17 Burst results for "Harvard Innovation Labs"

"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on The Men's Room

The Men's Room

05:29 min | 8 months ago

"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on The Men's Room

"But so most people always assume I feel like it's always assumed that it's the woman that hasn't issued usually women that these fertility clinics and get these hormonal treatments. Is it standard to test also the mad? So, it's shocking to me because it is so much cheaper and easier to test the man that you hear about a lot of cases, even before starting IBF where the man is not tested, and this is because even Obgyn's even people in the field who are dealing with fertility still don't know much about or don't think about meal. Fertility which is the number will be UN's that I've met who don't know anything about the statistics meal for is actually quite shocking. And when you compare just how easy it is to testify sample, or should say the specimen it's it's actually kind of shocking that it hasn't become completely routine. When when you start to even think about CASSIA. Yeah, that is shocking. It's strange so so you have these kits that you ship overnight. Do ship them all over the world, or is it just in the US? Right now right now? We're in the US but we're expanding internationally pretty quickly as you can. Imagine, Vid has negatively impacted. Those plans but it's very much on the radar so for US Geneva base into Europe. Dubai will be. Our base into the Middle East. And we have a couple of other countries in mind as well. Yeah, so you founded legacy in two thousand eighteen right? And it was something that you kind of hatched at Harvard Innovation Labs. So, it was a very scholarly and well researched startup but it since then grown, and you've raised quite a bit of capital to grow and scale the company I. You guys got one point five million dollars. A seed round led by Bain capital ventures that was back Last year last June. And then just this January raised another three point five million dollars so obviously. There's some interest in this industry. Just when we thought you know like a sperm bank was the sperm bank. How big is this industry and have you seen a growth since you started? Massively, so I'll address a few of the points that you made so first of all the initial funding from Bain capital ventures was just from kind of some of the early fundraising than we had done. And there was there was a lot of excitement about the product enough. I'll talk about more why acting in just a second. But then we went through the white combinator program in Silicon Valley last summer fairly well known accelerator for kind of high potential startups. And so official, but going to this program is that connects you to every major investor? Basically anywhere in the world I mean you. You have investors literally flying in to watch these one hundred or so companies present at the end of the program. So that actually helped us a lot when it came to fundraising, it really opened up doors for us on the west coast of the US where you tend to see kind of investment dollars, higher valuations, and so on so..

US Bain capital ventures IBF UN Dubai Middle East Harvard Innovation Labs Europe official
"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"We will again together I urge everyone to subscribe the camels text alert system by texting coded MA to eight eight eight seven seven seven and continue to get your news from trusted sources like local news newspapers and official channels like masterwork of slash code nineteen this point I'd like to turn it over to Dr lately talk a little bit about police technology and capability to assist Massachusetts residents you've been listening to Massachusetts governor Charlie Baker we continue our coverage Dr late coming up to the microphone cover Baker it's an honor to be here with all the you as a local business here in Boston our team is eager to help residents in our home state during this crisis we was founded seven years ago in Harvard's innovation lab to help people figure out what to do when they're sick or injured using modern technologies and artificial intelligence we thought there had to be something better than searching randomly on internet for help being scared and alone that mission has never been more relevant than it is today now we're here to help the department of public health get personalized information and guidance to residents about what to do if they're experiencing symptoms related to the car crying of ours whether that self isolation or how to get care and testing something else tool uses the latest department of public health in CDC guidelines to help residents understand the risks related to disease and what to do next you can find it online at E. dot com slash mass that's B. U. O. Y. dot com slash M. A. S. S. our goal is to.

"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

11:48 min | 1 year ago

"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Our board meets officially three times. A year We also have a separate retreats therefore effective meetings but our investment subcommittee which looks after the endowment very important role. They need ten times a year just as an example example. So we're asking people who have day jobs and real success in their lives and careers to really give their time and effort and their treasure to help support the university city. So it's a pretty big that we're making people who serve and tell me about the The Willingness Of folks employers to allow time. I'm off that is necessary here. I mean I'm just thinking now if you if you're working for say a New York Investment House or whatever or law firm somewhere these outfits are famous Amos for demanding just gazillions of our school week there people and all of a sudden somebody says hey. I need Thursday and Friday off. 'cause I'm going to Burlington for a board meeting House that flight. A lot of places often doesn't and you just captured the Challenger recruiting board of trustees what we have to try to intercept them at right exactly the right time in their lives so we will relationships without over years with people we think we'd be a trustee one day and what we try to do is determine. When are they going to have the capacity to so finding that person who's in processing retiring from their loss of were sent me don't have capacity lots of for organizations would love love to have them involved to make sure the head of the lie so what we have is a member conversations going at any one time with people that were thinking three and four board cycles? It goes into the future when he might be available and have the flexibility in their lives. That will serve. It's one of the hardest thing a lot of great talent there who just doesn't have the time the flexible flexibility in their schedule to be able sir. How do you actually do that? Invite them up there Vermont for fancy dinners skiing or something or what do you. What's the recruiting reading like? We meet them where they live Some of these folks do have homes in Vermont. Second homes will meet them here sometimes One of the trustees will be in their community. We'll take them to a lunch or dinner. will invite them to campus for an event The President University. So rescuer may be in a in a community Thrust please go meet this. This person and someone we've got to get to know better so there. There's this constant outreach to people to make sure that we are finding people just that are coming up at the right time on the challenge. Me Dave is. We only have three seats that open every other year. There aren't many openings on the board or the university Allow us to bring on people so every decision makers highly selective Highly carefully thought out. Because that's the kind of Rare career opportunity. We have to bring in skillset help aboard most board members Members of other boards as well. I would think so. Oh yes most serve on another gourds Most other philanthropic interest. They have in their lives Most have as you pointed out earlier pretty significant day jobs you know. For example on our investments we have one of the top you know bond investors in the country on our board. We want to reinstate investors vice chairman of Banque on our board. These are folks who are really expert we have the head of a Harvard Innovation Lab on our pool the Chancellor of Mit on our board A a person who started up a very successful biotech business in Vermont and ran that successively on our board. So it's a very strong board of people who've accomplished in really bring into their what we need in the conversation. And and the trustee wardrobe. Yeah it does sound like you're balancing. A lot of sort of competing needs here. A along with diversity is obviously important. One that's why we've talked about it now twice a couple months here on the Dave Ramsey show but but and and gender diversity versity Racial ethnic diversity the different flavors of of people come from all different walks of life and life experiences and so on and and and to the extent possible. I'm sure you WANNA reach out to as many of those categories is can. Do you happen to know the breakdown. There of the nine members appointed by the legislature. How many men? How many are women? How many are members of racial or ethnic minorities? The Legislative Trustees to the nine are female and one is an ethnic minority. Okay so I guess I don't know exactly what to make of that or to WHO But is there a Is Is there a little bit of glass houses kind of situation going on here well. It's a challenging situation and I feel for our brothers and sisters on the legislative of where legislative trustees because they of course have a fiduciary obligation and responsibility the university and his board. They serve but they're also in the legislature. I just later and they do have a voice in selecting those nine trustees that are legislative trustees. It is very difficult situation where they're kind of on both sides here. Media have direct impact and ability to influence. And hopefully. We'll be able to help in this area over time. I think they do control nine feet and the ability for for for them to help us at the macro level achieve more gender balanced with appointments. They make it will be very helpful to achieve that goal. Well actually he's an interesting interesting Issue that comes up from time to time it can actually with our legislative. UVM Trustees which is that lawmakers often support you know some their own Folks who are in the legislature have been in the legislature and the case of People who are both legislators and members of the University of my board of Trustees. STD's there's been some attention in recent years to a potential conflict of interest there. Where basically as legislator you have a fiduciary responsibility not to the tax payers have Vermont and the overall state budget and the General Health Fiscal Health of state government as a University of Vermont? Board of trustee. You could be forgiven for you. Know urging that the legislature cut also other purposes for state funding in half and give the money to the VM How do people sort that out and do you think? There's any sort of structural issue here that needs to be changed. It's a delicate challenge as There's a study Several years ago the audio a report that look at this issue and you know there are arguably some conflicts being on both sides of that I will tell you culturally culturally. The board functions very very well in terms of how it operates the relationship between the legislative trustees and the private trustees and the story of appointees is exceptional optional. We were really strong board culture. If you were sitting in a board meeting you would have trouble telling who's who functions very very well. We feel we must. I have strong connections with the state so having legislative trustees who understand dynamics of the state the state budget politics and have real finger on the pulse and really important warden so we must have that on the other hand we also need to. Have you know unbiased judgment that supports the University of and I'm sure there are times when our legislative trustees. He's feel a little conflicted as a result of being on both sides of that my experiences they've dealt with it very well and we've seen people get to the right decision that balance no interest. I'm sure it's been difficult on occasion. Yeah and Uvm of course is I guess a for lack of a better way the describe it doesn't have a supremely high batting average in the legislature in terms of extracting state funding from the the budgetary processes. In Montpellier. In fact it is is a ten year after year. One of the least well-funded at least from the point of view of public funding from appropriated by legislators one of the least used to well-funded State universities in the country. Is that right. That is true. We are very appreciative of the funding from the state. Quite frankly we rely on it but relative Tiv- to funding and other states are overall budget is really quite small and something we struggle with. It puts a lot of pressure on us to one raise money from elsewhere to make sure that we are bringing in the right levels of tuition to fund the University so a balancing act we have financially as a result of that limited funding. The state I mentioned appreciate above. And we are reliant on but it isn't as big a part leg as one might think so if anybody is worried about lawmakers giving away the store story to the university I this this bottom line really year after year. I mean this has been A. I've been in Vermont since nineteen eighty five in an all through that time time I've heard just the the legislature tends to be pretty Pretty stingy when it comes to the University of Vermont. We he really thinks that University of Vermont can be a huge engine for the state You've seen the dynamics demographically ovulation aging size university diversity brings people in. We're bringing in research dollars the ability to create jobs and entrepreneurs so we we believe the investment that the state makes the university Returns itself many times over. And we're proud of that. We're happy with the university can do think of state and particularly in this difficult time demographically. So we're trying to make sure we're doing our part I loved vision of our new president. Doctors Rescue Mela. He really has a sense of research is in the National Science Board. I think some of the things that you'll see we'll bring things to remind and engage the community in ways that we haven't before that will be helpful to the state overall so I think they look at us as not only only an academic institution by institution really in a position to help the state significantly when wish about diversity on the board You know you want obviously different genders and racial Pro Parts of the population re reflected and so on and so forth. I wonder Does anybody in any given this academic setting people sort of way in and say okay. Well we we should consider whether someone is a poet or a chemist to and you know the the humanities versus the the stem subjects is added another question for people trying to make a diverse board and university. You know we get pressure. Requests from all sorts of cool sometimes lose sight of is. It's not our job to make history professors right. That's the administration's job. That's the dean of Arts and Science Would really pass the line. Between Board Governance and Operations Board is here to govern to older. See to bring wisdom and insight and so what we want to avoid at all. Costs are any prescription any quotas. That say you must have at Swire's Eve represented we've gotTa Use our judgment and uses earlier in the conversation with diversity in its broadest sense. You're becoming increasingly divorce outside. Legal Meyer and outside of the northeast if you look forward at high school graduation forecasts. You're going to need to start recruiting from the south in the South West in order to meet our WOAH needs to making sure as we think about trustees we won't go where the Action S and make sure we're getting the right geographic coverage coverage in various parts of the community. But we we really do not seek to serve any particular academic academic pursuit of our board members. That's not what governance is about. It's not what responsibility right. Yeah well run lumber unfortunately we are about out of time for this segment of the today show but certainly appreciate you joining me again this morning and presses is is this topic continues to develop can have you back once more in the future and.

Legislative Trustees trustee legislature Vermont UVM University of Dave Ramsey National Science Board President University fiduciary Operations Board New York Investment House Burlington Amos vice chairman South West Harvard Innovation Lab Meyer
"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on Technotopia

Technotopia

14:11 min | 1 year ago

"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on Technotopia

"So it's really a twenty four seven life coach for for high performers. Okay. So how does it what does it take to build something like that, obviously, have the technology, which is I guess it's fairly standard? Now, everybody's got a Fitbit on. But how do you how do you use some of the data that comes out of these devices properly? Well push back a little bit on that I think that there's actually a lot of novelty to the hard word self. I mean you have to you have to really create this balance when you're building hardware between the feature set and, and things like battery life, data collection. So what does that mean? So for example, whoop collects data at this outrageous, hurts level. So we're collecting about fifty to one hundred megabytes of data on a person per day. If we were a product like a Fitbit, or an apple watch, and we wanted to do a bunch of other things. So, for example, the apple watch can do phone calls, and has a high resolution screen, we just wouldn't be able to collect that much data. And because we're just focused on health improving hell all that data than improves our actor. Which then improves the algorithms that we can develop which then proves the coaching that we can ultimately deliver. So there's still a fair amount of nuance. I would say happening at the sensor level. And a lot of that goes back to what your overall mission is. If you're trying to give someone a better sense for their day and you wanna be a step counter? Then you can have a really long battery life, you can have, you know, other features like the ability to see apps on a smart watch. But if you wanna be able to really accurately, understand the body to build understand that someone's rundown, or dehydrated or hungover or sleep deprived or peaking physically. Then you need to build a monitor the body super accurately. And that's where our focus group is come in, and it's why we've gone from working with, you know, the best athletes in the world to now, a more mainstream consumer who wants to understand their body. So what is what goes into a building a piece of hardware like this right now? It's what, what did you guys have to do it? What did you have to change? Well, headed terrific team. I think that's helped a lot, you know, we, we started the business out of out of the Harvard innovation lab in the first thing that we wanted to be able to do. This was in two thousand twelve actually the first thing, one Bill due to measure heart rate variability accurately from the wrist. So previously, Harvard variability was identified in medical literatures statistic that could predict heart attacks for former atrial fibrillation patients. It was a statistic that was used by the CIA to detect if you're lying, and it was a statistic used by Olympic powerlifters to see if their body was rundown. I came at this from the background of being a an athlete myself. I was playing squash was at Harvard. So I was pretty interested in, how could I better understand my own body, and I was someone used over train? So all of a sudden, this idea that I could measure something like heart rate variability, that would give me a lens into the status of my body. That was pretty interesting. And so the first thing that we wanted to, to see doom is. Is to measure variability accurately from the wrist and do it twenty four seven and that would affectively be able to give us all this information on your body, previously, you needed a electrocardiogram, you know, the machine that you find in hospitals very expensive machine to be able to measure, hurry, variability. So today, I'm happy to say that we, we measure that very accurately, but that was the, the core focus from day. One is Hettie measured, the statistic accurately. So it's focused on them. What's, what's next for this sort of technology? It seems like it seems like this is changing almost every day in terms of what we can pull out of the human body. Wasn't broadly speaking, you're going to get to a place where technology understand your body better than you. Right. It's interesting that I can look at my computer right now. And have all this feedback about my computer's battery life. It's performance it's memory. But if I just look at my body in the mirror. I don't necessarily know that much about what's going on, and with whoop, what we're trying to do affectively. Create this this concept of, of the battery life for your body. Right. What level my at today, do I need to be charged or, or can I expect some battery life, and I think over time, but that's gonna allow humans to do is just be way more productive. And to be way, healthier, because the realities their secrets that your body's trying to tell you that you can't feel the side that you can feel whether or not you're ready for something, or you can feel whether or not. You're getting sick or or your rundown is often not the case, there's, there's core indicators that can suggest the status of your body. And I think over time that, that, that's gonna be pretty exciting from the from the potential of. How can we make someone more optimal? Okay. So I mean what is it? What does that look like we does does our do our systems, basically tell us what to eat what to what to drink? That sort of thing. Oh, certainly, I mean, I think that from a coaching standpoint, you'll be able to know exactly what are the right things to put in your body in the wrong. You'll know really what's the perfect recipe of things for you to improve. I mean, we're already doing that to some extent today with the a lot of our high end athletes where they'll, you know, they'll input everything about what they're eating drinking different supplements. They're taking recovery tools. They're using ice bat location, tanks, meditation on the question is, what's the perfect recipe for you? What's the recipe for John to be optimal? And by the way, that varies a lot, right? Like the reason there's ten thousand diets there isn't one diet for everyone. And, and so to be able to give feedback on Haiti's of the things that you should be putting your body. And these aren't these are the behaviors that are good for you. And the behaviors that are bad for you. I think just bringing a lot more. Data to that conversation. First and foremost, you know, the layer on top of it is to be able to tell someone exactly what to do. I mean, I would I would love us situation where I'm basically my, my wrist basically says here, eat the eat this right now drink this right now. Hey, what are you doing? Put down that beer that kind of stuff. I mean it's seems a little bit. Seems a little bit. Kind of treat us like babies, but, I mean we're definitely not doing a good job feeding feeding training our selves without without any help. Well, I think it will look back on the fact that every human wasn't monitoring sleep as the stone age, and I certainly came at this from one of you of an athlete originally. And the fact that all athletes, especially once for serious aren't measuring their sleep is pure insanity. I mean that'll be looked back on, like, like baseball players smoking in the dugout. The reality is, there's so much you can learn from that I think sleep is just so so so important because it's this magical period of time where your body is recovering growing in everyone thinks he gets stronger in the gym yet. Get stronger in the gym you break your muscles down. You get stronger during slowec sleep, which is when your body produces ninety five percent of its human growth hormone. So if you're trying to if you're trying to put on muscle as an example, the, the amount of time that you. Worring about what you're doing the gym should not be greater the amount of time that you spend worring about how much slower sleep, you're getting something that will measures, you know, the same committee for Remm sleep. If your wrestler is your, your brain is recovering. Right. And so if you're trying to perform a high level trying to form in your daily, cognitive life, you need to be getting a lot of Remm sleep. So then that begs the question will, what are all the things that I can do to get more slowly sleep to get more Rhames sleep? Right. And again, that goes back to one very optimistic about the future from a health standpoint, you're going to be able to get coached on had to do these things. Look, they were already doing a lot of that at will. Are there have you seen anything in terms of being able to induce a deeper sleep better sleep any systems that you've seen? Well, there's a lot of general lifestyle things that are out there commonalities across humans. So one is that you generally wanna have a really really dark room, you generally wanna have a really cold room. You know, you, you want to avoid looking at devices or blue light emitting screens before you go to sleep. I find that wearing a ask helps a lot. And then another thing that's interesting is going to bed consistently going to bed and waking up at the same time every night is actually more important than the amount of Daration you get. So that's kind of a life hack. If you want to figure out how you can get by on six or seven hour sleep, you try to go to bed. Wake up at exactly the same time every night, there was a study from the nationalist to help on one hundred students and they looked at sleep consistency verse leap duration how correlated with GPA and they found that if you if you got more more sleep, it was actually less important than if you were going to bed and waking up at a consistent time in terms of how it affected the students. GPA. At we then ran that analysis across, like ten million data sets ten million sleepiq data sets, we found that indeed the people who were going to bed and waking up at a more consistent time, had higher heart rate variability in low arresting heart rates and faster recovery's. So that's now something that in our sleep coach within the w- bap, we provide feedback on. We tell you when we think you should go to bed and wake up based on your recent behavior for going to bed waking up. And by the way, that gets even more interesting when you start adding timezones and travel, because those are other things that humans do that they need to be more optimal around. So in terms of in terms of jetlag and stuff, basically to, to give that advice, how, I mean, think about the number of important decisions that are being made today by people across the world that are, you know, people who are jet lagged. Could those decisions be more effective? If those people weren't jetlagged, right? Have a number of decisions being made by people who are hung over right? So that's, that's very optimistic about the future because we've already seen it whoop if you can if you can show someone the behaviors that are good for them or bad for them, you can actually create a behavior change. One example, is we see people drink dramatically less alcohol after they've been on for four months. Seventy nine percent reduction in reporting alcohol consumption, and the reason for that is you can dramatically. See how negative alcohol is on your body's recovering your body sleep. Now, if you go in ask anyone and you say, hey, you think alcohol's good for your covering sleep? They'll say no. But all of a sudden, when you've got data against it in its showing to transparently every day, it induces, a behavior change, so that that's again while I'm pretty optimistic about the future in any think the details. Around coaching humans to do more. Optimal are quite exciting. What are these tools, look like in twenty years? I think I think the, the feedback that I'm pro that I'm describing is probably the same. Right. It's just a question of what the mechanism is that you're receiving that feedback today? Most feedback is given through a, a cellphone, right? So I think this is a bigger question for what's the next platform than it is really, what the future of health is the future of health is just being able to be coached on everything that you do in a preventive way. Right. Curative medicine is so much more expensive than preventative medicine and to be able to prevent someone for making bad decisions to encourage them to make good decisions that to me is the future of health. So you'll know the effect of something that before you put it in your body. You'll know exactly your battery life for the day, you'll know all the infrequent, and you'll get credit for doing those things in terms of, how that feedbacks deliver it could be screens could be glad. Passes could be a, you know, voice automation. You know, that, that I think is more of a just a general technology question of what's the next flap? Platform as is the smartphone thing in twenty years will probably be a different platform, where where you're, you're seeing that feedback delivered more important thing, though, is what that feedback is. And, and I think that's what's going to be quite powerful. Okay. What kind of what kind of performance improvements? Have you had since since you started doing all this stuff? A lot of it's been around things to improve sleep. We talked a little bit about it. Colder room darker room sleep mask, to take melatonin which, which helps you fall asleep a little bit faster. It's fairly natural supplement linked to take magnesium, which is typically also recovery's those things that do before bed. I, I try to go to bed and wake up at, at consistent times when I'm doing a quick trip from the east coast to west coast back, try to stay on the east coast time zone that goes back concept of sleep, consistency..

Harvard apple Remm CIA Haiti Hettie Bill w- bap melatonin John growth hormone Daration twenty years one hundred megabytes Seventy nine percent ninety five percent four months seven hour
"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Now back to Silicon Valley insider once again, you host Keith to welcome back to Silicon Valley insider with key today. I'm joined with Dr Mike centers, the director of healthcare and life sciences. Harvard innovation labs book again. You. So for this week cyber tip, whether you're cooped, oh curtsy enthusiasts or you plan to become one or you just interested. This is for you. So I've been reporting on the Canadian crypto exchange Quadra gusts. And how a couple of weeks ago back. They were reported to have lost one hundred ninety million dollars because their CEO and founder was the only one with the passwords and he passed away suddenly on a business trip in India. And the people at the company did not know his passwords to the private keys and therefore couldn't get into it. Now, there's a lot of speculation on what really happened, even though the death certificate to the dieting not die and the entire companies say they have no way of finding these crypto funds and experts all around the world trying to see if they can see it moving in and out of exchange somewhere while I'm really not going to talk about that. What's more interesting and a hack into an article by David Weissberger? He actually talks about what I'd be interested in is anyone who's using a couple currency like bitcoin or a theory. Why do you pick the cryptic exchange that you do because this particular exchange absolutely had repeatedly violated a lot of what's called best practices by financial regulators in Canada? And not only that if you were to buy something like a bitcoin. Their prices were almost always higher. Than other changes in the open market. So then the question is if you if you really know what you're doing. Why are you picking that type of exchange, and if you don't know what you're doing? You should really do the research just like you would in stocks or other securities or financial investments do comparison shopping understand the features of one platform or the other. So that you have the most information possible to keep yourself safe as a reminder. No actual blockchain itself has yet been hacked, but many cryptos changes, which is not a blockchain itself, it's simply storing or transacting your currency as well as the where you store it in a wallet. Those certainly can be hacked. They're not necessarily encrypted or cryptographic Lee encrypted like the inherent blockchain itself. Questions are coming. This feel free to Email said info at SPNFZ's, and that's the cyber tip of the week..

bitcoin Dr Mike centers David Weissberger Keith director Lee India CEO Canada SPNFZ founder one hundred ninety million dol
"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

10:11 min | 2 years ago

"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Your host, Keith too. Insiders. Welcome back to Silicon Valley insider with Keith cou I'm joined today with Dr Mike fen who's the head of healthcare. Life sciences at Harvard innovation labs, thanks again for being here. My buddy. So Mike as we always talk about innovation. What are hot topics in the of space for two thousand eighteen and beyond? Yeah. I think two thousand nineteen is going to be a really exciting year for life sciences path. I think we're gonna see a real growth in the digital healthcare. Second particular. I think we're acting to start seeing some realize Asian of AI being lamented in more clinical settings or get close being implemented more showing clinical settings and actually having real outcomes be an increase in in focus on patient, need and patient Centric care. I think that's an additional thing which is pretty congenital as well to the digital health. I think we're gonna see continued external innovation by the major players in the life sciences that is particularly Barna biotechnology. So that that's great. If you're a startup company, which means that as a start up, you're an potential acquisition target, and they're seeking earlier in earlier stage companies for potential acquisitions and expansion at an external innovation. I think really exciting from a biotech standpoint, we're going to see a lot more grow really citing technologies coming online in terms of cell based technology such as car keys, gene, therapies, antibodies cancer vaccine. I think we're gonna see a lot of really cool stuff actually making it out alive or sci-fi founding making it look clinic, and actually helping patients thank you very much. Just to continue on that vein of what's hot in two thousand eighteen last year. We had Dr John Madison who's the chief health information officer of Kaiser, and Dr vanilla seeing that she'd been off to the United States on our show and also at my conference, remember, she technology, and Dr Madison and seeing both said that they felt that we're twelve eighteen months away from significant breakthroughs in life sciences along the things you mentioned, which is like, gene therapy in vaccines for cancer in addition. So those types think you're actually seeing in Harvard itself. Yes. Yes. We are. And we actually have some some companies and startups page ventures which all born out and the top research labs here at Harvard. They're working on gene therapy. Genomic diagnostics on incorporating. A I. In an advanced machine learning several different regenerative medicine and cell based therapeutics. So some really exciting stuff typically in oncology space and then also neurology. I like that. I come from the tech world hard sciences and Larry Ellison had given a keynote a few years back those listening to and he had said, I don't know why people keep innovating on infrastructure regulatory -nology. That's boring to me, I think people should be investing in life sciences. And it's nice to see how licenses and technology are now integrated in kind of a joint philosophy. So what I mean is like things you brought up a I artificial intelligence machine learning, and how you find those data sets to then solve for for real problems. Yeah, we have a great point. And actually, I was I was reading the Louis or PWV's. Two thousand nineteen outlook. And there was a lot of talking kind of hearing about about the giants becoming increasingly of all things will ventures. Great example, writing best thing something more than I think of their capital and life sciences, right? And it makes sense again with the digitization of health and end the importance of data and all day. I it's really exciting. I mean, I think we're actually some some really impact me out of this. I definitely would that you know. Hey, I Trump turn around a lot especially in healthcare recently. But I think one of the areas that is gonna get more coverage. It's actually the data curation not not so much. Yeah. And what you can do with AI. But actually, the the data processing before the I is actually apply see more as well. Well, that leads a good point to talking about the data in the so myself at a tech and. Risk and compliance. We worry a lot about data protection. Banks large cloud based providers. And when I talked to license or healthcare related companies. Hip hip almost twenty years old. I believe there are certain things built in the hip because we don't have the infrastructure and data in the scale. We have today where companies can interact sharing data about patients or something. Like that. With honestly, less control than a Bank would have run a personal data. But what have you seen if anything around my science startups? How are they struggling or thriving in this kind of heightened awareness around data protection? Yeah. But certainly snub really right being able to share data, and it's very easily often is really important to being able to create algorithms strange and be able to improve patient care at the same time. Protecting patients data it's five or security surrounding healthcare data going back to what you said about hip also new regulations talking about Europe's regulation DVR all of these things are extremely important. And I mean right now, there's a lot of companies that are startups focusing on how to protect patient data. There's a lot of work. I think to be done with data coming online shooter Nathen data sets that basically dot fine. A person, Gino. How do we protect those twenty three in the largest genetic experiments chairman out there has all the date on how we ensure that that data can be protected. At the same time used it implemented to really impact patient healthcare delivery of healthcare. I'm really happy to hear that they're startups. Tackling that problem because I mentioned earlier show that I was speaking at a cybersecurity conference with Elvis Chan who's the San Francisco he leads the FBI cybercrime unit. And we were talking about how traditionally you don't hear of large data theft from a Bank it happens, but not at the scale anthem or some other life science or healthcare firm does. And that really this needs to be addressed. I think it's a great opportunity. So the fact that you're working or see startups in the space. That's a good thing. Yeah. And you mentioned blockchain, I think and the prettiest there's actually several double I talked to you or contact with recently, which are flying blockchain technology to secure a patient data share secure healthcare such a genomic data since I think again this year. I think we're gonna see more and more coming online really exciting. Yeah. And that's great too. I mean blockchain as we've talked about many times on the show getting past the crypto currency. The technology itself has a lot of practical uses and the overuse analogy of early days of the internet. This will become a standard for many things. And we think that patient data is a perfect example of block chain securing that data properly. There's there's still more things to be discovered. But it is a good use case. Absolutely. Wanted to come back to something. We talked about earlier in the show that Harvard innovation labs really supports the ecosystem of Harvard. So if your faculty if your alumni if your student or your within the department ecosystem, you have access to applying for your program, correct. Correct. Yes. Yes. If you are a Harvard, affiliated there there is pretty much type program of which you can become involved within the Harvard. Innovation lab ecosystem, depending on the stage of venture, of course. But but we have a number of programs help the Harvard affiliated community out. And I think that's a great. That's great news because Harvard has a very large ecosystem scale, so this might sound exclusionary or limited. You might have a lot more access than you think. If you have the right paths and partnerships. Yeah. That's absolutely, right. And I mean, we have teams ventures where one Harvard Business School Harvard Medical School, but the rest of the team is for not not. But I mean, these all of those teams they have access here on some way or another and the various insurance. Currently here. Sunday, gone on to really great things. I mean, we all right here again in the middle of Boston and Cambridge and we play a role collaborating with many other entities, universities or industry is teaching partners or the other hospitals, my clients players here. So it was a really is. We're we're in kind of the epicenter as I said the center of the universe. When it when it comes to light, scientists healthcare. All right. Well, thanks in our next segment. Let's talk about some of.

Harvard Harvard Business School Harvar AI Dr Mike fen data theft Keith Dr John Madison Larry Ellison giants Europe United States Boston Louis Gino chairman FBI
"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:28 min | 2 years ago

"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Welcome back to the show. Once again, I have Dr Mike fen who is the head of healthcare and life sciences at the Harvard innovation labs. Welcome again. Mike. Thank you. Thanks for having me. So what I love about Mike's background is it's not just academe Mike has had a full career straddling. Both the academic world and adventure entrepreneur world. And he personally likes to say that he's bridging the gap. And I think it's really powerful to talk about what might have been doing. Now that he's a recent transplant from the beaches of Florida to currently the very cold will the boss, so Mike tell me a little bit more about your background. Yeah. So again, thank you for having me. So my background is pretty diverse. And yeah, like, you said, I think spreads spreads the gamut from academia to the venture and startup world in which is as I said, bridging the gap in quotes. There's something I'm really passionate about working in life sciences. I it's, you know, a lot of the technology is a lot of the really innovative. Stop all come out a research lab. So how could get that to commercialization eight? I is really challenging a lot of inefficiencies. There's a lot of hurdles overcome moving and technology from a research lab in an actual venture. That's something. I thought about my background in in terms of academics. I was previously to inherit Harvard. Innovation lab was a professor of biomedical engineering research lab work on biomaterials for device back optic development. That's all I'm trying to agree bio printing, but I was also working with a number of. In my lab out side of a p startups out of the lab, which is a challenging thing to do from from Gary early stages. Basically of technology or concept, even I and so fun that after working with a number of startups and being relatively acceptable. I offered edition here at Harvard invasion lives. That is to be able to come up here in work did the startup in venture entrepreneurial ecosystem really that is Harvard University. I take focusing on the vertical healthcare and life sciences within the Boston, which is really the epicenter for life science ups in really like science, more, generally. Environment. I have a master's degree in materials engineering, and and probably my studies in chemistry. So I've been all over the place in terms of of where my expertise and experience about me to go in in terms of startups, again focusing a lot on devices and diagnostic platforms mostly really early stage. But now in recent years, I've actually got to see some of these flourishing grill, which has been extremely exciting. That's great. And I think because we've we've hosted other accelerators in innovation labs on our show and all it's a little bit different. I think it'd be great. If you talked about the entire universe of things that you're working on at Harvard because it's a lot of stuff. Yeah. Yeah. It is it is it it's a huge ecosystem here where we didn't have launched in Cambridge echoes for life, scientists, which is, you know, really massive. It is kind of the center of the universe comes to life. Life sciences, particularly farmland by attack may have heard KENDALL square. I now live about five six blocks from square, which is really a pretty amazing but Harvard innovation lab. So so what we are is. Approach for Harvard. We are kind of a number of things where I think Bater a co working space. We have accelerated programs that are fighting later stage companies early later stage some funding and all the support that they possibly need. We also have the the lifelock, which is fifteen thousand square foot wetland incubator, and really we're also just the place for for learning about entrepreneurship and innovation or anyone within the Harvard community. And we support all the different folks involved in that community from undergraduate students with an idea or just maybe interested in what innovation and entrepreneurship might be all the way through companies that are raising series eight hype route and natural really who are here for. All. Right. So my job as the director of healthcare and life sciences is to support all the ventures even a protocol. Companies or ideas again all the way through somewhat later stage in their process of growth development. So it's been really exciting. And I'm really happy to be here. And being part of the Harvard ecosystem is it open to anyone or is it Harvard research students faculty who who who are the typical makeup of the innovators at the Harvard innovation labs. So we we are specifically for harder affiliated students or researchers alumni faculty kind of depending on the stage area adventure. We have several programs that we offer. Of course, the year we have entering debate program, which is ongoing now, which is relatively early stage startups, they may have some funding they may not they may have property, or at least some business model, whatever that might be a work here to help this company, and you get a little bit further along we have a new accelerated program, which is for Harvard alumni, specifically these ventures are typically have some type of funding. They're back with the capital. They have intellectual property. They're actually even selling products in the market generating revenue. Hey, mike. Let's let's let's continue on because we're get that into the next segment. See listening to started with Keith coup. Joined with Mike then.

Harvard University Harvard Dr Mike fen Harvard community KENDALL square lifelock Boston Florida professor Gary Keith Cambridge director
"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Jerry Boyer. Public policy dot dot EDU. This is a special presentation of Silicon Valley insider, which could be heard on our sister station. AM twelve twenty K D O W Fridays at one pm. Now back to Silicon Valley insider once again, your host teeth coup. Welcome back to Silicon Valley insider with key coup today, I'm joined with Dr Mike centers, the director of healthcare and life sciences. Harvard innovation labs. Welcome again light. Me. So for this week cyber tip whether you're a couple curtsy enthusiasts or you plan to become one or you're just interested. This is for you. So I've been reporting on the Canadian crypto exchange Quadra CFCS and how a couple of weeks ago back. They were reported to have lost one hundred ninety million dollars because their CEO and founder was the only one with the passwords, and he passed away suddenly on a business trip in India and the people at the company did not know his passwords to the private keys and therefore couldn't get into it. Now, there's a lot of speculation on what really happened even though the death certificate. Did he died in not die and the entire companies say they have no way of finding these crypto funds and experts all around the world trying to see if it's they can see it moving in and out of exchange somewhere. Well, I'm really not going to talk about that. What's more interesting? An article by. David weissberger..

india founder ceo quadra harvard director today silicon valley pm
"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

10:14 min | 2 years ago

"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Now back to Silicon Valley insider once again, your host Keith to. Insiders. Welcome back to Silicon Valley insider with Keith cou I'm joined today with Dr Mike fen who's the head of healthcare. Life sciences at Harvard innovation labs, thanks for being here. My buddy. So Mike as we always talk about innovation. What are the hot topics in the lie? Scientists space for two thousand eighteen and beyond. Yeah. I think two thousand nine hundred is going to be a really exciting year for life. Scientists I think we're going to be a real growth in the digital healthcare. Second particular. I think we're acting to start seeing some realize they can of a being lamented in more clinical settings or get close game committed more. So in clinical settings and actually having real outcomes increase in in focused on patient. Need a patient Centric care. I think that's an additional thing which is pretty gentle as well to the digital health care. I think we're gonna see continued external innovation by but the major players in the life sciences that is particularly pharma biotechnology. So that that's great. If you're a startup company, which means that as a start up there, you're an potential acquisition target, and they're seeking earlier and earlier stage companies potential acquisitions and expansion and not at an external innovation. I think really exciting for a biotech standpoint. We're gonna see a lot more growth real exciting technologies coming on in terms of cell based technology such as car keys, gene, therapies, antibodies cancer vaccine. I think we're gonna see a lot of really cool stuff actually making it out of wild or sci-fi founding mainly clinic and actually helping patients. Yeah. Thank you very much. Just to continue on that vein of what's hot in two thousand eighteen last year. We had Dr John Madison who's the chief health information officer of Kaiser, and Dr vanilla seeing that she'd been off to the United States on our show also my conference, remember, she technology and Dr medicine and seeing both said that they felt that we're twelve eighteen months away from some significant breakthroughs in life sciences along the things you mentioned, which is like, gene therapy in vaccines for cancer in addition. So those things are actually seeing in Harvard itself. Yeah. Yes, we are. And we actually have some some companies and startups early stage ventures which all born out apps and a top research labs here at Harvard. They're working on gene therapies. Genomic diagnostics on incorporating. A I. In a dance machine learning several regenerative medicine and cell based therapeutics. And so some really exciting stuff. Particularly in the knowledge on colleges space and then also neurology. I like that. I come from the tech world hard life sciences and Larry Ellison had given the keynote a few years back those listening to and he had said, I don't know why people keep innovating on infrastructure and regular technology. That's boring to me, I think people should be investing in life sciences. And it's nice to see how life sciences and technology are now integrated in kind of a joint philosophy. So what I mean is like think you brought up a I artificial intelligence machine learning, and how you find those data sets to then solve for for real problems. Yeah, we have a great point. And actually, I was I was reading the Louis or PWS's. Two thousand nineteen outlook. And and there was a lot of talking kind of hearing about about the tech giant's becoming increasingly all Google ventures. Great example, right best something more than a third. I think of their capital and life sciences, right? And it makes sense again with the digitization of health in any importance of data and all day. I it's really exciting. I mean, I think we're actually some some really impact me out of this. I definitely would that. You know, we we Don. Around a lot especially in healthcare recently. But I think one of the areas that it's gonna get more coverage is actually the data curation not not so much. Yeah. What you can do with AI. But actually, the the data preprocessing before the I is actually apply. Let's see more as well. Well, that leads a good point to talking about the data in the eye. So myself coming out of tech and risk and compliance. We worry a lot about data protection. Banks large cloud based providers. And when I talked to license science or healthcare related companies. Me hip hip. A almost twenty years old. I believe there are certain things built in a hip because we don't have the infrastructure and data in the scale. We have today where companies can interact sharing data about patients or something like that with honestly, less control than a Bank would have run your personal data. But what have you seen if anything around my science startups? How are they struggling or thriving in this kind of heightened awareness around data protection? Yeah. Really right being able to share data very easily and often is really important to being able to creative algorithm. Strange algorithm and be able to improve patient care. But at the same time protecting patients data cybersecurity surrounding life-science healthcare data going back to what you said about hip, alternate new regulations talking about Europe's regulation DVR all of these things are extremely important. And and I mean, right now, you know, there's a lot of companies that are startups focusing on how to protect patient data. There's a lot of work to be done with data coming online is super in data sets that basically dot fine. A person Keno. How do we protect those companies like twenty three more genetic experiments Herrmann out? There has all the date on how we ensure that that data can be protected. But at the same time used to implemented to really impact patient healthcare delivery of healthcare, positively. I'm really happy to hear that they're startups. Tackling that problem because I'd mentioned earlier show that I was speaking at a cybersecurity conference with Elvis Chan who's the San Francisco he leads the FBI cybercrime unit, and we were talking about how traditionally you don't hear of large data theft from a Bank it happens, but not at the scale that anthem or some other life science or healthcare firm does and that really this needs to be addressed. I think it's a great opportunity. So the fact that you're working or see startups in the space. That's a good thing. Yeah. And you mentioned blockchain I think and the previous bit. There's actually several double company that that I talked to you or contact with recently, Richard applying blockchain technology. Did a patient data share scare healthcare day such genomic data. So again this year. I think we're gonna see more and more coming online really exciting time for that. Yeah. And that's great. I mean blockchain as we've talked about many times on the show getting past the crypto currency. The technology itself has a lot of practical uses and the overuse analogy of early days of the internet. This will become a standard for many things. And we think that patient data is a perfect example of block chain securing that data properly. There's there's still more things to be discovered. But it is a good use case. Apple wanted to come back to something. We talked about earlier in the show that Harvard innovation labs really supports the ecosystem of Harvard. So if your faculty if your alumni if your student or your within the department ecosystem, you have access to applying for your program, correct. Correct. Yes. Yes. If you are a Harvard, affiliated there there is pretty much some type of program of which you can becoming balls within the Harvard innovation lab ecosystem, depending on the stage of venture, of course. But but we have a number of programs help the Harvard affiliated community out. And I think that's a great great news because Harvard has a very large ecosystem scale, so this might sound exclusionary or limited. You might have a lot more. You think if you have the right paths and the right partnerships? Yeah. That's absolutely, right. And that I mean, we have teams ventures where we're from Harvard Business School Harvard Medical School the rest of the team is for not not. But all of those teams they have access here in some way or another and the various insurance born that way currently here Sunday gone on to do really great things. So yeah, I mean, we all right here again in the middle of Boston Cambridge, and we play a role collaborating with many other entities, universities or industry is strategic partners or the other hospitals or like minds players here. So it was a really is where we're in kind of the epicenter as I said the center of the universe when it comes to life sciences and healthcare. All right. Well, thanks in our next segment. Let's talk about some of the.

Harvard Harvard Business School Harvar Dr Mike fen Keith data theft Larry Ellison Google Europe United States Boston Cambridge Dr medicine Dr John Madison Louis Herrmann FBI Richard Apple
"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

07:26 min | 2 years ago

"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"And that they will price match those offers if you tell them, but what was really odd coincidental that the TV station tested was that every time the closer to the target every time they drove away from the parking lot. The prices would fluctuate. So just heads up to always check to compare. Persson shopping. And the last piece of news is that the president of the United States signed an executive order, which is aimed at boosting artificial intelligence in the federal agencies in the government. There was a five points in that. And the one I'll mention is that the NIST standard of framework is governing. The artificial intelligence to be adopted by the government, and we've done many shows, and this is just to continue to say that he is going mainstream. And that's the techniques of the week. Welcome back to the show. Once again, I have Dr Mike Finn who is the head of healthcare and life sciences at the Harvard innovation labs. Welcome again. Mike. Thank you. Thanks for having. So what I love about Mike's background is it's not just academics. Mike has had a full career straddling both the academic world and the venture world, and he personally likes to say that he's bridging the gap. And I think it's really powerful to talk about what makes been doing. Now that he's a recent transplant from the beaches of Florida to currently the very cold world the Boston, so Mike tell me a little bit more about your background. Yeah. So again, thank you for having me. So my background is is pretty diverse. And and yeah, like, you said, I think spreads spreads the gamut from academia to the venture and startup world in which is like, I said, bridging the gap in quotes. It's something I'm really passionate about working in life sciences. I it's, you know, a lot of technologies a lot of the really innovative stuff all come down at research lot. So how to get that to commercialization date is really challenging a lot of inefficiencies. There's a lot of hurdles overcome moving and technology from a research lab into an actual venture generate revenue. I have been more about my background in terms of academics. I was previously to stay here at Harvard. Innovation lab was a professor of biomedical engineering research lab work on. For device and back optic development. That's all some work on drug delivery, some work country bio printing, but I was also working with a number of my life. In my lab and outside up. I had watched a piece startups out of the lab, which is again, a challenging thing to do from from Gary early stages, basically, a technology or concept, even and so fun that after working with a number of startups and being relatively accessible. I was offered here at Harvard invasion lives. What you're talking about with that is to be able to come up here in work did the startup in venture entrepreneurial ecosystem really that is Harvard University I particularly focusing on the vertical healthcare life sciences within the Boston ecosystem, which is really the epicenter for life science startup in really liked science, more, generally. So I have a PHD environmental engineering. I have a degree materials engineering and started my studies in chemistry. So I kind of been all over the place in terms of of where my expertise and experience allowed me to go in in terms of startups, again focusing a lot on devices diagnostic platforms mostly really early stage. But now in recent years, I've actually got to see some of these. Flourishing grill, which has been extremely exciting. That's that's great. And I think because we've we've hosted other accelerators in innovation labs on our show and all of it's a little bit different. I think it'd be great. If you talked about the entire universe of things that you're working on at Harvard because it's a lot of stuff. Yeah. Yeah. It is it is it it's a huge ecosystem here where we didn't that Boston Cambridge eco-system for life sciences. Which is you know, really massive it is kind of the center of the universe. Like. Particularly farmland by attack may have heard KENDALL square, and they live about five six blocks from square, which is really a pretty amazing but Harvard innovation lab, so so what we are is for Harvard. We are kind of a number of things where incubating a co working space. We have accelerator programs that that by fighting later stage companies early stage funding and all the sports that they possibly need. We also have the the lifelock lifelock, which is a fifteen thousand square foot Wetli incubator, and really we're also just the place for for learning about entrepreneurship and innovation or anyone within the Harvard community. And we support all the different folks involved in that community from undergraduate students with an idea or just maybe interested in what innovation and entrepreneurship might be all the way through companies that are. Raising series eight hype around, and that's really who are here for. All. Right. So my job is the director healthcare and life sciences is to support all the measures. Even a pro companies or ideas again, all the way through somewhat later stage companies in their process of growth and development. So it's been really exciting. And I'm really happy to be here. And being a part of the Harvard ecosystem is it open to anyone. Or is it Harvard research students faculty who who who are the typical makeup of the innovators at the Harvard innovation labs. Yes. So we we are specifically for Harvard affiliated students or researchers alumni faculty kind of depending on the stage area adventure. We had several programs that we offer. The course of the year, we have an engineering program, which is ongoing now, which is relatively early stage startups, they may have the funding they may not they may have property. Were at least some business model, whatever that might be able to help this company and didn't get a little bit further along we have a new accelerated program for much lab back which is for Harvard alumni, specifically ventures are typically have some type of funding. They're back with the capital. They have much of a property. They're potentially even selling products our the market on generating revenue. Hey, mike. Let's let's let's continue on. We're get that into the next segment. See listening to civilian sided with Keith coup. Joined with Mike then that director of healthcare.

Harvard Dr Mike Finn Boston Harvard community NIST director Persson United States president KENDALL square executive lifelock Florida Boston Cambridge professor Gary Keith Wetli
"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Traffic. I'm Jeff Matthews for eight sixty a m the answer. This eight sixty d answer. Hurry into old navy one day only tomorrow all jeans are fifty percent off. That's right. Get fifty percent off all genes for the family, even your favorite rockstar styles. But hurry, it's tomorrow. Only at old navy and old navy dot com. Valid to sixteen excludes in store clearance sprints gives you the best of both worlds. A network built for unlimited and a great price. Aren't lt. Advanced network is now up to two times faster than before in our total. Lt coverage has increased by thirty percents. There's never been a better time to switch. Visit a sprint stores. Sprint dot com or call eight hundred sprint one and make the switch to sprint today. Mr. compared Fuji LT EMT advanced requires capable device for data covered with roaming coverage. Not available everywhere. Heath coup goes to harbored this week for his guest on Silicon Valley. Insider, Keith interviews, Dr Michael fan who joined the Harvard innovation labs as the new director of healthcare and life science doctor fan overseas early stage, high potential biotech and life science startups, which represent the diversity of the university. Thirty eight percent of the startup ventures have a female founder and seventy percent of the venture's have an international co founder find out more about Harvard's life labs this week on Silicon Valley insider, Saturday morning on eight sixty the answer. Technology truth brought to you by Geico. Truth you,.

harvard silicon valley geico co founder fuji today navy director emt matthews
"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Jeff Knox. Freight sixty sprints gives you the best of both worlds. A network Bill for unlimited and a great price. Aren't lt. Advanced network is now the two times faster than before and our total LT coverage has increased by thirty percent. There's never been a better time to switch. Visit a sprint store. Sprint dot com or call eight hundred sprint one and make the switch to sprint today. Compared to GOP advanced requires a capable device for GOP covered with roaming coverage and offer not available everywhere. I AM The Answer. Teeth coup goes to Harvard this week for his guest on Silicon Valley. Insider, Keith interviews, Dr Michael Finn who joined the Harvard innovation labs as the new director of healthcare in life science doctor van overseas early stage. Potential biotech and license startups, which represent the diversity of the university. Thirty eight percent of the startup ventures have a female founder and seventy percent of the venture's have an international co find out more about Harvard's life labs this week on Silicon Valley insider, Saturday morning at ten on sixty the answer. Santa Clara fans want to be part of a great atmosphere. Edna affordable price now is your chance from single game. In group tickets to even game plan packages, there are pricing options to fit everyone's budget. Come taking the excitement that is Broncos basketball at the Levy center all season long. Don't delay part of the action by visiting us at Santa Clara, Broncos dot com slash tickets that Santa Clara Broncos dot com slash tickets. Go. Goes. The best of Hugh Hewitt coming up at nine now. Larry elder eight sixty AM the answer. All across America. The Larry elder show. Nineteen ninety one you needed guilty to.

Santa Clara Santa Clara Broncos Harvard Broncos GOP Larry elder Jeff Knox Silicon Valley Hugh Hewitt Dr Michael Finn Edna America founder Keith director Levy center Thirty eight percent seventy percent
"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Thank you sports is big business. That includes NFL players who were looking to get into business on their own. Bloomberg's Janet blue is at the Super Bowl in Atlanta. She has this report on some interesting deals being made leading up to the big game for launching in two thousand nineteen with twelve franchises. Located TJ. Geographic markets. These franchises will be IPO to the public for six million dollars a piece we're gonna raise a little over sixty million dollars doing that. No. This isn't a presentation at MIT or Harvard Business School these business pitches are being made at the Super Bowl for third year. The financial arm of the players union is inviting companies to show them their ideas and why they should partner. Here's NFL PA Inc. President Ahmadinejad Sar we have a group of ten companies presenting in front of a group of judges consisting of former NFL players in some other executives investors. Make no mistake. This is serious business. Black rock and Kleiner Perkins. Our founding partners along with Harvard innovation labs were always going to work with the Nikes eletronic arts of the world. But we knew we wanted to be able to work with earlier stage companies as well NFL PA Inc. He does about one hundred and seventy five million in business annually for players with licensing and other deals. Ahmad Lazar explains what they're seeking. We are looking for new partners that we can work with to help grow their business and get paid and to also increase revenue to increase the diversity of companies that we work with. So last year at pitched the winner was a company called opti, which makes an augmented reality products. They're now licence-fee we have an equity stake in the company two years ago. A wearable company called whoop was part of our pitch day. We have an equity position in the company as well. And that that equity position is held on behalf of the players. Tell me a little bit about the deal structure has money been able to come into the players association. We haven't had any exits yet we have nearly ten companies in the portfolio NFL players association,.

NFL NFL PA Inc Kleiner Perkins Harvard Business School Janet blue President Ahmadinejad Sar Harvard Bloomberg Ahmad Lazar Atlanta partner MIT opti sixty million dollars six million dollars two years
"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Or launching in two thousand nineteen with twelve franchises located in key geographic markets. These franchises will be IPO to the public for six million dollars a piece we're gonna raise a little over sixty million dollars doing that. No. This isn't a presentation at MIT or Harvard Business School these. Business pitches are being made at the Super Bowl for third year. The financial arm of the players union is inviting companies to show them their ideas and why they should partner. Here's NFL PA Inc. President Ahmadinejad Sar we have a group of ten companies presenting in front of a group of judges consisting of former NFL players and some other executives investors. Make no mistake. This is serious business. Black rock and Kleiner Perkins. Our founding partners along with Harvard innovation labs were always going to work with the Nikes Electronic Arts of the world. But we knew we wanted to be able to work with earlier stage companies as well NFL PA inquiry. He does about one hundred and seventy five million in business annually for players with licensing and other deals. Ahmad Massara explains what they're seeking. We are looking for new partners that we can work with to help grow their business and get paid. And to also increase our revenue and to increase the diversity of companies that we work with so last year at pitched the winner. Was a company called de which makes an augmented reality product. They're now licensed we have an equity stake in the company two years ago. A wearable company called whoop was part of our pitch day. We have an equity position in the company as well. And that that equity position is held on behalf of the players. Tell me a little bit about the deal structure has money been able to come into the players association. We haven't had any exits yet we have nearly ten companies in the portfolio NFL players.

NFL NFL PA Inc Kleiner Perkins Harvard Business School President Ahmadinejad Sar Harvard Nikes Electronic Arts Ahmad Massara MIT partner sixty million dollars six million dollars two years
"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Plan earlier this month the harvard innovation labs is expanding the sixyearold entrepreneurship center is more popular now than ever before lead number hidden coming car harvard every year by and large dave reclaim but the number of students that are interested in innovation and entrepreneurship continue to increase that's jodie goldstein's he's taking over as executive director for the expansion she says this move is really a continuation effort to scale access and impact serving more student and hopefully alumni in the future it well and then when you talk about being able to scale impact how are we helping them how are we getting them further after increasing their likely hit afflicts fbi lab as it's known will launch a global accelerator program later on this year pairing current students with alumni on solid business ideas even with all the optimism about retailers growth last year and now this year the parent company of tj maxx and marshall's is exploding framing hams tj axeblows away fourthquarter expectations by wall street analysts with close to eleven billion in revenues to close out two thousand seventeen and umass lowell economists scott leith them says tj acts is a master at catering to the customer goldwynmayer know what you're going to get but you do have a level of confidence that you're going to get value i ended up going to be a need experience tidbit from the national retail federation over the holiday season some seven hundred billion dollars in sales above ninety billion of that number is expected to be returned to these retailers by.

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"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:29 min | 4 years ago

"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To persevere to innovate only says that you you tests well with reference to this statement explain whether you think exams have any future oh tony wagner expert in residence at harvard innovation lab beliefs it's time to rethink exams what we're understanding now is that while certain degree of intelligence is obviously important what is more important for adult success wellbeing is grit perseverance self discipline the ability to take initiatives the ability to learn would follow their the ability to work effectively that team empathy these are all qualities employers are increasingly identified as critical for success so today fifteen percent of google goals no hires dole heavily the great all the word college does not even a here on the job was what's the future of assessment as far as your concerned are we going to move away from traditional exams as we know them i think every student should have a digital portfolio the thousands with score and all the way in fact too their first job were they have to regularly present and defend their work where we see evidence of progress over time beyond the orange free a series of merit badges they're really show proficiency gamblers the cities let us a third harrison's memorize say the periodic table chemistry will not i own is totally useless waste of time that i for him we should rather say we want you to develop a hypothesis we want you to the design experiment to test the hypothesis we what should the results and we want you to represent and defend the findings publicly that sats mss on any him on issue his why should we test anything that is soon can look up in a narrow second on their smartphone whether it's a mathematical formula or a and members of apart of speech or whatever is if you can look at of the south on why tested artists stunned by that can't google stuff if you don't understand what it is you try to google you can't make sense of the research results if you don't already know.

harrison tony wagner harvard google fifteen percent
"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on Suiting Up with Paul Rabil

Suiting Up with Paul Rabil

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"harvard innovation labs" Discussed on Suiting Up with Paul Rabil

"Uber and i will be wearing home social media social media do i do i've twitter instagram snapchat score score sports you probably don't know about s q r got absolutely no okay yeah you do actually i learned about that from brett of an old teammate of mine a friendlier than say twitter like twitter every nfl guy when you get on the bus after a game you just you fight this temptation to i look at my mentions on twitter post game as assuming that's after a matters that has been nfc player of the week in like he look at you mentioned but played i bat poorly uttering played poorly in the first quarter and it's like oh it's terrible take two weeks off and quit know like all that and then way worse actually and then by the end of his love you same person usually so anyway scores little friendlier it's like for people that are actually the avid fan like a fan rooting for you and your team and even whether or not they want to interact with you they love seeing you interact with other players opponents teammates sports whatever so i like that it's new so it's still working out some kinks its new year's participating as you invest advising maybe ambassador may say is kind of a fan of it fan idea so i've noticed is disclosure at the harvard innovations lab for a conference and everyone here is like trying to pull you in one direction other to probably embassador their platform he has a lot of that yes he just try to pick the things that you're actually passionate about ryan and also the people that you like i was with some guys yesterday i thought that a great idea love their concept i would by their concept in a store on an app or whatever and it didn't necessarily.

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