35 Burst results for "Harvard Law School"

General Mark Milley Fails to Acknowledge Communist Roots of Critical Theory

Mark Levin

01:23 min | Last month

General Mark Milley Fails to Acknowledge Communist Roots of Critical Theory

"Isn't it isn't a typical though, like a lib. You're attacking the military. So now we're attacking the military. Those of us who are trying to protect the military try to get them back in their lane. The military that's buckling. To the propaganda and the programming. The most radical elements in our society and our law schools. Push by our so called Commander in chief. Now we You and I are attacking the military by defending the military. What kind of a jerk is this? That guy who likes Being the head of the joint Chiefs because this is the only way it works when your complete sell out, and he's a complete seller. Go ahead. Seeing some theories that are out there that was started Harvard Law school years ago, and it proposed that there were laws in the United States actually started before Harvard. Nice try. Why don't you mention Herbert? Marcus is a communist. Why don't you mention then he came to the United States from Berlin and the Franklin swill of Communists. Why don't you mention that he is the founding father of critical theory? And then you say it came from Harvard Law School. It came from him first. Then it worked its way to Stanford and Harvard and all the rest. Why don't you mention the marks is underpinnings of this ideology, But you didn't not once.

Harvard Law School Joint Chiefs United States Harvard Herbert Marcus Berlin Stanford
Black Lives Matter Co-Founder Patrisse Cullors Set For UCLA Commencement Speech Despite Anti-Israel Comments

Mark Levin

02:08 min | Last month

Black Lives Matter Co-Founder Patrisse Cullors Set For UCLA Commencement Speech Despite Anti-Israel Comments

"Was set to deliver a virtual commencement address for use UCLA's Luskin School of Public Affairs. Despite scrutiny of her past critical remarks concerning is rather school's dean. Confirm, Colliers called for an end to the Israeli state. While participating in a 2015 panel at Harvard Law School, So an end to the Israeli state would mean a second Holocaust. You would need to slaughter the Jews. Because they're the indigenous peoples there so you'd have to literally slaughter the Jews a second Holocaust. That's what the Black lives matter. Co founder is advancing. People wearing this name on their shirts. They might as well put swastikas on their shirts as far as I'm concerned. And I'm very serious about this, and it's about time. Everybody talk up here. It's it's Pass no more passes. She called for an end to the Israeli state. Which means what It's like Talib. Pushing them into the river into the, uh into the Mediterranean Sea. People talking like this. It's unbelievable. Palestine is our generation South Africa, Collier said at the event. Now, how could it be our generation South Africa when the Jews of the indigenous people I wanted to democracy that allows Non Jews to participate fully in the process. If we don't step up boldly and courageously to end the imperialist project that's called Israel Word doomed, she says. Meanwhile, U C L. A S decision to host Colliers as a commencement speaker. Despite her anti Semitism didn't seem to have enough concern. You see La Luskin School of Public Affairs Dean Gary Segura. Defended the decision in a statement of the Jewish Journal He said. Respect for diversity of opinion on matters of public concern is a key tenet. Okay? He goes on. Diversity of opinion. Somebody wants to wipe you out. That's a

Luskin School Of Public Affair Colliers Harvard Law School Ucla South Africa Talib Mediterranean Sea Collier Palestine La Luskin School Of Public Aff Dean Gary Segura Jewish Journal Israel
Breyer says big Supreme Court changes could diminish trust

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 4 months ago

Breyer says big Supreme Court changes could diminish trust

"Supreme Court justice Stephen Bryer is urging caution for those who propose changing the makeup of the court such as expanding the number of justices justice Stephen Bryer says liberal advocates of big changes including adding more justices to the Supreme Court should think long and hard about what they're proposing he says politically driven change could diminish the trust that Americans place in the court Breyer's comments are from the text of a speech he gave remotely to the Harvard Law School of which he is an alumnus prior noted that despite a conservative majority he and his colleagues stayed out of the twenty twenty election battle supported Louisiana abortion clinics and rejected efforts to end legal protections for immigrants who entered the U. S. as children Briar at eighty two is the oldest justice and is facing some pressure to retire now while Democrats hold the White House and have a slim edge in the Senate Jackie Quinn Washington

Justice Stephen Bryer Stephen Bryer Supreme Court Breyer Harvard Law School Louisiana White House Jackie Quinn Washington Senate
Merrick Garland Confirmation Hearing For AG

Morning Edition

06:35 min | 5 months ago

Merrick Garland Confirmation Hearing For AG

"But today is all about Merrick Garland. He'll appear before the Senate to take questions from lawmakers for the position of attorney general. Most people know Merrick Garland's name because of something that didn't happen. Garland never got a hearing after President Obama nominated him to serve on the Supreme Court five years ago. Here's NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Merrick Garland has devoted nearly 45 years to the law. But he didn't start out that way is, he told Professor Martha Minnow at Harvard Law School in 2016. Why don't you go to law school in the first place? Chemistry, well chemistry and math. Garland had planned to become a doctor. He wanted to help people one on one, but his collision with the hard sciences spun him toward the law, where he's looked for that sort of direct connection ever since. In the mid 19 eighties. At his law firm in Washington, Garland became a rising star. He made time for a young college graduate who worked in the copy center to Randy Thompson says Garland reviewed one of his papers, photocopied it and rearrange the paragraphs. That was the beginning of In essence and becoming a riding coach. For me, it was just extraordinary experience and became my coach. Eventually, my mentor and 30 something years later, a friend. Eventually Garland Road, MMA reference for law school and has kept in touch ever since, Thompson says garlands Still a little old school still humble, still looking to help. The only thing that really has changed about him, And I guess me as well is the color of hair. I don't know, well respected judge as attorney general. Help get the department under the quagmire of partisan politics that many people think it devolved to under President Trump and Attorney General Bar That's Georgetown law professor Paul Butler. He says the DOJ has been reeling from political scandals and racing to confront the threat from homegrown extremists. Merrick Garland has faced both before. After clerking on the Supreme Court. Garland took a job as an advisor in President Jimmy Carter's Justice Department. In those years after Watergate, DOJ struggled to separate partisan influence from law enforcement and establish new boundaries for the FBI. Garland also played a bit part in some of the biggest investigations of that era from political corruption to national security that Garland says later turned into hit movies. American Hustle about the Abscam case. Argo about the ex filtration of hostages in Iran and the most important the miracle on ice. Which was about the Lake Placid Olympics, where I did work on the security for the Olympics By the 19 nineties, Garland was prosecuting a violent gang that terrorized people in a public housing project. And helping build a case against DC's mayor Marion Barry. On drug charges Back inside Justice Department headquarters, Garland became the man to see for the hardest problems. The car bomb exploded outside of a large federal building in downtown Oklahoma City, Garland would soon travel to the site of the most deadly domestic terror plot in American history. 168 people died in that bombing in Oklahoma. Former deputy Attorney General Jamie Go Relic remembers watching that day with Garland by her side, he basically said while watching Children being pulled out of the wreckage. That he had to go. He really wanted to go. We both had young Children at the time and What we saw on those screens was so affecting. Garland oversaw the search warrants protected the chain of evidence and insisted that reporters have access to court proceedings. We wanted somebody Who could make sure that the investigation was done by the book. And that any indictment was bulletproof. Prosecutors later convicted Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols for their role in that bombing. Former prosecutor Beth Wilkinson says Garland played an important role in other confrontations with extremists in those years, including a standoff with the heavily armed Montana free Men. One of the examples I can think of is sometimes and there were these stand downs where there would be, you know, arrest warrants for someone, or there would be some kind of controversy between people who were challenging the federal government. America's first instinct wasn't to go in and arrest everyone. It was to try and along with the FBI to see if there's a dispute could be resolved. Wilkinson says. The FBI went on to arrest those men later. She credited garlands, quick thinking and cool head that may have prevented a tragic outcome. Just about the only criticism Garland's nomination has drawn is in the area of civil rights. Garland is a moderate, so I don't see him as the bold and visionary leader or racial justice that some people were hoping for again. Georgetown law professor Paul Butler that he's not an ideologue is both discerning for people who want an attorney general. To meet this moment of national reckoning inspired by the movement for Black lives and the killing of George Floyd Butler says he thinks girls just from the White House long time civil rights advocate Wade Henderson says Garland is up to the task. But Henderson says it's a big one. The next attorney general, for example, has to do everything In his or her power to fight for voting rights. Police reform Criminal justice reform and LGBT Q equality. For the past 23 years, Garland has been a federal appeals court judge in that role, he doesn't have much of a chance to share his personal views. Carolyn Lerner, the chief mediator at the courthouse, says Garland took an early, an important lead to update policies that protect workers from sexual harassment and other misconduct. I think it's very clear that Judge Garland cares a lot about these issues, and he really wants employees to be happy and comfortable in the workplace, and when he was chief judge, he took his responsibility. To these employees very seriously, she says. Garland wants to continue another of his projects at the Justice Department tutoring sessions with a young public school student. This year. The judge is working with an 11 year old boy and his twin sister. Your mom is Andrea Tucker. He makes this so interactive for them and so much fun and they can't get enough of it. It's the kind of public service that Garland has always wanted to

Garland Merrick Garland Justice Department Carrie Johnson Professor Martha Minnow Randy Thompson President Trump Paul Butler Supreme Court FBI Harvard Law School Jamie Go Olympics Georgetown NPR Beth Wilkinson President Obama Marion Barry Senate Jimmy Carter
Egypt and the Arab Winter

Between The Lines

04:40 min | 6 months ago

Egypt and the Arab Winter

"Arab spring. Well who doesn't love a democratic revolution. Who's not moved by. Brave protests is calling for the downfall of a brutal regime well a decade ago. That's precisely what happened in the streets of cairo and alexandria a wall of sound as egypt's vice president. I'm sulaiman announces that president hosni mubarak will step down the merciful. The compassionate seasons mahamat house entrusting mubarak has decided a month as president of the republic might have seconds after the announcement. Cairo erupted in celebrations. We are extremely happy. We are all aspiring future for egypt. We are not depending on the government anymore. This is the egyptian people. And this is the base of the new constitution now. The worldwide far the greater the egyptian uprising that culminated in the downfall of mubarak. This is ten years ago so february. Twenty eleven all. That was entirely understandable. Wasn't it after all all revolutions at least in the first few days they blissful and remember every tarn across the water arab world trembled. We already had president ali. Fleeing tunisia albany mubarak of course was toppled. Gaddafi was killed by fellow libyans. Assad of course. Vice the syrian sunni rebellion however. The egyptian uprising did not deliver a democratic outcome. Nor did the cycled arab spring really amount to a more liberal future for the region. Why noah feldman is professor of law at harvard law school. He's author of the arab winter. Tragedy noah welcome to. Abc's radio national. Thank you for having me take us back a decade ago so to the wave of popular protests that swept the middle east. There was something profoundly moving for anybody who cares about freedom in watching large numbers of people say enough is enough. We want to have a say in how things are done in our country and we want dignity and we want social justice and we want freedom. And that i think was the reason that all over the world people responded so positively to the arab spring. It's also the reason that the impulse to have these kinds of protests and change spread across the arabic speaking world to so many countries and so there was a sense of optimism but also a sense of gee what will come next and i think in some countries more than others a worry that what might come next might not be as positive as the protesters hoped what comes next. I mean for generations. It was widely believed that arabs. As opposed to site asians europeans africans latin americans. The widespread view was that arabs. Were uniquely allergic to democracy and of course the arab spring challenged narrative yet use site new book quote. It brought little good. The arab spring ultimately made many people's lives worse than they were before house are. That's a painful realization to reach especially for someone like me who believes very fundamentally that there is no country no culture no group of people organized by region or religion or language who have less in the way of aspiration to self government and freedom than any other but ultimately the reason i can conclude that it brought more harm than good. Is that in egypt. The process that began with democratization and experiment ended in a new dictatorship is bad and in many ways worse than the one that came before in syria the process of arab spring ultimate gave way to a vicious improve civil war. The gun to be sure by the syrian regime in its own defense that left almost half the population displaced either internally or externally and killed hundreds of thousands of people and pretty much the place in the arab world where things are measurably better as a result of the arab. Spring is the tiny country of tunisia. Which has actually the odds to build a functioning constitutional democracy. They still a lot of other problems. But that's just a tiny tiny piece of the much bigger picture in which things are either no better or in some cases much worse

Mubarak President Hosni Mubarak Mahamat House Egypt President Ali Noah Feldman Sulaiman Cairo Alexandria Tunisia Assad Gaddafi Harvard Law School Albany ABC Middle East Syria
Facebook 'Supreme Court' Orders Social Network To Restore 4 Posts In 1st Rulings

Marketplace

03:42 min | 6 months ago

Facebook 'Supreme Court' Orders Social Network To Restore 4 Posts In 1st Rulings

"Facebook has created its own sort of Supreme Court. It's an oversight board that has the final say on some of its hardest decisions over what users can and cannot post. Today. That board issued its first rulings it ordered the social network to restore several posts that it had removed for breaking Facebook rules. NPR TECH correspondent Shannon Bond joins us now to explain Hey, Shannon. Hey, Elsa. So we should first note. Facebook is among MPR's financial supporters. All right, So Shannon tell us a little more about some of the cases this board considered. Yeah, there were five and total announced today. And in each of these, the board was reviewing post that Facebook had taken down for violating policies against things like hate speech, nudity and harmful misinformation about covert 19. And when you dig into the details of these rulings, you know, enforcing these rules is really complicated. And ultimately, the board overturned. Facebook's decision to remove in four of these first five cases, huh? Okay, so give us a quick example. Right. So in one case, Facebook had removed a post from a user in Myanmar, who had suggested there was something wrong with Muslims and Facebook says this broke its rules against hate speech. This is an especially fraught issue because, of course, Facebook has been criticized for its role in the genocide of the country's Muslim minority. The board looked at this and said, You know, if you take into consideration the full context this post was pejorative. But the board didn't think it crossed the line into hate speech. And so it said, Facebook needs more justification. If it's going to take down post like this. And the board told Facebook to reinstate it Now Facebook has agreed to abide by these rulings and the post is already back up. Wait. So who is on this board? Exactly? Admit up of 20 international experts. They're mainly and things like law and human rights. But there's also a Nobel peace Laureates and journalists and even the former prime minister of Denmark. It was created by Facebook last year, and it's funded by Facebook through an independent trust. And do you think these decisions give us any clues as to how the board sees its overall role? I spoke to Evelyn Do ek Harvard Law School lecture has been following the board very closely. These five cases even though it's only five cases out of the thousands or millions of decisions that Facebook makes in awake are a true shot across the bow from the oversight board to Facebook. She says. It's a shot across the bop bow because the board is taking aim directly at some of Facebook's policies and enforcement, you know, warned about the extent to which the company relies on artificial intelligence that says those systems need more human oversight. It emphasized taking context into account, and it wants Facebook to just be much more clear about its rules on policies like health, misinformation or Dangerous groups. You know, Elsa, we know Facebook has this immense power over what it's billions of users composed. Now it's created this board and from what we've seen today, the board has ambitions to be a real check on that power. You know, it's kind of flexing its muscles so interesting. Well, what I did notice is we did not here today about Facebook's decision to suspend former President Trump after The whole insurrection at the Capitol in January. 6th. What do we know about the board's review of that case? Right. Facebook reviewed the Trump suspension to the board last week. This is the case everyone has their eyes on. Of course, right. It's a huge deal. The board is opening up for public comment tomorrow, and it has about three months to make a ruling, And ultimately it's going to be up to the board to settle this very fraught debate over whether Trump should get his account back, so we'll stay tuned. That is NPR's Shannon Bond. Thank you, Shannon. Thanks, Elsa.

Facebook Shannon Bond Shannon Elsa MPR Ek Harvard Law School NPR Supreme Court Myanmar Evelyn Denmark President Trump Donald Trump
"harvard law school" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:34 min | 7 months ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Harvard students seek to revoke Trump graduates diplomas after Capitol Hill violence Well, how about after all the riots over the caress of the last year? Again. I looked up more stuff. It's what I do. Today, and it turns out the riots over the summer last Wednesday, Doesn't you know that's a drop in the ocean? The riot's over the summer more than $2 billion in damage That is the largest dollar figure for riots in the history of the country, and the news media will never even mention it. Nobody in the corrupt news media will ever even mention it more than $2 billion coast to coast. The greatest dollar figure. Largest dollar figure from riots in the history of the United States. More than 2000 police officers injured wounded hundreds hospitalized by the left wing riots across the country. The news media will never mention that alright, Trump people are all terrorists. And and so on, Right? And now here come the friend and they're never gonna bring it up. How many thousands of businesses we may never know who is David Dorn, not a single Democrat in America knows Harvard students think to revoke Trump graduates diplomas after capital of odds revoked degrees off Kayleigh Mcenany, or, I think is Harvard and Harvard Law School. Ted Cruz, who I think may be Harvard and Harvard Law School. Also, I know he's Harvard Law School. And representative Dan Crenshaw. I lost his I've fighting the troubling tights from hell Seeking to destroy civilization. Dan Crenshaw. He went to Harvard to what about Tom Cotton? He went to Harvard. On Harvard long You should go to repeal them, too. Didn't work for Trump. So this is this is the unpersuaded as George Orwell is not what it was to be a nun person on the UN person Ng of people and Harvard. They're in it up to their eyeballs. This anti American, It's it's Harvard. I mean, honestly, they discriminate based on race against Asians because Asians are too smart. For Harvard and Harvard is too stupid for Asians, so they actively and openly discriminate against rations and white people because they're Racists. That's the short version. So the petition to revoke the degrees is called circulated by students there that go to Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. Naturally, I was reading from one of the Radicals own played audio of one of the radicals at the Kennedy School of Government, saying absolutely UN American Radical stuff. Yesterday on MSNBC. I played the audio They're prepared to take a stand for representative democracy that that they don't know what these words mean. They're brainwashed, indoctrinated radicals, and they want to destroy the electoral college. No true democracy is one man. One vote. Yeah, Yeah. One time. A Z wave scene again and again and against the violent white supremacy. This is what they say, prepared to take a stand for representative democracy that means doing away with the Electoral college, which would completely corrupt everything and lead to violent civil work. And about 10 years take about watch the documentary on Amazon called Safeguard about the electoral college and then get back to me, okay? And against violent white supremacy. There's here they say that protest last week is white supremacy because they used the words, but they don't know what they mean. So they want all the Trump administration people that and Cruz and crunch are not Trump Administration people..

Harvard Harvard Law School Trump representative Dan Crenshaw Kennedy School of Government Tom Cotton United States UN George Orwell MSNBC David Dorn Kayleigh Mcenany Amazon America
Loneliness and Litigation: A Lawyer's Case Study

The Psych Central Show

04:23 min | 8 months ago

Loneliness and Litigation: A Lawyer's Case Study

"Doctor. Freiberg welcome to the show. Thank you so very much dr freiberg. We are here to discuss loneliness. And i promise. We're going to get to that. But i'd be remiss if i didn't ask your thoughts on the differences between being a social psychologist and a lawyer. What's that like well. It proved interesting for me. I became a social psychologist. I and i was professor for a decade at boston university. And then i had a chance to go across the river and go to harvard law school so i wasn't gonna turn that down. I became a lawyer and then it pretty quickly became clear that criss crossing the to expertise gave me of field of work. It was unlike anybody else. No one else in in boston. Had both degrees and they're pretty quickly became what was sort of called around towns. The site lawyer. Boston's psych lawyer so institutions and agencies anything to do with psychiatry or psychology or clinical. Social work asked me to be their general counsel and it was in the context of being general counsel that i heard about so many clinical cases and that became the material for my research. You define loneliness differently from others. Can you tell us about that. Indeed what i thought. I discovered over thirty five years of being council to a great percentage of boston. Psychiatrists psychologists and clinical social workers was that they kept reporting more and more loneliness sure. Their clients had other issues as well but the clients kept talking about being enormously disconnected from others not having anybody to live with anybody in their life nobody to call more and more as the years went by loneliness became ever more present. I started just think about this topic and the more i researched it. It struck me that loneliness is not an emotion like anger or happiness. It's a sensation like hunger or thirst so just since our body tells us up were hungry thirsty it also says. I feel really lonely and disconnected. After hearing that definition it makes a little more sense this next statement because you consider chronic loneliness a public health crisis of the first order. They surgeon general of the united states. Vivek murthy the nineteenth surgeon general about a decade ago said we are actually experienced an epidemic of loneliness about thirty five percent of the american population in two thousand ten reported feeling chronically lonely and what i mean by that we all feel lonely from time to time. How could we not. But that's not like being chronically. Lonely just like being sad it's not like being clinically depressed. As a huge difference. Chronic loneliness is in the land in the last fifty years evermore so and it correlates with much worse health in much shorter life span. So it's serious. It sounds very serious but one of the things that i keep thinking about is people are enmeshed around other people may have social media so even when you're at home you're around other people. We work in offices. Now i know cove it has changed that a little bit but i just. I'm trying to think of the last time that i was truly alone. And i can't come up with it even as i sit here interviewing you. My phone will ding. I'm never not surrounded by people. I guess my question is how can people still feel so lonely. Given how connected our world is. But that's the key question because there are two pathways to loan one. Pathway is being alone being isolated being disconnected but a different pathway is being surrounded by people as you described but not benefiting from those relationships not feeling nourished not feeling nurtured not feeling sues. People are objectively lonely. 'cause they're all divorced off from anybody they don't have anybody in their lives but just as many people become chronically lonely surrounded by others

Dr Freiberg Freiberg Boston Harvard Law School Boston University Vivek Murthy Chronic Loneliness United States
The lasting influence of the Tofurky

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 8 months ago

The lasting influence of the Tofurky

"Twenty five years ago a food called tofurkey made its debut on grocery store shelves since then the tofu bass rose has become a beloved part of many vegetarians. Holiday feasts tofurkey. Thanksgiving are forever intimately tied in my heart. Yon duke of inches of visiting fellow at harvard law. School's animal law and policy program. He says tofurkey with different from most vegetarian fare. Because it could actually stand in for a turkey roast that allows me to be at thanksgiving meal having a sort of centerpiece of my own and not just eating stuffing and nibbling on veggies and today there are many more meat alternatives on the market some brands such as impossible foods and beyond meat work hard to appeal not only vegetarians but meat lovers to the strategy has been to offer product. That's as close as possible in taste texture and price to the product that meat consumers are already eating producing plant based proteins much less carbon pollution than animal agriculture. So duke of it says making plant based foods that appeal even a mediators can help reduce global warming on thanksgiving or any day of the year

Harvard Law YON
Climate Activists Want Biden To Bar Appointees With Fossil Fuel Ties

Environment: NPR

03:27 min | 9 months ago

Climate Activists Want Biden To Bar Appointees With Fossil Fuel Ties

"Joe biden has an ambitious climate plan and there are a lot of people with government experience. Who could help implement that plan. But some of them have ties to fossil fuel industries and that is a problem for climate change activists. Npr's jeopardy reports in philadelphia recently. A group of young climate activists marched to biden's campaign headquarters. The sunrise movement often pressures democrats. Back the green new deal but instead biden offered his own climate plan for a slower transition away from coal oil and gas. He has not committed to barring people with fossil fuel ties from his administration. Lauren martinez was sunrise. Thinks he should biden ran on the most progressive climate agenda in us history and one on it. So it's incumbent upon him to take that seriously and put forward people who are accountable to the people that elected him to office the head of the natural resources defense council and former epa administrator gina mccarthy says she understands why young activists want to ban on appointees connected to fossil fuels especially after trump. Put them in key posts including andrew wheeler a former coal industry lobbyist. I mean that's who has been running the environmental protection agency and has gotten us nowhere fast. It's backed us up. It hasn't supported a growing clean energy economy. But here's a problem with a fossil fuel will litmus test biden won't govern alone the us senate could remain under republican leadership that means passing legislation would require compromise and bradbury is ceo of the american exploration and production council. Americans voted for divided government. As part of that you know. I think they voted for moderation. And i think they voted for commonsense. Bradberry sees a future for fossil fuels even under biden's ambitious plan for net zero carbon emissions by twenty fifty worried about climate. Change say there are issues. Republicans and democrats likely can agree on heather. Reams was citizens for responsible. Energy solutions suggests activist focus on things like economic stimulus that boost clean energy. They should looking at the bigger policies and getting to what's possible with getting climate action done today rather than arguing about the position on one's resume among the names on the biden transition team a few have limited ties to fossil fuel but more are from environmental groups. Jody freeman served as councillor for energy and climate change on the obama white house now freeman is at harvard law school and says she sees a trend in the people selected so far i think the clear messages vitality one good people in place wrestling start who have experienced any days and not wasting any time. Freeman is a good example of those who could be excluded. If a biden administration rejects people connected to fossil fuel companies. She sits on the board of oil company conaco phillips but she also led obama's effort to double car fuel efficiency standards. She's also an expert on using presidential powers to address climate change. That's knowledge that likely will be necessary if both parties can't agree on new climate legislation when biden his sworn in next year. Jeff brady npr news.

Biden Lauren Martinez Gina Mccarthy Andrew Wheeler EPA Joe Biden American Exploration And Produ Bradberry Natural Resources Defense Coun NPR Philadelphia Us Senate Bradbury Jody Freeman Heather United States Biden Administration Harvard Law School Freeman Conaco Phillips
Twitter will ban Holocaust denial posts, following Facebook

Slate's If Then

10:26 min | 10 months ago

Twitter will ban Holocaust denial posts, following Facebook

"If you're American, you probably think of free speech as the default. Just the way things are. And I. Don't know where it enters the stuff. I don't know if it's in the water or if it's in the kindergarten curriculum Evelyn. Is Not American, but it's only something that I have encountered faith in years is just like first amendment fundamentalism she's an Australian who lives in Massachusetts and she's one of most dynamic and nuanced thinkers. Online speech. She lectures at Harvard Law School. You came here to study kind of First Amendment Law to look at this stuff. As an outsider, what was your impression of the US fundamental adherence to free speech? I feel a little bit like gas lit as a foreigner when you come to America. As I did for years ago to Study Comparative Constitutional, Law, and free speech One of the most striking things about American free speech doctrine is this like this example of there were Nazis that wanted to march in skokie. I know jumping straight to Nazis his kind of leaping into the free speech depend. But Evelyn's describing one of the most famous first amendment cases when that really tests American values, the story goes like this. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, a group of neo-nazis wanted to march in the Chicago suburb of skokie Illinois largely because a lot of Holocaust survivors lived there seven thousand concentration camp survivors living in the predominantly Jewish Chicago suburb of skokie not surprisingly, there was a huge legal fight cokie officials a block Nazi demonstrations with court injunctions when the Nazis appealed to the State Supreme Court a judge has refused to hear the case. But what might surprise you if you don't know the story is that the American Civil Liberties Union indeed a lawyer with the ACLU defended the Nazis right to March under the First Amendment saying the right to free expression with integral to who we are as a country. It's just such an iconic story of the literal Nazis were going to be allowed to marching the street and as a foreigner you come here, new learn that and normally deland that it's it's not like these inconvenient embarrassment about Assessment Amendment Law. It's this like really proud one of the truly great victories for the First Amendment was that it will protect the speech that we hate because it is you know Betta to have it out in the urban it's better to meet it with county speech and we just can't trust the government to suppress as an Australian very striking. I don't even have a right to free speech. We don't have a bill of rights and our Constitution it's it's like a completely foreign idea this fight over unfettered free speech and in fact, where it collides with Anti Semitism and Holocaust denial broke into the news cycle again, this week, there's a split screen like the Supreme Court confirmation hearings going on on one side, and then on the other side facebook releases a blog post the company which has always said it values free expression above everything else announced that it would ban any content that denies or distorts the Holocaust. Two days later, twitter did the same thing. It might seem like banning Holocaust denial is a pretty easy call, but it was only a few years ago that facebook said, it wouldn't prohibit Holocaust to nihilism on its platform. which is part of why and says, this is a really big deal I. think this is like a really iconic moment in the history of the company and its thinking and its evolution around its rules. There is no more emblematic rule that facebook had about. To First Amendment Principles. Today on the show. Decision to finally habit Holocaust, Mus Information and what it means for free speech debates, the Internet and the potential for change. I'm Lizzie O'Leary and you're listening to what next TVD A show about technology power, how the future will be determined stay with us. Voting this year is a little. Than usual, what you don't want to do is be the one sprinting to the mailbox trying to send in a last minute vote or get to the front of the line at the polls only to realize you're not registered. That's why facebook has created the voting information centre with you want to know how to register how to vote by mail or to vote safely in person the voting information center can help you find the answers to your questions and make sure your vote is counted because of vote counted is a voice heard for official information from election authorities visit facebook, dot com slash voting Info Centre. Countless emails, endless video meetings, lost documents sometimes, it feels like technology is working overtime against us. Well, MONDAY DOT COM is getting it back on your side by bringing everything together to streamline your workflows and keep your teams can sink in one easy to use platform. Finally your team can work confidently and manage all core business activities in one place creating a workplace environment where everything's transparent everyone's accountable and real work gets done without anything holding you back. Whether you work in a team of five or five thousand Monday. Dot Com is the easiest way to keep everyone connected and on the right track try it out for yourself to get your free two week trial. Good Monday dot com today. I, WanNa talk about how seismic shift this is if we think back to just two years ago. Mark Zuckerberg gave a very now well known interview to Cara Swisher. And said, she didn't believe that posts that deny the Holocaust should be taken down. I believe that our platform should take down because I think that there are things different people get wrong. either. I don't think that they're intentionally getting a wrong but I think that they. They might be but go home. It's hard to pune intent. Boy. It is a big journey from. People get things wrong even though I might find it personally offensive. To. My own thinking has evolved. The big thing that they always have hung onto was we don't WanNa be arbiters of truth, and we will not take content down purely on the basis that it's false. We might take it on the down on the basis that its nudity or that it's hate speech or that it has other sort of effects but we weren't take content down just because it's wrong and that's sort of what's reflected in that quote from Makoto Takhar Swisher is you know some people get things wrong sometimes and the the pandemic literally changed that decision overnight in the context of a global public health emergency they abandoned that they said we will take down. False information about the pandemic because it poses a public health risk, and now we're playing ball like now companies are taking content down on the basis that it's false and we're now seeing it in other areas. We saw it in the context of the wildfires in West my country was on file for months. In December and January, and there were lots of false rumors about the cause of the fires and facebook didn't take anything down and then Oregon was on fire A. Couple of months ago, and suddenly they were taking down misinformation about the cause of their as far as think a stock contrast as you can draw. It's still interesting to hear you peg this to the pandemic because I think about all the data points that came before that this is. After the two thousand, sixteen election, it is after the Charlottesville unite the right rally, which took place in two thousand seventeen. Do you think the coronavirus pandemic is it sort of launching us into a new I guess area of thinking about content and speech on its own or or easy it kind of a I guess a catalyst for something that was going to happen anyway. Yeah. You're absolutely right that it's only sort of it's part of the broader trend. It was a particularly visible and sort of obvious example of the trend in the same way that the pandemic has made many sort of fundamental. Assumptions structures in society more visible, and we've sort of seen progressively moving more and more along that line of sort of okay. We copies all speech all the time. Let's balancing trysts and draw the line and I think that the pandemic was just sort of another step along that road. If you think about it that way these announcements from facebook and twitter about banning Holocaust denial or in line with other content moderation decisions we've seen this year like the outright ban on Cunanan content. But in other ways several and says the decision. Holocaust. Denial marks a deeper and more fundamental shift in how speeches police online Holocaust denial is one of these iconic things about the first amendment and I believe that one of the reasons why facebook sort of stuck to that principle for so long of allowing on services was because it's still considered itself a fundamentally American company attached to these first. Amendment ideals is robust marketplace of ideas. Which is bizarre when you think about it these these are clearly global companies now and most of they US bases outside all over America but there was still something that it couldn't let go of and so I think it's really when Audience First Amendment land anymore like vc's we are now in this unknown landscape of trying to work out what norms we can attach ourselves to.

Facebook United States Skokie Makoto Takhar Swisher Twitter America Harvard Law School American Civil Liberties Union Massachusetts Supreme Court Chicago Evelyn Mark Zuckerberg Lizzie O'leary Skokie Illinois State Supreme Court Info Centre Charlottesville
History of Native Voter Suppression

All My Relations Podcast

06:18 min | 10 months ago

History of Native Voter Suppression

"Let's jump right in and talk a little about the history of the native vote and the history of the suppression of the. Native. Vote. I got to tell you that when trump I got elected I felt. Like. Sick to my stomach I. And I. Spent a good amount of time reflecting on my own personal behavior like thinking to myself did I to enough to. Try to make this, not happen. And and the answer is you know I don't often talk about national politics both through project to on my blog personally, you know because I fi-, I find it incredibly problematic and uncomfortable to talk about because you know we're living in colonial state and the federal government has actively tried to eradicate us, and there's a long history of broken promises and broken treaties. Therefore, it feels very uncomfortable to say to my fellow native people you know. Go vote in the system that's not meant for us that doesn't actually ever do the things that it's said it's going to do but go vote. anyways you know. It feels I, feel like a hypocrite just saying it. Yeah I really feel like we need to talk about it. Right Yeah it is by no means a simple decision for folks in Indian country and I think that's really important to acknowledge and to think about as we. Start to talk about this election and what we need to do. Right and you know there has been a long history of active native vote suppression for the first one, hundred and fifty years. In this country, we weren't even allowed to vote, and then in nineteen twenty four can the Indian Citizenship Act which formally US citizens but states continued to prevent us from voting, right? I. Think Sometimes, there's memes and stuff that gets posted where it's like going through the. Different marginalized groups, and when they finally got the right to vote, and it often says like native Americans nineteen, twenty four. But we know for a fact that that's not true. Because, as you said, most states still had things in place to prevent needed from voting like it wasn't until nineteen forty eight that natives in Arizona got the right to vote and then all of that. Suppression that played into the passage of the voting. Rights, act. So in Nineteen, seventy, five. So the things like literacy tests or poll taxes or all of these suppression techniques that affected other communities of Color Also affected a native folks as well. There's all of these appalling facts that have led to all of these underlying issues and voting cases as to why are people have not shown up to the polls in the same numbers you know I I often get asked. Like whoa when I tell when I'm having this conversations with non native people and say, yeah, like a lot of not a native people that I know are don't Vo are when you look at the numbers, you know you would you might think to yourself like, well, why wouldn't native people be active in this process and just want to acknowledge that it? It's it's very systemic. Done on purpose. Absolutely. Yeah. So we're like giving the dates from like nineteen, twenty, four, nineteen, forty, eight, nineteen, seventy, five but like. In twenty eighteen North Dakota changed their ID laws to say that if you were voting, you had to have an idea that had a street address on it and most native folks in North Dakota, Po Boxes, and don't have street addresses. So it was like an active step to try and suppress native in Dakota because natives have power in voting in north. Dakota and in a lot of states that have high population. So like this is an ongoing thing for native communities and then that actually that actually didn't work out well for. North. Dakota. Because all of these activists came together got really good publicity. There was a lot of grassroots organizations and then was it Ruth Buffalo ended up taking the seat. anyways. So so you know I think that's a really good demonstration of the power of the native vote especially in rural areas of Turtle Island. What I should add to this conversation. Around. You know like the the power of the native vote and the complicity of us. Even, telling each other to vote is that. You know we want to have a relationship with the people that get elected. Even. Biden beats trump's not only going to fix the dislike colonial problem. That we have. Yeah I mean it's hard because there are definitely things we can talk about that are like. Immediate. Undoing of things that the trump administration has done that have been really harmful to you need of communities, but there's also an entire list of things that are not going to happen even under a Biden Administration And there's this. Quote that I saw on the wall of the Harvard Law School Lake. Years and years ago and I think about it often in terms of these ideas of justice or like doing what's right from the federal government I will say it's problematic because it's only attributed as a quote African proverb, which obviously is a really problematic but the the Clo- is corn cannot expect justice from court composed of chickens. And I think about that in terms of. Natives asking for equal treatment or justice from the US. Colonial government is like corn expecting justice from a court may have chickens

Dakota Federal Government United States North Dakota Colonial Government Biden Administration Turtle Island Arizona Indian Citizenship Harvard Law School Lake Ruth Buffalo Biden Donald Trump
Judge dreadthe fight for Ruth Bader Ginsburgs seat

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:29 min | 11 months ago

Judge dreadthe fight for Ruth Bader Ginsburgs seat

"On Friday US Supreme Court. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died of cancer at the age of eighty seven. A candlelit vigil was held the following day outside the Supreme Court. Justice. GINSBURG was only the second woman appointed to the Supreme Court after being nominated by Bill Clinton in one thousand, nine hundred. I. In. Solemnly swear he was a champion of women's rights, and later in life she achieved restore status especially among young women. Now her death has set the stage for a divisive battle to replace her on the court. She was born in Brooklyn to an immigrant Father Dad was from Odessa in in Russia and to a first generation mother she was Jewish John. Fascination is the economist Washington correspondent and she was a trailblazer throughout her life. She was one of only nine women among five hundred men at Harvard law school, and when she arrived. Erwin griswold, who was then the Dean asked women in the class to stand up and justify taking a spot that could have gone to a man. She said the reason she took the spot is it was important that she understood her husband's work that would've made her husband Marty last Mardi was tax attorney well known in his own right he predeceased her but they had a famously loving and productive and equal partnership. She had a relentless work ethic in. Twenty five years in the Supreme Court she never missed today she's arrived four bouts of cancer before this fifth one killed her it was only after she got sick that she called by phone to oral arguments. I. Think People often have this idea that Supreme Court justices are sort of Stentorian wizards ready to shout down lawyer who they disagree with justice. GINSBURG was not like that she spoke very slowly very deliberately, which mirrors I think how she wrote and how she argued and how she thought she was meticulous. She was precise she she was not a showy justice. She came onto the court actually considered a moderate. There are a lot of people on the left who were upset when she was appointed because she was considered sort of two centrist. But as the court steadily moved rightward during her tenure, she has found herself the de facto leader of the courts liberal wing. Junk she spent a long time on the court. What did she achieve? Well, she was on the Supreme Court for Twenty seven years, and before that was on the DC Circuit Court of Appeals, which is widely considered the second most important court in America for for thirteen. So she was a judge for forty years I was age sixty when I was nominated in some people thought I was. Too Old for the job. Now I'm into my twenty-seventh starting my twenty-seventh year on the courts on one of the longest tenured. Justices. So if you worried about my age. It was unnecessary. Before that, she argued six cases before the Supreme Court and she was involved with thirty more as the first director of the US women's rights project. The first of those report court cases was in Reid versus Reid for which she wrote a brief arguing against the law in Ohio that preferred men to women in naming executive estates. She won that case in her first oral argument before the Supreme Court. She argued against the military policy that denied many husbands, officers, the same housing and medical benefits that automatically provided officers. Wise. The thinking was that women are somehow inherently more dependent on their husbands and husbands on their wise. Now, in that case, remember she effectively represented the husband she represented family but she represented the shoes argue in favor of the husband's benefits and she austin said that she was not arguing for women's rights she was arguing for the constitutional equality of men and women. Her death is come at a critical time in American politics. It's just six weeks away from the election. So what impact does that have? Well I think it's a little too early to say that definitively. It looks as though both sides are gearing up for battle, but they seem to be quietly circling each other in two thousand sixteen. The Supreme Court is central to Donald Trump's success I think because. There is an open seat in two thousand, Sixteen Justice Antonin Scalia died, and Mitch McConnell who is then the Senate minority leader rather than hold a hearing on Barack Obama's chosen replacement for Justice Scalia whose Merrick Garland he came up with a rationale disguises the principle which was that the causing election was coming up the speech beheld open. So the voters could decide now that had never been done before it was clearly a power play. It was a live sort of issue for Republicans impelled I think a lot of them who otherwise would have held donald trump at arm's length to decide that just had to vote for him this time I. Think Donald Trump is hoping for a similar effect this time, but he also wants to get the filled as quickly as possible. For Democrats donations had started pouring in, they have been pouring all weekend. Democrats seem riled up by this. I think in their view if Donald Trump managed to get a successor onto the court, this'll be the seconds effectively stolen seat right? The I was Neil Gorsuch. who was given the seat that was held open by Mitch McConnell, and the second would be whoever donald trump nominees to replace justice GINSBURG who gets the seat because Mitch McConnell did not follow the principle he set up in two thousand sixteen. John Do you think Senate. Republicans have the numbers to they have the votes to get in trump's nominee through before the election. Well this is the question on everyone's mind. Right so far Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski Republican senators from from Maine Alaska, had said that they will not vote for replacement before November third they have said that the president who wins on November third you choose the replacement now that only gets Democrats to forty nine and they need fifty one because in the case of a tie Mike. Pence cast the tiebreaking vote Lindsey Graham had previously said he would abide by Mitch McConnell's rule from twenty sixteen. He has now gone back on that apparently because he's angry Democrats didn't roll over for Brad Cavanaugh Chuck. Grassley, who's a senator from Iowa has also previously spoken in favor of McConnell's precedent. I, have a very hard time imagining that when push comes to shove, he'll stand by his. Word and so there really is nothing Democrats can do unless they can persuade two other Republicans to come join them, and if they can't persuade those Republicans and tip the balance what happens. Then what are the consequences for the years ahead on American politics? It's clear that what McConnell did in two thousand sixteen was a tremendous violation of norms I think it's not a good principal to. Uphold I think arguing that this is now how Supreme Court seats should be awarded that in an election year, you effectively have to hold the seat open until the end of the election is a bad precedent but I think there's a difference between saying Republicans should be consistent for the sake of consistency and Republicans should follow this principle because that's how court seat should be given out now. From the Democratic Base, there's been a tremendous push to threaten Republicans with repercussions if. Retake. The Senate and the president in that includes making Puerto Rico in Washington DC states, which would effectively at least in the near in medium-term Give Democrats four senators people have also been talking about expanding the court. So the reason they are Nice Ring Court justices is not constitutional legal. It's just a statute. So if they were minded and had a majority had a president who would sign it into law, they put eleven or thirteen justices on the supreme court. The problem with that for Democrats I think is that it sort of shifts the terms. Of the debate that they are now winning I think the way Joe, Biden has pitched. This campaign is on the one hand. You have the sort of chaotic destructive Donald Trump on the other. You have Joe Biden Palm known figure who will get us back to normal. If, he comes out and endorses expanding the court or State of DC in Puerto Rico, which to be clear he has not done. He is actually a opposed expanded from court but if he comes out if Democrats threaten this, then the debate becomes a lot murkier. Then it becomes the radical change that Joe Biden wants to do right take fifty, two states and putting thirteen on Supreme Court against Donald Trump will keep things as are I think that debate does not play out very well for Democrats. John Thank you very much time.

Supreme Court Donald Trump Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Mitch Mcconnell Dc Circuit Court Of Appeals United States Joe Biden Senator Senate Justice Antonin Scalia Democrats John Bill Clinton President Trump Erwin Griswold Harvard Law School Brooklyn Puerto Rico Odessa Washington
Boston's Harvard Law School students pay tribute to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

The Morgan Show with Morgan White, Jr.

02:48 min | 11 months ago

Boston's Harvard Law School students pay tribute to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

"Car, but then SKW Visi Boston's news radio. Good morning. I'm Tom Huff. Here is what's happening. The death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, BBC TV's Christina Rex tells us Ginsberg briefly briefly attended attended Harvard Harvard Law Law School. School. Justice Justice Ruth Ruth Bader Bader Ginsburg Ginsburg started started her her loss loss schooling schooling here here at at Harvard Harvard Back Back in in 1956. 1956. Eventually, Eventually, she she moved moved to to New New York York to to finish finish her her law law studies. Students here at the college tonight. Tell me, they're shocked and saddened by the news of her death. It's gonna take a while to process. The news of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is death hit Harvard students deeply as they got news alerts on their phones first found out I couldn't believe it because I think RBG fact that she's continued to stick with that and continue to fight. For us kind of. I kind of thought that you know she'd win. Keep going. This makes the Supreme Court one of the most important issues in the presidential election. Kent Green Fields of BC Law is a former Supreme Court clerk, he says Ruth Bader Ginsburg, affectionately known as RBG is an idol for young girls. My home It'll daughter knows who RBG is, and is saddened by the news to May. And I think they're know the story of my daughter is the story of a millions of little girls around the country. She she looks like this frail little woman, but she was a fierce warrior for justice. I think that many of us who loved her and loved her work just to really just wanted her to live forever. The thought on so many people's minds right now, what does

Ruth Ruth Bader Bader Ginsburg Harvard Harvard Law Law School Supreme Court Harvard Harvard Visi Boston Tom Huff Bc Law New York York BBC Kent Green Fields Christina Rex Ginsberg
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies at 87

The Morgan Show with Morgan White, Jr.

01:26 min | 11 months ago

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies at 87

"Tells us Ginsberg briefly attended Harvard Law School Justice Riveter. Denver started her loss schooling here at Harvard Back in 1956. Eventually, she moved to New York to finish her law studies students here at the college tonight. Tell me they're shocked and saddened by the news of her death. It's gonna take a while to process. The news of Supreme Court. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is death hit. Averred students deeply as they got news alerts on their phones found out I couldn't believe it because I think RBG fact that she's continued to stick with that and continue to fight for us. Kind of thought that You know she'd win. God. This makes the Supreme Court one of the most important issues in the presidential election. Kent Greenfield. The BC law is a former Supreme Court clerk, he says Ruth Bader Ginsburg, affectionately known as RBG is an idol for young girls. My home It'll daughter knows who RBG is and is saddened by the news today. And I think they're know the story of my daughter is the story of a millions of little girls around the country. She she looks like this free a little woman, but she was a fierce warrior for justice. I think that many of us who loved her and loved her work just just wanted her to live forever. The thought on so many people's minds right now, what does this mean for RBG Supreme Court seat

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Rbg Supreme Court Supreme Court Harvard Law School Justice Riv Ginsberg Kent Greenfield Denver New York BC
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

05:14 min | 11 months ago

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died

"Bader Ginsburg was a force to be reckoned with. All I asked about brethren. They said. They take their feet off our necks, barely 5 FT. Tall but a liberal giant, only the second female justice named on the Supreme Court serving there for more than a quarter century. Her path to the highest court in the land was not easy. As one of the few women at Harvard Law School she faced discrimination. After graduating from Colombia in the fifties, her tenaciousness in the classroom highlighted in the Oscar nominated documentary on Ginsberg titled RBG produced by journalists Julie Cohen and Betsy West. She was one of nine women in a class of 500. She was tied for first in her class. And the Big New York City law firms just weren't hiring women, not a law firm in the entire city of New York. Did for my employment charging forward, she became a beloved law professor rockers and worked as a lawyer for the O U, She mapped out a legal strategy to file lawsuits against gender bias in employment, housing and government benefits. Man and women are persons of equal dignity and they should count. Equally before the law, You won't settle for putting Susan B. Anthony on the new dollars When they would say things like this. Haven't you respond? Well, never in anger, Mother told that's that would have been self defeating. Always as an opportunity. Teach. I didn't see myself was kind of a kindergarten teacher in those days because the judges Didn't think so. Sex discrimination existed. One of the things that tried to plant in their minds was Think about how you would like the world to be for your daughters and granddaughters. She won five landmark cases, which she argued on behalf of women in front of an all male bench long before she sat on it. Ginsberg went on to serve as an appeals court judge in the nation's capital until that life changing nomination by President Bill Clinton in 1993. I am proud to nominate for associate justice of the Supreme Court. Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg. That announcement may never have happened had it not been for the intense lobbying effort by a staunch feminist, her husband, Marty Ginsburg, and at her confirmation hearing chaired by then Senator Joe Biden, the nominee did not shy away from her feminism spotlighting contentious topics like abortion rights. This is Something central to a woman's. Life to her dignity. It's a decision that she must make

Bader Ginsburg Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg Betsy West Supreme Court Ginsberg Harvard Law School Mother New York Senator Joe Biden Susan B. Anthony President Bill Clinton Colombia Oscar Julie Cohen O
State labor board rules Andover teachers participated in illegal strike, Boston

WBZ Midday News

00:46 sec | 11 months ago

State labor board rules Andover teachers participated in illegal strike, Boston

"Refusing to head inside at the start of the school year. And they're now being told by the state. Their actions are illegal. It was last week when and over teachers refused to enter buildings during professional days before the start of the school year, citing concerns over covert 19 that drew the ire of the end over school committee who took legal action with the Labor relations Board, and they've now ruled their actions were unlawful and they've been told to desist any sort of similar behavior. In Massachusetts. Any sort of public sector union strike is considered illegal and refusal to not enter school buildings falling into that category. According to the state. This ruling could be setting a precedent as other school districts and teachers unions have considered similar actions. Jim McKay W B Z Boston's news radio report from Harvard Law School finds in Massachusetts, Black and Latino defendants are more

Harvard Law School Massachusetts Jim Mckay Labor Relations Board Boston
Innovating for Disability, Because You Have To

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

07:32 min | 1 year ago

Innovating for Disability, Because You Have To

"Spoke with disability rights, advocate hub, and Girma, she's the author of Hobben the deaf. Blind woman who conquered Harvard law we relied on some of her personal tech to conduct our interview. So I'm blind access information best through Braille through my fingers. So I'm always looking for tech solutions that are touch based, and the specific advice I'm using is called a brown note made by a company called wear. It's a computer where instead of a visual display, their tactical display. There is a field where pins can pop up to form different ladders, different patterns of the pins, meeks, different Braille letters, and I read my fingers over the pins. The letter is quickly. And then I know what? Sad. So Gordon is here listening into the call and typing whatever he hears. That's connected to my Braille computer. So as you speak, he's typing I'm reading the words in Braille and then responding back with my own voice. Thank you. That's an amazing system and I understand you had a role in creating it. Can you tell me that story in twenty ten? The Braille note the Braille computer that I'm using right now came out and it was the first one with Bluetooth. Support. That sparked the idea of connecting the Braille Computer with an External Bluetooth Keyboard and that way when I meet somewhat hand them the keyboard and tell them just take therm words. Then I'm going to read in Braille and respond by boys. I started using this at Harvard law school. And in my book, I talk about the experience of using it for the first time with classmates with potential employers. Some people acting like it was really weird. But then others immediately understood because most people these days type emails texting. So especially millennials really understood and and we're able to connect with me. How often do you or others who are disabled have to come up with technology solutions on your own just simply because they don't exist yet. Disabled people constantly have to come up with our own solutions. Most things in this world are designed for non disabled white men who are right handed. The most designs is for a very limited segment of our population at everyone outside of that has to be creative and thoughtful and come up with solutions. Especially disabled people how has the technology evolved since you were in law school. You know why frail technology's not evolving very much in. It's extremely frustrating. I'm using ten year old technology. In some ways it's thirty years old technology. And I wish more companies would stop into this space and develop more brio technology tap into Hamernicks. There's an incredible market of blind disabled people who want to be able to access information through touch. And some men stream companies are taking the south. We you're getting more cell phones with haptic capabilities or smart watches with haptic capabilities, and we want to see more of this. And Digital. Braille is really expensive right now, we WANNA reduce that cost so that blind people all over the world especially developing countries can get access to frail computers, and if we can make Braille affordable, that would be the Holy Braille that's pretty wild. When you said that the technology is is ten or thirty years old you barely have a phone that lasts three to five years at this point is that Still, the technology is very sturdy. I appreciate that it's it's lasted quite a few drops. Your legal and your advocacy work has focused a lot on technology what other products are being developed now that you think are the most exciting or promising for deaf blind people or for other members of the disabled. Community. I'm really excited about self driving cars imagine the freedom, the independence I was talking to someone who works at one of these companies and he said Oh, you know a few years from releasing the cars. So maybe ten years from now will think about disability access. That's not how it works. You need to design disability access. Now not leader it's harder and more expensive to try to design disability access later. Using the example of self driving cars, what sorts of things that maybe aren't in that technology now, do you think should be included to make them that technology more accessible? For Self driving cars, WE WANNA make sure wheelchair users can easily get in and out of the cars independently. So the design of the doors, the does dine of the seats, the flexibility to move seats in and out the option to control the car with your hands through assistive devices like switch control, Braille computers there should be multiple options to access the information. We're in the midst of this deadly pandemic and lots of different groups that already were facing disadvantages in the workforce are feeling even more keenly. Now, how can technology help people with disabilities stay in the workforce during the pandemic? Technology is a collection of the biases of the developers. So it's really about the developers taking the time to imagine people different from themselves using their technology. The pandemic has increased pre existing barriers before the pandemic there were lots of videos online with no captioning. After the pandemic, there's still lots of videos online with no captioning lack of transcribes, image descriptions. All of these things were problem before the pandemic, and now that we're relying on the Internet more than before. Experiencing those barriers at a greater level. If the people listening to this could after hearing your voice, do one thing differently in their day-to-day. To create a more accessible world. What would that thing be? Encourage your organizations to increase hiring of disabled people if our workplaces were diverse. Specially tech companies if trump companies were more diverse and had disabled engineers and designers working there are products would be so much better.

Harvard Law School Meeks Girma Hamernicks Gordon
The Trump administration says foreign students must leave US if classes go online

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:37 min | 1 year ago

The Trump administration says foreign students must leave US if classes go online

"Donald Trump I ran for president. He's had a lot of racist and homophobic things about immigrants, and how he was going to build a wall to many of them out, he also said this. I want people to come into our country legally I WANNA have a big fat beautiful open door. A BIG FAT Beautiful Open Door for legal immigrants. That's how Donald Trump tried to convince the American, And the voters that it wasn't really about hating immigrants, it was just about the rule of law getting the so-called bad hombres out. If you recall Donald Trump has done many things, both during that election, and in the four years, since that made it really clear that he really is prejudice against immigrants of all stripes, or maybe of most stripes, and doesn't seem to care much about the rule of law, either but some level of welcome for immigrants, some level of acknowledgement that immigration is actually important to America's economy, if not its. Its values and traditions was mainstream republican consensus at the time as recently as last year, administration officials were still telling reporters. Trump actually wanted to increase the number of visas for highly skilled workers, but here's the thing Donald. Trump has repeatedly and emphatically slammed his big fat beautiful door in the faces of those same immigrants that his party once tried to make exceptions for the latest example is the trump administration's announcement of a new policy for international students who study at an American College and who studies have moved online during the pandemic. Pandemic, the trump administration essentially told those students to go back to where they came from revoking their right to stay in the United States. The decision doesn't just end the lives of those international students. It's another discouragement of them to study and potentially build their lives in America. We're shutting the door on some of the world's best and brightest minds, giving up on their contributions to American business to research, innovation and society, now and down the Road Harvard Law School Professor Vivek Wadhwa writes that the effective pushing these students away will quote. Quote likely be an exodus of academic talent to schools in Europe or elsewhere and intellectual catastrophe of historic proportions with long-term economic ramifications. There is so much at stake in this move by the president for the students for the universities, and for all of us that today the attorneys General of Sixteen. States and DC joined the age of Massachusetts ensuing the administration to try and stop the policy. They're asking Federal Court in Boston to block. The policy is the case moves forward no word yet, but as Rachel says watch this

Donald Trump Pandemic President Trump America Professor Vivek Wadhwa United States Road Harvard Law School Boston Massachusetts Federal Court DC Rachel Europe American College
"harvard law school" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

15:01 min | 1 year ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"PM eastern five PM Pacific on life liberty and live and we're going to talk about everything Iran peach meant China president trump this is a man who are I went to Harvard from a little town in Arkansas I went to Harvard Law School nine eleven took place he thought about dropping out of law school and joining the army but friends of his in the army said finish law school me what the hell you started it finish it and then you can join and that's exactly what he did Mister but is he gonna Harvard finished Harvard Law School then a list that in the United States Army in the middle of the Iraq war what the front end of the Iraq war actually he served saw combat in Iraq certain saw combat here in the bronze star did you know that here in the bronze star he also served in Afghanistan he served overall to tourists total of five years before eventually would run for the house of representatives that between a store in Iraq and Afghanistan was part of what they call the old guard which watchers watches over the tomb of the Unknown Soldier he had written a book about this in these men who look over the tomb of the unknown soldiers you see the March there twenty four seven day in and day out no matter the weather no matter the day a meticulous in what they wear spit Polish their boots inspiring because they're not really just looking over the tomb of the Unknown Soldier the looking over all the tunes at Arlington cemetery Tom kind is a remarkable man he's the only senator you remember the vote was ninety eight to one one was not present to vote against the Iran deal in that part of the deal that allowed for the Senate to have some over such but he said look this should be a treaty I'm not gonna participate oversight no oversight the fact is they should be treating a forgery this wouldn't pass the two thirds of the members present we just got around the treaty clause where all the great constitutionalist they voted for it ninety eight to one time cotton voted no Tom cotton's been warning about the threat from China since before virtually anyone but the president he's a remarkable young man is very tall too by the way six feet five inches tall you will be my guest on life liberty and live in for the full hour he also serves on the Senate intelligence committee in the Senate Armed Services Committee in addition to his own personal experience we'll talk about the war powers act whether it's constitutional or not we'll talk about what the president is double talk about this non binding resolution we'll talk about impeachment we'll talk about what the Senate should do when a touch all these issues he's also become one of the leading voices against anti semitism and recently he's condemned what the city of New York has done in terms of male with a lack of bail letting these recidivists violent recidivists back on the streets when they go back in the attack these Hasidic Jews among others the BDS movement this is a real statement in a list with Warren Bernie Sanders they get all the attention there's also senators who are much more flashy than Tom cotton I believe this gentleman has a potential candidacy the Republican nomination potential in the future for president United States so I hope you'll watch this Sunday look I can do a conga line of guests single mom hot hot fast and so again I'm not gonna do it this is a different show it's life liberty and live in I know there's a lot of football out there but you can record it to because I think this is going to be a very very important interview with Tom cotton Tom cotton really has never had an opportunity to sit down for a full hour with anybody little hits here she don't really know what president talk some frequently for input and advice he does with many and I think you'll see why he talks to Tom count I never met Tom cut before this will be the first time he's been on my radio show a couple times but not that often but the hope your market down that's forty eight hours away so you might forget but I think you'll like it a lot something different I'd like senator may see her own of Hawaii it is amazing to me the individuals that some states and some congressional districts want to represent them in the nation's capital this one in particular maze corona is it the phone of the first order here she is talking about the impeachment trial caught one go so let's get back to what we really should be doing which as are focusing on which is what kind of a trial that was in the house and the Senate is it going to be a fair trial or is a camera rig trial else and just as a president tried to rake his reelection by by trying to get the it's just that she's such an idiot this can be fair is it can be impartial she's to both major right this is her argument what issues you just as a president tried to rig the real so she should recuse herself right should she would use her cell now just all the Republican should recuse themselves in the minority the Senate should be able to control thing go ahead then to go along with his political skiing is trying to with the help of Mitch McConnell Reagan the Senate trial we've had enough of you want to thank the people for Hawaii for sending us immediate any club chair no more talk about how she abused her staff on a regular basis member that screamed at them because some of them Cryin leave and so what yeah we can't we can't say too many nice things about Amy club a tree now because she seven percent in the polls or something she's just terrific here she is on M. S. LSD cut to go I have I been listening to my colleagues personally talking to them as well as hearing what they say publicly and there are a few of them that have clearly indicated that they want witnesses well that's going to be there moment either before those articles come over or when they're there with a better stand up and join us otherwise it's going to be a sham it's going to be a sham she can't win it's going to be a sham boy my son's gonna be very upset disturbed is the drummer Neil hurt P. A. R. T. passed away he was his biggest fan just pointing that out the drummer for the band rush right Mister minister the fact that Qatar he signed the Qatar for my son years ago we have it framed on the wall in the in the bunker anyway I just mentioning that because I just saw that on on television look who's back from Miller Jayapala why nobody knows but Mila giant piles back congressman she's me can't say woman ache Congress X. our Congress it or whatever she's back when she was on MSL to am SLOC today with Andrea Mitchell now there is a reporter the old Russian school let's see how this went hat tip Breitbart cut three go what games I waited on winning the articles well I think that it caps it'll let me do this interview in a cafeteria or something how much Capitol Hill icy go ahead okay on what the American people want which is a fair trial we were able to people don't want impeachment fair to stop talking for the American people you wanna eightieth Congress X. that's it the American people don't know who Pramila Jalut palace trust me on this one but she represents all of us isn't it funny how they said that the American people want no we don't go ahead over and over and over again so when Mitch McConnell not giving in to any of our demands as yeah hopefully I mean how many witnesses that the Democrats want during the Clinton impeachment trial none how many witnesses where there none none I like don't waste your time with the other Sunday shows well Mister secretary what do you mean by imminent well Mister national script what do you mean by eminent well deputy secretary via DHL what do you mean by imminent what's imminent imminent imminent Eminem and many how many embassies three four two how many are we talking this is the insanity of the left media insane they have yet to bring forth people who have suffered from this monster family members who've suffered from this man they've yet to shell the story of this monster payment all the story other than he's like Martin Luther king is not what Chris Matthews said to the Iranian people use like Martin Luther king this idiot Chris Matthews knows what the Iranian people think it's a police state it's a closed society but don't worry Chris Matthews knows from his home in Potomac Maryland reclaim Virginia he knows some big moron let's go back to Adam Smith member this guy Adam Smith what a coward house closely it's time to send it over that member all I police interview by Jim sciutto former Obama administration official cut for go you just said that he did have some disagreement about the timing of this it's the big game be on today so I I misunderstood the timing I don't have a disagreement about the timing I misunderstood I misunderstood the term is Adam's apples dropping down his belly button I understand I miss Nancy Pelosi took me into her and she went to hell in a yet masking all wrong she told me she gave me a watch for and are you dollar sign misunderstood the timing I I don't have any disagreement with Nancy Pelosi no no I agree anything she says I agree with her can I had Gee I thought it was laying out sooner than it actually is I support what the speaker is doing I such a punk it's not even funny go ahead your honor why one of Saddam over today if the recognition have an Obama former efficiency in a he's said that over already yeah look like well you're getting killed plus you get Democrats running for president they need some space they need some oxygen you guys should tell of all this is the great strategist Nancy with the media's telling him now factset factset factset yeah I had as in fact his mom said he he said he has no intention of sharing details on the rules prior to receiving the articles I don't think there is a wash at this point if it's next week it's next week I think the speaker is absolutely right you shine the light on the fact you can assess you more on your own believe Adam Smith people who are in his district congratulations you're real congressperson choose me Congress sex is Nancy Pelosi ARE the timing I misunderstood a tie the speakers absolutely right she's absolutely right she reverses course the speaker still absolutely right she is unbelievable Tehran Nancy go ahead their trial in the Senate won't even tell us what they want a fair trial in the Senate should there be due process I don't think so I mean after all it wasn't any in the house I mean should the minority the Democrats have any rights yeah they should have the same rights the minority had in the house the remote which.

Harvard Arkansas Harvard Law School army Iran China president
"harvard law school" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on WLAC

"At Harvard Law School, the Harvard crimson the big newspaper there on campus celebrated her as a native American this was directly from the director of communications there. Mark shimura. Okay. Then in one thousand nine hundred six she was still at Harvard Law School. There was a piece in the Fordham law review that that that celebrated her as a quote first woman of color. She did nothing nothing to correct that impression. And in fact, she didn't of things to encourage that impression in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine when she was a professor at university of Pennsylvania law school angling for a job at Harvard, which was desperate for diversity. She filled out a form for her employer. Felt these forms. What's your ethnicity? She checked the box. She checks the box. She claimed that she was a native American. And so obviously that was to get her in the employment pool for consideration at Harvard Law School, so she's a dishonest person. Yeah. I mean, you're the historian Elizabeth Warren for sure that can look at the away. Some people may be Warren who is doing this exploratory effort about, you know, running for president in one of my friends use very much anti Trump wouldn't vote for Trump. Reelection didn't matter. What happens? I said what if what abo- Liz Windsor nomination other democrat, you know, party here. What what if that happens? Well, how do you feel about it, man? And he's like, I'll get off the couch. Hey, here's here's here's Elizabeth Warren blaming Republicans for her bad conduct. I grew up in Oklahoma. And.

Harvard Law School Elizabeth Warren Harvard professor Fordham law review Trump Mark shimura Liz Windsor director of communications Oklahoma university of Pennsylvania president
"harvard law school" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Or five FM WKNO s HD two Milford. Hey, I gotta eat a little crow here. But that's okay. I'm happy to do it going back to that NBC story about Donald Trump declaring an emergency to build the border wall. Let me just read a little excerpt from that because it is a little bit surprising. Actually, the article goes on to say legal experts said that Trump could find sure footing by using Anaba gated money within the defense department's budget because federal law allows the military to fund construction projects during war or emergencies. Pentagon spokesman a sites the title of the US code that gives the military authority to do that. And lo and behold, they go to Harvard Law School one of the most liberal law schools in the country and find a professor who has some sense never heard of him Harvard Law School, professor Mark tush net. Says this this is professor touch net. Speaking the department of defense has funds in its account that are not specifically designated for anything. Congress gives them money and says, we don't have to know what's going to happen over the next year and professor push net goes on to say, my instinct is to say that if he declares a national emergency and use us this pot unappropriated money for the wall. Listen to this people he's on very solid legal ground. So there you have it and I will eat crow. Harvard Law School professor saying, and I will repeat it. My instinct is to say that if he the president declares a national emergency and uses this pot of unappropriated money for the wall. And again, I have read about that that money is just sitting there, and it's discretionary professor touch net goes on to say he's on. Very solid legal ground. So there you got Harvard law professor that says that the president can declare an emergency. Hey, I gotta go to Marvin house a little rough within the last time. We spoke. Marvin. You doing? Okay. I heard what you just said. Okay. What?.

professor Harvard Law School Donald Trump Mark tush Harvard president Milford lo NBC US Marvin Anaba Pentagon Congress
"harvard law school" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

03:03 min | 3 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Elizabeth warren. Is less American Indian than most white people in this country. And Lindsey Graham is going is going to shame her. It really doesn't matter if she's much American Indian anyway. But it did matter it mattered to her career. It got her hired and promoted, and that's what's wrong with the playing of these games in an article in the Fordham law review in nineteen ninety five. The author writes there are few women of color who hold important positions in the academy. Fortune five hundred companies or other prominent fields or industries. This is not inconsequential diversifying these arenas in part by adding qualified women of color to their ranks. Remains important for many reasons for one there are scant women of color as role models. In my three years at Stanford law school there were no professors who were women of color. Harvard Law School hired its first woman of color. Elizabeth warren. In nineteen ninety five. Elizabeth Warren a woman of color. Could've she's one one thousand American Indian which they didn't actually use Indian blood to compare against. But hey, let's assume she is in fact, one one thousand American Indian I don't wanna take that away from her. But does that make her a woman of color? Why do we qualify people as a woman of color? Why is that important? It's important that she have been perceived in that way. Because it got her hired on it gave her an extra qualification. But here's the problem faculty positions like most other things particularly in public life in in government. Faculty positions or a zero sum game. If Elizabeth Warren got that job. Didn't that mean someone else didn't? And even if you buy into the nonsense. That you need to have women of color on the faculty for the sole purpose of being a woman of color, not because that person is the best. But if you say, well, we got to hire us one non white woman. And here comes this white woman. I'm a non white whitewater. If you say, so. That's why she has to maintain the lie because her whole career is based on that lie. You see that she's too she's into deep at this point. She can't get out. But the worst part is some black woman some Hispanic woman.

Elizabeth warren Lindsey Graham Fordham law review Harvard Law School Stanford law school three years
"harvard law school" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:03 min | 3 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on KTRH

"Elizabeth warren. Is less American Indian than most white people in this country. And Lindsey Graham is going is going to shame her. It really doesn't matter if she's much American Indian anyway. But it did matter it mattered to her career. It got her hired and promoted, and that's what's wrong with playing these games in an article in the Fordham law review. In nineteen ninety five. The author writes there are few women of color who hold important positions in the academy. Fortune five hundred companies or other prominent fields or industries. This is not inconsequential diversifying these arenas in part by adding qualified women of color to their ranks. Remains important for many reasons for one there are scant women of color as role models. In my three years at Stanford law school there were no professors who were women of color. Harvard Law School hired its first woman of color. Elizabeth warren. In nineteen ninety five. Elizabeth Warren a woman of color. Because she's one one thousand American Indian which they didn't actually use Indian blood to compare against. But hey, let's assume she is in fact, one one thousand American Indian I don't wanna take that away from her. But does that make her a woman of color? Why do we qualify people as a woman of color? Why is that important? It's important that she have been perceived in that way. Because it got her hired on it gave her an extra qualification. But here's the problem faculty positions like most other things particularly in public life in in government. Faculty positions or a zero sum game. If Elizabeth Warren got that job. Does that mean someone else didn't? And even if you buy into the nonsense. That you need to have women of color on the faculty for the sole purpose of being a woman of color, not because that person is the best. But if you say, well, we got a hire us one non white woman. And here comes this white woman. I'm a non white woman if you say so. That's why she has to maintain the lie because her whole career is based on that lie. You see that she's too she's into deep at this point get out. But the worst part is some black woman some Hispanic woman.

Elizabeth warren Lindsey Graham Fordham law review Harvard Law School Stanford law school three years
"harvard law school" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"So you though the same friend that went down to part time? Yeah, I friend Christine Rayner. She went to Harvard Law School. Okay. And I have been in her company many times where people have asked her where she went to law school, and then she has said, I went to Harvard Law School and almost one hundred percent of the time people go, ooh, ooh, more. And I have to watch them just patronize her for about five minutes. And I've thought ever since witnessing this, wow, I would have thought having graduated from Harvard is great thing. It'd be like a fucking racing trophy, but no, it totally backfires, right people are just generally so threatened by this. Is it miserable sane where you went to college? So allow me to indulge in my white privilege. Complain about going. It is. It is a weird going. It's a weird lose-lose thing because if you say you went to Harvard, that's the reaction. And if you say you went to school in Boston, which people do a lot of people that I went to Boston or whatever, and then they would do aware be you and then you're, you're dead and you don't have to Harvard, and then they didn't want us to double Wham. Joe, I, you just it's easier to say, went to Harvard, you know, you start by going on asshole or go to school. I'm gonna. Fuck in. So let's start here. Start from this baseline. You ain't me. I'm an asshole. Do we need to talk about college? Yeah. I mean, I was on like seventy five percent of my education was paid for with financial aid. And so I feel less poverty and I feel embarrassed about it because I do feel like I earned. It's it's actually so sad that we as humans are so easily triggered threatened. Yeah, that's something that is look. I could never fucking got into Harvard. It wasn't wasn't within me either through the due diligence or test scores, and it's a huge accomplishment. And it's crazy that we hate it. If someone wins a an Olympic gold medal, no one's like gold. What I think I know exactly what it is. We all have some weird fantasy of had we committed ourselves to learning the the high bar or whatever fucking sharing that we could have. Yeah, there's something about like intellectual feelings of intellectual inferiority that really triggers something much more deep to identity. I would actually say, I think you're right, but I would rephrase it a little bit. I think that the reason we don't do that with the hundred meter dash winner because it's like that guy's not. I'm not that guy. There's no one hundred years, but Harvard is like, well, I went to this college and you went to Harvard or Yale, or Stanford at Princeton or whatever. Yeah, and so it's like it's the closeness. It's the it's thoughts Dimity to it that makes people get defensive or whatever. That's a wild guess. I don't know if there's any. There's so many things in life like this, like I will..

Harvard Law School Harvard Christine Rayner gold medal Boston Joe Princeton Yale Stanford seventy five percent one hundred percent one hundred years hundred meter five minutes
"harvard law school" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Rod rosenstein is a is threatening members of congress and saying he's going to subpoena them if they tried to get rid of him i mean look look at rod rosenstein doesn't he look like the kind of guy who got multiple wedgies when he was in middle school junior high school this kinda gotta got his lunch bag stomped on and now now he's you know he he's a prosecutor and he thinks he's a real copy thinks he's a tough guy and so he's coming after people he's never been elected to anything and he's he's threatening these elected congressmen and you know i know congressman can be corrupt than the you know they tend to be when bags a lot of them but they are elected by the people they are the people's representatives and the and i'll i'll put more more confidence in in devon nunez or mark meadows jim jordan and i will in rod rosenstein who went to harvard law school the fact that all these people with the harvard law school speaks ill of of harvard law school you know barack obama rod rosenstein the divall patrick all on all these people on the supreme court they're they're they're not they don't they don't tend to be very good people eight four four five hundred forty to forty two they don't they don't seem to care that much about the law they think they're above the law i'm howie carr he's the google of graft we go my listeners love get the tea and ronnie now has a new special what is it ronnie well you know your listeners are are going crazy for the get the tea and that's great you know we take getting sick that's the worst thing and then there's a lot of people that have blood pressure issues and this is where our alison advanced comes in and does a great job with keeping intruders out so if you don't like being sick this is what you want to be taken and we're gonna do the super teeth so what we're gonna do is put this together all they have to do is put the.

Rod rosenstein congress middle school junior high scho congressman harvard law school alison devon nunez barack obama howie carr ronnie
"harvard law school" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on WGTK

"Everybody dennis prager here we're speaking with professor alan dershowitz famous civil libertarian professor of harvard law school and in my opinion most important he's intellectually honest he's a liberal who understands the threat of the left this division let me tell you how i explained i'd like your reaction if i may and i've always called you professor dershowitz but i i've been with you so often now oh he's not there i'm just talking to myself what happened we lost what happened i'm sorry okay all right well we'll get him anyway i am going to i'm going to present him with if we get back on the the difference that i always give to people when they say well what's a liberal and leftist and i give the race example liberal never never would have supported black dormitories on college campuses or black graduation exercises and that is a that is a leftwing position there are so many others that i maybe i think i wrote a piece on the difference between liberal and left she probably do another one just because that's the issue of our day liberals be courageous enough to take on the left all right he had to go okay fine i didn't i didn't know you were only having one segment anyway it it is what it is it was very important to have him on and it's very important to understand that he is an example i find it fascinating that he rarely speaks to two members of the family this is the way they live so many on the left the new york times you remember right after the election in two thousand sixteen had a front page piece about how so many people in the country wouldn't go to thanksgiving or christmas dinner with relatives who supported voted for donald trump it's almost always in that direction we tolerate their leftism we even try to make nice to them at within families but many are completely vile when it comes to us because it's all passion you know if you if you don't understand that leftism is rooted in emotion not reason then you have no chance to understand leftism and.

alan dershowitz professor harvard law school new york times donald trump dennis prager
"harvard law school" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"Uh you at harvard law school one of your classmates was barack obama he was two years behind me yes so he was there are now one of these a revisionist historians where i tell you i knew him very well but we used to play tuesdays and thursdays hoops in the hemingway jim saw all the gym rats knew each other he was a firstyear student one i was a thirdyear student but my best barack obama stories in two thousand seven he came to the university club you may not remember this i supported him and i buy i do i do remember and so i walked into the university club there were seven or eight of us from law school then senator obama from your great state of illinois are we are handing them cheques i turned to them i said senator i said you know we didn't really know each other that well in law school but i'm had had to rage a big shaghai said can i lied on my friends to tell them that we knew each other he laughed he didn't miss beatty said hey if you double the amount of the attack we can take it back to hawaii as the spurs out he'll he's got a great personality and by the way i did i double demanded shack and i went out and bundled form because i said to myself manama republican um i thought he was a moderate voice i had a lot of common sense he ran into him you guys can gradually guys right an amazing campaign um and i thought i was going to break a lot of different things the jackie robinson of american politics and i thought he was going to make the world better and by the way a lot of things you did i agree with we can talk about what they are some of the things he did i very strongly didn't agree one official obviously didn't like was you felt he was too rough on on wall street that his language was too rough on wall street stuff tough on wall street i know we we got into a little bit at the cnn town hall meeting at the newseum self hours i was.

harvard law school senator obama illinois beatty hawaii jackie robinson senator i manama official cnn town hall two years
"harvard law school" Discussed on Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

"Place so that's the long answer to that so let's talk about the the mood sri minute began who doesn't love talking about of god i mean he's just i i wanna like i would love to just be trapped in an elevator with him for a couple of days yeah as long as we had food and snacks but but can you tell us a little bit about him like what makes him tick i just it had find him so fascinating so yeah so scaramucci as probably allow a lot of people know the scaramucci origin surrey by now he i think he went up your harvard law school and then he worked at goldman sachs and then he failed at his first job at goldman sachs and then um i i don't know what was in between goldman sachs than him starting this company skybridge alternative estimates was basically like a fun to find funds that also had this like party on the other side in las vegas where he can just be as promoter and heat us like his the thing that gives him like lifeblood end the thing that gives him like all meaning in life is just being like this consummate schmoozer so economy sense when he was going from schmoozing on wall street to schmoozing in washington but clearly he didn't realize that washington wall street are very different places obviously that's what he's talking about you know getting stabbed in the front by these secret errors and he's just like he houston who fascinating to me i ain't i know that he is the guy who loves to be like i need from the old neighborhood were family i you know stand in front of a bus for you but i'm like endlessly fascinated by at hate him i have met him yes and what's he like in person he's i would say he's exactly like he is seen on tv and on print so that part of me that wonders like he actually doesn't seem like a bad guy a my is it just because i like him on a little bit at that i don't think he's a guy like you know looks like.

harvard law school goldman sachs las vegas washington houston
"harvard law school" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Okay this is one of those points that a number of people including the washington post james hohmann made this point in washington post president trump didn't use the term i i i i he far more frequently use the term we he used the word i twenty nine times he used the term we a hundred twenty nine times another communal word that the president used our he used at a hundred and four times okay you the tapes like the royal way but it was effective so why does elizabeth warren respond this way she tweeted this morning this is the senator from massachusetts the former professor of young joe kennedy owned by the way he met his wife and the mother of his two children at harvard law school in elizabeth warren a class so senator warren rights i went to the state of the union i wanted it burned into my eyes if there's ever a moment when i'm too tired to keep fighting i just have to close my eyes and see trump pence and ryan applauding themselves for punching families in the gut and i'm back in this fight oh yeah okay what what what is the point whoa at how how can someone answer the question seriously this is a woman who clearly wants to run for president what is she talking about how is speaker ryan how is president trump punching working families in the gut can you explain that to me please actually what the president was calling for is an effort to actually achieve more together listen fish in.

trump president elizabeth warren senator massachusetts professor joe kennedy harvard law school ryan washington post james hohmann washington senator warren rights
"harvard law school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Good evening and welcome to tonight's program hosted by the commonwealth club of silicon valley my name is low darras cordell it is my pleasure to introduce keyser con gold star father and author of an american family a memoir of hope and sacrifice mr khan was born in pakistan and received his law degree from the university of punjab he and his wife priscilla then lived in dubai before immigrating with their family to the united states in 1986 mr con graduated from harvard law school and that same year the cons became american citizens khan's have three sons shah who magnon and omar us army captain who magnon was tragically killed in the line of duty in iraq and posthumously awarded a purple heart and a bronze star many of us remember mr khan delivering one of the most memorable speeches at last year's democratic national convention as he talked about equality sacrifice and the ideals symbolized by the united states constitution we are honored to have him with us here too right please welcome he's here khan.

keyser mr khan pakistan law degree priscilla dubai united states harvard law school shah iraq democratic national convention university of punjab
"harvard law school" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Proved that saw michael patrick lay he breitbart because harvard university has the has refused to release her employment applications the university of pennsylvania law school the other lie ivy league law school that she was a tenured member of the faculty they refuse to release their employment documents and she claims that she never used her alleged native american heritage too wide to to jump over uh more qualified applicants but you know david french who writes for national review and i'm sure you've you've heard of david fresh yes he's a big critic of donald trump he attended harvard law school at that time and he got says you know the atmosphere around campus of that time was just uh very very critical of the school and they were demanding minority hires at harvard law school as you know and and there's no question that uh elizabeth warren presented herself as a minority in that enhanced her attractiveness to harvard law school when they heard no question about that right mind the understanding to she's a gradual of a rutgers university law school which is not exactly a firstyear lost mamone no knock on the rutgers but the harvard in these other ivy league call logist usually hire people who are graduates of the top tier absolute top tier law schools and she's i i think she's the only one who comes from a second or third tier school like or was the only one from a second or third tier school like rutgers you know it's like this is this is why she got the job because they thought they were hiring a a native american and it and it's just so preposterous to hear this the every time a trump mentions the word polka haunt us you know the the it's like it's like pavlov's dogs with the mainstream media they go crazy and they call him are racists than in it's just it makes absolutely no sense to me well i i think the reason trump does it i think he's very strategic and referring to her as pocahontas because it reminds.

breitbart harvard university law school david french national review donald trump harvard law school elizabeth warren rutgers pavlov mainstream media michael patrick university of pennsylvania law david fresh
"harvard law school" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Harvard law school in teacher professors a thing or two a few few months later i happened to bump into him at another event and he made only remembered million he asked well how did it how did that work when i brought it all back to las cool i said well joe fiscally i have bad news i brought it back to my school and the professors overruled you unanimously quickly a laugh because he understood all too well the situation of law school uh and how his approaches shooters constitutional approach this methodology is basic premise these were so at odds then and now with the dominant theories of constitutional law practice the most law school i learned from you that when justice scalia spoke at law schools or spoke before law students he was looking to disrupt them in some fashion any haven et declares that he wrote his descends for law students what is it that he was seeking to achieve by disrupting those of us who just memorize well justice scalia had in mind disruption of the best and not disruption will away the campus loser disrupted now unfortunately but what he meant was he was there it intellectually shake the students up a little bit especially the one who but exposed in a serious way too textual is emerge or ridge it'll is almost ideal uh interpreting the constitution in accordance with how it's words were understood by the generation that made those words with the law school year would come to campus he would give talks in an effort to spread that message but you mentioned the also wrote defending opinions and so many supreme court cases and those content by john who is owned admission uh were aimed at the next generation of lawyer so he'd already in any one case where he was defending use all the wrong end of the case and that is his side had lost his view it lost justice scalia was left to explain in detail for a generation of law students what a better wade to.

Harvard law school constitutional law law school justice scalia john wade joe
"harvard law school" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on Recode Decode

"But let's talk about what how you got to where you that you would you had started off you have quite a resume you start off educated all and and how you so what you go through that really quickly uh so i started out studying electrical engineering at princeton and i also did a side certificate in the wilson school public in an international fairs i went straight to you harvard law school the case go before that in the book you talk a lot about your background and growing up sorta seems delic the odds night yeah i mean wasn't quite a delicacy it was a little bit of a small town than who really have very many asian so there is a little bit of tension there but in a but my parents were you know like we had dinner together every night it was very um education oriented and you know my mom was a researcher at bell labs so we had access to computers swagger yeah my dad was a math professor so it was very know we had access to a lot of information and a lot of that you know an educational tools and uh and focus and achievement around achievement yeah thought was like they had come from china on education scholarships and for them like education was the path to success and the path to contributing back and it wasn't genderbased they were pushing right boning they had with three girls regular exactly bility to be unfair gender but also wasn't that is that eu she your mother was a researcher she had a significant job in the idea was that you could achieve whatever he was that's the pressing idea now but the goals weren't that great lu lu they were like if you could be a professor or a doctor that would be so awesome and but you can do it if you work hard enough right exactly so you went under princeton go ahead turns out entrepreneurs and then after prince and i want to harvard law school and i practice corporate law for two years and you're in new york and then a year in hong kong mostly men in the group um and.

princeton law school researcher bell labs professor china new york hong kong wilson school harvard harvard law school two years
"harvard law school" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"All poor moke yesterday they said he was a the harvard law school said he was dead he got fired now we got beat up in little italy today what's what's going on with the moke maybe should go visit his son in the hospital and is his astray ranged wife i think we're moving on from the mobster movies they even plugs out there i mean streets by the way 1973 a pretty damn good mob movie lower lackey semeck rail need is when i get in there coming up will you don't think mean streets israel news insists like every day you pull these gangsters 'cause i think you secretly think you are a little bit of a gangster who is widely biology i wanted to have you killed yati addi atta that's very true there is a little foam ogun going on with how he wishes you is a gangster yeah he's like i never clean that was a tough guy and then he pretends that he's a tough guy thou so is called and reminded me of that seem in in means streets his prefight guts out that that was the robert the niro's first the breakthrough movie he was the second lead the with harvey kyw towel was the was the lead and martin scorsese's first movie but a great great film in any way the moluccas is the most they'll hasn't been seen him so i guess i shouldn't be surprised he's he's a he'll he'll resurface somewhere he didn't do his exit interview last night on sean hannity either juicy greg gut felt he said i probably shouldn't be too harsh on the guy might end of work in here again you should have said again um how weak are today's news is.

harvard law school martin scorsese greg gut little italy israel robert the niro harvey kyw sean hannity