profiling or doing anything out there that it's inappropriate. Yeah. But one of the interesting things about this cannabis issue is that it doesn't break a lot break cleanly along party lines. So the lottery publicans in the Senate voted for it. But I've talked to we're going to have Sharon Garda on coming up next. She's a lawmaker from Franklin county, and she's very strong on the opt in idea, which is one of governor Scott's other conditions for signing the Bill where a local community can decide whether or not to host cannabis businesses in their in their in their jurisdiction and the opt in idea is that you have to definitively say, yes, we're okay with cannabis businesses rather than having to opt out. So that's that's an issue for Royal Democrats, in some cases. Well, I think that that's an excellent point as sure that this is that this is necessarily a a partisan issue by any means, and that was one of the things that we were able to to work out some last night is that you can opt in. Community can opt in for commercial retail. Excuse me, kill establishments. Not like growers not initially like roars now. No, if you had somebody that wanted to have an indoor grow operation, they're still going to be subject to the local, right, zoning and other. Governance issues that anybody would have to be. Yeah. Two four four seventeen seventy seven toll free one eight seven seven to nine one eight two five five. I'm John Walters on the Dave Graham show on NewsRadio. WD we are talking with state Representative rob LeClair deputy Republican leader in the House Republican caucus, and we do have a caller on the line Rama from Williamstown. Good morning Rama. Listen to quick comments here. I'm going to be brusque. I'll sound brusque. I don't mean to be impolite Iran don't. But the first one comment is that people seem to spend an awful lot of time, energy and effort. Mira wanna I I mean, I it's like how can we manage to control it, even though we're trying to loosen up the controls? I think you guys need to consider how much of the government's effort and time getting put into this. And whether it's really a worthwhile effort, the other part is and it had to do Mr. Clare with a when you were talking about the roadsides live at tests, and you were talking about a gentleman who's tire coming home from work. And as I that's kind of paraphrasing. What you said. And as I heard it, I don't know if this is how you magic. But as I heard it that it would be okay. If this guy was tired and not driving. Well, he could be patted on the back told to go slowly go on his way. But if we did a saliva test and found some metabolite from somebody smoking pot from two weeks ago that would that would be handled differently. And the reason I mentioned it this way is because one of my. Cernan in all of this people seem so interested in catching the I guess the chemical involved instead of dealing with the activity of the individual because unsafe operations should be unsafe. Whether it somebody who shouldn't be driving because they're tired from a long day at work or they shouldn't be driving because there's stone and they just smoke the joint or something. So I I would rather see the emphasis put on the activity of the individual themselves as opposed to how to catch the chemicals. Thank you for your call around. We're going to let you take the answer off the air because our time is kind of limited here, but Representative LeClair what do you have to say? Well, Rana thank you for your question. I, you know, I I agree with you that we are looking more at the actively quite often. Like, I said when it can happen law enforcement's responding to a call or could be an observation where somebody, you know. Hit the center line, you know, unintentionally when they're using the saliva tests. I think I'd said it a few times at that is all part of the overall thing when the law enforcement officer goes through and does the roadside testing. They're looking at of a right of things, and this is just a very small part of it. And we're very clear that at this point the saliva test is not evidently, either bright. But if that is an important point a saliva test after a warrant would be evident would be usable as evidence saliva test. On the road side would not be. That that is correct. So we'll see there's there's still more work to be done on this for sure. But you know, as far as being a Purdy like that's kinda like beauty's in the eye of the beholder. You know, it probably isn't one of my priorities, but it was somebody else's in as you said earlier as the governor said yesterday at his press conference. It wasn't my idea. Right. And I can't say this was mine. Either in being the assistant minority leader the majority has more say over the schedule than we do. Now. I'd certainly like to see that changed. More of us down here. But that's up to the voters. I did want. We're we're running a little short on time. But I did want to ask how has it been this year? Do you think you're getting a fair shot and the governor's getting a fair shot from the democratically? Yes, I do. I do. We've got a lot of complex issues out there. A lot of stuff has passed one house or the other. But yeah, I think that we've been talking early on listening to each other. We definitely don't always agree more often than not. There is agreement is to what the issue is were the disagreement comes quite often. It's what's the solution? But. Would get two more weeks to go. And we'll see what ends up happening. We just heard it. We're going to be in session. I think starting Monday the thirteenth the whole week. That's a good indication that will probably try to Gernon eighteen so eighteenth. We can we can all turn our attentions to the rest of our lives. Those of us who have fulltime jobs outside of the legislative commitment true. Yeah. Well, rob. Thank you very much for coming by today. Thank you. I should say for your service in the legislature because it is a commitment. It is not exactly lucrative and everybody wants. But if your time and thank you. I appreciate it. An- truly is an honor to to represent all right? Thanks very much. Good luck with the rest of the session. Thank you. All right. Rob Lowe, Clare state Representative from bury town Republican and the deputy leader of the House Republican caucus here. Joining us today coming up next. We will have a new lawmaker Sharon guard. She is from Berkshire up in Franklin county of rural district that normally is a Republican district, and she won election last fall that makes it an interesting dynamic when she's a member of the democratic caucus, but also representing a district that might be that is more conservative than the democratic. Caucases on many issues. So we we'll get some insight on her and her approach the role in her thoughts on her first session in Mont Pilat. That's it for now. John Walters in for day Graham, the day Graham show, NewsRadio WD. Spring long-awaited much celebrated upstairs at the almost world-famous. Warren store you will find colorful clothing for men. Women and children bulls, mugs, candles cards and gift wrap. Puzzles toys and games, jewelry, CBD products, local soaps, and more. That's one stop shopping for months. According to Yankee magazine, come for lunch on our deck and enjoy a fun funky and friendly world class shopping experience in the beautiful mad river valley. Lauren store in Warren village opened nine to six everyday. It's the Dave Ramsey show. WD? And John Walters sitting in for Dave who is still out sick. We hope for his return as soon as possible. And in the meantime, I'm here with you live from the state house where things are in a bit of a lull right now, I think both chambers are in session or or committees are in session. And so the action is elsewhere as we speak to you from just outside the cafeteria here at the state has in Montpellier. My guest this half hour has not arrived yet. Which is one of the fun parts of live radio. We are scheduled to talk with a state Representative Sharon fa- guard of Berkshire in Franklin county. She is a first term democrat who won one of the many sort of upset elections upset victories for the Democrats in two thousand eighteen she she won the N. What is traditionally Erie publican district? And that means that. She has. Sort of dual obliga- Sion's a member of the democratic caucus. But also representing a district that is more conservative. She describes herself as an independent democrat who is. Not beholden to necessarily following what the caucus would like to see. So that is a difficult balancing act, and we hope that she will stop by sometime in this half hour to talk about it. In the meantime, if there's anything on your mind, I I would be curious I spend a lot of time in this building during the session three days a week fulltime pretty much. And so that creates a very sort of, you know, statehouse Centric view of things we see what goes on here. We know what's hot. And what's not? We see the issues that take up a lot of leaderships time and a lot of committee time, we do not know how those play out in the real world to be perfectly honest. I don't get spend much time outside of the state house during the session. And if anyone would like to weigh in on what is she's matter to them, or what issues that had been kind of off the radar quite often? When. You talk about a real life things like auto inspections things like the plastic bag ban. That's moving through the legislature. Something else that that doesn't necessarily generate political heat. But it does have an impact on people's everyday lives. I sometimes think that those those issues deserve more attention than we give them. And if you'd like to weigh in on anything to do with the state legislature. Our numbers are two four four seventeen seventy seven. That's the local number in central Vermont two four four one seven seven seven toll free one eight seven seven to nine one eight two five five is the toll free number that is one eight seven seven to nine one talk. The Dave Graham show here on NewsRadio WD, John Walters, political columnist for the for seven days sitting in for Dave today. You can read my stuff in the weekly paper comes out on Wednesday mornings and is available broadly throughout. Out northern central Vermont. And also online my column and everything the news staff does and the food and arts staff does is available on our website. And we do a lot of stuff during the week that doesn't go in the print paper. So if you're interested in a fuller coverage, check out our website, seven days, V, T dot com. That's seven spelled out. And don't forget the V T thus ended the commercial. I would like to hear from you. If if there is if you have real life reflections, I what goes on in this building. Does it feel irrelevant to you? I recently had an experience that made it feel irrelevant to me. And I will I will tell you about that. My mother is eighty nine years old. She is pretty far into dementia. She lives with my sister who lives in New York state, and I get over there as often as I can't visit. So I was there for a few days last week and what I was driving back. It had been as it can be with people who have lost who are losing their memory. It could it it is a tiring experience. And so I was driving back and I found myself thinking. I'm going back. I'm going from a really dramatic real life situation. A really intense situation to a building where they spend lots and lots of time talking about incremental details of pieces of legislation that are going to do incremental things and. It suddenly seemed not quite so important as it often does when I'm immersed in this building. So that that sort of gave me that outside perspective, and it was kind of a wake up call. And I think I can use a wake up call once in a while. So it wasn't fun. But I was glad for that experience. I certainly glad to visit my mom, but I was I was glad for that insight that moment where maybe I realized why a lot of people hate politics. And while a lot of people don't engage and don't think that what happens between the two parties. And in this building really makes Halabi's except for once in a while when they get in the way, so. If you would like to weigh in on any of that. I am here to talk until eleven o'clock or until sure on guard shows up I have to think that she probably got way late into something more important than chatting with me. But in any case, we do have a call on the line. Jim from Richmond is on the line. Good morning. Jim. Mac. The. It's going to be fairly extensive, and it's not only plastic bags, but also a variety of single use plastics, including I think in most cases, drinking straws, and the drinking cups, and it's basically single use plastics at least last I heard and so that will. And I think the Bill as it stands now bans like supermarket, grocery store drugstore plastic bags, and there would be a small fee for the use of a paper bag, and what they are trying to encourage everyone to do is to have reusable bags and bring those to the store every time they go to the store. How how might this affect you? Jim. Water qualities deal, and we want people to not waste, and I don't know any reusable bags of work really well for that house that he's so those plastic bags gonna get a pass or there's some people that actually use those facts to do that. But again, you know, trying to plastic bag out of the landfill. And how they're gonna solve that one. Well, I assume that trash bags would be okay. I think it's just the retail bags. I have to say I'm not familiar with every bit of the law. But I imagined like I'm green up day. If you're in cleaning up, you will you will have a larger trash bag rather than a grocery store plastic bag. It does. I mean, if you're a dog owner, and you pick up after your dog when you're walking the dog that does create a bit of an issue. You'll have to have some kind of presumably you will not you will want a plastic bag rather than a paper bag appear your waste. So there there are there are complications their issues. And I think that you know, so far in the judgment the legislature the importance of reducing the amount of plastic waste outweighs the other concerns. What are they gonna give? Get rid of trying to reduce the amount of new plastic that's manufactured used once and then thrown away. So they, you know, they can't they can't do anything aside from green up day and other other cleanup programs about the plastic. That's already out there in the waste stream. They're trying to reduce the amount of new stuff that that that goes into the waste way stream Jim thank you very much for your call two four four seventeen seventy seven toll free one eight seven seven to nine one eight two five five I'm John Walters political columnist or seven days sitting in for Dave Graham today who is still out sick. And we hope to have him back all of us who have been sitting in for him hope to have him back as soon as possible. And so we are taking your calls on sort of open lines right now on anything do the legislature or politics. That's on your mind and Ruth from Sheldon has joined us Ruth. Good morning. That fathering me the most is h fifty seven and proposition five and the thing that bothers me about it is that they're totally ignoring the fact that baby exist, and they wanna put an amendment into the Vermont constitution that says that women have a right to kill their own children before birth. And that is that this me so much I wake up in the night. And that's all I can think about what is wrong with these people who want to make it legal to kill our own children. One is the people who testified in in state house said we need abortions. Because we don't have enough affordable day care how ridiculous it's that. That is the strongest argument I have heard that sounds downright flippant when when. Someone like yourself believes so strongly on this issue. About the baby. Why don't they have? They totally ignored that a baby exists. Okay. So that's my point. Thank you for listening to me. And that is the the very nature of the abortion issue is that there are so many people who feel strongly on both sides people like Ruth who believe that babies. Our babies are human beings before they are born. That's a that's a Dr that's a black line that cannot be crossed and people like Ruth are going to feel disenfranchised is and even even very deeply personally offended that her government is allowing in her view babies to be killed. It is that simple. And that's why we have been arguing about abortion for forty plus years. And it'll probably never end we kind of open the phones here to talk about, you know, I'm in the building all the time, I'm immersed in the state house. And that that creates a different perspective of lawmakers are here a lot of the time, and they take on that perspective. But they do also spend every weekend in their in their home district. So they do get more of a taste of what people are really concerned about. And really talking about. I feel like that's kind of a blind spot for me, especially during the session. So anyone wants to weigh in on that two four? Or four seventeen seventy seven toll free one eight seven seven to nine one eight two five five got about ten minutes left in the show. And Ralph from Johnson is joining us this morning. Good morning Ralph it's actually will. But thank you, take all done. Those two mixed up all the time. That's okay. I will try to you ask the question pretty quickly. And I'll take my answer off the air because we don't have a whole lot time. But I had the pleasure of attending h estimating regarding the fossil fuel infrastructure. Now, my concerns with his new I try to be objective about you know, the environmental concerns versus affordability and how that all relates to each other. But one thing is is that it doesn't, you know, stop the existing infrastructure. It's already shouldn't county. So that basically means we're shutting the door on for example, national. Yeah. Sorry. I'm speaking specifically to natural gas just the door on development over communities, which I believe, you know, any infrastructure that would be beneficial far as job creation in simulating economy. That's obviously on the downturn in the law, these real communities. The second thing is is that, you know, we only produce forty percent of the electrically that we consume in Vermont, and the good thing is that the majority that is renewable energy mostly hydro. But since we close Vermont Yankee. And since the rest of it is outsourced. If closing the door on all these other measures of generating electricity. That means that we simply outsource to hydro Quebec or in Hampshire, which, you know, arguably, you know, that they have different methods of energy production. But really, we're just making sustainability someone else's problem at that point or exporting our environmental impact. Yeah. So I'll take the rest of the year. Thank you. Yeah. You do bring up an interesting point. And I think it is a valid part of this discussion. The question was like running gas pipes farther out into Vermont and providing a reliable and less polluting heating source than for than say would or oil fuel oil that is a legitimate argument. And I think many make it those who want to ban on more fossil fuel infrastructure would tell you that that. This is a dead end that we are investing money the wrong way that we would be better off investing our money in new cleaner technology, rather than detro- gas is kind of a halfway step between dirty or fossil fuels and clean energy. It's an argument that can be made both ways I think I think Jim's point about business development in rural areas is a good one. Businesses need reliable and real reliable cost-wise sources of energy and natural gas is a good source of fossil fuel energy and relatively clean, especially with modern burning techniques. But that is that is the debate. And that's why that issue has gotten a lot of airtime in the legislature this year. Next on the phone is George, and George I don't have your town. Where are you calling from? Oh. John. I'm in Berlin. Okay. Welcome to the show. I feel for your mom outs hopes that a lot of friends you have spouses or parent. Great to have them around a long time. It said when it ends this way. Right. Who earn? Yeah. I was listening to talk common sense radio yesterday. One of the things they were touching on the, you know, the disposable grocer. And they were saying that the debtor and Kate study pretty mount of energy and resources to create alternative grocery bags. They said that they an all cotton organic grocery grocery bag takes twenty thousand you can create twenty thousand throw classic batch out of energy sources takes to make one cut are cut grocery bag and just a simple grocery bags like seven thousand five bags. So what feels good people isn't always you know, what where the truth lies. And I think a lot of stuff that goes on until you just that way. But I appreciate it here. Yeah. Well, that's a legitimate argument. I in my case, my family's been using reusable bags for years, and we get those really sturdy L being totes, and those you can use endlessly for years and years and years, basically, we use them until the handle start fraying and falling apart. Right. Those are those are great bags for it. But you're right. There is a tradeoff. And before we make rash decisions about anything. We need to understand the full impact, which is the legislative process takes so long. He said it would be three hundred years worth of grocery shopping for a couple. The us handed usage on that. Organic cotton. Yeah. You know, I I have to be honest with you in some ways, I think this is a feel good piece of legislation where you can say here, we have done something we have done something on the environment. And when at a time when the legislature is doing frankly, doing very little on climate change, which is a much more serious threat immediate threat to our planet and our habitat and our maple industry and are speaking industry, then doing the plastic bag Dan at the time when they're not really tackling climate change head on in any meaningful way. Kind of feels like looking searching for the quarter under the lamppost where the light is better. So, you know. I said that not you. Well, thank you. Thank you very much for calling in today. And you do bring up a great point. Appreciate it. Well, we are coming near the end of the day Graham show, if you wanna get in under the wire, call me right now with a quick comment at two seven two four four seventeen seventy seven or one eight seven seven to nine one eight two five five John Walters here with you. It's been a blast to talk to some of the people who are doing things or trying to do things around the legislature and also talk to you. You are a part of this show, and you should always feel welcome to to call in especially if you normally listen and don't call in. If you have a thought about something pick up that phone and give us a call. In the meantime, I'm John Walters. I've been sitting in for Dave Graham today on NewsRadio WD the show is available broadcast. It's available on livestream on WD radio dot com. And it. Has also posted in podcast form for listeners who cannot to tune in there at work or whatever cannot tune in between nine and eleven are shows are listed on the on the podcast site, which you can reach through WD radio dot com, and you can catch up with what's going on. You can see who was on the show. And if there's someone particularly interested in give it a listen, we have a lot of great guests on the show. Dave does a great job. Those who have been filling in with him. Likewise have been doing yeoman's work. It's really been a pleasure for me to to sit. In the big chair today. Coming up next on WD EV, NewsRadio is common sense radio and stay with us after that for the the new our news. And in the meantime, just a reminder the legislature is coming down to probably its last two weeks of the session if their bills you are interested in a lot of stuff is coming down the pike very quickly. Whether it be water quality or cannabis or paid family leave or minimum wage if you care about these issues do get in touch with your legislators, I have talked to lawmakers, particularly on the house side, they represent smaller districts, and they say, you know, some actual personal letters or emails or calls from people really do make a difference in their point of view. They don't want canned stuff. They don't want like the pre written Email or postcard, but they really do like to hear from constituents. So that is a part of your franchise not only voting, but also, but also weighing in on these issues so do feel free to do that. Anytime you care about an issue. That's before the legislature. That wraps up the Dave Graham show for today. John Walters bet a pleasure being here with you for the last two hours and stay tuned for the news and common sense radio on news, talk radio w.

Dave Graham John Walters Julie legislature Vermont secretary Governor Scott officer House Judiciary committee cannabis Bill judiciary committee Senate Yankee magazine state Representative China House Judiciary
Ep 109 - Roundtable Discussion: Black History Month

TMV Podcast

1:22:32 hr | 6 months ago

Ep 109 - Roundtable Discussion: Black History Month

"I'm everyone. Thank you guys for for joining me on this podcast. I WANNA jump in because I'm aware that this five guests here i. think if we just start off by quick round of introductions and then we'll get straight into at the questions and I guess the discussion around around Mike History month and and a black Muslim experience. So ladies I I learned that from our last round table Nabil told me four for for trying to get him in. Sister Half Sir. You'd like to introduce yourself. Yes. my name's Berry I'm an author Speaker Presenter currently the Editor in chief a digital platform could Muslim spoke with the and I also do of what to do with increasing within the Muslim community and so tackling topics like racism and anti blackness through swap Sheri's books in advance, and of thing. Moore also joined by name A-, Be Robert. Jacomb everyone my name's ninety and I'm an award-winning. Founder Sisters, magazine and host and curator gifts of the. Festival that's taking place this month founded on. Will so we've managed to get some guests from from the exotic side of the Atlantic. So I, the Imam Hamza from Memphis Tennessee is that right? Yes sir. So. Yeah. If you'd like to quickly introduce yourselves for those who? Haven't come across you before. Zach I. Thank you for having me. Ma'am Hums Abdul Malik on. in Memphis Tennessee and I'm gonNA, ma'am, teacher, and founder of Meteorology Kademi leadership, Academy for Young Muslims and the masjid. that we founded here is a imagine that is part of a revitalization effort of one of the most blighted not neglected neighborhoods in black neighborhoods Memphis Tennessee. As graduated and memorize. Studied overseas as well. Thank you We've also got Husham Shabbat. Thank you give me. Rb for the background I'm in Los Angeles Open world from. Deaths meetings but I'm honored to talk to you across the pond and everything I studied at UC Berkeley degrees. In a Slavic Studies, we see Berkeley multiple degrees at is and I focused now is I'm writing a dissertation on pedagogy alcoholics or how he's mouth mixed life as a way of teaching educating transforming people's lives. Time A. Started off season Irani. and what else do much snow but. I M Oakland on the Black Panther party legs keep you saw part of Lexi keeper of black artist. So I have a different shirt group of. Kids usually don't know who what, because most of my constituents aren't streaks. Awesome thank you very much finally, brame since I'm GonNa do a quick introduction for for him. Just, briefly reflecting on our experience playing. Call of duty warzone together he's. When we're not going to get into that. But but yeah, this is this is the first time actually we've had like a proper serious conversation about anything over. PODCASTS, as opposed to Tokyo on the playstation but so sorry Ibrahim if you'd like to introduce. I'm. Ema. Missing. To. Turn must've zoned out something. qualities. Are Money. Miserably insincere. Today I guess I'm having a capacity of spoken word is a hypothesis. Topics. Cover. Many spirituality politics. And speaking about my own experiences. Growing up in a council estate London or what you guys in the US Marku social housing. Yet I simply. Thank you all for for for joining me I'm as I mentioned to you guys, I I wanNA jump right in and I wanNA keep mount brief because I think. There's a lot to be said on this conversation I, think I personally want to hear from you guys in just I guess probe and ask further questions and understand the different perspectives. I'M GONNA jump straight in with with I. Guess You know with regards to the black Muslim narrative in Islamic spaces. Do you feel that it's something that's under disgust? And I'm going to start with him because we had a conversation the other day and he said that he had a lot to he wanted to speak specifically to this question. So Ibrahim. Takeaway. Thank you. Yeah. I guess at the moment like I've been such will have been looking into this book called those who know don't say. It's about against the nation of Islam in America I'm. The world, out the Muslims paid. Within prisons on I guess when you say black Muslim narrative, we have to put it in context of West Beacon in in more of a contemporary Western context wiped because if you were to go to Mali or Sudan Somalia anywhere in Africa or even in the Middle East is concept of black Muslim isn't really a concept because it's normal there's no There's no differentiation amongst Muslims at least in Africa on in Arabia in terms of black on black. That's also like more of a recent thing on anybody. Please feel free to me if I'm wrong under. Surrendering speaking about the Muslim Narrative I. Guess I have to put it in context of where and when because we know like Timbuktu in Mali was a sense of four Islamic law for Muslims all over the world. And people from Arabia Asia or what have you would go there and study If we're speaking about the important soda contributions of black Muslims timing itself black Muslim was coined. By American American government agents or American. Journalists who actually I'm speaking on them being different to other Muslims on. On, how a difference? Even the time I guess black Muslim in itself is in Utah. We have embraced. On. Embrace. But yeah, maybe I've been looking at how like Muslims in in America or at least many that's How they did a lot of the the the the LEGWORK and a lot of the fighting and sacrificing for Muslims as. As an entire group to be afforded the same rights onto recognized as a religion in the same way that Catholics and use were recognized as a religion within the prisons. So that means having the ability to hold Juma prayers ability to go to cook baas pray in congregation XYZ also access religious material. Muslims in general were not afforded the same white. So the the black Muslims in a nation of Islam were so. Pivotal in. At the center of fighting for those whites and being sent to solitary confinement in huge numbers to call. Bringing legal proceedings for with in order to gain those whites and then one does once those gains and once those lots cheap. It seems like the rest of the Muslim Community Alison America Dental, ten, their backs on on Douglas forgotten what their contributions were. Imams I think from a from a UK perspective I. It's always interesting looking at the differences between the American black Muslim struggle or the experience and the UK black Muslim experience in some of the stuff that Abrahim has just mentioned. Is Your understanding of the situation seminar. Well I mean you know there is in terms of coinage and the? the name black Muslim yes. I mean is definitely popularized. You know during the during the nation of Slam. But the the meaning behind it in terms of having a unique culture, unique history, unique challenges That is a distinct distinction. Olympic by any, you know your by any means it's diverse within itself You can refer just the whole idea of black identity There's books in Britain on for to disintegration Books written on that but the point here is that there is a distinct. Identity within the Muslim community here in the US. As, you can see the hash him. You have Shii of Sunni and it can range all the way from the nation of Islam or what have you all the way to you know I guess what you would call a few or Revivalist movements But what they all do have in common is the struggle of not only just you know. What almost have to have to work with and deal with with regard to religious struggles also the ratio. Really caste system on that that that was established in the inception of this country. Unique challenges that that come with that kind of level of double consciousness as. wbz Boy a eloquently stated in his book black folk so I think. That that, all these different expressions of our Islam- is is kind of you know that's in the backdrop the racialism in how we're treated as people of color is always something that we have to keep in mind as we're trying to express ourselves, we're trying to liberate liberate ourselves from whatever different social struggles that really sometimes have nothing to do with art slam actually slam for us in America especially was use to liberate us from the racial and social struggles on the idea of even calling ourselves black. Muslim. Adopting even if others might have been possibly imposed that we might feel some of us might feel that was imposed on us but even that category categorization was somewhat liberating for of people during time periods I mean the idea. To a lot of musicians, for example, you'll find that jazz musicians back during those times would adopt new names, Muslim names, and part of that was to create an identity that kinda liberated them from just being black rights just being. A descendant of slave African. to being something that a little bit more transcendent of just a pure white cat of you know what? What? What quote unquote white people would have categorized as as that came with certain privileges in society? I'M YOU NOT Homilies Book Think Butterfly He mentions as young as a young man they they couldn't get into a theaters. As just being who they are, but if they don West African garb and spoken accent with the same color. They will be able to go into a theater, a segregated theater, right? Because they were considered not. They weren't considered Negro. So to speak, they were consider now like. Or what have you or some other category even if they had the same skin color what have you so so slammed the relationship I think if just want summarize the relationship that black Americans have with Islam is is a lot different than a lot of other Muslim groups in the sense that Islam has been used deliberate liberator socially from the from the confines of of of of our pressure here in America it was. Deliberately done for that reason it wasn't just you know there was there. You know people adopt a slam because it's the truth because of the Bertram because of the the the relationship that we have our profits allowed himself them, but but the Dowa that is that was pushed was pushed in the form of Liberation and so that's that's somewhat unique. I would say that is a distinguishing trait among black Muslims especially in. If I could just jump in there have a quick question seem. So. Historically, that was the adoption of slum today's reasons and amongst other reasons. But do you think post nine eleven in the war and Tara, that copy of perceive a song as a separate identity that could solve I don't know. So up next their identity in the eyes of so of the white majority. A China I was trying to put my mic down. By Mike was a little too high One second. All right. You said post nine eleven. I'm just make sure I get the the question straight Hussein post nine eleven anything that's changed basically. Say I would say. You, know no, not really the the the reason why is because You know what? What is changed most post nine eleven is the political climate in the Muslim community. Has Changed a lot post, nine eleven A. so black Muslims is a special leadership always kind of still been saying the same things as we were saying before. Nine eleven can I? Can come up consciously ask. You said that the Muslim landscape has changed post nine eleven in what way do you perceive it as changed. Well there was a so. So if you can sit there like immigrants S- quote unquote immigrant Muslims who are on visa who have to make a certain pledge to be in this country and get citizenship and so on. So forth, there kind of bound by certain I mean they have real concerns about political correctness and being a considered extremist and they're and they're in their countries. There's certain groups that they don't want to be associated with better or for worse I mean, you know that it doesn't matter which country which we're talking about, but these are real concerns. And Post nine eleven a lot of a lot of Muslims. And Muslim leaders were very concerned about how we spoke about You know issues and this is kind of changed. A lot of lot of lot of time has passed since nine eleven and so critiquing Donald Trump, for example, but the. This kind of political Political climate was very that you can. You can. You could feel that it was very difficult to be politically incorrect during those times I mean even just like Shea comes use of when he went to to to the White House this was early on after nine eleven I mean he was highly critiques for that but that the Debate in and of itself like can we go and speak to to to you know to to the president about a war would have these are questions that have like Muslim community railed against him. I'm early on for that reason how you go and how you're going to represent Muslims also for but at the same time we had Muslims voted for Bush, a lot of American Muslims who had voted for Button George Bush. The second during that time. So there was there was a lot of. Back and forth within the Muslim community about you know how to talk about you know the government how talked about government policies and and so you know the voices that will more traditionally In, the nineties eighties were very vocal and very like A. Had, scathing critiques of the American Government or culture you know was very the Mike wasn't given to them as often anymore, and even even you know like Jamile mean he's still in prison Man, look man, in Detroit he was killed by FBI provocateur I mean there's there's a lot of history among the black Muslim community where we've seen provocateurs, FBI agents, and this is all not like conspiracy theories like real. You know his articles were written on this. Where they've come in, they've tried to take advantage of this anti I guess Are they take advantage of the energy that black Muslims had with regard to critiquing the culture critiquing police brutality critiquing you know foreign policy and things like that and kind of use that to entrap people and and and so the the climate change as a result of that. And I know the people feel that level of you know sentiment with regard to liberating themselves from oppression as we can see. George Florida these things but Not everyone felt especially after nine eleven not everyone felt that that needed to be expressed as strongly as it did before. Tonight I go for. Just, like late on, I think. One of the things that has come out quite strongly in our conversations during the badminton festival is the connection between the diaspora black identity with oppression and resistance to oppression. And, there's very much this feeling back. The closer you all to. Whiteness. The mall opportunities you have to take advantage of the privileges of Whiteness and as you know, a lot of the immigrant communities in the UK in in the states that proximity is there to varying degrees, and so I think what we see is an aspirational immigration class of people. Who have an opportunity to to to get in to assimilate into get into take advantage of the privilege, which is something that black people have never had right and I think probably goes in the states in the UK at in the Diaspora in general. So one of the things I feel that we have benefited from is an outsider's perspective on the society is almost we? Again, of course, is not a discount, the black middle class. Of course. But I feel like and from what we see in the UK maybe the states as well. The. Black Muslim population. Even if they are economically aspirational because of that blackness and the black experience, they is more of a critical approach a critical attitude towards pallets woods privilege towards stuff that's going on, which is statement dominant Muslim cultures or you know Asian Arab. In? Cultures. Then about life he don't like they want to simulate they want to get. The benefits of society and I think if you have for generations have worked and worked and worked and follow the rules and broken the rules and follow the rules and you still can't get a break. I think something happens there. When you start to think you know what? Maybe the system is actually worse assimilation into maybe this whole thing is actually was in a me selling myself selling my soul it's extra to get a peaceful and so the theme of resistance and resilience is something that we have a speakers as panelists. We have heard it coming up again and again and again, and a lot of people kind of want to put black Muslims in a box as this despised group as the ones that everyone knows and they don't ever get any representation while that may be true. The flip side of that is that we have. A view on the community of you on a society that allows us to critique it that allows us to to be to push change enter to fight change into cova change and to make noise you know in ways that is actually is it it has the potential to transform our. Society and rebuild things I feel like that. That aspect of being a black Muslim if you WANNA, call it that certainly be all of us this time during the festival functionally black because the festival has a lot of African speakers of African audience who of course, as the brother Brian said, do not see themselves as black right in the way that we because they have their own national identities that have their own clan affiliations, etc. But when you come out of Africa. And you are now minority you'll black like everybody else but I once I feel. We can claim and reclaim. What being black as a Muslim has has made us. And not allow the dominant culture certainly in the UK, we are minority and the dominant culture is Asian culture and not allow their attitudes their by the US bed prejudices, stereotypes, and are low expectations of us to have any bearing on us and how we moved and I feel like be claiming that space I mean that's what's been happening I think have so much lot. I. Always Defer to have because she is one of the pioneers in the space millennials be moving different. Sorry guys want to. Be Moving to the K.. They're not like US especially in the UK, the millennials in the UK last millennials in the UK very comfortable with their black and Muslim identity very comfortable taking up space very comfortable, creating their own safe spaces in their own platforms and if I off eldest coming into that space now but they are really the pioneers of that in the UK. Macho and I think that it shows with them because not only are they making a making change making waves within the button community but within the dominant culture as well. My cops the said that she's she's editor in chief of a classroom, but it's not a black Muslim platfo it Muslim at form, and so the stronger we are in our identity feel the the better it is for everybody so that the abbot sets of take. Thank you I wanted to bring in a rather harsh and just. Coming back to the kind of original question looking at the the. Narrative and and I think when we think about America historically and the the Muslim. Experienced Black Muslim, the Muslim experience, one of the Central Figures Malcolm, X. Obviously I I know that you'll. You'll think you said you're writing a dissertation from not mistaken was at and you're also close to the family and have taught his nephew and whatever else in terms of sorry. Sorry his grandson I in terms of. All of that considered when we talk about a black Muslim narrative, do you feel that it's underrepresented in disgust when when we look one of the central figures to American Muslims full stop? I was just elaborating or as everybody says some really good nothing's connected only disagreeing in hostages go Mamadou dreading university. So I think our millennials are going in the wrong direction personal you. Got A, lot of energy. So you gotta teaching us only because I think that. The one thing is the word allies right that this language that lineal people using that to me is detrimental for the moving on my phone. So this black lives matter stuff and all these things going on I get it, but you gotta remember on historian but also mechanical cook. So like Bobby. Seale. Boundaries background I talked to your another day I talked I talked to my elders who eight years old and I really is that the way we see language of going forward we separate. They say the blacks autism England. Yeah. The allies here. Okay. Well, guess what you recruit Sham was Japanese she was the first one. To get Malcolm X. Mouth, or says. Nobody, the black liberation struggle would consider Eureka champion what our she was a comrade. You know when you look at the weather underground right and they worked together black or summer Braga perspectives on Pantalica and when I think of resistance and black, you're black accepted a political. If, someone has not is always say more mirror you gotta understand it being morsch miracle has accomplished American How America sees us as captains one of the things Berlin made the point was. About us being the emerets right thing about this. Everybody in America. But Native Americans are immigrants except us. We're. Catholics. Were Unwilling to come here. So our dynamics, the Pakistani or the rain inside. So they already behind these, they've already come to America look equal a mere dream. So, they're dynamic and their experiences totally different experience. Right in how we see blackness is different. Don't want to face like are we blacks or we Africans? You say in that was something we really debate about at UC Berkeley because we have seen black political. We're talking to. But amongst ourselves I see most of African descent because it connects me to allay not sweat. I to A. Black addict that was using the sixties and so I, think the Muslims we admission we understand how you use these words in connection to the audience we're speaking to because we miss weaken mislead people. So one of my biggest pet peeves is when I say who are the blacks around Prophet, Muhammad that's the. dumbest thing in the world because everybody's problem, which is our black in America. You don't say whether you would like skiing or Dr Skiing you consider black if you got one. But sometimes, we get this day will. Problem that is so silly. Proper hundred black off. Black and We start to use these words that were to automate. We're still trying to appease the personnel debated kids in our language is the language means. So, when I see the black experience on. Mason Court we context I see myself as a Muslim African. Right talking to Indo Indian Pakistani couple they lived downstairs from yesterday and ask them ceases to come hairs. Right. You know come on. If I issue Kamala Harris. raised. Black people. Let's you to me. She's not after. All Black. Follows from Jamaica, which is not the same experience African American hormones. And as. Women, raise their kids. The fouche was indo-pak the food aid in the culture, her grandparents. Cousins like. 'cause. Ohio, cracking. Holds Beers totally different right is so I stayed at when because if you notice Kamala never puts forth that she indo-pak which I think is also do like she's always talking about this trying to get. Her being a woman of indo-pakistan is just as important as right after Americans but again, in his political culture people pick and choose what they want and I think We should all the beautiful ethnical backgrounds a gave us, and so we talk about African American Express to me. The aftermath experience is, is one where we look at the different diaspora is asking for right. So black people in England have a different diaspora black American boy still part of the same transatlantic slave trade right when I look at indo-pak and be lease jump Wyoming but indo-pakistan America you edit this out. In America. Batman Baseball. Indo-pakistan England, they will find you I'm trying to tell you right now and I think it's walked because Indo-pakistan England got a different experience with the British that indo-pak work. In their peers are close senior, get hit my sticks on it is. So I I was in Iran has pockets from England from England. Who just go from like? So I think that experience places also highlights how you see a lot of how you interact with people of color. Because to me the black. A resistance is work. If you go to Colin Kaepernick's our good for captain right and I have my little friends of mine beer he he's the one we cap in a lot of his stuff. He wrote an article on things resistance in our blood and you go to its website is called in Dr on he wrote it is a beautiful piece about after American Muslims a resistance all the way from Africa to American. But he highlights are African American experiment I say because the Birla Brown will Jalil Abdul Hakim, he was he just got out of prison he was after making was sprites new nuance. There's so many La. Members, Muslims who have just get out of jail. So there's a lot of black African Muslims who we don't talk about and years were here. So I talked to people like Jesse, how you talk Arab Alternative Cinema blocking. I'll get explained to me right like best season. There's move because Jerry. Very. Important. But Jacob is a website that you can go. All the political prisoners meaning of them. Must Right but it was started by Muslim woman building via car as feeble car was one of the most powerful women in Schnorr talks about his Muslim sister and the work she did guess she's grassroots oriented that work things a little feeble card if people who you Shabas right. She's Japanese lady gave Malcolm Mouth Mouth where cecessation right? You should look in life magazine Malcolm be shot as a woman topper as you job she was a member to the Japanese lady a you. Told me only three people could cook food for Malcolm Spam. Sister Betty says the sander in his Japanese lady in your right and your is real populated actually gave you recoup. SHAMMA. Shahada duct name fought them so so much misamis history disconnected with all these people and everything that Afghan experience is shared experience. But when we talk about it, we used to make sure that we talk about it. The way we accept all the different experience be different but saint talk. Is. Holistic approach to you. Thank you I am aware. Of got another four questions to get through but we spent a long time on the first one. But I think it's important because everyone's coming at these from from a different perspective and it's it's very, very fascinating to be honest But let's let's move on I. mean the second thing I want to ask was about the identity and what the identity means to you and I guess half sir, the a hush himself kind of deconstructed all of the language around black Muslims and what these things mean the the question I guess is a bit more open ended from my side in terms of. How do you identify what does the identity mean to you specifically I think. That constantly changing I think it's like a thing that's wrexham down instead and I. Think it's very so semi especially on my journey from about ten years ten years ago, and now my wife calls myself is the description but get to myself. In Change by thing when it comes to blackness over the Nigerian and so I really identify with my culture. When it comes to Sam the the I so abide by my the religion is from you know my heritage from my culture in West Africa, in Nigeria specific the dominant meth had is the Malecki meth Sir I'm very much on par with you know safety aspects that are. Not even from like this of the trends and traditions that we see. So developing in young community now overboard like what did my grandparents do and what is my grandmother telling me what my parents telling me how I so Land about my faith and continue to develop when it from that foundation. And I think he's been a very difficult journey for that reason because of how we've been So predominantly Asian and Arab spaces in the K. that sold idea up the monarchy meth had is like listening just shunned and like the idea of seeing theism is just on that I wouldn't who might see features because I didn't like titles are you can't call yourself received it's a practice it's a it's. A, yes and lifestyle. Exactly. So for me, it's like I think nine hundred mention that he folded. They're find very strong in my identity and see that. So where everything came from but to me, it was the conflict looking into spaces and being questioned about how I was living my life. And people calling me non-muslims for the way I was practicing my lungs and to me that was very conflicting to come even even from. People. Of Knowledge. I had to you had shaved people who were teaching me who were from different meth hubs and we'll be telling me what I'm doing is completely out before the religion. And not realizing that that was coming from the face of bias, an lack of understanding passing the onto young people like myself, and so growing up in that state booths or faces to me was very transformative in the sense that I. On the edge of leasing myself and not understanding how my faith and my cultural supposed to align. An instead was catapulted into this world. Walgreens actually knew what? I found these spaces quite toxic and now create spaces where people like me people who have the same that have can go to people's age and who can so be inspired and just So find a way to balance all of these things in our lives never find the perfect balance Spitzer to go hand in hand with culture and faith I think that's quite different to so things are on the other side because. This David being blackmailed much more interconnected. I think on that side of things but I think with the disconnect from our culture that we I- experiences So second-generation, it's been quite difficult to. Find a place that works for me began from the think that's why I'm trying it's more about so I did representation think acquired points than me seeing people who look like me Muslim people who look like me living their lives living those kind of lifestyle could reinforce it fit for millennials being spaces like this. And say the fast children's Cairo was. A Little Girl Could Sarah. She played basketball she job. She's not I'm and she's a senator of the book that talks about Confidence Islam face growth family on of these things. So disconnected from being black being. In the mainstream anyway but very natural to ox growing up Yeah. Now that that's where. I think. Makes Sense to bringing name straight straight after because obviously, you mentioned have Sir and the millennials new generation historically, what's it been like from us of identity perspective of you felt the need to conceal or hide away from the black Muslim identity or what's it been like just an Think. It's a it's a really interesting. Jenny because Obviously I am mixed race semi. That's why to lend loans back and I grew up Zimbabwe. So I grew up in Africa so as far as unconcerned on African. So grateful to have grown up with African. Heavily black a me, and so that's one difference. Second differences that Conrad Reba. So I actually had conflict with accepting Islam on the basis all my pan-africanism which had developed after I came to the UK University I was president of the African Caribbean Society President of Lone. Joined the Pan African groove and really that that's what I was saying about you know when you leave Africa. You are made to question your identity so much will because now you are in a space where the majority is imposing a particular identity on you and you have to decide I'm going to take this where they're telling me. I am am I gonNA find out who I really am and kind of commit to that. So anyway, my pan-africanism. Pulled posed issue for me because I went to Egypt. I was intrigued by the HAGIA jabots intrigued by a slam but I'd like I'm an African back be an Arab born in Asia I. Don't WanNa leave my identity in exchange for this religion and I'm very grateful to my friends who said to me but you do know that there are Africans. Almost right. Do Live I talk about this infamous because I went on this journey of discovery to Guinea, Senegal and of course, if anyone's been to west Africa. The way that aw in West Africa. All aware. Where'd you go in Africa? Chitty is just a part of them. There was no conflicts. There was nothing that I could see that made me question can I be boasts so that's how did I how I was able to become a stay at a became stem. I married Ghanaian brother Michela on a camel and living in south London with a bit that I want to offer is what? festively I ran into COBB and going from wearing ahead route to wearing the niqab is quite an agent experience. If looks like this, because already I was okay where's she from? With the head writer anyone recognize insists that officer. Assumed that starts wearing Hijab now is huron she Arab and then when I to win. I think a lot of people over the years many people didn't know that I had any connection to blackness as in nine maybe Robert Jenner shoes what she does. So. What that means is that full us in the nineteen just WANNA speak to kind of, as you said, like the old people's experience for often the nineties we came into slam many of us were converts we and we came into. We came into Senate Theo and the Senate. In the UK I think is quite different. Maybe the same as the states but we came into a slam and we were told that you're religio religion is the most important thing. Your race means nothing. Doesn't matter that you're black or anything else. All of that is Jackie Neha and basically get rid of it. So you'll find that for many many years people who became assemble start practicing in the nineties. They would not own blackness like that especially politically especially, not politically because it was felt that will Muslim identity or slamming identity that that is the only thing that matters and everything else. That's your weakness. Jabaliya. That's just it's not from slam and it's only now I'm seeing this in my. Own be now that you'll see people who at the time. Were Black. What about like a Muslim? Anisul Nets at who are now reclaiming not just that they're black culture, not just their black identity but also what blackness means interracial society in terms of your politics in terms of your critique of society, and so I'm seeing that my generation this release on happening where a lot of my peers are all crowd Lee stepping into that black Muslim you know. and there's no conflict there. But again, we didn't learn all the all the ways in which Africans with tied to Islam right from the beginning right from the year over birth and I remember as lacking quickest I can just mentioned this. He told the story of abroad who came with the elephants. Right we all know the the ear of the elephants. The process was born. This is huge. Coming K, which the Mecca of fleeing from his army right so much. So that a loss not to send the buzz with stones owner the story from work. And she said that Abreha can upper. How was he was the senior? That was a an African king who was coming to fight the methods of the time the place right. We didn't think of it like that dislike Muslims thing off the slamming past the only black person they can think of black but right from the professors Beth, there was upper Hutt those up then as his foster mother who was a woman of African descent who was like a second mother and again and again, and again you start to see that actually. Africans. Have always been. And Africans have always been implementing the Dean have been instrumental in the dean have been the supporters of the Jesse you know so many make sense to start naming them but it's live that history has been erased and only left with below and I want to see that regret that needs to be addressed everyone not just people African descent. But for all Muslims because I think that that erasure of blackness from Islam is a part of the racism that our our brothers and sisters are religionists have had imbibed through whatever the cost systems colonialism's whatever it is and I'm questioning wants to see that the I wanna see that. Imbalance. In needs to be addressed me see readjusts. I want to pick up on something you just mentioned in the question to a to a Atlantic brothers. And and and which one of you wants to answer just in terms of you mentioned the the experience of Muslims, the nineties and the kind of embracing of Islam. And that superseding culture and whatever else? What was the American the black. African American. Experience like in the nineties with regards to the Clash Ole. Not, the class early but how culture and religion go go hand in hand I don't know which one of you wants dance feel free to just jump in. So. I WanNa talk from the perspective is probably GONNA be two different perspectives considering house of born born Muslim and raised in MMC shockers community in. In new, Haven Connecticut. So. From from from that perspective. There was a tangible. There's a tangible as as I mentioned is the tangible sense of that kind of self vibe at least on the East especially on the east coast as `nother thing that between East Coast West. East Coast Celebrate Movement was was very strong in it pretty much there. There was a even if whether you Salafi or not there was a tension in terms of you know. Being, able to like justify mainstream black hoter within within the Muslim community one hand you had the Dean community with who had always been like progressive of progressive community but also very ultimate a older community as well. So the type of black culture that they were they were you know really more attuned with was more from like the seventies and the sixties. Music and the dancing and everything more had a labor to it. Versus more of the hip hop culture of the nineties but that said. From side too. You know this other fees it was all the wrong and Leah. Yes Oh, there was there was there was that range right there but you what you would find is that every major Muslim oh, every major city especially with a majority black Muslims like you know Philadelphia or Lanta. You would. You would find you know that range. You know you had your d message and they were big matches and you had your proliferation of of of south. He mashes e had the -Ympia all what was in between and so our match, it was more kind of in. We had embraced A. HIB people stayed overseas in places like Syria. Egypt Morocco I myself went to Morocco I. went to Syria. I. Went to Yemen. Went to Egypt. And so there was there was more of a a I WANNA say Balance Gazette gives the impression that you know one or the other extreme, but there was just more diverse. Diverse opinions within our community considering that we had, you know we were we working from that have more on principles than. Actual individual issues so they weren't like Lynch pin issues like Litmus test you listen to music you you'll good or bad. Muslim. Wasn't like that kind of thing. You know everybody had their their flavor. We had some people who are working community. We have some people who who are oriented. We have some people who have generally in the black community of find some level mixture there itself was more amash. Did that was that was dedicated towards revitalizing the neighborhood very similar to to what we're doing here Memphis and so if you were down with the cause in terms of cleaning up the streets because remember this crab crack epidemic eighties and. Nineties if you were serious about that, then you know and and and you know you did you five prayers you basic Muslim and you weren't about you know calling other. Muslims. Catherine or or or you know cut calling their blood allow for whatever reason. Then you know you generally considered someone that could be worked with with these within our community But you know obviously that vary from place to place you know depending on where you Abbott there was a tangible you know kind of You know that's the Selfie Dr what was being pushed very hard and it did create a lot of pressure attention within all communities. Even if you were in the world community I mean everybody did feel like they had to justify what they were on like what's your deleted ended the day that at idea of like you know producing live producing your proof what you want. And by. By by virtue of that, it of gave people in the sense that you know the that our culture or their sensibilities weren't already natural to the deem right so that we have to. Prove it at the very fact that you have to prove it means that it's not already kind of in line with the natural way to Dean got approved that is part of the deans kind of that kind of mentality but but you know most of us we have not Muslim family you know we we Like my parents converts I have cousins that are all you know not the most Menam you know on these anonymous. So this is this is something that we grew up in the culture whether you listen to music or not you surrounded by grew up in the hood or he grew on you even if you last, you know what? I'm saying you have friends, cousins what have you. So this this was part of the culture you know whether whether you. Produced, coach or not is a whole nother conversation but you are you were definitely a part of it and it was something that you had to deal with one way or another. You had to give our than you had to get to talk that language to know who you're dealing with but it was still a a sense of Islam is going to save us from the vices of what was introduced into our culture. Even if it wasn't something that we ourselves are like the whole. crack epidemic and and and and all of all the crime in the neighborhood Islam was supposed to come and save us from that. Even even today when we started the match in Memphis people in the neighborhood would like, what are you gonNA. Do drug dealers right. At that's. Understood in the culture that black Muslims specifically black Muslims for Turkish Muslims walking down the street which we do have. Turkish listens dog community. They won't ask them that question right? So it's not just about unfortunately in this case, it's not just about him being Muslim is about black. Muslim. So you should know what to do here in this situation which makes sense. I mean, 'cause you're you're supposed to be part of. So hustle. I'm GonNa ask you a a a a big question but the very briefly somehow imam homes have just spoke about culture and he mentioned music and Just before we started recording we were discussing briefly music and hip hop specifically, and you said something quite interesting offer you were talking about the fact that if if it if there's music that mentions Christ or Jesus it's Christian music, you have the same with with other religions and what you said if you have mentioned delights hip hop. So I think if we're on the topic of of of the ninety s and of culture and Islam I, guess just some thoughts from yourself about the. The meeting ground between Islam and hip hop and the influence that it's had I guess both ways. But again, as I said, as briefly as possible I know it's a hopeless some timeframe, but I just want go from. Hamas point because is important understanding. He's made what is between the timeframe east coast west coast right in copper in the late eighties and w macabre access different not just being a cover. But in that timeframe hip hop using was already the word Allala first time I heard was like interesting rock GM sale pretty belongs to a long s the blessed right I myself Koran was rock video, but he got the chronic come down which. This last me well for us it's like Yo you know and it had but it was Islam principles to. And so like I was raised in a Moslem against the email obdulio most right and in California. You know arch was I didn't know what a solid you us right because the I want to was African American but it was she is Sunni it. was launched in work on the streets. So I was raised by lately man best she. Starts Oh I remember. Berkeley was on the fourth floor I know where God show they said, who's on the fourth floor was the salad. This is what I said. Is it people support? Saudi Arabia. This is the fifth floor supporting wrong I. So what's one revolutionary? They said fifth floor to the fifth floor. Now, the funny thing about it was the fifth floor was mainly all Saudis just wasn't a job it was soon needs who supports revolution, and so sometimes get this thing they split when I came into Dr Hamad. Al Gore Enamels Muhammed Lasi, all these people they also But he's according to activist you know saying it was soon of your Shia and so that kind of transport but the hip hop was because Malcolm came in and They were less likely to call you Harare listening to music. So if music was party culture whose revolutionary amusing you gravitate to or those people instead of the people who tell you is Geraldo. DASS. Away. Whitney. Everything unless they say, he said some of his work, one of the biggest difference Detroit. Because he man Moussa was the biggest drug dealer oak right there. So him and then he was like he was against going after drugs why he thought we should convert but. Drove us is our dynamics. was We drug use coming in making slot what it's? Just, this well, there's sell literally every day nobody send Jimmy Broza make Julian eat every day right and so little by little we dow. So by big as drug dealer is name Freeway Ricky Ross is that. he's a good friend of mine. So I'm Elliot see it. Right? He's. He's the reason for the crackle California but he went to jail and he said he read the arbox Malcolm Dixon changes like. So when I look at dopey those like data, like you know what? Though a lot goes back my last night the Pedagogy Malcolm if you don't Malcolm changed so many people's lives we gotta get him out nearby. He would transfer won't allow us to meet mopping. I told he's a sign of God. Ah Transportation. So I think the how we get Malcolm People's. You know the the so much to unpack in everything you just said, but we don't have the time. We're going to do this again but Okay. So so moving on Ibrahim at the first question I, you mentioned Molly being a center of of education and that's kind of been lost. AM An icy collectively. There's been examples that you guys have given of I. Guess. African will black Muslim contribution being marginalized sidelined or ignored for whatever reason. Why why do you think that isn't and? How how can we change that? Do we need to change? Why do I think is I think a very straightforward and it's anti blackness. I think a great thing that has come on this conversation that there were so many different unique experiences. So when you say what is the expert? What is your experience as a Muslim even that is like such I guess a general retirement everybody has their own experiences. I'm. Brock me so me personally. On east African on South Asian. African is in Osborne Kenya, my parents were born and grew up in Somalia but where mix even within within Somalia are we will strive. But. Only. So he explains it so. Even even from that perspective, if he were to go to stop Abudazi Somalia, you have ten Somalis women. Awesome. What is it needs to be black you're going to get ten completely different. Different points of view. So that's a beautiful thing are in terms of why Why has this not been discussed? I think also, what is that's out is that we are now going out educating people about the history of. That people African people within Islamic Contributions Slalom. I mentioned. Earlier about. Fights for rights with imprisons and software, and that's in America and that was very recent and. All through the time and as as a assistant I'm mentioned there are import a historic figures who have contributed. To the League and the spreading of Islam and I think. To get about this conversation in terms of the millennials and those from the ninety eight hundred all we all learn from each other and everyone is am Donald Block for the next generation and continue building and wherever glossy him there are every generation chips away I just on, we continue to build that. So hunger and Jonah will. Continue lay down those building blocks for the next generation to come, and they will be more learning more educated than us and. These conversations will not be as unique as they are unfortunately right now, this is a unique conversation that's like within the hour I guess we all have so much say. Even I want to talk online, for example, by the Hashem, spoke about Islam and a hip hop in America or market speaker by Slama in in London on how intertwined, it was a grind music or how popular is in south London most. Most Workout on the. GRUNGE. Music so grind. Is variant. It's like a UK British variant of of Hippo. Side saw foster or emmy. Yeah Yeah. I can see this conversation during site very quickly. What my partners like these conversations take you know books and lectures and films and music, and there's Such a wide Corpus of knowledge that needs to be tapped into conversations like this is so And I was GONNA say I guess Nyman Hump. So you guys have obviously both been involved in in the the black Muslim festival. We had that podcast that we did a couple of weeks back specifically about that So I guess the both of you do you think that? UH Things like the black Muslim festival lend itself to Reestablishing, the some contribution in. Of mainstream setting. The really interesting question I mean I remember when I spoke with the editor of the, Guardian about nautical that I wanted to write. and. He's a black British man and he was like. Slim's. What the deal and I was explaining to him that there a minority thinking you kate's ten percents old black, Caribbean African, etc, etc.. And obviously being a minority in in interface community means that there are certain such challenges coupled with you know the answer blackness on racism unfortunately of people come with a road from the agents, our continent. So he didn't had no idea that the the protests in the SUMMA and the police brutality of the murders had led to conversations about antique lightness racism within the listen community itself. He had no idea. So this was news to him. You know why? The commissioner the obstacle. I think that what was the me? What's heartening about this festival is a the Pan It's it's a global. Pan. African. Muslim. Events It's not a British thing. It's not an American thing is not Canadian thing. It's a Western thing that is so crisis if anyone's watched any benign of course, all of you to join US coming, you know be a these conversations because the. Learning that has taken place with Britain across the. Atlantic. But also Africans, hearing the dice cleared the diaspora experience, the dice lining from Africans, and what that means for us as Muslims stree-. Powell's that's one thing that I hope we continue to do more transatlantic pan. African Global Communication Collaboration Cooperation that for me because one of the things that we know and I believe very strongly. While Africa Is. disrespected. In. The world. Defenders of Africa and children will never be peace. That's why believe that's absolutely I believe that the communities scientists that we live in the West whenever made for us, I actually personally believe that they are toxic soil of the neither poisoned and the healing has to come from US reclaiming. As. Africans got sex my personal belief I put that to happen. You have to talk we have to learn from each other on that basis of mutual respect mutual acceptance mutual healing soon. Say Making spadeful and holding space for each other because that's one thing I'll tell you. Let me have this conversation. It doesn't matter whether it's about black love which we talked about. We talked about family talked about history identity as one thing that keeps coming up again and again in all every. AND THAT IS TRAUMA And unfortunately to be black in a racialist world in the world that we live in today is to have a history of trauma. And and that is the trauma that the mole, the say. When the trauma is not acknowledged and nothing is done about it, but there can be no healing, right? So whether it's the trauma of having to leave your homes and bring your children up in England divorced Sunday culture whether it's the tool of not knowing who people are not knowing your real name knowing your language whether it's the tool of leaving the house and our database is being afraid for your life that is trauma that needs collected heating its collective for. That's what I believe in that and I see and you see the Nigerians for example, hearing it from the Horse's mouth from the descendants, all the Nigerians obscenity Gambians speaking their fruits and did a kinship that because just as you lost your, your go tribespeople lost your name. So we are not aways because Africa is. Considered to be the place receives a actually. Africa is the one that gives the age to the rest of the world because Africa is where the resources all on his own that stuff, right? So globalize. Mobilization I feel for me something I wanna see, and then the other thing is well as. Hamdani, love. Creates full the wider community, the mole weird position to now be on equal footing actually share and learn together as well. Because s something somebody said about US teaching the people that gives brother Abraham, who said a seeking the people rather we're out here learning. We on especially out here, running some of the stuff like Schuttler could has a full video latest. Awesome. The Best of all people were like war. Africans would doing that after case went across the Atlantic, the Muslims were. Across the slaves, how many Muslim the Muslim ruins with the troublemakers we didn't know this stop so as we're learning. We can start to disseminate but the me the she is the next generation walk we going to teach them how we're gonNA bring them up to truly love who they are as children of African descent wherever they are in the world, and as Muslims, blessed weight loss than analysts. On an undercover price artist wants to come from point as well. I'm I think we are being more. We are being empowered in sense that we now understand or. Renaissance is not our responsibility to educate others on their anti blackness. Think. Of as, your your. To bring back to initial question why you said I'm why has the are the contributions August off black Muslims not really been appreciated by other Muslims. I guess like four four people who have embedded or programmed anti blackness within an influx for them to a sense of that people that they see is below them have actually contributed to slam actually were the reason why they have a little bit freedoms have along their beliefs on able to access an the. The books and the education they do. It's very difficult for them to sept on for many years for a long time. I guess black Muslims have been fighting a losing battle and trying to prove that they. Should be accepted within the Muslim community on. That, we should be given the same rights and be given the same I guess respect as other Muslims. But overall, you know once you try five times, ten times you've tried out for twenty years you realize that actually you're not getting anywhere and you haven't really. Progressed in twenty years. Years has four years or fifty years except by actually taking that by force and going back within your own community and educating yourself and empowering yourself unfussy going from within your community, and we have a little of bonds in ties that we have to create within ourselves. Like. Isis said we need to. Embrace an ideal fanatic and ISM because I guess like we have tribal issues so on. So forth. So Being able to Be empowered in that way I think will be the yeah. Feature as. One small point. Other it's just A. Phenomenal and I think she makes a point that sometimes you talk about blackness but Pan, Africa's extremely poor I. Remember when I want to South Africa. All went to Robert I and where things different shade was between. ANC PNC OFF PAC. Roberson boot Wayne and talk about from Cape Town. Power cake better think that when we die Asper, Pan Africanist is very art in understand the differences, but we can get back to after water I say that because I have a lot of cold your friends there. African. Peace Lady that's what they know. They're Africans right. If you look at Gandhi Gandhi was Indian African. And then deep because Marcus Garvey who's considered the founder was the UN is he was England came to America, but he talked hat after his. Daddy award at us as Muslims could probably you'd better to identify bring together would soon as extremely but I will say what things that I believe that Arabia is a peninsula of African. So I thought it to be the culture of West Africans and people in Jeddah is to say like a person's GonNa. Saying I'm in. East Africa just like somebody in West whistle to meet. We got to throw in. Palestine in Africa. So you know saying they are. Reclaiming every. Anyway, I was born here. So we just. A MOM hums. There's there's two questions I. Think I'm just GonNa have to selectively. Ask One two of you the questions and obviously the other feel free to jump in with any points. But I am aware that we're over the AL mark I don't want to take too much more of everyone's time. So the other two questions th the second last one is about your personal identity in A. Specific your race and and how you feel that that sort of connection to your race has. Deepened your relationship with slum and vice versa. Is there a connection for you and and and how was that manifested? I would say for me I I definitely identify as I mean what? What, what we would normally call African American or black American Muslim That's what this commonly known as but really. I think that somewhat misleading because it tends to give a impression at that something about blackness itself. Or? has some kind of central quality to in terms of how you you behave or what have you rather it's more the experience of being the descendant of African that is, now you know re entered has been reintroduced to a slam after being taken away I think it's just that that that understanding of that experience of being in America being the descendant of an African and acknowledging that legacy acknowledging that experience is what really informs my perspective of you know the role that I play the unique. Unique perspectives, unique sensitivities that I bring to the table in that people like me that I can identify with also bring to the table and I think as a Muslim one of the things that and and there's no problem having that I think. Sometimes we. We're we're we're somewhat apprehensive about acknowledging race or things like that or the profitable label setup You know he was clear about his tribal US tribal lineage travel agents, as well as all the Sahaba and the citizens and what have you so that as built into our understanding of tradition. But what we could use it for his understanding, the profits was selected as well as his his family and his companions they we can we gain from our experiences. We can identify and solve the problems or bring a solutions to the table based off of the experiences that we share with the experiences that they have. And not all of US share the same experiences do due to simply due to the fact that we come from different races and walk T- level wonderful sponsor says that was one of his signs is the differences between our tongues in the way we speak and our color. Sign of. Sometimes I a halfway joke with some of my ones I mentioned that that that that is like, would you say ebonics is A. Based on that I have is one of the towns of human being. And what what out there you know that was a little tongue in cheek but the reality is that every human being has certain experiences that are the tribes and the raises and the nations of of of of humanity have experiences that can be expressed in a unique way that other people can't express it i. think this is what hip hop has been able to do very eloquently. And that's why everyone can identify with it. Because everyone's been touched with some level of colonialism racism and they can't express it in the way that hip hop is have been able to express it from the deep understanding that we have as descendants of asleep Africa's in America who are now Muslim have been touched with slamming way that part of the Western Hemisphere has you know other other. People in African diaspora haven't been touched. You know in that way or haven't experienced Islam in a way that we've been able to express. That's the unique thing that I think we're able to bring. So when we come to our neighborhoods we're bringing. You know we're bringing knowledge of the unseen you know through our religion and able to tie that give meaning to our experience in a way that's much more meaningful than any other people are able to do you know are able to to express I think when when we give our in that way, people are able to to realize you know what will all this I've gone through has a meaning. That transcends. This this you know tempore reality and it actually gives me a certain level insight into my. Relationship with my Lord that I probably wouldn't be able to get in this way if I got it gone through a different experience. And that's the unique value and I think that's why you know our our Shaheed Malcolm was able to hide from Shabazz was able to to really touch it. You know tap into that in a way that that kind of is kind of quintessential to to to kind of unique in value valuable approach that you know that our people have a that can touch all people all over the world. That was a a really beautiful answer I'm I'm to be honest I'm actually guts that that we don't have more time to do this. I do have more questions Dagnon, not rapping up, but I just wanted to reflect for a second that there's just been so many different avenues that this conversation has kinda gone down and I I love the kind of diversity of perspectives and generations that were kind of bridging here as well. I'M A and I think to probably go to the other end of the spectrum and Huzzah I want to ask you a similar question in terms of. You spoke about your your heritage, and having an inherent pride in that in your in your Nigerian roots, and that being apart and shaping your your Islamic identity, and the way you practice and everything else so. Again, it's the same thing in jump in terms of understanding from your perspective what? The word is what strength or what? Completeness I guess the marriage of culture, and religion has had for yourself. Yeah, I think. It was the home that was reading the foundation for me I think if I didn't have my parents and So that insistence on understanding the culture, earning the language, eating the food and resource myself in what it means to be Nigeria and I wouldn't have been able to woo cow and so defend myself from the things of being a woman a black in a Muslim Apaches differently abled like I just went able to deal with or this kind of thing. So I think the The company that provides now moving forward. I I do definitely have moments of so conflict where to sit down and to reflect on. The morals and the values I grew up with but it's a little easier for me to navigate faces which I'm being questioned. And spaces in which I'm forced to sort of voice might entity very vocal. And counter and be on the defense and by recognizing that. There is the element ways of needing to defend oneself when we get into some paces especially in met that. Like black mixed vegetable, it was important that we create spaces where Muslims could walk in and not feel like they have to defend themselves and feel as if it was more about just expiration and learning and so community rather than. Fighting people and with battling with so bad blackness and then the slimness and been questioned on these fronts I think one of the things really showed me as well was that. It was a privilege for me to have my family because I so have conversations with people who they want to leave the religion as a result of the treatment all they want to disassociate themselves from their culture and what they grew up with because of how when they can stay space. They didn't have the privilege the I had of having that foundation and having the backup and having that So solid communities to come from in the fast. Pace. and. So it really is a big issue I think when it comes to. Providing blackness about comes up and reading just reinforcing what it means for them to be able to have spaces too. So explore thousand shallow. and. The final question I have I'm just GONNA leave it open ended and whoever wants to jump in renounce a feel free. But that question is what can other ethnic and cultural Muslim groups learn from the black? Muslim community. Anyone has any thoughts to jump in. Edison say very simply we don't. Like Muslim communities lit like but that's Come on experience the energy listen to the incredible conversations honesty you know the Huma, the energy. Claiming that Kim says my experience of what we see how you know what I'm talking about right. But the this isn't amazing energy and you know I think that there's so much that other people can learn but also joy. An an and yet just just have that experience of of being a space where you're open to listening into learning. It's it's a very, very humbling. Thing, but it's also a privilege to to be able to do that. Actually have access to to people who are different from you and be allowed to to see them in their natural habitat being themselves and the. People go away learning a lot with a lot of food for thought Michelle Alonso in a mole, the mole people venture out of that comfort zone and into those spaces your. Transformations will happen. That you know the broiler, your point about the differences and. Would I talked to people? I don't talk illness no more just be. Is because. I talked to a friend of mine he's a man Encarta. Nigga chic-. NIGGA negotiating. He's only talk. To US Is Black American. This word is not good wordly. Noise. With the war people not order is a is a cold where like you speaking to people who don't nobody care about this black people but? They, just Malcolm X. was a Nick I. Out Now, everybody could use the word but is a part of talking and thinking about. History Czar was on you guys do relate gave trouble. He could the whole tribe converting so attracting everybody people all of their heart but a two things out learned they racial one. I stayed as as officer myself she and my fault Ave. right is that whether people believe they imams obligated up for email jacker saw team many everybody who says she don't realize their mothers were Black Nubians. Every mouthful Jaffer Sake Momeni. Africans. Are I'm amazed. Dude how can you even black when Yorkie moms are black one to the whole woman Ali? Share. Beautifully. Time Today Day you bow down not just where abouts led to an African woman who's very next college maybe. Hajer is and where she's from that. Transform a minute makes a lot. By. Think what was mentioned I guess got a conversation a couple of times buses, the name Husham spill of resistance that you find within that Muslims that you don't find within Asian Muslim than an Arab Muslims on I guess I'm. Each. Each communities each community is responsible for their own empowerment. But if I was to speak on what other communities Callan from the back Muslim community is to not have this as I mentioned like this distance, this desire that never ends to assimilate into be accepted. Within like the Western Watch society and not be seen as different in any way because whether you are black brown white anywhere that is outside of Europe you will never be seen as equal. Opinion. Amongst. The general white reputation in the West. I think as this is mentioned. That people Muslims As a whole. Accepted that I'm in a majority boxing among certain other communities. There's still a lot of A. Distinct lack of lack of acceptance and what has led to is a lot of people. So stepping on each other in order to climb the ladder. On, a complete lack of empowerment of from, from that perspective. Any of the final thoughts from from from anyone else. Don't feel compelled by the way just. Giving a minute in case anyone thinks of anything. Good all right. What would thank thank you guys all for for for taking part in this in conversation. Other said earlier it's for me. It's it's been a remarkable landing exercising and hearing so many different perspectives and and I think there's as individual conversations to be had with with each one of you with myself hopefully in the future. Spoken to since the name of before. Abraham and how as well But I definitely think Imam Hamza and Husham. That, there's a lot that we can discuss an unpacking and maybe we have you guys on the podcast again in the future and Sean La But again, thank you all and and. We'll. We'll see your Amazon.

America UK Africa Africans Malcolm US Memphis Ibrahim England Somalia Muslim Community Alison Americ black middle class Editor in chief Egypt London Tennessee Atlantic Berkeley Detroit
Freiheit heit, heute schon das Klima zu schtzen

Was jetzt?

11:45 min | 2 weeks ago

Freiheit heit, heute schon das Klima zu schtzen

"The law had had common by us yet. St- deem houston and ninety nine podcast fun site online. What is twi talk. That is just pulling on the zero papillon. Sheila bison defoe museum you listen. Podcast is archetype by mind by team in hooda madame bundeswehr. Fossils curated tuna ham. Help via listen in her. Daniela in podcast. Is i know sights on climate shots. When threatened him our kids music headphone house. Countryman they asked above denomination initially it could finance minister will have short small montoya in hamburg. Some parliamentarians onto our shows dot com scandal off declared schultz's ear. Malaita guy buca s own half say two thousand lipson on thousands eighteen months amid tumor the mystery vyborg bank angle. Today at us asked him ninety nine by. Don't as home their hamburger shampoo shaft. Soya's caputo radin upshaw on under spd's politica influence of finance on keenum ham armed up on cook. Tolerance washburn biden violence. Kite so munition fest. Lack mayor in east and You mentioned by muslim panic leaving. Come any comedians patient. On medicines act on rises told us up on uber in hundred. Let's ruskin out to. The future is unclear in ending bullishness. I understood in a raider under million baryshnikov. Finders of tapa watched on inside mentioned mid lakers. Minister netanyahu's powerful nashville encarta stouffer could exponential series and podcast is twinned floor. Guest on owns update. Here sean t mom. Nobody in china based zuganov linked visitor not my respecting ambition us now under positive album. That's that's for fossil reached hut in cheang dusk. Lima shoots cassettes. Deponent's in thailand. Nate madame gone cassettes for these philip. Max vetted see totta. Khayelitsha did some tile nausea union. Bush made a few hundred is intuitive. Angie graffman bush. Tim mullin in fi heads question. Let's anastas act hoi to defy at all. Salim highs cited multi guest on. It's obviously a nick. Mayor vinegar cleared. Superdome saunderson fly hide highest disclaimer host. Sean shoots doesn't make vice chidlren on deep ball. So i not included kupfer on this Heinrich beefing is political. All i'd at that site young henry stein kalsa horned on the roof of assam advised to wrist a lotta the middle mighty fascinates yawn deemed. These moore touch downs coverage of evening and the aina is does he clogged foolish. Var does opening up for yelp just bonus for festivals reached the fasten voter providers anglerfish indeed fired going to get the huytler. Sean ends on. The s in tacoma is toughest in does confessed dead clemen volunteered as national and political years. On non professionals gordon sets anguish. Stripped that most does. Let's don't be so does tab. You're cutting niche me last week. Hoyer team in to via via to follow patricia. Calf tab to china and butchering wouldn't is. This is not one of your thoughts on how to politician your station. That's what tiger woods off now. Anathema in that sukhoi leaked. Not emoto lebron just sean on morning sons of its morton namely to trust ish is new ball to gibson. Articles are david ganzi in industrial. Didn't as dash dot for flitted is traditionally given school to shootin. Even alpha measured cesar wouldn't estate took listed and desmond after convicting simply carbons good now does have contemplated of these not coach whitson. That's come even the bonus republic in up come by witness interstate guns cloud of an fancy shrimp muslim manatt. Holiday at hashim does brunner's cassettes as into a gift of graph and kind of goofing. It's keeps you balanced by ted online The site devictor stay politician in this yard. Vespa dotted configure politician tied on the consequences and relative giving That's does implants piane vicious the china. For felicity bonus young nation work does the biz ended swansea science Marshaled steeler Even gazettes fest leaked on war food at home. This is to give trunks on an outfit and sidhom twenty ties shrimp dish with dot com ziada and tried on of want to own ounce them manage alison you to contra. Sheep has loggers desperate hits in to the hostage mass nam yet sean to arise when does from woodland off governor converting. How'd y'all gonna sit on a house. Say need a clues on an outcome for communism young heinisch if you don don qadeer far beyond on still john gear. Agana again in bite on demand by jokesters. Manila had soy calmly. Light until feel liza flushing or i just found out. That was abana hunt. Grenadian does submits look. No nick defy uninformed hudson targets and enjoy garden embellishing pal el-gamaa. It takes a forty polit- saigal from diosdado on the spring. Commando unlooked lesson onto sprang command thus funding and and aplastic to might zero data gibson. Cordola owned glide. Kill set an indoor center spring garden abba depletes. I hot internet lucia show and pu from for what had Dehaan cannot ivana to niche zanjan. Zek speared psych. It's that naughty them. Now i you know now is fantasy busty. All's kongsberg concrete Mid level as you get your debt side in zephirin yawning indulgent in belene vectors pence dished status not limbs and it's not that knocked diaz constitution. It's violence fancy footwear. Stephen demoss nama. By daf hobeish lawson then infects yawns shoots gazettes and own for desktop yet. Lavar fastens slightly approved by me. Get stevens creek. Lauren professor dr anna katarina mongoloid hot food exists after i him quits gift f. I good english on album medicine. Good for foreign bonus for fastens graced the owls skunks peta that as if it it's clean on vida's modern western halifa mongoloid mongoloid zaidon skunk spelman zinn in gonda facilitation king basic contracts differs concerning by contrast kind of defending these emitted potent. Here for truth in la linea album matt. The spelled does the touting muslim feeling. One place. I was when does for the read. Decode crashed reveals. He wants Forced steph shops shouting. Most that isn't so much. Russia i love. It's shefty installs sean. Against violence in any is with muslim ban. Cops him for ganja ya podcast here. Had y'all nuclear tonight so gaskin alternative haga vehic. Somebody says installment anguish on duty kaliyan on darna by visit jeff lee dot de few the oscars pellagra appalling about clubmen mustard. Suzanne diaz comes better. He'll lift vans. Titans massnahmen packets. Home is zero minister hill does is also hug after start safely. The oscar relegate wants finance pursuant swim for morton's when these outside com was even call mafia potent exempt mobility and. I'm talked hope soc thunder on funding z. Mafia potent is against these allowed Awfully vivian woman. Hundred does highest. Their effect is absolute goosing. When t shooting of these people's think your own often had the given us wounds elissa hundred of us hoped to advance the oscar. Blink funding in deutschland is this skunks belly. I don incidents threat could cope with incidents that i wound up on canal cop along the busy realm via are they're incident that hundreds of willie i announce feeding begin. Dissolves span is at all skunks fantasize in the moment. Woody incidents guns cannot want the hundred hundred miles from guns quotes often investing they about your body exponential in vic long. That's faulty the wounded game. But that's why it's become an on off the skunks boever on your your lockdown. Viva doesn't in their niche zinn. Fulin is our half the incidence rate under control it supreme. Let's have harder on an island. Turkish van visiting the spoon awesome. That's why all nick often. It really does. The pilot awesome For ending talking about tone. That scene for customers for sure and one is great for long pm. Mitch to tune by on homelessness conducive shoulder. Meet us in colts. In china could toften their inverted in. is this year year and talk sodas. The anger shrank plying blackish mile zag respond v. Joseph them donkey union. You're good on vita atiku dots experiment. Sie lieber hurling on who. I'm indian notes on dasa vava's yet a modified talk more speed mountains. Update these my mid. Pr ocean bag. I'm originally bitter on spooners fussell's nine hundred shotguns on a male vaccines at tied blames. Install blames gavaldon golden heights. Vegas is experts. Like invited on the your yeltsin's cocooned choose. Vice is india listed on different wounds. Lewis was he. Gets me folks audition important advice. Uneven us combed about design and these potent.

Sheila bison defoe museum hooda madame bundeswehr Malaita guy buca radin upshaw keenum washburn biden sean Minister netanyahu zuganov Nate madame Khayelitsha Angie graffman bush Tim mullin anastas Salim highs Superdome saunderson kupfer henry stein clemen emoto lebron
Episode 2-Purpose, Passion and Pain

Radiant Pearl Living-RPL Live with Stacy Zant

33:10 min | 1 year ago

Episode 2-Purpose, Passion and Pain

"Welcome to the Arabian Paralympian forecast. Where you will hear fearless stories to nurture your dreams and inspire you to leave a radium lifestyle? You love now L. Hueys your host stacy's to radiant per living. RPI Live episode. Oh to where we are discussing what it means to walk in purpose to pursue your passion to live out your calling holly and knowing who you are from a multi generational viewpoint a discussion between mother and daughters. We're so excited to have you here and so we shall begin so the question that we're asking discussing right now is how do you identify awash within your. I'll do the purpose really. It gives you that sense of that sense of peace rain walking in your purpose. There's a certain amount of content. It comes with it is so so funny because last night at our house. Discount swooning Hersh He yes used so he about How we can walk in the purpose it does not free us off of? It doesn't really us off off issues that you face life but the difference is that when you walking in your purpose it gives you that stop it gives you that all that it inner unction to kind of keep moving. Because you're found God you find your place and you will because you are unique. And you're impacting increases awesome Yes just to asthma acid even as a young adult you know life US older and say e is she does love as you may be there are but just realizing from How still caught in teen the movers? Do you know they have a job. They have Your identity in knowing what they WANNA do with your life in they. Will you know pretty much do that. For the duration off their time here till they retire. But then I'm coming from the generation he said we are to pursue your passion talent and the moment that they find that this is no longer you're fulfilling nor full serving the purpose for which they believe. They're called in the season that they're in then they are when you walk away from it. They're willing to go ahead and go search what they believe their call to do you and what they knowing to fulfill for them to the house. They're calling and the earth in essence walk in the full legal. They are your age sometimes. They are researching on. And that's what that's what it's about how you know get our younger. An oven hung juries. You to start thinking about. How do I go from fooling through trying to figure things out? And it's a case of shoot. What am on this? You insult for me that generation and in a way even said that I've been kind of wait. You may years in terms of how I've always seen in knife and so so just as earlier a unity involved in ministry remember knowing that minister ministered to Paul and misery is everything because human beings and people go through everything and so there's so many facets that were able to operate constantly person that is called to news waiver saying about. Sometimes you know whether grew says so now we have to try just the aware of what we do one zero. What is it that we like to just like okay? This is doing something that I realize. Joy is okay. Hey maybe this is something that I wanted us to Destino rare like what you're doing and just realizing like your reaction to certain things it just being able to sneak heen online licensing rare yourself that I also when you're in your hurts or walking. This was actually that you mentioned that really kind of the whole as earth does something that you like and something that meets you and you'd be aware insensitive once really makes you feel like Oh this is the uh-huh yes okay. Let Me Tryin go that route right because actually that is for person who's really struggling China. Oh my was here to do what difference can have made that will make a difference is three. We all that you said really apart. Will the central Ohio said which is really be comfortable and being able to be sensitive at the same time that's circle being comfortable you are. You're passionate about Stacy's fashion so we're talking about passionately talking about feeling contented. I'll say time you dribble people want to excel that. They that he's on getting you that says uh-huh and love you both have ranked for four. I think about in as we both talk home. What comes to mind is it? It is going to be a huge finding as I mentioned a little bit earlier. Is that for generation that on the heart off. It's it's seems like the season that her in and what is going on in your life and what is content grazing the people who surround yourself that you're reading school the yourself to replace going exposure everything and so when you realize it's important you know as sensitive aware all of that comes forth when when you take the time to make connections go beyond the comfort zone on your device or laptop and you know you're in a society where everyone is training China to find their definition of the fast order definition identity. Not what they see on the screen may not even still a movie or TV you. Can you know we screen our phone than social media. You're unfortunately sometimes getting the chop off comparing ourselves. Because what showing their highlight reel on faith and all the other platforms platform than instagram twitter. Wherever you're saying snapchat there's so many of them out there that he Starting to use a mirror four should be and what they always say to light Be So close not only on. What is it that I WANNA do this? I've had experiences like in the past rare I would just get shredded sin time site. Was it that allowed I ju Treated I felt like I was in that limbo for such a long time because I'm so full me not knowing Berbice by where now I'm just trying to let it common. Let it flow. You know. Just keep living while he's saying that's all I realize I. I started meeting learning about one-sided that everything started to caught so let's not much Just actually living lashing sermon. The purse will continue where you just did that. Mom New Year's I- Youngest Gore. He's not about Daughter second daughter and it seemed to be like all the males tend to zoom in on rally all the issues at zooming undetermined speaker because my generation we we tend to kind of out allow south to Miro once around us allow parents were Kinda more rigid but then is is just as you said you. You just have very allow yourself to be mirror. millennials are more parcel. They're go again. We're more cautious then. Once we arrived here we actually and in the long run in the Han. Yes yes it is also the thing about it is that we will have less. He costs because we are. WHOA cautious with Michael Moore people processing statement in the process longer? Because I make sure that we were in the right direction. millennials guys see like kind of like I'll just okay. Why will this is what I want? I like this. I don't like that okay L.. Concert from anymore though I go ahead move forward latest to decide you know because we don't have attack to waste you know we were like in essence the oasis wii mutton agreed mark in the the industry in the you know the units weather's finally unit Ed or if you are a part of a ministry whatever it is that you do you have a passion for and you want to see something fulfilled and it's definitely Su- hugh as an individual individual than you're willing to go ahead and lay down on them and not necessarily endure the pain in a certain case when you get hitting maybe this is a sign that I need to go ahead and pitch in another direction. chedda explore that deeper that yet on Hayne then such an important part of the process you know the important part of off incoming coming coming that exquisite Janet that goal tough about the refinement of these these different johns that are found you and we want to be afraid famine a great asset to the to the world that you're in Tom's report apart off businesses that we are on everything that we J. Rolling. Let's head onto that second question that that is how income to embrace the pain and the struggles. You have me living off for twenty four years. I realized that we all have realized that. Awesome the cup. It's happened so since we know how to react to it now. We know they're gonNA come. There's some the lockers in life and things like that but you we Wendell's James Lead those battlements having which situation arises Salkin that women just like man this is my situation in just a high consulate or do we say okay right now all this yes the situation I don't like Feeling right now you know what can i. I know that this might help me. Become more empathetic person. You know table to relate to you probably have you know assist similar situation right and then also just unique able to it's helped me this cultivating alternating you just learn from those experiences. So I think that is high when grace it night doesn't last all lanes. Zeros doesn't last forever so knows is why cycle. You just keep going by The an Yorker seconds very similar to how I've used hanes hanging in life in general is not something new in our life result. The moment you start a grace notes Agni just engine on this. Is Charlie your pain into purpose us and harass will come in have that because you know that it is that you have to go through to all he wanted to come and also in full potential. If you stay in a place that is comfortable they you will never be stretched. You will never get to that level that he could get to were able to fight your way through and realize. Hey you said to. The headache wasn't taking Dayton. There's more that I hire that. I need to go and new findings fall. And so we always show is his own over and over again in mystery in in the evolves in helping whole working with awe you know you are the only way we able to sustain when we get higher place in having a little pacture students so yes and so you certainly be able to stay on top if you have a garden the need to go through. Because you're going to go with. Your movie is sized reject tad usually envied vidh visibility. Sola she had to deal with where you are on Tom. Because of Jealous they're phasing any. Don't try to attack you from all corners because you have so much more to give in to offer absolutely this episode is brought to you live by the radiant Pearl Platter at radiant Pearl Living Dot com slash plan. Dan Who wants to take the time to remind you to leave a review have enjoyed this interview so far and the wonderful all time that we put into creating content that will inspire you and encourage you to live a raid into life that you love so just take a moment to leave a review and we will be giving away an actual gift at the end of thirteen days as in this new year. Twenty twenty new decayed and we are so excited to give and share all the details at radiant Pearl Living Dot com forward slash episode to or able to see reference to all has been discussed. Download the transcript upped for this particular episode as well as to further connect with us on multiple social media outlets from facebook put crib radiant Pearl Living tour facebook page. If you give us a lake and just leave a review on this particular. PODCAST has us on our facebook page. We love hearing from you. You can connect with me directly on instagram. And if you take the time to tagging duggan share on your story takeaway from any of her episodes. I would be elated to further. Share your story join our texts group on the flick APP wherein the show notes the direct link. Is there for you to join and get bonus behind the scenes means opportunities with some of our guests and connect further with a raid in Pearl community. Thank you so much and back to the show so the only that you are sorry but all those kids the way you are gonna be able to be it is painted have perfected had four. You know this this race that she is oftentimes from year light years and one Islamic learned is that if evens is this teacher so much and it has healthy mice Unisys life is life has base. Shouli recognizing hers more competent. So I it's tough. Finding your purpose is an ongoing process. Because of the sexual who seizes you go through the scene Manson so as you say it's a matter of just Roy. The same tabloid stagnant not allow you Subsidy Push Vita forces that comes against. I'll is a matter of just really warming that have that passion and drive and that interest whatever level that you'd find yourself itself Whatever is it gives you that? He's an that happiness and that that comfort. Aw that inside of what is going on around you you are just at. He's because because you know the yourself that you're doing I wasn't doing you but you doing something that really is you the become a. I'm surprised you impact. People who are searching for Saadi ever want has something unique that will contribute or visit some. Yeah and so once you can find wanted Different downdraw listen to you. That if you're a good cr kind of John that really sing or utilized mostly sitting. There is a chance one ever Surrey. That comes the ministry that you're that space today that is that is what is draw. I'll I'll use OSI ASLI. That Hashim is stopping that eating live five five years of this disease. I still involving finding that conflict zone at different levels of really really still hill. Who She Powell's because view a wide empowered? I really love that money I think is so now. WE'RE GONNA turn to you as the listener. He has all this conversation that we're having coming from the different sects trump's living you know we talk about sanitation that is represented here as a listener. He'll where you are and and where you're coming from and I love the mantras brought out that is the SICOM heavy. Go through and one of the things. Things are always of a young girl in in college with the nonprofit work done you know. For some reason. The ideal seasons seasons seasons always resonated with. You'll see her slogan. Make this your fee then for a living as you kind of that idea that concept and what season are you in you know as recognizing Hsa being aware insensitive home. These import were that easy to take. Time to marinate fink on our. We don't take enough time. To really ponder you know Christiane and taking time to meditate on the word or taking time to just yellowstone and those to the than than they do their different ways of warning to the wall to me and to yet calm so they can hear their sauce. unclearly nearly see recognize where they are in this season of life that you are able to do that him out. You know what it is that defines you investable meant to define you in this moment. Then you're able to figure out what steps you need to take in order to walk in that Haas in Orange Impreza pain that you go through in order to eventually in that the also these all kinds of that hours. You're all our tests. What was brought for everyone has to whether they can meet your mom can reach? I may not be able to reach. I can't identify with that you. Don't we see different. That would you come to our artistic abilities right. And this was Rachel you tool can recognize our to influence the people that you'll be able to influence and be able to share your story and be able to encourage and to be able to minister to you so each of us has that amazing opportunity before us to imre the pain to embrace our story and to share I he said I wanNA give my sister. We just slow last words to say to encourage our listeners that she was lying on the channel. I'll have to say see. A rainbow has to be there before so Actually ran the Just get out you will find your purpose. This nation view where what's going on and it just be sensitive to different things and you'll be able to just once and not too much on whether it's my first what what am I doing. Take my word really is be in love. With what makes you happy. Be In love me me. Stocks your interest. If you're interested in something knicks excited about its chances. Are that me. If you're a sad enough somebody I mean right now on my johnny. After teaching for almost thirty years I finally finding one of my real strong passion in Makarova's your and that is to really build and work with and right now I've been asked me the the the literacy coach Why because Little Lil the SEC? With that passion for wanting to tell struggling readers one to house. This was struggling and really Dali the this will give them the deal so they can understand you can read something at breakdown homerun property. It's just fell on our laps. Every time I get a raise. Our revolve. who were Kocic cited is the fall? It's just slowly so anytime you bother you excited about something that faces you at the beginning humanity little therefore challenge but then as soon as you start relaxing okay is coming to be. I vote this especially if talk to the heart rate then you will unify once you talk to you and say okay got another side about it. Give me some visual. He's GonNa draw your that and you are just gonNA find yourself Awesome and love. I absolutely the love you know. Most View Religious Lena Alex in charge of how and how you are able. Yeah I think he are on that question for themselves being from the happy aunts. Yes you in that joy doing it onto living in that moment you know also. My mom is is packing machine at Lord opened the doors. Open up your own center. Oh yes so. That Hodge's voted to call off with just one event you wash booked out over four for semester. That season time comes around again. You don't don't go into Even hired on author on your part of your company. Yes yes we're GONNA differently link fat and show some horror Harare individuals as passionate educator and a minister l.. Psalmist singer just doing so much on your call to meet says Blessing healthy all. I mean there's no checking the doors that will depend on yourself. How how long have to open to us? And the work that ration- because preparation is really key to the into doors at the over once. You're on Jay snow in his communist repaired. So guys bitter even don't see any reason to prepare. You're just repair. That's a good thing about the other day when I was critically it was working to what I wanted to but I told myself how. Can I prepare myself right now at this job to take on another job that I would want. You can be a leader right now along. You know hi Ho words been by that so when the time comes I want to have a leadership position somewhere there myself job suggest seeing it like that to to hang herself in situations that you're in now on what a teaching moment at the other young ones down as loud as you because what you just raw word is the Afghan again. Yeah that you brought forward you know some people. The he said earn. How while in the state that they're in off things in my favor? What's going on what they deserve? This but they this Nessin that you to take phenomenally listen you instill ants to help to the place as a leader. We are servants leader. lee-ing when you don't even have the Maya Leeann how the platforms leading where you don't even have. They would say off foreign. TV's on the back of the pack right there that very interview. That Phone Ryan Army's incredible because that is a lesson that will take people years in year trial in order to learn. But if you can learn on your in your you you do how much farther you will go. And how much more prepared ready you will be the door. The Flung Open Y. ooh The audience. That has been prepared because you had taken the time to be ready for that moment but now moments midst the May not necessarily be a state but remember the wilderness occupies the rain after the Wilderness of going through union to go through in in order to be qualify. Not My man but you are touching upon. Aw all trading room on telling her up another another end saw we'll be able able to delve deeper into some of these that we left and always let you on the edge of your seat and ready to go deep hard to see more of Wack doc has more what needs to be a radiant carl exquisite gem. That is the process of. I meant to call in his fridge. This last words issue here pretty much check in one of the songs on eating trail. I believe I will say cats. I want you to say this is going to be a declaration I I I will make it all the pain or that I will will be more got has a it will come. He believes in an hugh for he has

China stacy Tom facebook US RPI Hersh holly L. Hueys instagram Ohio Pearl community Unisys Destino Surrey Paul
Dis-Kurti-ous: intrigues in Kosovo

The Economist: The Intelligence

23:40 min | 1 year ago

Dis-Kurti-ous: intrigues in Kosovo

"Hello and welcome to the intelligence on economist. Radio on your host Jason Palmer. Every weekday we provide a fresh perspective on the events. Shaping your world. This week's spring meetings of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank will be virtual. Of course they come at a tricky time. As Kovin stricken governments turned to their lender of last resort. How much is in the Kitty and will it be enough and for the most part Indonesia? The world's most populous Muslim nation practices of thoroughly moderate version of the faith but on social media you'll find hints of a more Conservative branch convincing young lovers to ditch dating and SKIP STRAIGHT TO MARRIAGE. First up though. Kosovo is in a divided unstable corner of Europe. It's a fact underlined by the fate of Albuquerque who spent just fifty one days as the country's prime minister. The coalition leader lost a confidence. Vote three weeks ago after a dispute provoked by whether to declare state of emergency because of covert nineteen. Mr Kurti was against the proposed measures. They would have given much greater powers to his longstanding rival. The Republic President Hashem Thaci a major issue is inflamed their enmity is the one that dominates Kosovar politics countries relationship with Serbia following the vote. The office of Mr Kurti remains as caretaker. Prime Minister contacted the intelligence. Would we like to hear his side of the story? Okay so first of all Mr Coachie. Thank you very much for for making time for us. I have really just a a few questions. Thank you for you and so. We took up the offer as well speaking to Tim. Judah the economists Falcons correspondent Albuquerque's a very well known figure in Kosovo ever since the late ninety S and. He's been a protest politician really ever since then until he came to power. After last October's elections. He was a vocal opponent of Serbia. Who imprisoned him in the late ninety? S then he was an opponent of the UN which around Kosovo until its independence took lead independence in two thousand eight. He was an opponent of all. Kosovo governments ever since and he has been against the EU and periodically against the US and many people in the former elite in Kosovo felt threatened by this. The deposing of Mr Kurti prime minister has been welcomed in Washington president. Donald Trump's administration has been trying to help resolve the impasse between Kosovo and Serbia persisted since the Balkan wars of the nineteen nineties. Serbia has never recognised Kosovo's independence although most European countries and a majority of EU n members have Mr Kurti though is reluctant to settle with Serbia. Deal that would make the trump administration look savvy that put him on the wrong side of Mr Trump. But it's the current course of our president who remains Mr Curtis more significant fo. Ti is behaving every day as one of the leaders of the opposition so every day he finds Bretax to attack me. The President Husham Thaci who was a senior figure in the former Kosovo Liberation Army which was the guerrilla group. That fought Beer in the in the late ninety s is the type of person that Mr Coachie really wants to see gone. He accuses Mister Thaci of being the type of person symbolizing that elite which he says has become corrupt. President of Kosovo. Is Laura often every day? Politician rather than ceremonial figure as president should be in a republic which is democratic parliamentarian in character. I imagine that our president would like to change our constitution and At ended our republic into a presidential one like us or France. Tim President Thaci argues. He's only focused on the corona virus. And that Mr Kurti's concerns about constitutional. Change aren't aren't valid. But their rivalry clearly goes far beyond this so over the last couple of years. Missa thought she has been pursuing talks with his opposite number in Serbia president. Alexander vote-rich aiming somehow to come to some sort of deal which would settle all the outstanding issues between Kosovo and Serbia and Mr Kuti has been opposing this and when he came to her he said clearly. I'm now the prime minister talks with Serbia will now proceed under my Egypt's I'm now in control and that's the main reason to have come to blows now well. Initially they've disagreed over the legacy of the last government which imposed a tariff of one hundred percent on all Serbian imports which is really huts. Ibm economically because Saban exports a lot to Kosovo and Mr Rich. The Saban Presidents said Fi. He would proceed perhaps to do a deal with Kosovo but he wanted this tariff lifted. Mr T. Then said fine. We'll lift the tariff. And he's begun moves to do that he just said on the basis of reciprocity which has angered the Serbs clearly but also the Americans because reciprocity is a way of kind of almost not lifting them. But how is it that the Americans are so involved in what amounts to some fairly fine grain trade negotiations? The reason for that is because the Americans specifically ambassador Richard Grennell who's the US ambassador to Germany. But also now it's acting head of intelligence who's been charged by the trump administration to oversee talks between Serbia and Kosovo. Now he's believed to want to have some form of foreign policy success. I A deal between Serbia and Kosovo which could be useful for Mr Trump during his election campaign the issue of trade. It's it seems kind of minor but this was what was halting possible deal or progress possible deal between Kosovo and Serbia between Hashim Thaci and Alexandrovich. Then we had the election and Mister Kunti seemed to get an away this and appear to be acting truculent. As far as the Americans were concerned they accuse me for being anti-american because on this point I did not agree with ambassador now so I agree with embassador Grenell that we need to have an agreement. Serbia that new energy is needed. But then when it came to the content of the agreement that we had the difference. I did not consider the difference. Should be of such great importance but it turned out to be so and so it seems that the Americans have encouraged. the friends in Kosovo including the society and others To get rid of this truculent. Prime Minister but traditionally America has been on the side of Kosovo rather than on Serbia anyway. What do you read in trying to put its thumb on the scales in favor of Serbia? Now well it's extremely strange. Because America was the most staunch supporter of Kosovo. Forget that in one thousand nine hundred nine. It was the Americans that led the NATO bombing which lasted for seventy eight days of Serbian which led to an end of Serbian rule in Kosovo. Which of course is lead in the end to Kosovo's independence a now. It's quite strange because the statements that are coming from Washington appear to be very similar to the statements and sentiments that. We've seen coming from the tasks news agency from Moscow so it's been quite confusing for some people because now it looks like the. The Americans are favoring Serbia And are on the same kind of art line of argument as the Russians. And so what what happens now that this all comes amid of course a global pandemic one that that will not leave Kosovo untouched and Mr Kurti seems to be out of power. But but what happens now? Well first of all. Mr Coachie continues as caretaker prime minister that means he's still IMPA but he has a government much less power than they would do ordinarily nine an ordinary situation. You could proceed to a snap election but under these circumstances clearly is impossible to proceed snap election so perhaps what will happen is that a new government will take over in the next few weeks unless Mr Coachie can think of a way to get out of this and him and his party will no longer be in power. Missa COOKIES ARE NOT likely to go down without fights. Politics struggled mannerisms. You know that old formula of closing. It's a war is politics by other means. I could say that now. The opposite is true. Politics is worthy and he assumes that even if he does go down then he'll be back soon as he can't be at Yuban much stronger position. Tim Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you for having me to get a lot. More analysis like this subscribe to the economist trusted source of information and well intelligence for one hundred seventy five years just go to economist Dot com slash radio offer twelve issues for twelve dollars or twelve pounds as the world's struggles to get to grips with the pandemic emerging markets are battling financial crisis as well as public health. One foreign investors desperate to avert risk been withdrawing their cash from poor countries at a record rate last week. The International Monetary Fund's Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva laid out the challenges on our sister podcast. The Economist asks never in the history of the IMF. We have had so many countries asking for financial support at the same time and never has been so critical that we are fast in responding to this requests. We are faced with with crises. Like no other this week. She'll be part of the spring meetings of the IMF and the World Bank trying to determine how to respond to that tidal wave of requests. I though the attendees will have to adjust to solving this global crisis virtually while newly as part of the spring meetings everyone the international econ who flies into Washington. Dc and hope Partisan and meetings and so on Somebody Canes Economists Trade and Globalization Editor on and this year. It's a virtual a fat which means much less socializing And some interesting logistical challenges. Because of course with everyone on different time zones. It's pretty difficult to coordinate meetings. So just as an example This year the European press conference is going to be at a lovely five. Am Washington DC. Time So you've got some very happy Us based journalists so in a sense a lot of what they'll be talking about is kind of already in the news the IMF has already said that the pandemic is is likely to cause the worse contraction than even the Great Depression that it's going to emerging markets developing economies the hardest. What would we already seen of of those kinds of predictions? Yeah I think based on what we've seen so far things are getting pretty ugly obviously things like GDP statistics come out with lying so the the extent of it is unclear But you know we can see commodity prices falling. We can see the country's relying on tourism revenues Are going to be struggling this year. we can see a scramble for dollars. People people trying to get whatever cash they can. Meanwhile investors are running away from from assets they see as risky so emerging markets have seen huge capital outflows as investors digest pulling the money out as fast as they can and in general just for seeing huge amounts of financial strain and obviously the the IMF has been on on the front lines over ninety countries have approached it To ask for help so the IMF is the SORTA lender of last resort for governments and their services ought in high demand. And I think the you know the sums involved pretty staggering the the IMF has estimated that emerging markets are going to need at least two point five trillion dollars over the course of the pandemic. And that's at least it could be moved depending on. Just how about this thing gets will exactly I mean that that is the source of Of so much of the uncertainty how can organizations like the IMF dole out the resources that they have effectively to to the most needy at the right time? It's tricky you know. The IMF is a rules based institution has processes that has to follow That said is recognition that this time is is extraordinary. The shock is extraordinary So just to give you an example There's a program by which countries can request. Help Anomaly. There's a there's a two step process for proving that so the first step is answering. The question of is money needed for for the problem at hand. The problem being claimed and then the second step is well. We'll debt sustainable even after we give them the money and if not then the arm of says well you know what we can't just give you money to pay off your credits you need to. You need to also some debt relief now. In this case it's broadly understood that actually countries really do need help right that there isn't a case by case assessment of like. Oh you know is is Kobe. Nineteen really a problem for you and so what's happening is it's really the debt sustainability analysis That sort of the bottle neck in the process so the economists at the IMF for working around the clock trying to try to make those calculations and disperse. The money's can use. They can and what about the depth of the Imus pockets? I mean these the psalms as you say I watering do. Do they have it? So the fund says that it has a about a trillion dollars on TAP. And and it's it's already committed about a fifth of thought But you know within the There are different kinds of money So a big chunk of that comes from money that is basically borrowed from member says members of committed to lend if if the need for the funds should arise and a big chunk of those borrowed funds still need to be approved by the membership this year. So you know in some areas. The Americans haven't been particularly coming with funds but actually in this area America has stepped up an approved. Its share Those the CAZ That went through Congress. The stimulus package surgery got in the approval for that extra funding but other members of the IMF still need to prove that show. And you say that the hold up is is working out. The the debt sustainability the conditions on. Which a lot of these loans will will be actually given. I mean is. Is there a way around that shortcut for that? Yes a one idea that a swimming around the ether. Is this idea that would let you give central banks around the world. Unconditional cash right. So there wouldn't be any any strings attached and this would happen through allocation of something called special drawing right so this is a kind of funny money That you can get and then you can go to say the. Us Treasury say he have some funny money? And I won't cash in return so the proposal is to issues a five hundred billion dollars worth of these. These steals special drawing rights and that would just get countries money without any conditions. Unfortunately it seems like the. Us is looking to. What is America care about that part? There's a suspicion that the reason was that they just didn't want money going to the likes of Iran States that the US wasn't such a fan of this is a pretty indiscriminate form of of funding the has advantages but it will so create political challenges. And so with all that in mind. Then what do you expect from these from these virtual meetings this week? I think I expect something to be announced whether it's a increasing access to some of the existing lending schemes perhaps Increasing the amount of support that a country could get relative to their contributions to the to the fund There's going to be too big big meetings this week. One of which is the G. Twenty and then The the on April the sixteenth. Whether it's a huge bazooka firepower trillions and trillions of dollars of extra resources. I'm skeptical but I suspect we'll see something to me. Thank you very much for joining us. Thanks for having me. You can hear a lot more insights from IMF boss Kristalina Georgieva. The most recent episode of the Economist Asks Available. Wherever you get your podcasts country's social media play a critical role in courtship glitzy pictures virtually bottomless pool of potential partners lowers the stakes. Flirting makes dating seem less of a commitment romantic liberalization. Let's call it. But in Indonesia conservative Muslim groups are using those same platforms to convince young lovers the ditch dating altogether. The country is home to the world's largest Muslim population Islam. There has been traditionally a moderate affair. Charlie McCann is herself East Asia correspondent. But you see these days. Lots of religious. Teens millennials embracing abstinence. Why is that changing? Well it's tied to a broader shift in the nature of Islam in Indonesia. Islamic law bans premarital sex yet. Two fifths unmarried adolescence had sex. This troubled a young university student called La Ode Immune Afar who is a conservative Muslim and about five years ago he started an organization called Indonesia Tampa Charleston which means Indonesia without dating the organization exists to promote the idea that young Muslims should renounce stating get married perfectly get married quite early and so his organization launched a social media. Campaign hosts lectures workshops it enrolls members. And what's up? Chat rooms where they can exchange Koranic verses and meet other like minded people and it's been wildly successful even spawned a new genre of Youtube video. Where teenage girls called their boyfriends and dump them to applause from their friends and buys them. I mean it seems like a fairly progressive way to espouse some pretty conservative views so loud is very conservative. But what's new about? What he's doing is his savvy use of social media perhaps the best example centers on this couple not TERRESA and Molina in two thousand seventeen. Natto was a a young. Are the dashing. Busker who found were does instagram account. He liked one of her posts. They got chatting and within hours he proposed. They got married a few months after that and have since become instagram celebrities. They make the case for early marriage. Way more effectively than any sermon. Good and has there been any pushback against that shift. There has been there is a A long established group of progressive feminist activists who have won some important legislative victories of the last years they've criminalized domestic violence and last year. Raise the legal age of marriage girls from sixteen to nineteen but for every progressive bill gets passed conservatives respond with their own Harlem currently debating a family resilience bill which require women to take care of of household affairs to. It seems that if young people on instagram raising to get married ditching dating that plenty are embracing the new conservative. Yeah it does embracing this new idea. One woman I spoke to thanks idea early. Marriages incredibly noble and practice. It doesn't always work out as they might hope for every Nada Wardha there is a Salma Fina tacky maleek in two thousand seventeen SOM- Athena who was then an eighteen year old instagram personality. Married is twenty two year old heartthrob talking leak despite the fact that only met two weeks before and they were really celebrated for this Indonesia Tampa Charter. Couldn't get enough of them but sound with fina soon learned. That tacky wanted to get a second wife. Polygamy is legal in Indonesia and encouraged by radicals and tacky soon discovered that some of Fina wasn't the submissive wife. He was hoping for and within three months at got divorced. So how do you see this playing out in the longer term? Should we just keep an eye on Indonesian instagram? To see where Indonesian Islam is going. Yeah I mean instagram's where it's happening right now. Certainly for conservative Muslim activists. They're all congregating on these social media platforms. The progressive counterparts aren't using social media and in the same sophisticated way many than aren't even on Instagram facebook. And they're really struggling to communicate their ideas as a result and to win over popular support. Charlie thank you very much for joining us. That's all for this episode of the Intelligence. If you like us it's a rating on apple podcasts. And see back here tomorrow.

Kosovo Serbia Mr Kurti International Monetary Fund President Hashem Thaci prime minister Serbia Indonesia Mr Coachie US Washington president America instagram Donald Trump Albuquerque Kosovo Liberation Army Jason Palmer Tim
The End of Physical Media, The Best Visual Cinema Experience, Star Wars, Aquaman, Rocky III & Great Gatsby

/Film Daily

43:38 min | 2 years ago

The End of Physical Media, The Best Visual Cinema Experience, Star Wars, Aquaman, Rocky III & Great Gatsby

"Whoever wanna welcome slash on daily for Tuesday November twentieth. Two thousand eighteen on today's episode were in touch with the latest film and TV news and try to answer some of your questions at the mail bag. This is slash on editor in chief. Peter Surata and Jenny miatas podcasts slash home, writers watcher and Billy. Hey, everyone in Chris Evangelista? Hello now alert listeners might notice that we have not had a water cooler this week. That's because of bunch of our our staff is traveling or indoor sick, and we're hoping to have our regular water cooler segment of the week tomorrow. But if not we'll have it on Monday of next week. He can look out for then blitz job into the news. And as I predicted my prediction came true, guys. I mean, I I am a psychic the news slowed down to really like almost a halt. We we have very little to go on here. But but we'll try to make the most out of it. And then we'll we'll get we'll jump into the bag of mail bullets start off first with the idea that Mark Hamill pitched, George Lucas, four Bubba fat. When when the first movies game out, Chris tell us about this I-. This almost sounds like it's a joke. But Mark Hamill confirmed it's real unless he's playing a really long game with this joke. But according to him, he originally pitched the idea that Boba fett would be Luke's mother in in the films, and that that was a way to top Vader being Luke's father. And he even pitched his idea to George Lucas. And as we all know jersey, Lucas did not go for this. So both that did not turn out to be Luke's mother and disguise. I don't know. It's to me. This sounds like an incredible idea. Chris. If the helmet off, and it was Boba fett was looks workers. Mom, I'm kidding, sure. This is not a incredible idea. It's wounded. What do you think of the side? Yeah. Like a joke to me. I we share Mark camel wasn't joking. That's that's what I said. But I really don't know. It seems like this is something he really pitched at the time. So. Keep in mind that he probably pitched us after what like Empire Strikes Back yet Masumi it was after empire. Because that's when the twist was with Vader in we had only known that both that was going after Hans solo at that time. We we didn't really. Yeah. I guess that's that's all we knew right? I mean them I let me liking the idea of the Lafayette turning out to be a a woman, which would have been very cool reveal for all people who unexpect- inexplicably like worship, but buffet as a character. That would have been a cool one. But I yeah. This idea sounds that. Yeah. Yeah. I vote Chris. Did you like this idea? No, this is dumb. But. You know, you never know maybe they would have found a way to make it really clever back then. But as you know, it should go without saying Boba fett as he is now is pretty dumb. There's nothing to that character. So this at least one of at least. At least when a given him some sort of backstory, I guess her back sorry. But overall, this is not a great idea. We're really running low and news of can't tell K's. Let's move on to our next story. And that is that aquaman the majority of Oklahoma and will be presented in full screen. I max it she tell us about it. Yeah. So director James wan confirmed that almost ninety percent of the movie will be in full. I am axe aspect ratio. This is in response to a question from a fan on Twitter who asks if there are any scenes in the full aspect ratio, which is the sort of Chris high resolution ratio without the black bars that you see in most films and James wan responded roughly ninety percent nearly the whole movie seriously. So this'll be a big portion of the film and probably one of the biggest portions of of a blockbuster films shot in with I max technology we've seen shot with max being percents. I and my space aspect ratio. I should I've seen men I can say that. I cannot say what I thought of the movie I'm wondering can I say what it because James one was there after the screening at conversation with him that's relevant to this. And I'm wondering if it's something I could talk about it. Oh, fuck Cam going for it. No, we're talking about this because he brought up the heat did not shoot the movie in. I max I did not see an I max bows commenting that it might be interested in seeing the movie in three d because it has a lot of kind of interesting, you know, whatever. And he was like he brought this up. He said that he did not shoot the movie in I max, but during the editing process, he realized that will first of all like ninety percent of the movie is kind of CG in some way. Like, you know, if it's under the water or whatever so their rent, they could render, you know, the extra room for the AmEx ratio, very easy. And he basically decided in the post production process to make it an I max movie, and apparently there's some kind of clever way to get into it. How it, you know, the screen expands and stuff, but you know, I will not ruin that. Not that I even saw that. But but yeah, I'm I'm actually interested to see it in Mexico. I'm actually. Fan of these. I Mex releases when when it is actually a majority of the film and not just like a senior to or when you have Michael bay. And it's like every other shot just changes in explicit in an explicitly between the two aspect ratios in. I mean, what do you guys think are are you a fan of seeing movies that have the the larger aspect ratio? I am equally bothered. I'm also bothered by a changing aspect ratios in movies, while I do like how beautiful and and stunning these sequences, look, it does sometimes, you know, take me out of movie when like we see one big action sequence in I max. And then suddenly we cut to a scene with the aspect ratio. Smaller again. So I would I would rather have like one aspect ratio. And I like to see maybe how James wine like pulls this off in like if if it is like streamlined into the movie. As he said, it is Chris what about you are you fan of the larger aspects? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. It depends on how it's done. I think Christopher Nolan is really good at exploiting this. He's very good at opening up. Big sequences. He doesn't really doesn't really cut back and forth. He does this thing where it'd be one long sequence in. I max, and then it will cut back to the regular aspect ratio. So when something like that, I don't mind it. But if it's done like back and forth, it can get a little distracting. So what you're saying? Is you Christopher Nolan plans things that yes, he's he's good at his job. Let's move onto we've talking about ridiculous ideas with Mark Hamill in Star Wars and Silvester Stallone revealed his original idea for rocky three which involves hanging out with the pope frisked what is going on here. So this is actually an archival interview. This interview is for one thousand nine hundred seventy nine, but no one is really noticed it for some reason. So at the time still own first of all he said that rocky three would be the final rocky movie. He even says in this interview there there will never be a rocky four, and we all know how that turned out to be not true. But he also said his idea for the film would have involved Rockies final fight taking place in the Roman Coliseum. And also the pope is there, which would be Pope John Paul to at the time. So this obviously didn't happen. There is no pope there is no. Roman Coliseum in rocky three. But this was an idea. Rocky rocky Sylvester Sloan head, and you know, he he saw it as you know, rocky being like the last blast gladiator battling it out in the Roman Colosseum. And you know, I can see sort of the Matic way of doing that. I'm not really sure where the pope would have fit in. I almost wish like the pope had climbed into the ring and tag teamed guests over there, Mr. T, guess rocky the pope fighting Mr. T, but I don't know what does the pope even go to like boxing matches not the real pope, but anything goes in the rock universe. Where as we all know pope. Yes. As we all know in rocky four rocky ends communism with boxing. So anything really goes in the rocky universe women? He he could always save this idea for creed. Three. We could have the Roman Colosseum in the pope in Crete three, right? That's right. We can have actually would seem like he would attend a boxing match. To he's he's he's the hip new pope. So I could see him being in creed. Three where Michael Jordan goes to meet the pope for some reason. Okay. So if this Luke Skywalker is mom being Boba fett wasn't ridiculous enough if rocky three taking place, lots of the pope was ridiculous enough. We have learned that they're making a great Gatsby origin TV series with a young hut. Mixed rage gets b. What is going on? Yeah. So there is going to be a great Gaffey origin series. That's being developed at YouTube premium, and it's called GATS. So it reimagined the tragic figure in the X cots FitzGerald novel as a mixed race, man. Based on some academic theories that posit that Jay gas was actually mixed race in details. Book so this'll be an origin story that is apparently retailing through a lens of the the cultural lens of the Harlem renaissance at the time. It's being developed by. At SC sensor. Very, and it's currently in the works at YouTube premium, and yeah, it's an origin story, which kind of defeats the purpose of the book itself, which is an indictment of the fallacy of American dream and don't know how they'll actually make this into a TV series or will stretch out his his origin over the course of a TV series. But my bet is that he will be a hot young gase who fucks and maybe all's mysteries. Are you excited about the saints? I I just I don't know. I actually I'm kind of intrigued by the mixed race angle. I don't know what this academic theory is. But it kind of makes sense in the context of the book. But I just don't know how I feel about an origin story because it feels like a defeats the purpose of the book itself and of the message of Fitzgerald's books. So I am I don't know, man. So whatever readers wrote in in the PS of his Email. He included a flow chart for responses. Chris has two questions but announcements of projects new and ask for. Flow chart goes Peter s Chris how he feels about this news, Chris sighs loudly, and then Chris gives a pain but thoughtful explanation. So Chris are you excited for gets be who fucks? No. I liked the idea of a show about the Harlem renaissance like that's a neat idea. I just don't want it to be this. Because it it it really does defeat the whole point of the great Gatsby. And guess what even tells everyone thought everyone, but he tells us he's origin story in the book. It's not like it's a secret. So I don't this sounds like a bunch of executives were like what's a recognizable property. Great Gatsby perfect. We'll do that. And I just make a regional shell about the Harlem renaissance like make something like the Nick like that wasn't based on properties. That was just a show set in the past. And it was great do something like that. Instead. But that's me. I'm not a successful executive. And this is probably why the the other thing. I don't get is like, okay. The reason to adapt. Something would be because the story is good. And it's going to connect with new audience, but they're not adapting they're kind of basically just using that name to do a prequel. Story they they're trying to use that brand name to attract Flynn, but this for YouTube premium, so this is. For young Molyneux who. Gingy whole group, but guessing. Of guessing most of these the majority of these people probably have more relation to gets beat in relation to the the the movie with Leo then actually reading the book. So I'm wondering are people going to actually be interested in this HD? I know you are a resident millennial you're actually a book reading money'll. So. Oh, I did actually have to read this book in high school. And I think a majority of people did I yes. Yeah. I I don't know if interested in the thing that's based on the book that there were forced to read in school. Yeah. I mean, the thing is I don't think people are like are immediately drawn to the property spite the IP being very recognizable. I think that like what Chris is saying. The Harlem renaissance angle is really interesting, and I've watched I would watch a series about that. But maybe because great Gatsby something that everyone's reading high school. They know it they'll be like, oh is this something that's like an edgy version of Gatsby, maybe with all the interested or maybe it'll provide fodder for all the great Gatsby parties that millennials and everyone likes the whole that also have nothing to do with the message of the book itself. Wait. They're a great Gatsby parties. You know this. No, I'm too. Too old. It's one of the most popular themed party themes in which you say that people say having a great Gaffey party. But it's only like vaguely twenties inspired. If someone gets shot at the end and fall in the pool is that how the party ends if only. Guys, you you just don't know gets. That's going to be very good. That's going to be the tagline. You thought you knew gets. You didn't is it really called GATS. Is that really the name of the show? Yes. Oh my God. It's like ants. Okay. Declaring the news for this week closed, and let's open the mail bag. Let's start with some responses yesterday. We were talking about YouTube ad-supported movies, they're offering a hundred movies from MGM that you can watch with ads are listener, Don each rates in that video has been doing this for quite some time. Now, something I didn't know I says he's not sure how long would he started getting marking emails back in March of two thousand seventeen offering free TV shows with ED's they have over a thousand movies and TV shows to choose from. And they can and that she's up the selection monthly now, Chris, I know you watch a lot of streaming services and stuff. Do you? Do you use voodoo? Did you know about this? I knew about it by intentionally didn't watch don't watch it. Because I don't want the ads like I knew it had ads, and that's why I basically avoid it. Like the plague. We I also I think earlier this week asked for some TV recommendations because I want some binge worthy cereal Tova version, and we got a lottery sponsors. I actually am only gonna read a few of them here or actually a handful of them here. But Jiechi chick Chandler from Mississippi wrote in with the recommendation of Amazon prime patriot. He says it's dark comedy of US spy coming to Luxembourg to interfere with the Iranian election. And as generic in an interesting as that sounds it's actually one of the better shows in the sad hitman John RAI it's really quirky in very complex plot. And who had a ridiculousness somehow wrapped into decent emotional struggle. Check it out for at least the first three episodes. If you don't like it. Then you probably won't be able to get into it have either of you seen patriot. I hadn't heard of this. I don't think I always see the the ads for it. When I go onto Amazon prime, but I haven't watched it will have to check this out. Okay. So Matt y wrote in in he's recommending room one. Oh, four the first season. From was from the toothless brothers Zini. And unexpected each half hour episode takes place in the same nondescript motel room the air. Visitors in metaphysical rules are always different the first season episodes split pretty evenly into a third of the episodes as junk and other third is good said in third of truly inspired storytelling. I'd recommend you. Check out episodes to pizza boy five the internet in seven the missionaries season. Two is three episodes in in has been free last night. Michael, Shannon, played a Russian diplomat who sets up a date with a. Woman he met on the internet played by Judy Greer. So I'm gonna have to check that out. Chris I think you have seen this show. Right. No. I haven't I meant because it sounds really cool. And I especially like attracts people like, Michael, Shannon, and Judy Greer. I just have yet to get around to seeing it. This kind of defies my definition of loves looking for Cyril. Know last show, but I love the duplex brother. So I don't know why I haven't given this a chance at HD. Have you watched it? I haven't I've heard of it though. Yeah. As an analogy series, right? And so it's really intriguing, but I never got the chance to check it out. Maybe I will kind of the idea kind of reminds me of that. What was that movie? That Quinn turn Tino was part of that were rooms. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And I think only one of those was good, right? Yeah. The Tarantino on was the only real good one. I guess the the Robert Rodriguez. One was pretty good. Yeah. Yeah. Those before he went downhill. Okay. Fred from Chattanooga. Tennessee writes in that should check out six feet under which I have seen the shield, which I've seen part of the Nick show that direct by Steven Soderbergh. He calls fantastic in the underrated banshee, another fantastic show, madman leftovers did would we got a lot of these kind of emails. That's just like had a list of of shows and it just like hard to read these on the air. So I'm reading that one just to to mention that Thac Roger writes in that. I should check out one of the greatest SCI fi shows of all time dabbled on five it's free on Amazon prime the first season is Ted slow build. But it's just incredible. And you might want to check out the misfits. It's on who. Oh, this is really good. At least the first two seasons are, but then it kind of loses original casts and isn't as fun. But that's a really great superhero. Like sexy superhero teen UK show. I like it a lot. Yeah. I watched the first season of that. And I really liked it. I'm not sure why I didn't keep going has anybody. Here watched Avalon five. No, no. Yeah. That's a gap in my sci-fi television. I feel like if I went back to it right now. It'd be it'd feel to dated probably. Sean from Missouri writes in suggesting that I should watch x files or the Gilmore girls. Which I'm guessing both of those shows. I mean from what I've seen of X files. That's very episode AC, I know there's a narrative over the tyre thing. But it's very thin. Right. Like oh. That reminds me Peter actually have you seen fringe. I have seen French. I've watched the whole for fringe is good. Those quite episode as well though, it was episode. But then once they decided to just kind of lean completely into their sci-fi state. Basically went like alternate reality was a lot of fun to like season three or four or five or whatever ones. I hate these like people that recommend something like well you have to sit through the slow first season. That's not good. But like, I just can't I just can't sit through twelve or twenty four episodes at something to get to the good part. Also, Errol L writes in from Los Angeles or Louisiana. I'm not sure. And he writes in a few suggestions banshee, he says he would argue it's the greatest action television show ever made the fight scenes throughout the show. Get progressively more insane. And unbelievable in the best ways. The only thing I'll say is you need to get over the initial premise in. You can do that. You'll have so much fun with the show the final season not only was chosen to end by the creator instead of being canceled brings everything home in a truly best way. It all can has anybody seen banshee here. No. But that's the second recommendation for banshee. Don't know what the show. Rectifies another show. He recommends he says it's a bit of a slow burn which makes me Peter out of not even wanting to read that recommendation. I don't have time for slow burn these. Okay. I'll Regan says he says, it's slow burn. That was literally make you cry. Every episode not for the reasons that parenthood, or this is us do the dialogue and the uniqueness of the main character makes the show very much worth the time to invest Chris by that sounds exhausting. Crying every episode just gonna. Crime. And what I've been watching that Netflix show dogs in I've been crying every episode, and I'm ready for bed after I can't imagine watching multiple seasons of that. Have you ever seen parenthood or Friday night lights? No, I've never seen either. Everyone tells me to watch Friday night lights yelled at us. Very well not watching Friday night lights yet. It's so good. And I hate sports. I hate football. So I it just, but that's one of those shows they'll make you cry. If. Man seeking woman is another show that he recommended. He says it's hilarious unique sketch type show that also able to be tied together in a coherent story from season to season, and they're going to feel they choose to end show. Just perfect points. Have either view seen men seeking women? No. I don't watch a lot of sketch shows because I can't it. I don't like the, you know, episodic serve nature of it even more. So because it's like short bits. But it sounds like it has a coherent story as I said. So maybe I'll check it out. Yeah. Peter Freeman from Gainesville Virginia writes in ask you with the suggestion of person of interest the show ran five season two stars, Jim Cavill, and Michael. Emerson Jonathan Nolan was show runner. The first season was initially procedural with an overarching storyline. But by season two it became a full blown zero as show, I believe, it's filled one. That's like I watched the show for I think two seasons, and I kind of gave up on it was to even when it was when you claim is full blown cereal has show. I think it was still too episodic where either view if end of that show. I watched the first three episodes and stopped for the same reasons that you did. Yeah. I never saw Keach hone rates in that. We should definitely watch the expanse last season was the best season of sci-fi currently on TV. I've heard many people recommending the expanse. I've only watched the first two episodes, and I was watching with my girlfriend kit Tra who just was not having it. So maybe I'm going to give it a go without her because I've heard so much good things. But the expansion I know neither of you watch the expanse, right? Yeah. Mitee rates in suggesting peepshow. It's a British comedy nine seasons each better than the west, and it serialize very dark one of the few comedies that warrants. Repeat viewings is on who in Amazon prime have either of you been to the peach. Oh. Bins at the peop- show. Yes. No. And. Movie geek, blog writes in that the Americans good wife are some of the best and also have you seen murder one? What does one have you either guessing murder one? No. These these shows are like on the on the fringes like I I never hear anyone talking about these shows. What did ask for things that I probably wouldn't have seen which is kinda funny because people are sending him like recommendations like have you seen madman? I've seen. Have you ever heard of this show? It's called Frazier. David Chen from the slash lem. Cast tweeted me that he just heard the recent episode of slash daily. And if you have who I think, you should check out these pointing to classic episodes of e r it's truly was groundbreaking and probably still holds up. So David Chen is in the side with Jacob and pushing ER did you do you guys have a history with your at all? No, my wife, and I are actually in the midst of watching it on Hulu, and we're in the much later seasons now, which are all but the first few seasons, but the original cast are incredible there. They twenty shows that really does live up to the hype at least for the first like five seasons. I may have to give it a chance then then stop before it gets bad. Okay. We actually have like a question here. This one is Michael O from national Tennessee writes in to ask a question about physical media. He wonders when will retail stores like game stop suffered the same fate as blockbuster or will they so I guess, you know, our biggest Cisco media person here. Chris, right. You have a lot of fiscal media still. Do you think like how long do you think physical media has left to it? And do you think like a store like game stuff will will suffer the same fate as blockbuster? I mean, I think physical media itself will always exist in some format. But I am surprised stuff like game. Stop is even still around because it just seems like more and more people are just downloading their games. I don't really play games. I'm not as up to date on it. But I'm sure sooner or later those stores are going to suffer the same tragic fate as blockbuster. But I do think physical media will always be around in some form, it won't be as prevalent as it once was obviously, but it's still going to exist. Yeah. I mean as long as they're still making vinyl records, you know, it's going to be around in that kind of more of a Nishi aspect. I do think, you know, the next generation gaming consoles. They're already talking about the won't have. You know, DVD drives or whatever that you'll be downloading the games from a server, and I think at that point it is done for game. Stop. I mean game stop. If you've walked into a game. Stop in the last couple years, you see that they they've they see that future. Coming like half that store is now like fun co pops collectibles, you know, KiKi kind of collectibles and. Have you can started selling board games, which I think shows you that they they they know the end is near HT. What do you what do you think? Do you think how many years does physical media half? Hi, I'm also on the same boat of being surprised that game stop is still around because anecdotally, I haven't been in a game stop for. I don't know a decade at least and there's still like a few several stores around the the country, which is surprising to me. And I feel like especially for video games a lot of people tend to preorder them because there's so much hype around their release and people want to get them as much as possible. So they just skip the store entirely we'll deals with the stores like if you I'm not a big video gamer, but like they'll if you preorder game at game stop, you'll get a special like in game thing that you couldn't get otherwise. So like, I think that is incentivizing people still going to the stores. Well, yeah, I that's good to know. But I do think that it's kind of written in the end the end is kind of for games up at some point. Although I will say in terms of vinyls or even cassettes being sold their at their urban outfitters. For example, is kind of selling these vinyls and cassettes as like novelty items, which I think is hilarious. I think at this point, they're even selling mix CDs. Which is just so funny to me as as as novelty items. So I'm sure like as long as there's a nostalgia amongst the younger generation for a time of analog technology than physical media will be around. But not in the way that it used to be. Yeah, I'm kind of curious like, even you know, you go into best buy in. There's still a few rows of like DVD's and Blu rays like it's still kind of a big thing. I it's not as big as when once was like, I remember when that whole middle section of the best buy was just the media section like when I worked there. He is the co did decade's go at this point like that whole middle section was the media section. So that was all CDs DV in DVD's at the time. And now it's only like a few rows of like DVD's, but it's still there, and I'm wondering how long that's gonna last. I don't know. It's going to be interesting, especially with like this Disney streaming service launching like, I'm wondering how many people are actually going to be buying Disney releases if like they have access to everything on that streaming service for like eight bucks a month. Like, it just doesn't seem like a viable thing at the same time. You know, it's worth noting that nothing is permanent. I mean, look at film struck everyone with so excited about that. As I was and now it's going away. So I mean, obviously, Disney has more money struck. But I think I think even you Chris would bet your money that Disney streaming service will probably around in ten years in probably wouldn't have bit your money that foam struck would have been ten years. I don't know. I mean, I'm shocked if any of us will be around in ten years, honestly at this point. Okay. Let's get to one last question. It's kind of a an interesting one. It's from a listener named washing who is rights in that. He's wondering what the best movie going experience you can recommend when it comes to just visually enjoying a film. Super large screens really don't matter to me much to me. I feel like I can always sit closer if I want everything projected large, a mainly about contrast color clarity in deep blacks and overall brightness or the premium offerings from standard digital projection really worth it. When it comes to those visuals, if so which theater chain stand out, especially can you rank based on visuals in that, necessarily, unsound food seats, etc. Very specific question here. Chris do you have any preference on just in terms of visual quality? I mean, I feel like beggars can't be choosers anymore, especially where I live where there aren't really greet theaters. I will say one of the best theatrical experiences. I ever had was I went to the metro graph, which is in New York, and that's a fantastic. Feeder and I saw Carol on thirty five millimeter right around Christmas time, and it was one of the best experiences in my life. Just visual quality. I don't want to be one of those. I feel like people get too hung up over you know, film is sacred. And if it's not actual film projection. It's blah, blah, blah. But it does look amazing. It does look I mean, it looks the way film should look in my you can see the grain. You can see the texture I feel like digital projections. Sometimes looks to clean as Weirs that made it sound it looks to artificial. So, but like, I said beggars can't be choosers. Very few theaters offer that these days so as long as he's necessarily asking about film projection, but just like the best overall, you know, visual like experience. I mean for me the best experience is an empty. I'm the only one there. No one's frigging ships behind me. I'm just alone, and the image never blurs or flips upside down is that happened because I've been in theaters where the image will literally accidentally flip upside down because. Because most most theaters now, they don't even have projectionist they have machines running their projectors because it's it's cheaper. And you can you can you can automate all of that. And there's no one manning the stores so this. Yeah. But the digital file shouldn't flip upside down. Hey. Don't ask me how it's happened. I always asking about food, but you did mention people munching on stuff behind you. Have you ever been to Alamo draft out four to one of those kind of theaters? No, I haven't. And I'll say I'm curious you would think about that. I am too. Because I've always wanted to visit the Alamo because I hear such things about it. But I I really hate when people are eating around me like, I have a friend. He's like he can't go to the movies unless he gets a snack. And I never get snacks. Louise, I'm just there for the movie. But you know, I'm a lunatic. So I don't know I'm a snacker I love popcorn. So I definitely would not be able to go to a movie with you. Yeah. I see. It's very hard for me to differentiate just the visual quality, not the sound seats and everything I feel like it all adds up to experience to me. And I I also don't agree with this guy that like if I want a bigger screen, I can just sit closer to the screen that sounds like someone any even says the letter that he doesn't have a try mex- screen near him. So that sounds like someone that has an actually experienced drew next screen, but I would say that the best projection I've gotten recently outside of, you know, obviously, I see a lot of movies on a studio. Lots in all. Some of that projection and stuff is some of the best because they have people that actually care about it, and there's filmmakers, actually, you know, editing and grading their films in those so but outside of that, I I really liked the Dobie cinemas like, I know AMC has them sometimes combined with their prime seats the that four K projection. The contrast, I'm not some of the theaters play this thing that is kind of like this video before the kind of showcases the contrast, and the the colors and everything and at the end of it. It is a black screen, and then some words come on the screeners those. Yes, the projector still on because like it's that black screen that like usually when you have the projector on a black screen. It's still kind of like a gray because there's some white hidden screen. I it's that impressive. So for my money. I think I I'm liking the Dobie and prime cinemas. But those also I it's also about the sound, you know, you have the that good at most sound you have those reclining seats. I know this guy doesn't really care about either of those. I think I max also. You know, the digital. I actually prefer the digital. I'm ex now to the real rely max because I think those screen the the real I max now that they're projecting digitally on those big screens. It's it loses something unless it's a real. I'm ex film being projected on one of those real amick screens. I think the digital. I'm is that four K projection, and that sound is great. You just got to kind of sit further back each. Do. You have any preference in theaters visually. No, I haven't had a chance to test out a lot of theaters recently. But I did get the AMC recently. And I was able to try out Dobie for the first time. And I watched a star is born in adobe theater. And it was just a game changing experience for me. I was like I I never been. I don't think I'd ever been to Dobie theater before. So just like the Chris like deep black colors, the surround sound by atmos-. It was just an amazing experience. Because and I was like it kind of reverberating a lot with that. Whenever you look song that played. And I was I was actually have sub woofers underneath the seats which I think is probably what you felt in most of those that are. Yeah. It's incredible. Like, I almost it's hard to compare. I know we talk about a lot about this AMC lists subscription in like, oh, I could see this movie and get this price. But like once you start doing this. And you see all you do is want to see the movies in these Dobie or prime theatres because it's like the best way to see a movie. Yeah. And like Dolby definitely changed my mind too. Because I I went a week later to see I man in I max, and it wasn't nearly as as like a visceral of an experience as we'll be was which was really fascinating to me. And I had wished I'd gone to see I man in Dolby, which I feel like why would have gotten that full experience out of it. Chris have you had any experience with the job your prime? I haven't now I'm I really wanted to check it out. I was actually just googling to see if there's a Dobie theater near me. And there really isn't because I live in the dead zone. It is very impressive. And I think also with this AMC list because everybody can bite the has the subscriptions can get tickets to like, I I'm ax and the prime those are like the the bigger price theaters. I'm noticing those are selling out at least in LA there's only out much quicker than they used to. And some of my theaters are actually already adding adobe theater on to you know, or converting one of the bidders into Dobie theater like an additional Dobie theater. So. I love AMC a list. Because I it's improving my option so seeing movies quite a bit. But I'm not sure if we answered this guy's question. I think we did we did a commonly. It's a very specific question. It's hard to to narrow it down. We did our best. Yeah. Yeah. And he's in Michigan. And he's talking about how he doesn't have any good theater chain Cinemark. And m j r I don't even know what that is. That yet anyways, I would say if you can he says he hasn't AMC near you. Check out your close, it's like prime or Dobie cinema. I know you don't really care about the sound and stuff, but. I don't know. I I just think that experience incredible. But we we have officially gone over. And we've hit the end of two the his slash daily HT where can people find more your work on online? You can find me every day at slash film dot com, and I'm on Twitter at h TRAN Billy Christopher can find you. I'm also slash home dot com, and I'm on Twitter and see Vangelis four thirteen and don't forget to send in your life advice questions. I'm I'm itching to answer more he s we we need like like, you know, it doesn't have to be about movies. You know, it can be like personal. You know, the relationship questions like what kind of questions are you looking for Chris? Anything and everything give me everything. The the more personal the better expose yourself to me. Give me I want you to lay your soul bear to me. Chris evangelist because I'm an expert in all things Chris wants like a really uncomfortable question is what he wants you could send us to Peter out slash dot com. And you can also send your your feedback questions. Comments concerns for the mail bag. Also, Peter at slash home dot com. You can find me online at slash on. Also, so media, you can find all the stories. We talked about today's podcast on slash dot com. And I will also include all the emails that we kind of basically rushed through. So if you want to read them in depth there in the show notes this podcast. Husham daily is published every weekday on dunes Google play overcast Spotify all the popular podcast apps, and please go to itunes give us five star rating. Write us a blurb telling everybody why you like this show. Oh, and we'll see you tomorrow.

Chris Evangelista Amazon Mark Hamill Harlem Boba fett Roman Colosseum YouTube AMC Twitter Luke Skywalker AMC Dobie theater Peter adobe Oklahoma Billy Christopher Tennessee George Lucas Pope John Paul
Rebecca Sounds Reveille with Dustin Ardine

Rebecca Sounds Reveille

30:09 min | Last week

Rebecca Sounds Reveille with Dustin Ardine

"Welcome to rebecca. Sounds reveille. i am absolutely excited to share with you today. Someone who is a winner of multiple best acting awards including best actor of the year at the metric that the matter mediterranean. Oh my goodness. I am just so speechless today. I'm so excited at the mediterranean film festival. Best actor at the red cornerstone festival. Best actor at the onion else film festival and best actor at the gold movie awards he is on. This is an exciting story about how he is where he is at today. Because he is known as a gordon as yet destined anthony sarah now and he was honored by his grandfather. This story is just so touching to me because his grandfather william ardine was a world war two air force better and this is where it just touches me because as you all know. I'm a veteran. And he was given permission to use his last name in order on to carry on his lineage and key began his journey in entertainment performing in musicals in dinner in school with local acting companies. And it's just. I embrace the so much because our historical. This is and i'm already starting to check up here. I am so excited because of where this is going. But at the agent or fourteen each trained as a professional wrestler and stuntmen. You've got to be so excited about where this is going. Because he received prestigious training by the legendary dory funk junior and as well as the phenomenal. Jay styles yes. You're just wait till you hear all of this. Today he later went on to run a successful Professional wrestling organization pro wrestling destination. And this went on for nearly a decade. this man. who's with us. Today is extraordinary because he's appeared in dozens of tv shows commercials independent films. He's had a number of upcoming projects. You're going to hear about a number of them today. Which includes starring roles in films religion and proving ground. And there's more in fact. I don't want to take away what he can share with us about his own. Your film and a really well received chinese feature film. So i'm in bring him on to share with that with you and we all of us who are listening watching today so with me today and you dustin ardine. Welcome to the show. I am so excited. I just i am so tied. I am just so delighted. You're here. Welcome okay watch for the intro muster. If i can live up to it but thank you very much. I am happy here so excited because your story has just got me so touched with how you have your name and what the honor it is to carry it out and so win it. Did you just received the honour. So my my grandfather. William ordine was a humongous influence on my life He's the one that in my family who really supported my dreams. And he he. You made me believe that magic exists in the world. You used to do magic tricks. And he used to You win any of us. Kids would have the hiccups or anything like that. He would take away from us using magic and and he was just an extraordinary man who was full of life and vibrancy and believed that that the world is worth you know. Living in the world is wonderful and and in he was passing. You know he he he Very sick and he was down in florida. At the time. And i i had gone down there and i'd stayed by his bed Four weeks straight. i wouldn't eat or drink or sleep or anything. Because this man that much to me and his only child had unfortunately passed before him so there was nobody to carry on his lineage. And i come from as you said my last name or name was sarah. No my father. Richard serano my mom. My mother tina serranto The i had many other family members cousins and other who renamed serano. But i wanted somebody to carry on your name because this man deserved it and and he such an inspiration to me. So on his deathbed. I asked for his permission to carry on his name. And to take it forward you know the world and he knew what i wanted to do with my life acting always been there and he speaks a quarter at and progress. Wrestling had always been there and he'd been a supporter of that as well so he knew my driving. My determination and i was. I was loath. You know shocked but relieved and and so west that he granted me permission to use his name that he believed that i was the right person to give it to and did you said he was a veteran and again. Thank you for your service. And i wanted to honor just every part of his life and his name forward. So i legally had my name changed and i went through the whole process to get my name change to our gain and i use that to this day and everything that i do and i eventually have kids on past that name to them in iran. Not only his lineage. But also my family's lineage through just me and then go out in the war will. I can do it my acting and import that us. Oh it's just so touching in at it is it is so neat. I think that this is such an amazing is just so amazing. So let me just go on. So that i keep getting choked up about the city. Further said the age of fourteen. You went in it to become before that you were doing acting and at fourteen. You went into doing professional wrestling as well as stunts. I mean how did you do that transition where you already in some of the acting in the theatre that you were doing where you kind of already embracing stunt where you were i was. I started acting When i was six years old. And i remember when i when i believe i was around that age maybe five five and a half when my dad showed me a return of the jedi star wars return to the judge for the first time and that was one of the films that this is absolutely amazing. And this is what i wanna do. So how do i do this. And he basically told me we didn't have any connections to the industry or anything like that. None of our. I come from a very a lower middle class family. My my father is a postman mothers in and didn't have any connections but they you know they did the best to me. They said okay. We'll get you into local theater. Groups will get you doing. Plays at school. Know that kind of thing so i just started out doing a local local plays and commercials. I was living in reno nevada at the time. And you know. Unfortunately there wasn't a whole lot of things except for donating that came in was like little side. Work background work. I remember i did Lewd sister act. There was a background. Pardon one of the casinos that a couple of us were had done and a couple people in my family had done. Angels in the outfield. When they're in stadium rob arms. You know stuff like that in whatever you could go out for and i want it to be more than that. I wanted to be the best actor. I could and i really wanted to home my skills so i started studying everything that i possibly could and wanting to go to the best schools when they didn't have the money to send me to the best school so just doing everything that i could on my own. Studying all the greats greats. The sends lau ski mask method. A method acting everything that i could do every book that i could get my hands on. I studied and read. And that's how it pretty much went from the age. I was about six to fourteen. Just doing what. I could one A couple of awards at the lake tahoe shakespearean festival. I've played iago in fellow. And i played hamlet and i won awards for both those around fourteen. I knew that professional wrestling was the kind of my second love. And maybe because of the way that i was bill or because of where we were around or the connections that we did have my mother actually grew up in texas so she knew dory funk about his training camp and And which had actually been moved to florida so when i was fourteen i went down to florida for about I think it was about two months and with dory and then we on my whole family moved up to pittsburgh pennsylvania and that's where i started training with age phenomenal. Aj styles and The ballard brothers and a couple other a well-known people and in in that industry and for a long time. There i was doing stunt work. I was doing a professional wrestling and always You know as mentioned before. When i was on theater i was stage combat trained and i just i learned to fall and i was like okay. Well if i can use my ability to learn to fall and to take a hit and to not be afraid. Because i'm not afraid of doing a stunt or falling from big platforms. I was always the daredevil kid. That was like no jump from there. Okay so a problem it So stunts came very natural to me. And i remember. I was in the movie war of the worlds. I worked on that with tom cruise for about a week and i was like right next to. Tom and tom gave me a bunch of great advice on and actually a local a paper that they didn't district pennsylvania san saying local actor follows cruises lead. And when i was on set with him. I met a couple of like The hollywood stunt something and they kind of found out about my background and they were like. Hey we we need somebody for this upcoming little shot in this movie So when tom cruise stockman man is on the top of his car in that movie in there barreling through people and people are jumping and rolling out of the way. I got to do that and then it just came more work over here more work over there and anytime i sign onto a movie now i was telling him. I do my own stunts. Now you don't need to pay for that. I want to commit fully to the character as a as a classically trained method actor. It's not just a gaining or losing weight. It's fully committing to the entire part of the films. There's a fight scene. I wanna do the fight scene. I don't really like to use body doubles stand ins or anything like that. Because i'm the one cast in the role right. So i should be there a a diva personality or anything like that so i want to be only embraced in the arctic warming above and beyond for the director to be able to get the shots that he wants. Is mike women to the film. That's won't this is really exciting. And i love how you are embracing. Every part of what you're doing you want the full embodiment of all of it. This is this is really neat. Now you went on to have your own Your own organization for an entire decade is a pro wrestling destination. We opened it up. I was I believe i was in Some more on the east coast. I've lived in almost every state in the union. I've tried a bit in my life and so is on the east coast and we. It was decided i was going. I was doing theater school out there at indiana university of pennsylvania and so i had decided i'm gonna i'm gonna go back out to california but on my way to california it was gonna stop and see family members that i have i have family everywhere And as i have family my mother at the time was in reno. Nevada went out there and it. The idea was hatched to create an organization. Because they'd never had anything out there. I grew up there and had to move across country to start my journey of professional wrestling And i was like. Let's i'm here. Let's let's start one and a do it the right way. We actually started from nothing to weekly wrestling television show. We were do monthly Shows where we bring the stars Many of the the same. That trained me I we'd out like honky. Tonk managing the our bret. The hitman hart We brought out many many big names. And i was at the at the time was doing that. I was also continuing my acting. Travelling back and forth between nevada california. montana in many different areas to do both acting in professional wrestling and about a decade in. You know because running a business is as anybody who's ever done that. Before is is a lot of work and i noticed that it was kind of overtaking my acting and that's all you know acting was my first love so i was a hard decision but we had made this decision that Are we just on a humongous show at a couple of the casinos out there on the pre casinos floor and we had taken it As far as we possibly going to be able to take it without knowing people with millions of dollars or anything like that. We've made a decision. All right i'm gonna. I'm gonna sell it and i did that so that i could move out to california to attend a school that i'd always wanted to go to And i use that money to go to the new york film academy and i enrolled film academy i use the money from the cell of my business to this war because i always heard you know they shoot run them hollywood back lot in their of tremendous will. But it's a it's an expensive school. You know so. When i when i made the decision to do that. I actually slept in my car for the whole two years that i went to that academy and you know i go to school all day and i. There's a gym. That's actually right very close to to the school. So i would walk over and shower at the gym or anything like that and then my car get up and do it all again. I did that for two years. While making connections. Here in hollywood. I shot my from i lead in a feature film called any That i've won a couple of best actor awards for and gained about a little over seventy pounds for that role but we shot that while. I was a iphone. Because i met the directory rodriguez at knife and we decided we're gonna do this. We're gonna make it to get it out to the world and now that's been out to blu ray. Dvd all over the world and came out of walmart and best buy. And what's amazing and it's been so so grateful to have won the best actor awards for that that role and to see it succeed then. I'm moving forward on on on from there like the e- come out here you do that. You gotta Boom you want to hit hard. So that's what i'm doing. Let me share that. That hashim that you have though is so important. Because oftentimes we feel like it is so difficult to pursue something but if we really put our mind to it and we buckled down and we say i'm gonna go after what i want no matter what it takes if that means i've gotta live in my car for two years i'm gonna live my carpet two years but look at what you achieved because of that and sometimes we just really have to buckle down and in. It doesn't necessarily mean that that's what we have to do. But we have to look at certain things in our life and say i have to cut corners here because i want to pursue this and if i want to reach this dream. This is what i'm going to have to do. And we have to make those those decisions and stick to it but but it's a really small price to pay for a long long time dream to achieve and you're doing it and you also played roles. Yes yes arose was a character that That i played it in the feature film It was a chinese feature film called waas angeles kidnapping and it was actually right after. I got don doing area edney in between the time that i was doing that in another film called birth. His i'd packed on the way because an area near based on the Bala g you need our thesis. That whole story is a reimagining i play. The minutes are character so the director was like you have to look like a bull. I want you as big as possible. So i ate everything inside and out constantly but three times a day and i. When we're done you know. I lived in that as that character for the full three months at a shoot and women who've done the very next role that i got was in horror film called birth and We actually shot that one at the same house that they filmed the pondering and and we had a great cast and the director phenomenon that film and it just actually recently came out. And i've won a bass ackward for that but the director was like you have to lose all this week. We have to lose everything. So i starved myself for four months. I didn't need us as scrap of food for over four months to drop the week on my god if you ever heard of that The master cleanse that they that they were. It's like water cayenne. Pepper lemon juice. I did not performance straight. Didn't have a solid ounce of of of anywhere works it works and it got me down and i and i didn't need throughout the entire production of birth which was horrible because the director brought on really good food every single day and i need any But the film came out great. And like i said i've won a couple of dr wars fort worth it and during where i was dropping i got offered the role as rose and it was a three million dollar Chinese film called los angeles kidnapping that was filmed out here. Now originally. I had a gone down to the audition. And they basically said that they wanted like a big burly biker which that time owes about sixty fifty five pounds depending on where i was. Heavier judah ariadne and But they wanted him to be very effeminate and they wanted him to be Like you just just very out there. And and so. I did my audition. And they didn't expect me. Because i guess because it goes back to that whole branding thing and you know how hollywood brand jew and i had a teacher one time. That told may If you get typecast you should be so lucky. Because that means you're working all the time and there's a lot of actors that aren't so getting typecast and then being able to break the mold is is is okay so i don't really cast for comedy a lot but i am traffic classically trained as i as i said i have done plenty of stage Rolls on on on comedy. Plenty of acting roles in the comedy genre. So when i did it kind of everybody away that i i was able to do that immediately. Hired me and originally the role was very small. I think it was like an under five in the film. And when i got on set we shot up in the hollywood hill. Sa- I go and nobody's there. I go to this house and it kind of looks like a colombian drug house and it has like an open foyer. And nobody's been nobody's there in like one or two people are walking around. I'm like is this the right spot and like oh yeah. They're they're all filming an application seeing. They're on the way back now. So about forty five minutes go by and then like five u haul trucks full of people just barrel out And every immediately said and stuff up. And i'm like okay. We're making a movie so they're setting up and they're telling me how they want the film to gaw the scene to go and i originally. There's only a couple of lines. But i i knew the character and i put so much work into character and i asked the director. Can i add let. And he's like. Oh yeah go ahead go ahead and adler and so i ad libbed a ton and And i kind of the the other actor that was working with the lead in the film was trying to like. You're not going to say off put by me. But he was kinda thrown with the whole situation because it was very different kind of scene. And so i was like okay. I'm gonna make this as uncomfortable. Possibly cam so i did a different things. He was not expecting. There was one second. Why caressed his face he wasn't expecting not And i just did so many things and be director's assistant came over to me. And they were all from video village and she's like he's loving everything that you're doing. Just keep at it. Go harder or more or and i just kept it up and kept it up and get them up and not only did the scene actually get extended to i believe is seen as a whole now eight or ten minutes now but i was actually put in trailer for the film and when the trailer for that movie came out and my character comes at the end of it i was just blown away because originally it was this very small role That i kind of just made my own. It became part of the trailer. And and that's what people remember from it. So i was very happy for rose when i show it to family or friends or people that have known for years. They they they can't believe it's me your But had a lot of fun. Playing you know rose a great character and even those a small character. It was a wonderful character of life and then going ariadne to rose to to birth was a a. It was a great break between drama and horror not to be able to do that comedic role solely because it gives you a lot of versatility and it shows your skills and creativity and so much more. And i know that you have some other upcoming roles. I don't know if you can talk about them yet. Are the ones that i can talk about. I definitely will. I had just a coupla additions One for a netflix pilot. Another one for feature film. And i just got offered a a role a supporting role in a different feature film that i they're shooting out in turkey athlete so i was very happy about that. I'm not sure when they they are but Do the ongoing pandemic. But one of the feature films that i have on right now that slated and i think that there they were getting the financing when the pandemic. It's musher exactly where everything is. But it's called proving ground and it's a psychological horror film Thriller horror film and it's i star opposite dominique swain and instant from the walking dead. And that's really excited if we actually get to shoot that one Another film that we had shot before the pandemic was a film. I'm not for sale. The fight against human trafficking. Just that's that's such a hot button We felt it was important to really talk about and not. Actually i star opposite emmy award. The daytime emmy award winner evans. Proper lead wanted to learn how it was to hold a gun properly. And i wanted it to really come on the screen that i you know it was this cop who would gotten trained and the it's going great right now and i actually want a couple of best actor awards from Romania lynn from here in los angeles. And i'm so honored to have won all that and to work with the crew. That i did on that film and Hopefully it just keeps going that way. And i was so blessed to have gotten that role in that film And to have done everything to make sawyer. Come alive in the film as i possibly could. I did my own stunts in that film as well So as it was it was really great. Shoot and i actually Actually broke my hand. During the shooter's i say on the very first day of the shoot shot one of the most intense scenes the very first day and I was in character. Nights slammed my hand down on this metal desk and i knew instantly that it was broken because i could feel a broken hand before and i didn't tell anybody because i want to lose a role and because i had slammed it down on the desk during the main like the master shot i add to continually do it for every single shot after that when we were shooting that scene and every single time i came down it hurts so bad but And then the worst part of it was that scene got cut right broke. My hand got got cut from a part of it fun. The the final part of it was came off. Amazing so i was. I was so happy with it and You break a bone or whatever happens during during the sad. It's the price you pay is the artist to bring Wives so when. I was very happy with the whole the whole cast and crew didn't even know until after we must go on. Go on right well. I am really excited about all the things that you're doing the things that you've done i am just. It's an honor with your name. Your lineage where you have going a. I m just wishes so many. Congratulations the wards. That you won. I want the audience to connect with you on so many levels so if you will share where you want them to connect with you right now. I know they'll be able to connect with you through the links that i share on all of the different forums in platforms that. We're going to be on. But i'd like them to hear it so they connect can connect with you right away especially if they're tuning in on audio and video. I mean i thank you very much for for inviting me here and for doing everything. The work that you do is extraordinary. And you're helping so many people in this wonderful great thing Secondly to anybody out there who who is listening into this is it. The light video wants to to follow me. I thank you very much. I'm i'm very appreciative of anybody. Follows my journey and and connect with me on any level or any of the characters that life. I truly does mean the entire world to me. So you can find me on my personal website which is www dot dustin ardine dot com. My mom on instagram at dustin ardine facebook it doesn't ardine actor linked in dustin ardine twitter us in our dean and soon will be uncut house and and other formats as well so. Please fall along my journey and comment on any any posts. I make any any picture of me. Now let me know what you're what you're up to and what's going on in your life as well. The reason i got into acting was. I came from of a broken home when i was a child. And a and movies were an escape to me. they were. They gave me an outlet to escape my troubles my school troubles. You know the regular troubles. So many people out there have and and i want to kind of pay that back to the next generation and the next generation after that because having those type of outlets and looking up to these types of characters Heroes might heroes. Were a grandfather. You know Rent the headman heart. That i used to see on tv every day and you know So many actors out there and then still continues to this day. Russell crowe is one of my. My my inspirations out. Dustin hoffman who. I'm actually named after one of my. Inspirations my mother named me after dustin hoffman. 'cause she's his favorite actor and You know these characters that we bring to life really do matter to people's lives and more than more than many people think and having the ability to pay that forward is i want to do with my life so please follow along and join me on my journey. I really love this. And i think that you are an incredible example and for those who really want to understand perseverance and dedication they really need to follow you and see the things that you're doing because for anyone who really wants to understand what pursuing a dream is. You're doing it in your living in. you're talking about an. You're sharing that. With other than i think what a wonderful example and a mentor that you are to others and so for all of those that are watching and listening. Today's please connect with dustin. I think you will definitely be. It will be really advantages for you. And i wanna thank you for being on the show and i want to thank all of you for tuning in today. Please make sure to connect with him. You will be so glad that you did and make sure to let everybody that you know all of those that you connect with on social media and everybody that you don't thanks for tuning in today charleston.

Wrestling dustin ardine gold movie awards anthony sarah william ardine William ordine Richard serano tina serranto serano hollywood mediterranean lau ski ballard brothers florida pennsylvania san tom cruise california reno east coast nevada
Wednesday 20 February

Monocle 24: The Briefing

29:49 min | 2 years ago

Wednesday 20 February

"You're listening to the briefing. First broadcast on the twentieth. February two thousand and nineteen on monocle twenty four. Halo unto welcome to the briefing coming to you live from studio. One here at Midori house in London. I am Marcus heap. Coming up on today's program can European nation. Still rely on the mice of the US military in the age of Donald Trump also heads Russia's strange relationship with Belarus and more British politicians leave their party over Brexit. This time they are conservatives and North Korea's leader prepares to embark on the ludicrously long trained, right to Vietnam, we discussed the world's best railway journeys all that right here on the briefing with me. Mark was hit me. The senior US Democrat Nancy Pelosi gave a surprise news conference that the NATO headquarters in Brussels yesterday, the speaker of the house of representatives going to exit Donald Trump by saying that the US remains fully committed to the transatlantic relationship. Let's get more on this weird for retired British General, Sir. Simon male Siamese regular contributor here on monocle twenty four and he joins me in the studio. Welcome to the broker good. You I tell us more about the message Nancy Pelosi was sending to other NATO countries. Will I think she said today encouraging message I was listening to her her news news conference, and as you quite rightly pointed out, this was a ten percent of the Senate or the congress had come over for the Munich security conference, which is which is a huge a huge demonstration affirmation of the strength of the transatlantic link. And as you said, it is not a bipartisan issue, Republicans and Democrats absolutely United in sharing the values of the of the transatlantic link respect for the European Union. But a huge understanding that NATO remains absolutely central to all values and offering an absolutely central to America's sense of its own leadership role and security, well, Shona she wasn't speaking on behalf of president's Donald Trump. Well, I think I think don't the way Donald Trump says things can often lead to misinterpreted, and and a deep beyond helpful. But some of the things that Donald Trump has said, I think absolutely carry weight, which is that the Europeans have taken a huge peace dividend since the end of the Cold War. And although the security situation has changed dramatically. Sadly, even in Europe with the with the sort of revulsion of Russia. The Europeans have not responded to that by matching there. Their own defense spending, and it some and I think he reflects eight an irritation by the American taxpayer and voter the the Europeans don't appear to have so much stake in their defenses the Americans do so the two messages do need to be dovetailed. But I was very encouraged other the legislature of the United States was so forthright about about its commitment to the NATO line send the transatlantic link topic of Bobby offer relief is this message for say European NATO partners. Well, it should be a relief. But what it shouldn't do is allow them to, you know, just an excuse to go back to what I would call normal jogging. I genuinely think the Germans have been really quite agree GIS in, you know, the the the importance of European security to their own prosperity and safety the amount that they've managed to build a highly successful economy in society, really on the on the back of the American security guarantees, and I think, you know, security does cut both ways. America has a leadership role. It is the price you pay leadership, but we should all be lean in a little bit more. We are matching the warm words of policy and her bipartisan team and meeting. Some of the justifiable criticism of Trump, even they often coached in rather. Abrasive terms so issue over money does remain. And it sounds like you think it has to be interest at some point. I think it does have to be addressed. I think you know, if we've got serious politicians who are statesman as well states women, as well, we have a genuine threat, we have a range of threats which are not as Nancy Pelosi said BI polar they are cyber they are human trafficking in they'll the external borders of of of of Europe, we have built ourselves very, comfortable, welfare state and hell serves all the way across western Europe. And we have neglected the responsibilities of securing securing that that very comfortable lifestyle with a genuine ostensible commitment to our security, and of course, it's not just money. It is capability. It's what you get for that money. Anybody can spend money badly. What do you expect from the future? Then a how other relations between difference NATO members? How is that going to off? Well, it's very unhelpful things like the French ambassador being withdrawn from Italy. These are two very very important NATO members that are very important European powers in the European elections again to be a be difficult. Brexit, obviously comes into it. Merkel's position is undermined Macron's is leading us so charged for greater integration and new European defense structures. Be catches it in terms that seem to encourage those Americans who are more I- solutions to pull away. So I didn't think we we we've got a very good political environment in the European side of the transatlantic link at the moment, and we're not, of course, help by words coming out of the White House. So as I say, this was important what an ANSI place, he said in the fact that it was bipartisan and Representative very large body of the American legislative show. What do you exp x from Donald Trump from? Presidents from the future is become quite clear that that's even though he may see the necessity off NATO at the same time. It looks like he's not exactly a fan of many international organizations. How much damage could he do to NATO by himself? Yeah. Well, I think I think a lot because you can get into the bloodstream certain new assumptions are under the Cold War. And then the decades followed the Cold War. There was still an assumption that NATO represented the defense arm of liberal democracy. And they those those values of which we the European nations. Rather said we made an assumption about American leadership and American leaders largely reflected a something in the in the body politic of America that enter the understood that responsibility when any relationship comes under stress, it's quite easy to forget the earlier assumptions, and it becomes a nigga lean match, and then people begin to sort of full back on, you know, assumptions in in. All all communists are under stress in defense spending should be higher. I think in people's minds than you know, welfare or or or or health, and it's quite easy to get out of the the the natural habit of of american-european cooperation across across the the transatlantic with American leadership being assured in a given given us all that confidence. That was sir. Simon mayo. Thank you very much more joining us here in the briefing. It is almost twelve eight here in London. The president of Belarus. Alexander Lukashenko has made over choose to Russia in recent days suggesting that the country is cute unite. So what exactly did he mean? I'm joined on the line by Ben let sock with a researcher at the center for security. Studies says ET h zero he's also an expert on Belarus. Welcome to the program. Begnaud? What do you think is going on over here? Why is President Lukashenko soak into United country Russia high Marcus high from Zurich it is a bit? Puzzling. Isn't it to the statement? It's an old Saint to say for a country's president standing next to the president of its vast large involves Lima powerful neighbour Russia, so by the mid Putin and basically saying, well, our two countries could unite anytime, we unite tomorrow. But then we should listen to what he said afterwards, which is basically that if our pop. Relations if Russians and Belarussians are ready for it. And by that he means much more. And if we look at the video when you made that statement, we very much see that from his gestures from his state of vegetation that this was probably not a statement that was previously prepared and Alexander Lukashenka's, quite notorious among these aides and advisors for deviating from prepare note. I think that was was the sign of it and other occasions Lukashenka said something very different, which is basically that sovereignty sacred bellarusse will never be split into regions, for example and United with Russia. And this whole statement that he made fed into an ongoing debate. That is quite alarmist. Almost panicky includes for example, of Washington Post article saying that there is a threat of Russia, invading, Belarus, and that there's this theory that Putin because he is barred from seeking other termi twenty twenty four could become. Resident of new country that unites Russia and Belarus, which sounds like a very neat plan. But I'm quite sure a majority of ten million Baru sins, and particularly one Belarussian Alexander Lukashenko would very much disagree with that plan. Exactly. So so it sounds like you don't believe that these two countries going to unite anytime soon. No, absolutely not. I mean, we can look at what he actually meant by these statements, which were very hasty and probably without without much cont context, he is in this ongoing negotiations at the moment he was in Sochi for the third time to meet with Ladimir Putin to negotiate energy terms between the two countries. As a matter of fact, bellarusse is very very dependent on Russian energy subsidies. They re-export petrol and petrochemical products to the west, and that is a very important source of hard currency, and these are the negotiations that are currently ongoing and Russia is not really ready to keep subsidies at currently. Levels. So they have basically for Belarus to integrate more with Russia in this very vague union states that connects the two countries as an exchange for these ongoing subsidies, but this is a recommendation is poll theater almost takes place every year when the negotiate these prices and levels of subsidies. So we shouldn't take this as a sign just from these few statements that those countries will unites anytime soon if that Russia will invade better Reuss if it doesn't agree with higher levels of integration. What what what is the relationship between Belarus Andros, your obviously Belarus needs Russia for an umbrella of reasons. But how do you think the people of Belarus themselves feel about Russia? That is actually very interesting. I think people have been roofs are very much supporting the status quo and surveys and polls actually support that. And the status co is that these countries are allies and are more closely aligned than. Russia is with any other country. So there's only as speller is a founding member of all Russia, led integration projects, for example, the Eurasian economic union or the studio which is like military alliance, but they depend on each other very much. So around fifty percent of Bill Russsian trade is with Russia and people feel very close as well. Up to seventy percent of better Russsian, speak Russian at home, not the Belarussian language, and they consume media from Russia, and so on and so forth. But and this is where many of these superficial nalysts Garang, in my opinion, one should not deduct from that that any kind of union between the countries or emerge is likely or that people would approve of that if we can trust polls. They basically say that round five percent of better Rusen people now want to unite with Russia and around seventy seventy five percent of very much supportive of the. Current state of integration, which includes freedom of Pete persons. It includes freedom of labor and a lot of trade bar. They will not want to integrate further let alone one to integrate through violent means, for example, if Russia invades they would not support that is though despite its Bill Russian precedent, Alexandra Lukashenka suggesting that the country is good to unite. The vast majority of Belarus would be against. Yes. If we say against it's kind of hard to perceive, how they will behave in a certain scenario, for example, if there's an armed invasion, how many people pick up arms, we do not really know that, but we can assess that not only popular opinion is against further integration or even a union, but also the political elite and Lucretia and could self he wants to remain president of a sovereign country. He does not want to become governor of some Republican the Russian federation. And this is this whole sa- holds true for the political elite around him. They have their positions to have. All kinds of assets and wealth to defend and they do not want to become part of Russia, also because it's perceived as in a way like the worst version of Belarus, Belarus is almost famous and quite respected for being less corrupt that inequality is lower the infrastructure is in a better state than in Russia itself, and the people who had very very much aware of that and will not be tempted by an integration into Russia. That is only gar kick where unemployment is higher. Why the political situation is much more chaotic that is involved in territorial disputes? And so on people very much prefer stability and look Shankar kind of guarantees the stability to his people as well. As to the vast majority of political and economic elite about it was the Ben Lord sock from the center for security studies that e h zero thank you very much. Now here is what else is making news today. Iran's president hurston Ruhani cysts ten Shuna speech. We in Tehran and Washington are at their lowest air before a number of decades animosity between the US and Iran has intensified following Donald Trump's decision to withdraw from an international nuclear deal with dare on the White House says Donald Trump will nominate Jeffrey Rosen Niners, the next deputy US attorney general the latest reshuffle in the Justice department comes as it faces considerable scrutiny over its Russia investigation. Rosen's nomination must now be confirmed by the US Senate and India's prime minister Narendra Modi has broken with governments protocol to personally welcome Saudi Arabia's crown prince Mohammad bin Salman to his country in India. It is customary for a junior official to receive a foreign dignitary at the airport. But Mr. Modi decided to do it himself. This is the briefing on one hundred twenty four. It is almost twenty one sixteen in Tokyo, twelve sixteen here in London and similar sixteen. A m in New York City. There has been a major development in British politics this morning, the political commentator and regular monocle twenty four contribute to lands. Bryce joins us now lands. What is the latest? Well, the latest news is the independent group of those who are leading the the main artist former new independent group. Their rent's in swelled overnight by one more labor. Empey is joined and then dramatically this morning by three conservative is less the governing conservative party and announced sitting with this independent group. So that all antiquated the will moderate MP's, but the strength of that group has now increased significantly because they're not all from one part. What have we heard? From these three MP's who have now left the conservative party their criticism, which will come as a surprise to anybody knows them. I think is that the Tory party is now being dominated by a people known as the European search group, they're the extreme, Brexit tears. Don't seem to have any problem with Britain crashy out of the European Union without a deal and Beth incerned is that this relatively small group of NP's in Westminster is dominating conservative, politics, and has forced the conservative government to leave the center ground and to go off in a right wing direction. So they say it's their duty to represent their constituents interests and to remind the conservative party that it used to be a Madrid. Party itself an account succeed. If it continues to move into right with direction, how big of a blow is this for prime minister. Theresa may. Well, it's a false. It's embarrassing. And of course, it so difficult in terms of the actual particularities of MRs may trying to get a deal through. And so it it doesn't make a huge amount of difference. These were always rebels. They voted against the government in the past. I've been very very explicit about their views. They've been out campaigning longside Fulmer labor members were now in this independent group for a people's votes of putting any deal back to the people in another referendum. So in terms of the very difficult and. Thickest they problem. She has having the judge in the house of doesn't make huge difference alert significantly. If you put together the labour and Tory. Former labour and Tory members joined this independent and now have more members of the house Commons than the Democratic Unionist Party was provinces most government except that. I was just going to ask how big force these now eleven independent MP's in the center of British politics can be well, I mean eleven as by themselves can't normally will the huge amount of influence, but of course, with no party having an overall charity at then they are in position to be a very big irritant both of the parties and make it more difficult for them to get a majority for anything. They're hoping I think that the numbers will grow. And there is on the vicar of thirty six if they were to get more than thirty six hundred and that's not impossible. Things are going the name with them, the third largest party in the house of Commons, and that gives them guaranteed questions actor prime minister's questions once a week, and that will make a real force to be recommended. Do you think any of these resignations can make a difference? When you look at what's due to happen in the end of March Brexit. No because these MP's have made their views on Brexit, very clear. They would have voted the same way had they remained in their all partisans. They will vote now Abbott. What it will do? I think is strengthen the resolve of those who think that party loyalty isn't the most important thing when it comes to resolving the country's future and by putting their own careers on the line because it's quite a risky thing to do to leave your party when you have a nice, comfortable majority. And if you stuck with it and swallow differences with your party leader, she probably get reelected reasonably comfortably. It's a big deal to do that. And by sticking nets out in this way, showing the kind of leadership that they have that. I think it will strengthen the resolve of other centers in politics. Whether they're in elected office all day individuals who are simply looking to somebody to represent their views, just binding Lassie. If I could ask you to look into your crystal ball, our given see are we going to see? Many more resignations. I definitely see more resignations. Just how many will depend on on. How one how does? The station's go visit in these last few days, but also how the party leadership's respond to the reservations of happened already and the moon, both Prime Minister Theresa may. And the lady the Jeremy Corbyn of more or less said, I'm right there wrong, and I'm going to stick to the way, I've always been doing things, and if they if that doesn't change than the likelihood of Moore's nations, I think is very high price. Thank you very much for joining us here in the briefing. We're off to Paris. Nowhere tributes have been paid to the I enjoy and Karl Lagerfeld who died in the city yesterday following a short illness. I'm joined on the line by Monaco's fashion director Daphne has our Daphne. What does the passing of Kaleida felt me for the French fashion industry is slightly end up an era. We were expecting that. He was going to disappear soon every fashion shows we were wondering if he we come out. But at the end, it was always they're always always looking good and always traveling. I mean, we knew there was a lot of rumors that he was not going well, but until last could your show, very recently. We wouldn't imagine that this kind of character will disappear once it's funny because he was H T five. Years old almost we will never know. How old he was? And this is not very important his age as always been a mystery. A secret was lying one or two years all the time on his edge. But as I said, it's not important for this. Character was totally timeless. But it's a big shock in the industry, of course, and miss about. This marks ember from era on that's something overheard. Elsewhere as well, why is that? Well, you know, it was is the only Hashim designer who has worked for more than sixty years in the business, and this is unique in the twentieth century and twenty I also he had known designers like sallow Hong Christiane your balance Jaguar who has already disappeared. But he was also a the period in you also the new generation such as a Disley man or Jack, moose he was totally well in this generation too. So. So he managed to pass the different periods of Russian with. No, no problem with being very modern. He's always been you as a real special character e was the only person who's been able to have a job in two different houses such as Chanel since nineteen eighty three and also attended nowadays. Nobody would give a fashion director to job at the same time. You also had his own label. It was able to do so many collaboration with Coca Cola. The Bobby matter. The Gillette, you also did a book diet book, and he has never been tacky. Only choice was where always respected, and you can wonder why it was so respective, and I think the answer is because he was a learned man, highly culture as inventions Lagerfeld's was was doing a lot on. He was working for a couple of companies. At least what does he's stiff. No, man. For sure what's happening in that company. Well, you know, he had a contract lives at Chanel. Everybody was always betting who's gonna be the next fell who's going to replace it at the at the top of this biggest fashion house, and we've heard so many names from alcohol Berra's to magic hubs and then head Disley Manan and more recent he Phoebe Fito, but it's been announced yesterday by Beckham O, owner of Chanel house that Beijing media would take over the house, which is nuts. A big surprise has. She's been working with tau for thirty years. He was telling about her. She was he's right hand and left hand. And for the less couture show when he didn't turn up because he was not well at all she came out. So we could bet she would replace him. I shouldn't director definitely has in Paris. Thank you very much for joining us here on the briefing. And finally today Spro chrome Kim Jong on will travel to Vietnam by train four next week's summit with Donald Trump. And it got us thinking, what are the world's best rail journeys, I'm joined unaligned by the trust sports writer and broadcaster. Christiaan Wolmar welcome to the program Christiane. Let's talk about your favorite journeys in just a minute. I I I have to ask from you. Do you have a theory? Why do you think Kim wants to spend two and a half days in a train instead of just flying Vietnam because he feels safe in the train doesn't he? Flying represents some dangers certainly a few political leaders who've been bumped off in the train in the plane crashes. So I and it'd be much more difficult to actually do that in a train the dictates. I think that the track is guarded all along his route for Sunday for North Korea. So. He's always he's always liked trains. He was actually educated in Switzerland. Where of course, they have the best trains in the world. So one could understand that he feels better with them knows about place to learn to appreciate greats rain Switzerland's Christian talk about those great journeys. What do you think are some of the greatest routes around the world? Well, that's the differentiate between the the most beautiful which I would say things like the trip up to Machu Pichu in South America or the my favorites. Which is they grace express up in the heights of the bernita mountains in in in Switzerland up to some mo-, it's a divorce on that. I absolutely stunning with the train journeys are may maybe the greatest engineering. Chiba? It's which I actually be very boring, but you know, going between England France and a tunnel. That's fifty kilometers long. It's pretty astonishing going along five thousand seven hundred and fifty miles from Moscow to Vladivostok on the siber- and not necessarily very scenic because there's an awful lot of Birch trees and no enormously interesting countryside by it's a fantastic achievement. Ten they just take six and a half days. So it gives you a chance to put your feet up. What are some of the greatest trains than if you want to if you want to pump yourself and guess bull proper luxury can you recommend some routes? Well, there are some companies now, I mean, they all. Luxury provision by normal railways has lots of these larger thing of the past. You know, it it. It's almost difficult to get dining comedy trains across the world compared with the old days. But what things like the vent is simpler, orientation express, which is a luxury trained that actually doesn't quite follow the original route of the express by actually goes around Australia and Germany and France in a luxury train. There's also simple in India that do that as well maharaja expressive alike, where you get pampered by, you know, lots of meals and the like, and I personally traveled on the golden eagle which does. Company that does several luxury toes, but you know, what I actually prefer just hopping on a normal train and enjoying the delights of beating cutter random people. And and sitting there for a day or two rather than being on the luxury train, which which takes you away from the normal railway experience. That's a very good point Christine warmer. Thank you very much much winning us here in the briefing. Today's broker was produced by Reese, James century searched by healing fan terrorism out of our studios on each of was mainly Evans. The briefing is back tomorrow at the same time. I am Marcus hippie. Thanks for listening and by phone now.

Russia Donald Trump Belarus NATO president Russia America London Nancy Pelosi Alexander Lukashenko prime minister United States European Union Simon mayo Europe MP North Korea US Senate Representative
Johanna Faries: Commissioner of the Call of Duty League & Jack Harari: VP of Global Partner Development at Activision Blizzard | #ThePlaybook 316

The Playbook

25:14 min | 6 months ago

Johanna Faries: Commissioner of the Call of Duty League & Jack Harari: VP of Global Partner Development at Activision Blizzard | #ThePlaybook 316

"On this episode of the playbook. I've the most powerful commissioner in sports. Nope not roger goodell. It's joanna ferris. She's the commissioner of call of duty. And i have vp of global partner development at activision blizzard. Jack harari and we're going to talk about how big e sports is in. How much good it's doing. Join me for all this more on the playbook. This is entrepreneurs the playbook each week. I bring you some of the greatest athletes celebrities and entrepreneurials to talk about their personal and professional playbook to success in. What made them champions on the field and in the boardroom. I'm your host. David meltzer dave meltzer with entrepreneurs the playbook and i have to super pinellas because they're in a space that most people still actually don't know about all those the fastest growing in probably largest in the world. I have joanna fair since. She's the commissioner of call of duty and jack harari bp of global partner development at activism blizzard which here in orange county. You guys are a neighbor of mine. Deca you're in new york. I'm gonna start at the very basics. Because i was on barstool sports. I'm not gonna stay with show Embarrassed my friends but a really big sports show and they were asking me what. I thought the hottest thing to invest in the hottest thing to look at sports. And i said believe it or not beyond gambling. I think it's eastwards and both of them one being a former. Nfl star in the other. You know huge celebrity at borstal looked at me and said what's e sports and once again and this was about nine months ago once again. I said oh my gosh. We are still at the pre chasm of sports. So i'd like one of you to to just define e sports for everyone out there in case there hiding under a rock somewhere or haven't heard of it everybody that can i may have made the jump spent on a ton of time at the nba. I spent a ton of time at the nfl But it's really about celebrating the best of the best professional gamers in all the world based on certain ip using call of duty as the example for call of duty league. You've got the best of the best call of duty players. There recruited onto city based teams. Just like the mets or the lakers but instead of playing baseball or basketball their plan call of duty. There is a dedicated set. Their specific maps and modes that those teams play on but it's effectively team versus team city versus city and their franchise very similar to the traditional sports leagues. We all know and love at least here at activision blizzard which i think is part of the appeal to those of us who spent a lot of time in traditional sports. Yeah was it appeal for me. I'm blessed to be a saying a founding investor in originally splice which is now overactive media so super excited about what's going on. Now join the unique background. I tell kids all the time that wanna get jobs in sports. That sports is almost not even the industry anymore. it's a theme. And so i say what you really want to focus in on. Is your skills your knowledge in your desire and then apply it to whatever entertainment sports industry or theme that you want to. You really have to focus on your skills. Your background is extraordinary I have a chip on my shoulder about the ivy leagues. 'cause all my siblings. All five of them went to harvard. Pending columbia. I went to occidental so i could play football Could you imagine when you were at harvard studying and then working for the big leagues that someday your job would be to be commissioner of a video game and you know how what skills that you have in knowledge that you have attained. How has that applied to be commissioner of video. Game and answer is now never for a second thought. I'd end up having this job or that. This type of job would even exist in my lifetime But i think part of it is. I've always loved sports. I was a multi sport athlete. Growing up i always fell in love with The stories of of how storyteller around sports sports ability to inspire. I fell in love with sportscenter back in the nineties. When it was just you know to me the most magical place to think about one day working. So i always had an affinity for it. I never even expected that that necessarily translate to working at league offices What i would say though is the skills that i both acquired while i was at the nfl and even now it's new job always comes back around to creating foundation all business models that can scale were in scale business right and if that scale. It's all about like. How quickly can you scale. But as long as you see sort of a pathway towards growth because there's fandom that can Sort of drag with The business investments that. You're making it that vision. Sound that sort of principally. I think the same. And it's also stakeholder management. I mean constantly especially in the role of a commissioner getting calls each every day. A lot of those calls are not from happy people because they have different expectations of the business that we are now building together. The owner has certain expectations in his market or her market The players have expectations about their playing experience. Competitive integrity is shared expectation Fans want you know. Want to have a certain set of directional Input and feedback loops in gaming where everybody is. So digitally native and so vocal. So you're sort of constantly. Balancing and negotiating and reconciling those those expectations knowing. It's never gonna be perfect for any wednesday colder but the beauty of leagues is that were all kind of together and that's where that scale ultimately can come from. So i don't know jack food. Add anything but that's how it answer to that question jack to your background though has more and you know what i consider the best business development schools and i know people probably have never defined a school like that but i think you know my friends who all went to university of wisconsin. The guys that wheels up. And you know eight obvio- and that networking group you know. Wisconsin is extraordinary. And then you're in communications television and media and so another medium here being east sports more aligned with you going back to a reunion and saying. Oh yeah you know. I'm working for activision. Blizzard and business development people probably are not shocked considering your background. What you're doing today. As much as i would have been shocked sending my daughter to harvard telling them well. What's she doing now. Oh she's commissioner of call of duty. That's not quite as allying the expectation that you may have had jack how your expectations aligned with what you're actually doing today. You know what's really funny. I i started in traditional sports about fifteen years ago. That cbs sports. And then i spent time with the nba time again. The in china and Absolutely incredible the irony of it was that you know if you told me i grope a aamer mike point a ton of video games would necessarily Categorize myself as humor. But i love video games. I understand white's action point Sports growing up. If you were told me at twelve years old that i was gonna at one point. Get to work on super bowls and get to work on final fours and then worked with the nba. Like i would have signed up for that in a heartbeat. And then if you want your company that the ice and fifteenth no fifteen years ago when i would talk to people that were in their teens and told them that i work at cbs sports. That was awesome. I not perfect. But now when when not a twelve year old nephew ten-year-old nephew nate know where i work now into them. That's better by to them. That's better than when i was working at the nba. Which i thought was really cool but like this is this is. This is even cooler to them. An even more affordable for me. That's awesome like it just it. Just you know to be unit industry Really be working on products that are that are hashim points for so many young people in a in a way that the way that traditional sports is is obviously but it is less so than it. Was you know thirty years ago forty years years ago. to me it's it's it's a logical progression in my career at something that i'm extremely proud to be barnum and that exponential growth of the fan engagement. We can't even fathom. There's certain things i tell people. The audience that exists in social media the audience that exists with twitch and other streaming services. The amount of engagement in all video games extraordinary in the cultural effect. That you i'm fifty two years old. And i this summer asked my son. You know you want this hall of famer to teach you how to play quarterback or this hall of famer at second base or you know. I'm thinking myself. Listen to yourself. I if i was a kid i would have dreamed to have me as a dad. I must be the greatest in the world and then he's like no actually dad. Could you give me a coach to teach me a game and then a hall of fame football or baseball player. And i can't even fathom being in this how big this is going to get but the thing that i love about it is it's the great equalizer. It is sport that no matter who you are. What color would size. what sex. What religion if you have two arms or two arms. It doesn't matter you can participate and play. Why are people so engaged in this virtual aspect of of truly competing in participating in watching viewing. Why is it such a phenomenon. I'll go first jack. You know i think part of it is because it's it's something that you can sort of be truly your cell phone. There's something meta about. You know what. I may bring to my modern warfare or my soon to be black ops cold war experiences. It's me time but it's also we time with my husband or my friends or somebody in japan or new zealand. Like they're such an interesting dimension of how Customize that entertainment experience can be and yet shared at the same time right. I can really Sort of be myself at. That's what we hear a lot from gaming communities but also know that they're such a reliability. There's a gathering well if you will in a virtual world That breaks down barriers. It crosses borders across his language. It crosses time zone. What i think is really magical about the sports piece then creates these elevated amplified moments in time that we can event highs around that passion right And bring those communities together all over the world in sold out arenas physically or in virtual arenas i mean even for our championship weekend it both cases for over again caller duty league we had the virtual is everything but it was still such an amazing opportunity to celebrate the power of technology the power of gathering the power of passion an aggregate that again at scale in these moments that matter to people have such passion for this ip. So i think that's part of what's so magical to me about sports. Is you get all the magic of the nfl nba and you can more from an innovation and tack perspective because these are digital experiences inherently that everybody is already kind of paying so much time into and so much sheriff mine so it's a powerful space to play in both both readers that way other dot also and like an. I completely agree with john everything. But it's you know we're also giving people is at if you're an overwatch if you're an avid overwatch player now washy center player. There's now a reality that you could actually be a professional major passing point right like that to me this ten years ago and and we're delivering that to to people around the world. Were get meyer. The same way that i admire michael jordan the same way that i watched the nba finals is incredible. What what what. What lebron james to do you know there. There are millions of millions of fans around the world to watch our sports and Admired appreciate that. The skill level that is at play there any allows people to dream by that allows people to thinking what i missing is a theme. That might that. My parents have a problem with. Because i can have a life in. This makes making happy. And i'm really good at it and that's something that's also known for us that momentum keeps on going on we just watch last week. Wait on arm this. The third season of over watson just had our highest viewership ever is global viewership ever for four grand finals mike. That's momentum excitement. And that's passionate. As allowing people dream that make that they could earn a living in create a life during the thing they marvan. And that's that's really that's a really great thing. First of all three of us have been in the this gaming world for a long time. And i don't mean just east sports. I ran the most notable sports agency and then warren moon and i had our marketing and media company. And i realized this is all growing. That is four aspects. That you guys work on one is how are you capturing the content. How do you modified for various ways in jacksonville you specifically utilize amplification in perpetuation to monetize for channel partners in associates and partners around but one of the most notable things that i've never seen wasn't available with traditional sports is on the thursday night football game that just went on that there is a bigger audience with one of the world's greatest streamers right. He had more people watching the game with him than actually was watching the game. Which is you know as a marketer. As a business person is business development. It opens up so many different avenues to monetize. These things let alone. I will admit to you both and you're probably happy about this. I have spent more money in the last twelve months on virtual clothing than real clothing for my ten year old. And i'm fine with it because it makes them so much more happy So jack i know you're in that side of the business. Where do you see the yield traditional marketing business development working today. And where do you see veteran big opportunities that exist within the context of you guys. Do they know it's funny to three years ago. We were were pitching the notion of sports as an industry right. And that's antiquated at this point handy and we did a lot of a lot of the. The yeoman's were four for industry at large in being out there being on messaging bras. It's it's conveying valuable about over. Watch the holiday. The about the color refranchising over what franchise and just working with activism blizzard across our entire suite of asset that Other properties that we have and for us the value proposition of it is undeniable. That that you know if if you're if you're brand poco was one of our partners. They have they have touch points with our with our fan as a over watching partner is over watched him partner at every point of of that. Overwatch fans overwatch consumers experience In a in engaging with over wash right and our and our fans watching hour and a half feet of traditional sports at five hours a week of sports they are they are young or twenty five years old is their averages and they're very averaging comes about one hundred twenty thousand dollars. I wasn't making twenty thousand dollars and twenty. Many that are and a lot of them are engage about properties. And so if you're a brand wanna hit that fan consumer at every single along the might cycle of their relationship with an ip which is all over. Watch or call of duty or warcraft. In than you have to come work with us. You have to have to figure out a way to partner with us on because sixty percent of our fans on washington. Forty five percents Don't have cable or satellite. They don't thirty percent of them Not traditional sports fan so you're leaning into the digital infinity of our car of our on fan experience and as grand if you're if you're trying to figure out your strategy that then you miss the boat right at an you'd be playing catch up on and i think brand realized that quite against years ago when we were talking companies know there there were they were trying to learn a little bit of now every company talking pazar as a specialist on the marketing team or sports specialists or a dedicated gaming in sports agency. The same weather that has fourteen season a. And so no. Frost is it's about it's about creating the experiences for our brand owners in ways that are unique e sports anchor gaming that traditional sports or other forms of entertainment. Some struggles you because we have that entire Entire life life cycle amount entire lifetime experience with consumer different entertaining on my god. I wish i would have invested twice as much overactive media that way. But i still just as you speak. I'm like oh my gosh. This is bigger than i can even handle it. I'm a dreamer Just finish up joanna. Every business has challenges. And that's because there's people and overhead still involved everything can't be virtual and you have worked with people in overhead for a long time. What are some of the bigger challenges that you have as a commissioner in what what are you doing today to kind of regulate or move it to something that may turn into something positive in the future. yeah. I think a lot of it is pacing. I think because you talked about your. You are a dreamer. I follow all your stuff. I completely agree on purpose. And just what are you doing. And what gets you up in the morning not just in the immediate term but just like where we taking this and the journey here has so much upside but because we haven't cracked it everybody's trying to figure it out activision blizzard's trying to figure it out. Riots trying to figure it out epochs. Everyone's trying to figure it out because it's still such nascent space. I think a lot of it is can do much because of the power of the technology that we have the global communities that we have vibrance and the passion of the fans that we have in the players. You have to actually temper that had to do to quickly you'd have to figure out what decisions you're going to prioritize what we wanna do and season two of call of duty league may be inherently different than what we wanted to do in season twelve and so i think it's both exciting but it can also require a lot more sort of moderation Patients to say we're on a marathon but it's not entirely clear where the marathon should lead so We have a lot of choices to make a lot of creative. Know how in the buildings if so to speak Where do we wanna take it What fundamentally we want to do. As far as structure business models content we create or don't create Live events we we do or don't do So i know that sounds like i'm inverting the negative to positive. I don't mean it's just. It's almost a little bit of an embarrassment of riches at times. And then you have to say okay got it. The world is always better. This is the plan and we'll we'll wait. We'll find out how good that plan was right. But let's not let perfect get in the way the good in all regions. I couldn't even imagine. I think about the super bowl in people. Laugh at me when i tell you know. The first super bowl didn't sell out right. They like interrupted for. Heidi not like a huge deal. So i mean imagine the first super bowl all of a sudden able to reach the entire world and there's literally more people than watch the nba finals or no. Watch these big games all at once and you're sitting there half of you is terrific and the other half of us like oh shoot. What do we do. Yeah we had if you look at the lifespan of soccer which is two hundred years old light. Baseball is a hundred years old basketball. Nfl football one hundred hundred years old you convert or in its current form is a decade old. And and you know we have. We don't even have version of the fuller pass you or our version of the three point line Or or our. Pensions are still throwing eighty miles. An hour and end no that we haven't hit that point yet and we're already at this early setting setting record engagement in record numbers in all of our all of our properties figuring out how to unlock two hundred million. Gamer base on oncology for Mike that's the real loser real things. And so the very bright yeah. There's no even free agency. I mean as a past agent. In marketer i sit there and people come to all the time for advice on. How do we market. Our our celebrity are athlete. And you know. I'm trying to utilize the same strategies use. The here traditionally is what we can do today and they get so excited about the offers in the numbers. I'm sure both of your phones are ringing off the hook especially yours jack. Everybody wants to figure out how to give their money. But you don't want to take wrong money in the wrong way and build around business model because there is so much potential. I i lied about the. I gotta ask one last thing because you both are very philanthropic in you. Have a bigger picture in your mind. You know what are you guys at at activision blizzard doing on the philanthropic side of things. I knew so much. But what's passing passionate for both of you as we finish up well at the corporate level. I mean i'll speak on behalf of call of duty league particular in call of duty. Bobby what he has ushered in around call of duty endowment is tremendous. I mean Dan goldenberg and others. Who focused twenty four seven on bringing veterans to high paying jobs high-quality jobs they have set a new benchmark for that mission And to do it the caliber that activision blizzard has done. It was also just like this enormous blessing to be able to walk into a corporate social responsibility. That was already so healthy. And just you know figure out the creative ways in which code and cdl can help amplify each other's we're going to see more of that coming up even next month. We have a veterans day of service every single one of our cdl teams. This year is going to participate in that in their local markets whether virtually or in real time on the ground and so that's just a powerful effort and code in and of itself has sort of become yet another masthead for the franchise on the philanthropic side that you can see. We can really measure the results. Of how many jobs have we've filled and making a difference in the lives of military servicemen and women. So just an amazing work. There that i can take very very little credit for. That's awesome. jot anything on your side. Don't have said that perfectly all right above you guys gaming for good giving greatness in you're going to change the world this if if you don't believe me you think about how have our sports really transformed the world let alone in the united states. There's nothing that will impact sports and the world more than what you guys are doing. I'm so blessed to be involved in a very small part. Although after this interview. I'm gonna go call up my investment group. Sam doubling down another razor something. I can put some more money because this is incredible You so much for your wisdom. Thank you for your efforts. And thank you for everything. You do for the veterans joanna. Dave meltzer here with entrepreneurs the playbook by hope you enjoyed this week's episode of the playbook as much as me on a personal note. I just wanted to thank everyone for making the playbook such a success. Don't forget to continue it by sharing subscribing and listening to your favorite episodes this dave meltzer with the playbook.

nba Nfl Dave meltzer joanna ferris Jack harari David meltzer jack harari harvard Pending columbia activision blizzard twelve year football fifteen years fifty two years roger goodell joanna Deca baseball washy center pinellas
Using A.I. to Achieve the Quadruple Aim with Alan Pitt, CMO at CloudMedx

Outcomes Rocket

24:38 min | 1 year ago

Using A.I. to Achieve the Quadruple Aim with Alan Pitt, CMO at CloudMedx

"Welcome to the outcomes rocket podcast where we inspire collaborative thinking improved outcomes and business success with today's most successful and inspiring healthcare leaders and influencers and now your host so marquez welcome welcome back to the podcast that i have the privilege of hosting doctor allen pit. He's a professor of neuro radiology at barrow neurological institute and also the the chief medical officer at cloud medics health at the barrow neurological institute. They are one of the country's premiere centers of excellence for neuroscience. He has degrees. He's from stanford and the university of arizona he did postgraduate training in internal medicine neurology radiology and neuro radiology over the past two <unk> decades dr pitt has worked at the nexus of computers and medicine looking for better ways to stitch together are fragmented care system. We talk a lot about the silo nature of healthcare healthcare and he hashim-ali believes that by putting the patient in the front of the right person fear anxiety for the patient the loved one. The nurse or journalists can be replaced by reassurance. Needless tests transfers and worry evokes is on cloud based solutions as he's doing with his experience at cloud medics next which he'll dive into a little bit further today and collaborating with stan will business models to create better outcomes in health care so in addition to that alan is also a podcasters caster. He is the name of this podcast healthcare pitstop curated conversations for better care will be leaving links to his podcast as his work in the show oh notes but for now. I just want to give you a warm. Welcome alan to the podcast. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me glad to be here. It's a privilege to have you carve out time for us now it. Did i miss anything in the intro that you like to fill in. I think you got it all. I don't think you put my birthday gifts but other than that no that's great and and so we'll catch you into the healthcare sector well so healthcare is really a family business for me. My my father's a physician. I call myself <hes> probably the the stupidest person ever go to stanford because all i thought about what's getting into med school while i was at stanford rather than looking at the opportunities there but pretty much you often follow <hes> <hes> in the things that you're familiar with my father had a very successful career in healthcare and <hes> i went into healthcare with that as a model. My wife is actually a physician. Half of all women physicians need and mary other positions and actually my daughter and her fiance airboats the mile so it really is the family business for us. It sure is that's amazing so you guys are truly at the core. You know a physician family. I would say so yeah for good or for bad. I had a lot of conversations with my daughter about <hes> <hes> you know why she wanted to do this if this was a good choice for her and she of course has all children didn't really listen to me and gave me reasons why didn't understand she's now at the university colorado in the obstetrics gynecology. Wow good for her for her. You guys you guys have done well raised her. Well and she's following your footsteps so you've also taken an entrepreneurial pursuits in in sort of gone into the business side of things so you know overall. You know you have a really well rounded experience. What would did you say a hot topic alan than needs to be on health leaders agenda today is and how are you and your organization's approaching it well so when i say my organization i have have many different hats that i wear when i speak about my organization i have the barrow institute which is an institute inside a large organization called dignity health out now called common spirit which is roughly a hundred and fifty hospitals here in the u._s. He'd barrow and dignity don't necessarily align with what their mission is. Barrow is really focused on and serving the most complex patients in the country where dignity has a broader mission of i want to serve the under served and take care of everybody and that's a separate topic epic and then i have my entrepreneurial had one where i look out in the world i see problems and i wanna find solutions and so you kind of have to couch it in those terms komo more broadly i would tell you that i'm now in my late fifties and i've lived through multiple iterations of healthcare that are going to have major influences influences and so when i was in med school of course we did everything on paper and we lamented how bad the paper was. If you wanted to do research you had to go to the medical records place yes which was kind of like the dungeon where they have all these charts and you get these big carts full of charts and you try to read through the charts and these eligible notes and you'd lament how they were illegible and you couldn't do research which is a medical student yeah now we have everything electronic and now we lament how bad the electron user interfaces and how we can't find stuff there and how it doesn't talk to different it systems. I think we've gone through this process of going from paper to digital but the digital really is not in a format that either providers or patients. Can i use to help them better understand their healthcare and i think we're about to hit. This kind of paper was the first wave. Digital is the second one the third wave. Is you know how is is digital actually going to interact with humans in a way that is much more fluid friendly and i think matters so the the third iteration would be. How do we humanize digital correct right so you have all this data now right. We've gone from paper to digital. You have all this data but from a patient perspective for instance. If you go to use google to search your healthcare you get an overwhelming amount of information which basically dilutes the value to use patient and you as a provider. You're at the bedside. You're really sitting there. Documenting almost a slave if you will to the revenue cycle side that the billing side of healthcare how we get paid as opposed to the technology's really adding as an assistant to you to help you better understand that patient and what our next steps what would be best practice actress next steps. We're not there yet. We talk about clinical decision support. Were really the very beginning of that and i think it's important to point that out because that's actually a a real opportunity for people who want to be entrepreneurial. How do i how do i take all this data and make it much more approachable for both patients and physicians yeah. There's some great great great insights there allen and so maybe you could dive into some of the work either at barrow or cloud medics. Tell us about how you've created results and and improve things by doing them differently. Yes so it's funny <hes> healthcare healthcare at the bedside hospitals. I think really <hes> some lag behind entrepreneurs enterpreneurs but i'm gonna just give you a brief example of what the barrow is trying to do. In any kind of points back to some of the earlier work i did prior to working with cloud was the chief medical officer of a large telemedicine company of zero which then exited to american well the idea of telemedicine the ability to bring the right person in at the right time really offers an opportunity charity to save patience a lot of angst and expense so a small example of something that we're starting to do in obviously. There's a lot of opportunity to do this. Is this idea of a network seeing information about the patient before a patient is sent to our hospital. We often get patient sent to us from hospitals around arizona as well as around the country country often. These are felt to be emergencies many times. They're not emergencies man if we'd only been able to see the patient or see their marai scan or c. t. skin we'd have been able to avert that transfer either. The patient isn't as sick as as being proposed or they're so sick that moving them to the barrow really isn't gonna help very much and so now we're basically and it sounds kind of almost old school in today's day and age where allowing our residents and attending to see some of those images before the patient gets in the hell of ac realize of course that many patients have to pay for that transport and that can bankrupt a lot of families. That really upsets me when we received somebody who didn't need to be see your mcleod yeah from a cloud perspective. I feel very blessed. I've reached this point at helped a whole bunch of startups and i have somewhat the luxury of being able to engage in companies companies that i really believe in cloud medics was started by two co founders with advanced degrees in computer science <hes> tishreen soleman the c._e._o. Was with microsoft for quite or two while he had his own personal experience with a family member where the physicians did not have the information necessary to make the right diagnosis and <hes> he thought he could build. It's something different but unlike a lot of tech entrepreneurs. I really applaud touching because he learned a lot of the lexicon and workflows of healthcare almost before he he built a business and now he's built a very interesting company that really acts to support both providers and patients <hes> leveraging artificial intelligence and he really tries to fit that artificial intelligence to the workflow of patients and providers in ways that are very pragmatic. I love the approach taking right because from from the bedside side you're implementing process innovation and you know hey risk stratification. Who's ill who's not. How can we prevent sixty the sixty. The number is sixty six percent of bankruptcies to healthcare reasons and i love your passion about that your complete disgust with that happening if it doesn't have to happen and then on the other side it's technology innovation leveraging your experiences so i love to hear from you through these these insights. I'd say you've made maybe something that didn't work out so well and what you learn from that made us stronger and better because of it yeah yeah that's interesting so <hes> you know i'll all tell you <hes> some mistakes made as a physician right and i tell you the the story only to give your listeners a sense of some of the struggles in healthcare at the bedside so when i was an intern in in medicine gosh almost thirty five years ago now restored by their patients that i was not completely but partially sean responsible for their deaths and as i looked at both of those experiences there were things checks and balances processes shoes that were broken that allowed the wrong patient to get the wrong medication and i participated in that and i i still see their faces if not on a daily basis early on a weekly basis and certainly when other providers have a less than optimal outcome. I always think back to those times that being said those experiences. I think have made me a little bit better. When i i see other people or i see issues pop up. It's given me some perspective on what can happen in healthcare. I should tell some of your listeners who are not physicians that you know whenever you think to hospital. There's no free lunch. I think americans believe that they can consume healthcare with with no risks and it'll be fine anytime somebody comes at you with a sharp object or a drug that you haven't taken before you really wanna. Ask yourself. Ask your provider are are there any other options because there's always risks involved so you want to think about that. It's a good call out allen. Appreciate you sharing that from an entrepreneur perspective. <hes> i think there there have been also some lessons. I'm an entrepreneur. I've also been an investor times. I would tell you as an investor. I give talks to my residents and fellows on healthcare investing thing and i kinda have a rule now that i tell them. If there's no revenue you don't invest you can help but certainly my mistakes in healthcare have been about i think the expression foam of fear of missing outright you're you're presented with a problem and a solution that you understand it certainly as physicians we you know rethink i think we're really smart and we can gauge stuff but execution matters more than anything else and revenue means other people are willing to pay literally pay for that solution and and so i'm very reluctant now to invest in solutions where other people have not elected to pay for things. I think that's a that's a great call out especially with the slow selling cycle in healthcare from you have an idea to hospitals practices are going to be purchasing. It is definitely a great a call out so as you as you've made mistakes also had a ton of success <unk>. I love to hear one of your most proud. Moments have been in well. It's it's been <hes> in terms of <hes> entrepreneurism and it's probably one of my proudest things but it's also one of great disappointments in real learning experience <hes> so so <hes> i posted some of this on the web so it's not private information about my mother-in-law was a patient here at this hospital and they had some issues with her and she got transferred answer to another hospital but my hospital forgot to tell the other hospital that she was coming and so i got this call from my father in law is a korean war vet. I can hear my mother-in-law kinda. Yell an atom <music> like near tears and i call up the chief nursing officer at the hospital of time at the time and i was a fairly well known physician and i said you created this problem tom. You will fix this problem and so they got my mother-in-law back in the hospital that night and i went to them the next day and i said look. I don't care if this problem happened. I just want to know what what you're gonna do to change things. Add you know things have gone sideways and they said sure we'll get back to you but they never did and i kept going after the person finally the person and was responsible to get back to you. I said you know what ways do you have to communicate with patients when things go sideways and he looked at me straight in the eyes dock i i really have nothing i have no tools to remind me to go back and touch that patient that we didn't do a great job on and in that moment i came up up with a technology strategy which i called my hospital. I partnered with the chief nursing officer to allow nurses on their forty eight hour follow up call all to record or at least not what patients were saying about their experience and if there was something that was not ideal to basically pass that message forward into into other sectors in the hospital chief nursing officer. I actually won something called. The greenlight award was an innovation award offered by dig meals at scrapped. We want one hundred thousand dollars to build the technology. We deployed that technology. The nurses who were very skeptical at first became some of the biggest advocates they sang songs about it and they got t shirts and then literally sang songs about it. I can send you a youtube one of the nurses all the t. platform. I i am aware of ever have nurses literally. They never poem singing a song about it. If you share the link i'll definitely put it in the show notes that absolutely <hes> finding so you know the nurses were all in and then really the leadership of dignity who had given all his money couldn't figure out how to scale this opportunity and the institution kind of through privacy and legal everything else kind of blocked it so it became came one of my proudest moments i created something that i could really add to care but also one of my saddest moments to see that we couldn't figure out how to get out of our own way so it was it was those kind of interesting ma. It's a great story and while also a testament to how you could get lemons. Make some lemonade and you know oh you truly did that with the situation created something awesome people rally behind it being made in the thing that that i guess ah all highlights the listeners is wow even as an insider dr pitt allen. You know it's hard to get these things to to move so if you're struggling right now with a solution that you believe in is hard so don't get down on yourself. Keep working on that. There's a way there's a way if you really believe there's way if you connect neck with the right people but meant sometimes there isn't and we got to learn how to so it's tougher than you think yeah yeah. It's really tougher than you think now this. This is a great <hes> great example allen and definitely appreciate you sharing that how about an exciting project you're on today so i would say the majority jardine tie a my time now outside my clinical practices <hes> being taken up by cloud medics. I'm <hes> super engaged with claude medics and and really believe in their mission shen moving forward really were being overwhelmed by data as providers. It's leading to a lot of provider burnout and the application of a._i. As is a body if you will to help physicians provide other providers <hes> get through their workflow. I think it's a really big deal. The founders actually had an interesting idea so i think their their first first software to pass a modified version of the medical boards came to me and said look you know we'd like to have our suffer. Take the medical boards and compared to u._c._s._f. Theus f- residence and i said don't do that. That's not really the opportunity. The opportunity is have the residents. Take this exam. Have the software take this exam a._m. And then have the residents with the software take the exam and almost as expected what you saw were residents gotten about the seventy percent range little higher their software got in the eighty percent range and then the residents with the software got in the ninety percent range is a whole thing there is that there's a lot of fear about a._i. I- displacing people it's not about displacing people. We're not gonna take your job. We're gonna change your tasks what your job involves and in in this world when you interview those residents after they took the exam with the software they said you know at initially at entrusted but then i started to lean in because i recognized that it was really helping me understand hand and if you've taken the medical boards they usually problem sets that's if a patient is this than that i think that's really about the future of healthcare and what it looks like i love that you know and in whenever i get into discussions about a i in in healthcare with folks i always say it's augmented intelligence the atari but somebody has to be augmented. That's right now. Somebody has to be augmented. That's right so i think that's neat and and i think gosh we could do another podcast and on. I really like the behind the scenes of cloud medic so the hook is in listeners. You know check out what cloud medics is up to and what dr dr alan pit is doing. There will link to to that in the show notes as well. It were here at the lightning round so i've got a question for you followed by a book you recommend the listeners reading you betcha all right. What's the best way to improve. Healthcare outcomes data transparency basically pointing out to people where they sit relative to their peers in terms terms of <hes> how they're performing. What's the biggest mistake or pitfall to avoid well i i. I'm not sure how we're going to tell you whether it's really two outcomes are starting a business. It's put a pitfall in terms of starting a business. I would recommend that you find a partner in it. I don't think you can build a business without here without somebody to help you when times get tough. I think you need undefined that other person who <hes> you know it's the jury mcguire line who completes you. I would definitely find someone else to go through that rough road love that how do you stay relevant relevant despite constant change high no that's. That's a tough one. I think <hes> from an organizational point of view from a large healthcare point of view <hes>. We're really struggling to figure out how to to not so much. Stay relevant but stay afloat but i think it's <hes> for me. Personally you know i tell people reach midlife and you start drinking. You have an affair or you start a new job. I think if you're always curious and always looking for solutions their problems waiting to be solved all around you all you have to do is look and try to think about that problem problem a little bit harder on a great great insight there and what does one area of focus that drives everything in your work. I know it's funny. I think from a personal perspective. I'm i'm looking to make a difference. You know i want to get to the end of the road and feel like i mattered somehow. I think sometimes that's a an empty. You know it's an endless cup that needs to be filled but <hes> i'd like to look back and by the way it's never i think would other people think about your work and what you're doing. It's what you think about that work and is it adding value. Unfortunately for many of us we often become her harshest critic and now i think that's a a great great insight there and so these next two are are more more on a personal note for the listeners to get to know you. What is your number one health habit so my number one health habit is that i have an ex reclining exercise bike not not a sitting reclining exercise bike because for the guys out there some of them may struggle as i did with <hes> when you sit on his bike for too long areas of numbness that are not i appreciate it so i have a reclining bike that i read or do some work or watch t._v. But i pretty much get thirty minutes of exercise. Get into a sweat almost every day which that's a great yeah so it's i don't go anywhere it sitting in my bedroom i can do that. That's awesome. In how about your number one success habit you. My kids will hate this but my probably my number. One success habit is that i talk to strangers. I love you never know if you turn to the person that you're waiting to get on on the airplane wins or you're out to dinner if you turn them to go you know what do you do. What are you up to. He and i think it drives my my kids. Kinda nuts. We went to australia wants his family on a trip and i did a a try. I i started talking to all these young women about. Have you ever thought about living in america. We're looking for an apparent. I drove my children nuts but we ended up having a great appear on a great friend on trip. Yes she finally said yeah. I'll do that that is awesome. That's great. That's a good habit alan. What book would you recommend the listeners. You know i would <hes> strongly recommend blue ocean strategy have a new book called blue ocean shift. That just came out ready like that one. I you know the new one is <hes> sounds like you've read it. It's it's a little dense but i think if you can get through shifts lucian shift left a lot there. Oh help you <hes> really a rethink how to build that business. I think we need a lot more entrepreneurs who are looking for a blue ocean strategy for those who don't know what louis louis <hes>. There's two oceans the red ocean. There's the commodity is where we are ocean of defined customers zero-sum game zero-sum game right businesses all competing for the same customer and then there's a blue ocean strategy which is a really really coming up with novel mashups to create additional value not necessarily margins for the business but value for the customer which ultimately results in higher margins and and it looks to enlist people who are not using the solution the product today in that new world and i think there's a lot to be gained about lou ocean strategies as we think about <hes> from a healthcare perspective from across the spectrum for startups great recommendation again folks you could find all of our show notes at outcomes rocket that health in the search bar type in alan pit. That's p i t t and you'll find the show notes. A full transcript was links to all the resources. We've discussed therefore conclude allen love if you could just share a closing thought and then the best this place for the listeners could connect with you or follow your work sure yeah yeah well i. I d i you know i'm i'm trying to make a difference in to do that. I really need to bring along a community pretty. I do share my own blog podcast on both linked in as well as my own blocks alker pitstop and you know i recommend you know i would certainly be happy. Anyone would not only listen but critique it. If you have thoughts around what i'm missing i would be very appreciative of that and frankly you know. Healthcare is one of the spaces very hard space to work in but it's one of those few spaces where you can do well by doing good. You can really make a difference. Mike jewish grandmother used to say you'd be healthy wealthy and wise well without without your health. You don't have anything and so it's really incumbent on all of us to try to stand that up. Let allen that's a great closing thought and a great invitations. Everybody listening check out allen's allen's work. It's worthwhile. I respect what you do allen. I admired the things that you're that you've been up to and really thank you for for spending time with us. It's been a pleasure. Thanks for having me. Thanks for listening to the outcomes rocket podcast be sure to visit us on the web at w._w._w. Dot outcomes rock dot com for the show notes resources inspiration and so much more.

dr pitt allen dr dr alan pit medical officer stanford barrow neurological institute marquez barrow institute Barrow stan officer google dr pitt professor microsoft university of arizona colorado lou ocean
Waco - The Betrayal | 2

American Scandal

41:45 min | 1 year ago

Waco - The Betrayal | 2

"A listener note. This episode contains references to adult content and language and contains material that some might find offensive. It's all in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine in California and just after dawn mark. Bro twitches in. His sleep is curled up in bunk. Bed inside a dimly lit garage surrounded by beds and sleeping people crammed into this one tiny place. The garage and House belong to the branch Davidians. They're a religious sect whose teachings. Bro has followed without question until now froze eyes flick open immediately. His mind starts racing. He's running through the same terrible question that kept him up last night he wishes he could get up and scream but instead he stays motionless under the covers. Bro Is in his mid twenties. He has a thick mop of dark hair. A deep desire to know God and almost for four years he's been a disciple of Vernon Howell. Bro Is housed trusted lieutenant. His entire life his home his friends his salvation rests on the faith that how is the new embodiment of Christ. And that makes this morning and his doubts so terrifying these last few years bro has learned some deeply uncomfortable truths about how last week for instance he and Hal drove from Texas to California and House Camaro but they didn't come along how also brought the thirteen year old daughter of one of his followers. They stopped for the night at a hotel. And how and the girl shared a bedroom. Bro Replays the memory in his mind. Over and over you feel sick to his stomach. He's given everything to how in exchange he supposed to play a central role in the salvation of mankind. But he thinks what? If how isn't the Messiah what if he's just a pedophile hiding behind Bible? The thought Sends Bro. Right out of bed. He dresses quietly trying not to wake the others. Then steps outside the sun is warm on his skin bros. partially blind but he can still make out the Pale blooms of Jack. Aranda tree just then. The front door opens row turns and sees clean. Cut twentysomething with blonde hair and a mustache. It's his best friend. Steve Schneider. Schneider gives a quick wave morning mark. Look awful everything. All right. Bro- avoids his gaze not long ago. He Convinced Schneider to follow. How now he's not sure he can look his friend in the I O. I'm fine Steve. You sure Bro. Hesitates well honestly. I'm kind of shaking up. Its Vernon Schneider gives a slight not enough encouragement for Bro to continue. He's been acting erratically. We're supposed to be saving people right solve what he's doing it'll scare people away. I hear you. I've been trying to recruit this couple and he's been so rude to them. No one's going to accept a prophet the way he acts. Yeah exactly lately feels like every day. He does something to test my faith. You Wonder Snyder raises an eyebrow wonder what Mark Bro. Desperately wants to share the doubts that are consuming him but he also knows the power that Vernon how wheels over his disciples if he questions House divine authority. Hal finds out rose. Life will never be the same. He's not ready to cross that line. Yeah ever wonder why of all the people in the world God picked Vernon Howell to be the Messiah Snyder. Last two broke and feel. He's broken the tension. The Lord works mysterious ways mark. We should probably get back inside. I'll be right. There row watches. His friend walked back in the house. Schneider remains one of the Faithful. The State of innocence. That bro wishes he could return to when it's too late for that. He's powerless to escape the question. That shook him awake this morning. Is He really serving the Messiah or Monster? And if he's been serving a monster bro knows he owes a debt to God which case he must do everything in his power to take down award. Winning Cast Cate Blanchett. Sarah Paulson Ouzo Deuba Elizabeth banks and many more star in the new fx original and highly anticipated drama. Mrs America the nineteen seventies were the dawn of a fierce woman's rights movement tune in as we explore the story of the movement that took place to ratify the equal rights amendment and the unexpected backlash led by Phyllis schlafly the forever shifted the political landscape. Mrs America Premieres April Fifteenth Exclusively on fx on Hulu Visit Hulu Dot Com for more from honoring. I'm Lindsey Graham and this is American scandal in the nineteen eighty s. a young man named Vernon Howell arrived in Waco Texas. It was here that he joined a religious group known as the branch Davidians though he was a newcomer how quickly gained power and took over from the group's aging leader. Lois Roden but how also clashed with rodents violent son George how believe that he was the new embodiment of Christ who had come to Earth to bring about the end of days. Over the years house confidence continued to grow and he convinced his followers to adopt an increasingly violent worldview but some of his followers began to question him soon. They turn against him fueling his paranoia and setting the stage for his fateful standoff against the US government. This is episode to the trail. It's early nineteen eighty-eight about a year and a half before mark. Bro Woke up with terrible worries about his religious leader. Vernon how today. The Sun slowly rises on the outskirts of Palestine. Texas Castle Hail Glow with branch. Davidian Camp Marlboro Shivers in the coal and hurries past the small. Shacks that dot the camp. He heads past the school buses. That have been turned into homes around the corner. He's got an electronic piano tucked under his arm and a big smile on his face. He's beaming because today's special Vernon Howell isn't just bros. Messiah he's also the leader of the rock band and the two were about to head into Waco for their very first recording session. Bro Reaches The van. He opens it up and set some music equipment carefully in the back then he jumps in the passenger seat burn house already at the wheel and flashes a grin how wears thin wire rim glasses and a rock and roll mullet. Whether it's a jam session or a Bible Study. How always suggests a world of exciting possibilities the to drive into town and how is in his usual talkative mood but bros? Only half paying attention he stares out at the Texas landscape blurring by and he thinks about how strange and how wonderful it is to be riding shotgun next to the Messiah. Bro has spent his entire life. Searching for God's truth just a couple of years ago he was living in California and working towards a masters degree in religious studies. He wanted to be a seventh day adventist minister but he was told that because of his poor eyesight he could not the set-back left him. In deep despair he was about to be saddled with useless degree. No future and no path to but then bro Met. Vernon how how took him in? He gave Bro. Deeper understanding of God and the Bible. But it didn't stop there with house. Instruction Bro had vivid dreams and even visions. He'd had them since childhood but now they felt stronger. More connected to God at First Bro. Was Skeptical. That Vernon Howe was a prophet but the Bible was full of stories of prophets. Why couldn't the same thing happened in modern times? And why couldn't he be a part of that story? How pulls up in front of the Big Planet Recording Studio in Downtown Waco? The two men step out of the van into the Crisp Air. They hold their instruments inside once. They're saddled how talked through the first song they're going to record. It's called Madman in Waco and tells the story of house shootout with George Roden at Mount Carmel. How recites the lyrics and Bro Nods? Along Bro didn't take part in the rate itself because of his poor eyesight but house upcoming trial for attempted. Murder is at the center of Bros. World how could go to jail and that would leave the movement without a leader or they could win acquittal and have a chance to take back Mount Carmel from George Roden. Bro Starts playing his keyboard improvising under the lyrics. But how cosimo harshly? That's not the party wants to wrong. Mood can turn like that and it's been happening more often lately bro Chafes. But he doesn't fight back instead. He begins to pick out the melody the way how wants it? He knows how was under a lot of pressure with the trial. Maybe when they finally make it back Mount Carmel. How will be less irritable right now? That's all broken hope for its April nineteen eighty eight on the third floor of the McLennan county courthouse. Judge Herman fits sits the front of the crowded courtroom waiting for George. Roden to be led to the witness. Stand fits has been a judge for nearly two decades the trial of Vernon Howell and his associates is one of the most bizarre cases he's ever seen fits is the prosecutors. They look nervous on paper. This case seemed airtight. How an eight of his buddies got dressed up. Hunting gear snuck onto another man's property with rifles and shotguns. Then began shooting at the property's owner. It's an easy case of attempted murder. Judge Fist thought the trial would last a few days at the most but then he met Vernon Howell realized. This trial would be anything but simple fits looks over at the defense table. How sits with his hands folded neatly in front of him looking calm as can be behind him the galleries crammed with people from house? Church or whatever it is the judge recalls the first day of the trial when he asked any potential witnesses in the gallery to stand and be sworn in women also sat there house lawyer tried to get them on their feet but they wouldn't budge wasn't until Hal himself gave them permission that every one of the women stood and offered to take the stand and things just got more colorful from there at one point the judge had to bar Hal and his followers from doing something unbelievable they wanted to carry an old dirty coffin into the courtroom as evidence fits thanks house about as crazy as they come but he can tell how has a strange kind of charisma. He's built sympathy with the jury. Fits watches as the bailiff leads. George Roden to the front of the courtroom Roden whereas a black Stetson hat. An orange prison jumpsuit heat ended up with a six month. Jail sentence after the county courts found an old restraining order against him. Barring him from living at Mount Carmel they also found that no one had paid taxes on the property for almost twenty years. Road and scowls at Judge Fits then how that house attorney the prosecution squirms and their seat rodent is their only eyewitness but they didn't want him to testify instead. He's been called to the stand by house. Defense attorney now approaches and begins his questioning. House Attorney Ass Road. If it's true that he dug up a body of one of his mother's followers road and doesn't hesitate he says. Of course he did. He was trying to raise her from the dead so that everyone would know he is the true Messiah Not Vernon how judge fits worms in his seat. That's it he thinks that's all the jury needs to acquit right there. They'll dismiss rodent as crazy and they'll accept house claim that he was just trying to get innocent people back into their homes. The judge glances over at how he's unnerved to see how smiling back his eyes focused intently on the judge. George Roden may be off his rocker. Thanks fits but that doesn't mean how is any more sane. Bits thinks about the best possible outcome after all the dust settles from the trial. He hopes there will be peace insanity at Mount Carmel for all the men women and children crowded into this courtroom. Today it's May Nineteen Eighty eight just outside Waco Texas the afternoon Sun casts long shadows across the buildings now Carmel Burn. How surveys the property with Marc Breaux by assigned Burge Chirp in the trees and house? Quinn says he gazes across the large property. That's now his God gave Mount Carmel Back To hal more quickly than he ever could have hoped his trial ended with a hung jury. Each of his followers were found not guilty. They were all out free and clear and their weapons were returned even better. It's George Roden. Who STUCK IN JAIL? How IS ECSTATIC FOR YEARS? He and his followers had to live in a makeshift camp in Palestine. Texas but now they can finally reclaim their rightful home. But as HAL makes his way through Mount Carmel he can tell. They've got a lot of work to do. Mount Carmel is hardly ready to be a training ground for the end of days because George Roden place looks like the apocalypse has already come the first house that he umbro enter a roof. That's completely caved in the water damage and mold are so severe. It'll take months of repairs before any followers can live here. The next house is full of trash. There are signs of rats and roaches yet another home stacked practically to the ceiling with pornography. One of Georgia's associates must have been running some kind of male owner business. How opens the door of little house in the back of the property? Putrid smell blows over him and he recoils Satan's bathroom couldn't smell any worse. He thinks he glances around and sees a propane tank. Hooked up to a burner nearby or a series of tubes which lead from a dirty glass beaker to several plastic containers. How stops in his tracks. Wall can't careful more. Looks like they're cooking meth. There's so much sin on this property math but I still. I wouldn't put a pass George. We'll box up the lab and take it to the sheriff. Think that's a good idea of course as we one mark we're on the right side of the wall. We'll just tell them that. The zoll Georgia's John. We don't want it coming back to bite us. We have bigger things to do. Bro Looks around the filthy room and size. Yeah you're right. I thought it'd be a little more triumphant to be back even talking about it for years. Well were you listening? I never said he was going to be a paradise. We're building an army for God. This is our fortress a place for pure people. Don't need comfort. Trust me more. They'll come flooding back once they get my message of course. So that means we're stepping up. Recruitment yes exactly you get back to California. Send Steve to England. I'll make another trip to Australia. Had Good luck there. Okay well and I'll just as soon as we clean up. Georgia's mess that's going to take awhile how can feel agitation rising? You know we don't have much time mark so we've been three years since my vision on Mount Zion. We're getting closer and closer and soon I'll unlock the seven seals. I know believe me I know. Roy picks the propane tank and exits a house shoulders slump. How returns his gaze to the King? Room they'll clean it up just like they'll clean up Mount Carmel but a not formed in this John has tasked with bringing so many people into the light. How can he fill the prophecy? Without an army of devoted followers. He knows he needs to look on his flock. Needs to see that. He's in control and self comment on when he's by himself worrisome. He hopes you'll find enough souls to save on his recruitment missions. But if you can't there's always planned being lord has already spoken him visions and he's revealed other ways for how to throw his flock. American scandal is sponsored by Missouri. When I told my wife that Missouri was coming on as a new advertiser she said wait. What Missouri. That's my store and indeed it is. I recognize the style immediately. Fourteen karat solid gold pieces often sleekly proportioned sometimes accident with Turquoise Pearl or even diamonds sophisticated with a bit of whimsy. Missouri makes fine jewelry for everyday wear pieces. That don't wear out or scratch easily so you never worry about having to take off your jewelry or getting pieces wet. Everything is low maintenance but high quality at fair prices because while fine jewelry is precious you don't have to be precious about it with new exciting pieces dropping every Monday. You can choose from a range of timeless styles that you can wear from day to night nor versatile enough to be styled with pretty much anything you own beyond the lookout each week for fresh new and exciting pieces sometimes under a hundred and fifty dollars head to Missouri Dot com slash. Ads For ten percent off your first order that's M. E. J. U. R. I. Dot Com Slash. Ads for ten percent. Off Your first order. It's early April eighteen eighty nine Elizabeth. Baron Yeah I looks out the window. As her plane descends into the Dallas Fort Worth Airport. Her heart is pounding within his patient. Baroness is an Australian in her. Mid Twenties with dark brown curls toothy smile she's flown across the world to see two men one is her Messiah Vernon how the other is her fiance. Marc Breaux. She saw how fairly recently back when he was on one of his recruiting trips in Melbourne. But she hasn't seen bro in two long years. They fell in love while she was living at the Davidian camp in Palestine but then her visa ran out. She was forced to return home. She hopes that on this trip. How finally give them permission to marry? Baron hurries up jetway and sees Bro. And how waiting for her at the gate. She rushes to embrace bro. He's thinner than she remembers but he still got the same gentle is loving. Smile makes makes her feel like nothing has changed between them when she turns to. Howl nods at her coldly. She's not sure did he expect her to greet him. I the three of them walk outside the terminal. How grabs heavy bags loads them into the trunk of his Red Camaro? He tells Bro to get in the backseat Saharan. You can sit up front with him as they pull onto the interstate. Baron reaches a hand into the backseat and feels bro. Take it feels good to hold his hand again and how doesn't seem to notice? He's too busy asking about the followers in Australia Baron. Yeah I was his first convert their back in eighty six but since then how has made more visits thirty more? Australians have come to accept him as the new Christ bearing looks out the window at the Texas Plains who's a long flight and her jet lag feels like a heavyweight. She knows how upset how will be if she falls asleep while he's talking he's going on and on about the improvements. They've made at Mount Carmel. New paint new roofs new buildings and soon they approached the renovated site. How pulls off the main road and cluster Beige buildings come into view bearing is heart lifts? Finally get to see her friends again. They approach a roadside shack and how slows the car man steps shotgun in one hand freezes unable to speak but then it happens fast? The man with a shotgun sees how and gives not and they pass through remember that back when she lived at the Palestine camp. Sometimes they're regards but at the time they were under threat from George. Roden she thought. Mount Carmel was a simple place where people live for God's truth not a fortress with armed guards baroness squeezes Bros. Hands Tyner. But his grip has gone slack since passed into Mount Carmel Park in front of the main house and step out of the car how then escorts her away from Bro her fiance and takes her toward the women's dormitory? She looks over her shoulder. Bro. As quickly receding into the distance Vernon how and structure to rest up as going to be a lot of Bible. Study this evening. After that. He says she broke and catch that night. Baron Yarbrough sit close to each other in a pew at Mount Carmel Church. Some fifty followers gathered under the freshly painted rafters. Some are old faces from the Palestinian camp but many are new Barron. Your here's British accents. She sees Australian. She remembers from meetings Melbourne. And it feels good to be next to borough. Even though they've barely had a chance to say a word to each other how paces in front of the Church. All Day Baron. You have been looking forward to hearing him speak. What how who told her in Australia about the end of days? That felt like a message of mercy. She can't wait to receive more of his beautiful truths about an end to suffering but instead she is shocked. By what her messiahs preaching this evening. His message is dark disturbing full violence and persecution death and war. He Warns of the Forces of Babylon the earthly authorities. Who will come to spill the blood of God's people? He asked his followers if they are prepared to walk through a hail of bullets for the Lord Mayor Steel Glance at Bro. Is this the message? He's been embracing. The last two years is back straight. This is look fearful Marignan wonders. Whether Bro is afraid of house dark prophecies whether he's afraid of Messiah himself it's later in April of one thousand nine hundred nine at the county courthouse in Waco. Elizabeth baroness stands beside mark Bro. In a small room adorned only with a mahogany desks in Texas and United States flags. Two of their friends colon. She still can't quite believe that. Today is your wedding day. She was surprised when Hal approached her the day before and gave his blessing. Bro had been asking how the go ahead for more than a year and finally came in today. Barry wears a white cotton dress and holds duquet of wildflowers from the fields of Mount Carmel. Bro Whereas a navy blue suit the same one he wears for recruitment TRIPS. The judge reached them and within five minutes. He pronounces man and wife straight from the courthouse. They had to their wedding banquet at sizzlers joined by the two witnesses to the ceremony. Steve Schneider rose best friend and Sherry jewel close friend. Baron is back when she was living at the Palestine. Camp Food arrives heaps of fried chicken sweet corn and rice. How would definitely not approve these excessive portions but baron? You is starving. After two weeks of living under his strict dietary rules. She can only imagine how hungry the others must be. She's relieved to see Bro. Snyder dive in with abandoned. She notices her matron of honor eyeing spread with guilt until her hunger gets the better of her and she begins eating as well. Bro Jokes that it's too bad. They didn't get married in winter that they could cram food into their pockets and sneak back to mount. Carmel Baroness smiles at her husband. But inside her mind races if Bros. Willing to joke like that. Maybe he's harboring some the same doubts she is. She knows even a small doubt can be torment. Her doubts have grown. Larger and larger. Ever since she witnessed. Howls dark sermon. She wants to talk to Bro about how she feels. She's not even sure how to start. The conversation Barron reaches out and takes. Her new husband's hand their marriage has just begun already. She's pulling the one threat that can unravel their entire lives late. That night mark Bro Cases Adoring Lee and his new wife. His eyes tracer profile. She stares up at the low ceiling. They've laid out blankets in a tool shed at Mount Carmel. This threadbare space is the best. They could manage for a honeymoon suite away from their respective dormitories. Still after years of waiting bro feels like their lives have finally been set in motion. If only baron you is visa weren't expiring again. The thought that they only have another week together has been weighing heavily on him. You wonder if that's why bearing high so quiet now Liz Liz. I don't want you to leave. I know more. I wish you could come back with me. Yeah that would be incredible. Barron turns and fixes her eyes. I'm Bro why don't you bro? Stammers a small part of them had hoped she would ask this question now. He has to answer it. I Dunno Vernon each me here. We're building an army. You know for cuts them off furnace change. Don't you think his message is different? It's darker angrier. I don't doubt that he's the lamb of God but after after hearing him preach. I'm not sure whether his path is mind to walk. Bro Is surprised to find himself nodding in agreement. Yeah sometimes I asked myself the same thing but just saying these words aloud Bro. Fields stomach drop like a void is opening up in front of him. Yes take a step back from it. But let's just forget about it for now. I think about Vernon Howell all day every day Kennedy. Just be the two of US tonight. Bro Is gripped by fear and the darkness of the tool shed Barron. Ya has given voice of something. He's refused to admit even to himself. His steadfast belief in house message has started to crack. The thought is terrifying. Losing faith would mean losing everything his home his friends his place at the right hand of Messiah. He praised for reassurance for something to assuage his doubts but one thing he knows for certain whatever path the Lord reveals he and his wife will travel it. Together it's nighttime in July nineteen eighty-nine mark rose in the office at Mount Carmel. Typing on the computer. He's working on a letter to his mother in Honolulu. But it's hard to know what to write. He's on a knife edge between saying that everything is normal and that everything has changed. It's been nearly three months. Since Baron returned to Australia and the doubts his wife stirred in him have only grown in the time since he snuck off an application to immigrate to Australia. But even if it goes through bro isn't sure whether he'll act on it so much depends on vernon how just bro. Here's a heavy thought. Looks up at the ceiling house. Bedroom is just above him. How said he was going to pack for the recruiting trip in California but from the sound of it he's probably up there cleaning his. Ar Fifteen rifle getting ready for the final earthly battle. Bros is baron is right. House message has grown darker but BRO also knows that. God's Word is continuously reveal. Who is he to question where? God is leading. Hell just then Bro. Here's the office door open in walks a thirteen year old girl. She lives at Mount Carmel with her parents. And Bro is especially fond of the family in part because they're astray. Leeann being around them reminds him his wife when he wonders. What is their daughter doing here this late at night? The girl hurries past Bro. Without acknowledging him he watches her. Walk up the stairs that lead to house bedroom. His mind starts racing. Maybe she's just delivering something to how or she's here to tell him. Something Bro is afraid. He knows exactly what's happening. He decides to wait in the office until she comes back down. Bro Starts playing a computer game hoping to distract himself. He knows that house marriage to his wife. Rachel was legal even though at the time she was fourteen years old. Her parents have given their consent. But since then how has taken many others? He calls wives most are of legal age but summer. Not even Rachel's younger sister was given to the Messiah. She gave birth to one of house children when she was only fourteen. It's all part of the vision that Howell says. He received an Israel the revelation that he should have children for the Lord. Bro Has accepted this as truth after all. The Bible is full of young wives and mothers and it doesn't condemn polygamy outright so long Hasbro has had complete faith house. Behavior has made perfect sense. But maybe Bro. Does not have complete faith. One of how isn't God's representative on Earth? That would change everything. How is no longer a Messiah Fulfilling Biblical prophecies? He's a man fulfilling his sinful desires. Bro Is drifting into a troubled sleep when he hears girls footsteps. It's five in the morning. He sees the girl stop at the bottom of the stairs startled to see him away. Row begins to speak but the girl scurries away. Ro- walks to the door and watches her move quickly across the yard to the house where she lives with her parents. His mouth is trying. A sense of guilt rises up to his throat. If how is hiding behind false prophecies and this child isn't a vessel of the Lord. She's a victim. Bro knows that the laws of Texas are clear on the matter. Each one of the miners as a case of statutory rape with the ones who are under fourteen. It's a felony bro. Closes his eyes and prays for God's Guidance Asking one question should he continue to follow the Messiah? Or should he use what he note to destroy Vernon Howell? If you're looking for a bit of escapism. Try getting lost. In the RICHLAND's family drama. The story starts with Eleanor and Michael. Richland having just lost their parents in a plane crash as they reckon with this tragedy. Something about their father's legacy just isn't adding up the siblings come face to face with two choices. Protect the family empire or risk. Losing everything. To find the truth you can subscribe to blood ties. An apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever? You're listening now. Hey I'm Dan Rubenstein. The host of Wonders Show Sports Wars on Sports Wars. We dive into some of the biggest rivalries in sports history and in our new series. We're looking at a different kind of story. It's tiger woods versus everyone. The field himself Gulf history to listen to this and other great series subscribe now to sports wars from wondering it's August one thousand nine hundred eighty nine in Pomona California. Marc breaux sits on the couch paging through his Bible. He's in the branch Davidians House but at the moment he's only pretending to read he can't concentrate. The terrible doubts that took root in Texas have festered here in California. Bro has had no choice but to join this recruiting trip but deep down. He's also hoped that spreading the word of God would restore his shattered faith instead. It's left feeling like a hypocrite at this point. Bro Is almost certain that he will abandon Vernon how he can't stand to be house accomplish any longer but can he really walk away from everything. He's given his life to if he's wrong to doubt how. How will he be punished for? Turning against the son of God. Bro has been watching his leader closely ever since that night in the office and how has been unusually silent recently a rarity for him. Bro. Wonders of how consensus doubts? Maybe God has given the Prophet a window into the mind of his most trusted disciple. Bro Look the other followers waiting expectantly in the living room. He hopes how won't hold a Bible study today? He's not sure he can take it. But it's Saturday the Sabbath. So there's almost sure to be a study and probably along how emerges from his room at one. Pm You always sleeps late. He says a study will begin soon. Bro Watches as the thirteen year old. Australian girl peeks her head out of the bedroom he feel shaky and sick Howell. Sinful acts have continued. Bro has done nothing to stop them. Bro. Scoots to the edge of the couch has people gathered for the Bible study. How walks to the front of the room where he surrounded by followers? They're seated on couches and sitting crosslegged on the floor row wishes he could flee. He looks at the door. But then how begin speaking? The book of Matthew says that we should be perfect as our father in heaven is perfect. Can any of you meet that? Standard Bro Sees everyone waiting anxiously for house next words. He imagines that they're all hoping for the MESSIAHS approval as bro once did but instead how begins to berate them if God were to judge you according to that scripture none of you would stand a chance gone? Would shake out most of you. You'll be rotting fruit falling from the tree. How cast an angry look around the room and stops to stare directly bro. You claim to be led by the spirit when you're actually led by the devil Bro. Fuel rising panic does how know that he's going to leave but suddenly how shifts his attention he turns. Steve Schneider Steve. Why did you marry Judi? Schneider turns and looks at his wife because because I love her. No Steve. You married her. Because you had a feeling between your legs he wanted to satisfy you had lust in your heart. You didn't really love your wife. Did you bro? Sees Steve Judy's faces turn Hashim? They're one of the most loving couples he's ever known he wants his marriage to be like fairs but he can only imagine their pain and confusion now all of you husbands in this room you love your wives. The way the world feels love now. It's time to love them the way that I am. The inheritor of all things you all married. My Wife's God gave them to me. I saw now I am taking them. Back Bro. Thinks of Baron. She's far away in Australia. But that doesn't mean how can't hurt. His heart starts pounding. He has to say something Vernon stop. This what you're teaching is adultery. House is are full of rage. Dare you how dare you accuse me how dare you try to deny God his righteous children? You're destroying lives. Vernon how can that be the wheel of God? The entire room falls silent rose heart slamming in his ears now that he's openly defied how he knows that he has lost all connection to his savior. He's given everything for his salvation and now it's slipped through. His grasp broke cries out and rage and despair. How stares at him in alarm so does everyone else in? The room shuts his eyes and imagined himself alone on a patch of earth surrounded by the fires. Hell but when he opens his eyes again he realizes he doesn't care anymore. He's finished with this false sign. You will never again Sir Vernon how. It's January nineteen ninety. A cold rain falls down Carmel. Darkening the Earth Judi Schneider walks out of the home. She used to share with her husband. Steve She's hoping she'll find Vernon Howell alone today. She is something important to tell him. How is her new spiritual husband and he's just announced a new name. It's David Koresh. Judy has no trouble with the change. The name fits the Messiah better than the old one she thinks. David for the King of the New Kingdom and Karesh is Hebrew for Cyrus the king who will overthrow Babylon and restore God's chosen people. Judy now feels more a part of that mission than she's ever been before judy approaches Russia's bedroom knocks on the door. Karesh opens it right away. He's a haunted look in his eyes. It's the same. Look he's had since Marlboro left the flock when they were all in California. Bro had said he was packing his bag to return to Mount Carmel but he never showed up in the first few days. Karesh stood watching the main road waiting impatiently. Then the painful truth seem to set in. Karesh seemed to know that his most trusted disciple was never coming back. That's when the shouting in tirades began eventually settled into tired misery judy steps into creches living room and the to sit down together. Crash immediately launches into his lament. She's heard it a dozen times he blames Elizabeth Baron for the loss of his closest disciple. He says that Bro. Couldn't accept the Lord's Truth and he loved his wife more than he loved. God's wisdom he couldn't accept the Lord's truth than all the groups. Women should become the MESSIAHS wives and that they should bear his children. Judy Steve faced a similar struggle but ultimately Steve was willing to give her up. He loved her so much he wanted her to be closer to God. It was a painful moment. They've been trying to have children for over ten years of marriage now. They knew they never could. Judy tries to cheer a crash. She tells that she has some good news. She's pregnant with one of his children. One of God's children crush tells her that's wonderful news the best news. He's had in a while. Judy beams and she hopes that once this new baby arrives. The Messiah will forget all about the betrayal of Mark Bro. It's later that month on the outskirts of Melbourne Australia Mark Roe surveys the faces of Dozen Branch. Davidians who've gathered before him and his simple suburban living room. A couple in their seventies sits upright on chairs. Brought in from the kitchen. Young Mother bounces a baby on her lap. Bro was hoping for a larger trout. But this is a start. Bro Stands at the front of the room clutching his Bible. He knows the book by Heart. Bro Looks over Baronet who gives him an encouraging smile. He and his wife had come up with an audacious plan. Bro will style himself as the New Prophet of the branch Davidians. He will preach his truth to the people and that truth will topple Vernon how it will topple David. Koresh taking breath. Bro Starts in on a sermon. He announces the Vision. He's received from God. David Koresh is a false messiah. The Room buzzes with confusion but as he describes their leaders sin and hypocrisy he can feel the people's shock turning to anger pro continues anger in the room grows. It's thrilling. He knows by the end of this meeting. He will have his rival flock. Karesh has long prophesized a battle against perfectly powers. Bro has decided he'll help bring about this vision. He and his new followers will gather proof of Kara's crimes and they'll give this evidence over to the authorities. If correct wants a battle with the forces of Babylon that is exactly what you'll get next on American scandal. A suspicious package sets off a federal investigation into Mount Carmel and as the accusations against him out David Koresh prepares his followers for a battle with the US. Government from wondering. This is American scandal. If you enjoyed this episode I have two other. Podcast might line American history tellers in American elections. Wicked game search for them. Subscribe on Apple. Podcasts spotify Google podcast stitcher wondering DOT COM or wherever? You're listening right now if you're listening on a smartphone tap or swipe over the cover of this you'll find the episodes including details may have missed. You also find some offers from our sponsors by supporting them. You help us offer this show to you for free. We'd also like to learn a little bit about you. Please complete a short survey of wondering dot com slash survey. That's one dot com slash survey. We'd love to learn what you're listening to what you wipe. What top two might tackle next? We use many sources and writing our shows to that were specially helpful for this episode are inside the cult by Marc Breaux Martin King and the branch Davidians of Waco. I can't g see Newport and just a quick note about our arena in most cases we can't know exactly but everything in our show is based on historical research. American scandal is hosted. Edited an executive produced by me. Lindsey Graham for sound design by Derek. Barons this episode has written by Michael Canyon. Meyer Edited Christina Malls Burger produced by GABE RIBBON EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS. Are Stephanie Jen's Jenny Lower Beckmann? And her non. Lopez for wondering warned social distancing. Getting Down Miss Going to dinner parties with friends while you're stuck inside we invite you to the world of the shrink next door Ike. A reputable New York City therapist hosted parties for celebrities in Manhattan elites at his home in the Hamptons host. Jonas Sarah was one of his attendees one summer. Joe Return to find that ice house in the Hamptons wasn't his house at all but the home of one of his patients. The shrink next door is a tale of manipulation fraud and horror. I use the power of position to hypnotize and subjugate his patients in increasingly bizarre ways. Find out just how far he was willing to go for. Total control. Subscribe to shrink next door on apple podcasts. Spotify wherever you're listening right now to listen ad free subscribed to wonder plus at one three plus dot com.

Mark Bro Mount Carmel Vernon Howell Sir Vernon Bible California George Roden Texas Elizabeth Baron Australia Davidians US Steve Schneider Steve Schneider Steve Waco Marc Breaux Hal Melbourne Baron Yarbrough