9 Burst results for "Harvard T H Chan School Of Public"

"harvard t h chan school public" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

07:19 min | 2 months ago

"harvard t h chan school public" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"The country on the doctors advising the biden campaign on exactly that joins me next so we are about to welcome the vaccines very first vaccines here in colorado and emitted. Now we're going to hear doorbell. Is this doorbell. It's a knock but okay i. We're going to. Of course let the vaccine in a this is the pfizer vaccine arise being here in colorado to end the pandemic here we have to sign for it of colorado governor jared polis who is just giddy for the arrival of the code vaccine as are the rest of us. The for shipments of the pfizer vaccine were delivered across the country today shortly thereafter healthcare workers. This group in ohio became the first people in the us to be inoculated against the coronavirus. Nearly three million doses are expected to be delivered more than six hundred locations. By the end of the week sandra lindsay. He's a crook. Who is a critical care. Nurse at the long island. Jewish medical center in queens. She was the first person in the country to receive the vaccine. This morning coats today. Really i feel like feeling is comment. I hope this mark with again into the end of the very painful time in our history. I want to instill public confidence that the vaccine is safe. We're in a pandemic and so we all door part just. Seeing these healthcare workers able to get the vaccine is a real reason for optimism but of course everyone keeps saying she said is or life foot said there is just a long way to go to curb the spread and keep the virus under control and government. Backs doctor told ghandi's assertion at brigham and women's hospital in boston professor at harvard's t h chan school public health sharing that expertise with president-elect biden member of the biden harris transition covid nineteen adviser report. It's great to have you on doctor. I i guess just to take a step back before we get into the the bad stuff and there's a lot of it. This is a remarkable scientific achievement. Essentially nothing has ever been done like this on this scale. How did you feel watching those images today. It was incredibly moving. There's the science but there's the bigger deal here. Which is that. We finally finally as a country committed to defeating the virus. We've missed so many opportunities over these last months. We didn't do test and trace as an effort to get this contained in control defeated. Now we're moving ahead and that is you just don't know as someone who's been in public health this long. We've been fighting uphill to come together as a country and we really did across all of our states. We came together and that is a very big and moving thing you mean in terms of just watching across all the states distributing inoculating today and to watch a kind of coordinated governmental effort that is actually like intervening positively exactly republicans democrats getting together on a on a on a common course to to stop and defeat the virus. This is not going to be enough by itself. We are up against three hundred thousand marked dead today The the next hundred thousand that it will be four hundred thousand that is already baked in with the millions who are actively infected today that we already know about the next question is can we stop the five hundred thousand mark from happening. And that's going to require not just the vaccine but masks limitations on capacity in places where the spreads happening out of control. Those are still the things we are going to be coming together to do in the weeks to come. I wanna play a little bit of what the the president-elect had to say about vaccines tonight. Obviously you know. It's i guess the closest analogue would be you know. President obama inheriting financial crisis or fdr in the depression of having this you know defining this defining challenge right of the vaccine. As sort of the first thing you have to do governance wise. He just talked about the urgent work in front of all of us and getting it under control as the number one job. I guess my question was like how hard task is that going to be. How much ranges. They're in the competency and execution for this new administration of how long it takes. It is a massive undertaking. There's just the physical production and distribution of the vaccine to move out into the country. There's going to be the messaging and the consistent Airing honestly about what we learn as we go through this you know we. We've had a very good day today. We're going to be hearing about people who will have side effects. You know There are people will have fevers. People have some adverse events that we know will come but our choices are get the corona virus or get the vaccine. That really is the only choice and already the evidence is clear. The vaccine is so much safer at every age than getting the corona virus. So let's talk about this this next period and the and the next hundred thousand americans we might lose the ones that are out past that the folks that are already as you say baked in i have to say i find it the most astounding moral failure of the american government. Probably in my life honestly Up where there with the iraq war and a few other things that that we have essentially allowed this to happen. And i i do wonder where the reserve of discipline amongst everyone comes from because right now it just feels like a lot of the country gave up the federal leadership and the president obviously gave up and the idea. The vaccine paired with this message. But it's gonna be a while it seems like it's a little bit of a tough one to pull off. What are your thoughts on that. Well i mean we're we're going to be tested every single week and the next tests that we have are already upon us. We haven't allocated enough money to distribute the vaccine yet. We the estimates from the cdc or they were that the vaccinators the states and localities need six billion dollars. The estimates from public health organizations are that need eight billion dollars. The current administration's allocated three hundred million dollars. We don't have enough for all the vaccination so you know the the relief bill. That's going through congress right now. The one that mitch mcconnell is fighting does not want money going to states and localities that is crucial that we actually get that.

colorado sandra lindsay Jewish medical center brigham and women's hospital harvard's t h chan school publ elect biden biden harris jared polis biden ghandi pfizer long island queens ohio boston President obama us depression american government
What we know about coronavirus reinfection from other diseases

PRI's The World

07:57 min | 4 months ago

What we know about coronavirus reinfection from other diseases

"Hello I'm Alana Gordon I'm a reporter and producer at the world covering global health here at the world, we've been holding a regular series of Corona virus conversations presented jointly with the Forum at Harvard Chan School of Public Health, taking your questions to the experts. This discussion series is featured on our facebook page, but we wanted to share what we think are really valuable conversations with you right here in the world's podcast feed. This Week I spoke with William Hannich Associate Professor of epidemiology at Harvard. Teach Dance School of Public Health about the pandemic and the latest updates as we approach the holiday season. To start in the United States more than two hundred, thousand people have died of Covid nineteen. The number of new cases is growing by some fifty thousand each day it's a figure that's been rising for four weeks running and is up by more than a third since just a month ago, it's hard to believe. The fear is that this is just a preview of what the late fall and winter might hold cold weather sends people indoors. We could see much more dramatic rises in Cova cases with winter holidays coming, and that's also creating really difficult heart wrenching dilemmas for many families. Do you travel even places in communities where there are lots of infections or to and from So. To Begin William, where do you see us now in this progression of the pandemic? Where do you see it headed? When you write the that are increases happening at the moment. In fact, I think that seventeen states reported record highs in cases just last night However, it's not by on the states which occurred be saying the most activity mostly in the Midwest and these sparsely populated states the. However, the numbers that do add up. said the moment this is what we're seeing. We're seeing continued DHAMMIKA activity on low levels on which of experienced reasonable amount of it already, and then more intense activity especially in some of these small towns in the heartland and that's what we are. That's what's happening right now. It's a bit early I think to be saying that we are saying the stock what's going to happen before but we do anticipate that the more in the shifting indoors to places my transmissions more likely to the end and I think the we all seem impact, find some European conference. So not provides a little bit of a window into the future. So when you see these high numbers in cases being reported now more so than the past, are you saying that most of that were really seeing in some of these what mid Western states right now? Yes. At the moment it is it's also worth noting testing has got a lot better. So when we're watching these sort of epidemic lives increasing with action, we're seeing them way more detail we did not spring so. Ratio of can sort of cases to the actual amount of continued on the. It is now much more clearly defined cutting much more clear in science. What happens with mild ignition switches? And so are you seeing any sort of signs of as people move indoors or as holidays come up of what sorts of risks that poses and? How we might see this. PLOP. So I think the one thing that is really helpful to think of his. We. Can think about preventing pandemic transmission in particular preventing clusters of transmission because remember, this is the virus which tends to transmit and clusters intends to fact number of people up on time. Japan viane came up with this notion of the three C.'s which three CS which can be avoided if not consummation and those three C.'s aw. Close spaces. Close contacts and crowding. and. It's very easy to see how those three could easily be going to could easily come together when it comes to the holidays. So hold events late Indo spices are at risk for transmission. We also know that an furtherest transmission is easing. Now we have a report from a few weeks ago from CDC and declaring fatty clearly that people who'd be needing indoors in a restaurant in the last few weeks where you know that was associated testing positive. So putting all this together I'm afraid that you can see them the holidays to the you know they have the potential to be real serious problems at the salute transmission. And so I think the same time there's also people are experiencing fatigue with this going on for such a long period holidays may be seemed like time were just coming up. To be able to beat with up to ones and at the same time just in general when it comes to the ways that public health has really been stressing. From people like you about this kind of sees or about the mask wearing and things like that, how do you manage the fatigue of this continuing? And it seems like. Is there a shifts to? kind of people being more willing to just live with the risks and live this virus and what that means got I think that you can think you're right and I wanNA start but pointing out that, yeah, I, understand that nicotine. I feel myself I. was like good bunch not touching my face and by increasing touching my face. The thing is that I think what we needed. Was for people to be straight up about this since the pandemic it's of of coined, which is not really been seen in about one hundred years as the response to it will need to be coordinated and staying now. That doesn't mean that it has to be intense guy it's. One of the things which makes me and my colleagues tied is when you when we will saying Oh, we're talking about lockdown to accede. That's true. That's just simply not true. You need very strong interventions if you lose control of. That says attraction. So. What you actually want to do is to maintain a bunch of interventions of kind which described the thinking about the three CS thinking about mass killings thinking about reducing risk in a way that you can't sustain. Its doesn't mean you have to stay a home continuously what it means is you can come up with ways in which you are able to avoid losing control because losing. Control of the pandemic lasting anybody wants to happen because it's that, but then leads to a threat to healthcare and the soldier surges. We saw in the northeast in the spring and you know over the summer and the sun belt. So that's what the personal needs to me. The first goal needs to be avoiding surges and I think you can't invent provided you all prepackaged Putin modern inventions. Angel Athletic. But we have to remember. This is the start of a window which is likely to be really very difficult i. think we got through. I contributed to that it's not going to be fun. So, then how do you weigh those risks and think about that with the holidays approaching? That's very really really good question I. think that people are obvious laden decisions themselves. I think that it's helpful to remain the few things about the virus. Are you often hear that? Is You know either you know you hear that it's incredibly dangerous everybody were that it's not angel anybody neither a true. It is. Overwhelmingly clear that among youngest, the very youngest people beyond the twenty, they are much much less likely severe disease I mean. That's not zero I mean we know that there are now Austin Grimm's which if you rack and if you in fact enough peak on that ice cream, you will see them but then much less likely to something consequences disease. But

Facebook Harvard Chan School Of Public Dance School Of Public Health United States William Hannich Associate Prof Harvard Cova Alana Gordon Midwest Covid CDC Austin Grimm Reporter Nicotine Japan Putin Producer
When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:05 min | 1 year ago

When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

"What happens when insurance companies deny coverage for medications? It doesn't just force people to pay for drugs themselves. A survey finds that for almost half of Americans went. When Insurance Denies Payment? They do not get the drugs at all. The poll comes from NPR. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T H Chan School of Public Public Health. NPR's Patty name reports Sahlin. REDUC- is seventy eight on a fixed income. She has severe acid reflux. I have to eat very small all meals and when I eat sometimes it feels like everything's stuck in my chest and I get really bad pain. And I have to throw up reduces retired on medicare she also pays for supplemental insurance policy to cover the cost of drugs but it will only pay for the generic version of her heartburn medication. Her her doctor prescribed the brand name. She says the generic version just doesn't work for her. No it's not as effective now. Definitely not she can't afford the brand name so now she has extremely painful episodes of acid reflux about three times a month. Our poll shows that like Ridolfi. The vast majority pretty of Americans have health insurance that includes prescription drug coverage but one in three say that in the past year insurance. Didn't cover the cost of medication and for themselves or their household members Robert Blend in with the Harvard Chan School directed our poll. So what you see is insurers are not paying for some drugs that physicians are recommending. The patients think they need when that happened. Most of the highest earners paid for the medication themselves but Glendon says is that was not the case for everyone else. A half of the people who are middle class or or moderate income are not getting him because they can't afford to go out and pay for it themselves batum line. He says it's just not fair. This idea that if we save money we all have to make tough choices together. The tough choices really don't affects the most wealthy people in the United States. They just affect people who are middle and lower

NPR Harvard T H Chan School Of Pub Glendon Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Harvard Chan School Heartburn Ridolfi Robert Blend United States Patty Batum
When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:05 min | 1 year ago

When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

"What happens when insurance companies deny coverage for medications? It doesn't just force people to pay for drugs themselves. A survey finds that for almost half of Americans went. When Insurance Denies Payment? They do not get the drugs at all. The poll comes from NPR. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T H Chan School of Public Public Health. NPR's Patty name reports Sahlin. REDUC- is seventy eight on a fixed income. She has severe acid reflux. I have to eat very small all meals and when I eat sometimes it feels like everything's stuck in my chest and I get really bad pain. And I have to throw up reduces retired on medicare she also pays for supplemental insurance policy to cover the cost of drugs but it will only pay for the generic version of her heartburn medication. Her her doctor prescribed the brand name. She says the generic version just doesn't work for her. No it's not as effective now. Definitely not she can't afford the brand name so now she has extremely painful episodes of acid reflux about three times a month. Our poll shows that like Ridolfi. The vast majority pretty of Americans have health insurance that includes prescription drug coverage but one in three say that in the past year insurance. Didn't cover the cost of medication and for themselves or their household members Robert Blend in with the Harvard Chan School directed our poll. So what you see is insurers are not paying for some drugs that physicians are recommending. The patients think they need when that happened. Most of the highest earners paid for the medication themselves but Glendon says is that was not the case for everyone else. A half of the people who are middle class or or moderate income are not getting him because they can't afford to go out and pay for it themselves batum line. He says it's just not fair. This idea that if we save money we all have to make tough choices together. The tough choices really don't affects the most wealthy people in the United States. They just affect people who are middle and lower

NPR Harvard T H Chan School Of Pub Glendon Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Harvard Chan School Heartburn Ridolfi Robert Blend United States Patty Batum
When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:34 min | 1 year ago

When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

"What happens when insurance companies deny coverage for medications? It doesn't just force people to pay for drugs themselves. A survey finds that for almost half of Americans went. When Insurance Denies Payment? They do not get the drugs at all. The poll comes from NPR. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T H Chan School of Public Public Health. NPR's Patty name reports Sahlin. REDUC- is seventy eight on a fixed income. She has severe acid reflux. I have to eat very small all meals and when I eat sometimes it feels like everything's stuck in my chest and I get really bad pain. And I have to throw up reduces retired on medicare she also pays for supplemental insurance policy to cover the cost of drugs but it will only pay for the generic version of her heartburn medication. Her her doctor prescribed the brand name. She says the generic version just doesn't work for her. No it's not as effective now. Definitely not she can't afford the brand name so now she has extremely painful episodes of acid reflux about three times a month. Our poll shows that like Ridolfi. The vast majority pretty of Americans have health insurance that includes prescription drug coverage but one in three say that in the past year insurance. Didn't cover the cost of medication and for themselves or their household members Robert Blend in with the Harvard Chan School directed our poll. So what you see is insurers are not paying for some drugs that physicians are recommending. The patients think they need when that happened. Most of the highest earners paid for the medication themselves but Glendon says is that was not the case for everyone else. A half of the people who are middle class or or moderate income are not getting him because they can't afford to go out and pay for it themselves batum line. He says it's just not fair. This idea that if we save money we all have to make tough choices together. The tough choices really don't affects the most wealthy people in the United States. They just affect people who are middle and lower income and this could leave lower and middle income individuals more vulnerable to disease and other health problems for Sally Rideau see one example is her EPI pen. She's allergic to bees and needs the EPI pen to inject life saving medication in case she gets stung and the last time I was stung. The doctor said each time you get stung can be very serious and it can result in death so he's always carry the EPI pen and in my case. I do a lot of gardening and I'm by myself so just felt safe to have my Epi pen with me just in case but this time when she went to the pharmacy to get the pen prescribed by her doctor she was told her insurance wouldn't cover the cost. It was close to six hundred dollars and I said well how about the generic could I get generic and she said well. That's three ninety eight and I said you're kidding. She said no I said okay then. Just forget it so today when we're dosing gardens. She wears as long sleeves and long pants to try to protect yourself against B.'s. The situation she says it's upsetting. I have three insurances. I'm always pay a lot of copays as I pay a lot for my drugs. It's very frustrating. I think when you have insurance I think you should be able to get the drug. You need one unexpected. Finding from our poll on income inequality is that even people who can afford to cover the cost of their medication. Sometimes don't this is one of the first polls to survey the top one percent percent people earning over five hundred thousand dollars a year and eighteen percent of them chose not to fill prescriptions. When insurance wouldn't cover it? Tina Smith is one of them. She runs a technology consulting firm in Minneapolis last year when her doctor prescribed a medication to treat the skin condition rose Patia. She got a shock. When I went to fill the prescription the cost for the prescription was over six hundred dollars? She says for the past seven years. The medication costs about twenty dollars. So this was a huge increase and Smith decided not to get it because I felt that it was fiscally irresponsible and I have no interest in funding big pharma anymore than I absolutely have to. I feel big farmers than rob in the American people for years and they continued to increase. The cost of prescriptions drug. Drug prices have been escalating. Actually four in a significant way at least the last couple decades Frederica saucy is director of the Consumer Advocacy Group families. USA But in the last five. Or six years it's really hit a crescendo. Not surprisingly the smallest increase were in generic drugs but the adjective small small. He says pretty much ends there. You know an average increase for drugs might be fifteen or sixteen percent annually which is much much faster than our paychecks or inflation inflation. But you could see a doubling or tripling of drug cost year every year depending on the ability of that drug company to have no competition he says healthcare caused swallowing up more and more families discretionary income not only in higher drug prices but also in higher deductibles co pays and cost sharing we. We spoke with representatives of both the pharmaceutical and health insurance industries and they point the finger at each other. Insurers say the financial squeeze Americans are are experiencing is because of high drug prices the drug makers say it's High Insurance and hospital costs whatever. The reason Harvard health economist and primary Care Physician Ben Summers says not getting needed. Medication is not good news. There's more and more evidence that having health insurance really does improve people's health and lives and and medications are one of the key parts of that because it is such a mainstay of how we manage a lot of chronic conditions now says not all medications are equal some of the medications occasions we prescribe are really kind of options to a patient. You say look. This medication may help you feel better while you have this infection or while you are having some heartburn but if view feel fine without it that's okay but how there's a critical cholesterol lowering statins for example or insulin to keep blood sugar under control and and sometimes people won't even notice they're not taking it not all these conditions have symptoms. You can be building up dangerous levels of high blood sugar or cholesterol without noticing. It until it's too late. Sadly summer says he's not surprised by the findings of our poll he says at least a quarter of his patients. Don't get new prescriptions filled. Because they say they just don't have the money. Patty named

NPR Heartburn Patty United States Tina Smith Harvard T H Chan School Of Pub Robert Wood Johnson Foundation High Insurance Harvard Chan School Ridolfi Sally Rideau Glendon Robert Blend Batum Harvard Consumer Advocacy Group
When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:35 min | 1 year ago

When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

"What happens when insurance companies deny coverage for medications? It doesn't just force people to pay for drugs themselves. A survey finds that for almost half of Americans went. When Insurance Denies Payment? They do not get the drugs at all. The poll comes from NPR. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T H Chan School of Public Public Health. NPR's Patty name reports Sahlin. REDUC- is seventy eight on a fixed income. She has severe acid reflux. I have to eat very small all meals and when I eat sometimes it feels like everything's stuck in my chest and I get really bad pain. And I have to throw up reduces retired on medicare she also pays for supplemental insurance policy to cover the cost of drugs but it will only pay for the generic version of her heartburn medication. Her her doctor prescribed the brand name. She says the generic version just doesn't work for her. No it's not as effective now. Definitely not she can't afford the brand name so now she has extremely painful episodes of acid reflux about three times a month. Our poll shows that like Ridolfi. The vast majority pretty of Americans have health insurance that includes prescription drug coverage but one in three say that in the past year insurance. Didn't cover the cost of medication and for themselves or their household members Robert Blend in with the Harvard Chan School directed our poll. So what you see is insurers are not paying for some drugs that physicians are recommending. The patients think they need when that happened. Most of the highest earners paid for the medication themselves but Glendon says is that was not the case for everyone else. A half of the people who are middle class or or moderate income are not getting him because they can't afford to go out and pay for it themselves batum line. He says it's just not fair. This idea that if we save money we all have to make tough choices together. The tough choices really don't affects the most wealthy people in the United States. They just affect people who are middle and lower income and this could leave lower and middle income individuals more vulnerable to disease and other health problems for Sally Rideau see one example is her EPI pen. She's allergic to bees and needs the EPI pen to inject life saving medication in case she gets stung and the last time I was stung. The doctor said each time you get stung can be very serious and it can result in death so he's always carry the EPI pen and in my case. I do a lot of gardening and I'm by myself so just felt safe to have my Epi pen with me just in case but this time when she went to the pharmacy to get the pen prescribed by her doctor she was told her insurance wouldn't cover the cost. It was close to six hundred dollars and I said well how about the generic could I get generic and she said well. That's three ninety eight and I said you're kidding. She said no I said okay then. Just forget it so today when we're dosing gardens. She wears as long sleeves and long pants to try to protect yourself against B.'s. The situation she says it's upsetting. I have three insurances. I'm always pay a lot of copays as I pay a lot for my drugs. It's very frustrating. I think when you have insurance I think you should be able to get the drug. You need one unexpected. Finding from our poll on income inequality is that even people who can afford to cover the cost of their medication. Sometimes don't this is one of the first polls to survey the top one percent percent people earning over five hundred thousand dollars a year and eighteen percent of them chose not to fill prescriptions. When insurance wouldn't cover it? Tina Smith is one of them. She runs a technology consulting firm in Minneapolis last year when her doctor prescribed a medication to treat the skin condition rose Patia. She got a shock. When I went to fill the prescription the cost for the prescription was over six hundred dollars? She says for the past seven years. The medication costs about twenty dollars. So this was a huge increase and Smith decided not to get it because I felt that it was fiscally irresponsible and I have no interest in funding big pharma anymore than I absolutely have to. I feel big farmers than rob in the American people for years and they continued to increase. The cost of prescriptions drug. Drug prices have been escalating. Actually four in a significant way at least the last couple decades Frederica saucy is director of the Consumer Advocacy Group families. USA But in the last five. Or six years it's really hit a crescendo. Not surprisingly the smallest increase were in generic drugs but the adjective small small. He says pretty much ends there. You know an average increase for drugs might be fifteen or sixteen percent annually which is much much faster than our paychecks or inflation inflation. But you could see a doubling or tripling of drug cost year every year depending on the ability of that drug company to have no competition he says healthcare caused swallowing up more and more families discretionary income not only in higher drug prices but also in higher deductibles co pays and cost sharing we. We spoke with representatives of both the pharmaceutical and health insurance industries and they point the finger at each other. Insurers say the financial squeeze Americans are are experiencing is because of high drug prices the drug makers say it's High Insurance and hospital costs whatever. The reason Harvard health economist and primary Care Physician Ben Summers says not getting needed. Medication is not good news. There's more and more evidence that having health insurance really does improve people's health and lives and and medications are one of the key parts of that because it is such a mainstay of how we manage a lot of chronic conditions now says not all medications are equal some of the medications occasions we prescribe are really kind of options to a patient. You say look. This medication may help you feel better while you have this infection or while you are having some heartburn but if view feel fine without it that's okay but how there's a critical cholesterol lowering statins for example or insulin to keep blood sugar under control and and sometimes people won't even notice they're not taking it not all these conditions have symptoms. You can be building up dangerous levels of high blood sugar or cholesterol without noticing. It until it's too late. Sadly summer says he's not surprised by the findings of our poll he says at least a quarter of his patients. Don't get new prescriptions filled. Because they say they just don't have the money. Patty named N._p._R. News.

NPR Heartburn Patty United States Tina Smith Harvard T H Chan School Of Pub Robert Wood Johnson Foundation High Insurance Harvard Chan School Ridolfi Sally Rideau Glendon Robert Blend Batum Harvard Consumer Advocacy Group
"harvard t h chan school public" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"harvard t h chan school public" Discussed on This Week In Google

"As investors tried to interpret whether disney's substantially higher offer means comcast will be there's nobody else is going to come in this is this is just too rich that's got apple amazon or twitter yeah they were saying well so comcast would become they were that they would become the world's most indebted companies so stories yeah we did talk about that papers and and comcast is already down twenty percent this year so there's there's there's definitely downside to comcast's debt stacey i think that's a really important point because if you look at companies like trunk and digital i where i used to be an adviser and gatehouse it's the debt that the cash flow was fine south yep yep yep so yeah comcast on monday after it was announced their stock went down from went down down because knox up to bid right so that's what i'm saying raised its bid that tank their stock so basically saying they want to see a disney acquisition and then to say yes afterwards no it went up today at one o'clock it was trading at thirty to forty and at three o'clock it was thirty three sixty three so what's that lamey five percent yeah what about this what about this what about this what about this a to go on d the doctor and writer is now ceo of amazon's employee healthcare joint venture with j p morgan and berkshire hathaway with no profit he has a very well known new yorker writer author of four new york times bestsellers and a surgeon practicing general and enter endocrine surgery at brigham and women's hospital professor at harvard's t h chan school public health and harvard medical school and now it's going to run amazon's healthcare initiative what is this kind of the energizer bunny or what well i assume he'll stop doing some of the other things don't go on day we'll continue all his current roles included surgeon yeah except he will become chairman of area dni which i didn't even mention transitioning from executive director some people just have a lot of energy i imagined he's just kind of a figurehead says that fight for them i don't know is that what you call it ifan well like staff people brooks box yes this is a figure head i really curious what amazon's it's from the hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy amazon has already automated begun automating its white collar jobs you got to like that but but in a way any john that was predictive this has been happening to yep and has just invested of more than half a billion dollars in the number two ecommerce site in china jd dot com jd dot com is also wellknown because last week it announced it was shipping over two hundred thousand packages a day from shanghai facility using four humans and a bunch of robust he google money come in handy it's a lot of robots with that yeah warehouse jobs you know let's bring jobs back to china what do you say well trump wants to bring them back to a phone company in the senate doesn't want to know i know funny battled senate one too by the way they put that in the armed forces appropriation bill that was my favorite story of the day your favorite what is wait a minute don't say let's take a break and when we come back jeff jordan favorites you know this is this is hey and maybe we'll talk about google and maybe what i mentioned i just mentioned google we may mention some more google this is an example of how vestigial broadcasting skills do not translate in the digital world because now people are just going to skip through the commercial find out what jeffs if if this was scum they'd have to listen it was listened to find a way to say you know you know it's moved to a new house i don't know if i ever got it well let's find.

disney comcast amazon apple twitter billion dollars twenty percent five percent
"harvard t h chan school public" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"harvard t h chan school public" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"The new harvest study published on tuesday in the new england journal of medicine estimates that at least four thousand six hundred forty five deaths can be linked to the hurricane in his media aftermath making the storm far deadlier than previously thought official estimates have placed the number of dead at sixty four account that has drawn sharp criticism from experts so they're only off by a factor of seventy whoops the harvard findings indicate that healthcare disruption for the elderly and the loss of basic utility services for the chronically ill had significant impacts and the study criticized puerto rico's methods for counting the dead and its lack of transparency and sharing information as detrimental to planning for future natural disasters the authors called for patients communities in doctors to develop contingency plans for such disasters so more people were killed by hurricane maria according to this hurricane according to this harvard study then we're killed in nine eleven by factor of about fifty percent and yet nobody is talking about that today we are all too busy talking about kim kardashian at the white house and the fact that roseanne said something racist in media valerie jarrett maybe our priorities in this country are a little bit screwed up researchers in the mainland united states and puerto rico led by scientists at the harvard t h chan school public health and beth israel deaconess medical center calculated the number of deaths by survey surveying almost thirty three hundred randomly chosen households across the island and comparing the estimated post hurricane death rate so the mortality rate for the year before their surveys indicated the mortality rate was fourteen point three deaths per one thousand residents from september twentieth through december thirty first 2017 he's sixty two percents increase in mortality rate compared with two thousand sixteen or four hundred six four thousand six hundred forty five excess deaths now that's probably a little bit exact it could be five thousand it could be three thousand but is not sixty four hell a lot of people have died because the government has done a terrible job of restoring what they need to import a rico and that is both the fault of the federal government and it is also the fault of the.

maria kim kardashian white house roseanne united states federal government new england journal of medicin official harvard puerto rico valerie jarrett harvard t h chan school beth israel deaconess medical fifty percent
"harvard t h chan school public" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"harvard t h chan school public" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"Full longer being cold drinkable sunscreen a harmonized water has made some changes after attorney general tom miller suit gary barrett has more the colorado company's than selling a harmonized water product calling it drinkable sunscreen with the attorney general's office sued saying it was just water with some unsubstantiated claims now consent order says harmonize pure medical skin care won't advertise benefits not backed by scientific study and they agreed to refund iowa customers and pay a fine of the state i'm gary barrett taught to residents of the sherman hill neighborhood in des moines they'll tell you there's been a lot of carb rig ins recently a friend of mine hadas windshield cracked in here two months ago somebody had the nerve the through a brick through windshield i'll wake up at three four o'clock in the morning and there's people running around me nonstop ideal of next to a but zillow even after two o'clock they're still people running around doing nothing filled davis tells who channel thirteen he's on the alert but search and paul parisi of the des moines police department said only ten breakins have been reported in the sherman hill area he says he's sure there are others and people need to report them so the department can investigate and beef up patrols more than half of white americans fielders discrimination against their race mark mayfield has more anew npr poll shows that fifty five percent of whites believed to discrimination exists against them in america however just nineteen percent of white people say they've actually been discriminated against while applying for a job only eleven percent said that they face discrimination while applying to a college npr conducted the poll with the robert wood johnson foundation and the harvard t h chan school public health a wind farms coming to palo alto county the board of supervisors voted three two voted three two two yesterday in favor of the wind turbines despite opposition from some residents get breaking news and severe weather on facebook click like on the who radio facebook page seven thirty five time for an update on the morning commute from jim brown in.

tom miller facebook palo alto county harvard t h chan school america paul parisi zillow sherman hill iowa colorado gary barrett attorney jim brown wind turbines public health robert wood johnson foundation mark mayfield des moines police department davis des moines fifty five percent nineteen percent eleven percent two months