2 Burst results for "Harvard Graduate School of design"

"harvard graduate school design" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

10:29 min | 9 months ago

"harvard graduate school design" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"On their own and might end up sort of stuck and if the government can come in and say we're going to pay for your home and then you're going to leave. They may not want to. They may not like it but at the very least it will not be financially devastating for them uh when they can better than having them just stay in. You know I think this is these are philosophical questions that society has to have and I think in the paper. You talk about that but I I just think this notion of this I I think what you're sort of encouraging to is like we're sort of this experimental phase and you did mention. We need to get started on the sooner rather in later in that means actually today but this notion of really this this high level four will the government and and I really do love the the association with evacuation nation. Because you know. There's there's so much precedent for looking at how we evacuated areas right. And what laws. How did how was their federal state? Local government integration and local. Go police officer and it just seems there's talk about teamwork and some areas. Do it better than others. I think Florida to their credit has had so much experience and they do it relatively well and so when a hurricane hits any loss of life is obviously tragic but oh five people ten people and that's why I think New Orleans there was. There was such a catastrophic level to just weren't used to it. They just didn't weren't ready whereas Florida. Here's a here's an example of an integrated system it minimize the amount of people that died in the storm event and we gotta take that approach with managed retreat. And that means. That's my next pivot for you. We'll see what you have to say about this. No one really wants to admit this but president trump Really had to go there. Listen I'm not getting to politics too much but this this open the door when it when it comes to emergency declarations that's right. He has used that power in ways that most of us are. Are you crazy out and abuse of power but some the courts have upheld. Some things things that he's doing on what we think are not appropriate topics but let's say when it comes to issues like managed retreat. Well okay. Maybe we need to take it to to that level of emergency declarations. Where you're having this sort of really high level power come into play instead of falling instead of sort of this voluntary terry approach to doing things? It's like how serious are we around this issue. And maybe that is a regulatory mechanism. That should be honored and again this is fraught with. Oh Oh well you know. CIDERS has taken this position on trump. Now this is philosophical discussion of powers in the the ability to overcome bureaucracy. And and taking an issue more seriously as well. Okay an emergency declaration around managed retreat. Should we do it. I don't know if I support an emergency declaration around miniature treat treat major treat in the US right now already happens in places where presidential declarations of disaster disaster declarations have occurred so there's already a recognition that these are major disaster areas and what we need is some guidance from the federal government that once that major disaster has occurred rebuilding is not going to be the priority. It's going to be building in a different way. And I do think we need federal policy on this and federal guidance. On this and I'd love to see Congress actually take action on this. Because he's going to require. I think more than just one executive but actually really coordinated and slightly more democratic process process about what we want the coast to look like in the future in part of the pondering of using an emergency declaration for managed retreat. I'm sure a lot of the existing. I think that you just described what kind of come into play anyways. How would it be really that different but to me? The sort of the awareness of building the benefit of this is really serious. Look what the president has done. Who knows you know again? It's sort of like communicating the issue at a broader level. Just getting everyone to start thinking about it differently and so so I I again. There's issues of power and all that but at some point all of us are going to be like climate change is serious. We're GONNA start taking it serious and a first step step to that might actually be to have our political leaders not themselves own or live in flood prone areas. That could be a first step even before in some federal decorations any show. You're serious don't buy build or live in the flood plain. That would be one way of showing that you're serious about this issue good we touched upon emergency declarations. I I had to kick it off on my box so I I think we're in the final zone here but I wanted to pivot again and talk about some of these solutions and some things that you're working on but there was a big managed retreat workshop at Columbia University in the early summer. And I got to go for like the the introduction of it but I didn't get stick around for all the presentations and stuff but what was that workshop. All about Columbia University hosted a retreat workshop shop so at what point managed retreat and actually they had a hundred and fifty presentations on men's retreat Related issues which was fantastic one of the the most frequent comments. I heard People Act. The conference was actually surprise that there were a hundred and fifty people working on these issues. Because it's it is really the in emerging area so it was incredibly encouraging to see so many people working on his efforts the number of times. I've had to answer you today with. We don't know yet right. We need smart people working on these issues. In order to fill in those gaps so that future efforts can learn from those successes and failures and data points so there are all kinds of presentations on the the legal aspects economic pieces presentations from the insurance industry. Presentations from community members indigenous leaders all different kinds of perspectives. On Army's retreat should happen. Could happen could be done better in the future. We'll have to wander around a little bit during the break. Time at really was kind of A. Who's who of some of these? The people people doing work related to this. It was just a treat talking to all these folks but now that you've been involved and I think you deal with a Wide University of people in this area who was kind of missing. I actually. Yeah Joa Ajibade and I are putting together a book proposal on finding the unheard voices of manage retreat because there are a lot of communities who are not being heard right now on these topics which includes artists poets photographers. It includes heritage managers climate heritage heritage people who are thinking a lot about relocation or how you document things that can't be saved or moved we need more community leaders to give more perspectives from the local area engineers who actually are involved in relocating lot of the infrastructure and the buildings that can be done landscape architects. How do we use the land ecologists? How do we use the land? Afterwards in beneficial way at religious leaders faith organizations who are helping communicate these issues with people and helping them deal with the community location. An minister treat is wonderful and complicated because it touches on so many aspects of our lives and so almost everybody needs to be at the table. The doctors psychologists mental health aspects that health aspects of relocation educators for the school systems this kind of endless. So really the answer answer. Everybody needs to be at the table. And so we're still missing a lot of voices in that discussion encouraging step. You've talked about some of the solutions that need to happen. A lot of it has to do with just reforming existing. Things like how FEM- operates and such but new things that can come out. I don't know if you've had a chance to kind of ponder for this but does the green new deal legislation address management treat even Indirectly is an opportunity there. I haven't seen anything on mandatory. Read the green new deal. It was really encouraging at the climate town hall and some of the conversations to hear presidential candidates acknowledged that this might be an issue in the future. It's a huge change. From when we heard you know rebuild back build back stronger through those rallying cries to go to move from that into a conversation or say yes some areas we might need to retreat at some point in the future. Let's start planning for that so I haven't seen it in a green new deal but I think it's starting to emerge and we need more emphasis on the the just transition conversation. A lot of discussion about dress just transitions in the green new deal and how we're going to help people transition from a mitigation standpoint point but we also need a conversation about just transitions when we think about adaptation when we think about transitioning the entire coast or river front properties and doing something completely different with that space needs to be a conversation from how we get from our current standpoint which is not equitable into a future standpoint that we hope is equitable title. And how do we make that transition. Just so I think a lot we can learn from the green new deal even if it doesn't mention injuries specifically okay before we get to the stage of declaring emergencies sees regards retreat. In one of your papers you talk about creating a grand vision for managed retreat in this idea of national seashore was brought up. Could you explain that this is the idea that resented Elkin at Harvard. Graduate School Design in. I have been kicking around. And it's this idea that managed retreat can't be about leaving even it has to also be about going somewhere else and so you need to give people positive vision. Why should we relocate from our beachfront properties? Why should we go somewhere else? And one idea is to create a national seashore so the idea is to imagine the US coastline and imagine one football field. Two football fields two hundred yards worth of open public beach. Everyone can access the beach. Everyone can go there. Everyone can fish sit. Sit on the sand. Whatever people want to do but no one will live or build their Sabih incredibly public access but without putting people at harms in harm's way and we propose this idea? I'm saying two hundred yards. The reality is it might be twenty yards in Manhattan and it might be two miles Dell's in some rural coastal areas but to have some kind of buffer and to have that buffer be dedicated public space so that everybody could be reconnected with the ocean and everybody can have access to use the land in a good way. Yeah I like it It people need a purpose instead sort of that sort of a purpose of how we're GONNA use the coast in this transition. Time would be awesome..

"harvard graduate school design" Discussed on The Design of Business - The Business of Design

The Design of Business - The Business of Design

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"harvard graduate school design" Discussed on The Design of Business - The Business of Design

"You know? I grew up in a place that was, you know, there were plenty of conservative people and plenty of liberal people. But I would say we'd come together on how unwise it was to build your house in. Flood plain Suzanne and Drake is the founder of deland studio, a landscape architecture and urban design firm has worked on bourbon infrastructure and public spaces in New York City and around the country. Susannah, welcome to the podcast. Thank you for having me. Susanna where did you grow up and your memories of that place influence the way you work? Now, I actually grew up in Norwich Vermont, and I would say that spending a lot of time out in nature had a huge influence on my future career where did you like to spend your time? Well, I'm the fourth girl in the family the youngest. So I just spent a lot of time out in nature by myself. So I would explore the forests and the play in the streams and damn the the little waterways that were around my house and learned a lot about hydraulics. I would say. Through that process. And and I also spent a lot of time horseback riding with my sisters through the landscape as well. So I started to understand for some of the patterns that existed and how they would change across the seasons. And also crossed the decades when you went to undergraduate school, you went to Dartmouth I did and was it by then a foregone conclusion to you that you would end up in some creative part of the world. Well, not necessarily. I I wasn't initially planning to study art or architecture or our history, but I did have one class with John Collier, who is an engineering professor and Peter Roby who was a an industrial designer, and they came together, and they taught this class called design thinking, and I would say that was one of the first times that I recognized that everything that people make is designed and did you go straight from Dartmouth? Integrates core. Did you work? I I actually worked. I I worked for a company that made three dimensional displays for trade shows that was my first job, but it really wasn't the right fit. And so after saying there for very brief period of time. I moved back home and ended up getting a job with an architect. And that really seemed like the right profession for me knew we were constantly solving unique problems. It was really super interesting. The problems ranged in scale from the design of a neighborhood down to the design of of say a doorway. And I thought that was something that could keep me excited as a career and actually that in that same job an issue of progressive architecture came to the office, and it was all about landscape architecture, and I thought well, that's amazing. You know, that's what I wanna do as a landscape architect I can create landscapes. And I started to understand that again the. Gapes around us are not they're created somebody's doesn't mind. Exactly. And so I also noticed in this article that a lot of the landscape architects were in San Francisco, so I basically picked up and moved and I didn't have job, and I didn't have a place to live, and I slept on somebody's couch, and San Francisco and San Francisco, and I took a class at Berkeley in landscape architecture design and applied to grad school, and I really didn't think I'd get in. But but then I got in. So I decided to do both architecture and landscape architecture at at the Harvard graduate school design you shuttle between those two departments actively. I mean, what's how would you describe the difference between the two them?.

San Francisco Dartmouth Susannah deland studio Norwich Vermont New York City Susanna Harvard Peter Roby Suzanne founder John Collier Drake Berkeley professor