19 Burst results for "Harvard law review"

"harvard law review" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:37 min | 7 months ago

"harvard law review" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"I think that somebody at Harvard just trolling I don't think it's a legitimate reality right however it is theoretically possible and it being proposed obviously by serious people in the Harvard law review it is and has some support I mean it also people like vox supported it box is like you know we don't agree with this plan to to institute another hundred thirty states and Washington DC should be one fifty because they don't have to depend on any of the other states the bottom line legislation here in West Virginia in the spirit of conciliation the ledge stir it legislature West Virginia hereby extends an invitation to our fellow Virginians who wish to do so to join us in our noble experiment of a hundred and fifty X. six years of separation from the government of Richmond wow newsradio nine twenty and won all four seven FM take a second listen closely because C. B. D. might change your life you know the health concern you're struggling with the one you tried everything to solve and nothing has stopped the discomfort and constant stress worry the keeps you up at night well let's talk about that why not try something new check out the remarkable CBD products from the experts at C. B. distillery dot com C. B. D. is the extract from the hemp version of cannabis you might have heard CBT may offer many of the reported benefits of marijuana but without the high CBT is legal to buy and you do not need a prescription when you shop online at C. B. distillery dot com it's time to deal with that nagging health concern explore the amazing CBT products at C..

Harvard Harvard law review West Virginia Virginia Richmond cannabis marijuana Washington C. B.
"harvard law review" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:02 min | 7 months ago

"harvard law review" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"It is amazing is West Virginia now is scrambling to see if there's any way to let counties from Virginia join West Virginia can you do that still another constitutionally you know you couldn't create a new state out of a state right you will unless you have the approval of the state legislature right however you can do it in Washington DC without that approval which is one of the kind of crazy left with legal theories going around create a hundred and seventy seven states or something a hundred fifty states out of out of Washington DC you get a hundred fifty liberal states that will prove all of your amendments and then you can amend the constitution it will this is like a legitimate thing was proposing the Harvard law review really think the American people would stand for that it's hard to imagine that that sound like almost like civil war because that's right I mean it will work that's because that's just a total I mean it's technically in theory constitutional and we only need three out of four if that's what if that's the game played I would not recognize the government that would do that as as a constitution as we remember governments are instituted among men yeah protective these right right so this is a trembling them trampling and to the point of that a state like a normal U. S. state would be like two blocks in Washington DC and they would cart carve it out so they were all left wing states because Ms ninety percent vote Democrat anyway carpet out so it's all left wing states and they could prove only Washington DC could change the laws Harvard said yes like Donald Trump you know sit on the Crapper three AM going this gonna drive I'm not Z. yeah I don't I mean I think that somebody at Harvard just trolling I don't think it's a legitimate reality right however it is theoretically possible and it being proposed obviously by serious people in the Harvard law review it is and has some support I mean it also people like vox supported it box is like you know we don't agree with this plan to to institute.

West Virginia legislature Washington DC Harvard law review Harvard Donald Trump
Why Should We Care About Privacy?

Crazy/Genius

08:12 min | 1 year ago

Why Should We Care About Privacy?

"Internet is broken. And nowhere is it's broken. This more obvious than in the endless series of scandals in one particularly sensitive subjects, but there's another privacy crisis brewing. And Facebook is reportedly bugs Aqaba says he's sorry about the privacy, data breach. Constitutional amendment to protect our privacy. Cyber security experts are calling a popular app on Facebook privacy nightmare more than seventeen million. Everybody's talking about privacy. These days who has it who doesn't which companies are taking it away and how to get it back. But I have a confession. And I'm a little nervous to say this out loud because I don't want to sound like a fool in the first episode of this season. But I have no idea what privacy even means anymore. And I sort of get the feeling a lot of you don't either we complain about. Alexa, listening to our orders about Instagram targeting us with ads about smart devices tracking our behavior, but every year, we buy more, Alexa products post more on Instagram by more smart devices. If you ask Americans have online privacy is in a state of crisis. They say, yes. But if you ask them, would you actually pay for devices and apps that would guard your identity, two thirds of them say, no. So we value privacy. We just value it it, exactly. Zero dollars zero cents. This divergence between are complaining and our behavior. Drives me a little nuts. Like come on people. We can't buy rooms at the panopticon hotel. And then complain about the surveillance this discrepancy between attitude and behavior is not a paradox. I can explain it to you ho. Thank god. And. Welcome back to crazy genius season. Three our theme for the next date episodes on break the internet. I up the privacy wars when people think about what's wrong with the internet. They think about privacy, but before we can figure out how to fix it. We need to agree on what it is. And what if anything is at stake when it comes to protecting our private data is everybody a bunch of paranoid hypocrites or am. I the crazy one. For the Atlantic. I'm Derek Thompson. This is crazy. Why are you interested in privacy? Isn't everybody? Interested in privacy that Sarah, I go she's a history. Professor at Vanderbilt University. She literally wrote the book on the history of privacy in America the known citizen. I wanted to know what is privacy. What does it mean? And have we always been as worried about it as we are? Now privacy is one of those interesting values that really doesn't surface until it's violated. So people don't enunciate it until they think they don't have it. I go told me privacy isn't a stable concept. And it hasn't always been that controversial, what's really striking. When you look at the period before say, the late nineteenth century, really before the civil war. You don't actually find a lot of public debates around privacy. You don't even find the word privacy in these debates. Pull up a copy of the US constitution on your computer, control. F search for the word privacy zero results. The closest you'll get is something like the third amendment. No. Soldier Shelby quartered in any house without the consent of the owner. But in the seventeen hundreds most Americans didn't even own a house. Most Americans in fact, were not particularly entitled to privacy, unless they were propertied unless they were men and heads of households lots of people didn't even own their own labor, for instance, if you think about enslaved people in the United States, and so, you know, we're talking about a pretty small sector of the population that thought of itself as entitled to privacy. Wh what do you think changed in the late nineteenth century such that Americans relationship to privacy really had a turning point in that period, but comes to the fore in the late nineteenth century is that all these new technologies kind of make privacy precarious in a way that it hadn't been before photography is one example, instantaneous photography amateurs, taking photographs being able to publish and trade images of people that were in a real sense kind of private images. But also telephone lines. Telegraph. Cables that made communications faster and more convenient and less expensive in certain ways, but also much more porous. So that you get worries about wiretapping and listening in and so forth. So whole bunch of technologies are one 'cause telegraphs and photographs brought tech into our personal space. But something else was getting into our personal space. Other people in the eighteen hundreds Americans moved from sparse farms into dense cities, people didn't realize they valued privacy until it disappeared. And they were forced to sleep eat work and live all on top of other people those things kind of collide in a in a pretty serious fashion in the late nineteenth century, and we'll give rise to the first modern calls for a right to privacy. So where does this term right to privacy come from pretty late? It's in eighteen ninety and it comes from a Harvard law review essay written by Louis Brandeis and Samuel Warren. Louis Brandeis would eventually moved to the supreme court, and they call for what they called a. Right to be let alone they believe that this is a right that people have against various kinds of invaders of their private affairs and private lives. And what were they responding to? They were talking about a right to privacy from an aggressive press from journalists who were scouring especially the lives of the elite for scandalous stories about divorce, and it's amazing. So the original right to privacy was a right to privacy from journalists. Yes. So from private actors, but also from what Warren and Brandeis called the new devices that allowed things that were meant to be expressed in private to be shouted from the rooftops snooping. Journalists and newfangled telephones weren't the only things freaking out Americans. There was also the mail when postcards were authorized and then went on sale. They were immensely popular. But they will immediately. Also cause a backlash by editorialists and moralists etiquette writers who believe there was something fundamentally problematic. About people sending private matter through the mails without an envelope. Right. That couldn't be sealed Americans are often charged with disclosing too much with being to free and loose with their information. And some of the critiques of the postcard read as if they were talking about in the late nineteenth, century social media. I mean, the terms are exactly the same the right to privacy is has essentially shifted in these one hundred years from a right to privacy of property to privacy of communications where the bad actor isn't so much the government anymore. It's private actors. It's muckraking journalists, and it's who else advertisers. There's this wonderful case one of the early right to privacy suits from nineteen zero to New York state, which is about a woman who discovers much to her. Shame and humiliation that her face appears on advertisements for Franklin mills. Flour? And she sues because this seems like a kind of a violation of her privacy rights, not a tangible property right again, but a right to control her own image. She does not win hirsute. But it does cause an uproar in the press is a nationally followed case, and in fact is responsible for the first New York state laws regulating the right to

Louis Brandeis Facebook United States Alexa Instagram Samuel Warren New York Panopticon Hotel Aqaba Government Vanderbilt University Harvard Law Review Derek Thompson America Professor Soldier Shelby Franklin Mills Sarah
"harvard law review" Discussed on Ear Biscuits

Ear Biscuits

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"harvard law review" Discussed on Ear Biscuits

"Shut the door, and you talk through a screen right at a priest about developing understanding of infectious diseases also necessitated private beds in hospitals because before they had individual disease. Okay. Invi individual beds in hospitals. They had communal beds in hospitals. Why do it any differently in the hospital? So you basically had a bed with a bunch of sick people in it. And they started noticing. Everybody's getting sick and these beds, let's have a clean individual bed. And that's when the concept of the individual bed really started to take off for for a lot of people. But then it starts to enter into writing and thought, and again, this is incredibly reason this is like literally less than a second ago in in. You know, the the line is helium of existence the industrial revolution push it even further. So basically, the material and moral well-being of workers. Depend the health of the public insecurity of society, depend on each families living in a separate healthy inconvenient home, which it may purchase. And this is a speaker at the eighteen seventy six international hygiene council or hiding congress in Brussels, which was one of my favorite historical events. So that was when they started saying everybody should have their own house, which led to everybody should have their own room in the house, which is kind of a later concept. You kind of start getting that in like forties fifties like post war sixties. And of course, now you've got to have your own TV. And you're right in finally with a webcam. That's watching you. And then you get rid of you relinquish all your privacy again, full circle. But go it's exactly where we're going. In the final thing that until we get up to kind of where we're at now the legal concept of the right to privacy. In the Harvard law review in eighteen ninety. It was written the intensity and complexity of life attended upon advancing civilization have rendered necessary. Some retreat from the world and man under the refining influence of culture has become more sensitive to publicity. So that solitude and privacy have become more essential to the individual. But modern enterprise in invention have through invasions upon his privacy. Subjected him to mental pain and distress far greater than could be inflicted by mere bodily injury. So this was the beginning of the recognition that violation of privacy is a true violently got to stand for a right to privacy because as we begin to introduce modern Interprise in invention they begin to invade privacy. But there's another thing about us as humans not only is so transparency is the natural state, but we began to fall in love with privacy because when we can make the choice. Choose privacy. We will do it as has been demonstrated by history. But we have a problem. We value convenience over privacy. So obviously, you've got modern examples of just like choosing to do online banking and stuff like that. And that that brings me to. I mean, the time article Evers reading details what researchers call the privacy paradox. Which is we care so much about our privacy. Yet, we keep giving our information away. And it says we do it because we reason that our future self will probably suffer no consequences. We figure that the worst. That will likely happen is we feel kinda violated by all the corporate algorithms, and maybe the government tracking us along with everything else. But it's worth it. Because. We get to use the app or we get to buy the thing so quickly or we get to enjoy the entertainment or we get to connect with people or we get to share something and get boasted in our egos zone in a digital sphere. And, you know, lean while the the it's not the we care about it. But it's it's we care about convenience. Connectivity dot dot dot a lot more in the people who have all the money and all the power the corporations, they know that this is the way that we are in. That's why God as they continue to give us the conveniences, and they continue to to whatever degree. We can talk about what the degree is track us and listen to us and understand the things that we like in that we searched for to begin to develop a profile of us as individuals..

Harvard law review congress Evers Brussels
"harvard law review" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"harvard law review" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"One of the things we've talked about is the net neutrality rules, and we know that those were the protections that were put in place by the FCC a few years back to prevent internet service providers from blocking and slowing traffic so that people would have equal access to the. Net and the case came before the DC circuit and they were against you. The rules were upheld by a panel of judges appointed by presence of both parties. We talked about this yesterday. I don't wanna get over your theory again on major rules which I disagreed with, but there was something we didn't talk about yesterday and that was that you and actually beyond the bounds of what the parties had argued to reach a constitutional issue. In that case, you found that the first amendment protects internet service providers, right? To exercise editorial discretion. Even though neither of the principal parties had raised a first amendment argument at all. Why did you go out of your way to address that? Constitutional issue that issue was raised in some of the briefs. In the case point, one point two, I followed the Turner Broadcasting approach that was a majority of Pinon the supreme court in nineteen Ninety-four of Justice, Kennedy in the cable operator context. Which as I explained in the opinion seemed to apply very closely in this situation. It's something I've written prior opinions on as well about how Justice Kennedy's opinion and Turner Broadcasting applies in other contacts and it seemed, but we the only judge that went that far to take on the constitutional issues. I may have been, but I was applying Turner Broadcasting. It's a precedent of the supreme court that seemed on point and it was raised in the case by party. And I thought it important to explain you've said that the canon of constitutional avoidance which says court should avoid reaching constitutional questions that aren't necessary to decide a case is something you would quote consider jettison all together. I think you said that in twenty sixteen book review, is that right? Well, I I would talk about. I talked about the problem of ambiguity as a trigger for certain canons of statutory interpretation because at least in my practice over the last twelve years, that's been one of the sources of disagreement among judges. That's hard to grapple with and figure out what's the had a bridge that divide when one judge says, I think this is ambiguous in another one says, no, it's not an Justice. Scalia Justice screen Kagan of both talked about that as being an issue. And that's one of the reasons I talked about it in that Harvard law review article that was a law review article. However, not a case or decision of mine where I was just identifying my experience in talking about ideas. One thing about the first amendment issue I wanna make clear. I pointed out there if a company has market power under Turner Broadcasting, then the government does have the authority to regulate it. But if a company doesn't have market power Turner Broadcasting says, no. But it doesn't bar all regulation by any stretch, not even close. This would seem that there's I commend men rights of individuals to use the internet and express their own views, and if it gets too expensive for them to use it, you basically said that the companies have these first amendment rights not looking at the issue that I think a lot of us as policymakers see is that unless you have some rules of the road in place, it's going to make it very hard for individuals and small businesses access. I think that's a fair point and argument like that was raised in the Turner Broadcasting case in nineteen ninety four when it was argued to the supreme court that was termite clerks and that's not the argument that the supreme court accelerated at that time. You mentioned Justice, Scalia and I wanted to end with when we talk about the effects of things. And he actually was at champion of the Chevron case, which of course was the supreme court ruling that allowed agencies decisions on health and safety protections. To stay in the book. It's been referenced in more than fifteen thousand decisions. But you said it was a precedent to me yesterday, but your writings in your writings, you've called it in a textual invention of court. Any judicially orchestrated shift of power? You have said that instead of.

Turner Broadcasting Justice Kennedy Scalia supreme court FCC Harvard law review principal Kagan twelve years
"harvard law review" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"harvard law review" Discussed on WGTK

"Then union would fight him telling you what we have as a maverick foul yet i know more than you you nothing you know what an employer in this country be allowed to hire someone illegally depressing wages for american citizens you wanna fix that problem we reform the system we legalize the people that are already legalize it no you can do it tomorrow why should employers be allowed to hire illegal aliens i'm gonna say it again me why they should be allowed choices here talker we got two choices we deplore the fourteen million or twenty million whatever number or we legalized we can get him out of the shadow know what you don't have time for conversations of people who don't know what they're talking about it haven't thought it through i wanna come on you more talking points in call anybody who disagrees a racist which is what you did in the very first sentence of the segment because that's what you're yeah you're you're pathetic how can these daca people call trump a racist given what he's proposed a much bigger deal than anybody even suspected and democrats still didn't go on with it now yesterday i was talking about obama's cuban deal and i said that the deal did not involve the release of any political prisoners that's not true there are about fifty political prisoners reportedly that were released there still many more remaining in prisons in cuba but the deal apparently did cause some fifty some odd prisoners to be released regarding obama being born in kenya did a nineteen ninetyone literary client list booklet identify obama as having been born in kenya according to one of the fact checker organizations that is absolutely true breitbart in may twenty twelve published a copy of a promotional booklet produced in one thousand nine hundred one by literary agency which showcased the roster of writers including a young writer named rock obama here's what the booklet said quote barack obama the first african american president of the harvard law review was born in kenya and raith in indonesia and hawaii and went on and on and on the literary agency later on said that they were wrong in putting it out that we just made an error and the editor of the biographical text said that the.

cuba kenya breitbart writer rock obama president harvard law review indonesia editor obama hawaii
"harvard law review" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"harvard law review" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Hi john you're next you're next on the ringcentral nightside call a line who would who would you prefer to have negotiating here beat to me too we'll see how it goes he cowley cokes right hand man i do know that he finished first in his class at west point and he was on the harvard law review pretty smart guy yeah that's how i get to be charlie cokes right hand man that that might be too true he's the secretary of state and i'll tell you this i think that it's better that he's the secretary of state right now than rex tillerson i think rex was a loser from day one remember this that that was that was still president trump's choice right upon tale there's no dope you know so i said well you know i i don't know what the democrats expect especially those you know people that you mentioned i i think the problem with the democratic party you know they always make dumb statements and they've been doing that for the last few years and acting stupidly but anyway you know he got the net that's the name thing i mean that's been the problem we haven't been talking to them so the fact that they got together and they didn't throw grenades at each other is an accomplishment you know by the by the way i wonder how many of these elected democrats and i'm not saying all like the democrats but some of these far out lefty democrats i wonder how many of them are rooting for the president's success and how many are rooting for his failure i'd say it's about ninety nine point nine percents voting fail i'll tell you that you gotta get bill maher credit did did you hear the sound from bill maher the him the other night if those who didn't.

john harvard law review rex trump democratic party president bill maher
"harvard law review" Discussed on The Young Turks

The Young Turks

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"harvard law review" Discussed on The Young Turks

"Nation a federal investigation by the fbi of that kennedy right they did that of hillary clinton not donald trump so please please stop your it's a barrister how stupid you people are with your stupid conspiracy theories yeah look so my opinion on trump changes day to day and i'm specifically talking about his level of intelligence right on any given day i could think oh he's actually pretty strategic and in this case he is strategic because he knows that it didn't actually hurt him politically in any way whatsoever he knows that if he makes a big issue about this and says that it was a witch hunt and it was done politically then his base will continue dismissing anything that muller finds in his investigation he wants to discredit that that investigation and he's actually doing a good job at that but look once the media's paying attention to and that's a big step if they're not paying attention to you than all this is really hard but if you're a person like donald trump and the media pays a lot of attention to you then politics gets really really simple you don't have to be smart in fact be smart might hurt you a little bit obama was brilliant harvard law the head of the harvard law review was a constitutional law professor and you know what we we eat a lot of and he would never make his case so people never heard it and people didn't understand it right and instead trump comes out and he's not just keeps repeating the same thing which one today he sent out on tweet all it said was an all in all caps which like we forget how insane the president is if randomly obama had tweeted in the middle of his presidency which hunt people like did he loses mind what does that mean what do you mean witchhunt and what kind of a tweet is that it has no context i mean this guy is deeply unstable fucked it just politics is not.

fbi hillary clinton donald trump obama harvard law review professor president kennedy muller
"harvard law review" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"harvard law review" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Others join this movement simul attain is say if we in this country we must address systemic racism systemic poverty ecological devastation the war economy militarism and the false distorted mall narrative of of religious and christian nationalism if we are going to really move this democracy fall and save it from from failure and reverend jonathan wilson heart grove the i you know during the obama years i was thinking wow you know the the the the institutions of white supremacy are being taken down are being challenged the white people are waking up is a lot of white people voted for obama and now with trump in place it's almost like you know the the the white voters said you know we're gonna prove that the that the that the worst white guy a pathetic misogynist business failure is is more important is superior to the best black guy barack obama you know roads are a excuse me a scholar a of harvard law review the whole bit and you know what what's your sense as a white guy you know what's your sense of the white communities response to this we backsliding or are we just waking up to a cancer in our midst we the many of us were largely out of where we got about a minute here before we're gonna hit a break pastor liberalism saying that progressives are atheists has been the language that has been stirred up by not not only the christian right politicos but also by christian tv christian radio i mean there there's a constant narrative of of of of being under assault and the obama administration was framed as a sort of great example of that assault and so this this backlash is very much in keeping with what we've seen in the past and they've tried to take the racial language off of it very well said jonathan wilson heart grove and william bar reverend dr william barber and and pastor jonathan wilson so glad to have you both on with us today thank you thank you so much for much vicky thank you could talk and we'll be back with more of our conversation about the correspondence dinner and how that ties into this whole larger issue of the rise of power and the use of power in this administration you're listening to tom hartman visit thom hartmann dot com for audio and video archives back with more of your calls after this.

barack obama harvard law review assault obama administration jonathan wilson dr william barber tom hartman
"harvard law review" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"harvard law review" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Litmus test your pro sarandia we can't vote for you i wasn't planning on focusing on this wasn't even planning on getting into it much but watching it gives us a larger context it gives us a lesson that we need to we need to understand i don't do hit and run on this show they would rather listen to me they would rather american farm policy fail then president trump succeed and that is the truth the absolute truth sarah huckabee sanders on fox and friends today cut five go we certainly hope that members will change their minds look at some point democrats have to decide whether they love this country more than they hate this president and they have to do all they don't they don't love this country more than they hate this president as a matter of fact they don't love this country more than they love themselves go ahead the security and diplomacy of our country ahead of their own political games and we're very hopeful that they will mike pompeo is a highly qualified individual top of his class at harvard thurston his class at west point he's been an impeccable cia director he's done you realize what it is to be first in your class at west point isn't that amazing in harvard law review how smart and talent this man is how patriotic this man is you know we've reached a point in this country ladies and gentlemen where we should be thankful that men and women of this caliber step up and are willing to serve in these positions that crack they take people out to destroy them to smear them the try and find a hook here and there it's a very dangerous thing to to.

president fox harvard director harvard law review sarah huckabee mike pompeo cia
"harvard law review" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"harvard law review" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"I wasn't planning on focusing on this i wasn't even planning on getting into it much but watching it it gives us a larger context it gives us a lesson that we need to we need to understand i don't do hit and run on this show they would rather listen to me they would rather american foreign policy fail then president trump succeed and that is the truth the absolute truth sarah huckabee sanders on fox and friends today cut five go we certainly hope that members will change their minds look at some point democrats have to decide whether they love this country more than they hate this president and they have to disarm them all they don't they don't love this country more than they hate this president as a matter of fact they don't love this country more than they love themselves go ahead a security and diplomacy of our country ahead of their own political game and we're very hopeful that they will mike pompeo is a highly qualified individual top of his class at harvard in his class at west point he's been an impeccable cia director he's done you realize what it is to be first in your class at west point isn't that amazing and harvard law review how smart and taligent this man is how patriotic this man is we've reached a point in this country ladies and gentlemen where we should be thankful that men and women of this caliber step up and are willing to serve in these positions that crack they take people at destroy them to smear them try and find a hook here and there.

president fox harvard director sarah huckabee mike pompeo cia harvard law review
"harvard law review" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"harvard law review" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Going to happen likely since about nineteen twenty five does it give you pause to ultimately ram through his nomination on the senate floor well i don't think allowing people to vote is called ramming okay this is a person that's highly qualified he was first in his class at west point did the harvard law review was in charge of that incredibly qualified person knows more about what's happening in the world probably than anybody in america because of his posted cia look under ordinary times he would be confirmed overwhelmingly secretary clinton had one negative vote when she came through john kerry had no negative votes when they came through committee he is more qualified probably than either of them but at least as qualified and we just live in a very partisan environment my friends on the democratic side and they are my friends i could try to make them feel bad about this i could they've got in their heart of hearts not feel comfortable with what they're doing but the base the base their their base at pours this president so much and vice versa goes both ways that we're in an era where somebody like this who's qualified unfortunately is likely to be voted out with that recommendation or with a negative recommendation but to allow that's not ramming through that's happened before and to allow senators vote on this nominee on the floor is the right thing to happen it's just sad that our nation has devolved politically to this point where someone of his calibre is not going to be there you mentioning politics you are not running for re election in tennessee the race to replace you in.

harvard law review america clinton john kerry president tennessee senate secretary
Sen. Tammy Duckworth's 10-day-old daughter Maile Pearl makes her debut on Senate floor

Washington Today

02:24 min | 2 years ago

Sen. Tammy Duckworth's 10-day-old daughter Maile Pearl makes her debut on Senate floor

"Allow senator tammy duckworth to bring her infant baby onto the floor the illinois democrat is the first senator to give birth while in office the chamber clearing the resolution by unanimous consent it allows senator duckworth or any other senator to bring a child younger than one year of age onto the floor during votes in this afternoon senator duckworth did just that she was back for her first vote nominate voting against a congressman breitenstein to be the nasa administrator in a statement she said quote the senate is is leading by example and sending the important message that working parents everywhere deserve family friendly workplace policies north dakota democratic senator heidi heitkamp becoming the first democrat to announce that she will support mike pompeo's nomination to be secretary of state but added if he's confirmed i will hold him accountable the senate foreign relations committee will vote on his nomination monday and with opposition from two democrats senator tim kaine of virginia and jeanne shaheen of new hampshire as well as that of republican senator rand paul his nomination is on track to be sent to the full senate without the approval of the committee this would mark the first time this is occurred for a nominee to be secretary of state since nineteen twenty five when the committee votes on the nominees were made public the chair of that committee is bob corker of tennessee our just argue to people here that have someone like mom mike pompeii ho who has served the nation so well this is a person by the way who graduated first in his class in the united states military academy at west point in nineteen eighty six he served as a cavalry officer patrolling the iron curtain before the fall of the berlin wall he also served with the second squadron seventh cavalry in the us army's fourth infantry division after leaving active duty mr pompeo graduated from harvard law school having been editor of the harvard law review mrpresident president sometimes we meet people in life that are just sharper than we are they've had an incredible academic background and i can't even imagine having accomplished some of the things that he's accomplished in life and what i have found and i know you're the same you serve thankfully we appreciate it you served in our military mr president people who typically have served in the.

Harvard Law School Harvard Law Review Berlin Tennessee Bob Corker Jeanne Shaheen Senator Tim Kaine Congressman Illinois President Trump Editor Senator Officer United States Senator Rand Paul New Hampshire Virginia Mike Pompeo Heidi Heitkamp
"harvard law review" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"harvard law review" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"Scholarly intelligent president or a harvard law review the product of somehow pratice educational institutions capable of talk into two different worlds and donald trump had to be rich and white that was it that's that's the difference that's my fav orange but but i hear what you're saying what you're saying okay let me tell you on the store i agree with what you're saying i genuinely do and i grew up with this every single day but then i go if you look at osvaldo and you track his progress a lot of the things that barack obama ran on all ideas and policies that donald trump has run on and not we're not talking about the major disgusting ideas that donald trump has the deplorable ideas that he has reprehensible you know feelings i'm talking more specifically around nafta trade policies policies that affect those swing states that we know to be the white working class bastion couldn't it be argued that barack obama and donald trump tapped into the same thing you know that they both knew that if i go and talk to that factory work and tell him against those trade deals that person will vote for me couldn't you do that it's it's that and not racism i don't think it's either or i don't think it is i don't really have the data my understanding is hillary clinton campaign in wisconsin yeah you know and i think that was a major major mistake he spent a lot of time you know investee you know i think he just.

president harvard law review donald trump osvaldo barack obama nafta hillary clinton wisconsin
"harvard law review" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"harvard law review" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"Get the situation with all of your potential appointees pump payroll is smart and who is the editor of the harvard law review you don't get that post i being uh uh built so in that way he at least bring some intellectual heft to that position however he his own um friendlies in in the intelligence community have said of him that he likes certainty he doesn't like questions he really um want answers when a job is about 'ambiguities and that's a huge problem in the intelligence world where everything you get as in shades of grey it you know if a president who tells you i only want consensus he is a don't want to hear anything else um it's also a huge problem at the state department where uh much as many of us lake of more black and white world you're dealing with really difficult problems and then ticket wrong which pump pair it was a very crowded out his views on the iran deal and how bad it is and high wants to roll it back iran as a noxious terrorist regime in iran sponsors terrorism at sponsorship monterey's abuse it uh kills people who are gay in walks up protesters and no one's gonna argue that this was a good country and if a large country and what it does matters on the other hand if it has nuclear weapons what'll happen to the rest of the region how many other countries we'll go nuclear what will happen to our ally and israel and so on you're dealing with difficult difficult situations and you have to be able to balance ambiguity and so the man who can't do that and doesn't like to do that as a dangerous mandatory it at.

editor harvard law review president monterey nuclear weapons iran israel
"harvard law review" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"harvard law review" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"He is cruel that's absolutely right he any is cruel in a social contact so if there are people around to observe him pudding someone down that one hell do it the other thing that is fascinating about the trump organization has said it's filled with moralists who have been there are a long time primarily because they've been promoted and rewarded at levels far greater than they would have been elsewhere so he's not someone who scans the a harvard law review and picks a lawyer from that class he's someone who's more likely to encounter just a guy who impresses him in passing who he then can plucked from obscurity and promote and reward until uh they never want to leave and it can also control someone better that way right absolutely but you can't do that in the federal bureaucracy most of the people who are in his cabinet her in high positions have their own source of power other predates their relationship with donald trump they can go someplace else in do far better financially and have a better life in many ways than they have at the white house so what does he have to keep them that in his old repertoire i i don't think there's very much yeah i wanna talk a little bit about the relationship between trump and the media which in many ways over the last year since he won election is the same as it's always been extremely confrontational but for me the conversation behind the media conversation is.

harvard law review donald trump white house
"harvard law review" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"harvard law review" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"When when you're talking about actual transcripts natural current grip okay he has released information about his academic performance at harvard law school and at columbia and i don't think any i don't think rational medal of honor but not releasing eighty two court you know i mean i can say i wanted to progress no you cannot say that because you will be exposed if you haven't and if someone says i have graduated a magnet from lahti from harvard law school and i haven't there is no way that he will not be exposed a by the way there there are people on our side of things who have claimed college records at aren't true and it's a very serious matter and by the way with all of the efforts to try to discredit president obama i i've heard no one question the idea that number one he got himself elected president of the harvard law review and then he graduated with honors from harvard loss cool i really don't understand why at this point people are concerned about president obama's academic performance which was pretty good by the way uh i don't know anything about president trump's academic performance except he said yesterday that i was an ice student he did he said i went to an ivy league college i was an ice student i'm very intelligent no doubt we'll be right back on disagreement day on the medved show it's disagreement today one eight hundred nine five five seventeen.

harvard law school president harvard law review obama trump harvard ivy league medved
"harvard law review" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"harvard law review" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"Yard there was like i said to alleged there was a caller jobs from somewhere in the midwest so i forget at the maybe a caller from chicago earlier and i admitted that there there are problems in many minority a new neighborhoods there are problems with the justice system and they're obviously there are there are problems with in the in our drug laws that i think should be looked at right but jerry let me ask you and then i ask joe do you think that barack obama who went to harbour and he he had he he attended many privilege institutions it is like do you think barack obama had advantages that i didn't have a guy who didn't even know graduated fouryear university jerry i don't think that you create qualification for what barack obama was brought to the type the do if you think about a rock obama didn't do anything for the make people limits cutler what he did is he raised the right split a but a gay community erased a rightfooter or white males we give the part of it uh minority because if we look at the global spectrum black people are not the minority or actually why people are anyway uh when you're talking about the heat were opportunity a white women oughta go on us are the minority who get most of those jobs it take about the reason why we had to create shop and to give minorities the an earth grace if book out the unions came about in a union you will the battle because the black people head of steals but they will burn down white dan if they didn't hire white people joe let me ask so do you think it thank you uh joe dias barack obama yes he attended harvard he had you know he had he had a white mother and a black father so if i was born in the fifty yard line where was he born and was he given a lot of privilege because he went to someplace like harvard i mean the connection zia from harvard and the harvard law review i never had anything like that in my life now in he did not have what you might call a representative american black experience growing up i mean he grew up in hawaii and indonesia where he even talked about how he stood out as a mixedrace person.

chicago joe barack obama harvard harvard law review hawaii indonesia jerry cutler representative fifty yard fouryear
"harvard law review" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"harvard law review" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Controversy over socalled decision relevant science is increasingly tied to identity protective cognition this is the quote tendency to selectively credit and discredit evidence in patterns that reflect people's commitments to competing cultural groups and that's a concept he says it's rooted in the two thousand to two thousand sixteen were of decay sherman in jail cohen right so maybe we should try to go a little bit deeper into where this idea of ah of identity protective cognition comes from so obviously there are a lot of ways to be wrong night you can be mistaken due to pure error right but as we've already shown you can also be mistaken for a reason our our brains are not so made as to perceive and judge the world objectively like when your reasoning and perceptions are skewed by a desire conscious or unconscious to reach particular conclusions this is what we call motivated reasoning and khan in an article he did for the harvard law review in 2011 that he reproduced and eggs are problem on his blog he he said quote motivated reasoning refers to the unconscious tendency of individuals to process information in a manner that suits some end or goal extra insect to the formation of accurate beliefs it that unconscious parted is is is very critical capsule luca's no that were not arguing the argument here is not that someone is saying oh i don't i don't like this climate change this is the expert from me this is it or or vice versa to someone saying oh i i'm i don't really like the idea of these gmo foods i'm going to listen to this expert right here this is taking place of a in the unconscious yeah you you don't even realize when it's going on and so there there is a classic highly cited paper in the history of psychology that he goes back to to talk about early examples of motivator reasoning and this is a precedent i guess for his they saw protests paper the original one was this paper called they saw a game a case study and it goes to stuff that has nothing to do with politics absolutely nothing you you you can take the politics and you can take the science completely out and you still get the exact same effects and what this is.

cohen harvard law review luca climate change khan