37 Burst results for "Harvard Law School"

Fresh update on "harvard law school" discussed on Jim Bohannon

Jim Bohannon

00:37 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "harvard law school" discussed on Jim Bohannon

"What in the world is going on. Alan Dershowitz joins us the noted Harvard Law professor emeritus and attorney, a man who will also tell us a bit about his podcast, the dirt show, and his new book, the price of principle good evening Allen. Good evening, I've lived my life with subpoenas, search warrants. So this is just the most affidavit. I've spent 60 years doing SOI think I can tell you a little bit about it. I would certainly hope so, but before we go any further than that, I would have to ask you one question the attorney general Merrick Garland stated that where possible they try to do this sort of thing in an unobtrusive manner. Well, then why is it not possible here? That has never been made clear, and it could be without compromising anything that is underway. Why not just simply answer that question? Well, you know, in my book, the price of principle, I state the principles under which my life has been governed. And one of those principles is this. If there's a dispute between two people or two institutions of two countries. And one of them wants everything to come out. Once transparency and the other one is trying to hide everything, always believe the person who wants the truth to come out. And that's what's happening here. I don't understand why the deathless department is playing this game. Why don't we see the affidavit? They can redact it. They can leave out the names of people, witnesses, et cetera, but we need to know. I'll give you an example. In order to get a search warrant for a faith, particularly a safe, you need to show a great particularity what's in the safe. And where you got the information, what's in the safe. You don't have to give the name, but where you get the information. Well, it turns out, according to reporting, the safe was empty. It was the Al Capone moment with Geraldo Rivera. I remember vividly. And right. And so the question is, what was in the affidavit? What was in the affidavit? Also, he said, we don't go for searches when there are less intrusive methods. Why? Did they have to have a search? They already had a subpoena out there. There was negotiations going on. We're told that there have been surveillance tapes and the surveillance tapes made them worried. Show us this surveillance tapes. Why are we hiding the ball here? We should be able to get to the truth. We have to sit in judgment. Who will guard the guardians? In America, we always said trust but verify. And I trust our government, but I want to see it verify through the affidavits. Yeah, really, the government doesn't want the affidavit to be unsealed, I guess a judge will rule on that on Thursday, but the rationale given for why the government doesn't want it to be revealed would indicate, I think, that there are witnesses, presumably, before a grand jury, which presumably has been impaneled, whether or not any indictments have been issued, I don't know, or maybe I'm just barking up the wrong tree here. You tell me what you read from their rationale. No, it seems to me you're a 100% right. They don't want to disclose the names of witnesses. And that's okay. I don't think we're going to need to know the names of trial witnesses if they will be trial witnesses. We don't need to know the names. Of the FBI agents or cooperating witnesses and sources. We need to know what the judge was shown. Before he issued the search warrant and we need to know whether he had probable cause to do that. And in order to make that determination, we need to see what he saw, not the names, not the specifics they can redact. Generally, the presumption should be in favor of disclosure. And the government should have the burden of proving that this name should be redacted that fact should be redacted. And generally, judges accept that, but at least let them come forward and give a justification. You know, I was involved in The Pentagon papers case. Remember that? A long time ago. Oh, yeah. Listen to general United States, my former dean at Harvard Law School got up until the Supreme Court. That there are such grave sequence in The Pentagon papers case that if they were ever disclosed, it would cause an enormous threat to our national security. And it would disclosed. And there was no threat to the national security. It was just not correct. Government always tries to over classify and over high and the media tries to get disclosure in the courts have to make a determination. And I hope the court will make a determination in this case with a presumption in favor of transparency. Well, I would certainly hope so. I know that you've written a great opinion piece here, but her emails question mark, a defense of what about ism. Now this says reference, of course, to what has been said by many people. Yes, myself included. Regarding the treatment of Donald Trump, in comparison with a few other cases, most notably the server that Hillary Clinton had, and we can all who were around at the time and paying attention can recall James Comey drawing up the perfect outline for a case against Hillary Clinton and then concluding by saying, but no reasonable prosecutor would pursue this case. And I remember thinking, give me the rest of the afternoon, I could find two dozen. Yeah. No, I think that's right. And I think in this case as well, you'll find some prosecutors who would some prosecutors want. For me, when you go after a future candidate for president, whether it be Hillary Clinton, or Donald Trump, who's probably going to run again, you have to have a slam dunk case. You have to have a Nixon type case. Smoking guns, obvious clear violations of the law. You know, and serious violations. If you just, in the end, come up with G, he kept some things to write his memoir because he enjoyed conversations with so and so and so and so that's not going to do it. It has to be much more significant and much more substantial. We don't know, maybe it is. I presume innocence for everybody, including Garland, who I know a little bit and like a lot. He was a student at Harvard Law School. I supported his nomination for Supreme Court Justice ship. And I hope he's going to show the good sense not to divide our nation even further by indicting on the basis of the allegations that don't really lead up to a slam dunk smoking gun case, particularly in the District of Columbia because anybody can get a conviction in the District of Columbia. And particularly again, Trump people visits 85% Democrat and very, very soon with Trump opponents. So he can get a jury verdict, but that's not the

Merrick Garland Deathless Department Alan Dershowitz Geraldo Rivera Al Capone Harvard Allen Pentagon Hillary Clinton America Harvard Law School James Comey Donald Trump FBI Supreme Court Mark Nixon Garland District Of Columbia
Fresh update on "harvard law school" discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:44 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "harvard law school" discussed on Dennis Prager Podcasts

"Okay, but the free will issue, and even what you just said, do you really believe if you really believe fewer police will reduce crime so you are either and I hate to say this because it sounds sort of like a cheap shot, but I don't mean, I mean it literally. So you're either an idiot, in other words, incapable of clarity of thought. Or there's what your theory, there's something going on in there that we can't relate to. To say such obviously refutable things, especially leftists. I mean, you always, and this is one of the main things that I've learned from you, and I'm immensely grateful for it, that we have to make a distinction between liberals and leftists. I think liberals have more of the free will component, if you will, they can kind of hopefully. With leftists, I'm sorry to say this. There's something that's sick. There's something that's innately kind of screwed up for them to buy hook line and sink or these insane things. Well, just to live in this society and not be grateful for it. I know. I know. You and I and tens of millions of others think that that is truly sick. So it's either sick or there's something really bad about you. You know, I've noticed with because again, I can't tell you how many times I've had the thought in the debate, is it just within this person to follow these ideologies or is there a free well component? I have observed. And again, it's anecdotal. It's just my own life observation. That many of those on the left suffer from low self esteem. Despite what you talk about, how there's this huge self esteem movement and we're told how great we are and that's not great for us growing up. Why do you say that? Again, it's just, I think a lot of them, these people who I have known personally and obviously I've encountered many of them throughout my educative experience from high school to college. They are insecure. The most hardline leftists I know are fundamentally insecure people. And I think they're trying to grasp at something that gives them meaning or gives them a sense of superiority. So that's one thing I've noticed. Another thing, and this may seem a bit counterintuitive because the left, especially leftists, specifically, really can get in your face and get loud. A lot of liberals I've observed are extremely conflict averse. They don't want to ruffle any feathers. That I relate to. You know, just interpersonally. They could be sitting at a restaurant for 30 minutes and the waiter won't wait on them and they will not get up and ask to be weighed in on. There's something within them that is conflict over. So they go, oh, I don't know. If people are happier without police, who am I to judge? Oh, I don't know if people want to, you know, like Boston children's hospital. I want to cut off people's boobs. Before 17, who am I to judge? There's a weird conflict aversion there. Again, it's something innate. So I think that's a very excellent observation. The liberals I know in my extended family, I think that is a trait that I would associate with them. It's not a condemnation. It's just that's very, very observant on the first one. The self esteem thing. We might have an area we differ. Oh. There you go. But your mother is her mother's wish. That's right. So when I think of George Soros or AOC. Or Nancy Pelosi, I don't think of people with low self esteem. Fair enough, those people certainly don't. I, on the contrary, think they have abnormally inordinately high self esteem. I am the determiner of right and wrong. I so trust my feelings. I don't need a God. I don't need a Bible. I don't need a religion. I don't need a constitution. I am the determiner of right and wrong. See, I don't think that way. Oh, you'll love this. I don't know if you know this line. I've said it a number of occasions, but I don't think I said it to you. So you know Alan Dershowitz the famous Harvard lawyer. Of course. And so before he defended liberal principles and defended Trump in court, he was the darling of liberal America. He was the intellectual hero. Alan Dershowitz Harvard Law School. So we were both brought to New York City many years ago, maybe 20, 20 years ago. When they still invited people like me to the 92nd street, why very famous place in New York City. So Dershowitz and I were invited to talk about Jews and Democrats and Republicans. Is this the Torah? Yes. You know the line? I do. So this is a very important line that I said to Alan Dershowitz. In the middle, I said, I said, professor or Alan, I remember what they called him then. He said, so I realized something tonight. When Alan Dershowitz differs with the Torah, that's the first 5 books of the Bible and it's the most important part of the Bible to Jews. When Alan Dershowitz differs with the Torah, he says the Torah is wrong and he is right. When I differ with the Torah, I say the Torah is right, and I am wrong. I think about that once a day, seriously, I do, because you wrote it in your genesis commentary. And I think it's one of the more memorable lines that you have in there. And the reason why it's stuck with me is a because I totally agree with you. That's the way that I see things with regard to the Bible. But also, it was a bit instructive for me reading that. Even though naturally, I would defer to the Bible than to my own conscience or my own judgment. I also try to remind myself of that too, that it's important, I mean, really uniquely with the Bible, I wouldn't say for anything else. But when it comes to the Bible, it is important to practice that. And know that you can't trust yourself with so that's why I raised it with regard to leftist self esteem..

Alan Dershowitz Boston Children's Hospital Alan Dershowitz Harvard Law Sc George Soros AOC Nancy Pelosi New York City Dershowitz Donald Trump Harvard America Alan
The Democrats Gender Confusion

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:01 min | Last month

The Democrats Gender Confusion

"I think we are at peak woke. It now begins to destroy itself because it's on display. And that's my, that's my proposition I'm sticking to it. Do you agree with me that if Democrats refuse to say that women are women and men are men and only women can have babies that they will suffer at the polls because Americans are not in to the hard left ideology of it's called critical legal studies and you came out of its birthplace Harvard Law School and see critical legal studies became critical race theory became critical birth theory. It's just crazy. It is crazy to you and I can't say for equal or not that's really not in our hands in the hands of the Democrats whether or not they want to start sounding like normal people again and defending the interest of normal people because remember to you, it's not just saying silly things like persons who are capable of becoming pregnant. It's also neglecting the priorities of working class Americans in favor of their abstract academic concerns.

Harvard Law School
Alger Hiss and 'Gods of Deception' With David Adams Cleveland

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:37 min | 2 months ago

Alger Hiss and 'Gods of Deception' With David Adams Cleveland

"To you about the book gods of deception. So what's the general plot of this novel gods of deception with this background we've been discussing? Well, one of the things that fascinated me was how his managed to assemble a defense team. Most of them were Harvard Law School guys. They were, they were people that knew his pretty well. But I mean, when the evidence started coming through, I just couldn't believe how could these guys really believe their client was innocent? As the evidence, they had papers. It's top secret State Department papers with his handwriting on them. They had documents that have been typed on the Hiss typewriter, it was quite clear that Hiss was guilty. So how was it that his defense team could have stood by him through all of this? So the way I worked the fictional arc of the book was having one of the main characters be one of his defense lawyers who had actually defended him in the trial. And come 50 years later, the now the Edward demick is known as the judge in the book, is writing his memoirs. And he enlists his grandson. Who is a Princeton astrophysicist to help him to write these memoirs. And it's actually the grandson's exploration of what's in the memoirs and talking to his grandfather to try to figure out what had really happened in the algebra his case. And

Harvard Law School State Department Edward Demick Hiss Princeton
Josh Hammer Reflects on Sen. Amy Klobuchar's Abortion Comments

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:42 min | 3 months ago

Josh Hammer Reflects on Sen. Amy Klobuchar's Abortion Comments

"Yeah, I want to play a clip for you here from senator Klobuchar. That I think, you know, when we talk about the constitutionality of roe V wade and obviously Casey sort of, in my opinion, obviously I think you would agree that it's unconstitutional. I think Alito's opinion was a skewered the original road decision. But let's play senator Klobuchar here, and I want to get your take on what she says because actually what she's saying from a sitting U.S. senator is something. I mean, this is not mazie hirono here talking here. I mean, which we just assume is she's going to say the most Atlantic, you know, far left out to see kind of the type of things. Is it senator Klobuchar, who many think is sort of moderate or left of center, but not far left. Listen to cut 6. Why should a woman in Texas have different rights and a different future and a different ability to make decisions about her body and her reproductive choices than a woman in Minnesota? How can that be in this country that we'd have a patchwork of laws? Your response. So senator Klobuchar and I actually went to the same law school and, you know, I would like to think that when she was in common law back in her law school day, she knew better about the actual constitutional law underpinning the roe versus wade and its murderous successor, of course, Planned Parenthood versus Casey 92. Now, look, I mean, John Hart Eli, okay? There are so many liberals who have criticized roe versus wade's fallacious reasoning or beers. But John Hart Eli, who is a longtime constitutional law professor at Harvard Law School, he was the dean of Stanford law school as well. He was personally liberal progressive he supported abortion rights, but he famously said in 1982 that roe versus wade was not constitutional law and barely even gave a semblance of purporting to be constitutional law. It was literally no less a feminist leftist progressive icon than the late justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg herself. We said the roe versus wade overstepped that the court should not have acted there when it did. They should have stayed cool, let it play out democratically in the states. So, you know, what I hear from senator Klobuchar there is, you know, it's constitutional illiteracy. It's also moral illiteracy, of course. We can't forget we're talking about it. You are talking about the wanton murder of now 63 million unborn children since roe versus wade came down in 1973. 63 million. I mean, it's really just difficult to kind of wrap your mind around around that kind of number. But you know, there's something about you said there, Andrew, that I think there's a modicum. There's a small, small sliver of correctness. Where I think she's correct, is that it ultimately is unsustainable for in the long term. My personal perspective in the long term for this to actually be a state

Senator Klobuchar John Hart Eli Roe V Wade Mazie Hirono Wade Casey Alito Atlantic Stanford Law School Harvard Law School Minnesota U.S. Texas Ruth Bader Ginsburg ROE Roe Versus Wade Andrew
How Biden Undermined Ketanji Brown Jackson's Impressive Background

The Larry Elder Show

00:46 sec | 6 months ago

How Biden Undermined Ketanji Brown Jackson's Impressive Background

"A very impressive background too bad he undermined it by saying he's going to choose a black female. She served 8 years as a federal judge in Washington, D.C., where she was born. She was appointed to the D.C. Court of Appeals last year by Joe Biden. She went to Harvard undergraduate, where she graduated cum laude in 1992, and then from Harvard Law School in 1996, where she was supervising editor for the law review. As mentioned born in D.C. to two public school teachers, one of whom her father went to law school at night. It became an attorney for the Miami dade county school board. Mother was a school teacher, public school teacher, and became a principal at a public magnet school. She married to a surgeon, admit star Georgetown university, his name is Patrick Jackson. They have two daughters.

Washington, D.C. D.C. Court Of Appeals Harvard Undergraduate Joe Biden Harvard Law School Miami Dade County School Board D.C. Georgetown University Patrick Jackson
"harvard law school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 7 months ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Way that whole process played out And does it foretell something about how these issues are going to play out going forward It's a very interesting decision because there are clearly three different groups on the court right now There is the group of Roberts Barrett and Kavanaugh who I think are worried about the administrative state but they are not as sweeping in their critique There's a second group of conservatives Gorsuch lito and Thomas whose critique is very sweeping indeed And if it were to become the law I think might change an unimaginable amount of our public life There's a third group Kagan Sotomayor and breyer who think that this whole approach is a kind of departure from the historic enterprise of American government to make people's lives better And breyer's descent in this case the osha cases I think it's one of his best and I'm glad it came at the end of his career It's a kind of valedictory That was Adrian from you He is a professor at Harvard Law School He's also a member of the council of the administrative conference but he wants to make clear that he's speaking on his own behalf here and not in behalf of the conference Professor Vermeer thank you so much for joining us and sharing this expertise Thank you Michelle I appreciate it You're listening to NPR news Now we want to talk about something we don't talk about Bruno No no no no no we don't talk about love you know you've heard we don't talk about Bruno it is the breakout number from the new Disney animated film encounter since the film was released last month the song has risen to number two on the Billboard Hot 100 chart making it the second highest charting song ever from a.

Roberts Barrett Gorsuch lito breyer Kagan Sotomayor Kavanaugh council of the administrative American government Thomas osha Harvard Law School Adrian Bruno NPR Michelle Disney
Freedom Comes From Obeying What God Wants for Your Life

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:14 min | 10 months ago

Freedom Comes From Obeying What God Wants for Your Life

"That people are becoming less free, the more that we degrade the moral guardrails of our society. That people are free when they actually abide to the law. There's this great quote they're going to take it down soon as soon as they discover it, because I mentioned it way too much at the Harvard Law School. It's far too wise for Harvard. It's just where this is great quote where it says the law are the wise restraints that keep men free. That freedom. And the sooner students realize this the better, and I pray that this is being taught to you, hopefully, maybe it is, maybe it isn't. That freedom comes in the earthly sense. Of course, from Jesus Christ and obeying to the scriptures, but that's the big one. Obeying what God wants for your life, right? Which is that you will be free, not from going to do whatever you want to do, things that make you feel good immediately, but instead, obeying the commands as how God wants you to live. That will be a state of freedom and I'll prove it to you. All of us, no alcoholics in our life. It's a very serious thing. Those people are not free. They do whatever they want to do. A lot of times whenever they want to do it. But unfortunately, that is not a state of freedom. That is a safe. That is a state of bondage to a certain substance that unfortunately then takes control of their mind and their body and hopefully not their

Harvard Law School Harvard
Derrick Bell Pushed for Marxist Model in America, Created Critical Race Theory

Mark Levin

01:15 min | 10 months ago

Derrick Bell Pushed for Marxist Model in America, Created Critical Race Theory

"And so what happened was they said well this isn't working We're not going to be able to overthrow the American system this way So there were splinter theories And one of them came out of Harvard Law School that I've been in a med Derrick bell who was an average or worse law professor In the 1970s And he felt that we should basically apply this Marxist model to race In many of his contemporaries thought he was unhinged Thought that he was a fringe 80 lock Thomas Saul used it announced him is really kind of a dumb guy who didn't make a whole lot of sense But dumb or not doesn't matter Over time he taught enough people and another professors joined in as they became more and more radicalized And this is something that has now permeated throughout colleges and universities starting in law schools In starting in the Ivy League schools And it's called critical race

Derrick Bell Thomas Saul Harvard Law School Ivy League
What Does the Constitution Really Say About Freedom of Religion?

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:41 min | 10 months ago

What Does the Constitution Really Say About Freedom of Religion?

"Americans really now need to understand what does the constitution say about religion. And I remember years ago, Hillary Clinton referred to freedom of worship, and I remember chuck Coleman at the time saying, wait a minute, forget about freedom of worship. It's about freedom of religion. Freedom of worship. They have in China. You go into your little weird building on Sunday morning. Do your little weird mystical stuff. And when you come out, you bow to the secular authority of the state. That's the opposite of freedom of religion. Freedom of religion says 24 7, you can exercise your faith. You can live out your faith. You can talk about your faith. You can do things with regard to your faith. You can refuse to do things with regard to your faith. That is an incredibly broad right. And we, in America, because we've been so blessed with freedom, have really just taken our eye off the ball in terms of what it is. And so when somebody says, do something you go, oh, okay, without realizing, like, wait a minute. I am free. Well, just to be clear, let's say let's speak theoretically, right? I'll be like Arthur Miller with a Harvard Law School. He used to do these round table things on PBS or something. You need to say, well, what about in this case? What if it's the Bubonic plague? It's not COVID, which where people get a cold and they inflate the numbers and make it sound like everybody's dying. Let's say tons of people are dying in the streets. That becomes a different issue. In other words, if somebody says, hey, I don't mind spreading the Bubonic plague. You'd say, well, your religious liberty doesn't extend to that because people are dying in the streets because the science actually backs

Chuck Coleman Hillary Clinton China Arthur Miller Harvard Law School Plague America PBS Bubonic
Should ecocide become an international crime?

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 11 months ago

Should ecocide become an international crime?

"The international criminal court at the hague in the netherlands prosecutes only four categories of crime genocide crimes against humanity the crime of aggression and war crimes but in june an international panel of lawyers proposed a definition of a new type of international crime. I can summarize it and what the definition says is that causing widespread severe or long lasting damage to the environment is the crime of echo side. Alex whiting of harvard law. School served on the panel. He says that for the international criminal court to prosecute people for crimes of eko side nations will need to adopt and ratify an amendment to the courts. Charter getting to that. Point could take years of debate and deliberation getting states to agree to this to bind themselves to an international agreement to an international crime is a long complicated process but getting started is important. He says already the work they've done to define eko side. As an international crime is motivating nations to think about their own environmental laws. And it's sparking debate about new ways to hold people accountable for polluting. The atmosphere and harming the earth

International Criminal Court Alex Whiting The Netherlands Harvard
President Trump Takes Sec. Mike Pompeo Over Sec. Antony Blinken Any Day

Mark Levin

01:55 min | 1 year ago

President Trump Takes Sec. Mike Pompeo Over Sec. Antony Blinken Any Day

"But I want you to hear from President Trump. He was on Hannity last night, and it was a tremendous interview by Sean With the president. And I want you to hear a little piece of this. Because I have something additional to say about it and try and set this straight once and for all. So stick with me. It will all make sense. Cut three Go. No, they have the cards with this group, and there are things you can do to counter it and things you can do to counter it very strongly, but they have the cars. But when you say secretary of state when you watch the decisions that are going to be made and being made, and you know what's going to be made because they played all their cards and look at the great job that Mike Pompeo did because he's tough. And he's smart number one of his class at West Point and a great student of the Harvard Law School. He was He did a great job, as secretary said, but he was tough and he knew what was happening with this, and he knew what was happening with China and Russia, and we would talk. Often. We had it all planned out, and then they decided to move the military out. And let's not follow the plan. It's like the only thing is, it's like the water wall. Nobody could handle it Worse were the greatest. We had the greatest protection that we've ever had on our southern border, and now we have the worst. And it was the worst nightmare to watch it that looks good by comparison to what's happening in Afghanistan. Okay? Something shocking happened. The Associated Press and our friend that right school, Brian Pointed it out. Biden has been saying all along that he was pinned into withdrawing from Afghanistan based on Trump's agreement with the Taliban. And he said more than that. Or we had to pour in, you know an enormous number of military resources. But stunningly, the AP points out how untrue

President Trump Mike Pompeo Hannity Sean Harvard Law School West Point Russia Brian Pointed China Afghanistan The Associated Press Biden Donald Trump Taliban AP
"harvard law school" Discussed on At Liberty

At Liberty

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on At Liberty

"It's what they need to know to be informed citizens in a country that is still on a pathway to become a more perfect union. You can't be a more perfect union. If you never learned what its imperfections. Where i i wanted to ask where critical race theory came from. I mean it didn't come out of thin air. What were you and others responding to or against that. Birth the idea of critical race theory. Well those of us who are the first generation are so critical race. Theorists are students who were the post civil rights generation. We grew up as kids. While the civil rights movement was unfolding and many of us went to colleges and ultimately law school with the intention of joining the civil rights movement kicking up the baton and running our lap of around the race and when some of us got to harvard law school. There were active plan to integrate the curriculum to bring into the teaching of law in that elite institution the implications of the transformative revolution law. That had occurred. After brown versus board of education it was as though that was an afterthought so our goal was to learn what we needed to learn about the relationship between law and ratio of liberation. Which meant we had to know about the relationship of law to racial subordination. And there were no courses. That were offered to teach us that so we began to share insights and drass with each other and ultimately became part of intellectual tradition of asking questions about our history. So if i understand correctly you were fighting against the idea that the law was this neutral body and if you just peeled away individual prejudice or discrimination that we would then have at the core this perfect neutral law and what you were saying is that there is no such thing. As neutral laws are written by people an embedded in them is all the bias and discrimination that they have brought to it. Yes and what's also embedded is modes of of thinking and accepting the status quo as just the way it has to be so our goal was to disrupt the believe that the status quo was in and of itself Racially benign or just the product of individual level capacity and talents or lack thereof..

harvard law school brown
General Mark Milley Fails to Acknowledge Communist Roots of Critical Theory

Mark Levin

01:23 min | 1 year ago

General Mark Milley Fails to Acknowledge Communist Roots of Critical Theory

"Isn't it isn't a typical though, like a lib. You're attacking the military. So now we're attacking the military. Those of us who are trying to protect the military try to get them back in their lane. The military that's buckling. To the propaganda and the programming. The most radical elements in our society and our law schools. Push by our so called Commander in chief. Now we You and I are attacking the military by defending the military. What kind of a jerk is this? That guy who likes Being the head of the joint Chiefs because this is the only way it works when your complete sell out, and he's a complete seller. Go ahead. Seeing some theories that are out there that was started Harvard Law school years ago, and it proposed that there were laws in the United States actually started before Harvard. Nice try. Why don't you mention Herbert? Marcus is a communist. Why don't you mention then he came to the United States from Berlin and the Franklin swill of Communists. Why don't you mention that he is the founding father of critical theory? And then you say it came from Harvard Law School. It came from him first. Then it worked its way to Stanford and Harvard and all the rest. Why don't you mention the marks is underpinnings of this ideology, But you didn't not once.

Harvard Law School Joint Chiefs United States Harvard Herbert Marcus Berlin Stanford
Black Lives Matter Co-Founder Patrisse Cullors Set For UCLA Commencement Speech Despite Anti-Israel Comments

Mark Levin

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Black Lives Matter Co-Founder Patrisse Cullors Set For UCLA Commencement Speech Despite Anti-Israel Comments

"Was set to deliver a virtual commencement address for use UCLA's Luskin School of Public Affairs. Despite scrutiny of her past critical remarks concerning is rather school's dean. Confirm, Colliers called for an end to the Israeli state. While participating in a 2015 panel at Harvard Law School, So an end to the Israeli state would mean a second Holocaust. You would need to slaughter the Jews. Because they're the indigenous peoples there so you'd have to literally slaughter the Jews a second Holocaust. That's what the Black lives matter. Co founder is advancing. People wearing this name on their shirts. They might as well put swastikas on their shirts as far as I'm concerned. And I'm very serious about this, and it's about time. Everybody talk up here. It's it's Pass no more passes. She called for an end to the Israeli state. Which means what It's like Talib. Pushing them into the river into the, uh into the Mediterranean Sea. People talking like this. It's unbelievable. Palestine is our generation South Africa, Collier said at the event. Now, how could it be our generation South Africa when the Jews of the indigenous people I wanted to democracy that allows Non Jews to participate fully in the process. If we don't step up boldly and courageously to end the imperialist project that's called Israel Word doomed, she says. Meanwhile, U C L. A S decision to host Colliers as a commencement speaker. Despite her anti Semitism didn't seem to have enough concern. You see La Luskin School of Public Affairs Dean Gary Segura. Defended the decision in a statement of the Jewish Journal He said. Respect for diversity of opinion on matters of public concern is a key tenet. Okay? He goes on. Diversity of opinion. Somebody wants to wipe you out. That's a

Luskin School Of Public Affair Colliers Harvard Law School Ucla South Africa Talib Mediterranean Sea Collier Palestine La Luskin School Of Public Aff Dean Gary Segura Jewish Journal Israel
"harvard law school" Discussed on Still Buffering

Still Buffering

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on Still Buffering

"Lawyer at harvard law school which i mean. I don't know i think it's funny. When he started talking about like at first. I was like oh come on and then i realized like oh. There's this is intentional. They're undercutting when he was like. I'm going to fight the system from within as like. Yeah i bet that's what. Uk is that what. I bet you're fighting the system from within on that's because his to have the whole like ethics of the scene put in steve o's mouth is like the narrator. It isn't a it's an interesting choice. Because he's he's a rich kid with like very loving parents more but they're they're very involved in his life. They're very they're they want different things him but they aren't rejecting him because he's not going to do what they want him to do. Yeah like and he. He loves his parents like he doesn't have like an antagonistic. You you kind of expect that. Oh you know july. He's like he's gets along well with his parents and then he ends up going to harvard law school and having this life like kinda handed to him and then you parallel that with his best friend bob who grew up in a very like broken home. Who dealt with a lot of you know it's implied but a lot of abuses the kid and like and i mean it's kind of if you wanna talk about like the the there's a scene that just plain and this this idea of like oh i'm gonna play in poverty and live in this this trashy loft because i can for a little while play in the scene but it was never real to him and if you really want to talk about someone who was real to like. That was kind of bob. And it's sort of like i don't know it's it was. It was very sad. Yeah yeah yeah. That contrast i mean that i i i like i said i had that sense of foreboding and then when he takes the pills and that scene i was like i know exactly where this is going i was just i where we were headed and i was so dreading it. 'cause i knew how sad it was going to be Especially so because they call him heroin bob but also he's scared of needles and doesn't do anything besides what smoke cigarettes and drink alcohol right..

bob july steve o harvard law school
Breyer says big Supreme Court changes could diminish trust

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Breyer says big Supreme Court changes could diminish trust

"Supreme Court justice Stephen Bryer is urging caution for those who propose changing the makeup of the court such as expanding the number of justices justice Stephen Bryer says liberal advocates of big changes including adding more justices to the Supreme Court should think long and hard about what they're proposing he says politically driven change could diminish the trust that Americans place in the court Breyer's comments are from the text of a speech he gave remotely to the Harvard Law School of which he is an alumnus prior noted that despite a conservative majority he and his colleagues stayed out of the twenty twenty election battle supported Louisiana abortion clinics and rejected efforts to end legal protections for immigrants who entered the U. S. as children Briar at eighty two is the oldest justice and is facing some pressure to retire now while Democrats hold the White House and have a slim edge in the Senate Jackie Quinn Washington

Justice Stephen Bryer Stephen Bryer Supreme Court Breyer Harvard Law School Louisiana White House Jackie Quinn Washington Senate
Merrick Garland Confirmation Hearing For AG

Morning Edition

06:35 min | 1 year ago

Merrick Garland Confirmation Hearing For AG

"But today is all about Merrick Garland. He'll appear before the Senate to take questions from lawmakers for the position of attorney general. Most people know Merrick Garland's name because of something that didn't happen. Garland never got a hearing after President Obama nominated him to serve on the Supreme Court five years ago. Here's NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Merrick Garland has devoted nearly 45 years to the law. But he didn't start out that way is, he told Professor Martha Minnow at Harvard Law School in 2016. Why don't you go to law school in the first place? Chemistry, well chemistry and math. Garland had planned to become a doctor. He wanted to help people one on one, but his collision with the hard sciences spun him toward the law, where he's looked for that sort of direct connection ever since. In the mid 19 eighties. At his law firm in Washington, Garland became a rising star. He made time for a young college graduate who worked in the copy center to Randy Thompson says Garland reviewed one of his papers, photocopied it and rearrange the paragraphs. That was the beginning of In essence and becoming a riding coach. For me, it was just extraordinary experience and became my coach. Eventually, my mentor and 30 something years later, a friend. Eventually Garland Road, MMA reference for law school and has kept in touch ever since, Thompson says garlands Still a little old school still humble, still looking to help. The only thing that really has changed about him, And I guess me as well is the color of hair. I don't know, well respected judge as attorney general. Help get the department under the quagmire of partisan politics that many people think it devolved to under President Trump and Attorney General Bar That's Georgetown law professor Paul Butler. He says the DOJ has been reeling from political scandals and racing to confront the threat from homegrown extremists. Merrick Garland has faced both before. After clerking on the Supreme Court. Garland took a job as an advisor in President Jimmy Carter's Justice Department. In those years after Watergate, DOJ struggled to separate partisan influence from law enforcement and establish new boundaries for the FBI. Garland also played a bit part in some of the biggest investigations of that era from political corruption to national security that Garland says later turned into hit movies. American Hustle about the Abscam case. Argo about the ex filtration of hostages in Iran and the most important the miracle on ice. Which was about the Lake Placid Olympics, where I did work on the security for the Olympics By the 19 nineties, Garland was prosecuting a violent gang that terrorized people in a public housing project. And helping build a case against DC's mayor Marion Barry. On drug charges Back inside Justice Department headquarters, Garland became the man to see for the hardest problems. The car bomb exploded outside of a large federal building in downtown Oklahoma City, Garland would soon travel to the site of the most deadly domestic terror plot in American history. 168 people died in that bombing in Oklahoma. Former deputy Attorney General Jamie Go Relic remembers watching that day with Garland by her side, he basically said while watching Children being pulled out of the wreckage. That he had to go. He really wanted to go. We both had young Children at the time and What we saw on those screens was so affecting. Garland oversaw the search warrants protected the chain of evidence and insisted that reporters have access to court proceedings. We wanted somebody Who could make sure that the investigation was done by the book. And that any indictment was bulletproof. Prosecutors later convicted Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols for their role in that bombing. Former prosecutor Beth Wilkinson says Garland played an important role in other confrontations with extremists in those years, including a standoff with the heavily armed Montana free Men. One of the examples I can think of is sometimes and there were these stand downs where there would be, you know, arrest warrants for someone, or there would be some kind of controversy between people who were challenging the federal government. America's first instinct wasn't to go in and arrest everyone. It was to try and along with the FBI to see if there's a dispute could be resolved. Wilkinson says. The FBI went on to arrest those men later. She credited garlands, quick thinking and cool head that may have prevented a tragic outcome. Just about the only criticism Garland's nomination has drawn is in the area of civil rights. Garland is a moderate, so I don't see him as the bold and visionary leader or racial justice that some people were hoping for again. Georgetown law professor Paul Butler that he's not an ideologue is both discerning for people who want an attorney general. To meet this moment of national reckoning inspired by the movement for Black lives and the killing of George Floyd Butler says he thinks girls just from the White House long time civil rights advocate Wade Henderson says Garland is up to the task. But Henderson says it's a big one. The next attorney general, for example, has to do everything In his or her power to fight for voting rights. Police reform Criminal justice reform and LGBT Q equality. For the past 23 years, Garland has been a federal appeals court judge in that role, he doesn't have much of a chance to share his personal views. Carolyn Lerner, the chief mediator at the courthouse, says Garland took an early, an important lead to update policies that protect workers from sexual harassment and other misconduct. I think it's very clear that Judge Garland cares a lot about these issues, and he really wants employees to be happy and comfortable in the workplace, and when he was chief judge, he took his responsibility. To these employees very seriously, she says. Garland wants to continue another of his projects at the Justice Department tutoring sessions with a young public school student. This year. The judge is working with an 11 year old boy and his twin sister. Your mom is Andrea Tucker. He makes this so interactive for them and so much fun and they can't get enough of it. It's the kind of public service that Garland has always wanted to

Garland Merrick Garland Justice Department Carrie Johnson Professor Martha Minnow Randy Thompson President Trump Paul Butler Supreme Court FBI Harvard Law School Jamie Go Olympics Georgetown NPR Beth Wilkinson President Obama Marion Barry Senate Jimmy Carter
Egypt and the Arab Winter

Between The Lines

04:40 min | 1 year ago

Egypt and the Arab Winter

"Arab spring. Well who doesn't love a democratic revolution. Who's not moved by. Brave protests is calling for the downfall of a brutal regime well a decade ago. That's precisely what happened in the streets of cairo and alexandria a wall of sound as egypt's vice president. I'm sulaiman announces that president hosni mubarak will step down the merciful. The compassionate seasons mahamat house entrusting mubarak has decided a month as president of the republic might have seconds after the announcement. Cairo erupted in celebrations. We are extremely happy. We are all aspiring future for egypt. We are not depending on the government anymore. This is the egyptian people. And this is the base of the new constitution now. The worldwide far the greater the egyptian uprising that culminated in the downfall of mubarak. This is ten years ago so february. Twenty eleven all. That was entirely understandable. Wasn't it after all all revolutions at least in the first few days they blissful and remember every tarn across the water arab world trembled. We already had president ali. Fleeing tunisia albany mubarak of course was toppled. Gaddafi was killed by fellow libyans. Assad of course. Vice the syrian sunni rebellion however. The egyptian uprising did not deliver a democratic outcome. Nor did the cycled arab spring really amount to a more liberal future for the region. Why noah feldman is professor of law at harvard law school. He's author of the arab winter. Tragedy noah welcome to. Abc's radio national. Thank you for having me take us back a decade ago so to the wave of popular protests that swept the middle east. There was something profoundly moving for anybody who cares about freedom in watching large numbers of people say enough is enough. We want to have a say in how things are done in our country and we want dignity and we want social justice and we want freedom. And that i think was the reason that all over the world people responded so positively to the arab spring. It's also the reason that the impulse to have these kinds of protests and change spread across the arabic speaking world to so many countries and so there was a sense of optimism but also a sense of gee what will come next and i think in some countries more than others a worry that what might come next might not be as positive as the protesters hoped what comes next. I mean for generations. It was widely believed that arabs. As opposed to site asians europeans africans latin americans. The widespread view was that arabs. Were uniquely allergic to democracy and of course the arab spring challenged narrative yet use site new book quote. It brought little good. The arab spring ultimately made many people's lives worse than they were before house are. That's a painful realization to reach especially for someone like me who believes very fundamentally that there is no country no culture no group of people organized by region or religion or language who have less in the way of aspiration to self government and freedom than any other but ultimately the reason i can conclude that it brought more harm than good. Is that in egypt. The process that began with democratization and experiment ended in a new dictatorship is bad and in many ways worse than the one that came before in syria the process of arab spring ultimate gave way to a vicious improve civil war. The gun to be sure by the syrian regime in its own defense that left almost half the population displaced either internally or externally and killed hundreds of thousands of people and pretty much the place in the arab world where things are measurably better as a result of the arab. Spring is the tiny country of tunisia. Which has actually the odds to build a functioning constitutional democracy. They still a lot of other problems. But that's just a tiny tiny piece of the much bigger picture in which things are either no better or in some cases much worse

Mubarak President Hosni Mubarak Mahamat House Egypt President Ali Noah Feldman Sulaiman Cairo Alexandria Tunisia Assad Gaddafi Harvard Law School Albany ABC Middle East Syria
Facebook 'Supreme Court' Orders Social Network To Restore 4 Posts In 1st Rulings

Marketplace

03:42 min | 1 year ago

Facebook 'Supreme Court' Orders Social Network To Restore 4 Posts In 1st Rulings

"Facebook has created its own sort of Supreme Court. It's an oversight board that has the final say on some of its hardest decisions over what users can and cannot post. Today. That board issued its first rulings it ordered the social network to restore several posts that it had removed for breaking Facebook rules. NPR TECH correspondent Shannon Bond joins us now to explain Hey, Shannon. Hey, Elsa. So we should first note. Facebook is among MPR's financial supporters. All right, So Shannon tell us a little more about some of the cases this board considered. Yeah, there were five and total announced today. And in each of these, the board was reviewing post that Facebook had taken down for violating policies against things like hate speech, nudity and harmful misinformation about covert 19. And when you dig into the details of these rulings, you know, enforcing these rules is really complicated. And ultimately, the board overturned. Facebook's decision to remove in four of these first five cases, huh? Okay, so give us a quick example. Right. So in one case, Facebook had removed a post from a user in Myanmar, who had suggested there was something wrong with Muslims and Facebook says this broke its rules against hate speech. This is an especially fraught issue because, of course, Facebook has been criticized for its role in the genocide of the country's Muslim minority. The board looked at this and said, You know, if you take into consideration the full context this post was pejorative. But the board didn't think it crossed the line into hate speech. And so it said, Facebook needs more justification. If it's going to take down post like this. And the board told Facebook to reinstate it Now Facebook has agreed to abide by these rulings and the post is already back up. Wait. So who is on this board? Exactly? Admit up of 20 international experts. They're mainly and things like law and human rights. But there's also a Nobel peace Laureates and journalists and even the former prime minister of Denmark. It was created by Facebook last year, and it's funded by Facebook through an independent trust. And do you think these decisions give us any clues as to how the board sees its overall role? I spoke to Evelyn Do ek Harvard Law School lecture has been following the board very closely. These five cases even though it's only five cases out of the thousands or millions of decisions that Facebook makes in awake are a true shot across the bow from the oversight board to Facebook. She says. It's a shot across the bop bow because the board is taking aim directly at some of Facebook's policies and enforcement, you know, warned about the extent to which the company relies on artificial intelligence that says those systems need more human oversight. It emphasized taking context into account, and it wants Facebook to just be much more clear about its rules on policies like health, misinformation or Dangerous groups. You know, Elsa, we know Facebook has this immense power over what it's billions of users composed. Now it's created this board and from what we've seen today, the board has ambitions to be a real check on that power. You know, it's kind of flexing its muscles so interesting. Well, what I did notice is we did not here today about Facebook's decision to suspend former President Trump after The whole insurrection at the Capitol in January. 6th. What do we know about the board's review of that case? Right. Facebook reviewed the Trump suspension to the board last week. This is the case everyone has their eyes on. Of course, right. It's a huge deal. The board is opening up for public comment tomorrow, and it has about three months to make a ruling, And ultimately it's going to be up to the board to settle this very fraught debate over whether Trump should get his account back, so we'll stay tuned. That is NPR's Shannon Bond. Thank you, Shannon. Thanks, Elsa.

Facebook Shannon Bond Shannon Elsa MPR Ek Harvard Law School NPR Supreme Court Myanmar Evelyn Denmark President Trump Donald Trump
"harvard law school" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Four years I've ever had working. Yeah. No, I think it's I think that's the that's what a lot of people could say to him. But you used to be the best four years and again. They came after eight years of just total stagnation and and Higher taxes, more regulations and the new normal. That's what that's what Obama call that the new normal was everybody was going to get screwed, and government workers and government was going to get fat and rich and the deep state was going to prosper and Trump said. I don't think so. And he did it for four years. Thanks for the call Tim. John. You're next with Howie Carr. Go ahead, John. Hey, Good afternoon. Well, you know, I haven't heard this from anybody yet. This impeachment. To me. It sounds like a kangaroo court. Yeah, that Z because it is a kangaroo court. I think John Yeah, I'll be saying anything. Number Kangaroo put. Alan Dershowitz was saying that this is patently unconstitutional. The impeachment trial in the Senate is to remove somebody. If the guy isn't there, How can you remove somebody who's not there? It's a new It's unconstitutional. I agree with Dershowitz. It's just on its face. You don't need to be a Harvard law School scholar. Just look at the look at the wording in the Constitution. How could you? It's like trying somebody for a crime who's dead. You can't punish somebody who's dead. You can't you can't remove somebody who's been removed. That's ridiculous. Thanks for the call, John. Rick, You're next with Howie Carr Go ahead wreck. How we Thanks for taking my call. I'd like to thank the president for a couple of things all the great rallies that he had throughout the year today and for driving joy Bejo crazy Joy Behar among millions of others. Driving everybody on the view Crazy everybody at the CNN, MSNBC Washington Post New York Times He drove them all insane. Thanks. We're gonna take some more calls when we come back, But we're gonna take a break right now. 844 542 42 844 542 42 Every new year, All you hear is new year Nu Nu MAI that usually means talking. You'll be tape picking better habits or trying new things. And if you do take up a new hobby, it's even better when you have amazing audio that will make the experience even better. That's why I recommend wireless ear buds from rake on every morning. I'm out of the dog. Riding my bike of flat stretch of land in in Florida. It's great riding, but it's ah, sometimes it's gets a little boring, but it's a lot more entertaining and I entertain myself if I have good music, and that's what I do with my rake on wireless ear buds. Today, I was listening to Blonde on Blonde by Bob Dylan,.

John Yeah Howie Carr Alan Dershowitz Kangaroo Nu Nu MAI Rick Trump New York Times Obama Joy Behar Bob Dylan Senate Harvard law School Tim CNN Florida MSNBC president Washington
"harvard law school" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Harvard students seek to revoke Trump graduates diplomas after Capitol Hill violence Well, how about after all the riots over the caress of the last year? Again. I looked up more stuff. It's what I do. Today, and it turns out the riots over the summer last Wednesday, Doesn't you know that's a drop in the ocean? The riot's over the summer more than $2 billion in damage That is the largest dollar figure for riots in the history of the country, and the news media will never even mention it. Nobody in the corrupt news media will ever even mention it more than $2 billion coast to coast. The greatest dollar figure. Largest dollar figure from riots in the history of the United States. More than 2000 police officers injured wounded hundreds hospitalized by the left wing riots across the country. The news media will never mention that alright, Trump people are all terrorists. And and so on, Right? And now here come the friend and they're never gonna bring it up. How many thousands of businesses we may never know who is David Dorn, not a single Democrat in America knows Harvard students think to revoke Trump graduates diplomas after capital of odds revoked degrees off Kayleigh Mcenany, or, I think is Harvard and Harvard Law School. Ted Cruz, who I think may be Harvard and Harvard Law School. Also, I know he's Harvard Law School. And representative Dan Crenshaw. I lost his I've fighting the troubling tights from hell Seeking to destroy civilization. Dan Crenshaw. He went to Harvard to what about Tom Cotton? He went to Harvard. On Harvard long You should go to repeal them, too. Didn't work for Trump. So this is this is the unpersuaded as George Orwell is not what it was to be a nun person on the UN person Ng of people and Harvard. They're in it up to their eyeballs. This anti American, It's it's Harvard. I mean, honestly, they discriminate based on race against Asians because Asians are too smart. For Harvard and Harvard is too stupid for Asians, so they actively and openly discriminate against rations and white people because they're Racists. That's the short version. So the petition to revoke the degrees is called circulated by students there that go to Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. Naturally, I was reading from one of the Radicals own played audio of one of the radicals at the Kennedy School of Government, saying absolutely UN American Radical stuff. Yesterday on MSNBC. I played the audio They're prepared to take a stand for representative democracy that that they don't know what these words mean. They're brainwashed, indoctrinated radicals, and they want to destroy the electoral college. No true democracy is one man. One vote. Yeah, Yeah. One time. A Z wave scene again and again and against the violent white supremacy. This is what they say, prepared to take a stand for representative democracy that means doing away with the Electoral college, which would completely corrupt everything and lead to violent civil work. And about 10 years take about watch the documentary on Amazon called Safeguard about the electoral college and then get back to me, okay? And against violent white supremacy. There's here they say that protest last week is white supremacy because they used the words, but they don't know what they mean. So they want all the Trump administration people that and Cruz and crunch are not Trump Administration people..

Harvard Harvard Law School Trump representative Dan Crenshaw Kennedy School of Government Tom Cotton United States UN George Orwell MSNBC David Dorn Kayleigh Mcenany Amazon America
"harvard law school" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on KOMO

"The House and Senate convene to certify presidential election results. Alan Dershowitz says he would serve as President Trump's counsel if he's impeached again. The Harvard Law School professor argues that the First Amendment protects the president's speech last week, calling on protesters. The fight for the country by descending on the U. S. Capitol. Dershowitz represented trumpet his first impeachment trial, and police are still working to track down the writers who stormed the capital. The letters from ABC News chief Global affairs correspondent Martha Raddatz. Larry Brock, a Texas based Air Force Academy graduate and combat veteran, arrested over the weekend, along with Eric Munch of Tennessee, who law enforcement officials say appears to be carrying plastic restraints, prompting questions about whether they intended to take hostages. A senior official telling ABC News. The writers were organized, coordinated and had leadership and communications equipment and that many former military members were among them. And not just military police departments across the country looking into whether their own members took part in the siege. Also arrested over the weekend. Richard Barnett, who sat himself in House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, is office chair, turning himself in at an Arkansas sheriffs office Friday, and new details about this frightening moment caught on camera. Washington Post reporting. The officer was holding back the mob after.

Alan Dershowitz president Richard Barnett ABC News chief Global affairs Martha Raddatz ABC News Harvard Law School Trump Senate Washington Post Air Force Academy Larry Brock Eric Munch Nancy Pelosi officer Arkansas
Loneliness and Litigation: A Lawyer's Case Study

The Psych Central Show

04:23 min | 1 year ago

Loneliness and Litigation: A Lawyer's Case Study

"Doctor. Freiberg welcome to the show. Thank you so very much dr freiberg. We are here to discuss loneliness. And i promise. We're going to get to that. But i'd be remiss if i didn't ask your thoughts on the differences between being a social psychologist and a lawyer. What's that like well. It proved interesting for me. I became a social psychologist. I and i was professor for a decade at boston university. And then i had a chance to go across the river and go to harvard law school so i wasn't gonna turn that down. I became a lawyer and then it pretty quickly became clear that criss crossing the to expertise gave me of field of work. It was unlike anybody else. No one else in in boston. Had both degrees and they're pretty quickly became what was sort of called around towns. The site lawyer. Boston's psych lawyer so institutions and agencies anything to do with psychiatry or psychology or clinical. Social work asked me to be their general counsel and it was in the context of being general counsel that i heard about so many clinical cases and that became the material for my research. You define loneliness differently from others. Can you tell us about that. Indeed what i thought. I discovered over thirty five years of being council to a great percentage of boston. Psychiatrists psychologists and clinical social workers was that they kept reporting more and more loneliness sure. Their clients had other issues as well but the clients kept talking about being enormously disconnected from others not having anybody to live with anybody in their life nobody to call more and more as the years went by loneliness became ever more present. I started just think about this topic and the more i researched it. It struck me that loneliness is not an emotion like anger or happiness. It's a sensation like hunger or thirst so just since our body tells us up were hungry thirsty it also says. I feel really lonely and disconnected. After hearing that definition it makes a little more sense this next statement because you consider chronic loneliness a public health crisis of the first order. They surgeon general of the united states. Vivek murthy the nineteenth surgeon general about a decade ago said we are actually experienced an epidemic of loneliness about thirty five percent of the american population in two thousand ten reported feeling chronically lonely and what i mean by that we all feel lonely from time to time. How could we not. But that's not like being chronically. Lonely just like being sad it's not like being clinically depressed. As a huge difference. Chronic loneliness is in the land in the last fifty years evermore so and it correlates with much worse health in much shorter life span. So it's serious. It sounds very serious but one of the things that i keep thinking about is people are enmeshed around other people may have social media so even when you're at home you're around other people. We work in offices. Now i know cove it has changed that a little bit but i just. I'm trying to think of the last time that i was truly alone. And i can't come up with it even as i sit here interviewing you. My phone will ding. I'm never not surrounded by people. I guess my question is how can people still feel so lonely. Given how connected our world is. But that's the key question because there are two pathways to loan one. Pathway is being alone being isolated being disconnected but a different pathway is being surrounded by people as you described but not benefiting from those relationships not feeling nourished not feeling nurtured not feeling sues. People are objectively lonely. 'cause they're all divorced off from anybody they don't have anybody in their lives but just as many people become chronically lonely surrounded by others

Dr Freiberg Freiberg Boston Harvard Law School Boston University Vivek Murthy Chronic Loneliness United States
"harvard law school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And I'm not sure that people point this out to you, you know, bringing a word like mercy using the language of redemption. This is significant because you know, because I think it's just you know, you went to law school because that you and I are about the same age like that's how you were going to change the world, right? Yeah. Changing legal structures and e mean here's something you wrote, and I'm pretty sure this is from just Marcie. Which gets at this that the life giving possibility in us picking this up right? You said. We are. We are all implicated when we allow other people to be mistreated. An absence of compassion can corrupt the decency of a community, a state and nation. Fear and anger can make us vindictive and abusive, unjust and unfair until we all suffer from the absence of mercy. And we condemn ourselves as much as we victimize others. You also, um this by saying we all need justice, he said. The closer we get to mass incarceration and extreme loves of punishment, But I think in wider and wider circles, we see this. It's necessary to recognize that we all need mercy. We all need justice. And perhaps we all need some measure of unmerited Grace. I really believe that. Yeah, I really do. And I think for me, it makes it easier when I have to challenge people when I have to go into places where there's a lot of hostility. Where there's a lot of resistance where people look at you as if you're evil. They hate it makes it easier because I've never thought what I do. I do just for my clients. I just I'm doing just for the people. Who I represent, or the people who know I care about them. I've always felt like my work our work. For everybody. That is. You know, we're trying to save everyone from the corruption from the agony of living lives where there is no mercy where there is no grace, where there is no justice where we are. Indifferent to suffering. Those kinds of lives ultimately lead to violence and animosity and bigotry. And I don't want that for anybody you know, and I do talk a lot. Obviously about my client's those of the people I have to advocate for. And when I When I say that each of us is more than the worst thing we've ever done. I'm thinking specifically about them. But I'm also thinking about everybody else. I mean, I believe that for every human being, I think if someone tells a lie They're not just a liar that someone takes something. They're not just a thief. If you kill someone, you're not just a killer, but it's also to a nation that committed genocide against indigenous people. A nation that enslaved black people for 2.5, centuries and nation that tolerated Mob lynchings for nearly a century, a nation that created apartheid and segregation laws throughout most of the 20 century can also be more than that racist. That work thing we did you always say that none of us is defined by the way. Exactly. Yeah, and that's the reason why we ought to find the courage to acknowledge the wrongfulness of those things. So that we can then embrace what's right. What's corrective? What's redemptive? What's restorative? Yeah, and I do want that for everyone. You gave the commencement address it at Harvard Law School Year, your alma mater, which I think he said You'd never turned up to graduation when you actually graduated from them. That's your your offer. Suing you found a vocation? Yes, exactly. I feel like you. You offered some I mean, I bet you get in conversations like this all the time to like, Feel like what I do, right? So give me a give me a tip right? Or what's the first step on it? But you did actually lay out of four point program, which, I think is helpful Understanding that this is not a four point program for What you do this week, but Stepping onto that long arc of the moral universe, right? And the first part is about staying proximate. I mean, you're done with your grandmother again. Yeah. Said to you, You can't understand the most important things from a distance. Brian, you have to get close. Yeah. For be. It is an important idea. It's interesting because in science and in research proximity is baked into the very heart of the discipline. If we create a vaccine for covert. If we create a cure for this virus, it's because the researchers and scientists understand The details of this rise with such precision and clarity that they've been able to create an answer. You know, innovation comes in science by the people are able to pull something apart with such insight and knowledge that they can then innovate and it can create new It's how we make progress. And I think the same is true in the justice sector that we cannot make progress in creating a more just society. Healthier communities if we allow ourselves to be disconnected. On the people who are most vulnerable from the poor. The neglected the incarcerated the condemned if you're trying to make policies in the criminal justice face, but I've never met someone who's in a jail or prison. You haven't been to a jail or prison. You're going to fail. I think sometimes when you're trying to do justice work when you're trying to make a difference when you're trying to change the world. The thing you need to do is get close enough to people who are falling down. Get closer to people who are suffering closer to people who are in pain who've been discarded in disfavored to get close enough to wrap your arms around them and affirm their humanity and their dignity. And that's why when you graduate from Harvard Law School, you graduate from college with your.

Harvard Law School Marcie Harvard Law School Year Brian
The lasting influence of the Tofurky

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 1 year ago

The lasting influence of the Tofurky

"Twenty five years ago a food called tofurkey made its debut on grocery store shelves since then the tofu bass rose has become a beloved part of many vegetarians. Holiday feasts tofurkey. Thanksgiving are forever intimately tied in my heart. Yon duke of inches of visiting fellow at harvard law. School's animal law and policy program. He says tofurkey with different from most vegetarian fare. Because it could actually stand in for a turkey roast that allows me to be at thanksgiving meal having a sort of centerpiece of my own and not just eating stuffing and nibbling on veggies and today there are many more meat alternatives on the market some brands such as impossible foods and beyond meat work hard to appeal not only vegetarians but meat lovers to the strategy has been to offer product. That's as close as possible in taste texture and price to the product that meat consumers are already eating producing plant based proteins much less carbon pollution than animal agriculture. So duke of it says making plant based foods that appeal even a mediators can help reduce global warming on thanksgiving or any day of the year

Harvard Law YON
Climate Activists Want Biden To Bar Appointees With Fossil Fuel Ties

Environment: NPR

03:27 min | 1 year ago

Climate Activists Want Biden To Bar Appointees With Fossil Fuel Ties

"Joe biden has an ambitious climate plan and there are a lot of people with government experience. Who could help implement that plan. But some of them have ties to fossil fuel industries and that is a problem for climate change activists. Npr's jeopardy reports in philadelphia recently. A group of young climate activists marched to biden's campaign headquarters. The sunrise movement often pressures democrats. Back the green new deal but instead biden offered his own climate plan for a slower transition away from coal oil and gas. He has not committed to barring people with fossil fuel ties from his administration. Lauren martinez was sunrise. Thinks he should biden ran on the most progressive climate agenda in us history and one on it. So it's incumbent upon him to take that seriously and put forward people who are accountable to the people that elected him to office the head of the natural resources defense council and former epa administrator gina mccarthy says she understands why young activists want to ban on appointees connected to fossil fuels especially after trump. Put them in key posts including andrew wheeler a former coal industry lobbyist. I mean that's who has been running the environmental protection agency and has gotten us nowhere fast. It's backed us up. It hasn't supported a growing clean energy economy. But here's a problem with a fossil fuel will litmus test biden won't govern alone the us senate could remain under republican leadership that means passing legislation would require compromise and bradbury is ceo of the american exploration and production council. Americans voted for divided government. As part of that you know. I think they voted for moderation. And i think they voted for commonsense. Bradberry sees a future for fossil fuels even under biden's ambitious plan for net zero carbon emissions by twenty fifty worried about climate. Change say there are issues. Republicans and democrats likely can agree on heather. Reams was citizens for responsible. Energy solutions suggests activist focus on things like economic stimulus that boost clean energy. They should looking at the bigger policies and getting to what's possible with getting climate action done today rather than arguing about the position on one's resume among the names on the biden transition team a few have limited ties to fossil fuel but more are from environmental groups. Jody freeman served as councillor for energy and climate change on the obama white house now freeman is at harvard law school and says she sees a trend in the people selected so far i think the clear messages vitality one good people in place wrestling start who have experienced any days and not wasting any time. Freeman is a good example of those who could be excluded. If a biden administration rejects people connected to fossil fuel companies. She sits on the board of oil company conaco phillips but she also led obama's effort to double car fuel efficiency standards. She's also an expert on using presidential powers to address climate change. That's knowledge that likely will be necessary if both parties can't agree on new climate legislation when biden his sworn in next year. Jeff brady npr news.

Biden Lauren Martinez Gina Mccarthy Andrew Wheeler EPA Joe Biden American Exploration And Produ Bradberry Natural Resources Defense Coun NPR Philadelphia Us Senate Bradbury Jody Freeman Heather United States Biden Administration Harvard Law School Freeman Conaco Phillips
"harvard law school" Discussed on No Bullsh!t Leadership

No Bullsh!t Leadership

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on No Bullsh!t Leadership

"The reason i love this podcast so much is because it really challenges my thinking it puts me outside my comfort zone and leads me to consider opinions that i wouldn't necessarily have held myself but i'm a sucker for incredibly intelligent and a-rod people talking. In a matter of fact about issues that would normally tend to attract quality deal of emotion guest on the megan. Kelly show a few weeks ago. Was alan dershowitz. He's an imminent defense attorney. Who taught at harvard law school for about fifty years. Now he said some things both shocked end invigorated me. I must confess and in part this convinced me to make this episode on diversity. He said something that just hit me like a pie in the face. And i quote the last thing. Harvard wants is intellectual diversity. What it wants is superficial diversity. It people to look different but at wants them to think the same dish which spoke about the growing level of ideological intolerance. So he's contention. Is that any of us that a now not left leaning a simply unacceptable and he is a lifetime democrat voter by his own admission but he makes that statement as political belief but more as a social observation on harvard law even went so far as to say and once again i quote. Students are not being educated there being propagandized. So of course i went. Searching inside are tend to do when my views are challenged is the push for diversity on boards and leadership teams genuine. Or is it. Just for show of the corporately used to mix with. How many of them do i think are genuine about promoting an unlocking diversity and how many just wanted to be able to report the numbers in the annual report as a form of virtue signaling is corporate diversity just for show or we really trying to nurture encourage and grow diversity of thinking. Perspectives forbid author worse now. I don't want to appease cynical. But i can't point to many people running to who i think genuinely believe in the value of diversity and take action to do what it takes to grow it. Most of them have learnt the.

alan dershowitz Kelly harvard law school Harvard
"harvard law school" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

06:51 min | 2 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Night side with Dan Rei Undead BZ, Boston's news radio. It's interesting listening, Tio Suzanne's broadcast there at the bottom of the hour. I did not realize but I guess this This newly appointed head of the Center for Anti Research, anti racist Research at Boston University. Abram ex candy Is in trouble. The He's in trouble. I guess. Others have have responded to this tweet in which he said, wrote quote. Some white colonizers quote adopted black Children. Now, when you talk about white colonizers, I don't know if you're talking about people in the Belgian Congo. I don't know if you're talking about people in the 17 hundreds here in America, I have no clue because white colonizers covers a broad spectrum. Okay? He goes on to write in the tweet. They quote civilized. These quote Savage Children in the quote his quotes, superior ways of white people while using them as props in their lifelong pictures of denial. While cutting the biological parents of these Children out of the picture of humanity. Now. Um, it would seem to me that the timing of that Tweet. Coming as it did over the weekend is in direct reaction to the nomination of Amy Cockney Barrett. And all that is his way to. I think so. Absolute seeds of distrust and cynicism against a woman who for all appearances that I know off, has led a remarkable life of scholarship. She meant effect. I believe that Professor Noah Feldman at Harvard Law School, has said that she was one of the brightest people if he ever dealt with in the law, although he is on the other side of the Philosophical spectrum in terms of legal jurisprudence, 617 to 5 for 10 30 Triple 89 to 9 10 30. Let's go to Greg and Burlington. Hey, Greg. Thank you for calling in your next on the ring Central. Nice. I call a language. Hi again there. You're doing great. I'm doing Well, anyhow, I'm very much air for Amy Quot. Barrett Cone. I think Tony liked Tonia yet yet Cockney Eric. No problem. It'll take a little It's a little bit of a tongue twister. Don't worry about it. I know I know, but anyways, very much enthralled by her, especially Pro life stand. Do you know well, referring to the Orthodox The Orthodox Church in America. They try not to be a politically What you trying to be political but for years have come up against abortion. But yet the same time they believe government should never have gotten involved in the abortion issue as a private Man that should be S O by primarily education. Records. Silly ation, Even spiritual Priya. I'm not. I am not familiar with what you describe is the Orthodox Church. What I know is that the Catholic Church Mom has a position that is that the sanctity of life from natural Conception until natural death. The Catholic Church is opposed to abortion. Uh, they're also opposed to the death penalty, but the church is the same way. Who's the Orthodox Church? Educate me, Greg, Who you talking about? Well, the eastern off a dog on the historic Catholic. Okay, fine. That's Yeah. Okay. I know that there's an Eastern Orthodox church. But correct again, Correct me if I'm wrong, and I don't want to get too far into religion here, But I do believe that the Eastern Orthodox Church Has its own pope. I believe they have a a patriarch Patrick. OK fact the term pope. I know if you know, but actually came from the Orthodox faith. Okay, But what I'm saying is, I don't know that they would recognize Pope Francis as the head of the church. I think that they see and correct. Yeah, That's what I'm saying. So and I don't know. I think that Amy Cockney Barrett. I do not believe that she's a member of the of the Eastern Orthodox Church will find out, I guess. It doesn't matter to me what religion she is or or whether she's religious, Greg. I'm looking at her conservative, you know, fit her conservative. Judicial philosophy, which is the judge's ah, there, too, to render decisions, but not to make policy. Certainly great. We're through. Hadley. Okay, All right. So we're kind of on the same page. Appreciate you think that was a good nomination? Very good. Good sum sometime. You maybe should get theologian could explain a little bit. About the Eastern Orthodox way. We tend to stay. I gotta be honest with you, Greg. We tend to kind of stay away from you. You know various, You know, religions. I mean, one of the things that you always told us. You're always told that in polite company. You never discussed politics and religion. So here we always discuss politics again. I never beat up on anybody's religion. But I don't. I'm proud enough that it knows what religion I was. Baptized into right after birth. Which was The used to unorthodox you young as they say. I just look, you know again, Greg. It doesn't matter to me. Um I have lots of friends who are from various and sundry religions and I never I don't stipulate you're more of a friend of mine because you happen to be of this religion. I look at people in deal of people individually and You could be. You could be an atheist. We don't have to talk religion. A matter of fact, I don't think I ever socially talk religion with people because my feeling is that it's such. It's like it's like talking to another couple of, say, Hey, how's your sex life? I mean, my attitude is the religion is sort of like out of bounds and what people's marital relationships aren't you know what I'm saying? I just think it's something a husband and a wife. Or an individual and their god or their lack of God. Tip. Listen. Thanks, Greg. Appreciate you call And thanks for the information. Have a great night. Lets go to Susan in Chicago. Susan, How are you tonight? Welcome here on the ring. Central. Nice..

Greg Eastern Orthodox Church Orthodox Church Amy Cockney Barrett Orthodox The Orthodox Church America Catholic Church Tio Suzanne Center for Anti Research Boston Boston University Dan Rei Abram Professor Noah Feldman Amy Quot Barrett Cone Susan Harvard Law School Burlington Pope Francis
"harvard law school" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Car, but then SKW Visi Boston's news radio. Good morning. I'm Tom Huff. Here is what's happening. The death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, BBC TV's Christina Rex tells us Ginsberg briefly briefly attended attended Harvard Harvard Law Law School. School. Justice Justice Ruth Ruth Bader Bader Ginsburg Ginsburg started started her her loss loss schooling schooling here here at at Harvard Harvard Back Back in in 1956. 1956. Eventually, Eventually, she she moved moved to to New New York York to to finish finish her her law law studies. Students here at the college tonight. Tell me, they're shocked and saddened by the news of her death. It's gonna take a while to process. The news of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is death hit Harvard students deeply as they got news alerts on their phones first found out I couldn't believe it because I think RBG fact that she's continued to stick with that and continue to fight. For us kind of. I kind of thought that you know she'd win. Keep going. This makes the Supreme Court one of the most important issues in the presidential election. Kent Green Fields of BC Law is a former Supreme Court clerk, he says Ruth Bader Ginsburg, affectionately known as RBG is an idol for young girls. My home It'll daughter knows who RBG is, and is saddened by the news to May. And I think they're know the story of my daughter is the story of a millions of little girls around the country. She she looks like this frail little woman, but she was a fierce warrior for justice. I think that many of us who loved her and loved her work just to really just wanted her to live forever. The thought on so many people's minds right now, what does

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court Harvard Law School Kent Green Fields BC Law New York
"harvard law school" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Oxford, You attended Harvard Law School and You have had the most amazing life. Including an invention. And so What? What an example. You have been to anyone out there that says I can't do that. I have limitations, because it's obvious to me that your blindness Actually. Enhanced her life. If I could say that. Yes, you can in this way. Well blindness, My vision. Also opened as you suggest a new world. Long that had no horizons. A world without limits. And I've done everything I could Explore and great the endless space I was presented with. Since I like lying Did I see a picture of you playing basketball? Yes, you did play to it, Bradley. Yeah, That's what I was just going to say. With Bill Bradley. Yeah, yeah. You know, Sandy? This is such an inspiration. Way all need this book. This book is so important. Because many people are feeling very limited by this virus very limited. In their scope of what they could do and how they're feeling. And I think your book Hello, darkness. My old friend opens up an opportunity. Of new possibilities that are available for everybody. Thank you for saying that. No, it's true. It's really true. And your friendship with with art continues to develop and grow through the years. His for his forward is just absolutely beautiful. Don't you think? He is the beer. The Lord speak up. Yes, Yes. Tell us about your Invention. It started when I returned to Colombia in my senior year is blind, stupid. I have many people who have the most important of all those Ivy. And I had a tape recorder very large one when they were called something. Called a reel to reel tape recorder. And I'd like to spend Reels faster to make 315 more minutes Pace. Goal much faster, double or triple. But by doing that, you've got a lot of distortion. So I thought about what Could I do about it? What would be the next step? And I learned very early out. Taking problem or trying to think through a problem in advance really is difficult, but do it up front and pay attention to him. Hastens the pace of your Achieving the call. In my case, I thought about it and realized For the past 15,000 years. We've been communicating principally by speaking Listen. It's only been a last 500 years. The Gutenberg came along with a printing press. It might be genetic, historically. We might be able to adapt to the spoken word. Yes, I'm going. I'm going to let you finish that story. I'm going to let you finish that story. In just a moment. We have to take a quick break Joining us today. Sandy Greenberg. His book is called Hello, Darkness, my old friend how daring dreams and unyielding friendship. Turned one man's blindness into an extraordinary vision for life. And what's the best website as we go to break what your website Stan Greenberg We'll be right back. I'm Frankie Boyer. This's biz talk radio. You like business content? I mean, if you.

Sandy Greenberg Bill Bradley Harvard Law School Oxford basketball Frankie Boyer Colombia
"harvard law school" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

09:49 min | 2 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Is a professor of constitutional law at Harvard Law School and I think it is worthy of a brief discussion as well beyond originalism the dominant conservative philosophy for interpreting the constitution has served its purpose and scholars ought to develop more moral framework this is part of the common good conservatism wing of the conservative movement there's a really interesting ideological battle that's been put to the side obviously during a global pandemic but it's kind of interesting and and fun discuss because it will rear its head very quickly I think in the near future and that is there's a side of conservatism right now our side of the conservative movement and basically suggest the government is there to do the common good thank that government is there to chronicle do justice which is that seems big and scary to you that's because it is big and big really frightening and that the sort of libertarian ash wing of the the classical liberal wing of the Republican party says the government is there to perform the functions that independent society cannot perform and it is there to enforce neutral rules that that it that the goal of the government is to essentially prevent harms from one person to another person on the federal level and then when it comes to local government insecurity when it comes to me and my friends in my local government creating rules for the community wish to live in as long as people can leave and you have a little bit more leeway with what you can do with government that's sort of the traditional classical liberal view that mixes a bit of Barron's Montesquieu localism with the classical liberal philosophy of John Locke along with probably some John Stuart Mill the the sort of non harm role right that's sort of the the that's sort of where I come down then there's the common good conservatism view and that's it just that all the things that I like right family and church and marriage and social networking right now all of that sort of stuff on to be promoted by the government even if that means violating the restrictions on government the government ought to be grown now the most dangerous form of this is being expanded by professor vermeil it or by my Adrian Vermeule he is suggesting basically conservatives ought to embrace this not as a legislative strategy not just as we get elected to the federal government now we're going to push laws that that we we think promote the common good which is a sort of lefty perspective on how to use government itself but that we ought to use the judiciary in order to do so which is a complete violation of the checks and balances the regionally set forth by the founders one of the reasons that the founders took a more classically liberal view of what government ought to do is because they have very little trust in the people who run government if all the people who run government are ambitious track I think the people who run government are incompetent check I think the people who run governments are willing to use powers in ways that most people are not happy with absolutely this is why the institute checks and balances common good conservatism suggest sort of like early twentieth century progressivism that those checks and balances ought to be put by the wayside in favor of the common good yeah that's scares me because to me the government as a giant gun I called it a giant lumbering area before it is the government's giant lumbering idiot so that means they really only want to try lumbering idiot awakened when there is nearly one hundred percent approval for an action we have the power to do that through building a consensus in emergency everyone is on board right I'm a I'm a libertarian ash reason engine is fully libertarian nobody is calling for everybody on the streets in the government can't do anything it's doing right so emergencies we understand we need the government but in non emergencies what those checks and balances to apply it ran for meal is basically expanding the the opposite he's saying that we want government to be able to do whatever Adrian Vermeule wanted to do today which sounds a lot like if I do they ring for militants a lot more like the leftist version of our government ought to do stuff I like then like the principled containment of government for the preservation of individual liberty Adrian Vermeule writes originalism in the judiciary which is the perspective of the constitution itself ought to be strictly interpreted such that you can't add stuff to the powers of government right the the constitution is a document of delegated powers and it says exactly what the government can do and everything it doesn't have to come into the government not to that's what the constitution is designed to do an originalist on the judiciary our job is to interpret the constitution strictly like any other piece of law people one left on the court have for generations suggested about a broadly construe the constitution such that we can read our own moral once into the vague language of the constitution for meals as concerned as you do the same thing is originally has outlived its utility has become an obstacle to the development of a robust substantively substantively conservative approach to constitutional law interpretation such an approach one might call a common good constitutionalism should be based on the principles the government helps direct persons association and society generally toward the common good and it's strong rule in the interest of attaining the common good is entirely legitimate now remove the conservatism hard then I'm to read that sentence again and that is indistinguishable from what you read a Jacobin magazine government helps direct persons associations and society generally toward the common good and that strong rule in the interest of attaining common good is entirely legitimate does that sound like the checks and balances conservatism you know about no doesn't sound anything like that because it isn't anything like that real says in this time of global pandemic the need for such an approach is all the greater so again quick quick point anybody who gives you the cheat it is a cheat anybody who gives you the cheat I'm suggesting that pandemic politics are normal politics is not to be trusted any time abandoned that that that you know if somebody breaks into my house in the middle of the night and I go in Iraq my shotgun and then I know they're on the other side of the wall and I can hear them clicking on the other side along if I blow a hole through the wall to get the guy on the other side of the wall of my shotgun that's a legitimate response to me creeping around in my house don't know who it is I can see my camera it's not a family member and I blow a hole through a wall that does not suggest any normal non prowler in the house situation I should randomly go around blowing holes in my wall with my Mossberg okay that that is and yet anybody that that's what this pandemic politics people are saying they're saying it's pandemic see how we need government during a pandemic that means we should use government like destroying a non pandemic we see this from from Democrats routinely with regard to the language of war as we get the war on poverty is take it the the the the war on want's result Franklin Roosevelt in his four freedoms speech suggested freedom from once was a key freedom no freedom from want is is not eight a freedom that is guaranteed by the constitution a freedom of speech is guaranteed by the constitution freedom from want is something that should be accomplished through community and social networks and social fabric but again equating everything's a time of war according everything to a time of pandemic is a cheap way to to move toward dictatorship vermeil's as alternatives to regionalism have already have always existed on the right loosely defined one is a libertarian constitutionalism which emphasizes principles of individual freedom that are often an uneasy tension but the constitution's original meaning and the founding a generation's norms the founding year was hardly libertarian a number of fronts and that little today such as freedom of speech and freedom of religion well this is why I have not suggested that it is a particularly originals perspective to for example suggest that flag burning was enshrined by the US constitution I I'm not sure that constitutional decision by justice Scalia wasn't keeping with original intent so I think the flag burning was a dummy I think they're counterproductive but I also I'm not sure that they should be ruled out by the constitution nonetheless vermeil continues he says that another alternate is broken traditionalism which tries to slow the pace of legal innovation here too the difference with originalism is clear original as miss sometimes revolutionary consider the court's originalist opinion declaring a constitutional right to own guns a standing break with the court's longstanding presidencies contrasting his vision with these other visions he says circumstances have changed hostile environment to meet originalism useful rhetorical and political expedient is now gone outside the legal academy legal conservatism is no longer the siege if president trump is reelected some version of legal conservatives will become the laws animating spirit for a generation of more or more so in other words what he wants is the Judiciary Committee activist judiciary on behalf of things Adrian Vermeule likes that have nothing to do with the constitution how do we know that he is now nearing the perspectives of left because he called people on the left he says I'm talking about a different more ambitious project one that abandons the defensive crouch of originalism and it refuses any longer to play within the terms set by legal literalism Ronald Dworkin legal scholar and philosopher used to urge moral readings of the constitution common good constitutionalism is methodological war canyon but advocates a different set of substantive moral commitments and priorities come to work and which were of a conventionally left liberal bands many tries to proclaim it is not legal positivism meaning that it is not tethered to the particular written instruments of civil law what the will of legislators who created them instead it just draws on the tradition of the western canon the interlocutor the activity of washing follow in order to that should follow in order to function well as law is not libertarianism sound legal liberalism its aim is not to maximize individual autonomy bottom line is that there's no limiting principle here is not limiting principles it finally unlikely beloved legal of religion says Adrian Vermeule coming to constitutionalism constitutionalism does not suffer from a horror of political domination hierarchy because it sees that the law is parental a wise teacher in in cocaine of good habits yeah that sounds exactly like Barack Obama and his knowledge strategy for what want to do it ought to make us better people will want to make it your parents ought to make a better people your religious community us make a better person your moral teachings on to make a better per person if you're relying on the government to make you moral and wise let's just say that there's not a long history of that being particularly effective just authority in rulers as Adrian Vermeule can be exercised for the good of subjects if necessary even against the subject's own perception of what is best for them perceptions that may change over time anyway as the one teachers the **** was and reforms them okay this is what I'm sorry this is dystopian language it really is if this were written by somebody left with all the calling and Tierney to pretend that constitutional law that common to constitutionalism as anything other any arbitrary application of government power to a set of principles that you like even if I like the same principles is to completely reject the founding vision of a limited government.

professor Harvard Law School
"harvard law school" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

12:09 min | 2 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on KTRH

"Filling in for Rush Limbaugh ladies and gentlemen mark Hey day I really should just the light to myself up the and be done with it you know I was here yesterday and I said this is just rush's official buff days us face down in the birthday cake he is definitely gonna be head live noon eastern on Tuesday and then noon eastern on Tuesday comes around and they say ladies and gentleman sitting in FOR mocks assistant for mock finalist Wilbur's was get the sim for Rush Limbaugh his mock Stein and I said yes I know I said it would be Hey yesterday but unfortunately he's not somebody in something came up but you can take this to the bank so help me god if I'm wrong about this you can take me to the edge of town stake me out for the buzzards you can center in Tommy you can sell my body parts on the internet he will be hair I swear to god mid day Wednesday rush will be a well about two minutes ago I just said I meant that I said half an hour ago I have about three days in a row since nineteen eighty seven that's true I don't know if I can do it yeah but it's nothing please please please please restrain yourself with the rotten fruit you can hold the you can hold me to that you can the feather and Tom a Tom and feather may you can if you wish they'd be out for the bus to tie cannot tell a lie I like yeah you can bet on my my both so most of them are on news since nineteen eighty seven oddly enough when I was worn out by working three days in a row so you can do whatever you wish and I was wrong I lied I misspoke I misspoke as the politicians say what I said what what that's not who I am a shapeless liar who just said but I didn't know until two minutes ago a rush is that Russia is definitely gonna be hair on first say if he is not here I you can take that to the bank yes I know all the banks are closed its a bag holiday in Canada that apparently there observing in the United States so yes you can if the band was open you could take it to the bank if he's not a hair on Thursday you can sneak up behind me like a Nepalese GA cat and go rock me in the night if I'm wrong about that if he's not a on Thursday you can you can you can you can leap into smash the for open the front door my home and take a machete to all my most intimate body parts in the manner of isis you can do what they do in Liberia you can eat them to celebrate the successful a conquest of your enemy you can do what you like if he's not no I'm Mike is just go in there that's the that's the special of the days of your average life is made with a average Liberian dina it's the previous strong man stand it'll senses the what they do and I don't blame me for it if he's not bad hair mid day on Thursday I I am sorry about I don't I don't know what I don't know what to say to that but it's like it's slowed down the return of rush is like sending the impeachment articles to the Senate but it's definitely gonna happen just as the house is going to vote to send them to Mitch McConnell tomorrow so on Thursday rush will return and I I apologize for that my understanding you can throw as much rotten fruit at may is the one I misspoke I misspoke too soon and I deeply regret that Armonk stuff in in a in for rush the ugliness I mean what one of the things what we what we don't have that is like the **** insane ugliness of what's going on both in the impeachment and in these revelations by James o'keefe about what Bernie staffers and campaign field organizes a daring in Iowa and also I think in this Twitter feasting on Vince Vaughn the actor who spend fifteen seconds with Donald Trump not the Superdome in New Orleans last night and is being excoriated for it and at some point what the guy in Iowa is saying has a certain logic if if you won't trigger unless of course the way it is right people who like Vince Vaughn movies triggered by seeing him shaking hands with the president this this is this is madness this is a kind of collective insanity that actually will lead to war because your talk your your establishing a a a coals of war I'm known to any previous civilization usually things had to actually get pretty bad for people to want to make war on each other even in **** places like the Balkans Hey when now here when I was saying that things like sharing a joke with the president of the United States if you're a Hollywood actor but should be on the pile we actually have to face down this thing just to go back to Ricky Joe vase at the golden globes which now seems a lifetime ago but is only a week ago thank you Joe vase has a very good point which is that we have somehow accepted as an organizing principle of contemporary life that everybody should have to react to everything in exactly the same way that everything has to be universal and everything has to affect someone the same way so you might have people do all kinds of things for all kinds of people you might make a radio show for a certain kind of audience are you might produce a Broadway play that's aimed at a particular type of theater going you might to right to know full that's aimed at a particular kind of read out but none of that matters now because everything is supposed to be universal and when he was first told that this so that joke of his was offensive to somebody he refused to accept the premise because he he he rejected the premise that the joke has to be universal a joke has to be everybody for everybody and he says any joke in the wild offend somebody and he goes so why did the chicken cross the road how dare you might chicken died last night are you totally heartless about my dead chicken well no sorry sorry I didn't realize your chicken died last time that's ridiculous you calm live like that no society can function like that so when we now talk about things that are being this soul that is offensive and that Madeline and particularly in the Chinese whispers age of the internet IBM lost yesterday show by talking about how old the diverse city had been booted out of the democratic primary there's no diverse city left all the eggs interesting exotic identity politics characters all the nose dived into the briny cari Boca Camelot Harris all the rest them now into so they left with the old white guys and I said but with a couple of exceptions but I said how do we know even know who it is with wallet is a woman she lies about everything else when she lied about that too and is how do we know Mappy Tuesday because basically all the desert was in the context of all the diverse the big booted out of the democratic primary so the little pajama boys in their little Thompson onesies having that George Soros cocoa over at media matters they get all excited about this and they and they and they put up a little excerpt from what I was saying about is is is Elizabeth Warren really a woman as if this is an outrageous thing to say let's take it on your own terms the drama boys you believe in affirmative action I done I think it's outrageous and there is no justification for it in the modern era and we shouldn't have it but you hold to believe in affirmative action Elizabeth Warren as I said was how middle schools fast woman of color that's how she was billed for for for decades Harvard law school's first woman of color now if you like you little insensitive Nelly pajama boys you purport to believe in a parent family of action seriously so that means that somewhere out there in America is someone who should have been the genuine Harvard Law School first woman of color and she had that stolen from her by Elizabeth Warren that's the crime that if you take your rubbish seriously there is a first woman of color at Harvard Law School who never got to be the first woman of how the hello at Harvard Law School because Elizabeth Warren stole it from me to never mention that do you you don't even take your own you don't even tell you norm some seriously so you know a big write up on me saying is is Elizabeth Warren even a woman but you don't you don't do anything you know you don't do anything on the real of victim of Elizabeth Warren's fate get biography that doesn't interest you just says if I wanna caper around all my Darling little Miami in black face you'd be furious and they'll be no end to it but if Justin Trudeau does it or the governor of Virginia does it you don't care about it so your home bugs so you don't even believe in the universalist you don't even believe in why did the chicken cross the road you might check and died last night you don't even believe in that because what matters is whether the person complaining that he's chicken died last night is an approved designated Las old victim on the left or whether it's just some right wing guy amount thing off so there is no universe service so don't accept the premise of the left is all kinds of different people some people find chicken jokes funny some people I'm fine chicken jokes funny why did the chicken cross the road the chicken cross the road to get away from the totalitarian and full size of media matters on the Twitter not to those who are demanding that Vince Vaughan never work again in Hollywood because he shook hands with the president of the United States don't play that game do the Ricky Genovese thing shop at old down their throats and bread of of June bug and all the rest of it just just yet the world's biggest mallet and a hammer it back down bag gullet because there is serious about it it's so it's not settled a softer talent Arianism but they're trying to destroy real lives here and there's nothing soft about that much sign in for rush we will take your polls straight ahead rock shoes always at work and the E. I. V. ever closer to fifteen hours a week here what is there not it turns out a lot yeah the Limbaugh letter is a repository for win three hours is just not.

Limbaugh official
"harvard law school" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Constitutional lawyer at Harvard Law School so hi constitutional lawyer Weiss constitutional professor wise he's about as big as they get and that's why on all the TV networks when they want the big constitutional legal perspective they bring this guy on he tweeted out just a day ago about the incoming impeachment trial because of all the senators who are saying this will talk about nothing we should vote to dismiss it so I'm not an impeachable offense I'm done with it when the check and he thinks this is not they're not taking their duty is juror was properly Lawrence tribe says when the Chief Justice administers the oath of impartiality to a senator who has said he will not be impartial he will need to decide what his Ono's demands and whether he has jurisdiction to rule on a motion to recuse that senator for Cole's mother is a lot of mumbo jumbo legal speak in that but essentially well this guy tried this supposed constitutional professors Riverdale is he knows nothing about this particular constitutional prices are the misfortune to attend the last impeachment trial all of the transit drop a Clinton twenty years ago in the United States Senate and ever since I've been in favor of America doing what New Zealand dated and abolishing it's on the house because it's a miserable process it you really don't want to see how the senatorial sausage is made it's a revolting place about a one of the things it becomes clear immediately is the Chief Justice although he has a net that a name that sounds like he's a judge is not actually the judge of the Senate trial he's loosely presiding but the the senators themselves are judge and jury he presides the guy back then and I sat and watched him every day for however many weeks it was was Rehnquist and rancorous afterwards said my job was to do nothing and I did it very well that his main contribution to the Senate trial because he felt he shouldn't wear the usual roads that he would wear if he was just at the Supreme Court so he designed his own robe modeled own a judicial robe form Gilbert and Sullivan's operetta Iolanthe with full gold bands on each sleeve that was his main called tribute shin to the trial of William Jefferson Clinton he designed his own row it looked lovely no nine there was a terrific it's all like you know the Chief Justice of the Solomon Islands or whatever was not good but it was a possible road eight maybe a bit bright guy in the right designing business Wranglers but that was all he did because that's only has to do is not the trial judge he doesn't he just presides only fifty one senators get together and decide to ask him a question or to ask him to rule on something he can rule but he calmed rule on anything unless they also can Terry and they could have if they had on like just Gilbert and Sullivan rub they could have said fifty one of them and voted for him to actually appear in a clown suit he would have been obliged to preside over the Senate trial in a clown suit why doesn't a constitutional law professor for decades this story tribe is the biggest big shot in the whole constitutional law business how come he doesn't know that he doesn't know that how can you make a fool of himself on Twitter how can we know who but when the Chief Justice presides over a an impeachment trial.

Harvard Law School professor
"harvard law school" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

05:20 min | 3 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"Hello and welcome to background briefing available twenty four seven a background briefing dot org hi I'm Ian monsters and today we'll look into number stories and issues in the news we'll begin on this eighteenth anniversary of the nine eleven attacks and speak with veteran Washington correspondent Jim lobe who is chief of the Washington bureau of inter press services and runs the influential low blog website with trump now trashing the justified tireless hawk John Bolton who apparently we can thank for preventing the photo op of the Taliban who harbored Osama bin laden shaking hands with the leader of the free world at camp David but now that trump's biggest donor Sheldon Adelson has seen his protege booted from the White House we'll assess how Israel's prime minister Netanyahu might feel about losing a like minded hawk who has been anxious to bomb Iran and we'll also examine Netanyahu's campaign promise that if he is reelected he will annex nearly a third of the west bank along the Jordan River to capitalize on what Netanyahu Coles quote the unique one off opportunity of having such a compliant in a blur as the trump administration boasting that thanks to quote my personal relationship with president trump I will be able to annex all of the settlements in the heart of our homeland. I will speak with Jodi Freeman professor at Harvard Law School and the founding director of the law schools environmental law and policy program she served as counsel for energy and climate change in the Obama White House and joins us to discuss her operated at The New York Times the auto rule roll back that nobody wants except from and the looming war between trump and the state of California of the press in this peculiar obsession of on doing anything Obama achieved. even in this case when increased fuel efficiency has the support of major order manufactures Ford BMW V. W. and Honda and it means clean air less global warming and trillions saved at the pump by American consumers. and finally we'll get an update on the turbulent and tortured politics of breaks it in the UK and speak with rob Ford a professor of political science at the university of Manchester and author of revolt on the right which examined the rise of you kept the UK Independence Party he joins us to discuss the latest intervention by the courts in Scotland ruling that bars Johnson misled the queen something the Supreme Court will decide on next Tuesday which could put her majesty in an awkward spot caught between the leave and remain poles of a divided country. and on this eighteenth anniversary of nine eleven I'm joined by Jim lobe who served as a Washington DC correspondent and chief of the Washington bureau of inter press services until retiring in twenty fifteen he's now an associate fellow of the institute for Policy Studies and he also runs the influential lobe log website welcome to background briefing Jim lobe thank you very much and they just fired by two eight and Nash could advise the John Bolton trump is trashing him ironically do we have Bolton to thank for the fact that we won't have the picture of the Taliban hanging out at camp David around the time of the nine eleven anniversary particularly since the Taliban of course happened some bin laden. I don't know if it was Bolton alone I don't think there was too much enthusiasm within the administration and certainly among Republicans in the Congress for the idea of inviting the Taliban to camp David close to that nine eleven anniversary I'm sure he voiced strong opposition that may not have helped his case with trump impact it may have been the straw that broke the camel's back between Bolton and and Tom but I think there was a large consensus that the idea of that camp David retreat was not a good one and combat to deal with that. well of course trump is trashing him and I'm wondering where that old ones other circle adults in the room not that necessarily Walton was one of them but in them with monster madness eccentric they have gone silently matters just write a book that's absolutely useless we all know that on the inside you're dealing with an insane person in the oval office and you would think I'd be there turning Judy to let the American people now what kind of person is that is running this country to the ground but now that trump is picked a fight with molten do you think balding might be one of the people that break that damn and start talking about what it's really like to serve Sacha incompetent and irrational any radic chief executive. I frankly I don't know I think it's possible he he may write a memoir or maybe a series of op ed he published in the wallstreet journal which was his favorite platform before he became national security adviser. covering.

Jim lobe Taliban John Bolton Netanyahu Coles Sacha Washington camp David Sheldon Adelson Jordan River White House Obama rob Ford Obama White House Harvard Law School Israel UK Independence Party David Jodi Freeman institute for Policy Studies camp David retreat
"harvard law school" Discussed on The Influencer Podcast

The Influencer Podcast

03:37 min | 3 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on The Influencer Podcast

"And then I sell legal templates that are kind of DIY templates for entrepreneurs that are affordable. The people don't actually feel like they can get everything they need their protection. In place at don't have to worry about it. And then, you know, hey, as you make tons of money, then you can hire me or some other lawyer. But in the meantime, you know, I want to sell kind of something that they can use as a stopgap. Where do you think that that passion for assessable ity comes from? Well, so it comes from my y so at first I started with a all beyond us when I I was trying to figure out pricing. It was because I was scared. I was scared to ask for a lot of money. And I thought why would they pay me it cetera? But I actually reconnected with my wi- about a year ago and part of that was reconnecting going back to this. It drove me nuts to see the pain that people were in because they hadn't gotten it done. And I just knew that quite honestly excess ability and affordability is a big part of it right now. And so I just said that's what I care about. There are plenty of people. I can make a good living without charging a bunch of money. And so I just made that a decision, and that's kind of been a state that I've put in the ground, and, you know, a lot of this is quite honestly, you know, I would rather you come and pay me a reasonable fee rather than either do not. Nothing or go trying to rip somebody else's stuff off. And then it's not right for you. So that's kind of my think rain, so there's a few things that I want to talk about because I think that you know, there's there's what's what I found. Really interesting is that you found somewhat of a creative passion in something that traditionally speaking law. I don't really think about his creativity. And I loved how you were able to take this very traditional, you know, work career, if you will work life kind of thing if you will and then turn it into a really kind of interesting and innovative new path and new venture. I would love a few kind of dive into that a little bit. Because I think that we do have a lot of listeners who they may still be in that corporate world or in in that traditional working landscape, if he will, but they have this idea, and, you know, their family thinks it's crazy sometimes they even think that it's crazy. They're just like there's no way that this would work would people actually high that? So did you ever ask yourself those questions in? How were you able to navigate navigate overcome the fact that like, yeah? Like legal templates would people actually buy that? Heck, yeah. Though, actually by that and kind of become become a resource become a solution provider for that. Well, so there's a lot of parts to that. And so some of it is yes, I get asked. I think about that. And I had those doubts for longtime. And quite honestly, I still talk to some of my friends who are traditional like what do you do? And I don't even try to explain it because I'm wondering why would they go to you? Instead of legalzoom on my 'cause legalzoom doesn't have these kinds of contracts because I'm serving a different kind of entrepreneur. Cillers you're they just don't get it in. So don't even try, but you can imagine trying to explain to my parents how I went from Harvard Law School grad top law firm to you know, I'm kinda really don't wanna practice. A lot of rather. Do a lot of the selling stuff on the internet. That was an interesting conversation. They still don't understand what I do. Exactly. They're like, oh, he does this internet thing. But but what happened was candidly? So I had been for most of my career..

Harvard Law School wi
"harvard law school" Discussed on We The People

We The People

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"harvard law school" Discussed on We The People

"Kirkland Ellis professor at Harvard Law School, specializing in constitutional law in constitutional history. Professor clermont's first book from Jim crow to civil rights the supreme court and the struggle for racial equality received the two thousand and five Bancroft prize in history. His other books include Brown versus board of education and the civil rights movement and unfinished business racial equality in American history. Mike, thank you so much for joining. Ted Shaw's Julius l chambers distinguished professor of law and director of the center for civil rights at the university of North Carolina school of law where he teaches civil procedure and advanced constitutional law on the fourteenth amendment. He served as the fifth director council and president of the N double ACP legal defense and education fund where he worked for over twenty six years. He was also formerly a visiting scholar at the national constitution center. Co wrote the interactive constitution explainer on the fourteenth amendment's equal protection clause. Ted. It's great to have you with us. Ted's all star with you. Can you tell us a little bit about Dr Martin Luther King? When was he born where was he from? And how did you get started with civil rights work? Luther King junior was born in nineteen twenty nine. So he would have been ninety on January fifteen he was born in Atlanta, Georgia, his father was a prominent minister, and he got into civil rights because he was assigned to the Dexter avenue church in Montgomery, Alabama and happened to get there right around the time that the Montgomery busboy Cup started. When now famous Rosa Parks refused to give up a seat. And so he was a young pastor there. And because he was a new pastor. He was chosen to be the head of the of the churches of for purposes of supporting this this effort. Mike is there anything you'd like to add about Dr king's early life and anything you want to tell us about the satis of the civil rights movement at the time. The boycott started on December of nineteen fifty five which was about your and a half after the supreme court decision Brown versus board of education. And as Ted was saying, it was important that Martin Luther King was due to the city of Montgomery. He was twenty six years old and one reason why he was chosen to head this organization. That was orchestrating the boycott the Montgomery improvement association was simply that because he was young and relatively new to town. He had yet opportunity to make enemies in the city an older. More senior pastor might have had a device of fact on the community because there'd be some people who had an opportunity to alienate. So it was actually just a an instance of being in the right place at the right time. The fact that king was young relatively unknown new to the city actually enable him to attain this position that ultimately became prominent because the boycott turned out to be a land. Mark event in the civil rights movement at lasted for year, thousands of African Americans in Montgomery participated, literally,.

Dr Martin Luther King Ted Montgomery visiting scholar Montgomery improvement associa Harvard Law School Professor clermont Brown Montgomery busboy Cup Mike university of North Carolina s Kirkland Ellis professor Jim crow Rosa Parks distinguished professor Co Julius l chambers