17 Burst results for "Harvard Penn Columbia"

"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

05:37 min | 5 months ago

"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

"It took time and it took experimenting with essentially every protein powder. There is every natural sweetener. There is we went into it with certain somewhat vague parameters right. We wanted sugar to be less than three or four grams per serving. We wanted protein to be more than ten grams per serving net carbs less than five or six then within those parameters. We had some ingredients that we absolutely did not want to use so north officials sweeteners. Sugar goals or corn syrup list goes on and then from there. The question was basically. How delicious can we make it while still staying within those parameters and we knew we wouldn't be able to get a hundred percent as delicious sugary cereal but we think we got pretty close. And you know depending you ask. Maybe it's eighteen nineteen ninety-five percent as good as regular serio but so much healthier. That is worth that that little sacrifice now. New an ivy league guy academic an economics person and your first venture with your co founder was more on the insect proteins of of crickets which i love by the way I know they haven't caught on quite as well in america's magic spoon but a big fan of the the insect protein as well but the nuance is interesting because all my siblings went to the ivy leagues. Harvard penn columbia cousins at brown Just a little bit older than you and there seems to be this divergent population in the ivy leagues. I find that. There's an extraordinary academic well-trained contingency of my ivy league friends. That have this critical analysis in the ability to transform academically. Books that they've read but there's also this blend of the hyper entrepreneurial that can understand the academic side of things but blended into an emotional alert adoptable intelligence and both the businesses. You know the one that you started with gregg in two thousand and thirteen with insect protein but especially magic spoon to me shows an extraordinary emotional intelligence. You've been around the ivy leaguers more than me. I have resentment because they kept rejecting for undergrad and law school in my siblings. Rubbing it every chance they get moreover i've you'll use this nuance of emotional. Intelligence that yeah. Maybe i didn't study hard enough. I'm not as good as a student. But i'm just as intelligent as you since you have the duality. Where do you see the value as an entrepreneur in the academic side of what you really excelled at beyond this emotional intelligence that you obviously have as well..

america less than three two thousand less than five eighteen nineteen ninety-five both hundred percent Harvard four grams first venture thirteen six more than ten grams per ivy leaguers ivy leagues every protein one ivy league leagues gregg
"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

04:53 min | 8 months ago

"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

"Developed to after graduate school. I was gonna pay for all the college graduate school it used to you. Bring her Fleet stress in so at five years old when my dad left. I'm like i'm going to be rich now. One advantage of believing money buys love and happiness. That i found and i know georgetown a lot of the students. They're probably have parents that were like my mom. Dr lawyer failure. You feel a lot of pressure to cleese your parents especially if they're paying for your college want to do what they ask but one advantage of not doing that. You know my mom. My siblings all went to the ivy leagues. Harvard penn columbia soon became loud. Listen to my mom i did. I wanted the advantages. If if you're only looking at money you're always looking for more options. Because they're always look for someone to pay you more and so that really drove my career. So when i went to law school finally to be an oil gas litigator to be rich enough to buy mama house in a car. I also was pursuing other opportunities. That would pay more than one hundred and fifty grand by the way. I wish somebody would have told me this. When i was in college. I know a lot of you may be wanna work in wall street or be doctors and lawyers in all those look just because you can make one hundred and fifty grand being lawyer out of law school. You're you're not making that much. You're working fifty thousand dollar jobs for more money. That's not the way to go. So i took a sales job. Ironically my mom told me. I took it in the internet in nineteen ninety two. Oh wow you're bored dos monochrome screens. I carried my computer on luggage card. But more importantly my mom told me the internet was a fad and then by wasn't a real lawyer that i'd be disastrous failure and that the internet was a failure. I was a failure in. How dare i be a real lawyer. Great lesson even if You don't listen to anything else. I say just because your parents love. You doesn't mean they give you good advice. Great advice theory. And it's not just even like i think. I think you're the one of the big things i've learned in my own. Life is that just because they approximity. Someone doesn't mean that they're the right person to ask for advice. Proximity is a bad proxy for quality.

Harvard penn columbia cleese georgetown
"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

04:40 min | 9 months ago

"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

"David meltzer was a mathematics on. Thanks for having me. I'm really excited. Anyone friend with ed. My lead is a friend of mine. Definitely i love that. Talk about positively man so great to have you on and i want to start with your superhero story. All right because there's a nugget shared here and i usually read people's by which story so fascinating and just before the show we're talking about like you've been literally all over the map in where you've come from and so let's talk about this. Let's talk about the early years all right because you're kind of childhood background you. You didn't definitely didn't think you'd be doing what you're doing today. No i didn't actually thought it'd be professional football player but i grew up in highly academic environment with a single mom. Six kids and our way out was education But for some reason all joke about a mom. But i wanted to do was be rich and not for me because i grew up. Happy five boys. One girl two bedroom apartment in akron ohio. It may not seem like a bad of happiness but it was the start of understanding that i lived in a world more than enough and it's very important as we go through this to know that that's the world that i believe in and even though monetarily most people would look at me like i was living in the begun in africa to me. It was more than enough. But the only time i wasn't happy was i kissed my mom crying because the car broke down and she had too much pride to ask for help and all these energies and things kind of laid into me. But i just wanted to buy my mom a house and a car and i thought because i was so fast. It's scared from people that would be a professional football player. Almost they reached academically harvard. Penn columbia. I was kind of the black sheep of the family..

David meltzer football harvard Penn columbia akron ed africa ohio
"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

05:52 min | 9 months ago

"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

"Wagon packed lunch dinner. Sorry in a brown paper bag and had the older ones the younger ones, and I would literally just tell my siblings who are all by the way parents wet dreams, Harvard Penn. Columbia. Wow. I. Literally thought that I was a terrible students I gotta be They ended up soon macroom loudly from these schools in but I would tell them, I don't need to do that because I'm just going to be rich and I knew literally money would buy me happiness and all I. Wanted talk about unconscious manifestation I just wanted to buy my own house in a car because most of the time she was sad is because she literally didn't like the places that we lived in and we never had a nice car and it would break down and we never had enough money to fix it. So that's where I think my chip on my shoulder started was that I didn't feel like I was enough because everyone else I felt like look down on me because they had nice houses and Nice cars my family all were doctors and lawyers, and my mom had too much pride to ask for help and I always felt like the underclass citizen wherever I went. So. Do you remember it? Do you remember some things early on that? You did. To try and make money. Oh. Yeah. Want. It'll new blackout things but. When I was five years old. I was really fast. Even remember being five. I. Remember My dad left in that game. Remember thinking in my head I'm GonNa be the man of the House. Like if five and so the six of you, what is a middle middle high so okay and girls boys one boy one girl five boys. And still you want to be the man I want to be the house. My older brothers were. Very academic. They liked to play the piano to read and study. So I really like I love sports and I always said I had one gift in I could run scared really fast and ironically the first job I had was there I literally grew up where Lebron James grew up in Akron Ohio at this age and it was not a nice neighborhood I was the minority in the neighborhood but I remember people giving me something to run up to the lessons which is a convenience store and getting five dollars for running stuff up there. Okay. Instead Hustle and yeah yeah and I really five or six. I didn't really know what I was doing now I know what I was doing. Probably. was a good meal for them but I really like money and even throughout. High School I would do sales type of thing, really sell stuff that we had I can find. Funny the only two real jobs that had in college. I was playing football but I had no money. So I got a job selling encyclopedias because you can do that night one appointment at six pm one point eight PM and they sold leads to people just had babies and you go in and because I had.

Harvard Penn Lebron James Columbia High School football Akron Ohio
"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

04:21 min | 10 months ago

"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

"Goodness I met my mentor. taught me meditation and we were working together and she said to me she said, you know you carry an energy that you're not worth. Your inadequate that you're less than that. You're stupid. And I looked at her and in my arrogance said, you're crazy I mean, I'm insecure about a lot of things but that's not something that I feel that adequate name is my. My intelligence I never feel as if I'm stupid I don't know what you're talking about. She said Oh. No, it's quite prevalent. Everything you do in his causing interference corrosion between you in that unbelievable source that you're connected to this unbelievable power it's stopping you from liberating your light. So you can liberate other people's lives as well. You need to figure this. Out and I said, well, I know I think in saying new things as if I'm smart, I don't carry this lack energy I don't understand. So we went and worked through things that happened in my life and number one I grew up in a hyper competitive intellectual family. You know I always joke around but if I was sumo lower body at Harvard. I would be a one of many people in my family would not be an exceptional feat not like me playing sports rows think was the only one even to play a high school sport but moreover, the intellect competition in scarcity of my family was great. So even my siblings all who went to the Ivy Leagues, Harvard Penn Columbia extraordinary intellects, my mom uncles aunts. I thought well, maybe I didn't feel adequate against or with or in comparison to them, and then a little bit further into the discussion I realized that I was hyperactive as a child my mom used to make me run around the block and tie me time is you could beat that time. It not only did it allow me to come a better athlete and get into better shape, but it also took all my energy away. So I was able to focus, but I was very hyper and where my grandmother used to Babysit us, which was often because my mom had six kids they will mom my grandmother would babysit us I tell my grandma all the time grandmother I'm bored. She's bored only stupid people get bored smart people think of things to do and all of this feedback this conscious feedback laid within my subconscious mind and in my subconscious, I must've been thinking Gosh, you know what? Maybe I'm inadequate maybe I'm less than maybe I'm inferior to and created in started to put messaging not just unconsciously what I do and believe. But moreover activating my DNA of less than and it manifested itself by surrounding myself the wrong people the wrong ideas always, you know putting myself around people there's a ABC thing I learned today..

Harvard Penn Columbia Harvard Ivy Leagues
"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

"Move you to buy something if I know how to talk to you, I don't have to be in person, but a helps I don't have. have to be in person. You can hear my voice to do that and people are losing that art. They think they can text you and move you the only thing that will move you was the content in a text. Not the text itself voice like I'm trying to do now will move you by the sound by the strength by the the loudness or the softness whatever it is, you can't get that on tax, you morons. That's what the telephone means to me. People you WANNA. Make distinguish your life. You want to be successful. Learn how to use a goddamn telephone. And then the second part which tie into telephone knows a little off to is what your GRANDPA had toughness. You learn toughness. He spent all that money on those schools Oh. Yeah, and I'm sure academically. They taught you better than I did at Patrick. Henry the public school, but they must have done fairly well because you know. My brothers and sisters went to Harvard Penn Columbia Sumer Ku Saudi with the greatest minds from the greatest schools. Yeah, so they must have been capable of something, but I'll tell you what they didn't teach. The Patrick Henry Bishops Francis Parker the Hoya country. Day Torrey Pines High, school Carlsbad village, whatever they are none of them talk. What I learned was just straight out old school eastern European, Gary Vein or check. toughness. Come out tough me, and I'm not talking about physical toughness, although I have some of that as well with the tiny little body God gave me I'm talking about try to beat the toughness out of me. Yes, the mental toughness, the emotional attachment, the inspirational toughness, you learn the telephone and toughness. You will be successful. That's why every kid in this office it comes to me and says I would work for you Mr Meltzer. I'll do anything I'm like you WANNA. Do something then you want. This job is bad as rudy wanted to play football at Notre. Notre Dame and after the kid tells me who's Rudy and I kick him out of the office and they go watch it to come back they do they come back and they're like Shit I..

Patrick Henry Bishops Francis Harvard Penn Columbia Sumer Ku Rudy Gary Vein Torrey Pines High Mr Meltzer football
"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

"No matter what lessons you've learned in your entire life you're gonNA forget them period. I forget them all the time on stage and talk about gratitude forgiveness and things that my mom taught me from the day I was born but yet I forget them so One of my objectives here is to teach you the lessons but most importantly allow you to come away with at least one lesson that you'll remember. I can't tell you how many seminars workshops that I've gone through through my career and I walked away. Someone say Oh what was it about? Oh you know the guy was. Ceo of Lee Steinberg. No no what was it about. I spent two hours sitting there and I couldn't say one thing so I'm hoping if you have a pen and a pad iphone takeaway with you. That hopefully will have a quantitative value for you I don't believe in subjective value. The reason I don't believe in subjective value is that everything we do has subjective value and it varies by our perception. And we'll talk about that in business and in life. I think is important since everything already has subjective values and I only control my subjective value by my perspective then quantitative values what I should focus in on and my perspective and my perspective most positive. I'll always have the highest objective value whether I live in California Pittsburgh root for the steelers or the chargers right with the perspective. I could actually think the charges are better than the steelers. That would be very optimistic. Considering I represented Ben Rothlisberger I know the truth. But you understand. We're here to have quantitative value. I'm GonNa take you through a little bit of my journey. We're GONNA HAVE EXERCISES WE'LL HAVE Q. And A. and in fact even afterwards I'm GonNa stay after to do a Q. And A. Session outside of this. Anybody that wants to stay is welcome to join me. I think some people from public may come as well just work through some things. How did I grew up? I grew up really close to here in Akron. Ohio kind of the Pittsburgh Ohio and I was born into a family with six kids by boys and a girl and a single mom. My mom had one objective and that was the fetus wasn't fully developed until after graduate school. She's extraordinary mother. She succeeded with five of us now. Counting me all of them went to Harvard. Penn Columbia there for graduate. School and undergraduate full scholarships incredible academics. And then there was me who wanted to be rich. It's funny because I really did. I my dream and five years old when my dad left us Was I'm going to be rich? I'M GONNA make a million dollars and I'm GONNA buy Mama House a car and retire. That's how old I am. But that was my dream. I literally just wanted to make a million dollars to buy Mama House in the car and the reason was I really happy and I think a lot of people from the Midwest because now I live in California New York. I see a difference. A lot of people really value happiness in the mid west and understand what I'm talking about just because I had a two bedroom apartment in six kids stuck in that apartment in a single mom who worked two jobs in fact our dinners and do a country squire station wagon and went back to work with us in the car..

steelers Ohio Ben Rothlisberger Midwest California Pittsburgh Ceo Lee Steinberg Harvard Pittsburgh Penn Columbia Akron California New York
"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

"Why do I want to vibrate faster and she said because everything vibrates in vibration is the key to awareness and awareness? Is the key to life when she liked to know all the answers. This is entrepreneurs just starting off. I was born into values. Six kids and I lived in a small town called Akron Ohio. It's a great place to be from called the armpit of the US. Although Lebron James and Steph curry were both born in the same hospitals I obviously had different nurses. Oh no honestly I think maybe eventually I'LL BE NBA Commissioner. That would be the bloodline of being in the hospital. I grew up with five boys and one girl in a single mom. Some of you may have grown up with a single parent without much money. Pretty much describes how I grew up But I was happening. I was really happy. I have a great mom. She's extraordinary and I didn't really understand that. I did have less than other people even though we had a two bedroom apartment and my mom had to teach during the day and then She bagged our dinners. The would be in the car and then she takes us to fill up a greeting cards at the seven. Elevens convenience stores just so we had enough money to eat. My mom wanted our older siblings younger siblings and her main thing was to be educated like she's a big school person. I always called her school snob. My siblings all into the Ivy Leagues. Harvard Penn Columbia. I wasn't a school. I didn't like school. I didn't want to study in fact when my older brothers would try to read to me. I would tell him. I don't need to study that. I was going to be rich and they look at me like dude you got to study to be rigidly night..

Lebron James Harvard Penn Columbia Ivy Leagues Akron Ohio Steph curry US NBA Commissioner
"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

11:25 min | 1 year ago

"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

"Creating content craze upton is actually good within the media and stuff like a lot of it is garbage really bad but a brain so I guess my question is as we. Where did you get? Okay with shifting gears elite because like I'm really working on just ignore everything like coker long Alabama good good cows carry or because I'm literally in college debt because this choice makes family burn right see. That's that's what most people have in their life right. He's manifesting what other people wanted for himself. He's feeling resentful for the people that care. The most about him he said is family is friends and not. GonNa ask for hands but I know exactly how that feels hundred thousand dollars in debt graduating law school. Going what the heck am I doing? I don't want to be a lawyer. How how how. I literally started finding my own frequency. And here's a handful of sand analogy all those people that love you and they do man they care a lot about you and you've got to draw from that inspiration is like a handful. Salem. I'm fifty one years old. My Mom's still gives me advice and I still have to go back to center but I literally take it. Handful San I listened. Oh you shouldn't travel so much you know you need to play golf more or whatever advice and I'm like a handful of sand and that every once in a while someone tells me something. Be more interested in interesting kind to your future. Self do good. Deeds became not right. Be of service provide value put profitability. I When you make a decision we live on this earth so do an economic analysis of it so I don't think going I think law schools a tremendous thing. I'm not sure I'd go that far into debt. I I was so scared of my debt that you may resonate with this. I graduated one hundred thousand dollars in debt and I remember when I was applying to those jobs saying God God if you can give me a job to pay back my law loans and buy Mama House. I will shovel shit with my hands for six days a week. Twelve hours a day and be grateful. That's all I wanted. If you could let me pay back my law all that education everything that it was so desperate because I wanted to please my mom and everyone you know. The the fetus wasn't fully developed after graduate school. I Have Ivy League. Harvard Penn Columbia. I'm living up to all things I shouldn't be living up to and I'm sitting there in bed thinking to myself. I've done all of this so I can shovel pray to God for the ability to shovel shit for six days a week. Twelve hours a day so I can pay back my loans. I'm not making that decision. I'm not making that decision. And so what I'm doing now saying to myself. How can I get a law degree if that's what I want if I want a lot of not because other people tell me but because I learned how to communicate? I think there's future opportunity to make money. There's a relationship that we're GONNA make with people because I'm GonNa get a good law school because I'm not gonNA have acid. I'm not just going to go to western State University. That's discredited in three years right. I'm going to top law school specifically for this. This is the way that I would do it. And here's my economics. I'm GONNA find the frigging money if that's what I WANNA do and if not I'm GonNa find something else. That is more economically sound because profit. I I always will put purpose into what I'm doing. I find purpose in taking out the dress. I hated taking out the trash. I found purpose in it by saying to myself. This'll give me time to think about what I won. I moved so fast I got a slow down so when I see trash I grab it instead of creating resistance and spilling on me and cutting me right. I actually changed the energy by putting purpose into something basic so I would say to you. You got a lot of choices. One is going to law school. I make the decision. Why you WANNA go to law school? Then put an economic plan together of how you'RE GONNA pay for it. I met great story to this measure. Josh your guys. Like two hundred and fifty six franchises fastest growing Franchisee gym guys. And it's international now but I love the way that he decided to start his idea. He needed fifteen grand so he already knew what he needed. He created a plan of. He's GonNa Start this online Jim and it was gonNA cost him fifteen grand unlike most people. Right he decided. Okay I'M GONNA go work for the fifteen grand and I'm GonNa Literally Save Ninety some percent of everything I make because it's only gonNa take me so long to get my fifteen grand so instead of building a business right like all. This heat is went right for okay. I'M GONNA make it fifteen grand save it and sacrifice and eat peanut butter and Jelly. Which is what I did. Even I started working at twenty dollars a day per diem. I literally would keep the twenty five and eat peanut butter and Jelly or on the plane so I could have an extra hundred and seventy five weeks. Seven hundred a month. Pay My lawn but this guy. His friend says hey. I got a job at the country club. It's good money. You can caddy goes. I don't know anything about golf. You GotTa know anything about golf just caddy. So what does he do? That's different than everyone else. And this attitude I want you to take. He goes and does research on all the members of the height. Hoity Toity New York Country Club. Any finds the richest dude. He finds the richest guy he asked around about the richest guy. Not only is the rich guy. Everyone says he's the best dipper the nicest guy and so what he does. And this is what changed my mind and the story is. He's at every time he came in a club. He was right up on him and he knew what he liked to eat. He knew diet coke. We'd like is guess what happened. The Guy Events he said I want that guy to caddy for me so then when caddy for me knew all about him and he was like a perfect caddy catering to Zego doing all the things and of course big tip. Save all of it. Guess WHO. He chose the next day when he played same guy. I thought he was going to tell me that. He sucked up to the guy. Now for the fifteen grand. That's where my mind went. That's not why he's so successful. He's so successful. He's more interested than interesting and he was willing just to earn it and save it. Gary talks about all the time the part I like they. Love is about the sacrifice part. I'm in sportsman. People tell about. How did you get that job Mike Danton Baum my friend Independent Pictionary? You sold picks you now you that. And he looked. Dave no was there when I was sixteen hours at the bottom of the escalator at nordstrom handing out pictionary seventeen years and. I risked everything Mike Tannenbaum. Gm of the jets was in law school with me. He always says well. I got lucky because the bargaining agreement Mike I graduated one hundred grand in law loans. I Have Jewish parents. You graduated with one hundred grand in law loans. You have Jewish parents. You work for six hundred bucks a month for two years for the saints that sacrifice. I wasn't willing to do that. I was afraid I was still living in shortages. Voids don't project that onto everyone else. Don't feel their pressure here. Here's another will convert you younger people. I wish I would have learned this in the end through the bankruptcy through all the huge awards successes in millions of dollars in everything I had. I realized one thing about the person that I wanNA please. My mother should be myself but in the end. It's the same thing because when I learned about my mom in about every one of your mom's probably have the most influence on your life. Is They only want one thing for you? They just don't know how to do it. They just want you to be happy. Wants you to be healthy and happy. And they just don't know how to do it. So what are they do they tell you? Oh I see a whole bunch of rich lawyers your boy from the Hood Playing Back Your Smart. You graduated pens. Go to law school. But they don't know Dick about what it's like to have two hundred and fifty thousand dollars with loans and they don't know their sentencing you to pressure in an unnecessary situation that the world economy has changed that. We don't have to go to school anymore where we can be educated in different ways. Although there are advantages I always tell you. WanNa go to school and you want to be an entrepreneur. That's what you WANNA be. Then go to the school with the biggest riches alumni. Go do your research get into that college. Don't worry about your goddamn grades. Go to every single alumni event network your house get a kick ass job from some billionaire. Do Lie Law. School sealed my favorite story of the guy said my mom I was studying arts was like you're going to end up working for Burger King Someday. So he started studying hard being. Ceo Burger King. I go to school right. But that's really how the world works. If you really want to be educated go online. I wish I had access to Dave Meltzer and Gary v Bob Proctor and go. I go online all the time. I want to research something. Like what is this mere brain thing? I'm looking online for the conscious. Mir because the brain actually can mere emotions which may actually cause empathy and. I'm really curious. On how connected. Well I have to go to med school. There's like all these videos from these unbelievable doctors that can't they can't even afford them at Harvard. I think outside the box man. If you're going to be like everybody else do what everybody else does doesn't mean don't go to law school but sixteen million ways to go there anyone else. Yeah all the People..

Dave Meltzer upton coker Salem Gary Alabama Ivy League San western State University Mike Tannenbaum country club Harvard Penn Columbia Mama House Harvard Mike Danton Baum Josh Jim
"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

08:22 min | 1 year ago

"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

"One simple philosophy in life doctor lawyer or failure. That's aw- literally ever heard. In fact she did not believe that the fetus was fully developed after graduate school. But the amazing thing about my mom. Typical Jewish mom. You know but she was a black belt in the martial arts. She was one of the few third degree black belts in the marchant of Jewish guilt. And so she drove us. My siblings or parents wet dreams me not so much but they went to Harvard Penn Columbia. Someone will live around here so if you look at my last name. Don't tell them that you met their brother. It'd be embarrassed. But she was the best mom in the world. I honestly complete Mama's boy I'll have trouble getting through my story without crying about my mom because she was that amazing she worked two jobs. He was a second grade teacher. Packed our dinners paper bag and then filled turnstiles at the seven eleven convenience stores we could eat Made sure that we studied my siblings. Were great academics. I personally wanted to be a professional football player and I had one skill. I could run scared faster than anyone could angry. And I had a two bedroom apartment with six kids in five four brothers so I really learned to do fairly well worked really hard. And that's why I learned my definition of happiness because although we didn't have any money I was super happy really happy kid and that's why I adore my mom looking back with all that again. Have I had more than what most people have today? And I was so happy the only time I wasn't happy though is that would catch my mom crying over financial stress right. A car would breakdown Summer camp through things like just broke my heart so at the age of five decided that I was GonNa make a Lotta money to buy Mama House and a car. That's all wanted to do. I was going to be professional football player. Buyer the house in the car and my siblings. They can study. That's how I was going to be the favorite child and I did. I had this definition. I always enjoyed the consistent every day persistent without quit pursuit of my potential. And looking at me you can imagine my football potential but I did get a scholarship to college which was surprising to me and I remember the first football game as a freshman. I was the fastest one on the team. So they put me as a bullet on the kickoff team as a freshman my very first play. I weighed one hundred and forty seven pounds and I haven't shrunk so about this tall then I remember flying down the field thinking I kick off. This is the start of my professional career and I flew down and sure enough just like any other time. I got down there. I and I just nailed the ball carrier. I ripped indigenous and the next thing I know I was flying backwards landing on my back. The Guy Actually stepped on me house lying there. Thinking myself doctor lawyer picked the wrong profession and luckily for me. That guy that ran me over was a guy named Christian Koi Yeah. His nickname was Nigerian nightmare. He's AFC player the the next year but nonetheless. I decided I'd better really take. Academics seriously immediately started studying. I was premed at the end of the season. I went to visit my brother who was doing his residency and learned a great lesson. Because I went in there like every great eighteen year old and I told my brother I hate hospitals is what do your Pre med. You Hate Hospital but I'm not going to be a doctor and hospital. It'd be a sports doctor. Fields training rooms. What do I need to be in a hospital for? And he looked at me and he said David you need to be more interested than interesting and that was truly a valuable lesson when I ran. The most notable sports agency in the world is still today people. Come up to you Mr Meltzer. I wanted to be a sports agent just like you and that's the first thing out of my mouth you know. Do you really know what you're talking about? You need to be more interested than interesting especially today because there's so much out there there's so much information and if we don't know what information in vet that information correctly that we need. We're in really big trouble so I pressed upon myself every day to ask the other questions to ask more questions to figure out how interested I am and what I'm doing. It also formulates into a mathematical equation of what you pay attention to put your intention to equals the coincidences in your life. Which is a mathematical currence when two angles. Clyde is a perfect angle. It's a coincidence right. So it's a mathematical currency. I have all these great coincidences. People say I'm busy. I Say I'm active. I believe in activity. You get paid for activity. You don't get paid for master time through that concept of attention and interest anyway. I immediately switched my profession to lawyer to satisfy my mom when I went to law school. Another lesson that I learned was reverse engineered everything. I saw that a lot of people my age. When I was going to law school they were going to law school because their parents really wanted them to. They're going to law school because they didn't have anything else to do. They're going to law school and they thought they'd figure out what they would do. In Law School I went to law school to be rich. There's no die told my mom. I'm going here because lawyers make money and so I literally look up. What type of lawyers made the most money graduating law school? And it was an oil and gas litigator and so I went to Tulane law school despite I got into other law schools because they had the top maritime program and they had the most graduates that work for oil companies. And I literally. That's only reason I wanted to go to law school to buy my mom this house and a car when I graduated law school. I actually had two job offers which is even more surprising to me. One to be oil and gas litigator which probably would have afforded me enough money to buy a house in a car for my mom. Maybe not in San Diego where she moved us out too but at least in Louisiana Akron Ohio. No I But then I also got a job offer selling legal research on the Internet and this is the early nineties so the Internet was nothing like it is today and I remember distinctly trying to decide what to do. I asked my mom my great adviser what should I do? I really WANNA be rich. What job should I take without blinking? Of course he said you need to be a real lawyer. This internet thing. It's a fad. Don't do it less than number. Two and probably one of the most valuable lessons is just because somebody loves you. Trust me. My Mom's still loves me too much like most Jewish bombs just because someone loves. You doesn't mean they give you good advice in this really important because we don't always find the people that sit in the situation that we want to be in we. A lot of times rely on advice from people that have no clue whether talking about my mom knows what she's talking about as a teacher but not as business or the Internet so I also think that a lot of times we vote for what other people want for us. And then we resent them when it's elected into our lives and so at that time was the first time. I voted for what I wanted and so I went into the Internet. Nine months out of law school. I was a millionaire. I had two hundred fifty thousand dollars plan and I made a million dollars in nine months and a lot of people. Ask Me if you're not thinking of it. Shame on you. How the Hell did you do? That was twenty four years old and I think it's important because I've run my life. This way especially with money is that I took a formula and started looking and say to myself. Gosh if I work twice as productive as everyone else if everyone's productive for eight hours what if I could be productive for sixteen hours a day. And what if I worked on the efficiency of that time I have thirty two hours of productivity a day and what if I was more statistically successful at it I could have sixty four hours of productivity and a day so I would have? Ada's productivity every day. And because I don't believe it work I believe in finding and loving what I do learning what I loved to do learning to love what I do finding the light love and lessons in everything I do and took that attitude because all I wanted to do was be rich. Buy Mama House and a car. So everything for me was focused. I remember praying to God and my third year in.

football Mama House Harvard Penn Columbia Ada Mr Meltzer Clyde David San Diego Akron Louisiana Ohio
"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

09:33 min | 1 year ago

"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

"Dave thank you so much. We had scheduled a call at this time. But I'm sure you're caught up on the other line or in a meeting you can't get out of Please give me a call back. I met nine four nine two nine eight to nine zero five. That's nine four nine two nine eight to nine zero five if that's actually my texts number by the way and that's how you leave a message. Notice I left my number twice. Notice took all the energy out of the resistance and the shortages ages and voids that I allow them to have an excuse that they must be in a meeting or a line that they can't get off of. I gave them the opening to call me back. I gave my text number nine nine for nine to nine hundred to nine zero five but I did it twice because how many times especially if you talk fast like me to people on their phone. Just go ahead and hang up. Because they don't have a pain they don't they don't have the time to get that number down so make sure you say that number twice slowly entertained correctly. Only one thing you're worried about when people don't answer that's get them to call you back to not sell on the phone. Nobody buys off an answering machine. Just remember that in fact I've learned I don't even say sorry anymore. You know one of the CEO's love she came in. And I said Oh. I'm sorry I'm running a little behind as he said shame on. You said what you should know better. You're you're the gratitude guy. What kind of energy does I'm sorry? Have it's scarce energy. It's a diminishing energy. Aw Say thank you for your patience. Thank you for your understanding thank you for. That is an empowered. It makes us feel good way better just because I say sorry that makes you feel worse. We I can't feel bad enough for someone that feels bad right. We can't be sticking up for some of that six. I can't be poor enough for someone that's poor. Why believe in creating a great flow of money the energy so it can come through me and empower other people? Everything life comes through me for everyone else. That's what experience in other way to react. Question is David. What would you teach your seventeen year old self two words write it down? Put An X.. Your bed I hide it all over the place including on my phone own is radical humility radical humility humility. You need to ask people for help. The coolest thing thing about being your age is everybody. My Age wants to help you and the bad thing about being raised as you think by asking for help that diminishing your capacity. I wish I would've asked for help. I would have saved all my money and I know I didn't touch on this John. I would like to right now. People don't make bad the decisions they make Batson. I lost all my money not because I made a bad decision. I made one bad assumption. Asian and I lost everything one bad assumption now if I asked for help in had radical humility I never would have made that assumption but I made one madison awesome. So you've got to be more interested than interesting before you make saying. What am I making this decision? Based on what assumptions in my making it on. If you're a doctor you could give ninety nine of the right things to do to someone. Make one bad assumption. And they're dead. Oh I just assumed it was on the left side right. They weren't allergic to that. I mean well everything else. You did procedure if everyone reads. The checklist. Manifesto goes through. How doctors are supposed to read through a checklist? List of like one hundred pilots pilots. Always look at the checklist when they're a passenger but the the pilot is actually right. They never look at the checklist. They think they have it all under control. You got some show. I made by the way just so you know 'cause I like to pass on the lesson is I always assume that the bank would let me borrow against the equity. I had a secured interest. I has always assumed that I owned equity and property and that when Shit hit the fan I just go borrowed another ten million and I'd be fine little. Did I know from that assumption. That banks could get in trouble and they would rather have my property than give me money on my property. They'd rather have my money basically and they rather say no instead of letting you borrow that. I'd rather sell it to somebody else and keep all the money myself. Because we're GONNA foreclose on you bad assumption and all I had to do as one person in finance going dude. I own one hundred million dollars in property I have about forty million in equity. What's the best way that I can protect myself to make sure I'm liquid and and there's tons of people that have answered that question for me? Radical humility always. Ask yourself instead of you gotta learn for yourself but accelerate your learning by the asking someone that sits in the situation that you want to be in and learn from that as well as your experience. It's bullshit answer. I want to do it myself because I want experience myself. No accelerate your experience ends by asking for help as bullshit. I lied to myself that way all the time I do myself. No I could've done it myself and been ahead of the ballgame by asking smart guys like John Saying Hey man you've made millions of dollars. Can you help me do this. And then learn from what he tells me my own experience instead of Nal do do it myself. Your way must suck well if it sucked and learn that what socks you can be the best in the world. Because I learned how not to be a dad disdain. You'll use good example or a bad example right great question. I can look at our resume all day long. Harvard Penn Columbia Lumbia and four point zero five point. Zero is now you know unbelievable test scores and you know they're in the business fraternity and and they're on the fencing team or and but yet when I'm with them I feel like this right. I want someone that's going to rock doc me right. I want someone that has fire in their belly that sits there like look. I may not be the brightest fastest smartest. But but I'm here and I'm not going to quit on you every day. I'm going to be engaged in your business in coming up with good ideas and I'm willing to do what it takes. That's what I'm looking for her. If you want to go into interviews make yourself equal. That's fine everyone has grades. Everyone has classes. Everyone's going to graduate. But then make yourself different and by. What are your personal values? What your experiential values? What are your giving values? And what are your receiving values. Can you rock somebody. Can you make bake them feel good. Because that's who they're going to want to be around you. I tell people say thank you before you go to bed on you. Wake up to nine months to do that for thirty days. Me Me. I'm teaching it I I would miss a day shit. I forgot to say thank you last night. No this is the best way to change my life to have gratitude a toot my soul not just my subconscious or conscious in my soul so that when people attack me ungrateful. They're not happy. Happy People don't attacking. It is almost physically impossible. You ever see someone cracking up and be like. Wow there's no there's no attacks they're not saying anything bad enough thinking thinking anything bad. They're not acting on anything to hurt you. Now when you're laughing and happy if somebody attacks us for one reason they they are not happy with themselves as nothing to do with. You has nothing to do with you. There's the universal law of no. I allow allow the universe to let things happen at. Its own time the right way at the perfect time with me pushing. I only pushed three times. The nose aren't necessarily someone saying no it could be. Hey I gotta cancel because you know this happened or my tires flat no matter how legitimate the excuses are the universe gives me three Reno's my conversion is always. Hey obviously is not the right time emotion or place. Unfortunately I don't I won't be able to pursue this anymore so when you're ready please let me know. Of course I'd love to do business with you. Believe it or not fifty percent of the time utilizing the universal law no fifty percent of the time they they ended up doing it right doing the meeting closing the deal. Whatever I've been waiting for the other fifty percent of the time I never hear from again? I've automatically Magli. Just save fifty percent times however many pursuits. I was on Sunday. Show me your friends and I'll show you your future show. Show me your friends and I'll show you your future your the aggregate of the five people that you hang out with the most you're the aggregate of what you watch what you listen to what you learn what you read read. That's what you are and don't lie to yourself. That's what you are in fact. I'd even go as far as when you get older. When you take your five best friends you'll make about the mean of what your five best friends make? There's a certain collective belief that happens so be very aware of who you hang out with. Hope you enjoyed this episode of the playbook but more importantly I want you to join text community. I'm doing a lot of fun. Things there one on one conversations trainings giveaways and is the first place I release all the the information that I'm giving so join me at my texts platform nine four nine two nine eight to nine zero five. That's nine four nine two nine eight to nine five joined my exclusive community..

CEO Dave Harvard Penn Columbia Lumbia Reno Batson David John
"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

08:34 min | 1 year ago

"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

"I only wanted to do one thing and that was to be rich I wanted to be profitable this is entrepreneurs the playbook today I wanNa talk about three things that I'm important And to me one passion to purpose in three profitability and through my journey a lot of people can't reconcile all three of those I coach a lot of people that have tremendous passion and they want to save the world but they're broke and it's been my experience that broke people can't save the world just the truth then you have purposeful people's well they have great purpose but once again they don't really have a passion in or can't tight the profitability my life has been a journey of understanding the reconciliation of passion purpose and profitability. I was born with a single mom born with her I had a single mom growing up six kids boys and a girl and my mom was a substitute teacher and so you can imagine how much profitability we had in my home in Akron Ohio but my mom is still purpose in passion into my siblings and I in fact she's an incredible catalyst all my siblings I call them parents wet dreams they went to Harvard Penn Columbia I had a different route I was going to take I wanted to be professional football player and for me I didn't really listen to my mom about passion or per abyss my brother the doctor did my other brother the rabbi did my other brother the philanthropist did I only wanted to do thing and that was to be rich I wanted to be profitable since I was five years old I wanted to be a millionaire the reason I wanted to be a millionaire though wasn't really for me self it was because I grew up really happy at this great mom great brothers an assistant great sister and I just wanted to be happy and the only time I was unhappy was when I saw my mom crying because the car broke down or the dishwasher broke or she couldn't send us to summer camp and I thought to myself Dan if I could just be profitable if I could just be rich if I could just be a millionaire I could buy Mama House by my Momma car and then she would be happy and I studied really hard and worked really hard to be a professional football player I actually got a scholarship to college and my very first college football game played the bullet on the kickoff team as a freshman because I was one of the fastest guys on the team and I ran down in the kick returner catches the ball and he completely runs me over a little did I know until the next year that that running back who ran me over was Christina Koiei AFC player of the year that year nicknamed the Nigerian nightmare but I quickly decided that my profitability dream how did change so like every other Nice Jewish boy I decided going to be a doctor my oldest brother was doing his residency back then doctors made a lot of money. I figured what a great way to buy Mama House in a car I was going to be a doctor you're so after the season I went over to visit my brother at Ucla doing his residency and I met him in the hospital I remember telling them Gosh I eight hospitals spell over us what are you talking about your premed at this great college God knows you're not going to be a professional football player you hate hospitals but you wanna be a doctor I wanna be a sports doctor hospital or maybe I'll be a pediatrician and help kids. He gave me a great piece of advice towards passion purpose and profitability in order to be passionate and purple profitable you have to be more interested than interesting you can't say I love sports that's why I want to be a sports agent You can't just give yourself some purpose you actually have to be more interested than interesting and figure out how do I monetize this how do I maximize the inch or this opportunity to tie in my passion and purpose and it does take a lot of interest to do that it takes a lot of attention as well as in attention to do that mentorship is extremely important to me in fact you'll find out later it's one of the keys tying pass into purpose to profit Pity I went to my mom and ask for advice I said what should I do should I be a real lawyer or should I say a legal research on the Internet without blinking my mom said David that'd be a real lawyer because the Internet this Internet thing is going to be a fad lesson number two just because what he loves you doesn't mean they give you good advice very valuable advice because there's nobody loves me more than my mom and I was asking a second grade teacher about the Internet that was gonNA determine my future and if I would listen to her I'd be like so many people that I coach resentful of the person that I love the most because they gave me bad advice and I should be accountable because I asked the wrong person for the advice you need ask the right people people that sit in the situation that you want to be in for that advice at all times you should have three mentors in your life people who sit in the position that you want to be and that's why you're here today because two of those guys Ben Anderson Very Abib know more about this industry than anyone I ever met and I wish my thirties is you'll find out that I would have had been and or bury my mentor because I probably wouldn't have to be speaking here on stage today because I went on and took the legal research job within nine months I was a millionaire as a great salesman at a very young age I'm sitting Reuters bought us out three years later in one thousand nine hundred five or three point four billion dollars and that's one billion dollars was a lot of money nine hundred ninety five and I became the youngest executive Thomson Reuters I then went to the Silicon Valley had one hundred and sixty nine million dollars start up called every path which was the wireless proxy servers space transitioning from web phones onto the Internet and then finally at the age of thirty two Samsung asked me to be the CEO of the phone division their first smartphone my journey we say if you look back and somebody asks you will Mr Meltzer how do I become a sports agent and I went back and explained to them so far how I became a sports agent they would probably walk away from me right what do you mean that's how your sports agent because what I learned was I had to detach outcome I had to develop skills knowledge end desire to have passion purpose and profitability at the age of thirty four I retired and I started to invest in real estate I had enter ship I did very well in real estate and tack Angel Investor Nicknamed The MIDAS touch pretty much everything I touched turn to gold I was worth over one hundred million dollars at the age of thirty six and I was completely lost because all I was was profitable early in my life I was passionate. I had a purpose to make to buy my mom a house in the car which I did nine months OSCO I bought my mom a house a car and pay back my law loans I learned one other valuable Efim at that time is that money does not buy love it just rents the shit of it because I became my favorite favorite child of my mom immediately forget Harvard Penn and Columbia and even the rabbi but I surrounded myself with the wrong people worse than not having mentorship I surround myself with the wrong people and the wrong ideas and I was doing the wrong things and I remember coming home at thirty six living in Rancho Santa Fe had a Ferrari pours all the profit you'd want he built this beautiful home and I remember lying in bed when we built it thinking to myself Oh shit completely empty no pass in nope visit I live in a world of not enough right because my perspective was there wasn't enough for me and then I lived in a world of just enough even though I had so much and so surrounded myself with the wrong people in the.

football Harvard Penn Columbia Akron Ohio Christina Koiei Columbia Dan Rancho Santa Fe Harvard Penn Efim Ucla nine months one hundred million dollars sixty nine million dollars four billion dollars one billion dollars three years five years
"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

14:32 min | 2 years ago

"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

"Dave meltzer c._e._o.'s sports marketing with with entrepreneurs the playbook and i have i shouldn't say an old friend but a dear friend ray anderson the athletic director of arizona arizona state university the sun devils and we're here right in the conference room ready discuss something that i'm most interested in is ray welcome to the playbook but i wanna know the playbook to become in appalachia director. Dave i tell you man <hes> <hes> i didn't invent it. That's for sure the typical route. Is you know through administration you start sometimes as intern turn you wake up through the ladder but kinda in the same department or certainly in the same <hes> flow path <hes> i wasn't that traditionalist league <hes> and so i ended up here <hes> through security of course most mostly through being an agent then being with team being at the league always spend been a lot of time on campus <hes> because we represented coaches and when you're a evaluating <hes> players you're scouting you're evaluating spent time on campus but never with the intent thought that i'd be an athletic director <hes> at all right but you know i always say to kids when they asked me how to be sports sports agent and said you had to develop the skills and gain the knowledge and have the desire because you know if you don't really want it somebody else really. Does you got that blue playing sports but you went to law school. Why did you go to law school. I went to law school because my my my father who passed away early had planned to be a lawyer as a young boy coming up <hes> through nine years old <hes> once he passed away that began came my focused i wanted to be a lawyer didn't didn't really understand what it meant but learned over time through teachers and others who who schooled me about that <hes> and so i went to law school <hes> with the thought that i'd be a lawyer you're not with the thought that i'd be sports agent <hes> or litigator <hes> or certainly not an athletic director <hes> but i went to law school because it was something something that was kind of ingrained in me as a young boy and you went to some significant schools. I was joking around the first time we interviewed years back. I said it's hard hard for me to give this interview because i've been rejected my favorite squander at stanford. I apologize to be here but they rejected me for undergrad in law school. Actually the thought had a chance for law school but then you out do yourself. <hes> going to stand for you go to harvard law school. I was fortunate <hes> and it all started really with the folks when you're in grade school and junior high and high school in my case <hes> had really taken an interest in me personally <hes> and so just weren't we're not gonna let me falter academically academically and always stressed that so <hes> fortunately i was able to get into stanford <hes> in in do well enough academically to actually apply admitted to harvard law school so i've been very lucky very fortunate. <hes> both great institutions and i'm really glad i went to both of what do you think the advantages you know. All my siblings went to harvard penn columbia. But what do you think the true advantages of graduating from harvard law school competitor like two lane it. Is it a long term effect. Or what do you think the number one advantage of going to school like harmony. Well no disrespect to to we all know the top the perception inception <hes> is that if you're able to go to school like that in graduate <hes> then <hes> people give you a significant benefit of the doubt apt to start to start with is just kind of ingrained in so <hes> you go into literally every situation with probably a competitive edge eh <hes> that is <hes> attached to graduating from a place like harvard or yale or princeton or stanford or <hes> or certainly a sister when you're there though because people have a higher expectation you've ever feel that because as as a boss i've hired kids from the ivy leagues and and i allow that same perception to happen and then i have higher expectations but yet there's still twenty four years old. I think somehow you know myron rolle. Remember meiring your favorite clients at rhodes scholar but i forgot i forgot that he's twenty one so although he's the first client i've ever had to say mr meltzer query and asked me questions that we're really deep. I still forgot that he's twenty one and i think you you know there is looking at my siblings who all went into the schools. They got great advantages the start but there's more pressure on them because people were like oh. That's the harvard kid. He's summa okay well. There are some expectations that go along with the privilege of going to a place like that <hes> and that's just part of the and you have to take take that on and so yes when i left harvard law school and i went to my firm initially <hes> law firm in atlanta georgia. I don't think there's any question that folks looked at me and said hey. That's the the harvard guy you expect a little more in terms of the quality of the work and even worse for us. You married a woman named buffy yeah so you go to stanford harvard law school where mary girl named buffy there. Your expectations are like who is this guy gets like preppy be privy to the to the hill exactly so that <hes> but no those are great opportunities to <hes> get higher education at places that <hes> very frankly people will give you <hes> like i say the benefit of the doubt they'll give you a little more <hes> leeway as a matter of fact but it also comes with expectations dictation. I'm glad i had the opportunity to deal with that. I i am as well. Now you go to law from litigator. What skills do you think you learned the most litigating that help you today as an eighty <hes> preparation <hes> in the <hes> the realization that there's just no substitute for just hard work work in preparation <hes> and so and <hes> a lawyer's role particularly litigator where discovery and research and preparation way saying advance of ever getting in front of arbitrator or panel or jury is absolutely the most important thing you do so <hes> that that translates really into everything. I did my business life but certainly here. <hes> preparation is is key. It's it's vital doing due diligence doing your research getting the appropriate rotate input getting ready and then when you make the case <hes> hopefully you're very prepare <hes> and you're more able to deal with surprises or curve balls etc etc so preparation is absolutely forms now on the administrative side like you said the traditional route is to build that administrative experience understand the culture of the institution and build your reputation within. There's a budgetary side sure that you don't really get get her back. I was litigator myself and you know the reason. I wanted to be illiterate. I didn't want to deal with those details. Afterwards right. I wanted sure other kids that do the research for me. I wanted to speak and how did you develop up those skills because budget huge businesses you for you well along the lines. You get a real appreciation for accounting and finance and law school. You take an accounting course you. You should <hes> part of what i did <hes> to advance my opportunity is at i actually studied financing at one point. I had a series twenty two. I think it was was a license from that. I got back in massachusetts underachiever by taking additional courses and financing in management and investments <hes> but the real trick is to know that you come into place <hes> and you know what you don't know <hes> which means you then look to your finance folks in your internal accountants. <hes> can you give those folks <hes> a lot of responsibility and a lot of runway <hes> to do it right. Keep you informed and then you delegate to people people with the appropriate expertise but never ever just completely delegating in saying you just do it. I'm not interested. I'm always interested in being being briefed <hes> and kept in the loop so when the final decisions are made i'm all over them but in terms of the expertise <hes> in the nuances of finances is an accounting and budget etc leave to the experts are part of my team and you do really great job including one of your latest hires right yet. You hired a friend someone that you had to work with at the n._f._l. Frank came came with ms our chief financial officer for sun devil athletics <hes> <hes> in my years at the n._f._l. Running football operations he was the finance budget leader for my unit for eight years so i certainly we went back to <hes> someone that i knew and trusted <hes> who could come in here and culturally we were seeing. He knew what my expectations were. He could come in here and and get up to speed very quickly on what goes on in a athletic <hes> budget in finance arena not very different very frankly and what goes on at the n._f._l. Pro level so you you go and get really good people around you then you delegate to them. Let them do their job and you know what you you got a chance to be in pretty good. How old were you when i look at you. I think of radical humility and it's something that i had do do my career in my thirties. When i retired tired in was an idiot and didn't humbly tell you right now. I wasn't radically humble so i wrote those two words on my nightstand and i said from today on i'm gonna wake up and pray to god for ten and people can help because that's the way that humility starts for you with all the pride agree harvard stanford in buffy all the pedigree you have you you know to understand which took me later on in life to understand that if i elevate others i elevate myself and lee had this great saying be kind to your future self and it seems to me from her to frank and others around you that you understood that much younger than i did. Where where did the humility come from mm-hmm who helped inspire you well first of all thank you for the compliment radical humility and <hes> album believer that <hes> you are at your best when when you have the best around you in terms of teammates and support group and if you have that you got a chance to be wildly successful because you're not just depending on and yourself you're depending on a team and i learned that early on in that started very frankly with my <hes> freshman high school coach guy named lloyd parks and <hes> who actually when we showed up as real cocky junior hockey to beat everybody and football baseball basketball we come into high school in our football coaches lloyd loyd parks and who is a marine who landed on iwo jima and survived that war and then ended up being coming back and being a meal military marine instruction officer so when we showed up there was lloyd parks all six two of them you know i shaved in grizzled <hes> and wiggins it was a very good example coaches paul wiggins we showed up and he made sure that across the board we understood. You're only as good as all of you. Are there are no stars it is about team and he really drove who've that in us and in me <hes> and i give coach parks and more credit than anybody in my life or driving home that you'd better be humble. <hes> and you better be appreciative of everyone around you because without them. You know what you will die. You will not be successful in that that that drove it it from then on. I was always about okay. What's my team. Look like <hes> everyone's gotta roll <hes> in success <hes> and that's kind of been my marching orders <hes> <hes> and that's why i very frankly i've had some success because it's about the team delegating not micromanaging <hes> and then giving everybody when when it is appropriate. Give everybody the risk but also give everybody the we're awards and what do you in that mary oxy. What do you instill empower to allow them to make decisions. We're not micro. Managers would values that you you know for me. I understand par people value so they can make their own decision. Based on the values is that we have as a collective. What values are the ones that you look at. When you're empowering your associates employees etc the thing we say about around here all the time david music culture is just not important culturally is everything <hes> so we <hes> <hes> we we we said in advance a culture of <hes> teamwork <hes> no selfishness <hes> think through unintended consequences for the good of the group not just for the self <hes> and then core values like you know what <hes> family really does come first <hes> and work life balance really is important <hes> and <hes> communication education and very honest genuine consistent communication is really critical to our way forward and those are really our core core values and we just tried to instill <hes> and then live those not just talking but living by example up and down our chain of command ed at one of the things i noticed different here. I'm blessed to have gone to tons of universities and blessed with friendships like yours but the one thing that stood out when i walk through this office was the one word i don't see often. I see integrity. I see commitment. I see consistency right. I see pursuit any wooden type of of of success s. triangle but very rarely do. I see straight out on the wall graduation because i like to me i went to occidental college because it's the only place to let me play football football but my mom loved it because when i was recruited by saying he goes eight and other places and they talked about their graduation rate with players and my mom went to occidental coach we'd off at at the time very winning coach league said she said well how many players graduate he said seventy percent and she said only seventy percent and he said no no. I'm sorry seventy percent go on to graduate school school. I'm sorry everyone graduates right. That's the feeling and energy expectation i get from. You and we're very proud of that because they are student..

harvard law school harvard stanford football director Dave meltzer c._e._o. harvard penn columbia Frank myron rolle intern harvard stanford appalachia occidental college lloyd parks ray anderson arizona arizona state universi mr meltzer massachusetts atlanta
"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

"And then the other thing was that I went to high school so to my sister, and she played basketball, and basically like not to get in the whole song dance of it. My dad who's like very into basketball. Like, honestly, I don't know if I play it. He's into it. Regardless women's basketball is not even about me about it. But he just indefens- like some of the girls are my team. He didn't feel like the coach was doing a great job. He'd he's probably they were he she was treating them like unfairly not even to me. And so it just the whole thing just kind of played out where he was the one that was like, okay. I think we should go to Christ the king. I was okay with it because I wanted to do it. But also like I had my friends. I was cool. Now, he's going to have these like to friendship groups say Osset where I'm from. And then cry skiing perfect for me. It didn't matter. There was actually my dad. So it wasn't me. Like, I didn't knock on the door. Like, I want to do that. Okay. Cool. Dad was actually one of the ones that was like, I think this is best for you and your best Walker and then go into college. You like rejecting Stanford to me. It's this out. I'm talking about data lot here. Sound like my dad? Crazy. I'm yeah. I almost went to Ivy leagues Harvard Penn Columbia thought, I was I got accepted to one Ivy league school, no money, obviously. And I wanted to play football, and I found this division three small school oxygen over Obama win. But they let me play the coach literally said you're going to play here. And I was like, okay, I'm up. I was crazy. And although I would have went to Stanford and not play football because that was my dream school. They rejected me for undergrad for law school. Now. I speak there as its way always start my speech. I'm like thinking. Exactly teaching me. Now rejected me, but nothing turns around, but we do we we take on our parents advice, even though just because someone loves you doesn't mean they give you vice now fast board. One of the best basketball careers next Larry Bird, sue bird. That's when we see the great careers. Right. And but it's interesting because you had a lot of individual accolades, although I watch you play from the time you're at uconn, and you're one of the greatest like Magic Johnson team players of all time. Was there a conflict with your teammates in your own self about like, wow, I wanna give my teammates because you've played it for one of the greatest basketball teams of all time. I think he lost four games in four years, which is really really hard to do in basketball. So how like how did you deal with that side of it? That was I mean, I think the way I play is just what comes natural. It's not something I ever set out to do I have like vivid vivid memories of some of my early coaches. A coach is actually being like sue, please shoot. Please begging career. Career literally. And I I would almost like get in trouble for not being selfish. It was just I think just by nature. That's how the game came to me. That's how I found it. So as I got older. Yeah. You have to try and find a balance because you know, you kind of discover if you're not doing the things that can be viewed selfish when they're you know, the right time to do them. If you're not shooting when you're supposed to if you're not being aggressive that kind of thing you're actually in some bizarre way. It's like full circle you are being selfish because you're not doing what you can to help the team. So there's a balance there. And then once you find it, which for me probably came. I mean, like as I went got better and better, but like starting in high school college for sure and then onto the pros. It was like that was just who I was. It was never an issue. I never had a problem with teammates or anything like that. It was just like on the point guard. I'm are on the team. Hopefully, I'm doing my job in such a way that I can actually yell at you..

basketball Stanford Larry Bird Obama Ivy league school sue uconn football Harvard Penn Columbia Walker four years
"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

14:10 min | 2 years ago

"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

"So as long as you're with mom and dad. Ultimately, you're safe. I'll tell you who was bitter towards my parents is my older brother and older sister. My older brother was nineteen. My sister was twenty one right? And so they have lives there, man. They were going to college. My brother had a girlfriend who he was thinking of marrying all of a sudden their whole life was ripped away. And I remember for like three years of nine nine hundred eighty eighty one eighty two my brother and sister would cry to my mom and dad, we just wanna go back the people here don't understand that. They don't understand our language culture. Why can't we go back? I've got friends I've got relationships there. And I couldn't understand why we couldn't stay because after the first year I was able to simulate so. Well, right. So I think in that way, I had a massive advantage because they came younger, so I had no bitterness towards them. No taking that over talk nor ship. Sure. You know, there's a lot of struggle to get start in just saying you're getting the subway coupons in there's a certain time where business grows that I believe someone told me six years in they felt was the time. But. I believe the scariest part about a business is when you're successful ready. And after go all in again. Yes, right now, you got something to lose. I know that a lot of entrepreneurs out there that are innovators and you're starting out, and there is an enjoyment, and but you have nothing to lose. Right. We might have a little bit of somebody else's money. But we're really gets good. Is when okay, I'm successful. But now, I gotta go all in and I have a lot to lose. Yeah. How how do you deal with that that breakthrough because you got like eight companies and all of them are very successful. You're to the point. We know how to skill them and allow them to break through to that time. Yeah. You know? It's funny. You say that right because just in this one company and fit body boot camp, we've got sixty one team members and another company that I own actually out of Newport Beach. We've got forty team members. And I've got six more companies that I own all of them have anywhere from a dozen to a couple dozen team members when you're responsible to that many people's livelihoods, it does tend to weigh on you. And as you said, it's almost like when. You're going when you're gonna just jump into the pool from the edge. Hey, what's going to happen? If I actually miss I'm just going to scrape my shin. Now, if I go to the diving board way up there, I might hit my head if I don't hit the water, right? And a hit flat. I'm actually break a bone break my face, right? And I've heard Gary banner Chuck say this before like as the CEO is the person starting out. You've got no one to turn to when something goes wrong to go. Hey, what do we do? Now. Everybody else from the bottom up can go. Hey, boss. What do we do? So the technician to the department head department head to the VP VP to the show all the way up, but you've got no one to turn to in a scenario. Like that. Do I feel the pressure? Absolutely. I've also learned to thrive on that pressure. And I think we're more people need to do is to be able to trust your gut and learn to thrive and enjoy the process I enjoy the process, but I also have a great team around me who we go. What are all the what ifs like we realized that we're maybe on the edge of the economic bubble right now, we also because of that have rat hold a lot of money. So that Wendy economy crashes, not if when? The economy crashes, I'm going to buy a lot of competing businesses for wholesale are every single one of those going to be successful. Are they going to thrive? Probably not. But we've rat hold a lot of money. Hopefully that the ones that don't drive we can let loose right? Who's willing to do that? Well, go into an organization into an industry for a decade decade and a half. And my case two decades now right in your case, you've got your finger on the pulse of a company of an industry. You're going to do. All right. Like, I've always stayed in the fitness space. I have my finger on the pulse. I believe better than anybody else in this space, which is why don't venture out of it. Yeah. I tell people all the time with investors will come with me. You know, have a TV show called elevator pitch. There's all types of deals will the judges all have their own core. Competencies or situation knowledge. I Lau them to let me know. Okay. Because there's no way the things that I know about like sports, the intricacies of the subtleties of success that I know about the business sports far outweighs any type of knowledge, I could have. For example, in fitness, which is a completely different biz bright. And so I leverage that situation. Now your business coach, I'm a business coach. Gee, you have you're still your own mentors. I do I do at any given time I have three to four mentor so one I'll be very Frank with you. I've got a therapist that. I still pay for I worked with him for sixteen months straight, sixteen months rate every Monday at five pm I'd go to him as Dr Kevin downing and brea, California, and for sixteen months straight, and I worked through all the deep seated issues that I had as a kid man when you come to this country's a foreigner. And myself personally, I I was sexually abused in Armenia as well. So you add the shame rage confusion that comes with that. And now you're bullied in this country. You don't speak English, different culture. Like, I didn't have bitterness towards my parents, I had bitterness towards all the kids around me who would laugh at me, and ridicule me, and so I grew up with rage so much rage. And that I'd want to just kill people. Right. And I believe some of that that I can harness. I can use for good and grow businesses and lean forward on that. But man, I had to work with the therapist for sixteen months straight to get through that. And I still see him from time to time just to process through things because at the end of the day, no one gets out of life unscathed. Whether it's emotional abuse, physical abuse verbal abuse sexual abuse that same part of the fight or flight brain is lit up, which means you're seeing life through these twisted filters that the rest of the world isn't seeing life through. So anyway, the way I would see life is I can't trust people. I can't be loyal to people and someone's always going to try and rip you off. Take advantage of you. How great is it to have a therapist take those filters off of you? And also, I knew I had a great story. I had a great message and people go man, you're an amazing entrepreneur, you should share it off stage. I've never spoken from stage. So I got a mentor Joe Weldon, and I pay him. And he teaches me story. Tell better right and marketing pay Dan Kennedy. I want to become a better direct response marketer. He says go write rewrite every Gary halbert letter, I go and find those Gary halbert letters, I rewrite them, and he says do this. And I do that I will pay for knowledge and mentors to buy speed all day long. I'll rather do that than by the next Lamborghini Rolls Royce for private jet. Right. Even those those goes fast, truly exhilarated your life is leveraging the situation on all. I I'm the same way. The biggest mistake when I discuss it with you. How did you lose everything? I didn't ask for help. All you gotta do is this one person that owned the golf course one person that was in finance about what I couldn't couldn't do leveraging what I had built. And it would've saved me milk. Of millions of dollars or even had a therapist who could tell me. Hey, you know, later on in life, I had one and I was abused variety of different things. But my biggest thing with me was energetically. I had energy those stupid, and which was weird because it caused me to surround myself with people less than me. But now if I if I'm in a room, and I'm the smartest one I'm in the wrong room. Right. But before I had always I had these siblings at all went to the Ivy leagues. Right. Harvard Penn Columbia. So I had this thing this energy that I was consistently projecting my insecurity that I wasn't good enough smart enough, and it changed my life. And I really got into it with you because I think it's really important to know that radical humility, you know, what it takes to eliminate being abused in front of millions of people and all the things that we is the key to life. What point of your life? Did you you come because I'm sure you were at this all the way came to enlighten -ment that hey, wait a second illuminate too. Help other people by humanness humanity. You know, what to meet some forty four now. So this was only six years ago at the age of thirty eight I thought I was having a massive heart attack and dying. And as it turns out, it was my first of many anxiety attacks, and I had always felt anxious, but I've never had a massive full blown anxiety attack. So when I had this at age of thirty eight six years ago almost seven years ago. Now, I really thought I was dying because my throat was closing up my arms tingling tunnel vision. Heart's racing. I could hear the thug lug in my ears of my blood pumping. And I go man, this is how I die and in that moment, I accepted death. What I had a hard time accepting was who's going to walk khloe down the aisle. If it's not going to be me who's going to teach Andrew my son. How to be a modern day and night. If it's not going to be me who's going to provide and protect for my wife. If it's not going to be me in that moment. I had I had accepted death. But I couldn't reconcile my regrets. And I said if I revived this all I wanna do is pay it forward and teach others. It was on the heels of that. When I went to the doctor the next day and said, hey, I think I just being very honest with you, I should have gone the moment all the elements went away. But I was so busy working. I had to go right to work in my head. I just dodged a bullet with a heart attack. I'll just go to the doctor tomorrow. And so I went the next day. And he says look all the tests came back fine. You didn't have a heart attack. But it sounds like you're stressed and my wife rolls her eyes. She goes. He drinks half a bottle of Nyquil every night to go to sleep and takes vicodin to fall asleep. And then he wakes up and takes Adderall in pre workout just to kick that fuzzy headedness from the Nyquil and the vicodin like he has major issues here with things and stress. And so he says look if you don't deal with the stress you are going to have a heart attack. And that was the day. I said it's time to man up. I told myself those five words, and I started working with the therapist. And he said the reason you're having anxiety taxes because exile is anticipation of future pain. You're not having the conversations that you should be with people, and it's giving you anxiety because you're anticipating future pain that day. I want to start having one conversation after another as uncomfortable as they are KOMO conversation. I should have had months ago years ago. I started to have and before you know, what the executive went away clarity came my sleeping pattern was fine. And so I didn't have to take on the vicodin and everything shifted, and it was no surprise that within the next two years. My. Company hits the Inc. Five thousand list and the entrepreneur five hundred fastest growing franchises and top fifteen franchise list. People man, what did you change with your marketing or you're selling nothing? Nothing the leader changed, and when the leader changes, the entire enterprise changes. And so I I said oh it to the world. I'd have to pay it forward. I don't wanna see any other entrepreneurs suffering. Silence. Like, I did is amazing. So I tell people time if you change the way you look at things the things you look at change were there denial Ray when when usually when we having Zayed projection all the things that you endorse happened when we were young I had this. There's certain things that all of a sudden appeared that I was in denial about and realize did that really happen? Was there any one thing that you were in denial about until you came through this quantum shift of yours? You know, I want to say there was one thing. I would say there was many things I was in denial about and it was that my wife just doesn't understand how hard I have to work. And this is why she's nagging me about money. My employ. Louise, don't get it. My franchisees have unreasonable expectations the denial was I'm a good leader. A good visionary. They just don't get it. When in reality. I was the problem. Right. And I was justifying to myself. She's a problem there. The problem the franchisees are the problem. Then it was the economy. And then it was the competition. I was the problem all along. And all I had to do was have those conversations that I was burying my head in the sand about and I need to start taking control of my health. Like, I was the fitness guy who's forty pounds overweight again because I would eat my way out of stress. Right. And so it was telling some guys over lunch earlier this afternoon. I said I'd be the guy would stand at the island in our kitchen, and I'd open the fridge, and I take out the bag of bagels the whipped cream cheese and butter David and not just one or the other both and I would four or five thousand calories at nine or ten pm gone ingested because I. I would eat my weight of stress then you wake up the next morning. Hating yourself right in the cycle would continue because you hit your the fitness guy who starts a franchise. You hate everybody. Because no one makes sense to you. And so you eat eat your way into stress, and then you go out now hypocrite because I'm the fitness guy. But I'm eating all this fattening salty, sugary foods. Right crazy. I would say there's two questions always asked. Right. What did I do track? This to myself. What am I supposed to learn that blame shame and justification? They'll get us into big trouble. Now, my podcast is like yours wish. I had another hour here. This look at the clock Kennedy last question, we're gonna have you back on. We got do some more love that. But I have a last question. You're still young you're more healthy than ever share. Your businesses are thriving and unite share the same philosophy that this economy is going to go down, and you'd better be cash cashing the and take advantage of the options that you have within the context of what you know. But what in the long run in your life? What legacy? Do you wanna leave? That's a simple answer. Man. The legacy. I wanna leave is too wonderful human beings who can do more for this planet, and the people on it than I've ever been able to do in the short amount of time that I live here. Like, that's my legacy is my two kids and the good they're going to do. And how confident are you that they're going to execute on your plan, my wife, and I are fiercely obsessed with that one outcome so God willing, we do our part, right? I'm super confident it's gonna work out. I think it will as well. Everything comes in the right way at the perfect time. And I talk about I meet some people as you see on this show. And I just I just have a new lifetime friend you. And I sing the same frequency and anything I can do to be of service. I'm just proud to have you on that on the playbook. This has been an extraordinary episode of entrepreneurs the playbook. I hope you enjoy this week's episode of the playbook as much as being on a personal note. I just wanted to thank everyone for making the playbook such success. Still forget to continue it by sharing subscribing and listening to your favorite episodes. Dave Meltzer with the play.

Gary halbert Dan Kennedy Lamborghini Ivy leagues golf Dave Meltzer anxiety department head Newport Beach Armenia California Harvard Penn Columbia Adderall Frank Joe Weldon KOMO Heart Dr Kevin downing
"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on Short Story Long

Short Story Long

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on Short Story Long

"Could sleep when my house and that's on weekends as well. And family was most important. So education was second, and I was joking around, but my mom's your typical Jewish mom stands about five feet to and just the talks to everyone like they're kindergartner loves everybody sweet except for one thing, you wouldn't believe it, but she was a black belt in the martial arts. This little tiny woman. She's a third degree black belt in the martial art of Jewish guilt. So that's why, like my siblings, all our parents wet dreams. They literally went to Harvard Penn, Columbia Sukhumi cloudy. They never got to be. I'm the only one of my brothers and one sister get a beat like, and I thought, literally they're gonna come, have a yellow bus, pick me up and take me to some other schools. And that was just because I heard like martial arts ability. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Like I literally, I gotta be at high school and like I literally thought I could do like I probably could have been arrested and felt more confident about coming home and telling my mom is arrested. Then literally telling her that somehow I was the low end of the gene pool when it came. You were the last one on the list? I got. We got the straggler still day. This is my mom's philosophy is literally doctor lawyer or failure, which is very common blue-collar place because your parents want you to be a professional, right? And get out of where you are, they want better for you. Yeah, and and guaranteed way. Yeah, although don't you find it weird. I've close friends. I just got off the phone with one of them. I made a bad Browns are playing the chargers. I bet him that if the Browns win me and my eight year old will go to his eight-year-old birthday in Ohio, and if the charges win him and his eight-year-old after come out to California. Good, he's going to get the better side of the bed. No metal. But we used to that. I have this friend. They don't wanna leave, but you got to of people guys like us want bigger. Better. Brighter? Yeah, and people, they're just, they love it there and it's like we're crazy out here. Yeah. Do you ever wish you or the other type? No, like I wasn't born in me, man. There's not like that's one thing I wanted to be rich and I wanted to leave. Yeah, I don't even know. I love my mom. I love and I think my mom did. She moved us out, you know, all of us when I was ten movie San Diego. Got it. Yeah, that was for better opportunity or what? No. Her sister had gotten married and moved to to San Diego brother was already there. So her little, I remember her saying, well, if I'm gonna be this poor with all these kids, I might as well live in San Diego. Yeah. 'cause we literally because they can play outside all the time and I have this tiny little place. I'd rather have a tiny place in a huge street in parks that you play all year for sure. Best thing she ever different..

Browns San Diego Harvard Penn California Ohio eight-year eight year five feet
"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

13:24 min | 3 years ago

"harvard penn columbia" Discussed on The Playbook

"Tell me if you just get three hits Steve. That's it. Yeah. Yeah, that's right, right out of life because you knew I, my siblings were extremely academic and intelligent Harvard Penn Columbia, but I was the sports guy, right? And she was trying to get me motivated in school and talking about life's, you would always tell me when I I tried really hard and something happens all it takes us three hits. Right? That's just one of the night expanded on that in people can't take. No, right. And if you're going to work in baseball, you're gonna take no allot. In fact, your mentor bud black right here, you have your mentor and your awkward position having shirt and m. Sure being a great mentor. He was more proud of you and happy for you, and he wasn't worried about himself. Yes, but dealing with no. Yeah. So many times in highschool, you dealt with the college pros managing, you know, I know the program deals with that a lot to that character of, hey, you're only so many knows from, yes. Yeah, in teaching the kids that yeah, and that's the thing is that. There's there's a resiliency component because it's not the right fit or at that moment in time to get that, yes. But a lot of times we as humans and people, and especially the youth have a tendency to take things personal and I was guilty of that as well. So it's one of those things that you can look at it as fuel which many people do, and people talk about a chip on your shoulder to prove people wrong, or another way also could be positive to take it and what can I learn from the no in why is no NADA, yes. And so for me, that's the kind of the ultimate balance. And so when you're around the right people, the positive people, and I think that our coaches are very good. It's planning the fund, the positives and what skills and character need to turn those nose into yeses. And, and I really liked being around people that are open, but those resilient people. That can take no, but keep pounding, pounding and working and trying to turn those Nossa yes is obviously I have a lot of respect for and we kind of are married in in that sense for sure was interesting to diversity inequality or big as issue in life and wise PIN three sixty. I think really promotes equality and diversity in my business partners, Warren Moon. So I've dealt with a big fan of those types of issues. And I used to people my gold working with Warren Moon for so many years was that someday they won't say black quarterback. They would just say he's terrible God, right? Whatever. But in here you are, they say, the first run cost. Right? And to me looking around, I represented the Clemente family. When I was with Lee, we did this statue for Jackie Robinson, and it's been a big part of my career. But when I look at the Weinstein three sixty, I see kind of the next generation where we grew up with those differences and you had to overcome a lot, you know, in soda die and other people on both sides of how equality and diversity works. I loved it back men, women in softball, baseball and softball. It's every race. Creed, we got. We got Venezuela, we got one Ricans. We got them all even the care, Sal, the real daddy flavors cares. I've blessed the goodwill of their and I can't believe talent is around the world. Where do you see as you are a leader of your culture? A lot of kids looked up and say, I can do anything just because some people still are ignorant. Some people minded that's a, that's a multi layered issue and topic, David, and I really appreciate you bringing that up. Baseball for from one to kind of on the on. The surface is obviously a very diverse sport. So now when you're talking about baseball and the diversity and being open to different cultures and languages and things like that, that's been amazing for me. And then you talking about the Dave Roberts or warm moon, kind of great black quarterback or Africa first African American manager, and it's kind of, again, kind of goes to the. Not taking it too personal because I think that at times Warren speaking for Warren myself or other people, you take it a little bit personal. But I think that in the right context, it's because the truth is that if there's an African American kid in in the city in the inner city and says, I could be the next Warren Moon because he has the same skin color as I do or somebody from Puerto Rico that says, I can be the next catcher like sandy Alamar from Venezuela. So it's like he's a great Venezuelan shortstop Omar Vizquel so you can take one way or another way of kind of giving people hope. Right. And so for me as the first African-American manager for the dodgers, could I take it as a little bit of a slight. I think that some people could look at it or you can look at it as an honor or responsibility. So that's why for me, it's fascinating to have this conversation. So when I'm around diverse people with character, open-mindedness, wanna be positive. That really kind of, obviously I'm getting going right now because that excites me. Yeah, me too. In fact, what are the things as a mentor myself that excited me is I always wanted to illuminate the difficulties, the failures that I had. You know, whether it was my size or whatever. I love self deprecating humor even when I coach because I want the people that I'm coaching to feel as if they're equal to or better than me because that gives them hope when we feel don't you like, wow, I used to use my size as an excuse. Football? Yeah, higher level, but not the highest and I had all my friends playing in the bigs, right? And I would say, well, Eric cares is six foot four if I was six. Four, yeah, and it's a lie and you know that. And so do I and I love that side of it for me is you know, looking to and then you got judge right to great young talents or Ozzie Albee's I know right love of e ways like one hundred and fifty pounds. Come on that guy hits home, runs he. He won the homerun derby in cares against Dini goriest video earlier. And you know he was there like this kids and I said to myself, I've been lying to everyone for years, right? Because if I had the skills, right, what does it take you'll regardless of your size, your color, your sex. What is that ingredient that you see that is the difference? I know what it is in business for me. I call it the consistent every day, persistent without quit enjoyment of the pursuit of my potential. And I didn't have that in sports. Although I, I had a desire passion is like someone come to you and saying mandate. I want to be the manager of the dodgers someday, but they're not doing the work at the level. You need to do it. What do you think that secret sauces? Well, first of all, I want to kind of remember what you just said, because that's sounds very similar to what I love joy of the consistent persistent without quit pursuit of your potential. Because I think that in. Of the processor liking practice or loving to practice. I think that's part of the process, but I think though it's it's interesting because we all have different pass. Your path wasn't to be a major league baseball player, but you're successful in your own right and have really affected millions of people and that right there was your path. And I think for me and out to Vegas wherever that's our path. So I think that I do agree that there's kind of an overarching enjoy the process. There's a talent. Obviously, there's a hard work ethic. There's a recovery of mental toughness part of that, absolutely that you have to have to be to reach that ultimate level. I do agree with that. And also to sustain it, you know, because there's a lot of people that get to the pinnacle and they can't stay there. But those things are really good ingredients for me to be successful in life. And I just I just have a hard time saying that was excess one thing is going to make you successful or one occupation is successful versus another one. And I, it goes back to kind of what you said about the coaches and having them whether it simplifying things, or you telling a player that you have more talent, and I did this and this is a row of roadmap for you to kind of fulfill your drink, you know. And I think that that's really fun for me. I think you nailed something with the roadmap in that's going back to why Why's PM three sixty? There's many different roads to Rome, right? There's. Is a real, t's people because the most common question for me is probably similar to you. It's Mr. Meltzer I wanna be a sports agent. You're right. What am I supposed to do? Sure, right. And if I told you that to become a sports agent, this is this is my path. And if I told her kid this, they would run away from they would. I went to law school decided to work in the internet. Instead of practice law, I sold legal research online, became a millionaire, Silicon Valley raised a bunch of money. Sure. It got into the wireless proxy. Service base became the COO of Samsung's. First phone division lost all my money met Lee, Steinberg and inject more ad was leaving. And in forty eight hours, he hired me to be the cheap operating officer of the most. Notable sports agency became CEO best friends with Warren Moon. Right? And so that's how your sports aid so that that's the road about there you go and you. Didn't get recruited. So I walked on at UCLA keeps going keeps going on on the manager of the Padre twenty eighth round draft pick you signed for a thousand dollars Detroit. Tigers you wanna make eight fifty a month. Go forward not only being said with your background with YSP and three sixty in your journey. What advice would you give to your self? If you were at the wires, PM three sixty with all the coaches. What advice would you give to your teenage self to my teenage self? I think that as a recipient and receiver of, I think that I would just vet I I would hope I would have my father would encourage me. My coaches would encourage me. I would be around the right coaches that would want to vet all these. These coaches that have really been great in their own right in their own sports and baseball and the women in softball. And really, I think that just to kind of understand the whole game in itself because I think that there's so much in baseball. So multifaceted. But I think that the people, the coaches that we have in place are such good men. And I think that when you talk to Jim brow who's a pitching coach up there and Seattle with the Mariners or Brian corier, like I said, sandy, they, these are really good men that you have a potential to connect with and really feel that personal connection that I think that that could motivate a teenager or somebody with the let alone the content. So knowledge is very powerful. Understanding the game of baseball being more well round is going to only make you and enhance your opportunity or chances to go further in this game. I just look at it as an opportunity. All the great coaches that are volved with YSP and three sixty. I think the difference that I found a why I support it is that I have an old saying in the business world people by on a motion for logical reasons, and whether you're the manager of the dodgers you, you have to have an emotional buy in the connection to all your players garp regardless of your Bobby Cox, this genius, a baseballer or any other coach that knows the game inside and out. That's right. It's that emotional connection that makes the great managers and also the great coaches. And you know, I know I was talking to as well about the coaches that he picks sandy. He doesn't really care about that logical side. The first thing is I'm looking for good people that are gonna inspire in us buyer to be great and to help others be great. Yeah. That's well said, because if you look at the coaches that are involved, this is something that these guys us guys feel compelled. We have a passionate about and it's the youth. And it's not something that we have to do were forced to do. And so for me, that's really encouraging for me in that kind of when it was brought to me and I see the people that are involved that I have respect for. They're doing it for a bigger purpose. And I think that that servant attitude the the, the giving, paying for whatever you want to classify it. And it goes back to the character, the character of these men and women. I wanted to be a part of it, and so it's kind of I think that it's like you can get somebody you can get in front of somebody. But if the people giving the information or the coaching or whatever aren't passion, believing what they're saying or aren't real authentic, then it's a click off. It's not a return. It's like it's come and gone, but you have a chance to sustain it when you have the credentials of credibility of some high character. Great players. That's awesome. Last question regrettably 'cause I would stay here all day with you, but. You're going to begin tonight. Last night. When it's all said and done being the manager of a story organization, what legacy do you want to leave as they Roberts.

baseball Warren Moon dodgers softball Dave Roberts Venezuela YSP Lee sandy Alamar bud black Harvard Penn Columbia Steve Omar Vizquel Warren Jackie Robinson Clemente Weinstein Sal Ozzie Albee David