35 Burst results for "Harvard Medical School"

The BEST Pro-Life Arguments Around With Seth Gruber

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:59 min | 3 d ago

The BEST Pro-Life Arguments Around With Seth Gruber

"There is this kind of raging debate around abortion in our country. It shouldn't be much of a debate. And let's just kind of start at the basics, which is for a listener right now who might be agnostic on it without knowledge or just kind of people can make whatever decision as they see fit. What's wrong with that perspective? Why should a listener the Charlie Kirk show care about life? Yeah. Amen. I gave a talk to a Republican women's group recently in Simi Valley about why conservatives actually have to be pro life if you want to call yourself a conservative. And our founders said we hold these truths to be self evident, right? The translation for that for gen zers is duh. You know, we hold these truths to be done. This is obvious. It's axiomatic that we're endowed by our creator with certain inalienable rights. And of course, he put the right to life first. And Reagan talked about this at length in his book abortion and the conscience of a nation. Reagan, former governor of California used to be pro choice. And actually had some blood on his hands because of some bad bills. Yeah, he did. And doctor Mildred Jefferson, the first black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School who started the national right to life committee. Once gave a defense of the pro life position, so persuasively on TV, Reagan watched it, wrote her a letter and said that he had become pro life because of her presentation. And he wrote his book abortion and the conscience of a nation. And he makes his point, I think, to your question about why life is the most fundamental right and why we as conservatives need to get that right right. He says that Abraham Lincoln recognized that we could not survive as a free country, as long as some men could decide that others are not fit to be free. And should therefore be slaves. Likewise, we can not survive as a free land today, as long as some men can decide that others are not fit to live. And should therefore be abandoned to abortion and infanticide. So there is no cause more important than affirming than the transcendent right to life of all human beings. The right without which no other rights have any

Charlie Kirk Gen Zers Reagan Mildred Jefferson Simi Valley Harvard Medical School California Abraham Lincoln
Honesty, reassurance: How to talk to kids about Ukraine

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

Honesty, reassurance: How to talk to kids about Ukraine

"The Russian invasion of Ukraine is adding to the list of topics that can create anxiety between parents and kids the events are being played out on television clinical psychologist Jenny Dominguez says it's best for parents to acknowledge to their kids something is going on just providing reassurance that you know we're okay you know this is this is what we know right now being okay with saying I don't know she says kids may not want to talk about it but that's okay Jeanne veracity is a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School he says lots of kids suffered posttraumatic stress disorder watching events like this on TV so that the media is Hugh Sheridan says as the Ukraine invasion plays out be honest and indulge young kids if they need to sleep in the bedroom and for preschool and school age kids turn the media off I bet Donahue

Jenny Dominguez Ukraine Jeanne Veracity Hugh Sheridan Harvard Medical School Donahue
Who Is Dr. Robert Malone, Inventor of mRNA Vaccines?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:58 min | 6 months ago

Who Is Dr. Robert Malone, Inventor of mRNA Vaccines?

"And he is the president of the international alliance of physicians and scientists, doctor Malone, welcome to the Charlie Kirk show. Thank you. Thanks a lot for the opportunity to be here and talk to you and your audience. So let's get on it. So I'm an admirer and fan of yours. I first was made aware of you and your work when you join Brett Weinstein on his podcast all the way back in April or May or June if I remember correctly. In the back in the 20th century. It feels like yeah, that was a different world. And I was very interested in that conversation and I've watched hours of your footage since because it seemed that you were confirming some of the suspicion that I had and skepticism in my head towards the current rollout and the vaccine that we are now being in some ways forced to take. Please establish your background in vaccine technology, the original inventor of MR MN RNA and DNA vaccines and talk about why and how you got concerned about this. And we'll go from there. Let's see. So briefly, the bona fides. Let's see, you see Davis, biochemistry, bachelors and science. You see San Diego and the salk institute masters in biology, MD from northwestern university in Chicago. Fellowships, research fellowships at UC Davis and a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard Medical School for global clinical scholars research training that was just a few years ago to kind of tighten up all of my credentials having to do with clinical research regulatory affairs and all that stuff also completed a internship medical internship at UC Davis. I'm a licensed physician in the state of Maryland. I did invent the core platform technology that gave rise to these vaccines. I did not invent these vaccines. And I'm a little aggravated at what's been done with these vaccines as what's happened to the technology. But I had a extensive academic career top pathology at UC Davis and new Maryland Baltimore and also was an associate professor at the uniformed services university of the health sciences. You could look up all the papers and the many patents through if you look on Google scholar is a site so you can just Google scholar and I'm having trouble with that just like you were with the mRNA. With my name on it. And you'll see the over hundred papers and 12,600 plus academic citations for the work blah,

International Alliance Of Phys Charlie Kirk Brett Weinstein Salk Institute Malone Harvard Medical School For Glo Uc Davis Northwestern University Davis San Diego MD Chicago New Maryland Maryland Uniformed Services University Baltimore Google
"harvard medical school" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:50 min | 7 months ago

"harvard medical school" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"And the great new study out of Harvard Medical School and the university of Iowa talking about the importance of vitamin D and lung function It supports a healthy on top of all of that and a great new study out of the university of Hawaii talking about vitamin D and colon health I mean who thinks of those things right Yeah that's amazing So I think it's a welcome addition to this amazing formula to co Q super boost formula In addition to that I said that you had a look We should put some B 12 in here as well Let's call cobalamin And I say that because B 12 converts the carbohydrates and proteins and fats that you're eating converts them right into energy And this is all about energy and well-being Now I know you like to say until you try this unique combination of the 100 milligrams of CoQ10 the advanced resveratrol the way you find them in purity is co Q super boost formula that you won't know what you're missing but explain what you mean by that Well I want you to experience it I mean I know you've heard about how CoQ10 and resveratrol and B 12 and vitamin D and by the way there's even some vitamin a in this amazing formula How do you all work together to create what I call the environment of energy in your body Not only physical energy Mark but mental energy endurance and stamina I mean who wouldn't I mean raise your hand if you don't want energy endurance or stamina Everybody wants it Absolutely I mean come on and this is a great way to do that And I said Jan you know let's tell them about it And let's let them experience it for themselves Well absolutely This has been fascinating but doctor Preston for people who are tuning in late How about a quick recap here What exactly is resveratrol super formula Who needs it and why is this in your opinion the next generation of Coke supplementation and how does purity these free bottle offer work Well look I think there's a distinct advantage to having energy endurance and stamina And if we were going to isolate the nutrients and create what we would call a daily essential and somebody gave me the assignment list the top 5 or 6 nutrients that we need to literally give us energy to build endurance to Bill stamina I would list the following nutrients CoQ10 resveratrol B 12 and vitamin D this is the advantage that we're speaking about And rather than going out and buying all four or 5 of these different nutrients you get them all in one with a co Q daily super boost and the idea behind this is you take two a day you see how it works for a month and you'll find that you're going to be on the phone calling to order more because you're going to have a lot more energy just make sure you're in that first thousand of the day today and get a free offer that we've been talking about Doctor pressman always a huge pleasure Always interesting talking with you Thanks so much for joining us today Marks my pleasure I appreciate it Now one more time have that pencil and paper handy right this number down it's one 807.

Harvard Medical School university of Hawaii university of Iowa Preston Mark Jan Doctor pressman
Trees Could Be a Mental, Physical and Climate Change Antidote

Environment: NPR

02:02 min | 8 months ago

Trees Could Be a Mental, Physical and Climate Change Antidote

"Is well known. The trees help counter climate change by soaking up carbon dioxide. Now there is a growing body of research to point to many ways of dose of trees can improve our mental and physical health. Here's martha bebinger member station. W. b. you are on how and why the tiny sapling robin williams planted thirty years ago towers above her boston home. I raise this tree when i raised my children and look at this look at that. She says there's something about being near this tree. It makes everybody a little bit happy around here when you're looking for strength you can't do better than looking at a tree and there's evidence williams may will be gleaning any number of direct or associated health benefits a longer life. Bitter birth outcomes lower stress levels lower risk of heart disease. Dr howard lumpkin. Is it the university of washington school of public health. Lower risk of diabetes reduced symptoms of adhd proximity to trees is associated with a ridiculously broad range of health benefits. I wish we had pills. That were this good for health. A few countries notably japan and south korea have invested in a practice known as forest bathing which is spending time among trees as a preventive health measure but prescribing time in nature is still pretty far outside mainstream medicine in the. Us from can says that. Maybe because there's a lot we don't know what doses needed. Do you need to walk. Among trees is sufficient just to look at the trees from outside your window. Do you need big trees or do small trees do the trick we you know. We're not able to tease the forest from the trees. Peter james at harvard medical school aims to answer a lot of those questions. He's merging health data captured by phones. Real time surveys about wellbeing and mood and street. View mapping data to dig into. What's exactly within view. Is it trees. Is it flowers and how those things are related to help behaviors and health outcomes.

Martha Bebinger W. B Dr Howard Lumpkin University Of Washington Schoo Robin Williams Boston Heart Disease Williams Adhd South Korea Diabetes Japan Peter James Harvard Medical School United States
Dr. Stella Immanuel Details How She First Started Treating Covid Patients With Hydroxychloroquine

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:46 min | 8 months ago

Dr. Stella Immanuel Details How She First Started Treating Covid Patients With Hydroxychloroquine

"What did you discover what was what was your initial experience when this pandemic hit hard in. Houston well what we were. We were scared. Because i have all these patients from defiance china and everything so we really try so we got all the tv You in the first few weeks. We just Or moskvy if this thing just to survive and then a pharmacy coach me on set that using top secret open in china in spain to italy so we said wow if i took. I'm used to the medication. So we basically just using it. We isolate using to monitor. Those patients are way doing extremely well. We'll keep patients early in marks and you know we put it on sink we also had And everything so. We started treating patients undergoing extremely well. I was so excited. I went on. Facebook started talking to physicians. All my Imagine hydroxy this could be patients getting better to better. To my surprise i talked. You get attacked for healing people. What is wrong with you. Don't you know doctors are supposed to be political figures. Healing actual human beings issue. Okay so i have to imagine to be perfectly blunt. You're a woman. You are black. You have an accent. It strikes me that if you were a six foot three white guy from harvard medical school it would be different

China Houston Spain Italy Facebook Harvard Medical School
Medical Expert: Breakthrough COVID-19 Cases Are 'Vaccine Win, Not Failure'

Learn to Buy and Sell Cars

02:14 min | 10 months ago

Medical Expert: Breakthrough COVID-19 Cases Are 'Vaccine Win, Not Failure'

"DT narrow Kara, Harvard Medical School physician and co director of the Harvard Medical School, clinical clerkship in community engagement. We're talking about the latest developments in the pandemic and something that more and more people are seeing our breakthrough cases. Friends, family members, coworkers getting infected with Covid 19. Despite being vaccinated. What do we know about those situations? And how much do these vaccines help in those instances? That's a wonderful question at the start. When we were seeing the Delta variant emerged. There were many concerns on whether or not this would what we call evade the Community that is provided by the vaccine, which means that would we see more breakthrough infections up till now. We may be seeing some breakthrough infections here or there, but for the north part, the vaccines are doing their job. And we are not seeing as many breakthrough infection as we anticipated, so that is very good news. There are many questions, though, so when someone does have a breakthrough infection, which does happen, what is the authority of that infection? We are learning more and more that if people have briefing infections, they are often mild. When these Patients. What when these people are vaccinated We also wonder if someone has a breakthrough infection might they develop long covid symptoms, which is a real concern among young and healthy people again. That is a big question mark. The key thing to remember is that breakthrough infections are not a vaccine failure. It is their vaccine success is because The school of the vaccine is really threefold. The first is to prevent severe illness. The second is to prevent hospitalizations and the third is to prevent death. And so these three major benchmarks have all been met with the vaccines. They're incredibly efficacious and all of these metrics, so that is very promising. Hopefully, breakthrough infections are mild. It's not much of a concern, and it is still considered a vaccine win and not a vaccine failure. Now that we're a year

Harvard Medical School Covid
The Climate Crisis Is a Public Health Crisis

Short Wave

01:34 min | 11 months ago

The Climate Crisis Is a Public Health Crisis

"Today i want to introduce you to rennie solace. She's an emergency medicine physician at massachusetts general hospital and harvard medical school. There was a patient i saw. Who was a young girl who came in with an asthma attack and it was her third one that week and her mom was just beside herself. Trying to figure out how to protect her daughter for dr solace treating. This girl meant seeing the problem through a lens that might surprise you. Climate change during the initial discussions. I hadn't really realized that pollen levels were higher because of climate change. And that's something that we've covered here on short. Before the more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere the more pollen that's produced towards the end of the visit. I recognize that. And we talk through that. And i think by me making that diagnosis of recognizing that higher pollen levels were contributing to why her daughter wasn't able to keep her disease under control allowed us to develop a treatment plan directed at that. And what did that look like. Well dr solace talked to the girl's mother about checking pollen levels online or through an app to decide with her daughter should go and play outside or whether to install an air filtration system in order to keep calling outside of the home or to make sure that the home is optimally. Weather is d- and i think also recognizing the desert treatments and so we as doctors need to think about prescribing these for our patients because not everyone can afford them and so we have to make sure that everyone has these because this is how we protect health in the era of climate

Dr Solace Rennie Massachusetts General Hospital Asthma Attack Harvard Medical School
The Fastest Way to Build ML-Powered Apps

Practical AI: Machine Learning & Data Science

01:57 min | 1 year ago

The Fastest Way to Build ML-Powered Apps

"Today. We've got to heen trips. Daba with us who is co founder and ceo of base ten. Welcome to him. Hi thank you. Thanks for having me. Cristiano yeah it was great. Meet you. We had a chat last week and i was learning a little bit about some of the things that you're doing and had to get you on the show right away so really excited to hear about that stuff but before we dive into all that could you just give us a little bit of info about your background. How you got into doing what you're doing now so my backroom actually electrical engineering electrical engineering college in optical h. I decided that the right thing to do was to go work in finance in new york for for a couple years it had nothing to do. That's the rumor and academia that i heard was like you can sell your soul and go make a ton of money and finance not that you have to sell your soul to go into finance to work on the fund problem of privatizing toll roads There you go fascinating in. Its own way but after a couple of years of it. I decided that wasn't for me. And i decided to go back to engineering so actually moved to boston from new york to work at a weird academic lab at beth israel medical center which is part of harvard medical school. Where the professor who had one apprise full coming up with a noninvasive way of tracking the progression of ls and he'll spin off. Stop as part of that. That was very data driven. Like two thousand and eleven. And i didn't know anything. That machine learning stats. Well you know. I've done a bunch of electrical engineering and information signal processing in college. I could probably convince him. Just take on. You know boston suppler. We'd breed in that. You know the kind of very research focused laura grant and frankly to quite cheap. And i was like i'll go and tell them to pay me. Allie alco work this. I went there. And i got to work with this guy. These three mit pc's basically figuring out if they can predict the prognosis of neuromuscular disease.

Cristiano New York Beth Israel Medical Center Boston Harvard Medical School Laura Grant Allie Alco Neuromuscular Disease
Interview With Paul Farmer on Global Health Inequity

Solvable

01:14 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Paul Farmer on Global Health Inequity

"Paul farmers it professor at harvard medical school chief of global health equity at brigham and women's hospital in boston and the co founder of the organization partners in health began by asking him to describe the global health care situation in his own words. Well right now. We could focus almost entirely on the setbacks. You know one of the biggest problems we faced all over. The world is that with a shutdown. Obviously people aren't able to readily accessed their their care. What if they have cancer. Whatever they have diabetes have severe hypertension. So those are ranking problems. I think to anybody who's involved in global health. But that's just the tip of the iceberg. A lot of the efforts that we have engaged in to address. Social determinants of health are also being set back economic educational programs cultural endeavors employment opportunities There's been a major contraction. An anti poverty efforts overall. so it's going to be Troubling reflection on what's happened this past year and a lhasa worried it's gonna be projected poured into a futures. Will

Paul Farmers Brigham And Women's Hospital Harvard Medical School Boston Hypertension Diabetes Cancer Lhasa
"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"You know probably you heard about stem sets right so people has working first of all you can generate astros. I like cells in vitro right by. There's always a conflict the question that state suggesting that those cells that you can get to grow happily in culture right. They are not as they do not completely resemble the complexity and diversity either in terms of appearance on function of ostracizing beach. That has to do. With the fact that when astros i'd easing the right in the bray. Each environment is so freddie's interacting with other astra sites in specific tree the Organization talking with different cell types so so but so far. That's how far we've gotten have tried gutten. I don't know much about this. Franscisco is is it He said cut to think about so. So that is obviously specialization. International sites in the brain. And then you get them from the stem cells You the diversity. You don't get the fish playstation if to introduce them into the in the devil almost lack of the language if bility's to communicate with the system. That's i mean that's that's way to put it and that's one of the limitations. Obviously the phillies chasing is changing rapidly. But that's one thing you have to keep in mind that bring you the friendship damning vitual where you work in vitro You're prone to right. That's the way we read to you. So as long as you are aware of it than the not you're aware of the limitations of those astronauts on systems you gonna stay move forward so this Wanting to vote in functions. It looks to me that astra sites you sort of keeping the brain home your static x doing law of different things and things go in one direction it can look back to make it more stable as so the sort of the critical ratios between this. I would imagine it's important to keep that. Who abused tactic. Balance of the brave by is that the issue. That's that's actually right. So there are different Radio son kind of one of the questions. Trying to address right. I've different subsets in different functions. Yes or no that. Lots of very interesting questions to address their so tune conclusion francisco. I know that you're doing you doing god's work to.

one thing one Each environment one direction one of Franscisco questions francisco
"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"I i know that you know we have learned a lot last fifteen twenty years. What do we know about their function. of our officers sites in the okay. So you know the easiest thing to do. It's to think about what they do in that one day doing this right. So in the first of june development they will guide you know newroz. Extend these accents right. These kind of like extensions so astro Guide those accents in addition astra sites with also guide the formation of a series of membranes. That kind of wrap or the central nervous system and they are called the manages. The blood brain barrier died is tightly controlled blabbering tightly controlled by the astros sites and then also with astronauts do is a provide nutrients they provide factors for neurons to do well right. I'm also you might know that. Neurons you know. They communicate by secreting chemicals. Right that produced by one. The essentially anuron so astros sides can regulate the secretion on app. Take those chemicals and by doing so they can actually regulate sitemap communication neuro to neuro communications so then they can having ten roads in behavior for example the memory. Now that's five of kind of like what we call a mere static right like functions faster exciting have in the context of the seas. They first before they can stop doing all of them right. And obviously that creates problems out boost when we call near the generation which is just another death. He added on top of that they can actually drive inflammation within the brain with. You can imagine very by than literally they can secrete molecules that killed nuris and that. It's even stronger driver of near the generation. so so is it. Correct francisco thing about sort of the neurons is like the hardware and astral sites through right. Your function sectors cried provides energy utopians it regulates communication so s sites is sort of like the software is likely to think about it afterward certain extent i would say that both duro sastre the other legal sales right of had way which has each one has his own programs on software but what is important to understand is that only the consequences of the function of the central nervous system. They resigned from the directions and communication between all those different parts of hard work. And they don't take to put where they feel has been for years. Is that for years. We've focused on the neurons as the main source of program know function but now we need to zoom out a little bit staticy with all those other cells and the their communication. What do they do in order to produce what we know as a function of the central nervous system has to the given that they have a video important set of functions that that affects the neurons if -bility to work.

each one both five first last fifteen twenty one day years duro sastre francisco june
"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My district is confident franscisco. Kim who is a professor of neurology at the center for neurologic diseases. Brigham and women's hospital. Harvard medical school at an associate member at the broad institute. Harvard and mit Investigate signaling pathway said control they knew discounts at euro. Degeneration the document goal of identify noble therapeutic targets and by loggers for immune mediated disorders. Conference is go. Hi thanks for having made today show you. Thanks for doing this. You have couple of recent papers that i would outdo love to go to the first one is Got licensed interferon gamma cells. Drive and information. astral saris you say astra cited a glee of cells that are abundant in the central system and that important kobe promoting functions. How little is known about the static. Anti inflammatory activities of ezra sites and deregulation before we get into the details of this francisco. What exactly are astro sites. So he's actually an interesting question right. Because if i were to ask you what is the most uncertain your brain. Most likely you'll tell me the neuron right yet yet. The most of on themselves in the brain are astro sites. They got that name because they looked like straw. Look at them in the microscope under the microscope and in four years there were so band they were just kind of thought to be glittered. Glue literally were thought to be some kind of providers for neurons to do their things. However nowadays we realize that these cells being stored on that are not just passive bystanders. Right there they are very important for our the functioning of our brain and spinal cord. We call this the central nervous system. You encounter a known so very important drivers of neurologic diseases so he you know you have the most random cell in the cnn yet. You don't know what it does. So so as a everybody knows about the neurons and their importance. But you have this. Microbe leah and mac leukemia cells. Right in the brain so astra slice is sort of a cell exactly when you think about leo sales from the brain. You'd think about microbes you think about which are kind of macrophages right these ourselves. That eat up stuff random. Then you have another center which is called audio dangerous site. Which were they does it. Produces it synthesizes. The insulation around the neurons right the neurons ahab Insulation tissue. I mean we could that actually allows to work and then the third type of lille sell you. Having the brain is the astra site. That's why sometimes you would hear. They are referred to as astronaut leah. I see okay and so so what do we know..

Kim Harvard leah four years today first one Harvard medical school Brigham and women's hospital third type astral saris couple center for neurologic diseases
"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

Eating this ratio of fruit and veggies could help you live longer, study suggests

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Eating this ratio of fruit and veggies could help you live longer, study suggests

"Your mom probably told you to eat your fruits and veggies to stay healthy. Now there's new evidence showing she was right. The American Heart Association study took about 30 years and 29 countries that it shows those who ate more fruits and veggies reduce the risk of dying related to cancer, cardiovascular disease, potentially respiratory disease. Harvard Medical school doctor and Thorndike says Not all veggies are created equal. For example, starches you want to get these other types of more healthful fruits and vegetables, and then you can also eat the potatoes or corn or Pete. If you choose, study says to daily servings of fruit. Three of veggies could help you live

American Heart Association Respiratory Disease Thorndike Cardiovascular Disease Harvard Medical School Cancer Pete
Intermittent Fasting for Menopause with Marcelle Pick

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

05:43 min | 1 year ago

Intermittent Fasting for Menopause with Marcelle Pick

"Welcome everybody to the fasting. Transformation summit rear uncovering the most inexpensive and powerful healing strategy known to mankind. We are talking about fasting. And i'm your host. Dr david shockers and in today's interview. I'm really going to be talking to women who are going through menopause. Maybe peri menopause period of time before menopause. Or perhaps you're younger and you're thinking you've heard horror stories about menopause and you are be prepared. We're going to be seeking directly you and perhaps your man out there and you're married to my going through menopause. this is gonna be beneficial for you. just how how understand what menopause is. We're gonna talk about basically what happens with our female hormones during this period of time of life and lifestyle strategies that can help ease symptoms and help improve the this life Life transition As you get older and have this kind of change up in your hormones recourse. we're gonna copper. How fasting can play a role in adding best strategies fasting. So because it's topic was so important. I reached out to my good friend and literally world expert in this topic. Dr marcel pick and dr marcel co-founded the world renowned women to women clinic in one thousand nine three with the vision and not only treat illness but also helps support her patients who proactively making healthier choices to prevent disease. She successfully treated thousands of individuals three unique approach to wellness and then in two thousand one. Marcel created marcel. Pick dot com great website. They can go check out and her goal is able to reach inspire and educate even more women. Worldwide website offers informative articles on women's health issues natural solutions to some of the most troublesome symptoms experienced today. Marcel also discovered functional medicine very early early adopter in functional medicine movement was honored to be one of the first that he certifies functional masters titian. She's written a bunch of books including the core balanced diet. Is it near my adrenals. And is it me or my hormones create great titles by the way and so these books have been been read by millions of people around world. Made a incredible impact on helping house armor sal. Thanks so much for joining us. Here on doc- transformation summit. Thanks for having me. I feel like. I have loud information to share. Can't wait to get started. Yeah absolutely. I'm really excited. You know we talked. I was sure where your experience with was with. Fasting was many. Let me know how this is something that you practice in something that you recommended and saw really excited to bring you on the summit's region guy deep into menopause obviously about fasting and how can impacted. Let's start with your story though. And i and how you really got into natural health So probably don't even know this. I was born in australia. I grew up in the outback. And i spent a lot of my time with the aborigines. Knee aboriginal caves very early age. I was surrounded by natural and natural medicine and then came to america. One eleven on after having been exposed to know cars. We didn't have toilet. I i should tell that really different kinks america and my parents are both holocaust survivors. They were from europe so we never did a lot of the conventional ways of eating to begin with and from a. You're young time. I knew that i was very interested in going into alternative medicine. I went to a program with harvard. Medical school nurse practitioner. Actually and boston college. Because i knew then i needed have a standard had to do research. Look at double blind placebo. Controlled studies also understand. Where does the notion of nutrient come into play and we started women. Two women in nineteen eighty-five before anybody was doing any alternative medicine. We were the first all women practice in the state of maine. No one had done functional medicine or anything like it in the state of maine and we were equal partners. Md nurse practitioners. so we. I've been on this trail for a long time understanding that if we educate women in particular about their biochemistry in their health and start to understand. What's upstream we will be healthy no matter what age in our medical system now says many times. Here's the drug will get you better well. It doesn't get you better. It takes his symptoms away and oftentimes makes worst symptoms on the other side. So i'm passionate about this. I love what i do. And my goal is to change as many women's lives as i can with information data and also the supportive things like internet investing. Yeah you're definitely making a huge impact your books your website. Everything at you're doing so let's talk about menopause. What is menopause happening with. Female hormones during that stage. What kind of symptoms do many women experiences. They go through a loss you know. It's interesting many years ago. If you'd come to me as a patient the symptoms would have been flashes. Night sweats getting some way. What i see now more than ever before his anxiety. Applications abnormal weight gain an absolute frustration with their body. Many times. they'll come in say. My body's deceiving me. What the hell happened. I feel like a train wreck under depressed can't sleep Hot flashes. I don't have a sex drive anymore. gamal dried up. What the hell

Dr David Shockers Dr Marcel Pick Dr Marcel Co World Renowned Women To Women Marcel America Maine Boston College Medical School Australia Harvard Europe Gamal
Near-Death Experiences

Unexplained Mysteries

04:28 min | 1 year ago

Near-Death Experiences

"Accounts of near death. Experiences can be polarizing indie. Most often happened while people are unconscious so researchers are incredibly limited in what they can actually measure. They must rely on human testimony to fill in. What's actually happening in other words. Andy ease exist near the intersection of two seemingly contradictory ideas science and faith which is why after a neurosurgeon reported in n. d. e. it became central to the conversation in nineteen eighty eight. Dr eban alexander began his career in boston at one of the most prestigious hospitals in the country. Brigham and women's well working as a neurosurgeon. Dr alexander simultaneously target his father's alma mater. Harvard medical school in both institutions. He had access to some of the most cutting edge medical technology in the world. Soon dr alexander became an expert in a non invasive. Surgical treatment called stereo tactic. Radio surgery a procedure that uses targeted radiation to address medical abnormalities. In the brain it can even eliminate tumors without needing to open the skull in his own practice. Doctor under-used stereo tactic. Radio surgery to treat cancer. Epilepsy mentoring nerves and tangled blood vessels and for nearly a decade in the field of medicine. His star was on the rise until two thousand one when an elderly woman from arizona. Whom will call. Rose contacted him to remove a benign tumor in her brain. Dr alexander was one of the few surgeons in the country capable of performing the procedure. So rose flew from arizona all the way to boston but she didn't receive the treatment that she expected when rose arrived at the hospital orderlies placed her in a wheelchair and brought her into the operation. Room apparently no one spoke to her or explain what was happening. After doctors strapped into a device rendering it immobile rose demanded to meet. Dr eben alexander. She was about to go under and he had yet to introduce himself mere minutes before the operation began. Dr alexander stepped in front of her said. Hello and assured her that she was in good hands then she drifted into unconsciousness and the surgery began when rose woke up in the icu. She couldn't move the left side of her face. Dr alexander never warned her about the risks associated with her surgery and though he'd successfully eliminated her tumor half of her face was now permanently paralyzed. Ultimately rose filed a lawsuit. Her lawyers asked to see the paperwork she'd signed before entering surgery. But apparently dr alexander could only produce a single sheet of paper. It didn't even have rose's signature on it. Apparently dr alexander had misplaced a number of her forms. The case was eventually settled out of court shortly after. Brigham and women's fire dr alexander from their roster administrators have not stated whether or not the dismissal was related to the lawsuit. Either way dr alexander moved on to work for umass memorial medical center located in worcester massachusetts. Where apparently his careless behavior continued during one operation. Dr alexander reportedly left a small piece of plastic inside a woman's nick. In addition to the pain this caused her she needed another intensive surgery to have it removed then in august two thousand three umass suspended dr sanders for an error made during an operation. On another patient's brain stem the specific details surrounding. These punitive measures remain confidential by early two thousand seven. Dr alexander relocated to lynchburg virginia and began work as a staff surgeon at lynchburg general hospital but his lack of professionalism and care continued

Dr Alexander Dr Eban Alexander Brigham Dr Eben Alexander Boston Harvard Medical School Arizona Andy Tumors Epilepsy Rose Cancer ICU Umass Memorial Medical Center Dr Sanders Worcester Massachusetts Umass
"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Help you sleep bright but not. Everybody has that problem. It's not like everybody's dozen sleep because they're not able to sleep. Biologically righty fewer caring for young child for example. Or whatever you're going to be losing sleep no matter what would be really good to To have something that you take and to mitigate some of these bad bad fats up sleep loss. That's the dream. Do you have a hypothesis. Why eleven of those fifty. Three only seven of the sixty three work. Sandy communist again eleven. We didn't really see anything obvious than we did. Try for all of these. Compounds tried several different concentrations. But it's possible that for some of these. That didn't work that we just didn't find the right dose or we shouldn't stick into that a little bit more maybe to think we didn't see anything super obvious as to why some of them work or not up for some experiments.

Sandy
"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"They did is they prevented from sleeping. Down saw that this indeed decreases their life span severely. Their life spending half. Let's say to suppress ninety percent of sleep if you percent prevent all sleep cops a downing quarter and preceding these preceding this increase in mortality They founded there's a really dramatic increase in reactive oxygen species and we talk. We can talk about what these are. These molecules reactive oxygen species the gut specifically flies and so this accumulation for seated that In flies the regardless of the method with which we suppress sleep som examples of examples abroad so trump peroxide h two two is an example of routes relatively Officer superoxide is another one. So what what russ are are the ross stands for reactive oxygen species so these are derivatives of molecular oxygen sox. Oxygen is very reactive. Element sorta severi chemically reactive element. It loves electrons and that's why we use it in a lot of reactions Most notably you use it in the in the might of the electron transport chain with were essentially a sink for electrons you electrically power production of atp survey energy cellular energy Currency in the might of contra you electrically powered then what you do with those electrons at the end. Oxygen takes them up because it's it really loves electrons but in the process of doing that gets converted into any been more reactive molecule reactive oxygen species which that needs to be quickly neutralized the salvat. Rust are made in other processes. They're not just made in. The michael conjure their mates for example in god in particular. They're used for normal physiological processes. So they're made for example to control the levels of bacteria in the gut and also to control turnover of cells in the gut would actually do need to be turned over. Every few days walks gives says. I know that it has been implicated in many different things. Including our siamese disease oxidative stress in the brain this oxidative stress in the gut and And you are drawing a specific connection between Lack of sleep and the production of laws and then consequently oxidative stress and And the implications that severe oxidative stress prolonged oxidative stress leads to leads to death at least in the fry experiment. Yes so in the gut. This accumulation ross guts..

russ ross michael
"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Most basic or requirement for sleep in terms of survival. So why is it that that lack of sleep will kill you and that doesn't necessarily explain the reason for sleep right. It could be that when you don't sleep. Just some some adverse events occurred can kill doesn't mean that that's the reason Y you sleep but you know it solves definitely the really big mystery which is that. It has been observed in various model systems. That if you prevent sleep this causes that that means it just hasn't been a demonstration convincing demonstration. You could prevent animals from sleeping and and the day could survive without without it. So yes so you have to at least two possibly more Experiments writes the one in flies one in mice Going through a process of you. So you have a control and you have You have a immortal that That is Deprived of sleep floor. Mpg of time. How many days. So i guess could you talk about the frie- experimentalist and you found you. So yeah so. I'll saw just so basically again. The motivation for us was to understand what lack of sleep. That's you and let me just say that you know traditionally kind of house sleep is is usually Talked about is in terms of brain and the nervous system right so this is for for good reasons because you need the nervous system to go to sleep and of course we dream during that time and we know that if we skip even one night of sleep. We don't feel good the next day. It's hard to think to remember things etcetera but again animals. That are much simpler than us. Don't even have brains. That have very simple nervous systems. They they sleep and it seemed to us You know that that. Not all functional sleep could be this could be explained by these cognitive functions right so so we didn't just appear with these wonderfully complicated brain right so simple animals that we have evidence that sleep emerged in earliest status. And if this is true than probably some basic function so our idea was we really wanted to understand on what is it that lack of sleep does to the body or does to the animal. And let me just say. Clinical evidence shows that there's the lack of sleep can lead to various diseases which is another indication that it cannot really be all about the brain and so we didn't want to be married to decide. Yale sleep equals brain and we thought that okay if something goes wrong really without a melson and they die in. There should be some signature of impaired cell function or upsell that somewhere in dubai so we were not restricted to the brain and essentially de was to deprive animals of sleep and tried to do it with different methods or that of suppressing sleep of sleep deprivation and then look all over the bodies for signs of damage as so This is the work carried out primarily by a post. Docs in my lab. Alex vaccaro and llosa coupla door. And what.

dubai Alex vaccaro llosa coupla
"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"The chance that he will court is higher than if he is in a in a low motivational states and every time he touches the female he gets a story n. inhibitory inputs onto what we call command neurons courtship command neurons which drive the actual courtship behavior itself. And so you can imagine if you get both x citations. Something driving you forward any condition. Something sort of a holding you back that you could kind of bias. Right the expectation or inhibition and so don't towards more expectation incubation and so dopamine does is that it essentially lowers the probability that the that the dischord chip command neurons which dopamine inputs will be or. Get these excited. During inhibitory inputs will be inhibited. Wants the male when when the mail touches the female so that he has a higher chance of the excited by her. And there's constant of sort of push pull between between expectation and incubation. so essentially. he's the he's the quantity is the quantity of dopamine release that ultimately determines stoa outcome yes so so dopamine. The actual levels of dopamine are really important there so we found a a small set of dopaminergic neurons that are in the brain. So you have these. You have these what we call again a commander. Also these nores. The dr Sexual behavior courtship all male towards fem- case so these these are neurons that lie upstream of motor actions that the male takes right when he courts the female and we found In two thousand sixteen and this the work collaborative work with creek. More lab in these experiments were dod by a stephen shonda sheriff student between my lab and more lab and what stephen found is first of all established this paradigm that males get sexually Satiated did male flies get sexually satiated. And then he found essentially that there are there is an input to the goes from the male male's genitals to the brain to regulate the activity of these on of small set of dopamine neurons which then gates d..

stephen shonda stephen gates
"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

College Esports Takeover - Harvard Med Publishes Article on Health Impacts of Gaming

Esports Minute

02:16 min | 1 year ago

College Esports Takeover - Harvard Med Publishes Article on Health Impacts of Gaming

"Published by dr. Peter grinspoon. The article is titled the health effects of too much gaming and I'll link the article below before get into the article and my critique of it. I believe a key part of that title. I want to reiterate is too much gaming has plenty of cognitive benefits as we've discussed in the segment for the last two months, but doing anything all the time, especially sedentary activity like gaming is going to cause some health issues the article first mentions some of the studies and the benefits of gaming before diving into the potentially harmful downsides. The first downside is repetitive stress injuries particularly in the hands and wrists carpal tunnel is usually to go to example of this it's a potentially serious condition, but most Gamers know to do hand stretches while they play these days and that really is important every Thursday. Answer so it's been a few minutes doing some hand stretches and you'll generally be fine here. Just listen to your body. If your hand sort then stretch it it could cause issues but with a little bit of proper care, it probably won't them to mention obesity in the article. And this is where I have a critique as we covered last week Studies have actually found the competitive gamers are healthier than the general public but most Gamers aren't top-level Esports players and that's what that study was looking at home still this author cites a study from the journal of clinical nutrition and that study states that male adolescents Associated video game session with a higher rate of food consumption. But if you're wondering why I haven't covered that study it's because it was published in 2011 and the total testing group was just 22 people. I think it's fair to say the gaming has changed quite a bit since 2011 and that a study of twenty two people is not enough to back up this paragraph that Associates gaming with obesity and that's what the authors claiming here. He says straight out that obesity in teens is tied to video games dead. And that claim is certainly Up For Debate multiple studies found that the link does not exist until adulthood and even then it's pretty marginal a link a competing study below which disagrees with Vinings the author finishes up by mentioning that moderation is the key here, which I of course agree with but I think in this case, even though this was published by the Harvard Medical School a doctor had a conclusion in my mind and search for the studies to back it up. Now Harvard is of course a very prestigious school, but that does not necessarily mean that the author is completely without Folly here.

Peter Grinspoon Journal Of Clinical Nutrition Obesity Associates Gaming Vinings Harvard Medical School Harvard
How Food Affects Your Emotions with Dr. Naidoo

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

04:54 min | 1 year ago

How Food Affects Your Emotions with Dr. Naidoo

"In this more newly recognized. Feel so what an amazing feeling. Thank you so much for all the work that you do. You've got to list of credentials You're working with mass general. Harvard medical school serving on faculty list goes on and on you've been featured in wall street journal. Abc news harbor fresh goop and many others. And i'm really excited about having you on the show because your topic and your Focus on nutritional. Psychiatry is such an important part of health and healing. So thank you so much dr For being with us. Thank you so much for that. Lovely and kind introduction really appreciate the invitation and showing my work and and i'm standing admiration of the work you do as well so thank you for that. Thank you so. Let's i always like to start the podcast with the pain to passion. You know what was it in you that really triggered that desire to go down that half of traditional archery and you pretty much invented that term. I think You know. I i think in the united states. Suddenly there aren't many practitioners and this isn't a clinic so people have been kind enough to regard me and consider me a pioneer here that You know my johnny really began a back with my family. When i was a child there was always food love. Nutrition and nurturance lodge indian family many cooks in the kitchen But also many medical doctors and are practitioners of this that balance combination of science and nutrition but also nurturance and always brought that forward with me. And when i choose to study. Psychiatry is what most appealed to me. I found that the conversation. That really almost was part of my dna. In i mean within hindu roots it was always the mind body soul connection. There was always meditation. Mindfulness was proud of how we were raised. How we understood at spirituality sudden seventy my background was part of that. And so i felt it was a missing hot When i spoke with patients and it was a young resident in training. And i was learning you to the power of this prescription pad and i was really feeling that they in addition to that they needed more mechanisms to feel better and knew that medical school has this gap for most of us at some medical stool school. String better than others but but many a hostile behind. And i certainly didn't have enough of that. And i felt that that was something i wanted to learn. I will say that you know psychiatry. I loved i. Loved filling in that gap of nutrition but going to culinary school was a pure passion project because it was really about julia child being my food hero when i couldn't cook only lend to later life because they will always matters grandmothers. You know ons older siblings in the kitchen. And i would always be around but i learned how to because i loved signs but it really wasn't expected to cook in lodge in family and so my journey began later but my companion On public television was julia child and she helped me gain the confidence. Because i had moved far away from home and You know it was something that that i had learned to read about. Her life followed recipes realized. She had done this much later in life in his second. Create with autocrat to me. Why not me. And that's really how these these pieces came together for me. But they unexpectedly and in a way that i feel fortunate from very very good so essential number. Four in the seventy central system is to heal the emotional than we often talk about Mind action slow internet nutshell house. Our diet impacts are mood in our feelings. Our thoughts will. It's exactly as you just don't politically. It's it's the fact that many you know when we go on to talk to our doctors zip positions we have conversations about a family. His trip diabetes. So we have conversation about. I gained weight after the holidays. So you know what about my cholesterol. How should i eat. But we're not talking about food in the brain and that's where the emerging Evidence around the gut brain connection which has occurred over quite some time Really fills that gap you know the gut and brain originate from the exact same cells in the embryo. And then they remain connected throughout life by the vegas nov the tenth cranial nerve which connects the gut to the brain and the brain to the gut and simpson's a two way superhighway to chemical messages and other things to travel back and forth.

Harvard Medical School Abc News Wall Street Journal Archery Julia Johnny United States Diabetes Vegas Simpson
How Food Affects Your Emotions with Dr. Naidoo

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

04:54 min | 1 year ago

How Food Affects Your Emotions with Dr. Naidoo

"In this more newly recognized. Feel so what an amazing feeling. Thank you so much for all the work that you do. You've got to list of credentials You're working with mass general. Harvard medical school serving on faculty list goes on and on you've been featured in wall street journal. Abc news harbor fresh goop and many others. And i'm really excited about having you on the show because your topic and your Focus on nutritional. Psychiatry is such an important part of health and healing. So thank you so much dr For being with us. Thank you so much for that. Lovely and kind introduction really appreciate the invitation and showing my work and and i'm standing admiration of the work you do as well so thank you for that. Thank you so. Let's i always like to start the podcast with the pain to passion. You know what was it in you that really triggered that desire to go down that half of traditional archery and you pretty much invented that term. I think You know. I i think in the united states. Suddenly there aren't many practitioners and this isn't a clinic so people have been kind enough to regard me and consider me a pioneer here that You know my johnny really began a back with my family. When i was a child there was always food love. Nutrition and nurturance lodge indian family many cooks in the kitchen But also many medical doctors and are practitioners of this that balance combination of science and nutrition but also nurturance and always brought that forward with me. And when i choose to study. Psychiatry is what most appealed to me. I found that the conversation. That really almost was part of my dna. In i mean within hindu roots it was always the mind body soul connection. There was always meditation. Mindfulness was proud of how we were raised. How we understood at spirituality sudden seventy my background was part of that. And so i felt it was a missing hot When i spoke with patients and it was a young resident in training. And i was learning you to the power of this prescription pad and i was really feeling that they in addition to that they needed more mechanisms to feel better and knew that medical school has this gap for most of us at some medical stool school. String better than others but but many a hostile behind. And i certainly didn't have enough of that. And i felt that that was something i wanted to learn. I will say that you know psychiatry. I loved i. Loved filling in that gap of nutrition but going to culinary school was a pure passion project because it was really about julia child being my food hero when i couldn't cook only lend to later life because they will always matters grandmothers. You know ons older siblings in the kitchen. And i would always be around but i learned how to because i loved signs but it really wasn't expected to cook in lodge in family and so my journey began later but my companion On public television was julia child and she helped me gain the confidence. Because i had moved far away from home and You know it was something that that i had learned to read about. Her life followed recipes realized. She had done this much later in life in his second. Create with autocrat to me. Why not me. And that's really how these these pieces came together for me. But they unexpectedly and in a way that i feel fortunate from very very good so essential number. Four in the seventy central system is to heal the emotional than we often talk about Mind action slow internet nutshell house. Our diet impacts are mood in our feelings. Our thoughts will. It's exactly as you just don't politically. It's it's the fact that many you know when we go on to talk to our doctors zip positions we have conversations about a family. His trip diabetes. So we have conversation about. I gained weight after the holidays. So you know what about my cholesterol. How should i eat. But we're not talking about food in the brain and that's where the emerging Evidence around the gut brain connection which has occurred over quite some time Really fills that gap you know the gut and brain originate from the exact same cells in the embryo. And then they remain connected throughout life by the vegas nov the tenth cranial nerve which connects the gut to the brain and the brain to the gut and simpson's a two way superhighway to chemical messages and other things to travel back and forth.

Harvard Medical School Abc News Wall Street Journal Archery Julia Johnny United States Diabetes Vegas Simpson
FDA panel meeting could lead to Pfizer vaccine emergency use OK

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

FDA panel meeting could lead to Pfizer vaccine emergency use OK

"FDA is Vaccine advisory panel is meeting today to discuss approving the emergency use of the Visor covert vaccine. Harvard Medical School's doctor offered. Levy, a voting member on the advisory committee says he believes the fives the vaccine is safe and effective. We don't have a license for authorized Corona virus vaccine as we speak right now. So even if the efficacy had only been 50 or 60%, you know we would have said Well, it's not optimal, but it's better than having nothing were you know right now looks like 95% that that's like hitting it out of the ballpark in terms of

Vaccine Advisory Panel Harvard Medical School FDA Levy
Biden Names His Picks For Key Players On His Pandemic Advisory Team

All Things Considered

04:28 min | 1 year ago

Biden Names His Picks For Key Players On His Pandemic Advisory Team

"Joe Biden takes office next month, one of his first priorities will be responding to the pandemic, and today he named his picks for key players who will advise him on how to contain it and how to get people vaccinated. His picks include some very familiar faces and some new faces to joining us now from Wilmington, Delaware. To talk about all of this is NPR. White House correspondent Tamara Keith. Hey, Tam. Hey, Elsa. All right, so let's just start off with perhaps the most familiar face on this team, Dr Anthony Fauci. What, exactly Well, his will be one bite and becomes president. Dr. Fauci will continue to lead the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases where he's been involved in vaccine development. And he will also be an adviser to the president. The president elect now On covert 19. He said on CNN that he thought his role would be similar, though What he didn't say is that Biden is a lot more likely to listen to him on a regular basis than President Trump has been certainly of late. Fauci will bring continuity between the administration's and he knows all the new players, including Biden's pick for the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Rachelle Wolinsky, as well as his pick for surgeon general Vivek Murthy. Here's what he said on CNN today. I know both Rochelle Walensky and Vivek Murthy very well. I mean, I've been working with the back for years when he was the surgeon general during the Obama administration and Rochelle Wolinsky has been a colleague of mine. She's an infectious disease expert. From Harvard Medical School in Massachusetts General Hospital. Now the CDC director job doesn't require Senate confirmation, but surgeon General will and Murthy had a difficult time getting confirmed last time because of his work on gun safety issues, Right. Okay, there's another doctor on this list. Marcella newness, Smith. Of Yale School of Medicine. What is her role going to be? She's going to lead something that Biden is creating called the Cove it 19 Equity Task Force. As we all know. By now, the burden of covert 19 has been disproportionately felt by people of color, and Nunez Smith is the founding director. Of Yale's Equity Research and Innovation Center. She's been working on this issue extensively and building trust in communities that don't necessarily trust the medical community or vaccines. Let's Turn now to the pick for health and human services secretary. The person who will be getting that job is state Attorney general of California, Javi Airbus era. He's also former congressman. Why do you think the Sarah was selected for this particular job? You know, he's been actively involved in defending the Affordable Care act, leading a coalition of states fighting to save it all the way to the Supreme Court. He spoke about that effort last year on all things considered, Americans are fed up with uncertainty. When it comes to whether or not they can send their child to a doctor or the hospital. We deserve to have certainty. Health care is not some widget that you play with its life and death. But beyond that, while attorney general in California he went after a major hospital system in the state for anti competitive practices. He backed legislation aimed at preventing drug companies from keeping generic drugs off the market. And the thought is that he may be able to bring some of that experience and energy to bringing down health care costs. He would also be the first Latino to lead the department. He grew up in Sacramento with working class immigrant parents. He got into Stanford, according to his official bio after fishing and application out of the trash that his friend and thrown away his personal story is something that you can expect to see Biden and his team highlight, especially since Biden's been under pressure to make good on his promise to have a diverse cabinet, right. Lastly, there is a White House position. Jeff Science will be the coordinator of the pandemic response. He's also gonna be a counselor to the president. There has been some pushback right to this particular selection from progressives right? He was a top economic official in the Obama White House. He famously was brought in to help after that disastrous rollout of healthcare dot Gove and save the launch of the Affordable Care Act. There has been pushed back as you say, from progressives to his appointment. He comes from the business world since leaving government he's Leading investment firm, and he also served on the Facebook board of directors for a time. The reality, though, is that this doesn't require Senate confirmation. And even those who object to some of his connections concede he is good at managing systems and solving problems in a crisis that is NPR. White House correspondent Tamara Keith. Thank you, Tam. You're welcome, Elsa.

Vivek Murthy Biden Tamara Keith Dr Anthony Fauci Dr. Fauci President Trump Rachelle Wolinsky Rochelle Walensky Obama Administration Rochelle Wolinsky Centers For Disease Control An CNN Equity Task Force Nunez Smith Equity Research And Innovation National Institute Of Allergy Joe Biden Fauci White House Elsa
Biden announces key appointees to health team

WBZ Midday News

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Biden announces key appointees to health team

"Joe Biden's announce some key members of his health team as they prepare to inherit the fight against coronavirus in any let Joe Biden announced more nominations to help lead his health policies. Nominees include California Attorney General Javier but Sarah to be the Health and Human Services secretary, Dr Vivek Murthy To once again be the U. S Surgeon General and Dr Rochelle will Lansky to head up the Centers for Disease Control. Dr. Wilensky is the chief of infectious diseases at Mass General Hospital in a professor at Harvard Medical School. In a tweet, Dr Wilensky says, I'm honored to be called to lead the brilliant team. At the C. D. C. Appearing

Joe Biden Attorney General Javier Dr Vivek Murthy Dr Rochelle Dr. Wilensky Health And Human Services Lansky Mass General Hospital Sarah California Centers For Disease Control Dr Wilensky Harvard Medical School
"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest today is professor. Gordon fischel. Who's a professor of neurobiology at harvard medical school and the stanley center at the and secured. He's a developmental noodle. Biologists interested called the architecture brain. Circuits are assembled with a special focus on the diverse populations of inhibitory interneuron though. Come guard great to be here. Yes so thanks for doing this. I want to use one of your papers. Due to sort of set the context for our conversation at it's entitled interneuron tights asset tractors and controllers in bq say cola into neurons display striking differences in shape. Physiology another attributes channing to appropriately classified them. A you save the previously suggested that interneuron types should be defined by the role in quantico processing. But here you revisit the question hub to fly that diversity based on the division of labor and function as controllers and cortex information flow I it's So before we get into do it. Gaudino i kept some interest. Do not typically intelligence Clearly be kevin really progress that lot window. They're sort of hype hype around it and You know. I think a more detailed understanding of the mechanics of the rain is not only useful for neurobiology. But also for other feels so before we get into. What exactly is an interneuron. It's pretty much what it sounds like. It is a noor on that connects to another neuron so and interface between two different neurons in the context. I use it they're also local interneuron. Which is to say. There are lots of neurons talk to other neurons matter of fact that is the characteristic of most neurons in your brain. These ones Restrict their connections both in input output to very local areas so they're part of a computation folk pho sai in the brain rather than being distributed across different functional areas. And in our case they are entirely. Inhibitory in nature so computational just level Because something like humans have something like hundred billion neurons in a typical rain that that is the number of heard. Bantered around yes. Approximately and and these things are Sort of is collected think about neurons sort of communication vehicles sort of cables and the interneuron saw doing the computation is the right way to think about it. I think there's a real danger. Particularly particularly people in computer. Sciences attended think of circuits in the brain like circuits in an electronic board and maybe that is becoming truer. I'm not a computer scientist. But.

professor Gordon fischel harvard medical school stanley center quantico channing scientist kevin
"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"On basic and trick research to prevent and treat Parkinson's disease and later neurological and eight disorders. He's a founding director of the Neuro re-generation, research institute at McLean. Hospital. Of Neurology and neuroscience at Harvard Medical School. Preface of neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital. and was elected fellow of the American Association for Advanced and assigns. He's the author or CO author of over three hundred scientific research publications in your science technology. And books in his field. Delta Molly. Here. I know that you have done a tremendous amount of loose age in neuroscience neurology. indy picked few papers for to have have a discussion and and one of them s entitled Nola Songs and concepts emerging from Lipid cell biology relevant to degenerative brain aging and to seize. Invite. You say while rare familial forms of Alpha the can cause Parkinson's disease. Lewy body dementia, an easily to dementias. Recent, in-depth studies of Lipid disturbances in the majority of the common forms of this diseases instance suggest a privately genesis in liquid pathways. So. So this is different from conventional wisdom. Isn't it? Would you like to talk a bit about the of Research Direction here? Yes. That's right the. Conventional Wisdom has told us that what you see in a brain autopsy it is the problem what we see in Alzheimer's Disease in Argosy a theology is usually some protein aggregates. In the case of park the they're called buddies. Made aggregate of UPN. Alzheimer's disease we see data, but I won't be searching. Rather than the protein aggregating being the course of the disease. it may be more underlying actress trying that increase the compensatory reaction. to brain so do and so. Consequently, if there are other underlying causes you would need to Expose, Problems I. Right so. So. So in terms of the Lipid Issues are there other specific areas that you are you looking at what types of lipids and you know what the mechanism might be? Yes. So he wasn't surprising. I'm medical discovery.

Alzheimer's Disease founding director Conventional Wisdom Harvard Medical School UPN Massachusetts General Hospital Delta American Association for Advan
"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"harvard medical school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

"harvard medical school" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"harvard medical school" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"We also have a member of the faculty at Harvard Medical School saying that if you're gonna be flying you really don't need to worry about the air inside the plane Dr Joseph Alan of Harvard says that error is not going to be your biggest concern he says there are other things that you'll be concerned about on the airplane like I said the air quality is pretty good you bring in a lot of air and everything all of the air is filtered through a help a filter high efficiency filter that captures ninety nine point nine percent seven percent of airborne particles I'm worried about what airports are doing there it's hard to think about how they're gonna handle queues at the security gate how they gonna handle queues at boarding yeah he says that's where he's concerned as you're in these lines it's crowded that's more of a concern of picking up coronavirus can't you just throw down the feet that all the stores have you stand here the next layer six feet apart one I mean they've already figured it out for stores why can't they figure it out for the airport and and have a word you say what you're going to get a you're going to get your boarding pass do everything online she'll have to touch anybody or get a piece of paper yes get get in the car the same way prepay keys will be in the car and go and let's be honest there's not big lines right now no no it's down ninety two percent compared to the same time last year but Dr Joseph Allen of Harvard Medical School says look it it is a concern he says the very best thing is wear a mask and keep washing your hands were individuals to this you have to be hyper vigilant as you're going through the airport and boarding and on the airplane and when you're on your seat turn on the air flow pointed directly down I think if we put in these later defense control strategies we can get to a point where we can reduce risk of course there's no such thing as zero risk in anything we do bingo yeah all right we want to get some of your thoughts you can call you can Texas here's the number five one two eight three six zero five ninety get in here and join us three eleven now with mark ed and Melinda at McDonald's was still here even though a lot has changed it's good to know some things have changed at all right it's Jamie progress is number one number two employee leave a message at the Hey Jimmy it's me Jamie this is your daily pep talk I know it's been rough going ever since people found out about your archipelagos Matt harmony but you will bounce back I mean you're the guy always helping people find coverage options with a name your.

Harvard Medical School
"harvard medical school" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"harvard medical school" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Harvard Medical School in medical oncology which is the study and practice of cancer treatment chemo treatment three more years Ford certified second board certification number three Harvard Medical School joint center for radiation therapy three more years radiation oncology practice and treatment of radiation for cancer nine years after medical school the only Harvard trained triple board certified cancer doctor in New York one of the few in the world thirty four Broadway seeing patients with newly diagnosed cancers and recurrent cancers primary cancers that means cancers where they started or even cancers of traveled metastatic cancers even if prior chemo or radiation or surgery didn't work or isn't wanted or isn't tolerated we see so many people like this man he just did not want to forming surgery I see so many people like so many women who do not want to forming surgery or removal of their breast or other parts of their body we see so many people with prostate cancers and bladder cancers involve or cancers and kidney cancers colon cancers paying gruesome liver along we just don't want radical surgery who prefer Bon invasive out patient therapy to sleep in their own bad every day that's what we do here at thirteen eighty four Broadway we have lots of information to send you can call our office even now you call our office there night at two one two choices two one two two four six forty two thirty seven two one two two four six forty two thirty seven our office even though to get information about our work or you go online website is listeners save lives dot com. listeners save lives. com but in such a leader and we'll be right back prostate cancer news New York times highlighted great risks of prostate cancer and black men one in six black men will get prostate cancer and one in twenty three black men will die of prostate cancer.

Harvard Medical School Ford Harvard Medical School joint c New York Broadway Bon New York times prostate cancer Harvard nine years
"harvard medical school" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"harvard medical school" Discussed on 710 WOR

"This is data from Harvard Medical School me saying this on the relating the facts that exist. That eighty percent of men who opened surgery will have urinary problems and eighty six point eight percent hub robotic web sexual problems. You automatically know that most men will have urinary problems or sexual problems who have had surgery. I don't have to tell you. And I see that all the time. I see many many patients had many of my patients, we have men and women equal numbers of our men. Patients have had surgery at fortunately the man who called me today. And now not only most likely does he have the sexual neurotic, but his PSA's rising strike one strike to strike three his PSA's rising. Well after surgery opener robotic surgery, the PSA should be zero. The surgeon was supposed to remove all the prostate or move all the cancer. So why is this man who went to a super duper place? Why is this man's PSA rising? There's only one reason. And that's reason is that the cancer is back. So. He paid the price with surgery paid the price with sexual issues paid the price with urinary issues. He paid the price financially opened up his wallet and paid and probably his insurance company paid much more. And now the cancer is back. Well, he has one more chance to be cancer free. That is to come to us for pinpoint treatment to try to kill the cancer cells that the surgeon left behind so the PSA should be zero. After radical surgery. I'm not advocating radical surgery. I really don't believe in it. I think that established stating for most man, I think it changes men's quality of life in a very very bad way. I think that our results, and you can look at the data if you believe in data, and if you believe in facts that you can see the data, and for example.

Harvard Medical School eighty percent eight percent