20 Episode results for "Harvard Club"

Whole Hearted: Ep. 215

Unorthodox

1:17:08 hr | 1 year ago

Whole Hearted: Ep. 215

"Appreciate appreciate like a short Hershey for she ate it. Appreciate it there you go. This is Unorthodox University leading Jewish podcast. I'm your host Mark Oppenheimer Anaheim our joined this week by another host tablets senior writer. Liel Liebowitz hello to you you lying. Doug Face Pony soldier. Oh isn't that the greatest I word ever cody soldier. This Joe Biden thing I did not. Did you call someone a pony soldier. A very lovely moment. Ask them very innocuous question. He turned around and said No. You didn't you lying dog faced pony soldier. Wow then she was like what he's like. It's woman old. John Wayne move was like no. It's not every single John we you literally. It was big in Delaware that instead slander. That's slur was big in Delaware. The nineteen fifty. It was a pre talkie. That's got to the president just for the Retro Quality. Just just to take us back in time Lille and I are alone in the studio today. Stephanie has jury duty so it's just only al to celebrate. Celebrate the upcoming hog known to the gentiles. Valentine's Day is revelatory. Yeah that's right Ed. We will be speaking with some people who know something about Love Seduce today. They are among others. We're going to have the cast members of the web series soon by you about dating in the modern Orthodox world how carp when our favorite guests from the apology episode came to our live in Cincinnati to tell us a very very special story. And then if you like hearing US whisper sweet nothings into your ear. Buds wait until Oh you hear the lovely singing voices in our interview with cantorial student. Jacob Sandler yes he gets US singing. We really do put you in the Mood for love. This is love is in the air in twenty twenty s as the corona virus. But Hey you win some you lose so the the updates on our lives. Stephanie is currently only doing civic duty during jury duty somewhere in the five boroughs Stephanie was in Scotch Plains New Jersey having a great event there a few days ago Maybe we'll we'll get the update next week. Leo You're in the motherland right. I was in beautiful Israel. Why for my grandmother's one year as a memorial service? Yeah Had a chance to sit and study some Tomlin with my Gerke Hassett cousins. I dearly love and again you know. We're often kind of like you know funny about these matters here but every now and then I really do get the urge to be sincere when I sit with people who you would think we have absolutely nothing uncommon. But then you realize we are truly literally and metaphorically speaking family and when we get together that love that connection is completely puttable we have spent very a little time talking about the fact that you're related to Garros So how did these are first cousins of yourself. I Costa who went. Who Went Garrard in your family? My Grandmother's sisters Shula Married Girl Haas. Okay this is a particular sect of Hasidim. What is there? What's the What their vibe? Like what what makes Gerhardt's put it like this cafe after the memorial service writing grandmother. Someone was talking about a person who's become about Shuba who's found religion later in life and became a gir- haas acid and one of my cousins who is Haas it said really no one becomes Bolshevik becomes a hostage and I asked why not and my cousin said well. Because it's it's perfectly fine to be like a really religious Jew and not go all the way to where we are. Why would you ever do the house? We have no choice right. Mind way you ever come here. It's so interesting I don't have any Cassini blackadder's any Haredi in my family I have modern orthodox cousins in Israel whose parents my mother's first cousin hasn't her husband actually were leaders of the conservative movement in Israel but then there's not much of a conservative movement in Israel so if you grow up kind of conservative conservative acts like observant conservative but if you SORTA got a pick or are you going secular going modern Orthodox and they're you know they're orthodox but I don't know of anyone who's like got the hat and the beard. It's a great a crying. Shame you have Hasidic material written all over your basically and this is the thing that I I kind of realized this week. 'cause we were hanging we were talking and at some point. The conversation vacation got kind of really elevated. And then I thought you know moved to dial like three clicks to the right and we're talking about Cherry Garcia Right in one thousand nine hundred. Seventy right eating shrimps and the bus and the way to Monterrey. That's kind of the VIBE. Yeah really the essence of not just observing the strict strict interpretation of the law but really trying to find this motionless spiritual connect mystical court to it would love to. I WanNa hang with your gear custom in cousins or Greg. I had a slightly different experience but in its way no less mystical by the way while you're talking about Jerry Garcia on the bus. Were you on the conference call when I when we were all doing like a pre show Oh crap and Rebecca. My thirteen year old was in the car and she was saying Dad. Can you explain the the grateful dead to me which is a really deep question because you know I could say I mean. I think we'd been listening to uncle. John's John's Bander Casey Jones. Or something you've come on. Come on the playlist in the car and I could say well it's a it's a group from about nineteen sixty seven to nineteen. Ninety give is playing the debt side. But I could give you the Brownie right and you'll eat it thirty five minutes you'll understand everything about this man. I mean I. It's really hard to say because it's so much more than a band to six never made sense to me before I try them on. Meet cliche thing to say. One is a grateful dead. The second is tennis and attended attended. I'm like wait until you understand. 'em This is a great game. I just have to move my eleven right. I'm so into this now. I add my own mystical experience in Wia missing in Pennsylvania and a bunch of people came like they'd set up fifty chairs. Forty five of the chairs were were filled with super curious. Interesting people of all ages a young rabbi from Lebanon Pennsylvania brought his twenties and thirties. Group is like young singles of which there were five or six and they were super into it and they listen to the show and they wanted copies the book and it was magical. The Jewish Cultural Committee organizes their author series was three people. None of whom was is Jewish. Okay one of them was Nancy Russo. WHO's married to to Paul something? Jewish and Nancy is is Italian Catholic by upbringing. The main woman the director of cultural life for the Jewish nation is Amanda Hornberger. Whose husband is like something German Lutheran? She herself grew up. Congregational est she's on the vestry of her united the Church of Christ Congregational Church. I've always said that the congregation great out and there was a local librarian named John who grew up in Baltimore where he did sixteen years of Catholic school and then went off to college college. I mean literally none of these people even guys. Every time we meet a gentle on our show it turns out there a quarter Jewish. These people like zero Jew in them and yet they are keeping the Jewish heart beating y missing Pennsylvania. They were interested they were curious they're booking good authors. They're running great programs. The people they bring in Inter asking smart questions Jews by choice we had a convert. who showed up a Sherry came and said thank you for your your help on my journey? The podcast has been meaningful to me. gentile L. spouses of Jews. Why a missing? Pennsylvania was among the greatest afternoons of my life is how it ought to be how it ought to be. Whatever New York like fucking fucking A.? Y. A. Missing Pennsylvania it there. Are Jews starve reading. The News starts reading this and I want to see even today do an event at the Barnes and Noble in Union Square. And you'll get fifty fifty three people and I go to why missing and get forty and in town. That's probably like twelve thousand people get numbers you get. People are truly engaged truly engaged and so grateful full end their listeners and the ones who aren't listeners could become listeners I it was it was magical. Speaking of Magic Amazon is somehow making the Nazis disappear in news to the Jews. This this week we learned from the New York Times about that Amazon is and I quote quietly canceling its Nazis over the past eighteen months. The retailer has removed books by David. Duke a former the leader of the Ku Klux Klan as well as several titles by George Lincoln Rockwell founder of the American Nazi Party Amazon also prohibited volumes like the ruling elite the Zionist seizure of world power and and history of central banking and the enslavement of mankind from its virtual shelves. What are we think of Amazon? Taking strong hand Nazi literature out of its store. You're I'm not down with it. I'm not either tell you. Because here's the thing. Once you at a major conglomerates start making judgment calls about what is and is is not permissible for its captive audience to read. I think you're sorta screwed actually kind of a free speech absolutist in this way like yes I want everyone three David Duke Doc if only because once you do unless you're total frigging maniacal moron. You'd understand that this is absolute drivel. Actually want like free copies and like every this show be like. Hey guys here you go and try to get your way through mine com- If you can't get twelve pages into it. It's the most boring stuff you'll ever find. The beginning is funny. The middle sags the characterization gets gets a little thin toward the ad still never figured out how it ended. I never read it. No but really like do I really want Amazon making this call them. Why not the next up being like well you know This type of ideology is also quite offensive to us in history is in the type of thing we want people to read. You can imagine agenda that you can imagine where it goes very quickly to Jews in the Middle East or Zionist saying. We don't WanNa read you know the Hamas Charter and Palestinian activists saying we don't want to read. This spoke about the founding of Israel. I mean it's all of a sudden you've a lot of people who authentically believe that they are keeping genocidal literature out of the hands of other people saying what people can and cannot read and you add in the fact that Amazon really does have a kind of monopoly power. What we're reading? Yeah and find the these days of elsewhere. I'm not down with this this at all and and it's not because again your point that when you spend time with Nazi thinking it you realize what drivel it is having interviewed White Supremacist Neo Nazis. They're pretty boring uninteresting. Not just that. The thing I love about talking to White Supremacists the Nazis which I've also done on occasion is their concept of the the level of Jewish Command Organization. Have you ever been uninsured committee meeting. That's even decide what to do for the kit. It is for like two like no. We're totally incompetent. Just like the rest of the world. They'll take their volumes atomic off the shelves and like open tractatum like like Moron and say like you see this line here which has juicer supposed to dominate. That's what Jews are taught in school. Think we which Jews are these who are learning how many members school a the one percent of one percent attentive American Jews. Do spend days arguing. Just say one sentence in the red. Oh they think we're very impressive and you know where you find some of those Jews. Well one fewer of them at the Harvard Harvard Club my favorite story fewer of them. You're who the New York Post reports that Vanessa. The Levin aged twenty eight has been expelled from the Harvard Club now. Of course as a Yale man this story is just. You're loving this story. She attended a call. Your Friend Jones e. from skull and bones feel like cheerio boys logos Kosovan Vanessa. Levin aged twenty attended event last year at the Harvard Club called the Hundred Years War in Palestine L. A. Stein it was electrified Rashid Khalidi. She claims that she sat peacefully. And then during the Q.. And A. Session asked how Mideast peace could be achieved. Palestinians are taught quote to support terrorism against using Susan Israelis. According to the near post the audience erupted in mob like fury at her queering. According to the lawsuit she has filed. Why did she file a lawsuit? Well according to her version of Events Harvard Finance Finance Professor Forest Mussa saw called her a whore in Arabic and grabbed her by the arm bruising. It as he tried to take the microphone. According to court papers she was then followed out by audience members shouting to get her. She filmed the incident and posted it on facebook. It seems to be that what upset the Harvard Club then was that she refused to take down the facebook video thus violating the sanctity city of their Harvard nece and the board of trustees demanded she take it down when she refused. They expelled her and she is now suing the Harvard Club. Now The New York Post is is not say if Vanessa Levine went Harvard and I know that the L. Club who's extremely good water pressure showers once enjoyed as a young recent graduate New York. I've never felt water. Pressure like the water pressure in the showers by the squash court pressure. You felt that the the the water pressure Yell Club but based based on what I know about all of these clubs. They're not bursting at the seams with with members. They are like elite clubs everywhere. They've had to loosen the membership requirements. A little bit to get member. Pursuade Yell at the Oakland for example there now much less rigorous about when you have to wear a jacket to eat in the grill room and I believe they even combined with like Dartmouth Club in l.. Look not the don was called Chevrolet so these clubs were inviting other clubs with other other pedigrees. Shall we say to merge with them and use their spaces and so you now might encounter people at the club who do not themselves have yellow. Diplomas I I don't know if that's what's happened at Harvard smelling salts outrage so my question is did Vanessa with one s Levin even attend and Harvard and Radcliffe colleges or was she an interloper whose money they were taking but whom they were happy to be rid of not interested in the opinions communists. I have researched the actual rules for Harvard Club members show but rather get the angry mail from Harvard. Alumnus about this story is like hits a perfect sweet spot for me. It's like everything that I find stupid about America a about a particular subsection of life versatile really why are are you going to events with titles like the hundred year war. I'm like there's so much shit on Netflix Israeli grade book. I know they're nice people out there. Don't don't go to an advantage advantage to ask like an outrageous question number one number two really like the Harvard Club. I gotTa tell you though it. That's what the Harvard and Yale Clubs. Is there right near Grand Central Station and again the Yale Club. The water pressure showers Leo. It would flay the skin off your back. It would change everything would change. You've ruined every other shower. Ever only going to be a part of his Kish disclosed Vanessa. Levin should have been on the upper west side twenty years ago living the beautiful pre-nine Eleven sprightly love infused existence assistance of Ed Norton Ben Stiller Gentleman in the movie keeping the faith. Now you'll remember a few weeks ago you and Steffi night we agreed we were going to have a film called. We're going to watch this movie. which is one one of the great Jewish movies of all time It's the story of two friends. Rabbi and a priest Ben Stiller Edward Norton who reconnect with an old friend from childhood with. WHO's growing up into this? Great beauty played by Jan Elf men and love triangular hijinks ensue revisiting. This movie Lille Bentzion Shlomo Yoshua o'malley Liebowitz Liebowitz. What did you think it broke my heart? I was so profoundly sad. I arrived at the city shortly before the events depicted in in this year. Movie take place and I. I really couldn't help thinking how it captures a reality. That is completely alien to the way we live today. People call each other on the phone then they have meetings in person if something goes wrong and you want to talk about it in life. You don't tweet about it. You actually go to a friend's apartment and and you sit there and you have all these lovely late night. Confessions no-one intended the upper west side is robust. There are no stores that are shuttered because the Internet There's no kind of you know existential. Fear and dread that seeped into the city after nine eleven it is just a testament to to hope to humanity to connection to the possibility of faith to transform lives. It seems like a document from another century and in a sense it really is at the fact that one of the running gags is how they mocked Elf men because he carries a little cellphone around like that was the moment when cell phones. Were first becoming a thing and I remember getting my first one thinking you know and I I think I told myself it was a financial decision it was cheaper than having a landline. And I I was doing some traveling for my graduate school work and it was GonNa let me keep in touched on the road and even remember the last phone number. I ever learned because once you get cellphone records you know what's the point of it was John Pitt. partner at Williams and Connolly former roommate of mine. I don't know his phone number now. I guess I guess some years later I learned my wife's phone number and then my daughters and that's it and it really was a time where yes. The whole premise of the movie is they all live near each other on the upper west side and therefore can get together to fight out all of these Dramas that their lives are playing out and they have to do it. They have to cry at each other's shoulder and they have to. When when Edward Norton gets upset by the turn things are taking he goes to a bar even the fact that like? He's drunk in the bar crying to the bartender. Looks like such an anachronism such an actress. The person who made this movie. This really is one of the greatest films of the last thirty forty years. The person made this movie. I think thought he was making religious movie inasmuch as it was about these. You know this relationship between the Rabbi and the priest I think what actually we ended up taking from it vis-a-vis vis-a-vis religion twenty years. Later is the fact that for spirit to survive at all. You need precisely that you need to be able to sit at the bar and talk to. The bartender need to sit on the couch with your friend and cry for hours. You need all these things that life post Internet simply makes if not impossible the really really unlikely and really like I felt post human watching this meeting realizing how much was lost in the last years made me deeply depressed and I don't think I'm just being kind out of like you know. Middle aged man hotdogs cost a quarter. It really felt like a teaching. It's terrific movie and it was. It was a terrific movie Middle aged man right. I completely agree with you and but when I talked to my college students or when I talked to my kids about it they they don't disagree they they watch a movie like this and they know exactly exactly what I'm talking about and which is why in fact. I'm meeting increasing numbers of undergraduates. Who I work with? Who are off social media? I mean they have their phones but they're trying to reclaim claim something of that analog existence and finally say it takes religion seriously. It's not reverend but it's serious and I think that's really cool. I would love to get Stuart Blumberg. Who wrote this movie on the show? He's made a few movies since If Interest Stuart Blumberg Connection Lake Drop us a line. And meanwhile J. Crew. Your assignment is still bill. If you haven't yet go keeping the faith and then send us a note about it. There's been a lot of facebook chatter about it. We want your mail. UNORTHODOX A tablet MAG DOT COM or call. Nine one four five seven zero four eight six nine nine a Uh Soon Bhai you is a scripted. Web Series by and about Orthodox Jewish millennials. Trying to find love or at least lost in the big city it has been described as a Jewish version of friends. which is exactly how you would sell it to my daughter? Rebecca who's watched although honestly twice is so so much better but I love French. Keep saying I love friends so I to me. That's a high compliment anyway. Take both. They'll take whatever we give. And this season the second season they move into some super contested territory as they introduced Queer Orthodox characters. We are thrilled to welcome From soon by Danny Hoffman Gottfried. Thank you for coming on. Orthodoxy are having having are gentiles of Jewish. So let's start with this. First episode of the new season tells the story the one we just released his the second episode of the second season. We've I've always surrounded. Our episodes around six characters are Orthodox and live in New York City. And this time For this episode we meet one of our main characters siblings. Who Do we find out a little bit through the episode spoiler spoiler alert? Pause the podcast episode of You have could you please play these spoiler alert music there. Thank you very much Josh. we find out a little bit through the episode that this Characters Actors Sibling is gay and we meet him as well as a friend of his. WHO's also a gay woman and we learned a little bit about them their experience and these two organizations that we partnered with to make this episode Q.? and Shell who are very involved in the Jewish gay communities communities. It's something we've been thinking about for a really long time and we really wanted to do it in an authentic way. We recognize that it wasn't our experience and much of this show so far has been from our experience in our lives so it was really important to us to partner with these organizations in order to you know create a story that makes sense for them and is important for them to get across really just amplifying. Their voices is our goal so so I assume that once you started doing the show and getting really big. I know a lot of people who are really mega fans of the show them big craft show myself. I assume that the pressures of representations right began being thing. I assume a lot of people came to you and said hey man you know. It's really nice that you did this. Dating scene lighthearted CETERA. But it's time to talk about some of the more contentious issues let's talk about. LGBTQ modern Orthodox people did it. Did it happen this way. We actually got it in from all directions. Directions are characters very much in the way that lay and I and the other producers and actors grew up which is modern Orthodox and we were it was pointed out to us that that is a very very narrow representation of Jews in general that we were kind of only showing our own experiences and people are like well you can show him where she experiences. Yeah but that's but that's what artists stew off it as they work from their own experiences. There's nothing wrong with that. I don't know that much. Except that as a Jew journalist I've learned a lot about it but growing up I knew nothing about modern orthodoxy. Like what if you gave me a show that was just modern orthodoxy that would be a world unto itself that I would never know so why I don't know did. Did you kind of feel like wait. A second we're doing a thing that actually is represented almost nowhere else in American culture. That was really what made me create. The show is because I didn't see this representation anywhere else and it was my experience and I thought it was so interesting and so fascinating fascinating for other people to kind of get a look into this subculture and I think the purpose was to show this kind of Niche Group of people and they're not really shown anywhere anywhere else it was. It was very much inspired by the Israeli shows through Jim which was about one orthodox Jews dating in Israel and like for me seeing that I felt like wow I had never seen this world world portrayed before and we wanted to bring that to New York and the states and explore that world. I think that what people connected to. Where there's there's not this content about these other parts of Judaism these other representational groups of Judaism and they saw us and they said we'll that's close to who I am but if not exactly why don't you include some more people and I think from artistic expression this is who the stories are about our experience but they don't have people doing that for their experience and they'd like us to do that for them as aw they should do that kind of built in challenge there? I think because you know if you look at so much of the progression of American sitcoms in the last twenty thirty years a a lot of it has its own kind of grammar and it's fast in many cases. It's Glib it is often built around these minute misunderstandings and other kind of just ephemera and here you're describing the lives of a community that by definition to be too cute about it answers to a higher calling. It has a different set of ideas ears that inspire and move it so I'm interested in how that comes into play. When you're writing the shows that I can feel it kind of in the background but I wonder when you writing getting these episodes if you think about rather than just okay well you know the characters are GonNa do x and Y and Z and the interactions and relationships are going to work in this way and it's going to be really really funny? Oh remembering all the while that will one of them's a rabbi. And they all have something that terrorism together that is more than just the friends paradigm paradigms of like. Oh were young attractive and happen to live in the same building. Yeah I think that's exactly it just because coming from a place of where we are because we are similar to those characters in that way. Hey it kind of just seeps into the work naturally because a lot of it is from our experiences and from the world around us that we see but honestly like we didn't go into it thinking about that so much we just wanted to tell stories about modern orthodox Jews and just really humanize them in a way where anybody watching can relate to what they're going through and can relate to the the emotions and the desires and the loneliness and the isolation in certain ways and the fact that they're orthodox Jews in the fact that they do you know sort of have this higher calling as you you said just makes it more interesting but that was never like the goal to kind of explain orthodoxy or anything that was just like who cares but but I I still wonder I mean when you watch curricular secular American television. Is there a part of you. That looks at ince's my God man. This cultures completely decimated I as is a fan of the secular American television and prolific watcher. That's sort of what modern orthodoxy is. Orthodox people who love the right and to be honest the only reason I think because we watch. TV that's the only reason are able to make our version of that. I don't find myself thinking like Oh there needs to be more Jewish value in these episodes. A lot of the drama comes from things that might not necessarily come up in Orthodox Jewish dating. And that's what's right for that show. That's not what would be right for our show. I do come at it with the thought of incorporating Jewish values but not like overtly and not in your face but just naturally through who these characters are and that I think to me is in general how I see myself as a writer and a filmmaker and Unorthodox person who is writing TV and film and everything just sort of naturally having those values seep into into my work yes is for entertainment and entertainment sake but I also see a higher calling to all of that and really for God's sake and for the sake of bringing more light into the world through through entertainment and through fun. I am astonished at how few shows have any meaningful depiction of any religiosity Jewish Christian Muslim. Like you can watch all all of NBC ABC and CBS and find almost nobody who ever says like. Oh I'll meet you after church. It doesn't even exist in the country that by some counts. It's like forty forty percent evangelical Christian. It's not just a Jewish thing. It's that Hollywood really is determinedly. It is run by secularist and journalism is well media really is run by secularists. Do fuel resistance from the media. Community is filmmaker. You're like the only filmmaker you know except the people you work on the show with whoever goes to religious of any kind I bet well I would challenge that actually. Yeah I think there are can't come on my pocket too late. There are so many incredible filmmakers. Who are doing just that? And maybe they're not like fully completely mainstream yet they're out there and so many of my mentors and idols and people that I look up to our religious filmmakers who are creating powerful work and and people want to see that and people want to see that more. And that's something that I want to change and I want to bring more of not just with this work but with other work also because like you said there are so how many people whose experiences are not being represented and who are kind of just like they don't exist in the world of of film and TV. And I think especially now with the the industry kind of being more open to diverse voices. I think it's a good time to kind of slip in and change that right. Which is why my my favorite scene in this episode? We've been talking about is trying arranged the governing on a boat fantastic but let me ask you this on on a very personal note. You've started to show some years ago right right. How many years four or five years ago you were all in different places in your lives back? Then we've had you on the show earlier and some things might have happened to. That's a Maybe changed your perspective lives since our lives have changed definitely since we started. I was already married when we started doing the show. But I am now a father which is a definitely definitely a big massive change in my life and let you talk to your changes? So many things happened. I think what you're referring to is probably that I did get married. A couple of months ago muzzles it just wonderful and a beautiful part of my life. was there a specific question about the question. The Super Bowl first of all I mean there's a brand here right. The show is called soon by the whole thing is around this oh searching for love first of all and second of all I also seem that artists you are now in different places in to tell the stories and you maybe have different emotional. Valances that that you want to bring to your work. Do you think about that. Because you're not the young upstarts that you were four years go. You know established celebrities indeed families and Van Basis. We are very selectively celebrities places. New York happens to the go-to Kish remote or your mob like some places town where you have to bring security. We're like Kish rush celebrities. That's the only place where we're not shape. Things might be. It might be different for the both of us. I can say now that I'm not I have a daughter and you know I'm starting to think about the world that she's GonNa be growing up in and the religious circles that she's going to be growing up in and because of that and also because of these voices who have spoken to us about you know making sure that people are represented in the show. Now see our show as a an opportunity to kind of try to represent those less represented voices are we talking about the LGBTQ representation in our current our most recent episode. And it's something that is important to us because it's important to the Lgbtq community but it's also because there is this the people who were not necessarily accepted In many circles of Orthodoxy and that has ramifications on their personal lives lives. And it's it's very very difficult. We have the show. And it's an opportunity to kind of say like here we are as Orthodox Jews and that is not what Orthodox Judaism is to everybody. Buddy who is Orthodox and Jewish Orthodox Judaism does not necessarily mean that we're not going to accept or include people who don't live their lives like the rest of the Orthodox community necessarily and I think that's an important thing that we can do through our show for the community and also for the future perhaps of young earth that actually although we were talking a little bit earlier earlier about you hear it from the left and the right so to speak so I mean you're also getting people from communities to the right of yours religiously speaking issues communities more Haredi communities more conservative modern Orthodox communities who probably are saying like. What are you doing with this show where people kiss before marriage? And what did we do. Quick Eric Doctors Right was there never. I thought there was in my mind. Maybe I'm conflicted with streaky. Because I've sometimes been characters you have but characters have been strictly Schumer Schumer which is not the case for every modern Orthodox. So was that also a decision that was made as a to represent a certain kind of religiosity. Johnson was and people always ask the question like will they. Well when will they will. They hold him exactly married. Let me ask you this so it. It seems to me that the last four years have been a very difficult time and as much as the political schisms that have affected all of us also kind of at least drove rove this community to feel much more opposition as the kind of bastion of a conservative values if not outright trump supporting these trump curious curious versus the more secure or more liberal rest of the American Jewish community that has been moving further and further to the left. Do Do you first of all. Do you feel any of this in your lives in. Does that inform how you think about a show like yours. Well I can. I can definitely say that. There's people within my community that I you can count on regular basis who are very strongly in both camps who are very strongly pro trump and very conservative and also very strongly anti-trump very liberal. Those are all part of the Orthodox community that I'm a part of as far as our show is concerned. I think we've been very intentional about not being political. I mean it does feel like a very divisive time though. I'm like I feel it in my life. I have family only members who are more of the the right wing community and friends who are more liberal and I'm sort of interacting with all of them in does feel like I can i. I can feel the tension and I can feel a lot of opposition just in the world in our world in general And it's kind of disheartening at times but with the show you know I think where religious we keep coming back to. What do we feel is important and not sort of seeing ourselves as politically anywhere but just more from like an artistic place like what is important important for us to explore about this community? What voices are important to be something that I think has been important for? Our show is that this is an opportunity especially especially for introducing Orthodoxy Jewelry to people who might not be familiar with it or at least our form of Orthodox Jew. It's an opportunity to bring people together. Who might not necessarily have thought you know that they have something in common We've gotten comments from people about how you know. They didn't know anything about US before but now they see how much more similar they are to themselves than they thought and That's an opportunity. You bring people together and we certainly don't want to do anything that's going to drive people apart speaking of bringing people together. This is our Valentine's Day episode big till Munich holiday celebrated tate's throughout the world. Give us give us some wisdom from the soon by U Universe about finding and keeping love in the twenty first century. Love Yourself I. I think that's where it starts. Yeah I'm all about like self love and going on dates with yourself and if you're if you do it all the time she was married she didn't say it was to another person who picks up the TAB on a rabbi. Rabbi well I kind of jumping jumping off of of what you started but I think that finding what you are excited about finding what you're passionate about. What makes you happy is going to be very valuable and finding someone who you were going to be able to be? He that person with will work said at about soon. Bye Thank you so much for joining US available on a web browser near you YouTube. Dot Com Danny Hoffman. Got Thank you thank you I. Hey J. crew you've heard me talk about. How much daughter loves Jewish summer camp? That is the truth. Scout's honor like like scouting camps. Honor now now. Is the time for you to start planning a Jewish summer camp for your kids this summer. The foundation for Jewish camp has mountains of research that quantify what we already know which is the Jewish camps transformed lives six kids who go formed strong Jewish identities and develop lifelong friendships and they achieve greater independence and confidence. You can tell you that me because I've seen what such a camp does for my child. Now if you're thinking I don't know if my kid is the Jewish camp type IV good news. Every kind of kid is Jewish summer camp kid type the foundation website. Lets you explore over three hundred camps day camps nightcaps programs that range from two weeks to eight weeks all walks of Jewish life all observance levels. You're sure to find a camp that matches. Does Your Kids Interests Sports Cooking Surfing horseback riding social justice stem adventure. Whatever it is? They're sure to be a camp for every kid so go to one happy. Camper DOT ORG SLASH UNORTHODOX Orthodox to explore camping options. That's one happy camper dot. Org Slash Unorthodox. Send your kids to Jewish summer camp. Have some free time sleep in this summer. You'll love them more when they come back. Absence makes heart grow fonder Jewish summer camps rule. Dick Rowe I know a lot of you go into a winter hibernation where you just decide. You're not GonNa Shave your face or your legs or whatever. All winter spring is coming in. You need to be ready. If you want any extra smoothness move nece for the spring time. Get smooth now. Harry's wants to offer you even more savings new customers with five dollars off a Harry's trial set when you go to Harrys dot com slash unorthodox the Harry's well because Harry's believes truly believes that everyone deserves quality shaving supplies at a fair price. 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What is the trial set? It's a five Blade Razor waited handle foaming Shave Gel with aloe and a travel cover. Join the millions of guys and some non guys who are already saving money by Harry's dot com slash unorthodox claim your offer and be smooth J. crew. We just can't get enough of you. We just can't quit. You gave twenty eighth. Stephanie will be doing unpacking the book series at the Jewish Museum. That's with Goldie Goldblum Abby. Cova sign at Seven PM Fiber Twenty Six. Stephanie and I will be in Naples Florida at the greater Naples Jewish folk festival March six. Stephanie will be the Book Center in Amherst Massachusetts in March twelfth. She and Leo will be in Boca Raton. Torah congregation March seventeenth seventy will be out at the Homeland Long Island Old Westbury Hebrew congregation. And you know what we have more stuff plans. HUDA TABLET MAG DOT dot com slash unorthodox. Live we especially want to tell you that we finally have made it happen book out. Kansas City show stay tuned for more details about how we're coming to Kansas City. IN IN JUNE GO TO TABLET MAG dot com slash unorthodox live to learn about all the opportunities to reach out and touch us in person. Aw MHM J. Crew. If you heard our apology episode for the Jewish Year Fifty seven seventy nine you will surely remember how carp he told a story about repairing his relationship with his brother he was one of our favorite guests and he touch with us and said that he had some news that he wanted to update us on so we were excited to have him at our Cincinnati live show where he told us this story our super fans and many longtime listeners. People just been with us for even just a year if you've been through with uh-huh Kapoor In the fall. You've heard that what we do for you. I'm comport is our annual apology episode. And that's because the poor is not just a time for a Tony with God but also for apologizing to other human beings two years ago on the apology episode. We invited a gentleman who is a writer and storyteller lives down in Texas to tell a story three of atoning with people who felt he had wronged It was wonderful story. Got A lot of tremendous feedback and then we didn't hear from him for a while but we were proud of that episode and then we heard from him a couple of months ago and it turns out that the story only got more interesting so to talk about that. Please welcome how carp so how welcome welcome so for the second time thank you. It's an honor to be here. So why don't you start by telling us a little bit about Out The story that you told us give bring people up to speed. If they didn't hear that story. My original story was about in Nineteen Ninety I was in Dallas and living with my brother and I was also secretly. He did not know this a full blown alcoholic and drug addict and he had invited me to become come his roommate. Because we're going to be too hip and cool Jewish guys living together except that I was not hipping cool. I was addicted and I took advantage of that situation every chance I got I never once paid him rent and lost every job. I had within weeks and it just got really bad really fast but at one point I had manipulated situation to actually have him arrested and sent to jail instead of me and he went went to jail and he did not do anything wrong. I actually obviously did the wrong thing. My family then obviously excommunicated me. My addiction got worse Eh. I committed a variety of criminal acts and got sober and always wondered. How do you make amends for that in the twelve step program that I was then I was told that if you ask God to show you away they'll show you away like a door will open and my brother after I was sober awhile? My family realized I was a serious about being sober. He needed to have surgery and my family. All else was out of town and he asked me if I would come stay with him and take him to the hospital hospital for surgery and pick them up and then take care of him so I got to basically for one week. Be The roommate that I never was and I got to fix it. You told that story at beautifully greater length on our show and people should go back and listen to that that episode from two thousand eighteen. And then you heard from somebody. I did ED so there was a girlfriend that I had dated back in Nineteen ninety-three. She was a a wonderful girl. We had a great connection except I was PRETENDING TO BE SOBER I would actually go to twelve step meetings and like stay sober couple of weeks a couple of months but I was lying about really being sober and in order to take care of herself she broke up with me and I was so angry about that. Because you're a drug addict you're fucking angry all the time everybody's fault except yours and I stole her identity and got several credit cards and her name and Rondos up. Of course. I had a plan like I'll pay them and nobody will know but that didn't really work out very well. I got a phone call from her mother and her and they had found out at the time she was actually teaching English in Costa Rica. And I thought you'll never find out. She's in Costa Rica. This is my plan by the time she gets back. I'll win the lottery. And payback these cards. I I really had like some insane plan like that so I I remember after she found out this is August third nineteen ninety-four. She had called me and said why. Would you do this to me and I remember remember when we hung up. I remember thinking like how could I do this to somebody that I really loved is deeply as I loved her. Her name's Irene. I just remember thinking. How did I get get here? You know and that was probably going to go to prison. That was the night that I actually got down and prayed to God for the first time for real real I really said God. If you're there I need help and then exteriors the first day of my sobriety. The you know what's coming so the story there was a piece in there about the felonies. When you get sober you know the first thing you wanna WanNa do is like I want to call her? I WANNA call her. You know and your people that help you in sobriety. Tell you your way to make amends to her is. You're never going to bother her again. You know like she knows how sorry you're asking people you apologize to. And there's people who there are people that your way to apologize to them is to never bother them ever again so I got a facebook message trimmer. She had heard the story on the podcast and she said I heard the story brought back. Wrexham Memories. I was glad to hear that you are doing well and healthy. I'm divorced. I'm living in Fayetteville Arkansas. And I hope you're doing well. I wrote her back and said thanks for getting in touch and as I was typing that I realized one of the things they tell you. When you're like I want to talk to? I WanNa talk to her. And they're like you're never gonNA talk to her is if we're supposed to talk to her one day. If you're supposed to make amends God will open that door. Can we bring her up now. Where's Irene Irene? We come on up and Josh leaving. Get you a chair. Yeah come sit on the outside thank you Irene for joining us away from Arkansas. Okay okay so high from your end is the son. You're a fan of unorthodox I gather or you. You know what I have I I cannot tell a lie I am I I am now a fan of Orthodox at the time I had this how Jala had always been the level of my life in truly heartbroken by everything that happened in when I was in Weird spot every now and then I would just google his name or facebook like look him up on facebook stock but lake. You know every five years or so. It's funny because I actually stopped my ex's on facebook. I full on just google but I just google them shame here. I told the story about link when my marriage. Let's really really bad. There was one year I actually drove by his family's house for Thanksgiving and just was like longing for like we used to go over to his family's house for Sunday dinner and it was just. It was one of the sweet memories that I had eight and my marriage is falling apart and I just I mean I remember like going to therapy. I'm like what's wrong with me like arriving by my ex-boyfriends House you know and he like did this horrible thing to me. And whatever so last September ish I had one of those facebook Kamenz and he just posted a link to the podcast. It's like Interesting I'll click on the link and you know and then I listened to the story day and I was kind of blown away by how gentle and how human his story was and and obviously there was a reference to what he had done to me and so yeah I did I with with with no intention other than to reach out and say I'm I listen to your story. I'm glad you're healthy. I hope you're happy. That was a guessing. You didn't tell your best girlfriends that you get this. I don't know like the guy who stole your identity. The they ain't actually it's it's amazing. How much grace your friends have win when they hear her like the whole story but we definitely well? That's it's kind of fast forward. Let's let let's let which one of you wants to take it from there. You want you tell us what happened then so they say if you're supposed to do this God will open the door so I remember rethinking that very moment this is it. This is the chance to make amends to Irene the money that I paid the bank back when I got sober ended up not going to prison prison which is a whole other story but I had never made amends for stealing her identity in for harming her violating her trust stealing her peace of mind so I messaged her back and said you know if you're ever in Dallas let me know we can meet for coffee and I can give you the apology that you're long overdue to have Chiro wrote back and said I would welcome that. That would be a gift that I never thought I would get in this lifetime just because you know when you have the opportunity to get closure on something that has haunted. Did you for so long it was. I was that it was like I was it was seeking closure right so you traveled to Dallas. Well so I actually used to live. I mean I lived in and out of dollars Alex for over twenty years and had relocated to Arkansas in twenty fifteen and travel back and forth to Dallas on a regular. It's my kids have friends there and my company has an office there and so my clients are there so anyway there was a trip that was gonna happen and then it didn't happen anyway. We wound up meeting for Coffee Offie in the end of November last year a year ago and I had to get to a couple of conference calls before we met in. Somebody's somebody's sitting at this place he had picked by the way it was quite ironic. He picked place called. I mean if those of you there's a place called Cafe Brazil it's right off the highway and we used to go there and so when he suggested like a place to meet and he suggested that I was like. Are you fucking kidding me. I'm sorry the only reason I suggested she said I'd conference calls to do. And they have Wifi. Could there be any more irony in this reconnect then freaking cafe Brazil and like okay. Whatever no problem I will meet either right? So I'm on a call. He walks in. He just Kinda saunters and I'm I'm speechless. Because I had a lot going on in my life one of my kids was at the end of a rough patch and I was dealing with that in dealing with work and ping a single parent and all of these things in walks. This person that I'm telling you lake the memory of standing in the street in front of his parents house him putting my hand on his heart and telling me about the the still small voice you know like this man walks in and like everything disappears right and I'm on a conference call for work and I'm like okay. Case keep your head you know and we just started talking and we just got caught up in the end we like. We walked out and I said some kind of hooker. Can I give go ahead. No like nothing right and he gave me this hug. That was lake was everything. I don't know how to explain. It was I melted edited and I got in my car and I started to cry by that time. He had pulled out of the parking lot as sent him a message. I said thanks for seeing me It means everything and and then when I left Alice that Sunday night I just I son cinema thinks thanks again message from the day we met for coffee. I don't think there's been a single day where we haven't talked facetime so my birthday is December. Sixth Right so twelve plus sixes high eighteen and He said to me in this text he said you. You said you had an upcoming birthday and I always remembered your birthday because twelve to eighteen eighteen is high. I can't tell you. The number time is between last year in today that this man has just melted my heart and brought me to tears and yesterday he asked me to marry him. So Mazal Tov in Kim said yes so I got this email from Hal a couple of months ago. He don't think I don't know if you knew you guys were going to get married that but you were just in writing to say. Thought you'd like to know that some good came out of I mean lots of good came out because people are so moved by your story. Yeah I think. What's amazing is the spiritual aspect to the story? Tori was that I am my spiritual journey with God is that I was honored to tell this apology. Story on this podcast ASP which I love and then you know I thought Oh. This is a great opportunity. This is so great to find out that Oh it leads. It's GONNA lead to another apology. She and we assume with that was all I thought was going to happen. You know And then And then and I walked through that door because I'm willing to make amends and then that led to finding love forever which is Irene. If there's a definition of its Irene and so so you're welcome is says so thank you so listen thank you guys. No no no no you. This means we have to throw the the invitation so to your small intimate gathering whatever it is anyways to say one more thing lease forgiveness is a gift. Don't write in. It's a choice and I think that we both in the years in between not seeing each other done so much work on ourselves that we're in a place where that can happen in not only that but my mother who I was petrified defied like of all people to tell I was petrified. Tell my mother and they now have the sweetest relationship. It's this has been like the gift that keeps on giving and I honestly have to pinch myself about how much good there is the my life. Mazal Tov Jalan Irene Go to the mailbox. Leon I have a question for you. Whatever happened to the days when all of our listeners were mad at you I I miss the days when I was the good guy? It's a refreshing change and all of the sign of the times when I am the kind of unifying figure these days. I'm the one getting it in. Maniac is beloved loved by all your beloved by all at I five from new haven source. Everyone's shitless a few weeks back. We ran that interview with anti-zionist editor and writer Caroline car-sharing. We got a lot of anger email from that and we were gonNA play some of it but then I got even angrier email for my interview last week which I thought was a little bit of a sweet nothingburger. I thought it was a genial. Sit Down with moderate Evangelical Mark Galli Former editor of Christianity. Today and it turns out. No everyone's mad at me for that to to also as it happened. I got some facts wrong about reform and conservative conversions. I'm just getting everything wrong. I'm apparently the pox on the world of Jewish. podcasting thing will be fortunate to have such wonderful listeners. Right in and educate that's right so what what. What were we educate it on this week? Okay my friend. Rabbi Michael Farber men from greater new haven from MM temple manual road dear mark you got it wrong. The state of Israel accepts non Orthodox converts under the Law of Return. It allows them to make Aliyah the get Israel. They're registered as Jewish citizens and affords awesome all the civic rights. The problem with the Israeli system is while the state of Israel recognizes. The status of these converts marriages for Jews are under the auspices of the Chief Rabbinate which of course naughtily does not recognize their conversions but also no longer recognizes certain Orthodox conversions performed outside the state of Israel by certain rabbis. Yours truly rabbi Michael Farman Temple Emmanuel. Yeah Well Okay Rabbi Michael. Thank you for correcting me. That is true. You don't need an Orthodox conversion to make Alibaba but when you move there you might have trouble getting rabbi to do your wedding. I got that wrong and many members of the rabbits reached out to correct me. Rabbi Michael Thank you for the gentle correction many of the corrections were not so gentle for example. Dear Mark Mark Stephanie and Lee l I want to add to the chorus of listeners who were deeply disappointed by March interview with Mark Kelly. I'm glad on Orthodox effort to bring in disparate voices I think episode sued with Jay Michaelson was a fantastic example of this kind of thing. My issue with Mark Galli was not his opinions as such. I was shocked. That Mark Oppenheimer did not seem put it off. By Mark Galli bemoaning the lack of seriousness and respect in media portrayals of evangelicals only minutes later to declare. Okay I get it. They're gay people in the world. What could be less serious or respectful from Galle? Worst of all was Mark Oppenheimer giving Mark Alley the space to equate same sex marriage with Nazism with no pushback. All the the Best Ryan Minster now Ryan is referring to Galle discussing the Evangelical Christian Baker who refused to bake a cake famously for a a gay couple wedding cake and Galli said something to the effect of look. We wouldn't ask Jews too big for Nazis and this analogy was picked up on by what a couple couple dozen listeners and he was in the facebook group it was male that we got and a lot of people seem very angry. That I didn't quote push back and I want to say a couple things thinks about this if I may the first is that when I interview people I usually go in with a fund of sympathy of giving them the benefit of the doubt Now sometimes I want to mix it up and engage with them. The Caroline car share interview for example. Was One where I thought the most interesting stuff was going to come. If I pushed back and really argued with our right but that it was partly because we're both Jews and we share some of the same conceptions like our critique of Israel rate with Mark Galli who's an evangelical Christian who's often voted for conservative politicians. I don't agree with him on a lot. And so actually paradoxically I give those interviews subjects more space to say what they want. Because I'm not going to change his mind on anything so I tend to sit it back and just figure if I give him space to say the things he believes we will learn something more whereas if I stop him and push back and quarrel that what happens is the subject will often shut down down and feel like. Oh here's another hostile interviewer from the liberal media and it actually end up being worse interview in which we will learn less we have no dearth of places to go witness. Shout fests between trying to make points right now. I think a lot of our listeners actually had another thought in mind which was not that I could have changed mark allies view but they I felt that I as an ally to queer people especially Queer Jews Odia to them to be an upstanding bystander. That when somebody Said said something that seems drawn analogy between gay people and Nazis. Although I want to be fair I think that Mark Kelly just chose his words poorly. I don't think he actually thinks gay people are like Nazis. I think that's A charitable he was talking offensive sentiments in general right and chose a bad example. Right listening to the show. I did not actually thing yet. The acquainted one with the other. But I understand how listeners would have heard that really bridled and recoiled and how it would have felt to them and so the question is why didn't you stand up for us and I hear that and and I think there are conflicting things there. I think there are conflicting impulses there if I have to inspect who I was being at that time one is yes I do have a world of listeners. Who might have asked me to say as something but the other is again? I invited Mark Galli on the show right mark. Kelly didn't pitch us this. He didn't have a publicist. Say Oh can we come on Unorthodox. We invited him here. As our guest whom we wanted to learn from and better understand the evangelical mindset and remember. He came on as somebody who had already taken enormous heat for criticizing president trump. So he was already very embattled and and again I think that I defaulted to the sense that I was the host and frankly there are times when it's not profitable to stop people in push back against them. That might not be satisfying into some of our listeners. I understand that but I think we all make these decisions on the fly a lot and I trust that our listeners know that I don't think that the analogy is perfect. I I don't think that baking a cake for a gay couple which is something I would do. Although I bake poorly Is it why would a gay couple couple kicked by you. Nobody nobody would WANNA GEEK BY V. I think our listeners know where I stand on that and we had someone on the show who chose an analogy that I would never have chosen but you know what he was our guest and the most important thing to me was. Let's have an interview where he feels the free to share who he is. Because we don't hear from a lot of Evangelical Christians and we can learn something and some of our listeners. Here's wrote in and we're appreciative of that. So we're always grateful for all the feedback. Hallelujah you may remember that in last week's news of the Jews we talked about the Hate crime in which if somebody threw a piece of pork at a conservative synagogue and I joked that the people that are conservative synagogue or reformed temple would take the piece of inside fried up good at eat et because they largely keep kosher. Now one letter very angry and said this is yet another case of you demeaning reform and conservative Judaism to which I respond. Hey Pow I'm on the Board of my conservative synagogue. Ah President is considered like no I know conservative Judaism and I know that a lot of my fellow congregants eat pork and a lot of people in the conservative movement even eat pork and I was having some fun at the expense of movement that I proudly belong to who summer camps I send my daughter to. WHO's Day school? I send a different daughter too and the fact is a lot of these fellow conservative. Jews even gorge whose motto you have tattooed on your shoulder. That's right. I am in Minya more than I. Love Them. MM-HMM I happen to be a vegetarian and I don't eat pork. I'm imagining fellowship with them fellowship. With them I do bibles I do. Wednesday Bible study with them I happen to be a vegetarian. Who even when I cheat and eat meat? I don't eat pork but you know what that's me. Lots of my fellow conservative Jews eat pork and I was having some fun at my movements expense. We got this letter from a listener. Who totally got it? He writes my father was a kosher butcher in Cleveland for more than thirty years well Marx observation that many conservative Jews eat pork but won't admit it was was just as true thirty years ago as it is now many years after his death I discovered that after closing his shop at around four PM on Fridays. My dear sweet dad would go to Harvey's a RIB joint about five storefronts down from his butcher shop and shout down on pork ribs at a table set up in the back room where nobody would see him. It made me laugh and remembering with even more fondness to learn of his taste for back ribs when it took me until the age of sixteen to work up the courage to take my first illicit taste of Bacon. Have a great day all Richard Silverman Eh. Dick's Overman. You remind me it was the first episode of Six feet under the first episode of the dad dies and they discover that he has a private apartment where he's is gone to just like sit and smoke. Pot discovered a weed lehrer. We're escapes his family of crazy kids at crazy wife. It goes to you discovered that your dad at a special pork room at Harvey's that is awesome Yet a tree cave of you leave. Hypocrisy is human and God loves us Anyway call it a its complexity. Complexity is human. Call US nine one. Four five seven zero four eight six nine or write to us or send us a voice memo UNORTHODOX OPS at tablet MAG DOT com. You know sometimes we We do stuff apart. Stephanie only all went to Sutton place synagogue. A few months ago and met cantorial student Jacob Sandler at the evening services they are. I didn't meet him then but they they said it's okay. We gotta bring this in studio and so we did have alyssum. We are here with Jacob Sandler. He's a student at J. T. S.. We met him during our visit to the Sutton Place Synagogue Synagogue in Manhattan. He too was visiting there that night and we knew we had to get him on this show. Welcome hi thanks. It's great to be here. We have questions for you so Stephanie and I were sitting I'm GonNa Pews and we saw you doing incredible thing. We get up in front of a room of complete strangers and lead them in a song they had never heard and you did. It's like really helpful thing with your hands like you say ha and then you go haha. You seem to be really into it and to me. I cannot think of a single human interaction that is more mortifying than king strangers to sink. Tell us how does that feel the moment. Well well you know. It's one of my favorite things to do is teach people how to sing because singing gives me such joy and I'd like to give back and all that sort of nicely stuff but also I. I got my degree in music education occasion before I started cantorial school and so I need to believe that everyone can do it. or I be out of a job. You're that kid growing up. You're you're the singing kids. Yeah I mean more or less. I started on piano and started singing. I wasn't even that good really until like junior year of high school but no one told me so it was okay and yeah you know getting up in in front of a group of people. I don't know what they know. Assume they know like the standard Jewish tunes that everybody knows what you're mostly Karl Bach and like Debbie Friedman. And then I come in. I'm like they probably don't know this one but I like this one and I want them to see something new. That was what we had discussed before I got there. It was like we want to show them. What else is out there? So like come and take us out of our comfort. It's my great okay. And then what I'll do is I use my hands to conduct the melody line so that they can sort of see directionally like it's getting higher both in space and in you you know pitch and now it's getting lower. It's it's almost like bobby mcferrin where he would like jump across the stage and he's like this is the note here then he jump over here and he'll be over this loan like dumb bomb bump bump bump bump whatever you would do and I'm doing the same thing with my hands. You know dumb but it turned out that sort of thing we back up a second. I always love hearing about clergy journeys right. So where are you from sure. What did you think you were going to do when you were five years old tan lead you make the decision from just music to cantorial music? Yeah she's amazing. Well I started. I grew up in Rockland. County New York and so I was sort of Jewish. BIOS Moses said Kosher Food and yet I went to public school and did my thing. The journey like career wise was like in sixth grade. Kids said you should be a rabbi. Because I was the only one in Hebrew school that thought to read the Hebrew ahead therefore sir. Yeah I knew what I was doing but I didn't WanNa do that then or now. And then in like ninth grade. I realized I really wanted to give back to those things which really shaped my childhood. And that's how I knew I wanted to be a cartoonist. But that didn't really pan out either because I think it was around junior year when I took a flash animation course in high school because I had a cool high school and I also also took music theory and animation was like really really tedious and exhausting and I only did it in school and music theory which is like so fun. Ex- well yeah so music theory. I would like go home and I was playing piano and singing in the shower and like analyzing Bach counterpoint. For Fun and I was like maybe this is the direction I should go since I'm doing it anyway. So wind chill will so that's a great question too. I I grew up at camp in the Berkshire is that's a camper on. My daughter wouldn't go to. Yeah well she's she's New England so I was going to say is it because of our their stuff going on their reputation to well. You know. It's The New York metropolitan area in West Chester and your Long Island. Apparently you guys bring to phones the one that they confiscate and then the secret. It's an iphone touch. It doesn't have cellular. That's why I can hear you calling your mom on Shabbat in the bathroom late. None of that's okay. I started as a counselor and and then when I was in school to be a music teacher which was like a music profession. That might pay me. Little known fact music teachers get paid so justified going back to camp after summer or by being on music staff so it was like direct experience in air quotes like with almost like an internship. So I didn't have to get a real job because this was my real job and by doing that they would send me to different like professional development things with their budget. So I went to Havana. Sheera I which was actually a U. R. J. Reform Song Leading Conference that was started by Debbie. Friedman admits and Jeff Clapper and people like that and I remember leaving the first year. I was there on the bus and I'm like man. There's just not enough Jews in music school. There's not enough enough music at Jewish camp. Where can I go to this kind of like excellent musical Jewish experience and my friend goes to school? Okay Okay what is your family. Say when you're like okay. I'm going in cantorial school for me. Not taking the cats again sister is in getting an MD PhD and her name is Rachel so she got the Jewish name and actually I guess the Jewish career and a real career. She's a she's going to be the doctor in the family. So that takes the pressure as the Middle Child. I don't have to be the oldest and the most whatever but there are actually quite proud. It's really sweet to see they're like it's amazing. I come back from like different gigs and I tell them how much I made for. Like a Shabbat or this and that and they're like wow. It's actually pretty good. And what are you even do what you just like leading the prayers. You did that for free for your Bar Mitzvah. I'm like yeah I get paid more to do a little bit less because they don't actually make me retort. My internship we the the Motto Control School get paid more to do a little bit less sexually. Yes you're in control school but but I think you're being on this podcast is a big deal. Your family right. Yeah well my mom listens to this podcast. And her name is Hanni Sandler Shadow Tahani Sam all right so it's now time to make honey proud to lead us and so I love me do this. Oh Jay Ready. Are you ready to do the hand thing. How January warm-ups ups today no but I will in a moment Great what a so I get to pick the song could use. Could I love learning new tunes into a done alarm so if you want to do in a donut alarm. That's great. Do the traditional. Don't Olam to the backstreet boys. Yes yes yes yes I definitely. Are you after Milan. Force Betsy boys for him. The job the backstreet boys. I used to dance around on the catch my living. I like this a lot. Yes yeah it was the cutest thing when this kid came up to me like new traditional which ones that goes he goes. I don't know I don't know that. Much share Ma bit. Tehran Co Pay Room. Go you know so. The eight nurse Arba ebbed so cool ship. Neutra it's the best and traditional. Yeah and I'd like right and so I was sitting here and I'm going to be justified. There's a lot going on right. You're familiar I think. Donald Trump asking mark oppenheimer is familiar with the hoover of the backseat boys. It's the president. Tell us what's on. This is set to backstreet. Actually Boys Song. I want it that way. which is a classic tune about love it? I think maybe even heartbreak at ain't nothing but a heartache. So I'm just going to do like the regular part you guys be the you know the Tommy wise is your lead lead us. So I'm GonNa like gesture to me when it's my turn and is often my tournament a gesture you guys when it's your turn so I don't no no Lomb my share Butare Room call eight asa is I if you heard they almost they sort. I just started to come in right in the middle of that last line and that was why I was just like with sort of a rotating hands and elbows like no altogether come together that sort of motion which she's a great song leading to a four colon together. Now we sing together these amazing tastic. Jacob Sandler thank you for being with US extra having me. I'm sending him along. You're welcome for putting on a show your best you leave a Mazal Tov. This week. I have an amazing muscle tone so you may remember former Unorthodox guest and and friend of the show Rabbi Dr Stu Halpern. Yaakov Yeshiva. University fame indeed learned earlier in the week. Rabbi Sue hat for the first time ever in his life a piece of Bacon even more shocking than that tried. Hamas rabbi still had gone through thirty odd years and several choose choose a hummus virgin thousands of Chabad meals without ever once tasting the delectable delicious nectar of life. That is Komo's how is that even possible. I don't know but rabbi STU my friend welcome to the club. Rabbi Stu you are now a Jew welcome of to the club. We have a model that came in over the listener line. We want to wish a huge hardy. Big throated Jolly Mazal Tov to our fans. KANTER CANTOR EMMA and Rabbi Adam Lutts on the birth of their first baby Ruby Mira was born on January third and we love her already. This came in from your friend. Sorry sorry and we heartily endorse the sentiment Mazal Tov to the whole family and one of my own. My Niece Marlene tremor rocked. Par Shot Bush Shylock at her Bat Mitzvah at said at one hundred and west end this past Chabad. Does that mean she had the same parcels. Rebecca t did have the same pastas Rebecca and and I said to Rebecca's sitting there in the pews kind of You'RE GONNA that's how you pronounce it. Yeah you sure you could buy stuff you can go up there at But don't it larger lead brought her own swerve her own mo Jo her own a game to the partial and it was a beautiful service but own spin and basilica was darker. It was kind of like like the joker. A song was kind of minor key with some big organ chords and therapy in the back and Marley did a great job. And I couldn't be more proud as an uncle Mazal Tov Marley friends. You know that sometimes we turn to you in the J. crew for content. We need you. We have some really good themed episodes coming up and we need your input so think hard if you have anything to contribute if you want to be interviewed if you WanNa read something on the air if you want to help us in any way for any of these episodes were going to do a show about Jewish hair. That's not just for women that's not just people with curly hair. It's whatever Jewish hair means to you. Do you have anything to tell. Tell us about your experience with Jewish hair. Also what about converting we always do our conversion episode around Chavalit. That's this spring. Please let us know. Are you going through a conversion to you. Know someone one who's gone through conversion. Did you convert have terrible experience. Did you convert and then convert back. Are you thinking about converting. Whatever the story is we want to hear it and finally we're we're bringing back the Jews around America episode? Only this time we're calling Jews around the world. Do you have a story from a tiny or lesser known or neglected Jewish community anywhere. Are you from a place where nobody whatever think. There's a Jew did you ever in your travels come to a place region. Think you'd find a Jew but you found one. Were you ever to Shebab dinner in an area of the world where you wouldn't think Jus we're even allowed Jews around the world coming up this July. So Jewish hair conversion Jews around the world what you got for us. People email us at UNORTHODOX TALENT DOT COM or call us levers of westbound nine one four five seven zero four eight six nine unorthodox brought to you by Tablet magazine on the web at tablet MAG dot com send this your thoughts on orthodox a tablet dot com or call us nine one four or five seven zero four eight six nine we do a newsletter it's written by one Liel Liebowitz. You can subscribe by going to dot slashed slash Unorthodox podcast. You should wear and carry on Orthodox are you Hannukah shopping for next Hanukkah or just birthday. Shopping would bit dot L. Y. Slash Ortho shirt and find the latest in Unorthodox shirts mugs and onesies follow us on Instagram at Unorthodox podcast on twitter at Unorthodox. Underscore pod join our facebook produced by Dot Cross says you producers are Seraphim and Alana Levinson out. Artwork is Esther Word Iger our theme music is by Gholam Online rox dot com in our mailbox themes by Steve Barton Tablet Magazine's editor-in-chief Alana newhouse consecutive editor. Wayne off rabbinic supervision this week by Rabbi Samuel and of Congregation Beth Israel in Lebanon Pennsylvania. Come to you from Argo Studios. They still morning. It's Oscar Wells Philo

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421: Getting Rid of Eczema for Good With Dr. Ana-Maria Temple

The Wellness Mama Podcast

51:08 min | 5 months ago

421: Getting Rid of Eczema for Good With Dr. Ana-Maria Temple

"Bobby podcast this episode is sponsored by four sigmatic. The superfood mushroom company. That i have been talking about loving for years. I'm a big fan of all of their products especially their coffee fused with brain boosting lion's mane and their ratio exert night for awesome sleep recently. I've really been enjoying their protein. Powder is especially love. The peanut butter flavor because confession. Peanut butter is one of my weaknesses. And i loved that. Now i can get all the flavor in this protein packed format rather than in the super calorie dense format of just peanut butter and i've been making peanut butter chocolate smoothies with that of people who've banana. Banana would probably be a great addition but vicious been sticking with the chocolate and peanut butter. I love it and my kids. Love it too but you can try all of their products. I have yet to find one. That i don't love. Try them all at four sigmatic dot com slash wellness mama and as a listener of this. Podcast you can save ten percent off all of their products with the code wellness mama all lower case so again that's f. o. u. r. s. I g. m. eighteen. I c. dot com forward slash wellness. Mama and the code wellness mama to save ten percent. This episode is brought to you by wellness that's wellness with an w. e. l. l. n. e. s. s. e. Which is my new company. Make personal care products that go above and beyond just toxic to actually be beneficial for you from the outside in. I realized years ago that even some of my most naturally minded friends and family members who made an effort to eat organic food and be really cognizant of what brought into their homes. Were still using certain. Certain personal care products mainly hair care oral care and the reason was they weren't willing to sacrifice how they looked and felt just use natural products and none of the natural products are finding really lived up to the conventional products as far as how effective they were so i resolved to change this and realize i had things that i've been making my kitchen for years that worked just as well and then i could share with other families and thus wellness was born. You've probably heard that what goes on our body gets into our body. It made the chemicals we encounter end up in our bloodstream. To me this means nontoxic and safe should be the absolute bare minimum baseline for any products. That are in our lives. But i wanted to take it a step further. I wanted it to use this to our advantage to actually put beneficial ingredients in our hair. Care chief as personal care products so that they could benefit our body from the outside it. Why not use that wonderful skin barrier to our advantage so our hair care is packed. Ingredients like metal which helps hair thicker over time are dry. Shampoo has scalp promoting products that really help follicles. A strong and our our toothpaste. Toothpastes has a naturally occurring mineral call. Tiktok's cap is which is the exact mineral. It's honor teeth. That's president and strong naval so they're all designed to work with the body. Not against it to help you have stronger. Healthier hair teeth. We now have a hand sanitizer. That doesn't drought your hands. Like many hand sanitizers. Do be honoured if you would check it out. I would love to hear your feedback. You can find all of our products at wellness dot com. That's w. e. l. l. n. e. s. s. e. dot com. Hello and welcome to the wellness podcast. I'm katie ramallah's mama dot com and wellness dot com. That's wellness with a on the end. My new line of personal care products. This episode goes deep on eczema. Because get so many questions from other parents about this. My second son. My third child had exit very severe eczema and we were able to reverse it and we talk about some of the changes that helped him and also some of the changes that help many as many kids. today. I'm here with dr maria temple. Who is a bestselling author an award-winning speaker at the harvard club. Boston and she has a medical degree and Works much functional medicine. She's helped over thirty six thousand patients in person and also via online courses and has a specific expertise when it comes to eczema so we go really deep on the topic of how this process can start even before birth during the birth process what are some early interventions and then what to do even if a child has had extra for a long time or has a very severe case and there are some very specific resources for this in the show notes at walnut mama dot. Fm if your child is struggling with highly encourage you to check those out because I learned firsthand. You can reverse it. And i know just how horrible it is to see your child suffer so please take advantage those resources and i hope that you'll find. This episode is helpful as i did without further ado. Let's join dr topol. Dr anna maria. Welcome thanks for being here. I'm so excited to be here. Thank you so much for having me. I am excited to chat with you because you are expert in an area that i hear from a lot of parents about and it seems to be i hear from an increasing number of parents and families about that and that is asthma and there any skin issues that fall under that umbrella. But i wanna really start broaden really go deep and get into some specifics on this today because i had this with my second son my third child and that we eventually were able to resolve it for him but i know it was a little bit of a long road and i saw firsthand. Just how uncomfortable he was. And it's heartbreaking as a parent to see your child go through that and of course horrible for the child as well so to start broad. Walk us through. What's going on physiologically in the body when someone has excellent well you know. We've had the same shared the same issues in my household in. I was able to have two children that suffered for megabucks. I'm an overachiever. And so i've gone to see a first hand as well and what's going on in our body in the traditional model you know. We are often taught about the skin that the skin is the problem and we have to do topical treatments for it when in fact exit has actually started from the inside out and usually starts with you know for our children with the moms dia before she was pregnant during pregnancy and birth Once the children are born and they're out in the world depending on the diet that they have right now when what's going on is that the children's bodies receiving different messages and those messages are internalized. Often go right through the gut and then depending on how the food is absorbed. It has to be sent to your skin cells and if it's the signals are messed up. You end up with abnormal skin. Which for many looks like emma. Got it that makes sense. And i think we're seeing these even. I've seen young young babies even with these problems. That can start really early on right. It is You know like we were saying. It's an epidemic the rates of eggs in one thousand nine hundred seventy s like one in fifteen maybe one in twenty. We're now seeing rages one in five and in some nationalities in some countries is one three. You know it's not okay and it's got an Being seeing younger and younger these days. Wow okay gotcha. so let's start with. What's the first step when someone comes to you. And your previous attrition as well. I'm sure you see many many kids struggling with asthma. What is the first step when you have. Someone new come when i i see them. I discussed really cutting things that we're talking about the catholic because most that you see in the In the media and on social media and out there in blog world is that it's a topical issue and so we start with a mindset that we're going to have to work from the inside out and that there's not one more cream you know in two thousand seventeen. I so reports that people spend thirty seven point. Seven billion dollars on topical treatments for eggs. Ima when compared to things for cancer chemotherapy. Forty eight billion dollars. So exuma is almost costing us as much as chemotherapy which is insane to me which made the parents are searching continuously for. What is the next topical lotion or potion. Now we can put so our first discussion is like you know what the reason that the lotions and potions are not working is because we gotta start from the inside out and we need to look at your child's diet in that usually is our first step and it's probably the hardest. yes especially with younger ones. I remember that from working with my son. What are some of the big dietary kind of red flags that you see. you are triggers. That seemed to be relatively common. I know it's very individualized on the guy but are there ones that are more common. Oh absolutely processed foods are number one and followed right closely behind by sugar. I have a pm. One of my family's actually just sold my clinic. Couple of days ago in the dad was like. Oh i watched you on eggs among for kids and you talked about sugar so i started looking at my diet and i decrease my sugar significantly before the pandemic. And he's like all my skin issues went away and then this christmas guy really cavalier and so i just did a free for all because it's christmas and he's like what happened. I exit came back. And i was. I was excited when that happens because it happens because people can actually see the power food so processed foods are number one in you know. We become a world of convenience foods and it's easy were busy and i have three kids. Have six kids. Probably folks listening have multiple children busy jobs in busy lives and were running a million directions so convenience become the norm and they're just so full preservatives and food coloring and additives. That a lot of times. We don't even know what they need and really everything has been now filled with sugar because sugar makes everything tastes delicious and you know in the nineteen eighties. It was a low fat trend in everybody was cold muster low fat will when they remove fat out of the products will they had to add sugar. Because if you take the fat end no sugar. It tastes like Bark or do awful and so they added all the sugar so now our children are continuously blasted with processes in sugar. So those are my number one Fun fact in my eggs. Of course. I have parents that come in all this we tried this died and we tried this other diet and they've never decrease their processed foods or sugar levels. Are the i go to all my gosh. That made the world of difference like blown away by these two steps. And i would love to say. They're simple they're super hard. Yeah i like simple not always easy and someone. I really admired ball ravikant. He says Easy choices hard life harnesses easy life. It's like you know the the things that really matter in that make. The difference aren't always easy ones but their worthwhile Do you see gluten and dairy or secondary ones like eggs and peanuts as triggers pretty often. Oh yes and then followed. The asteroid processed foods sugar than dairy is next in line followed by gluten eggs and nuts. Any kind of in that actually in that order because we've seen him to become they are in the top eight allergen foods and there's a lot of literature to show that a lot of children respond very positively with resolving excellent when they removed those different foods. And i'm curious. I know with my son. It was not a lifelong intervention. We had to be really careful about that for a while. We really helped intensity focus on his gut and as he's gotten older he's had like really strong dietary habits since he was about to. He's actually been able to now consume a lot of these things from really good sources not processes but he can consume certain types of dairy. No problem at all things like that. Do you find that like if you really addressed address. The root causes eventually. There is a chance. Kids can actually handle some of these foods. Oh absolutely and i think probably. that's a huge misconception. In a holistic world is let me remove see in a lot of mommas there like will verse lowly search. Thank you know. I know about Sugar dairy and now removed the different things. But they don't do much to rebuild the gut. because we've gotta rebuild it. We got to rebalance repopulated so a lot of stuff that needs to be happening in order to not wanna cure. But like you said we gotta bring the fluids back because some goal is not that we're gonna have. Our children be deprived of food for the rest of their lives. So they don't keep their coming back. The goal is we rebuild the gut. So the children can be able to tolerate the various foods probably in different quantities in different moderations. Like you said different quality foods because not all food is created equal and then we want him to grow up just like everybody else making smart choices for their body in zine which foods sit with their systemic makeup compare to to their friends so the goal is to bring back at most of the time except for the people that come in and they have an afl access to food so far have a youngster. That has an access to peanuts. Now it's gonna take a whole lot longer. It's whole different ballgame compared to the youngsters that we removed foods we talked about in their. Xm gets better. We rebuilt the gut repopulated replenish and then were able to bring foods. Let's to everybody's astonishment. That i because they had these before. But we do differently on the backside. I'm curious if there is a connection potentially with the gut bacteria thing to how babies are born as well. And i ask because my son who had asthma with my only c-section section and it was placenta previous. So it was completely not avoidable. And i didn't know then what i know now about the gut. Bacteria transfer during the birthing process. But i notice that there seems like at least people i know in my personal life stronger. Correlation of the potential for things like eggs with babies who are born during c-section moms who had complications and ended up with a lot of antibiotics. Oh my gosh. And i think it starts even earlier. There is actually studies coming out of new zealand. And i just saw a steady coming on norway where they're specifically focusing on lactobacillus revenue service which is a specific probiotic. They give it into pregnant. Moms to see if there's a correlation with decreasing the children being able to have less Later on in life in a couple of studies with women that were about five hundred over five hundred pregnant women they showed that the using lactobacillus ram news as compared to other probiotic strains was able to decrease the risk of the children developing asthma by fifty percent. So i think you become. It's even earlier than birth. And then just like you said i'm seeing a tremendous correlation between babies born via c-section. Xm though interestingly when we look in the literature it's the studies don't really support that. They support at c. Sections or related with food allergies asthma in other allergic issues but not specifically excema however. I'm seeing different story in my practice in a fun. Fact is a new bacteria not new. It's actually an old bacteria but in nineteen sixty seven before our babies were all populated with a be infanticide and this a difficult factor in fantasy and all the babies had in their guts and scientists cited recent. They'd like let's look at the baby's guts and see whether populated within you know. When the when. I was trained. It was like oh guts are sterile. Babies are born with sterile gotten. That's not really true Anyway so now being fondest has virtually disappeared from american babies guts had birth is gone and you know a lot of speculation on the maternal diet. Is the antibiotics in. the meat. Is all the lysol bleach reporting everywhere. Right and the other thing was that it was shown that At have been santus. The baby has to be born vaginal in order to get it from. And here's a fun fact for everyone. The reason one of the reasons that we postulate that when they're born they're born face down is to eat moms poop. That's so disgusting. But but stay was saying the be infanticide mom's gut in the poop as is in her vagina and the babies that are born face down or more colonized with being fontes than babies. That are born via c-section differently. You know there's a huge trend on there for mama's to get amazon stuff to make sure you don't have the who accident on the delivery table. Well it turns out that actually is a evolutionary thing. That is important for a baby. So out of the to bacteria would say the lactobacillus ram nooses and being fondest. Are the dupay players. Another great fun fact. I just finished writing a blog site Nerd facts on the Human breast milk makes a very specific of oswego sakarai which is basically form sugar in. Its only purpose is to feed being pontus. It has serves no other purpose in the environment or human body except to feed being fun. And i mean when we look at the evolution of what's going the way our babies were before and less significant chronic disease compared to our babies today plagued by exile and other issues and we see these key players missing. You know just makes you wonder. Is it really. There's no difference or they're really a connection. I mean i'm going with a really strong connection between our gut bacteria in our children's i agree and i've seen that play out like i mentioned with my son but also as dula. I been at a quite a few bursts in a lot of those. At least six. I i had moms. Who knew they were going to need to have a c. section and so they basically prescheduled. There's a whole process for this. And i can link to what i've talked about before on this but of helping seat the baby's got if they're not born badgley or also interesting correlation here. My last two daughters were born badgley but they were born breach and they were breached. There was turned a different way. And of course their body left mind before they headed and so the microbial transfer didn't happen the exact same way and we had some minor food intolerances with them early on that we had to kind of improve their gut to reverse as well as i think. There is a really important by crowell connection there. And i think we're only starting to really learn just how important it is kinda cracks me up some of the burst. I've been at when you bring that up and doctors. Kind of get grossed out. I'm like you are at births all day long. You know how this actually happens. It's not a sterile process by any means in it's not supposed to be But i think we're gonna keep learning a lot more about this. And i think it's good for parents to be aware up to know if that is how your baby center the world. It's good to have that knowledge to be proactive about their health. Or even if they're born you know post your sunny side up or just breach. There's things you might want to do to help. Support there really early on. Are there other things recommend appearance starting in those first weeks and months even with babies. Oh yeah one of the other things. That a lot of parents don't know about is about tylenol acetaminophen. There is a very strong correlation between using tylenol or minute then in children and their risk of developing elegance study done Looking at children of all ages including teenagers and how many doses of tunnel they had over year some had non some head once a month for twelve months had more doses in the more doses of tylenol does stronger the correlation in higher the risk of developing exit up to ninety nine percent risk of developing asthma in teenagers. Who were using tylenol on a regular basis. That is so scary because we have you know have a fear of fever. We have fear he thing. We fear pain in the us I had the privilege of working in new zealand for a year and a half where people just accept pain. They're like well when you with life and you fall out of a tree you're gonna have pain in so they are less likely take medications in the us. We are so painted verse that we are just giving our children's tylenol like it's going out of style not to mention the fear fever and another one that is not well known is actually the correlation between reflex medicines end excema mind-blowing because again we fussy babies collar key babies. Oftentimes we reached four on anti reflux medication. Which actually hurts being fondest if we're going to go back to that guy but if we're using anti reflux medication instead of dietary lifestyle modifications were adversely affecting the child's gut which then puts them at high risk for developing zima and for folks out there one of the things that i want to caution. You is when we research you go top causes of x. amount and it's like you know dry air cold air. Topical things may be dairy. Come into see tylenol in zantac but when you search is their coordination between tyrone excellent and your google page blows up. Oftentimes research is biased by forces that we don't know and don't understand. I don't understand them and so when we're researching stuff it's very interesting. How different stuff comes to light depending on how you look at that is so fascinating. Imported know about the reflux risk as well. Are there other things early on that. We need to know about that. Like when kids start getting introduced to food. I know for instance. I've worked for the company that looked at the research on early allergen introduction and realize that like completely avoiding certain foods can be problematic. Starting them too early. And so i know. They advocate like very small dose introduction in a very controlled careful way to help avoid actual allergies. But then i know beyond that like are there things that are supportive of the guy when babies start reaching that food age you know the he you know that. Several studies now changed my medical practice when i was practicing. Like a general pediatrician. Because they showed the studies coming out of israel when they were doing small dose controlled food alleged children. They did have less allergies than the children that we did. Let's call the american way where we're like. Oh don't do peanuts until they're older. Don't do eggs until one to strawberries to one. Enzo a lot of. The medical care has changed based on all the studies. More studies have come out to actually support that in the beginning. Things that i you know. Breast milk like we just talked about is best. And even if you know not everybody's body is able to produce personal and we know that and it's unfortunate. It's hard if you're able to produce one ounce is very helpful because of all the different benefits that we already talked about when we look at different formulas pay attention to the formula. Speak with your doctor. Make sure that you're getting formulas that don't the first ingredient is not corn syrup and then when we started solid food introduction ham about root vegetables and i'm not about rice cereal and i don't like oatmeal and thankfully never even in my traditional practice. I never advocated for rice cereal because well it has arsenic and then humans have added iron and made it seem like oh. Babies needs to have cereal because of iron. But we're giving them processed foods as their first food introduction into knee. That's ludicrous. And i go with root vegetables always talk vegetables and i'm not like a must Vegetables and then alternate fruits vegetables fruits than adding in your high allergens to us. But i'm all about full foods real foods and a lot of folks get overwhelmed when you have a lot of kids you like. Oh my gosh making my own food. I'm like it doesn't have to be hard. You could just motion avocado banana. If you guys are making sweet potatoes for dinner switch it up with your four can put it in the fridge. And that's the baby's food. It doesn't have to be complicated. I'm not saying that there's not great companies out there that can help you make your life easier than that. I'm just giving examples on how you can make it home. But i'm all about a whole foods. I really not a big fan of the teething crackers. The keating biscuits squeezy packets can also be a problem because a lot of are filled with citric acid. Sometimes natural flavors. Sometimes just weird ingredients. I don't even know what they are. So i've cautioned you without. We wanted he. The children having really greedy and in their diet and now keep their guts knife and nice and healthy. So they can. We can prevent the development of excellent. And you also mentioned to somewhat controversial topic. And i'm so glad you brought it up and that was fevers. And if they should be reduced and if so how they should be reduced. I've written about this before and surprisingly gotten some of the most strong reactions on both sides about this particular topic and You are much more qualified than i am to talk about those. I just have parental experienced but For my research. There's so so much that goes into considering what to do about a fever and the fact that the body's immune system does this for a reason so it maybe like at least the first line of defense in just jumping into reducing the fever necessarily but like. I said you're much more qualified to talk about this than i am. Can you walk us through your approach to fevers and what parents need to. Yeah and just you know. I was gate heat for too. So you talked on it but when we look at fever the body that some bodies response wage. We say it like you know what. Let's use the flu virus for second. Flu virus cannot live by itself could survive on a surface for short period of time but then in easy human body to replicate itself so for simplicity purposes like okay. The flu virus in his fifty friends. Come into your body in the us. Your body is a photocopy machine. The human body is like no. We're not gonna have anything to do with that. So it raises the internal service ad for two reasons. Number one is gonna stop the photocopy machine. A number to. It actually stimulates the immune system for making more. Antibodies turning around clicker making them stronger. So we need fever to to make more. Antibodies faster in. If you let the child have a fever and led the body do its thing. The the body stops the replication. So now your body has to like sixty viral particles. And i'm doing this super simplistic now if we are giving the child tylenol motrin because we're so afraid of brain damage seizures and such things which talk about in the second we allow the photocopy machine to turn back on now. The virus is able to replicate itself to billions. Our immune system is sluggish and worn-out because it needs the high temperatures or to do the job so now the virus says billions of particles that our body has to overcome which leads us to be sick for like two three weeks. And it's with no end in sight. Herons are atrophied of brain damage. Human in a neurologically normal tracks. Human body will not allow your temperature to get above a hundred and five point five at one hundred five point five. You do not have brain damage. Also the febrile seizures are a huge risks of concerned parents. There's no amount of tylenol or motrin to stop a febrile seizure. A febrile seizures usually happens. A child is doing fine. Playing dabba seizure. You pick them up because they have a seizure in all of a sudden notice. they're burning. It's because it's the rate of rise in many steady said than done to see how can alternate what if you alternate tunnel. What about boutron. What if none of it is shown to actually prevent febrile seizures if your experiences several seizures stick to your doctor on how to dose medications in this case and if your child has neurological abnormalities your different case closely with your doctor. In all other children the body needs the fever and a needs to do. Its work the other thing that happens. Is kids look like you know laying around on the sofa. They're not doing anything. That's actually the body. Say i need my energy to fight this virus. please don't play. Children don't eat when they're so when they're feeling on. Well that's because the body says. Please donate because i need all my energy in order to fight this virus on top of some other things but i think the paranoia is like. Oh my gosh. Looking child has fever is laying around not doing anything. I'm must medicate him. Because parent we have. We always feel like we have to do something. And when the kids pop off the couch and they're playing their rate will rejoice however six hours later they go down again with fever and now we panic because we think something is horribly wrong and it's just the immune system trying to overcome the medications that we are trying to do. Because we're afraid that was such a concise explanation of that. I hope offers parents a lot of peace of mind. Cause certainly it's scary as a parent if your child is suffering in any way but especially especially people procedures can be very scary but also such a good reminder that the immune system knows what it's doing and a fever serves a purpose back to the topic of asthma so we've gotten the kind of a good primer on diet and especially the early introduction and what to know about that what are some of the other factors as kids get older or if a child has already very severe eczema. What are some other things that can help. Because you already mentioned that. People think of eczema. Topical problem and i know firsthand. Nothing topical worked for my son. It wasn't until we address address the internal that he got better and at that point he he didn't need the topical stuff But what are some of the other things appearance to know to start that process other things that in some kids that are so severely affected in the parents had done everything. Histamine are a big problem and what his took means are like little tiny. I call my confetti and hang out in mass cells in basically masol's look like balloons with Patrol our body and our body in order to defend as actually is a great purpose. you haven't invading virus the Masol's explode the confetti of which is a history means explode in they call in other immune cells in order to fight this battle. Saving you come in clump contact with colin and bold and other things in some kids they have so many masol's and they have muscles that are so incredibly sensitive at everything triggers. So there's children by the eat a great with the topple the cracker or they drink water and they have eczema. They're they're sensitive to everything in our in our course where they're logic to life because the are continuously trying to figure out which thing which thing. It's not one thing is that their system is over. Responsive is just so incredibly sensitive. Anything that come. They come in contact with they just explode so then we look into factors of okay. Well you you're considering a high estimate diet. What is your family history. Could they be lacking in specific digestive enzymes. That could be helping in curtailing this issue. Do we have any other gut imbalances because where do the histamine reaction really all begin in the gut and then also do. We have anything else in the environment like heads. Mold is a huge I live in charlotte north carolina and we are in moldy only place in Is mold factor in your house because if we can decrease inflammation on the enzyme vote. What about our violent. You know what you cleaning with. What kind of things are you doing your laundry. Not specifically because it's irritating exit more toxins were exposed to from our food lotions potions chemicals in our environment that can trigger the other thing that is so under recognised join. Our pandemic is stress. The stress is out of control. Mental health is we are at the brink of massive issues and a lotta kids can be stressed. But i'll take something when the mama stress. It goes right to the babies and the babies we have documented. We have scientific evidence to show that there's an electromagnetic field. That may sound hokey people. But it's we are able to communicate with actual run in our spouses and our friends from three feet away without having to say work. So you know. Imagine the last time that your partner came into the house you you heard the door open and just the way. The door open enclosed. You'd know it's gonna be something that happened in their tents and they walk into the room in your tents and the kids become tense and without him or her ever seen lert in so we have to really hone in on our stress from social isolation from the zoom school from zoom work from all this other stuff because our stress affect cortisol levels are cortisol levels affect our his means and our other inflammatory markers in our body which can make us have eggs issues. Even worse. I know you talk about this in depth in year. Course but how can parents start addressing the histamine issues because certainly for kids that have that especially like you said the ones who are allergic to life. Seems like a daunting process. A lot of parents are gotta take a lot of parents feel like they have to do this all on their own because they've lost faith in the physicians they're seeing or the practitioners they're seeing. I must do it. i must. He'll am all about you. Know trying to educate empower inspire families to do it on when it gets this difficult to really important to pair up with somebody that specializes in this because it is hard. It's even better to have a community of people that are speaking. The same language are going through the same thing being doing everything alone. And now it's highlighted our social isolation in the great big world is exhausting. And you know. And i also have a question like did motherhood require an md degree. I have political science. Degree attrition. It's exhausting and so the first thing is i'm like you know find a community that speaks your language so you can be together find a provider that can direct you because the issue is shouldering can become malnourished. If we're not doing this properly you've been totally pull up a blog on his main intolerance or some gray blogs out there. I'll tell you the first few things are going to be that are histamine are going to be your processes like. We talked about dairy. Your khumbu chosen pickles. Leftovers cold cuts in steer Of course you go to bananas avocados strawberries and then you wanna cry in your pillow. 'cause you're giving your children fabulous foods but yet they may be affecting your child so i do. Just proceed with caution when it comes to a history nights in children's specifically because we are not all nutritionist. People go to school for this end. It is a delicate balance. So we don't have the children deprived in one nutrient because we're trying to avoid estimates gotcha. Okay that makes complete sense. This episode is sponsored by four sigmatic. The superfood mushroom company. That i have been talking about loving for years. I'm a big fan of all of their products especially their coffee. Infused with brain boosting lion's mane and the ratio exert night for awesome sleep recently. I've really been enjoying their protein powder. I especially love the peanut butter flavor because confession peanut butter is one of my weaknesses. And i love that now. I can get all the flavor in this protein packed format rather than in the super calorie dense format. Just peanut butter and i've been making peanut butter. Chocolate smoothies with that of people. Who has banana would probably be also a great addition but just been sticking with the chocolate and peanut butter. I love it. My kids love it too but you can try all of their products. I have yet to find one. That i don't love. Try them all at four sigmatic dot com slash wellness lobby and as a listener of this. Podcast you can save ten percent off all of their products with the code wellness mama all lower case so again that's f. r. s. I g. m. a. t. i c. Dot com forward slash wellness mama and the code wellness mama to save ten percent. This episode is brought to you by wellness wellness with an e. l. n. e. s. s. e. Which is my new company. Personal care products that go above and beyond just nontoxic to actually be beneficial for for you from the outside in. I realized years ago that even some of my most naturally minded friends and family members who made an effort to eat organic food and be really cognizant of what brought into their homes. We're still using certain certain personal care products mainly hair care oral care and the reason was they weren't willing to sacrifice how they looked and felt just use natural products and none of the natural products they were finding really lived up to the conventional products is far effective. They were so. I resolved to change this and realize i had things. I've been making my kitchen for years. That worked just as well. And then i could share with other families and thus wellness was born. He probably heard that what goes on. Our body gets into our body that many of the chemicals we encounter and in our bloodstream. To me this means nontoxic and safe should be the absolute bare minimum baseline for any products. That are in our lives. But i wanted to take it a step further. I wanted it to us to actually put beneficial ingredients in our haircare toothpaste personal care products so that they could benefit our body from the outside in. Why not use that wonderful skin barrier to our advantage so our hair care is packed with the gradients like nadal which helps haircut thicker over time are dry. Shampoo has scalp promoting products that really help follicles stay. Strong and our toothpaste for instance has a naturally occurring mineral hydroxy appetite. Which is the exact mineral. That's on our teeth. That's present in strong enamel. So they're all designed to work with the body not against it to help you have stronger healthier hair and teeth we've now have a hand sanitizer. That doesn't drought their hands. Like many hand sanitizers. Do i would be honored if you would check it out. And i would love to hear your feedback. You can find all of our products at wellness dot com. That's w. e. l. l. n. e. s. s. e. dot com so we talked about things and triggers to avoid You mentioned a few foods especially to add in are there any supplements or nutrient deficiencies. That tend to line up with xm. That parents need to be aware of vitamin d. And i know the vitamin has been hot in the press these days but vitamin now the data on vitamin d supplementation vitamin d deficiency associated with desma is nixed. You'll have studies that will show you wanna see in studies that show you that you honestly but whenever i looked at medical literature in data's mixed on i'm always looking to see but did it help some people because supplementing vitamin d. And you need to know what kind of vitamin d to make sure. That is a good quality. Vitamin d doesn't have other chemicals or additives. It is very beneficial in a lot of kids with eczema. Is it in. Everybody know nothing is in everyone. There's not one thing that i consider like that is the one thing that's gonna pure no. It's a mixture of things that's why we're talking about all of them so vitamin d. I find very beneficial in. Do ask fed if possible to get your children's vitamin d levels checked. It just helps you be more mathematical. About how much supplementation. We need to vitamin d. If possible than we have zing mixed data on this as well. But i am very encouraged by some of the studies. Coming out at twenty fourteen from topical zing to oral supplementation of a zinc sulfate specifically in men. There's a company out there that actually has zinc infused clothing. And there's studies to show that actually having those on like a jammies or dry wraps decreases in kids risk of having flares omega three essential fatty acids. of course. You guessed it. There's mixed reviews on that funded fell but they are a portion of children. I do beautifully wet by trees. Which essentially fatty acids again. You add them. As a supplement on the inside and you can actually use them as a as a topical in moline because they're so beneficial to so many things including brain health probiotics and knowing specifically which products. Because sometimes if your child is dealing with history overload some products can make that the symptoms were. That's why it's great to speak with somebody so you can know which bad except right for your child. I do use digestive enzymes day specific kind. There was one small. Study that showed a benefit for using digestive enzymes in children with asthma. So i do use those. And then i'll use Botanical herbals in children to help cleanser got an rebalancing because oftentimes they on as you know we are for everyone human cell. We are ten bacterial cells. So what. I really was actually connects from the national institute of health but there is a very fine balance bacteria so far is populated with more bad guys. We're going to have more. Xm chronic issues versus if we have more good guys so i will use A botanical herbals in order to try to rebalance the gut so we can get back in a symbiotic relationship with our friends. Got it in. Like i said i know you go in depth because there's so many different factors that come into play here so i assume every case is somewhat different but you hope pantley dial down and have a partner to work with in figuring that out. I agree with you. Motherhood should not have to have a medical degree. Although i feel like i have so many listeners. Who for the sake of their children have become extremely well educated in different areas. Just i think there's a joke that no one does better research than a mom when it comes. Kids even fbi. But i think the best case scenarios happen when you have a well educated parent working with the well educated practitioner and that gives the kids the best hope of recovery in this point. And we've touched on this a little bit. But i wanna go a little bit more specific also about the conventional medical approach to exit. Because i also have heard from so many parents who have gone to doctors and tried everything and really been diligent and still aren't seeing results. And i feel like maybe there's some holes when it comes to modern medicine and not really addressing. These root causes that you've talked about. It is totally is. There's so much other. Wanna go back to the one thing that you said about us having our md degree actually. My children are the exact reason. Why a functional medicine doctors. Because they're chronic disease. I did all my research. And i got certified in lettuce because they were suffering with chronic disease. I didn't get the answers that i was hoping from the traditional model and here we are so yet so i have to say my children are actually my greatest medical accomplishment and the reason i do listrik medicine now but going back to the whole it. Is we a lot of times. When i talked to the parents in their like. We've tried everything. Will everything that you know to try. And a lotta times. We will say what. I went to a specialist. And i'm not knocking on any schools. They're amazing schools out there but the more prestigious school the more were like. Oh but i went to see this doctor. And they're from. Let's hopkins listen harbor from. I'm not bashing any schools in just giving examples and they just say topical stuff innate do the traditional model things will if there were other options. My doctor would know because you went to a fabulous medical school and i went to a fabulous medical school too. I did not know until i did more research. I cross paths with dr mark. Hyman and that's when i was like it is true. You know people should eat more vegetables so whenever you're feeling like you have all the answers. The question is but is that all that you know. Because that's all the people that you hang out with your. I didn't know anything about functional medicine. And i didn't know anything treating my children's excellent asthma constipation. Adhd until i took a different approach in it was accidental. How i stumbled into the whole thing. And because there's so many factors between your lifestyle factors nutrition the environment they live in the Talk about the stress around in. Sometimes there is a new issue. That may be so much deeper that we need to look further than what we're normally trained to look into. I agree and i'm going to have a link in the show notes and you guys have a specialized link with especially as discount for anybody listening. Who has anyone struggling with But talk a little bit about your course. Because i think it's also so timely right now when in person visits have gotten more difficult even with primary care doctors just because of all of the current climate and everything going on and so this is a great option that works from home that really gives parents the power in the tools to start finding result for their kids right away but talk a little bit more specifically about your course the way i'd put the course together basically after treating you know hundred kids with excellent and doing all this lab work and doing food sensitivity tests in tests and Doing supplement whatever. I was like. There's a common thread to all these like you know we can reach a broader audience. We can help more modest by doing an online course and i wanted to make it so unique. That there's there's really no other course like there and what we did is is actually have module so you can do your modules and you go from understanding specifically because of the first question there has. Why does my child had excellent. So that's actually the first thing that you do you go through an exercise in the course. What help you identify. Exactly were the root causes your and then we go down. The list of like understanding of how food is related to your skin cells. Then we go into the food eliminations but all of this is actually side by side with my health coach and myself and we walk the walk with you as long as as well as the other mamas when you can yup just doing the modules. You can do it yourself. But i've so strongly believe in community and in helping one another and learning from one another. I don't know everything. I know that there's moms that are just like you said that are so researching their niche that they teach me all the time as well and so you go to your model. That are about ten minutes each you have. Pdf's you have supplements have dosing. You have the side effects like everything is explained to you. We give you recipes snacks in all the different stuff but really think what is the jewel of the mom. Is that every monday at two o'clock on facebook. My health coach gets on and she talks to my mama's about all the different struggles from parenting to food too. Picky eaters to those who have adverse reactions to different things on thursdays at two o'clock eastern time i get on my facebook live with all my mom were addresses medical questions so not only. Are you doing modules. But you actually can get personalised care so when the children are not doing exactly how the you'd expect based on the course like my mama's come on there we find tune stuff in somebody's like will you know i read about topical b twelve. Can you tell me about that Gray look into that. You know we talk about zeolite with more. We talk about all these other. Things are not even in the courts. Because my mama's want information they want more sub. They're sponges and ben direction. As i said they teach me some stuff from i had no idea about the goat milk flakes. We are last thursday on stuff that we can share with. Other mamas in the community is supporting one another. So when some. But he's doing for the all. The other moments are jumping in. And we're having a discussion in brainstorming Brainstorm without one. Moss usually shows beneficial usually shows beneficial for the other. Moms are like. Oh my gosh that's exactly was gonna ask. Why do you think about that. So it's it is very collegiate way of doing an online course. Basically you get to see a health coach and a physician twice weekly as awesome. Like i said that link will be in the show notes for you guys listening especially if you're exercising driving. That's all that is wellness mama dot. Fm you bite all the links and the discount code there and another question somewhat unrelated that i love to ask at the end of interviews is if there is a book or a number of books that have had a profound influence on your life or been really inspirational to you and if so what they are and why the latest book that i have taken to heart actually fiber fueled by dr will be a mess up his last name every single time and he has been super inspirational. He is a gastroenterologist traditionally trained and he talks about plant based diet. I'm not fully plant. Based i do lot of plans but emma plan based on the takeaway from his book has been planned points and so right now on instagram. We have a big challenge going on with plan points and the children are obsessed. Because you know what's good who's gonna give up a good competition between siblings. So i'm having children that have not been eating. A lot of plants generally speaking doing amazing because they want to out compete their their siblings so his book has been really fantastic and The other books. Like i said earlier. Dr mark hyman books which actually i accidentally stumbled upon when i was trying to my children feeling better and what he was what he refers to in his books is how will use our food to be our medicine and i can't really pick one specific one if i were perhaps one that actually speaks to executives. Like what should you eat it because a lot of people are like okay. Great now heard about the different oils. What olive oil should. i have. great. I should do. Free range redmi. Because of the labels. How do i read a label and found his book to be so helpful. In helping navigate. Our process awesome suggestions. I will put links to all of those in the show notes as well as you guys can find and read and learn but dr maria thank you so much. I think this is such an important topic. I know you have so many more resources available on your website. I'll make sure those are linked as well. But i hope this helped a lot of parents and will help a lot of kids and really appreciative of you doing this work to help so many. I'm so excited to be here. And you do such amazing work for so many families. And i am honored to be part of your tribe talking to all the moms because there's so much more to doing medicine and to everything that we do for our children and i hope as a community that would just come out just healthier on top. Absolutely i've always said mom's air force of nature. I think when you have amazing moms in connection with amazing practitioners like you then amazing things happen and very grateful to you for being here today and very grateful of course to all of you for listening for sharing your most valuable resources your time and your energy with both of us. We're so glad that you were here. And i hope that you will join me again on the next episode. Wellness mama podcast. If you're enjoying these interviews would you. Please take two minutes to leave a rating or review on. I tunes for me. Doing this helps people to find the podcast which means even more moms and families can benefit from the information. I really appreciate your time and thanks as always for listening.

eczema asthma fever Tiktok katie ramallah dr maria temple dr topol Dr anna maria seizures masol badgley food allergies asthma dupay dula harvard club Flu
Facial Recognition Fears and Rihanna + LVMH

After Hours

32:46 min | 2 years ago

Facial Recognition Fears and Rihanna + LVMH

"They each presents. Hi everyone. You're listening to after hours. I'm young me and I'm here with Felix here. Hey guys. Me here this morning, I woke up to this wonderful Email from a former student of mine Mahir, and she was talking about you because if you days ago, she attended this thing that you did in Sydney, Australia. And she said it was just absolutely fabulous. So are you still in Sydney still in Sydney and the days are a blur? What did you do is seminar, or Utah, or yes? I came here to speak to the annual shindig, for all of the securities regulators around the world, and so had a great time there, but then I gave a couple of seminars to the Harvard club of Australia and a couple of other things all as part of the book tour, and I think I knew exactly what you're talking about, and she's fantastic. And we had a great time. I have a question for you. Young me is checking Email is that the first thing you do in the morning. So my morning routine is none of your business. Frankly, good answer. Good answer. So I'm excited for tonight's conversation because I am going to insist that we do my topic tonight. She's Riyadh not exactly our comfort zone. But yes, let's try. Then Felix, I know you brought in some funny topic. Did you saw the news out of San Francisco technology capital of the world, so to speak and the board of overseers just decided to block to police from using facial recognition software? So love to get your take on that. Okay felix. So you wanted to talk about how comfortable we are living in a national digital pinup con. So this week or maybe not who knows saying Francisco leads to way, as it often does. So this is the board of overseers in San Francisco voted to block to police from using facial recognition software. And already there's a sense that other cities in California, and then certainly other say these across the country will put similar bands in effect. And this is the backdrop of really a rapid increase in the use of facial recognition technology. You may remember the horrible capital gazette shooting last year in Annapolis. Facial recognition software is part of the reason why they caught the perpetrator relatively quickly. Taylor swift is using facial recognition software to identify stockers at her concerts, and so on and so on so against the rapid use and implementation of this type of software. What do you? You think if you had been on the board, would you have voted in support of depend is the ban on the use of facial recognition software, or is the ban on video capture of citizens like in the world because they're Cici TV and there's people picking up my image, is that okay? That's totally okay. Yes. All it's doing is it doesn't allow the police today in use facial recognition software to identify who's in these videos. Well, so I think there's two different issues. You're right. One is about the precision with which this software works, and there are concerns that these softwares don't do that. Good job with underrepresented groups and given historic problems in the criminal Justice system. We worry that this would only compound all those by sees inside the criminal Justice system that to me is one problem. I actually think that's probably solvable. And by that, I mean that software over. Time could get better. And those he's gonna get better. That's not the part that worries me in the long run what worries me in the long run. I don't like all this video capture being done by governments and I, I find that when I go to the UK and see is everywhere. And in the US we haven't had that tradition, and I quite like that. I don't like my face being captured all the time. I don't want it to be captured in the first place. And then I certainly don't want state authorities to use facial recognition software to try to match it. Think there we are entering into like totalitarian landscape. I know that sounds like a kind of crazy off the grid kind of guy, but that, that really does worry me I would've voted in favor of the ban as well, impart because I think we all just need to pause for a second before we aggressively begin to roll out this kind of technology, simply because we can so right now it is an absolute free for all because there are no federal laws or regulations. That create any kind of boundary on what's acceptable. And if you look at other countries, so China's an example of a country where there is extensive use of face recognition software. And sometimes it creates an incredible while factor. So if you go to the airport in China, you can walk up to a kiosk that will just read your face and within seconds. The screen will show you where you're Gators. And when you use that kiosk for the first time at freaks people out, but there's a little bit of delight to because of the efficiency, but in China also, though, the government uses it to survey, the weaker Muslim minority. And so it's a bit of a free for all, and I would hate for us to go down this path before we are able to have a conversation about, what are we comfortable with what kind of regulation should we put in place? So, yeah, I would have voted in favor of the ban. You just kinda summarize to me, what was really worrisome, which is we're trading off would seem to me to be kind of, like tiny efficiency gains, which is open. A cool. I get to go to my gate quickly with this much like deeper loss of privacy, and it's kind of crazy in a wit, and I think part of what's interesting about the current situation is, we've been pretty careless about what can be collected in the first place and one reason why it didn't matter so much was. There was no way to really make use of all the information that we collected and say the whole debate around Cici TV everywhere is like, yes, there's all these images. And there's just no chance that anyone can actually, you know, at scale then analyze who's doing what and who moves how in the public sphere, more recently, the National Institute of standards and technology. They have documented that even just in the last four five years systems have become twenty times better for now down to failure rates of point two percent, but the bigger debate is the classic notion at least denied. States is that are you in a space where you can have a reasonable expectation of being private right? The reason why you need a wiretap to listening to a phone conversation is that when we call each other, we have an expectation of privacy if we, walk down a public road, we have no expectation of privacy, and as a result, that information at least given the current legal landscape is our progress is up for analysis. This is what's problematic about this. I don't think it's about real reasonable expectation of privacy. So I don't want to be captured on video and have that funneled to the state on a twenty four hour basis whenever I'm in public and the fact that you say, well, oh, me here you're in public space. You don't have a reasonable expectation of privacy that doesn't feel right? Not how the current love works. That's the legal basis for all the CC TV. I think the problem with that is who's collecting the data and the idea of the state is collecting the data is really problematic, because once they have that day. Oh, they can do a lot of things with it. And that to me is zero TAY with company stewing. This that's problematic for sure. But I usually have some control over that, right? In the, when the government does it in all public spaces. Now, we're talking about an entity that has incredible power knowing everything about where I am. But they're private companies that are doing it across all public and private spaces. So we'll see. How can they do that in public speaker phone knows where you are at all times? But I can deny them locations ervices, I have choices about that. I mean you think you can. But well though you're right. We don't know, for sure. Literally have to remove the sim card, and that in and of itself is still not sufficient rates of governments can do things. I mean governments can put me in jail and private actors can't right. I mean that's a difference. Yeah. Look, I find it all increasingly troubling. You know, the biggest fear at least with respect to governments is that your private life becomes weaponized and used against you. In the case of commercial activity, it makes your private licence source of profit for other companies in ways that you might not necessarily be fully informed about, but I gotta tell you like at a whole different level. The whole thing is just making me increasingly an easy. And if you had asked me, a year ago, I would have been less. Uneasy because I would rationalize it by saying, I don't care. I don't care people know where I go, and they can take photos of me and I have nothing to hide. But what has made me, increasingly uncomfortable is not the collection of the data, but my understand. Of what they can now do with it. So they can take this meta data and the ability now to create a kind of meta intelligence about me, that is unprecedented. That's what makes me feel really uncomfortable. And I think there is a cultural costs that we pay when we give it that kind of privacy, I kind of agree, completely with what you're saying, but there is a pardon me, which feels like we're on a train, and it's moving. And like we can pause it. But God I, I grew everything you're saying. I mean, they used to be if you wanted privacy, you just went into your room and you shut the door and think about it now, your phone is collecting data. Your Alexa, your fit bit. There's no privacy anywhere. And the reason it concerns me just at the level of our collective psyche. It disturbs me is that privacy is a form of freedom and it enables us to explorer selves, to test the boundaries of who we are. So you might be a teenager trying to figure out your sexuality you might be. Secretly contemplating career change you might be exploring alternative religions in others privacy is freedom because it begins with this notion that there's something that belongs to you. And that's you who you are your inner desires, your behavioral tendencies the very essence of your being belongs to you, and it's up to you, who you share it with. I mean, this is what intimacy is this is what it means to own your own sense of self. And when you give that to someone else it's a special thing, because you're basically saying, I'm sharing with you me. And now all of that is lost all meeting. And so we're just giving away to other people who we are. And that to me feels like we're losing something very, very important. You said it so beautifully. I think this is one of the reasons why thinking about where we can and cannot reasonably have explosions of privacy by this is so important. It seemed, you know, at one point in time, it seemed. Not really giving up all that much. If there's no reasonable expectation of being private in your in public spaces, and now is not so clear, because that information has gone from being utterly useless because you didn't have that technology to make sense of it to now being highly highly relevant, and so what I fear a little bit. Is that the war on tools such as facial recognition in a way is not quite a right battle to fight, because I think there's something much more fundamental that has happened and the usual regulation that consent. I think we know you know, from the hundred sixty eight page user agreement that you sign whenever you download the weather app contentious doesn't work because you don't really have a sense of the trade off that you're making you consent to information about you being used in particular way, or would either of you consider kind of giving up the tech. Logical devices to kind of re install a level of privacy in your life. Have you ever even Sean plated here? This is such a great question. We are inconsistent in the kind of exposure, will tell her so we don't like being fingerprinted, by government agents. But we will happily give our thumbprint to apple to make it easier to log into our phones, apple has all of our fingerprints, and you get used to things, so Craig, I remember maybe a good year ago. It happened to me for the first time, my bought something at a duty free shop in an airport that they scanned and captured the image of my passport, right? I think it was buying pistachios or something like this, like, why exactly do you need? My passport information for me to be able to buy a bag of nuts. And today, I still find a little curious but I have basically, you know, if you buy something at the free shop, basically, they're going to capture your passport. But when you think about it, like what can? Possibly be the justification of this. And yes, it's slippery slope. Yeah, increasingly I am becoming more sensitive to how much privacy how much it gives us human dignity. And it's not about, oh, I don't you know, my life is an open book kind of thing privacy is not the same thing as secrecy. Like when you go into the closet. We know what you're doing in there. You're changing clothes, but we still respect your right to close the door. So it's no, we give something away when we reveal who we are. And that's why revelation is a gift. It's a gift a friendship. And it's a gift of fellowship, and it's just I don't know it all feels very. Hopeless to me. I don't know what else to say. Back to my original point living in a digital panopticon the fact of her having this conversation. The fact that at least three of us I mean, here was probably always into right place. But as the two of us have moved a little bit thinking about what this means. I think it's a good sign. Yeah, I'm optimistic because I think the very fact that are feelings about what is happening right now have changed. That's the beginning of change feeling that such a good point year ago. We had this conversation and Mahir was, this is horrible. And, you know, you and I were just, you know, it's not that big a deal. And now I find myself in a very different place me here. Don't get smug. He will be really interesting, if, if a candidate in twenty twenty like really embrace this issue and tried to make a big deal about it because I haven't really heard somebody talk as eloquently, you've been talking about a young knee, and it would be interesting. If a candidate really push this as an issue, and, you know, to the point, you may young, which is we need a pause. But we also need somebody to lead the discussion. Yeah. Right. And it would be great candidate actually took this up as an issue 'cause we then really benefit from having a national conversation on in a way. That's not happening at all. Yeah. So who knows what be a good idea for the candidates to listen to after hours, no alternatively Felix? I'm thinking Felix. It might just be better. If we just do young me twenty. At a time. Right. So riana this past week, LVMH, which is the world's largest luxury goods, conglomerate, and 't. It is going to launch a new fashion house led by riana. It's Fendi Mazo. Is this a big deal to this catcher? I yes, I think it's a big deal for a couple of reasons. Right. One is, it's a big deal because LVMH does not start a fashion house every other day, right? Huge investment. And they only do it once in a while. I think lost one might have been Christian across the second reason why it's huge. It's the first time I think a woman of color has run a house, which is also kind of amazing. But to me, the bigger story is this is like the next step in celebrities taking ownership of their brand, and creating businesses around themselves. And that is really, I think interesting. So I had a similar reaction in that I think is really interesting to see that this happens would I'm less sure about this. Is it something big and systematic that makes us? Rethink how luxury works into role of celebrities, or is it just that here's this one woman? She's just basically super talented at everything like she's a great musician. She's a fabulous singer. She has actually quite a history of designing clothing also. And so the part that I'm less sure about this. Is it more as story about celebrities and how they will interact with commerce, or is it more about, oh my God? Someone like riana comes along every decade once or twice, and it's more story about her. Yes, let's unpack it a little bit. So if you think about it from the perspective of a conglomerate like LVMH historically, there had been many flirtations with celebrity. So it used to be, and it continues to be the case that celebrity endorsements are really common. And so you have Nicole Kidman at Chanel and Natalie Portman, at Dior as sort of these celebrity brand ambassadors. The second. Stage, which we've seen a ton of in the last ten years has been this whole phase where they begin to dabble a little bit more aggressively in collaborations, particularly with respect to street wear and sportswear. So cognac. Yes, exactly what you're seeing here. This is very different me here. You mentioned this LVMH has not launched a new house in more than thirty years. So the way the company is organized, they have seventeen houses in fashion. Right. Exactly. But these fashion houses, these are brands like Dior Vinci, Celine, Louis tone. These are heritage brands that are part of this richly historical European definition of culture and luxury. And now they have elevated riana to that rank, and so it's quite the seismic shift in how we think about the upper echelon of luxury. Why do you think they went with real Anna? So one of the things to think about this. What does riana have that is really hard to get for LVMH? And I think the answer is axes to a young very diverse audience. That riana is much better at building this audience than LVMH with all of its marketing savvy and old the experience at the half. That's not something they can easily do. And so I'm thinking we're seeing this power shift because there's a new way to build audiences, and it's all online and Instagram plays a huge role and LVMH basically, shut out unless they go through someone like Riano with the exception of beyond say, I don't think anyone kind of comes close to Rana, and I think the reason why I she's Doral she's been around for fifteen years now and she's very young, but she's demonstrated her capacity to survive. And that is amazing. But I think what is special about her is that she works in high culture as well as on the low side to which is broad mass appeal, but then she's cultivated an image in the world of haute, couture, and in very high end world as being edgy, and I think that edginess has given her something that none of the others have. Have her ability to kind of be broadly popular to be edgy and then also to kind of appeal to people who perceive themselves to have higher sensibilities. I think that is unique and that doesn't work for the other folks with the exception of again beyond say, so that makes her special add is that she is a proven quantity. So Elliott they began by doing these joint ventures. And of course, the most high profile one they did was with Feni, beauty so Feni beauty is the cosmetics brand that riana launched in late two thousand seventeen did you guys follow that story the launch offense beauty? You're listening. I remember really is the tagline naked is not beige, which I thought was just spot on really like a great line to sort of position the Brandon what it was all about. Yeah. So when Fendi beauty dropped it hit like a mediator, she launched with forty shades with beautiful quality price. Accessibly with a particular emphasis on providing extensive shade choices for people with deeper skin tones. So now why is this a big deal? It's a big deal because historically, one of the criticisms of this industry was that there's a whole spectrum of humankind that this industry was missing out on, so she drops Feni, beauty. And in the first month of her launch seventy two million dollars in sales. In two thousand eighteen which is the first full year offensive beauty. She did have a billion dollars in sales. Is your sense that there's competition is your sense? When you talk about the beauty line is now that it's out the now that they're stemming instructed demand. Are we seeing that most beauty companies will offer similar products are similar quality? Yes. So that's a great question. So what happens in any industry, where copycatting is not that difficult? The survivors tend to be the ones that demonstrate that they can create an innovation engine. And so they're always innovating. Everybody's always playing catch-up. So she then launched to conceal her body lava, and of course in these industries, your ability to do that. Well as determined by for example, your tastes making ability, and your ability to understand what the market's going to respond to your timing ability, so your ability to have a sense of when is it too soon to launch the next thing when is it about time to lunch? The next thing in other words in the last eighteen months with Feni beauty. She has demonstrated an extraordinary ability to guide this brand forward in a way that shows remarkable potential is Sephora an important part of the story. I'm thinking of the Pixar Disney relationship where you have just like incredible creativity at Pixar, and then this. Best in class marketing machine called Disney can bring out the products. Is that the kind of relationship that we should think that's the riana LVMH tie up? Yeah. You know by partnering with LVMH so, for example, when she launched anti-beauty it launched in Sephora, which meant that it launched in hundreds and hundreds of stores in it heavily orchestrated choreographed campaign. So it hit the world, all at once you can only do that with LV major in many ways is why the latest announcement about if you think about Feni Maison, which is the new fashion line. I mean she is going to have access to the best platform in the world in terms of distribution supply chain access to the most prime real estate in the most important cities around the world. And so this is I think where the partnership becomes really important. I never understood fully, how much of LVMH power comes from real estate until I was talking to them. And I realized that their ability to kind of get. Prime locations and rental rates that are really good because they become the defining characteristic of a mall like I have see Shanghai or any other place. And then they have so much power that they're actually their economics are so much better. And they're of course dangerous in question is I mean importance for real estate personnel. I think is going to be very different right compared to the importance of real estate for fantasy. I think is maybe another way to sink about the relationship that it gives them access to marketing resources into channels, where they have not really played traditionally because that wasn't their core audience. That's the other piece of this. That is fascinating to me, which is that in effect, the best way to do that is to partner with a pre existing brand, which is what riana is in effect, and that strikes me as the really interesting thing to see over time, which is do we no longer want to build our brands and is it just better to buy a brand and buying a brand basically means buying a celebrity? So is there any? Celebrity out across this landscape that you would look at and say, that's the next big one. That's one that could potentially be elevated to this heightened level of hard to discount. Cognac western what he's done. Of course. It comes with a huge amount of all Attila the with him. Because of what he says, and what he does, but it's hard to just discount. The fact that he created a fashion line that went high and was able to succeed in went low and broad and was able to succeed. I think Belan say and her tied up with us is probably of similar significance. It's always a little hard to know from the outside, maybe only difference being that Riano seems to be super hands on obviously, there's a creative team around but down to details. She seems to be super super involved, and I think that's part of what's really special and unique about her. What do you think young me? I think your instinct about kinda is exactly right. I think he is somebody who the industry, and I'm talking about the high fashion industry has kept an eye on yet, hasn't fully embraced. And I think what he has demonstrated. I mean he has a track record now for being heavily heavily involved in design. There's a particular aesthetic that he has brought to the world and. I think people associate aesthetic with him. So it's uniquely his so I find him to be really fascinating in that regard final question on the one hand from an LVMH perspective. You could say that very easily. This is an attempt to appeal to younger customers and broaden customer base. But you know LVMH plays the long long game. The L game. They're not thinking in terms of what's going to sell tomorrow, when they launch a house, they're thinking about generation after generation, and they're doing it in the high luxury space. This is not low luxury. This is not coach. This is not Burberry. This is high luxury. And so they're making a bet that this is what high luxury is going to be for multiple generations. Are they making a mistake? Are they gonna regret this for the size off the group? I think there's a thirty million dollar capital investment, which is more than they spend on other houses. But it's this sort of a make or break kind of decision. I mean, even if say Fendi turns out to be successful for the next five years. And then there, some sort of a meltdown, I don't think for the group as a whole. This is this significant business investment, I think it's got to be a winner and the way they've branded it and to your point about the way they did the cosmetics line. It's accessing a whole new population that wants to actually aspire to a brand. And so I think it's fantastic move sell Fendi Maison will debut in Paris, the summer, and I will be watching. And you will tell us about it. I hope I will. Okay. Thanks case. Okay. Guys, I have a really good pick for you, so on HBO. There is a new miniseries called Chernobyl. So I've only watched two episodes, and I think there will be a total of five episodes, and it's a recounting of the turnover incident and it is so well done. And it is so harrowing, and what I find remarkable about it is the pacing of it is so measured. In other words, they didn't Hollywood it up, may didn't create the pounding music. It's none of that. It unfolds the way you imagine the actual incident unfolded documentary. No. I'm sorry. It's not a documentary. But it's based tightly on the actual incident to the point, where specific characters represent real people. You know, when I saw it on HBO I wasn't going to watch it, and then I got a tech. From one of my sons and it just had one line. It's it mom chur noble. You gotta watch it. And so then I thought, okay, I'll give it a try. You have to be in the right mood for it. But it's really good. So I would recommend it. So here what he got. So I got something later. Which is a show and a comedy that was on BBC a couple years ago, and now it has a second season and it's available on Amazon prime, and it's called fleabag, and it is pretty dark humor, but it is hysterical, and it's created by women Phoebe Waller bridge, who started with a one woman show, I think, in life theater, and then became a TV show and it's just about her life in the life of a young woman who has had some bad things happen to her. But it's about the way she kind of makes her way in the world, and it is both hilarious. And also thought provoking is really fantastic. So it's called fleabag dark, and funny, and really thought provoking. So fleabag is my pick didn't she also create killing eve, you're absolutely right? So she wrote and produced killing you, and she's also like thirty three years old, which is creating. Fantastic. Okay, Felix, the New York Times had a headline not so long ago that caught my attention. The best green salad in the world. The most Email, it was most emailed forever. Right. This is from a restaurant in New York, invest village at the cow rota. But I thought like how can that be, you know, we have green salad, basically forever. Like, how can it be that all of a sudden someone invents like far far away to crack the code? So as you can imagine to try to make that Sal. It's awesome. It's all the things you'd expect. It's all voile. It's Sherry vinegar. It's shallots, and so on so, so nothing special except there are a few things. So, for instance, after you cut the shallots you rinse them in water, and then you steep them in water for a little while and it's just amazing about cooking. How sometimes the tiniest little details really can make a difference. So if you go it, I'm sure it's easy to find, is it really the best ballads halls on the planet. I am not totally sure. Is it pretty darn amazing? Yes. Absolutely. As someone who is trying to teach myself out to cook. I need to ask you went question. So when you steep shallots for a few seconds, it really changes it a really changes it, you have to do it to believe. Okay, got out salad. In particular salad tossed. All right. Fantastic recommendations, I guess that's it for this week? Thanks, everyone for listening. This is after hours from the HP our podcast.

LVMH Felix LVMH Cici TV Fendi Sydney Riyadh Annapolis San Francisco Taylor swift China Australia Harvard club of Australia Riano Utah Francisco California US China
Recapture the Rapture: Alchemist-Like Cookbooks, Carbon Dioxide & Nitric Oxide Inhalation, Sexuality, Music, Mind-Enhancing Substances & More With Jamie Wheal.

Ben Greenfield Fitness

1:35:52 hr | 2 weeks ago

Recapture the Rapture: Alchemist-Like Cookbooks, Carbon Dioxide & Nitric Oxide Inhalation, Sexuality, Music, Mind-Enhancing Substances & More With Jamie Wheal.

"On this episode of the ben greenfield fitness podcast. They're like oh my gosh. Sex drugs and rock and roll are going to be the end of civilization but in fact sex drugs and rock and roll where actually the beginnings of civilization our people are better off. never mind the skid marks. Let's get there as fast as possible. Is what sets us up for an awful lot of sociopathic solutions and movements states. We've ever had that often. Appear to be meaningful and can often guide the way into a more courageous life to live performance nutrition longevity ancestral living biohacking and much more. My name is ben greenfield. Welcome to the show all right if you didn't hear yet. My cookbook is here. It's lost people all over the world or sending in photos of these wonderful wild meats and grilled recipes and suvi and pressure cookers and smokers and smoothies and cocktails and craziest eyeballs. Every weird recipe of come up with my kids have come up with my wife's lovely sourdot bread recipes in their beautifully laid out with tips with the science behind the meals. You can wrap your head around why it's good for you by the time you finish this book or by the time you just cook a few of the recipes in this book you are going to amplify on your appreciation for good food and how to cook it but also nutrient density digestibility health. This book is designed for as the name implies. Boundless energy go to boundless cookbook dot com to grab this cookbook now. Boundless cookbook dot com. Check it out. This podcast is brought to you by kion. Our most popular product there bar. None is our essential amino acids formula It's like a swiss army knife for everything from sleep to gut stability to building muscle to say sheeting. The appetite in a fasted state to dumping a bunch of neurotransmitter and protein in muscle precursors. Your body everybody. Who takes us stuff tells me i get tax from people all over Including big health influencers. Like what the heck dude. I feel like i'm on steroids. I'm sleeping less more. Energy building muscle satiated with far fewer calories. That's that's keenum knows does for you and a whole lot more. We have researched the best ratio. We put it in both a tab. Anna powdered format. And you get twenty percents off of this stuff or any of the fine fine products from kion go to get kion dot com slash. Ben greenfield get k. I. o. n. dot com slash ben greenfield. I was just telling me about the amino but you can bundle that with any of our products. Twenty percent discount at checkout get kion dot com slash ben greenfield. This podcast is also brought to you. I didn't really realize this. Until i really dug in but Wrinkles and scars and stretch marks. I just got stitches on my thumb. Last week i've been using this on my thumb in the scars. Healing up just dramatically. It's red light. I have one of these. Well i got big red lights. But i had this little ones called jew go. I can take it with me anyway. So my desk and china on my thumb or really anywhere else. Face treatments hair treatments Spot treatments the big ones. You could do full body treatments with it. Uses pulsed. Near infrared light technology gives your cells extra healing boost also great for testosterone thyroid function. Circadian rid misty. Juve does a really good job with their lights and they just upgraded all their devices to be sleeker up to twenty five percent lighter package with new features like they're they're light therapy modes anyways. Though the the juve company does a really good job with with all things light you get an exclusive discount on your first order when you get a juve. Dot com slash. Ben that's j. o. V. v. dot com slash. Ben are. i folks he's back my guest on today's podcast is jamie wheel. Jamie just wrote a new book. It's called recapture the rapture. And he actually did a podcast with me last year in which we kind of like previewed. The release of this book talks about biohacking sex and tantric breath work and plant medicines for orgasmic enhancement and the following that particular episode. My wife and i actually went on a hotel retreat and tried out just about everything jamie and i talked about in that show. I don't recall getting much sleep that night. But it was certainly quite a bonding experience. Jay jamie as a matter of fact at one point in the evening We we were just so high on life that We we left the hotel and went walking. Run down for about two hours and stopped at some random bar and sat out on the patio and in jordan amazing meal together then went back to the hotel room so that it was like a like an eight hour four a with with the restaurant stop and a walk through town kind of like halfway through. So yeah do exactly that. That's actually one of the best things everybody does dinner and a movie or whatever they do out on. The town is sort of foreplay. But in fact if you actually do if you reverse it and you do it as afterglow just go out into the world just happy as clams who was great stoking out the world yet. Superfund yeah it was it was like afterglow slash four play because when we went back to the hotel after just kind of kept going so anyways though as as you listening in might imagine jamie covers some pretty wildly stimulating topics in his books however he also ah delves into a lot of a lot of kind of visionary thinking He he calls himself. I believe in neuro anthropologist. i'll at him clarify. What exactly. that is momentarily But this new book finally came out it's called recapture the rapture rethinking god sex and death in a world that's lost its mind In jeannie does he combines this unique flavor of neuroscience and psychology but then he throws a bunch of practical stuff like breath work and movement and and sexuality in this book kind of kind of brings all that together and it has this basic big idea that we're suffering culturally from a collapse in meaning and that fundamentalism and nihilism or filling that vacuum with consequences that are affecting all of us. The book is split into three sections. The first part is about the coming apocalypse so to speak The middle part which is my favorite part in and to be honest with you. Probably the part that will focus on most. Today is called the alchemist cookbook that that was that that's the most dog-eared section of my copy recapture the rapture and in the final word is called ethical colt building. Now jimmy also wrote stealing fire which is also a great book. How silicone valley navy seals and maverick scientists are revolutionizing the way we live and work He founded the flow genome project and he speaks all over the world. He's in high demand based on his outside the box thinking and he lives in the rocky mountains in some off grid cabin somewhere. I don't know it's probably something he can't talk about. Because when not writing it can be found mountain biking kite surfing and backcountry skiing. And i'm sure he doesn't want anybody to bug him however he is being bugged today by me so welcome to the show. Jamie what an intro and psyched to be back in jamming with you've been. Yeah we're man word or as as we say on my show when i'm interviewing you not jamming jamie ing right jamie Okay so so. I have to ask you what. The heck is a neuro anthropologist. Did you just make that up. Yes one hundred percent. But it gave me permission to do the thing that i was. Oh i realized. I'd been doing all along. So my academic background actually through grad school Was in actual history historical anthropology so that was legit amount of training which is just how do you assess and compare different cultural approaches to the same fundamental human condition across time and space and way davis. Who's a friend and one of my mentors. He's the harvard. Mto botanist and national geographic explorer in residence in like kind of like a real life indiana jones. He said something really profound in one of his ted talks like we have to stop thinking of other cultures as deficient attempts to be to be our culture. You know you have to kind of look at them intrinsically in their own million and just sort of an and build up from there. so that's that's anthropology but for me narrow anthropology is really Taking a look at interesting things that you see around you in the world with happened in your life and say okay. That's interesting right now. Who else has done similar stuff across time and space and then you start seeing patterns you like. Oh we're not the first. We're not the last. How else have other folks approach this. And then you start getting a kind of a pattern language of whether that's belief whether that's breath work or that sexuality with that substance use whether that's innovation with technology whatever like nothing new under the sun so you go back and you you kind of get a case study of like half a dozen examples at dozen examples and that then you can start kind of extracting what are the commonalities. And then the niro pod which was really recent like we've only even had this capacity for the last few decades is to say okay if it's shown up across centuries and you know it around the world that probably there there why does it work. The neurobiological putters. What's under the hood. What are the actual mechanisms of action because most culture comes wrapped in mythologies. We do this thing because our gods gave it to us or we do this thing. Because we've always done this thing because you're great great. Great great grandpa did the thing right but very rarely do we. Do we strip out the mythology and just look at and understand the technology. What was the functional mechanism of action. So near anthropology is backwards looking retrospective but once you get that and you're like okay. This is the source code of why the things well then you can engage in the process of culture architecture which is forward-looking now that we understand why things work the way they do. We don't just have to bring them wholesale wrapped in their stories. We can actually just bring through the how they were in the why they work to build more effective more vibrant social and human organization Interesting and it seems like there. There's also a lot of kind of philosophy woven into writing in almost like social theory or was that all all things that you covered in college or in university and neur- anthropology studies or is that just something that you kind of sprung into being interested in along the way. Yeah i mean. I think that's probably coming out. Of most of my academic renaming i was i was all down a phd. Done all my course work By the age of twenty two. So i've kind of gone lickety-split through that sort of academic system. And then i just got to the end of it and i realized i was actually hopelessly naive about what being an academic entailed these days and i had to kind of really look long and hard at and go. Oh actually i'd rather go out and do stuff then be down in the basement. You know assessing tax records and dusty old dusty all data so i kind of came to the conclusion i was like. Oh i think. I actually i love. Love love reading whether it's guns jones and sapiens or things. I love reading brilliant people within the disciplines even more than the how the sausage is actually made crunching a bunch of really tired and dry stuff myself so i was like. Let's go out and live. Let's go out and build stuff. Those frameworks and structures of how to look at race class gender environment. Belief systems ideologies. All of these things and look at how they intersect and how we got to now. I would say that's kind of been a foundation for all my other curiosities. Yeah it's it's so interesting. I mean not like nowadays with with spec scans and in cuba. Eeg's and all these methods of of quantifying the brain. It would be interesting to say like go back in. See what the prefrontal cortex of the founding fathers was doing you know in terms of taking information categorizing it relating to other pieces of information and cut it kind of see from an anthropological standpoint. How much of american culture for example is influenced by by the neurology of of our founding. Fathers or something like that it. It'd be interesting to kind of like fast forward. One hundred years now that we do have access to that data and we'll be able to say okay. Well here's here's how bill gates and ray dalia inject doors e in jamie wheel and ben greenfield influenced influence culture in this day. And i'm just throwing our names in there to make a sound like we're we're amazing cultural influencers to draft up. We'll draft off that that list all day long. Yeah i mean. I mean an example of a very specific example just to kind of ground. This folks is in the study of this book in the preparation to write the section on respiration. I was looking at. Oh how to pray at work right around the world and there was a study on tibetan. Own money pod home like that that kind of classic tibetan incantation comparing it to The catholic hail. Mary hail mary full of grace. Lewis with the and there was parallels with them effectively in training people into Alpha wave eeg frequencies because Said in a certain way with rosaries like so. You're you're kneeling. You're staying in front of votive candles so there's visual stimulation flickering dim light there smells. There's the smells and bells of incense or candles. There's an icon in front of you whether it's a patron saint or it's or it's a raffle or benevolent deity in tibetan buddhism. Whatever it would be kind of a bunch of things or even in a in a sort of What do they call them in interrogation a forced. There's something posture. I don't know i've never been interrogated. He exactly but like kneeling for an extended period of time. Like with without your butt on the floor and you know is is a restriction. It actually how you can breathe and all these kind of things. And then you're engaged in a force respiratory pattern with tactile stimulation to offload your prefrontal cortex and executive function. You're now just feeling your way along. Your mallaby leads right. One hundred eight times or in a catholic rosary. Something else that you're offloading conscious working memory and then you're doing a nine second or nine hurts. Repetitive breath patent right. Which in trains you into nine hurts alpha waves dates. And you're like oh okay so it totally makes sense given all of those just again neurophysiological substrates to what is a cultural religious spiritual practice. That yeah you can totally bet that the odds are the odds are greater than average that something interesting will happen for those folks when they enact all of those things but there's a substrate that shed across culture and you're like oh neat you know like this is how we clever monkeys do stuff. This is how we build the layers of our socially constructed worlds as fascinating. Well you know. My wife. And i were having dinner last night on the porch with the the boys as we usually do in the evenings having family dinner and eating some fish and playing a game and i mentioned that i was going to be doing a podcast interview this morning and she said with who and i said jimmy wheels. She's like well you know. Who is he wrote. This book called recapture the rapture and and she said what's that even mean as what do you mean. She said what what. What's that mean. Recapture the rapture. What was it. what's the rapture mean. I i was trying to explain it to her. And i thought you know what this would actually be great question for jamie like like in terms of the whole idea of a rapture. You know the way that i understood. Especially the first part of your book was that we kind of have woven into human culture this idea of a oncoming kind of like cataclysm or rapture type of event and i. It seems that the book is kind of centered around that type of event. But but can you explain kind of like the title behind. The book like what is recaptured. The rapture actually mean if you're stuck on an elevator with my wife. Well i mean think the first part is you know the the the most succinct description. I've heard of it is is yates's pawn the second coming where which is about like what misshapen beast. It's our come round at lost ledges towards bethlehem right that that one to sort of spooky one he wrote after world war one in the last four five years. It's become the most such poem the things fall apart. The center cannot hold was like the most searched key would in two thousand sixteen. The dow jones wall street journal did a semantic analysis on interstate. So clearly it's up for us right like like what is happening right now but buried in like the last stanzas of the poem. He says the best lack all conviction while the worst are filled with passionate intensity and it really seemed to me in the formulating of this book was is like wow man. It really does feel like the crazies of hijacked the mike. It feels like there's this huge moderate middle of really decent live-and-let-live hardworking people. That just kind of want a shot at you know pursuing their dreams and and and having their kids live a better life than they got to. And that's kinda the way it's always been as where. Increasing entering increasingly intense inconsequential times where our our collective challenges absolutely mandate collective solutions that that we are being led led astray right by passionately intense Minorities and and the question that said the recapture the rapture became kind of a play. On words. right it was it was lower case rapture. Hey where all jacked up stressed out. Isolated lonely anxious depressed all the things that you know folks facing wrestling with these days so we need to recapture are lower case. Rapture right we kinda need to process our grief in our trauma. We need to remember our inspiration. Our highest purpose. We need to connect to each other and high. You know high trust joyful relationships we need that as a sort of rocket fuel to face the challenges ahead but then there's also the capital rapture which is where are we going at the end of days kind of thing and and can we. Can we steer this in a way. That forges solutions. That work for all of us. Not just a tiny fraction of us. And can we do that together yet. For for me grownup christian the rapture was always know within the branches of like american evangelicalism. You know this time event you know when when all the believers who are alive come rise into the clouds to to meet the lord in the air and in the in the bodies become resurrected in that that's kind of been my own flavor of what exactly a rapture is but it sounds like you know one of the things that that seems going through the pages of the book is that culturally or anthropology anthropologically this idea of a rapturous kind of woven into in most cultures. Yeah it it's fascinating actually an and And i and i've shared this. Because i was i've been so geeked on it. But there's a fellow John gray at the london school of economics who wrote a book called black mass apocalyptic religions in the death of utopia and he just lays out this thesis which blew my mind. I don't know whether i'm just super duty. Maybe maybe ben you've got equal cred But he was basically he just. He just kind of made a very convincing argument that in the west at least in the judeo christian west right we have a very unique version of time. So for all you know. For almost all indigenous societies hunter gatherer societies in even pre industrial agrarian societies. Right time was mostly cyclical. It was the seasons and it went around and around right it was rigorous. It was the snake that eats its tail right and there was a sense of very little forward motion through history and a whole lot of same as it ever was what comes around goes around right. And the hebrew tradition. that really insane shaded. The in the beginning was the word and at the end. There's an end right. The alpha and the omega. That broke the you know the secular time and then hammered it into time's arrow the specific contours of that story are really familiar to us but so familiar. We don't realize that they were actually novel. Once upon time. Which was there was a time back when all was perfect and that you know indigenous nations. That's you we could talk to the animals and this and that obviously in the judeo christian tradition. It's the garden of eden. Then there is a fall right from grace that somehow starts history right. There was a sort of suspended animation in the pasta and then history begins. And there's there's a there's a fall from grace of some sort and then there is this moment or inflection point that got the omega pointy end point where that changes and then we're delivered to a heaven on earth or off it and john gray's point was he's like that is such a deep groove in our kind of myth oh poetic narrative structures the stories. We tell that it even shows up in the atheist movements like socialism and communism in the twentieth century. The communism was effectively that identical story. Just minus god. You know there was the idea that we were happy. Hunter-gatherer phone than the fall from grace was the rise of the capitalist owner kloss and you know man is everywhere born everywhere in chains right. Then there's this redemptive movement of the communist the the revolution and a communist utopia that we all live in right happily ever after and that could just be like a sort of not historical side until you look around today and then you realize oh my. Gosh everybody from techno utopians like we're going to upload our consciousness to computers or ilan's gonna give us near lincoln. We're all going to be smarter than they. I or blockchain is going to take over the world and we're all going to be living in super groovy super groovy independent cities dates. You know. never mind all the countries and all the taxes and this and that or it's seized ebbing or it's you know more Volatile versions like alright identity arians or isis or anything else you realize holy smokes or psychedelic. New age magical thinkers that we're all going to vibrate out to the fifth density gotten techno utopian. You've got magical spiritual you've got fundamentalist traditional you got all sorts of visions and they almost all follow that same pattern and the pot. That's so insidious and tricky is that no matter how they slice it. They're all one percenter solutions on my one percent might be the moral it might be the fellow believers it could be the meritocratic. It could be the smartest best and the brightest. It could be economic. You've got you've got a quarter of a million bucks for a ticket the ticket to as a space colony right whatever. It is like their thin slice solutions. As a result they all they all kind of share a same four-stage stage framework. And this is what. I would sort of classified like a working checklist to say. Is there rapture ideology and play which is the world is we notice screwed. And there's no saving it like it's actually more messed up than it is salvageable there's an inflection point in the near future coming soon and we can see it from here. We point at it. We can anticipate it might even put a pin in the calendar on the other side of the inflection. Point our tribe our people. We are actually better off not whistle no matter how scary the road to get there right right and therefore let's accelerate to get there as fast as possible because happy days are head for us and it's that lost the last two. Our people are better off and never mind the skid marks. Let's get there as fast as possible. Is what sets us up for an awful lot of sociopathic solutions and movements. And so that's really you know that was kind of the hot intention of of saying. Hey i just kinda wanna ring the bell here rise. Anybody else seeing what i'm seeing and if so we should all be in this conversation together you briefly allude to the idea of calendar and that. That's what i think is is funny. Because like i used to walk into your the christian bookstore in loosen idaho where i'd grow up and inevitably like every year there'd be the new book about when jesus's return was going to happen or win. The rapture was going to happen. You know i. It was going to be in like eighteen. Forty four and then like nineteen eighty-one in nineteen eighty eight. and then. I think the most recent one was based on astrological theories like two thousand seventeen. And fortunately for me. I i actually am. I grew up a little bit more post millennial and still believe that in in terms of the christian approach to the rapture that you know the the entire tribulation foretold in revelation in the bible and all of that was kind of fulfilled during the jewish roman war. Back in kind of like sixty to seventy ad when jerusalem was destroyed and that now the world isn't necessarily going to hell in a hand basket. You know fast. Forward into some intense apocalyptic event but instead everything is getting better and better and better as heaven on earth just kind of gradually comes to life and you know so i kind of fall onto camp of guys like john bunyan or jonathan edwards or charles finney when it comes to the way that i view the rapture of the apocalypse. So i haven't had to to worry your pay attention too much to the calendering. Because i really think it's it's irrelevant but you know in the first part of your so wait. Just i'm tracking you. Because i've never. I've never heard that perspective. You feel like that. Yes so you feel like the moment. Was the fault that this this was the collapse of the jerusalem temple the routing of. Yeah exactly and that. That was the moment that john of patmos in anybody else was signaling. Yeah like emperor. Nearer was the beast and like all that like like basically all of that is in the past has occurred has been fulfilled. And now we're already living in this new heaven and new earth that is slowly coming to be and that you know satan has already been bound in an all those horrific events that we see in revelation that people kind of equate to like you know black chinese helicopters and all that is all. That's that's bunk. All that was just the the foretelling of the destruction of jerusalem. Okay and then so your your assessment at like we're already living in heaven on earth is just that for anybody who's not experiencing love and light right now anybody who's dealing with real hardship and things that you just saying it's it yes that but we're on a definite cup so it's almost like a steven pinker irish twist to millennialism right. The the knowledge of the glory of the lord will be covering the planet as the waters cover. The i forget the the bible versus says that. But i think we're just in the process of that happening like people actually becoming closer and closer to god and and love and peace. Enjoy being something that is going to simply continue to take over the planet. And yeah like i said basically the the world isn't going to hell in a handbasket. Things will just getting better and better with some some obvious speed bumps along the way but that we don't have to worry about this this massive apocalypse event. But i mean you know. I think they've done all sorts of studies right. I mean i mean more accurate. People are more pessimistic and mortar depressed and willfully optimistic people even if it may be sometimes in the face of the facts actually tend to do better. You know what. I mean so like that. What you've just articulated feels like a very pro. Social and adaptive worldview. Even if you could go factoid by factoid and say is it or isn't a quote unquote really happening. The fact that you're enacting it increases likelihood of happening right exactly. I mean you could take some like like cova for example and look at the majority of the christian evangelical church kind of like you know shrugging and into a certain extent not to paint with too broad of a brush almost like saying well this. This is the beginning of the end. Light right we. We've got the great reset and the new world older. And it's it's it's all happening and we're screwed so we might as well just step back and watch this whole thing crumble. Whereas i say you know now there's this chance to cover more people with love and peace and joy and and perhaps a lot of the you know a lot of i guess the improvements in everything such as a healthcare to telemedicine to the ability to be able to work from a home office. And be with your family more you know. All all of these are actually outcomes of. Yeah you know a briefly problematic viral scenario. But you know when you're able to look at life through that lens. I find it to be incredibly refreshing and almost piece bestowing to be able to have that type of approach versus kind of like an apocalyptic approach. Yeah i mean you know. I in like ski mountaineering. You know one of the things we do is like you. You know you tend to climb the thing that you're then going to ski and on the climb you're paying attention to everything that can kill you. You know all the loose rocks. The snow that the depth of the snowpack. What's going on what's going but by the time you're standing on the top a you look around your inspired by the view. That's kinda why you went in the first place. And then you click into your bindings and then on the route down you completely change your perspective and all you're looking for. Is that ribbon of white that you have to stay on and connect and you completely tune out the rocks and everything that can kill you because if you don't and you focus on them they sure as hell gonna kill you. You know where your head goes. The body follows right so to me. It's that it's that dialectic right. It's like can we take clear. I looks at situational assessments. And then when it comes to go time can we absolutely focus on the single path that is success. And let's go hit it. What the hell do. I want to interrupt today show to tell you about the sauna of course with the sauna. I have that. I can fit me and my children and my wife into for breath work session. We can do a four way. Family breath work session in that thing. It's so big is the clear light. Sanctuary yoga asana their infrared sauna. Full spectrum infrared. They have other son is too. But the one. I use is the sanctuary and They shield against imf exposure they do near mid and far infrared heat. They come with a lifetime warranty and they're going to give you a smoking hot deal. If you use my code it's he'll with heat dot com and then mention my name and that's how you get your discount. He'll with heat dot com. Call them up right a mention my name and you'll be into the special vip club so those are the clear lights on us. Check them out here with. Heat dot com. This podcast is also brought to you by paleo valley dot com slash ben. What occurs when you go there you get access to their grass fed grasp finished. Burma minted beef sticks. So they take beef they ferment. Which crises naturally occurring probiotics. That are really good for your gut. These all organic spices rather than the conventional spices sprayed with pesticides or so-called natural flavors which are often made from gmo corn. That a lot of these these popular beef jerky brands use. And these things are kito friendly. Chock-full gouda dione bio ville protein omega. Three fatty acids paleo valley has done a really really amazing job on these beef sticks. My kids love him. I love him for snacks. And they're perfect pantry. Food paleo valley dot com slash. Ben gets you fifteen percent off of those paleo valley beef sticks or anything else from paleo bailey. Fifteen percent off at paleo. Bali dot com slash. Ben i would love to talk about this first part of the book that. Choose your own apocalypse part For a long time. However like i mentioned. I think that the alchemist cookbook section is actually going to be incredibly interesting for my audience. Who are kind of into all the things you talked about when it to like respiration and microdosing and substances in music and i'd love to delve into a little bit of that but i'd be remiss not to mention how how kind of like funny and creative you're writing is like like dur- during that conversation with my wife last night i said jimmy's a really good writer. I'm like baby even if even if you're not interested in this book like you would appreciate a lot of you know like like your subtitles. The twin hilarity instead of the the singularity or or barbecue your sacred cows or lexicon for the eschaton. It's like as i'm reading through your book. I just chuckle at a lot of a lot of the subtitles and a lot of i guess the word play that's woven in and so as an author myself i'm just curious like do you have an actual creative writing process. I mean are you. Are you like you know. Using some other elements of your book like lsd in prostate massage and anna in with some co two carbon to get you in the mood to write or or how do you actually sparked creativity and you know in in. Get yourself to be such a such a creative writer. Our thanks man. i mean. I'm super stoked that landed in the way that was intended which is just like hey even if these are some somewhat intense or heavy topics we can and must have still have play still have fun with it So yeah i would say. I mean i you know. I grew up in a family where my dad did. These crazy complex crosswords and every other dinnertime was you know some greek illusion or some shakespeare quotes or this and that so like was very much steeped a little bit like growing up in england and like our house was like you know how to was built on the fifteenth century so there was always ancient around me. There was always like layers upon layers. So i've always been like a etymological geek like what i don't understand a word until i understand it's route and its origin and what's the story behind the thing and that kind of stuff so that was definitely a baseline On the actual day to day the most of this book was written during quarantine and it was you know our kids have been shunted back from college. We're suddenly four people rattling around in a house again. And i was like oh my gosh. How am i going to do this. And it was literally like a set of bows. And and i. And my and i told my Editor harpercollins. I was like well. Hey look this whole covert thing happens. We've kind of been on like emergency. First responder kind of roles for the last eight weeks I'm a bond behind on the writing and she's like oh no no no. We're not postponing this again. This comes out spring twenty one and and you've got you've got to have this shipped by september so i had five months to write four hundred pages and i was like holy smokes. Okay it's on and so basically i. I got a five hundred dollar pair of bose headphones. Because i absolutely have to go into my tunnel. I did a sixteen ounces. A yeti mug full of shade grown organic high-octane coffee and then Two four milligrams of nicotine gum based on our buddy andrew cooperman at stanford you kind of just touting the benefits of nicotine which has never been a part of my life and brain fm Audio and treatment. And i would just disappear for three to four hours and and i wrote literally. I wrote this book off the top of my head because i was like okay. I've done all my icon. I can't afford to go down any more research rabbit holes and i would just put. Tk where. I knew there was a citation from from something. I'd read at some point and had my research team. Go back after the fact and i just wrote off the top of my head and i wrote four hundred thousand words in that time. So that's the day to day. Like how did i kind of quote unquote biohacking. But to your point on the inspirational stuff. I would say. Eighty percent of this book actually came from the place described in the book. This book is actually a massive hyper object disclosing how to get to the place. Where the hyper object disclosed itself. Which i know sounds rather abstruse. Yeah explain what you mean by that. Okay so so My partner and i eight or nine years ago found ourselves through no skill or intent of our Being led down this rabbit hole of the practices described in this book and then the practices described in that basically the donald engineering where the sexual yoga of becoming right. However we want to kind of phrase that and for anybody. That's interested in the appendix. There's a study with ten couples going through this whole experience with lots of their kind of journal reports. And all this kind of where were you took the whole i. I guess almost like the whole parliament. They use the wrong term but almost like the sexual biohacking section of the book. And you actually kinda did like an internal study with a whole bunch of couples using all of the things that hopefully we get a chance to touch on a in a little bit here and actually kind of like follow. These couples along the course of them experiencing many of the elements of the alchemist cookbook section of the book exactly and the total mind-bending thing that i couldn't write in the book because it would just sound loopy or totally pretentious. Was that like this was actually quote unquote downloaded to like. We didn't think this shit up and it kept on coming through. We kept on having these experiences and in the experiences of getting into like delta wave. Eeg high on the tone primed endo cannabinoid system and the kind of basically global system reset of our nervous systems as. We were learning to play with this thing. That's what's happening on the body brain level. It's literally like pressing the power button on your laptop and powering down and powering it up so it's close to a death rebirth. Initiation ritual as you can do the kind of twenty first century weston thames right now but at the same time you're also having the equivalent of an nda or having the equivalent of a tunnel of light experience which is super rich content and the content itself was the content of this book. So like you know a few few years in. I'm like holy shit j i think I think i Actually need to write about this. I think this is the thing i think. The reason we're receiving this thing is to then share the thing and tell everybody how this works and she was like you're crazy. Don't tell anybody about this. And then you know had set aside for like three months or six months and it would keep coming back. And i'm like no. Actually i think i think i have to so it was a totally ridiculous path. To conceiving an idiot in a book and it and it was literally we have probably at this thirty to forty hours of two to three minute voice memos where we would come back from that limited space and make a voice recording of the piece that we had just seen or or or you know and just sort of been disclosed that became the structure to the book. So that's a very you can't you can't exactly show that in a bookstore or a writer's workshop But it was so profoundly interesting. It's why that loss chapter of the book is. Where does the information come from because my sense is in the psychedelic renaissance in meditative states. And all of these things people are. they're often. They often get really fixated on the the method. They use to get someplace interesting. But you kind of like. Hey i think it's the someplace interesting. We should be talking about at this point. What is the arc of you know. It's effectively tetra. Grammont on is the author of the covenants. The burning bush. You take your pick of analogies but where is a place of absolutely perfect implicate information that appears limitless in all directions. And if you can tune primate nervous system to be able to receive that information it is the seedbed of the greeks called the muses. They literally had a sort of divine entity. You know. there's the grace of god and the holy spirit this you know. Every society has always had some metaphor or descriptive of massively kick ass information quite often that shapes science or shapes philosophy or shapes out civilization technology that was bigger than the president. Who who you know who had came through and they assign it someplace outside themselves and you're like well what is that. And can we actually start advancing the inquiry in ways that give us better understandings and appreciations of you know what i would just end up super generic term. Just call the information lab. Yeah you know what's interesting a couple of comments for for my audience for first of all Just in case. I didn't mention i'm gonna link to all the things that jamie and i talk about at ben greenfield fitness dot com slash recapture rapture. That's been grief hilton's dot com slash recapture rapture but anyways First of all jamie did mention one thing. I need to clarify. He used the word t. k. And just for those you who aren't in printing and journalism that that means to come. I don't know why they don't call a tc but it comes in quite handy when you're writing. And it's an abbreviation that kind of signifies that additional material is going to be added at a later date. It is a huge friend for any author who wants to go deep into writing and not get bugged by say like delve into extra research as you're writing something or you want right and you said you're on an airplane you're not using wi fi and you know it's something you might come back to or add additional material to just add that. Tk in their credibly convenient and then the other thing is you know when when you describe jamie how you'll you'll do your big cup of shade grown coffee and a two four. Mig of nicotine. Gum and some brain. Fm if if you an author alive one hundred years ago it would have been like the cup of cowboy coffee in the cigarette and the birds sing outside. But it's it's just that that that simple writers way of putting yourself into an altered state. And i swear like nicotine caffeine. You know all other fancy brain stacks and metal peptides and cdp coleen and pipering and anhydrous caffeine and everything else aside like like when you when you step back and look at it with. Simplicity nicotine and caffeine are two of a writers best friends. So i'm i'm right on board with that for for some of my own writing and actually let me let me just add one additional things to the writing thing because for anybody that's considering it themselves etc which was because of the way this information came into my brain and mind it was it was fully formed including late. Wed the word plays in the ponds and that entire vital respiration protocol. All of them like it was ridiculous. It was just like little packets of complete information. And i'd be like oh shit. That looks fun. Funny interesting beautiful. Whatever i should really remember that. And that's really what it was but trained is an academic. I knew the academic case. I wanted to make but i was also where i was like. Man this is a this is a pretty shaggy dog story. There's this big and be these days we're you know we're thumb scrolling monkeys right. We like. it's not enough to simply make a compelling argument you actually have to have plot tension you have to have something that causes people to turn the page and keep reading. So i looked to stephen. And i was like man. The here's joan is the one that everybody goes to and you know at this point. It's kind of tired. And it's almost like this like sort of invisible structure of ted talks like everybody's everybody's sort of regressed to do the mean and now even the tata moment in a tedtalk. You're all expecting that. Moment is just not that he kind of loses. Its magic something. What is a structure. That i can hang. What is it plot structure. That i can hang this on and stephen press. 'field the fella who wrote the war of odd and you know legend of baggage vans and he's kind of a you know he's kind of an inspiration in the field of the author writing right. He and his editor have put together. Something called the story grid. And they're basically this like. Hey there's only something like ten or twelve stories. And they all follow sudden beats. They all have obligatory scenes in them. And if you missed the obligatory scenes then your readers going to be under satisfied but if you hit them than the story has it has tension has climax has resolution at feels like a good story and so i used his framework for what he called a worldview revelation story. Which is the way we used to look at. The world doesn't work you. Then have this crisis you then have to adapt or explore this new world view. And if you do than the new world view will help you kind of save the day. But there's always an ironic twist at the end which means it's not even quite like the way you thought it was gonna to be. And so i had the seventeen obligatory scenes and conventions. And i laid those against my academic argument and then wrote the story trying to hang the chapters in the plot points on those obligatory scenes so that was another just kind of a structure behind the structure. That hopefully made. It makes it more accessible and readable for. Read it actually. Yeah yeah and now. I was kind of half joking about the prostate massage. But i think. I believe you get into that in the book. The idea that that men have this erogenous zone that allows for an ejaculation. Free orgasm that you can just return to over and over again. You know during during the act of lovemaking or you know while you're masturbating or whenever you're else you might you might want to orgasm. I'm one of those guys that just like try stuff that reading books kirkman from own. Did you talk about that. In the book i mentioned it. Yeah i mean it was. It was called a super orgasm. It was online community based around this sort of automatic prostate massage. Yes contraction But the thing that was super interesting about that group is. It wasn't it wasn't sort of sexy time. I mean if anything. It was a sort of a recumbent meditation practice. It was not very rarely. Even including action or declaration it was breath. Work looping sensations of Prostate inveigle into what these these men were reporting became these overwhelming waves of sort of euphoric sensation. They were sort of saying this. Kind of multi orgasmic closer to kind of a woman's orgasm more a spiritual spirituals states. Once again toback deniro anthropology. You're like What the hell's that about you know and then getting under the hood of like a. Why might that have been the case from the physiology an and regarding the latter. That's actually what i wanted to get at a. You know. I i actually went. And i bought one of those Is called the anaerobic a. N. e. r. o. s. Prostate massagers and. I've used it while simply sitting in a meditative position. Because as you breathe as you as you contract and relax the muscles as you breathe and that's basically you know kinda like massaging process as you do so it does actually shift you into. I'm actually not sure which which is zone. I'm reaching feels like it's a little bit more data but it actually seems to enhance a meditative process. And i tried this a few times after after reading about this in your book and i mean it actually is really simple because you put it in you know you get on your side put it in then sit up and sit to meditate as you contract and it actually does allow you to to reach kind of like a deeper state of consciousness. It was it was very interesting and You know obviously you know some people might be grimacing at the idea of sticking something up there but especially men you know thinking of of of a targeting their prostate for a meditation session. But but it actually is. I think worth a try in kind of kind of an interesting tactic. Yeah i mean i mean you obviously. It's our discomfort. With both our core bodily functions are sexuality even kind of varying moral judgments on different substances. And of course we we. Don't judge them all. We judge the ones that are unusual. Or atypical through our community or country or or or faith. But we've got strong feelings about all these things right. But if you just kinda reduce us if you just kind of lop off our arms and our legs you know and you just realize oh. We're just prefrontal cortex connected to spinal columns connected to you an awesome genitals nearly a. We're we're just worms you know and and our vaganov Which starts in our brain stem and goes all the way way down to our route is one of the most potent metronews that sets the rhythms and functionalities of so much of our vital organs and and even awareness. And if you can shift and adjust those things then you can have profound impact on your state and wellbeing and that tat you know typically the closer we get to those basic evolutionary impulses respiration you know are vital organs viscera in things like the vehicle of and the end of cannabinoid. System are orgasmic. Response all these things which again we have tons of feelings about social and cultural taboos about but really you know if you were justice sort of anthropologist from space you'd be like hey humans here's your user manual you know here's how you work make the most of it and once you do that you realize that you can. Have you know basically that that notion of how do we precipitate that global system reset that which that's the biology of it. The culture of it would be a death. Rebirth ritual or practice or initiation and then you know and typically you do that by loading up the system and then pulsing a huge amount of energy through that and that can be breath wake intensification that can be pleasure pain stimulation that could be orgasmic response. It could be vibration with with sound and music or even like per customer massage. Like thera guns like load energy through the system create a peak and then a deep recovery on the other side and then how do you feel who are you. And what have you seen or experienced on the other side of that and you kind of get to come back to homeo- you get to come back to zero zero on your grid coordinates on time in tune in balance and then just live ford's from there. Yeah interesting okay. So not in other got prostate massage out of the way. Let's delve into the five big techniques for achieving a peak state. I think that this kind of like Set the pace for the alchemist cookbook. Section and And you talk about getting into this peak state as the state of flow. You know obviously. Like i mentioned the introduction of whole book about that that flow state and you know stealing fire gets into that and recapture the rapture does as well but what are the five big techniques that you write about for actually getting into peak state. Yeah and just you know thirty seconds of preemptive to the why would. Why did we select these. There's obviously infinite numbers of different ways to do to to shift states to achieve access to the newman etc. The idea here was saying. Hey if we're trying to recapture the rapture if we're trying to have a whole bunch of people around the world everywhere wake up grow up and show up like just fine ways to you. Know seek inspiration and remember what we've forgotten you know he'll in men's were coming from our most resource place and engage the world and each other. You know from from on a good foot. Then you realize okay. So solutions com be fancy and high tech if you're trying to get to the bottom four billion humans on the planet right. They've gotta be. It's gotta be cheap or free and it's got to be open and available to everybody said then next with that setup. You're like okay so then it would make sense that if we wanna use the longest levers possible to try and move us as humans and those longest levers are typically as to evolutionary drivers as possible because it makes sense right if we are hard coded to do it for survival. There's all sorts of nearer chemistry. There's all sorts of rewards and reinforcements to get us to do the things you know and other than eating rhyming. Breathing is right up there right if we stop. Breathing is the first thing that kills us. So we have powerful physiological incentives to breathe and when we learned to monkey with that when we can kind of hack in the back door of that panel on respiration we can totally change our physiology in our psychology. And you kind of go next down the stack you're like okay and if we don't procreate if we don't make more humans than we also die so that's the next one that is massively massively encoded now the fact that we have so many hangups into booze about it isn't shouldn't oh then. Let's not discuss it. That too should also be blinking neon sign going. Hey there's that they're they're the reason. Every civilization has taboos around sexuality intoxication all these things because if they didn't they would run the show we'd never get anything civilized done right but sexuality as Kinsey masters and johnson john lilly. All back in the fifties and early sixties discovered is that our sexual arousal because it's so foundational are sexual. Arousal second is the found is the bedrock of our entire ecstatic and reward circuitry in our in our bodies and brains so if we just live the default version of that then you know our sexuality are sexual impulses creates tons of trauma tons of suffering tons of hottick and we're just puppets on a string of evolution evolution amoral. It doesn't actually k. Whose gene pool with. Who's in fact. If anything it it flies in the face of monogamy of flies in the face of commitment and fidelity and all these things because they just wants a robust mixed up gene pool we can say version one of human sexuality is us puppets on the string of an indifferent evolution version two could be. Hey let's untie the strings you know. Let's do the pinocchio thing. I want to be a real boy right. How can we actually use all of those impulses and drivers in not for instinctive procreation but instead for deliberate integration. And if we can do that. That's fantastic and then we talked about embodiment. Were all in these meet suits of ours and understanding and just a moment to focus on things that not everybody would necessarily always be talking about this specifically the end to collaborate system pleasure pain as hot wired circuits and what is the role in what is the interrelationship between those that vaghul nerve and the capacities for us to understand what does embodiment. Do you know what what does optimizing our bodies and brains do for our minds and hearts so you've got respiration sexuality and embodiment. Those are very kind of obvious evolutionary drivers but then you can throw in to sort of force multipliers which is music and substances and. Interestingly those might almost seem superficial you know compared to the other three but the moment you steady. You're like like ron siegel at ucla has established that you know intoxications. Not just humans. Is you kind of hunting. Go back in history to find the point when we i figured it out it predates us. It goes through the entire primate family. It goes into all automatic. Many many mammals from elephants things all the way to birds. Right crows and ravens get lit. So you're like oh. This is ancient ancient the desire to shift state as an evolutionary adaptive advantage. And it's clearly not when you're when you're wobbly and cross eyed falling out of trees. that's not. That's not an adaptive advantage but the seeking of novelty the interruption of patterns and rats. And that kind of being able to jump the tracks and come up with your chocolate might peanut. Those are the movements that intoxication like okay. That's ancient and an essential. Ron ron siegel even calls it. Our forth evolutionary dry right that that that would check wandering around. Your backyard might have just chewed on some morning. Glory seeds to to fuel with some variant of lsd his his shuffling to and fro in in in an altered state of consciousness where i would say an enhanced state of conscious. I don't even like that word intoxication because it brings to mind the consuming some toxic drug. I don't i really don't Don't feel as though one must sacrifice sobriety so to speak or or awareness of one's own where where one's body at is is that in space you know as a trade off to using these types of substances. I think that these these altered states of consciousness can can enhance almost like a as a micro dose. Might you know our our productivity or our creativity and and you're right there. They are kind of like the icing on the cake of of respiration or embodiment or sexuality. But i'd never want to give people the impression that know in order to achieve a peak state. You need to be you. You need to a toxin or you need to be in in a state that would not mirror say something close to sobriety. I think that's where a lot of people people fear this stuff they just think. Oh it's it's a it's a poison that shifting me into a drunk state when in fact there it can but it doesn't have to. Yeah and i think you know again. My interest is always kind of popping up a level from the the doorways or the keys right to the actual what. What is the view from the balcony. And in this instance right. I think it's fair to say that. What is really healthy is for us to have a full range of new physiological and psychological experience right an anthropologist call cultures that have just kind of one channel of consciousness. One that's approved as mono phase one phase right but most indigenous cultures were polyphonic. They had a bunch of different channels. So yes there was waking state you talking me and me talking to you. And that's making mouthy sounds right but there was also the dream i had last night. There was possession that was trounced. there was visions. There were all sorts of other quote unquote non ordinary means of information retrieval disclosure and sense making and they were valued and they were integrated and it wasn't just considered noise or chatter. Or you know or erotica right and then post postmodernism post french enlightenment and scientific materialism all these things are dial. Kind of rusted. Shut and we're all yearning for more range and you can see it. Even in intermittent fasting. We're like oh shit is probably not a good idea to have a hundred thousand calories in a big refrigerated box just across the couch from me at all times juiced with salty sweet and fat and i can't stop so we're like Intermittent fasting prominent a bad idea. That might even be healthy about conscious therapy. It's probably not always good to be just living an entire twelve months in seventy two degrees. You know whether. I'm in a box on wheels or no box. Call my house like maybe i should get super hot and super cold from time to time. Right i mean at you can see it in the in the entire biohacking movement. Right is we are seeking to reestablish and to sort of expand the range of our physical and emotional experiences. Because it's it feels health- giving and i think within that you know that's where the low near the subset category. And what about deliberate state shifting tools and technologies right because it can be substances and compounds oliver sacks the nyu neuroscientist famously said that he's he's drugs offer shortcut. They promised transcendence on demand. So say what you will about them but they work and they work within deliberate time windows where you're trying to stand the thing but if anybody has any concerns in any shape or form about exxon genus compounds or substances things. That aren't on inside me. That i ingest Just consider you know the tried and true fasting. Extreme endurance physical activity and or darkness. So you know and if you wanted to really combine them you know you can do a nine or ten day. The posner retreat while fostering into silent darkness and things will get massively massively non ordinary and there's no special whizbang tack there other than the old tried and trues and when ethnologist have gone back to try and figure out like what was the sort of shamanic magic potion. You know of the greeks or of the hindus or of you know of an african tribe or wherever. They're looking and quite often when they find the plants that seem the most likely candidates. They're often somewhat underwhelming from pharmacological point of view. Like lake. i feature in the book right at them that this tribe and papua new guinea that had three plants they worked with worked with ginger tobacco and then mushrooms but only mushrooms at the higher level like ginger in tobacco. You're really seriously like what's the deal with that right. But you combine it with eight strong and pure and freshly grown and harvested and much higher nicotine content than contemporary tobacco. And those kind of things but also fostering you know extreme privation and exertion your prime and you know an all night rituals and all the culture and all the juju surrounding it. And you're like oh so. This is just one element. This wasn't relying solely on the chemical as the depth charge to get the whole project. Done right and for those of you who might think that this books not for you after hearing jamie. Describe a ten day silent. Meditation retreat in a cave while fasting You know in our previous podcast episode. We talked about this concept that jamie lays out of he donna calendering meaning those types of experiences might be you know once in in a year or once in a decade in the same way that you even describe i believe in recapture the rapture jamie the idea that for example you know the type of intense hiawassee retreats or plant medicine journeys that people seem to be almost like over using these days are something might be reserved for say a rite of passage into adolescence or adulthood. And then sharing that space with with your your spouse on on the on the evening of your wedding and then maybe on your fortieth birthday. Is this idea that that these are few and far between throughout one's life as these deep immersive experiences and perhaps some of these other ways to to shift into a peak state might be used throughout the week such as chewing on nicotine gum and drinking shade grown coffee while writing. But you know. Don't don't feel if you're listening. In as though this this is about continually seeking events that just thrust you deep into these altered states of consciousness. Because there's there's definitely at this concept that jimmy gets into called he don calendering in jimmy talked about four techniques. Respiration embodiment sexuality substances. And then i interrupted you as you were delving into ended up fifth way of achieving a peak state. Yeah good old fashioned tunes right. I mean there's a beautiful hasidic saying says there are nine levels of prayer above them all is song and and again music and seem like a sort of johnny lately especially compared to the others but daniel levitin At mcgill university in canada. has written a book called. This is your brain on music. And he and and other ethnomusicologist have made a fairly convincing case that there's this evidence of music there's bone flutes from discovered in caves that are dated at fifty thousand years and clearly flutes. Were not the first thing you probably had gourds and rattles and drums and those kind of things massively predating Instrument tonal instruments and that that predates any for sure any level of symbolic Language and those kind of things and his case was is that that was probably actually the way we started to communicate so pre complex and tactical language like what we would think of like sentences with the subjects or objects and that kind of stuff that we were communicating via rhythm melody invoice. And we were using it for essential social bonding and survival whether that was staying awake at night through a campfire to ward off predators whether it was organizing work or or hunts or or war or any of these things in that that actually you know you kind of get this goofy situation where you know frightened parents in the nineteen fifties and sixties when it was kind of like elvis and you know and and woodstock in the beatles and this kind of stuff. They're like oh my gosh. Sex drugs and rock and roll are going to be the end of civilization. You know going to undo it all but in fact sex drugs and rock and roll where actually the beginnings of civilization. Yeah i remember you saying that in the book that that really struck a chord with me this idea that we vilify sex drugs and rock and roll. And i know there's there's a whole political movement behind that you know everything from you know reefer madness to the to the nixon and reagan administrations and beyond. But there's this idea that when you think about a lot of what you've just described for achieving a peak state. I mean you you mentioned sexuality you mentioned substances and you mentioned music. And that's basically sex drugs and rock and roll and those those have actually been used to build civilization and bring cultures together and kind of we've humankind along this path to you know personal growth or cultural growth and we're kind of like hardwired to experience those and in many cases i guess there. There's even this idea that farming and agriculture and the emergence of say grains for fermenting and everything. We're all just kind of a way to figure out how to organize around sex drugs and rock and roll in a more efficient way. Yeah i mean. I mean those those are the you know and even as far as going back and taking a look at Jared diamond's research. He's the fellow. The road guns germs and steel he said. Ucla anthropologist that many folks have probably come across but he wrote a book called. Y sex's fun and actually makes the case that Our human sexuality is is actually. It's even more weird and of an outlier than our making an upright posture. As he's he's it's the third leg of that stool like typically when we think of us going from naked age too clever humans right. It's it's we are opposable thumbs. Our ability wheel tools our ability to make languages like our completely unique Sexual habits and patterns and even physiology are morphology what our bodies look like and how they behave and function is so different than the entire rest of the animal kingdom including our closest primate cousins. Because you have to consider that. The neurochemical priming of repeat frequent elective recreational year round sexuality in humans Is one of the things that actually changed us and made us homo sapiens. Not just homo erectus. Okay so we we've got these five big techniques for achieving peak state respiration embodiment sexuality substances and music respiration. I'll tell you the truth. Is i flipped to that part of the book. I just because i've got such an interest in breath work and have been in the. You know the deepen james nestorian patrick makau in in some of these other folks going through their books. Also so i flipped your your breath. Chapter i in and you began actually by talking about this concept of circular breathing and the use of this digital redo musical instruments as a device to learn that. And i'm just curious. Have you ever. Because i've thought about attempting to learn that maybe using a harmonica or something just just so that. I'm annoying fewer people with giant injury doing the living room. But have you ever attempted circular breathing and also. Can you explain that to the folks. Yeah absolutely So up shortages is yes. We lend play them. But there's actually you can go on amazon and there's little super cool. There may be twelve fourteen inches. High little wooden boxes With to sound chambers in them so you can learn to play digitally do with this little thing that fits in a laptop bag. Do you know what's called. Gosh i mean literally do like digitally do box or something like that. And if not i off yeah yeah because It's a you know. Ultimately humans we learn best by play right and so given any form of something that is engaging frustrating satisfying when you get it and then you can tweak it and learn more and keep going kind of thing like that's how we really acquires sustainable skills. One of the things. That intrigued me was the karolinska institute In sweden the folks who award the nobel prize and that kind of stuff or also cutting edge research institution and probably five years ago. They released a paper on nitric oxide production which is a neurotransmitter that crosses the blood brain barrier in its sweeps away stress and arousal chemicals and introduces. What have been hubbard called the bliss molecule right sort of introduces all the groovy. Things have nice peak states so it's a very helpful and very effective neurotransmitter and the karolinska institute folks found that when you breathe and vibrate your sinus cavities and when you breathe out through your nose and vibrate your sinus cavity the same time so That kind of thing. You increase nitric oxide production in your brain by fifteen times. Which is insane right as this one deke was ridiculous performance booster and and then i was like That's interesting so on the one hand. You can do your yoga you can do. You're sitting meditation. And you can be humming while you breathe. Great so mildly embarrassing. You know but still decently effective. And i'm like wait a second. That is exactly what you have to do. When you're playing the didgeridoo because it's this long tube. It looks like something. Out of dr seuss right. This like wooden trumpet And you blow on it but then the way you know both trumpet players like louis armstrong but also indigenous digital plays. Len was if you kind of blow out your cheeks like a bullfrog and you get to the you know you blow outward until your lungs are almost empty. But you've got that extra pocket of air in your cheek and then you can squid that through your lips while you're simultaneously sniffing so you should forever squeezing sniffing at the same time as this kind of goofy herky-jerky motion but once you get it down you can effectively keep playing continuously for as long as you want. And then so that was. That was where i was like. Wait a second. I bet that you take that. New caroline get institute research on nitric oxide production which den tends to put you into a trance state. You have the vibration of that. Wouldn t trumpet the didgeridoo and you have perpetual forced rhythmic secular nasal breathing. I bet that does a thing doesn't it. And then you go and research and you're and you're like oh. Yeah that's exactly how aboriginal elders would play themselves into dream time and they would then enter sort of this non non ordinary state of information access etc as soon as you started as soon as we started comp- combining all the research you like. Wow that is an ancient niro technology for trance induction and traveling and it's as simple as making music with a very specific and unusual breathing pattern interesting. I'm to get one of those little boxes and give it a go because of it's always been my radar. Try circular breathing. Just because i've seen some of the same research on things like nitric oxide production that you bring up in the book and they were just talking about but it's it's a simple simple ways grads strong grab a drinking straw and try and blow perpetual bubbles into a glass of water and you can just do it and you can just do it by blowing out your cheeks. We actually do these. Do these workshops and stuff to give people progressions on how to become like what is what is respiratory mastery and. That's one of the really fun ones that you can do. My twin sons and are going to have fun now. Straws are getting broken out tonight. The giant curl. Oh yeah all right so so related to that. Because i i wanna talk about a few things that that may be folks. Don't know about when it comes to to breathing in gas in general medina's mixture. What what is that you right about that. Yeah it really was. It was a total accident. Roger walsh shoes. A md. Ph d. at uc davis and sort of. He was one of the coins of the tim. Trans personal psychology. He's been kind of one of the guiding lights of that generation of academics elders. And he he's actually responsible for that queuing me onto that monotheistic and polytheistic distinction about cultures and their ranges of consciousness. But he actually gave me a copy of his book higher wisdom and it was a series of basically like an oral history of the first wave of psychedelic researchers so sort of standoff in the nineteen fifties to the nineteen sixties before even can keesey and things get you know wacky and weird for the electric kool aid. Ariza back when it was. You know when santos. Lsd was research chemical when it was at ucla was in manitoba it was at stanford it was all completely rigorous an above board places. And at first i was like thanks so much roger you know deeply appreciate but i think i kind of know all these stories you know i kind of did my diligence back in my twenties and i can sat on my shelf for for a while and then i pulled it off and i just just flipped open to a chapter of somebody i hadn't had and suddenly they were describing that in the late fifties up in manitoba they were using this other thing called medina's mixture as a screening tool they were having people breathe this gas blend and they were using it as a screening tool to check to make sure someone wasn't gonna freak out when they actually did the proper lsd sessions and the it was from ladas lav maduna. Who is a hungarian researcher. At the same time that standoff was still over there so before standoff at even come over to the states and plugged in at johns hopkins and medina had been using this mixture to try and create basically a sort of respiratory respiratory induced epileptic. Seizure a grandma seizure because he was hoping that you know this is the era of electroconvulsive therapy like jumper cables to the brain and that kind of stuff because everybody realized i mean they were they were. They were barking up the same tree. We're talking about which is how do you use a global system reset and if you can. It seems to help or amino resolve or ameliorate. A host of different conditions from epilepsy bipolar to you. Name it right when we have those moments of coming back to zero zero where we often stop better than we were. So that's what. Madonna was trying to use it for. And that never quite panned out but the lsd researches including groff realized. Wait when you do this and it's a it is a let's think what's the the ratios is. It's seventy percent oxygen. Thirty percents co two. I it it ranges but like when when people say medina's mix that's typically the ratio they're referring to so it's you know if atmospheric oxygen has roughly twenty percent oxygen. Then you're looking at sort of three and a half times the o. Two you actually need so you're massively massively oxygenated but you know when we exhale we have. What roughly four percents co two. You know so you're like you know and instead you're getting thirty percent. Co two so way. More common dioxide than your brain is used to registering. It is that it gives you this paradoxical situation where you're safe as houses you couldn't you've got more due to the brain than you ever would on a month of sundays and yet you have this absolutely overwhelming sense that you're dying of suffocation that simultaneous increase though in carbon dioxide and oxygen is something that kind of difficult to attain most forms of breath work. You're breathing off. Co two retaining oxygen or vice versa. It's pretty common to be able to retain both high levels of co two and oxygen. But this idea of inhaling and they're even devices. I if you google carbon and you can find. I think it's like a four hundred dollar device that comes prepackaged to your house. You can wear a mask and breathe this stuff and and that that idea of exposing yourself to that shifts what's called the curve and physiology kinda to the right you get more. Oxygen dumped off into tissue. But what's interesting and i. I think i talked james next door about. This is training the body to be able to tolerate those higher levels of carbon dioxide. Kind of like a cold bath increases stress resilience and the production of both heat shock and cold shock. Proteins to induce greater cellular resilience and resilience to stress overall the high levels of carbon dioxide. The bloodstream can do the same thing. And i believe that breathing this type of mixtures actually being used to do things like a treat people's anxiety or allow them to deal with anxiety more efficiently. Yeah and the thing that prompted me to go down this rabbit hole in the first place. Was that the subjective reports of several. Like in in one book. I think i came across it. Three different times in three different chapters was that Patients who'd been breathing the collagen as a screen for the lsd had then gone back and said you know i did both and i think i actually got more out of the collagen like i had more profound insights. I had more more non ordinary state experience etc than from the lsd itself and that was back in the day right. I mean this was sandoz. Finest grade and high dosage lsd so like nothing to sneeze at and and it was just co two and oxygen was doing even more so so to me. That was a fascinating a fascinating inquiry. Because once again you know that there is a little bit i mean. It's it's a goofy analogy. But i think of like professional wrestlers. Right where you like. W w e or f. I think there might be both with any of that. Like right. when they're about to go into a super huge move they go they go running into the ropes and stretch them like rubber bands and than use that rubber band stretched to come back and launch a piledriver onto their opponent. Right my sense is that with all of these protocols there is a degree of heading in the opposite direction of where you're trying to get you load the system right. And so if you're trying to get to a really calm integrated reboot you actually go shoot the moon. You do that. One of the best ways to do that is by cultivating the the most intensive peak experience possible. And you can then sequence these so the project we're working on right now is to actually sequence This gas assisted protocol. And you can you start with this combination and then light and sound that is off understandably scary oppressive. You know doc imagery sad discordant music all of these things while you're breathing kaba because that's the one that makes you feel like you're being buried alive to the point where you literally get to snapping. Can't it anymore. You dissociate into you know i. I've just died. Whatever i've given up the ghost in some way and then seamlessly transitioning into like celestial. Euphoric the gas blend then shifts to nitrous nitrous. Oxide and oxygen blend nitro oxygen. I think on the book. Yes literally like the whip. It's that we talked about in our other. Podcasts that you can use for for sexual enhancement literally like a. I guess that's what they're called whip. It's where you use the little whipped cream canister cartridges in the balloon. I is that what you guys are using to deliver the nitrogen. No i mean. We'd use medical grade gas splitter so you can actually you so professional the ratios and those kind of things i mean. I mean the challenge with anytime. You're inhaling pure gas that doesn't have oxygen is is no surprise high poxy. I would say it's not advised and certainly not to be misused. But yeah with a with a gas splitter you can dial the ratios in the strongest ratio you can do. They have sort of set points on them is seventy thirty Nitrous oxide to oxygen. And that that's still ensuring one hundred and fifty percents oxygenation over anything else. You'd be doing okay. So that's basically like the like the vital respiration protocol that you talk about in the book combining carbon and then doing oxygen in with static apnea right. So then you're doing. The full inhalations and maximum breath holds and then seeing. How long can you remain in that space without thinking and what the nitrogen does is it. It shunts you for three to twelve minutes into double amplitude. Delta wave eeg activity which is a very rare usually. we entered delta in deep dream asleep. Be double amputee. This was discovered at mit by a team of anesthesiologist. They're like what the hell like. We've never seen this. We didn't expect this in. This appears to be a thing. We were working backwards from knowing that experience. Deliver these transcendent repeat insights. Where like we know. There's there there now. These guys are telling us what the mechanism of action is. Oh shit double amplitude. Delta and interestingly the brain normalizes and adapt you conscious. Go camp out there for hours at a time. Offer that three to twelve minutes you go back to baseline and potentially kind of alpha beta and you lose access to that information because it's it's only disclosed down in delta and you get back up into conscious waking state prison house of language territory and it slips through your fingers which is what you know. William james winston churchill commented on back in the day so and then you know. You're like okay now. Now we've got our you know the same way like kabul was this like should have you know like rabbit hole to go check out like a fascinating they're the same thing with these delta ways because the mit study did it right. We knew from her benson's wicked harvard nitric and nitrous. Oxide had this some form of interrelationship and some contribution to peak states neuronal signaling and then call dice roth at stanford did something with ketamine. Found that that was three hoods which is within the delta wet delta band is one thing if you think about it right. Point one huts to four hoods is the delta wave at the lowest eeg below point. One you're effectively brain dead. There is no niro electric activity right so we are right on the doorstep of a near death experience and what folks have found with the antidepressant benefits of ketamine the antidepressant and the olympic effects of nitrous. Oxide you pretty much anywhere you look. They're like oh it appears to intercept the hypothalamus and and create a brain stem reset. It affects the brain stem and stimulate the brain stem. The stimulation of the brain stem seems to correlate with e. g. signature of delta wave states. Right and what dice roth at stanford found was. He's like okay. Ketamine seems to benefit people for depression because they have an they have dissociate or out of body experience and that stepping outside yourself appears to help you when you come back to yourself okay. Then he found that it was three hoods signature and said locations in the brain then he went back in electrically stimulated three hoods without the ketamine so no drug intervention now just electrical stimulation of the brain. Now that we know what it did and the same dissociate of experience happened. They had the same out about these hate and the same positive benefits to their mood and wellbeing. So now you're like okay so that vital respiration protocol and really even all of this he acc engineering can become. Oh how do we do everything. Possible to let a person who's tired wired and stress who's jacked up messed up all the thing we carrying the buttons of we get to have an experience that both charges us to build lots and lots of energy in our system releases. It in a blissful white light you know culmination and then lets us ride that. Wave double amplitude. Delta eeg brains. Dan rea said. Hi vegas enough tone. Right and full discharge in reboot even if it was content neutral even if it was just like white noise static that whole time. You'd wake up feeling like a million bucks right like whoo boy. Oh boy i just feel like i just had my you know like jiffy lube oil. Change fifteen point inspection. I'm ready to go but it's not neutral. It's usually some of the most profoundly inspired epi panic states we've ever we've ever had that often appear to be overwhelmingly meaningful and can often guide the way into a courageous higher integrity more creative more effective life to live and by the way i should caution people you'll alcohol is one of the best ways to reduce delta wave activity so you'd never want to combine this preferably with any form of of alcohol but one thing i do know that that actually increases delta the g. activity that i i don't think you mentioned your book it'd be interesting to toss this into the equation is there's an injectable peptide. Many people use to enhance a deep sleep called delta sleep inducing peptide and literally as the name implies induces delta the activity and that would be interesting to kind of kind of see how that plays into the the nitrogen carbon breath were mix that you just described to see if you could you could shift it just a little bit more into into delta state. So have you. Have you check that out at all. Tested against i haven't i've used the deltoid peptide or the delta sleep outside but i haven't combined it with that and i've only used it for sleep number altered states of consciousness so it it'd be something interesting to try be something interesting one of our listeners to try and perhaps just leave leave comments over in the show notes. You know one other thing regarding breath that you talk about that i. I think it's going to be interesting for people. Because i'm i'm actually working on article right now about nutro picks and and how to how to come blend different nutro picks to accelerate or brake Neural activity such as if you were to to say like overdose on a on a microsoft l. s. or lsd for productivity how to combine things like l. dean and creating and the copa mainieri or a black seed oil. You know some of the things that actually kind of kind of break the excitability or irritability that might occur from overconsumption of something. I consider be an upper or accelerate. You actually get into the same type of concept regarding breath you kind of lay out acceleration and braking and steering and i'd love for people to hear a little bit about what that actually means like like how you could use up simple as breath to accelerate or to break or to steer one's psyche. Yeah i mean the intent though is that you know i think there's there's a lot of Interest but also hype and false complexity as people are getting into breath. Work these days you know and just just to try and really really grounded which is basically saying. Hey you can kind of up regulate how you're doing. You can add more pep or juice to what you do. That would be the acceleration you can down regulate how your body and brain of feeling so you can basically take a little heat off the ball. If you're feeling stressed agitated those kind of things you can meaningfully slow yourself down to a more auto onomic receptive right You know sort of para sympathetic state And then you can also kind of transgress what you doing. That would be the steering like. Can i go someplace else. Can i see what another way of being alive and receiving information feels like we. We kind of no. I just intuitively examples of all that right so that you can mean a classic sort of tony robbins bouncing up and down on his mini trampoline huffing and puffing or michael phelps. You know breathing breathing fast and slapping his back before stepping up on the block. Surely you're like okay. I'm getting ready to do a high energy. High output high consequence thing or ski racers in the gates where they puff and bang bang their polls together like that. Let that as an up regulation technique. The opposite could be or. I'm going on that stage and i'm scared out of my mind. So take a few slow breaths. And i'm really trying to see myself down or or or i'm walking down the aisle or or lamas breathing right. I'm sh sh- i'm trying to. I'm trying to actually dump energy from an aroused and stressed system. And then there's the steering or transgressing states of consciousness and you alluded to them earlier. Ben but you know hyperventilation combat in some combinations with breath holds is a very effective way of exploring different states in it's because it blows off. Co two pushes. Our blood into the alkaline ph and that has all sorts of knock on effects to consciousness. Once you realize that. You're like i'm in charge of my consciousness and i'm in charge of it with my hand on the lever which is as simple as it could possibly get. Which is what is the rate depth. And rhythm of how i cycle air through my body and lungs. Yeah it's it's kind of similar to something like using a cause. I do this a wim. Hof protocol prior to a really cold ice. plunge you know doing the entire inner fire. Pradyumna esque breath up which would be accelerate and then once any dizziness has subsided shifting to the cold tub is straight into a box breathing protocol and that would be an example of light like accelerate followed by. You know box breeding is a little bit of. It's kind of like a combination of braking and steering to a certain extent. Although i consider steering to be something i would use more for like a meditative or plant medicine experience where you know especially for some deeper plant medicine journeys you can usually use your breath as fuel to actually literally steer you in different places. But this i this idea of recognizing that breath is not just relaxation not just de-stressing nor is it just for amping ones up but can be used as both accelerate and a break and as a as a steering mechanism is something that you unpack in the book and i thought that was super interesting. That a lot of folks probably don't think about now. I know we're running a little bit short on time. But you've you've mentioned a couple of times that That that you do like workshops that you have people come in and try some of these things or or learn from you. Is that something that you do out there on the in the rocky mountains in colorado do you travel and put on events or or if. Somebody actually wanted to work with you with your team. How's that actually work. Yeah we're actually doing one in the mountains near aspen and colorado in a few weeks time. that's unfortunately all all full up. But then we do other things for groups like why peo- and we also do adventure courses in utah. In baja we basically kind of try and follow the hydrologic cycle of the seasons right so the snow falls in the mountains and we can do like ski mountaineering and leadership things than the snow melts. And it goes into into the aspen groves. And we kind of like hot midsummer gatherings and then it flows down into the revision the canyons and we'd go canyoneering an adventuring in the fall and that it pumps out to the sea of cortez and we do kite surfing and free diving and those kinds of things in baja and that's our sort of cycle. You know we just kind of follow the seasons for flow camp this summer. you know. we're also doing Pretty much everything written in the book right. Which is marshall outs. With nikita maastricht actually trained seal team six as well as tony robbins deep bodywork acura yoga You know thera gun massaging all sorts of things for bodily integration. We're doing intellectual in theory. We're but we're also doing percussion. The band rising appalachia is going to be there. We're doing everything from gospel. Church karaoke singing. The american songbook joyfully together but also lennon group percussion as an entertainment and group flow tool Then culminating in the middle of the week where they and then doing breath wake static apnea pulse ox symmetry personal scores measurement etc and then working with colorado physicians to do a research project quote unquote. Right where everybody gets to participate in additional layers of breath work plus wearable base like sub packs. Thera gun massage partner. Spotter cannabinoid so edible cannabinoid in the state of colorado which is recreational available into the gas assisted nitro oxygen and carbon jen and then potentially on specific specifically In inducted patient doctor prescribed oxytocin and ketamine nasal spray is now what we can do. Is you can do the synchronized consumption of prescription pharmaceutical than an over the counter Compounds in combined with stacked protocols doing all the other stuff the breath the body wag the music sound the lights to create basically celebrate tori church so it sort of instead of byu be. It's b. y. o. e. like. Bring your antigens right. Everybody everybody is doing something that is that is not underground is completely sanctioned and above board each round gets increasingly intense but the intention is not to sort of go cross eyed drooling. The intention is what what might a postmodern contemporary celebrate story. Sacrament look like these days and can we create one that is using household materials and yet nonetheless gets us where we're hoping to go to deliver insight healing and connection and can reaffirm are both collective and individual desire to you know. Step up show up and what's asked to do. Well that's especially cool for those self experimenters psycho nods. You don't want to mess around this stuff at home and want to learn it from the experts. Do go into workshop. Like this would actually. I think pretty helpful to be able to to gather more information and experience some of the practical aspects within within the book and some of your other teachings and and and writing and We we really Just just listening in like jamie. Scratch the surface on some of the stuff that i wanted to get into. But i mean this book Is one of those books that i took a while to get through because every page has super interesting super interesting information and also just just big vision thinking in it. And and so. I would recommend they read it's called recapture the rapture and a link to it and everything that we talked about at ben greenfield venice dot com slash recapture rapture but worth read and also linked to the other podcasts. That jamie and i did about about this. Whole idea of enhancing sexual experiences using again a lot of the tactics and the heat on sex matrices and things like that that he outlines within the book. So jamie. Hit all the ballpark with this thing and And kudos for writing it. Thanks man i mean you know it just felt like Yeah i it was a swing for the fence kind of play but i hope that it can support people because if you know the simplest would be. Hey you're not crazy. The world's kinda gone a little crazy and Giving us a just acknowledging that so that we're not beating ourselves up you know next realizing. Hey there are ways to remember. You know to to to find that loving feeling that we might think we've lost and they're always for us to get back on our feet and they're always for us to reconnect with each other and oh by the way you know if it ever feels like this world a little overwhelming if you had a choice of which movie your show up in. Wouldn't it be star wars. Wouldn't it be harry potter. You know wouldn't wear hardwired for those stories of late leader. Tiny little band rebel misfits at the eleventh hour saving the universe from unspeakable evil right the hobbit all of them right. We love them. And so like what if we're born into that period in history where it's go time where it's guts ball and we've been blessed with the tools to get the job done so you said read the book but i'd i'd even encourage listen to the book because i actually got to read it myself during that crazy snowstorm that shut texas down in the beginning of the year and feedback has been that that is a much higher bandwidth communication than just the woods on the page. So if you have the choice definitely check out the audible. Does it come complete with like like the like the sirens and the shouting and and the the mass from all the texans freezing their asses off at fifty degrees. It was just so quiet in our neighborhood. Not nothing happened. It was perfect. Cocoon time a love art so cool the audio books available to everybody in a link to that in the show notes as well so jamie thanks so much for coming on the show man. It's it's as usual pleasure talking to you. Always been and and really really psyched on all the overlaps in our in our life and our increase and and our community so i hope this land for for you guys listening. As well our folks. While i'm ben greenville jamie wheel signing from ben greenfield fitness dot com. Have an amazing week. Thanks for listening to today's show. You can grab all the show notes resources. Pretty much everything that i mentioned at ben greenfield fitness dot com along with plenty of other goodies from me including the highly helpful ben recommends page which is a list of pretty much everything that i've ever recommended for hormone sleep digestion fat loss performance. Plenty more please. Also know that all the links all the promo codes that i mentioned during this an every episode helped to make this podcast happen and to generate income that enables me to keep bringing you this content every single week so when you listen in be sure to use the links in the show notes. Use the promo code that generate because that helps to float this thing and keep it coming to you each and every week.

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December 18, 2019: Ivan Boesky Sentenced

Today in True Crime

16:22 min | 1 year ago

December 18, 2019: Ivan Boesky Sentenced

"Today is Wednesday December eighteenth two thousand nineteen on this day in nineteen eighty seven when Ivan. Boesky was sentenced to three years in prison when he was found. Guilty of Insider Trading Time magazine classified classified his international financial conspiracy as wall. Street's Watergate. Welcome to today and true crime apart cast original today. We're covering the criminal. Sentencing of stock trader Ivan liven. Frederick Boesky after the SEC brought civil charges for insider trading the US government realized they'd stumbled on a massive assistive tangled insider trading rat king and Boesky was just the first rat holing the tails revealed old unheard of corruption in the financial industry and inspired new laws around white collar crime. I'm Vanessa Richardson and today. Okay I'm joined by our guest host Hannah of the podcast red handed along with her partner. Cerruti Hannah's show covers all manner of true crime stories stories. Everything from serial killers to haunting ze two. Who Done? It's she's here to discuss some historical aspects of the crime. While I'll cover the narrative. Glad to have you Hannah. I'm glad to be hit. I'm really excited to dive into the Ivan Boesky scandal. Let's go back to Manhattan's federal courthouse on December Bert. Eighteenth nineteen eighty seven just after ten thirty. Am Most people would be thrilled to have a million dollars especially in the mid nineteen eighties but for Ivan. I haven't Boesky a million dollars wasn't enough. Hundreds of millions of dollars wasn't enough boesky publicly promoted that that greed is good and now the man who inspired Gordon Geckos famous line in Oliver Stone's Wall Street stood before are a federal judge the movie loosely based on Bosque's life and crimes had just premiered last weekend and everyone was ready ready to see the villains real life come up in the courtroom was full standing up front Ivan Boesky. Oh Ski was the very picture of a blockbuster. Bad Guy Boesky was the kind of man whose father in law said he had the height of a rhinoceros and the nerve of a burglar. The kind who wants ordered every item on the menu at the upscale cafe does artiste just to take a single byte of each the kind whose Bedford New York estate had custom carpeting monogrammed with his initials the kind whose limo had three phone lines. The papers called him Ivan the Terrible Mythology ising him but here he was was nervous before Judge Morris e lasker sipping water in an attempt to appear calm. He was tall and thin making his custom tailored suit and deep blue tie look stretched out. Officially Boesky criminal charge was filing false malls documents with the federal government. Unofficially he was guilty of much much more the year before he paid a hundred million dollar fine to the SEC to settle civil charges of insider trading a few months later facing federal charges and five years in prison Boesky took a plea bargain during which federal investigators learned Boesky had according to the L. A. Times likely engaged in manipulating stock prices and unlawful takeover activity among other possible possible crimes. As for what Boesky actually did his firm Ivan F Boesky and company bought cheap corporate stocks by the thousands thousands. They held them for a brief time. Until almost magically the company they'd invested in was acquired by a bigger more profitable edible corporation. The original stocks prices skyrocketed Bosque's firm then sold the stocks immediately at an impressive massive prophet fifty million dollars when a company sold to Texaco fifty million. When one sold to Philip Morris Sixty five live million when the buyer was Chevron people thought Ivan Boesky was a financial wizard he wasn't? He was buying lying tips from his. Powell's Dennis Levine and Martin Segal Investment Bankers who brokered corporate acquisition deals. Acquisition deals Are as a rule highly confidential but for seven hundred thousand dollars a pop levin and Siegel were happy to sell Boesky Boesky Corporate Secrets Ivan. Boesky was a master at secretly acquiring and abusing privileged information formation. And that didn't stop once. He was caught to reduce his own sentence. Boesky turned government informant law enforcement allowed Boesky to temporarily walk free while he helps gathered. The evidence needed to take down Levine Siegel and their entire insider trading ring during this reprieve Boesky conveniently had the chance to unload about one hundred sixty eight million dollars worth of stock before the price had a chance to fall in the wake of his guilty plea it was his last insider our trade time and again Boesky proved he do anything to get richer and while he'd publicly said greed is healthy. His quote proved as out of touch as those infamous words attributed to Marie Antoinette. Let them eat cake. When Boesky stood for his sentencing on December eighteenth? It was barely two months after black Monday. The biggest single day crash in Wall Wall Street history. The stock market was still in a deep recession. Boesky and his conspirators. Were partly to blame. The the American public was ready to take him to the Guillotine. Boesky is attorney Leon. Silverman described a bloodlust in the community directed at his client. Silverman spent forty five minutes arguing. That boesky deserved leniency. For his extreme cooperation which even the prosecution conceded was unprecedented before Judge Lasker are issued. His ruling Boesky was allowed to speak for himself in a flat. Low voice he said I would like to simply simply say that you will recall. I expressed my profound sentiments to you on the date. We met and I could not make it more. You're deeply now. Those sentiments were that he was deeply ashamed and desired redemption as he awaited. It'd his sentence. Boesky tugged on the nod of his tie as if he could feel the bonds of prison already around his neck. Finally Judge lasker spoke quote. Breaking the law is breaking the law. Some kind of message must be sent into the business community that such activities cannot be wholly repaired simply by repaying people after the fact Ivan. Boesky defense cannot go. UNPUNISHED ITS SCOPE was too great. It's influenced to profound it. Seriousness to substantial merely to forgive and forget judge lasker sentenced Boesky to three and a half years in in a minimum security prison. Boesky left the room without emotion or any perceptible response. He was escort it out to the chauffeured. I car waiting for him. According to The Washington Post Vo Skis Car ran a red light as it headed uptown. Coming up the circumstances that pulled Ivan Boesky into the biggest financial scandal America America had ever seen today in. True crime is supported by better help online counseling sling people often portray their happiest self to others. Whether it's at work or on social media we often make it appear that we have everything figured out but a lot of times. We don't I know that I don't and if you're like me it's not always easy to ask for help and find counseling. This is where better help can help. Hope you better help offers. Licensed counselors who specialize in a variety of issues including depression and anxiety as well as trauma anger family emily relationships and so many others. And if finding a counselor that lives close to you has been an issue better help allows you to connect privately with your counselor through text text chat phone and video calls. You can get help at your own pace and on your own time and best of all you can get help. At an affordable rate today in true crime listeners will get ten percent off their first month with Discount Code today in true crime. That's better help dot com slash flash today in true crime. Why not get help? Better help dot com slash today in true crime now back to the story at his criminal sentencing on December eighteenth nineteen eighty seven Ivan Boesky as long wrinkled face remained STOIC. He was only fifty but decades of non stop work fueled by greed read had prematurely aged him my guest host. Hannah is going to take over from here. To discuss the details of Bosque's criminal enterprises thanks Vanessa Info taste of Ivan Boesky at work. There's a craze in his eyes belies his avarice a man for him being rich. which simply wasn't enough? The son of well of Russian Immigrants Boesky saw himself as better than the family daily business even better than the Strip club that he ran in his early twenties. A close friend said Boesky saw himself as a rothschild after tanking. The Strip club Boesky married up to Beverly Hills. Hotel Heiress Sima Silberstein. Her father bought an apartment on Park Avenue and Boesky donated just enough money to Harvard to become a member of new. York's Harvard Club leaving people to make that own assumptions about where he'd graduated college in truth he hadn't Boesky was a university first Michigan Dropout in nineteen seventy five. He borrowed seven hundred thousand dollars from his father. In Law to start his own arbitrage firm he engineered the brokerage Eric Rich to cut himself fifty percent of the prophets over double the typical twenty percent management fees. A textbook workaholic. Boesky routinely slept four Hours a night working the other twenty. He was often seen with a phone in each ear. And two hundred ninety eight others at the ready often often ringing the schools phones were manned by the staff of Ivan F Boesky and company. But in retrospect many believes that the staff were a cover and and the Boesky made all his real money through wholesale inside a trading not managing individual portfolios for over a decade hundreds hundred's of millions of dollars funneled through an insider trading ring centered around Investment Bank Drexel and Ivan Boesky when Boesky whiskey and his accomplices were caught in one thousand. Nine hundred seven. It was the biggest financial scandal America had ever seen however Bosque's punishment was relatively collectively light. One hundred million in fines and restitution paid out to the SEC and three and a half years in prison he got out after two Boesky spent his sentence a white collar facility where he grew out his beard played. Tennis Boesky is currently a free multimillionaire again and thanks to alimony from his ex wife. Even considering Bosque's cooperation with law enforcement the federal government simply couldn't penalize Ivan Boesky. Dennis Levine Martin Segal and Michael Milkin adequately for that crimes up to this point. No one had considered that an international snow insider trading ring could run this deep or that its demise might contribute to such historic economic downturn in response Congress passed cost insider trading act of nineteen eighty eight which expanded the scope of the SEC's prosecution powers and allow them to enforce harsher penalties now under onto the IT S. F. A. The SEC confined guilty parties up to three hundred percent of the amount of money made through insider trading these powers were imperative in prosecuting and punishing criminals. who followed in Bosque's footsteps including Bernie Madoff and Martha Stewart Stewart and now the I T S? Fema guarantees that crime never pays Thanks for listening to today in true. Crime I'm Vanessa Richardson. Thanks again to Hannah for joining me today. Thank you so much for having me. It's been a complete pleasure. You can find my podcast red-handed on spotify or wherever you listen to your podcast. You can catch us every Thursday for more stories like this checkout our episodes of con artists covering Bernie madoff today in true crime is a podcast original. You can find more episodes of today in true crime and and all other podcast originals for free on spotify. Not only the spotify already. Have all of your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy okay. All of your favorite podcasts originals. Like today and true crime for free from your phone desktop or smart speaker to stream today in true crime on spotify lot of Fi. Just open the APP and type today in true crime in the search bar at podcast. Were grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at par cast and twitter at par cast network. We'll be back with a brand new episode road tomorrow in True Crime. Today in true crime was created by Max Cutler is a production of cutler media and is part of the podcast network it is produced by Max Ron Cutler sound design by Andy Weights with production assistance by Ron Shapiro Carly Madden and Freddie Beckley. This episode of today and true crime was written by Maggie Admire. I'm Vanessa Richardson.

Frederick Boesky Ivan F Boesky Boesky Boesky Corporate Boesky Guy Boesky boesky Ivan Judge Morris e lasker Cerruti Hannah Vanessa Richardson SEC Ivan liven America federal government Bosque spotify Bosque Bernie Madoff Levine Siegel Watergate
142. JESSE COLIN YOUNG: Get Together, Dreamers & Coffee!

Your Online Coffee Break

14:01 min | 10 months ago

142. JESSE COLIN YOUNG: Get Together, Dreamers & Coffee!

"We'll go to your online coffee break where we discussed bite-size topics that inspires educates entertains. Here's your host, a software innovator award winning marketer and astronomy and space boss stuck fields. Hello thanks for joining me today for online coffee break today on. Thrilled to issue special, Guest Jesse Colin Young of the young bloods. Jesse joins US by phone today to discuss his incredible career as well as recent solo album dreamers, which was released last year now for your coffee lovers out there Jesse and his wife owning organic coffee farm in Hawaii, and they're offering up some special brews including morning blends and the get together fiftieth anniversary edition on their website at Jesse Colin Young Dot Com it's delicious to be sure to check it out. At why hunger we don't just ask why. We find solutions to hunger that transform last and tackle urgent human needs. It she's food is a human rights and hunger is solvable. That's why we worked with grassroots organizations in social movements across the globe to ensure everyone has access to nutritious food in efforts to end hunger for good. For more information visit, www, dot hunger dot for. Online coffee break. Just you've had this amazing incredible career that still going strong. Now, I understand that you actually grew up in Queens New York City. And I was just wondering, can you tell her audience what inspired you to get started in music? Family really we my dad was a channel player classical mostly, but he played a lot of stuff for us to sing around the piano. My mom had a beautiful voice. And When I was little you know before I was ten there was no in our house. So we entertained ourselves sing together and you know a dad come home from work sometimes, he'd sit down and play classical music for awhile I'm unwind is an accountant and then maybe it was a weekend or maybe it was a boring night. And we just get together and sing. And My poor mother has perfect pitch. So she was always saying to my father over his shoulder here my my sister's lovely voice to four years older than me eat hand. And she would lean over his shoulder. His name was Fred and Fred that was a b flat not be natural. So. You know he's reading. All these or playing for memory of these Usually savory, all these camp songs. and. Harvard. Fight songs. He taught me all of those and I actually probably made my debut. When I was eight, it took me to he took me to Harvard Reunion. In New York. I guess the Harvard. Club. Just, maybe they couldn't get a babysitter or. Maybe, they didn't like baby shoes. I don't remember much babysitting. So there was. Life begins at fifty for the class of twenty five. And when they found out that I knew some of these songs, they had an accordion player who I guess probably made us living memorizing every colleges. Songs. Nice. So they, put me up on a cocktail table and I sent ripped off you know six or eight. loot Clemson and something flashing distractions of victim. You know old he lies hopes we are dashing into pure obscure routine. Is Stuck with me. See I I love hearing how it inspired you and what really surprise me. Jesse, about just read more about your background. Is even before you joined the young bloods, you'd Ashley started became a successful folksinger you are you released to? Solo of a city boy and young blood where's young come from? Where's youngblood come from weather just thinking of something to go with my name to. Put the album I love it. It works instead ups over the city boy. It's young black. It'd probably Bobby Scott thought it. You know UNISOM and it was a fairly common term in New York among musicians. The young blood you know the ones coming up I always wondered what they came for that make sense because yeah. Ahead at feeling had something to with your name of course, but I just thought it was kind of cool that you had the album called young. Blood and then you call your band the young bloods see I would like to ask you about about get together I mean it's it's been over fifty years since hit number one but I just want to share just some of the lyrics I mean the main course you know come people now smile on your brother everybody get together try to love one another right now those words are too so powerful even today they're so cool. Can you believe in fifty years? That's incredible. Slash. Yeah I was GonNa say the one that you did with Steve Miller. How did that come about? That was just incredible. Well, I was to reading with the band in two thousand seventeen my son Tristan and from. Berklee. College of music and I went to his county ny my wife went to his senior recital and I just sat there. About five rows back. These are during their done during class. So kids come in and out I could sit wherever I wanted to I. Got Right in the Middle Layer about ten most back just listened to them and there were no vocals was instrumental quintet sextet. Let me see two keyboard players, Bass Drums Guitar, and you know some of it was tunes that I knew. The beautiful version of BLACKBIRDS. Fusion. Great Great Drummer, and I. Was So. Good. I mean had quit the road. Oh, six years before that I was too sick with mine disease. Yeah. That had to be something horrible to go through but I thought it was neat. How Tristan? In that just inspired you yeah, just blew me away. I mean I just ran backstage and said I wanNA ban like this. He said come on Dad retired and I had to ask him several times he said come on dad it's a lot of work to do that. And yes I did yes I did it and we had an invite I say where we haven't been bite to south by South West and that actually came to us through the Australian guy who loves their coffee and he does all of the picking of the bands through that part of the Pacific is that the South Pacific? Hawaii which he always considered me once of course, we did live there for on the farm for twelve years. So he considers me a Hawaiian artist. So in inside its south, Pacific New, Zealand? Australia and and so and he had always said the county I think Jesse. She said he's not putting. So that year I was getting better and county and I started writing together and we wrote a song called Cast Stone I. Love that Song Love It only if you just just tell our audience a little bit more about how did you come home cast Estonia. They were they were filming a movie Boston that became Boston strong about the bombing at marathon continue was living three blocks, finish nine and a lot of his friends and. All these kids. Were in school there at that time. So somehow the casting director got his number ten said, Hey, do you think any of the kids you know to be two, hundred, fifty to fifty for day? You think anyway. Kids would your son like to go and we? Know he's like he's buried. He didn't have his six hours in homework a night each he's he doesn't have a day to spare. So they said what and she said well, you know we have this. Song but Luke lyrics really stinks. So you think just great some lyrics to it or you know really the songs pretty stupid. Do you think you guys would write a song about the bombing? And so Tony said, well, you know ask them we'll think about. I mean next morning I woke up county been up since five she had. A page of lyrics really three three verses. Yes and I dug into it I mean it was was Boston actually my folks are from that area the Irish and Scottish all. So I know Celtic music and I just felt like this is a Celtic thing often celtic songs or about horrific experiences of. Our experienced, the first versus about US hearing We we don't say that reheard PR. They said a bomb went off in Boston. That's all the information we have. So, we're on our way driving home thinking. Oh my God. So we start calling t know we can't get through. And turns out they shut the cell towers down because they were afraid they were more bombs. So we get home and it's definitely be and we still can't to and call in talk to them. So I'm sure that was you know. There's so many students a quarter of a million students in Boston, and so that makes you know at least a million parents and uncle to begin. Trying to call a lot of worry going on it. So that's you know that's the first versus. That experience about. Witness being this evil miles and miles and buffet we're seeing on TV need and we're wondering is our son okay? Did he wonder down? But finish line you know because it's so close to his house just. 'cause he was bored or wanted to see her so he was okay see this wonderful but I mean, all your songs Andrei dreamers are just incredible I. Mean they all they all reach you know different issues. I. Just think that also powerful. So good I mean it's a great album. You Yeah I I, love making it. I think it's your son helped inspire you to do and I I just got a kick out of that. The kids all in their twenties loved to get together and they sang it and played it. So beautifully I thought you know we didn't do any disagree only did new music country Mars and I thought I want a recorded version of get together of US doing it. So the studio had had a cancellation and they were open. We went in and put down together and so it sat around, you know maybe a year and a half and Think summertime came around and I mentioned it stiegler had moved to New York. For a while he was rebuilding a townhouse and then he moved into it I guess and yeah. I think we were there eating dinner and t ruthless and I mentioned it to him. I said, you know got disputable track would get together and. It comes a point that somebody wants to put it out. Would you WANNA play on it and he said Very. Simply. I mean that's awesome. The blast fall I thought. We need get together. And I got together. So I I started working on it and I redid my Boca's which needed it and my guitar, and then Steve was coming off the road from his whole summer thing and I called him I said, I'm doing the get together say man. So we did it. We got in the studio on an afternoon and Steve came in and did this thing and I. And because I wanted to be sure you're amazing that. Come on and so he did he did the harmonies thirst. 'cause you know like me he's pretty much a lead singer. Other people's do the harmon. Did a great job and worked hard at it, and then we went to guitar and and he played took it in. Know he just had some. There's some rhythm guitar buried in there. That's kind of distorted. But only slightly that's really added some some grit and then he played beautiful Solo. Oh, it turned out fantastic I is I'm so glad that you redid it I just think the story is is NEAT and having Steve Miller be a part of that too. It's just wonderful. What's next few? What's coming up for you this fall? I'm almost finished with a DMG asked me to do solo album really because of had you seen any of the one song at a time on Facebook I see the now Jessica Myung Euphoria one song at a time it gave birth to this album. I haven't had my final listen but I have just finished twenty one who stick show low songs I don't know. There's there's a lot of magic. Dear. Jessie, it has been an honor speak with you. Thanks so much for taking time to join me a really do appreciate it Oh man our pleasure. Online coffee break. Why Really Joe McCarthy's from yesterday and I'm loving his music from the album. Dreamers also love his delicious coffee much more to check out their website Jesse Colin Young Dot Com. Our thing. Jesse. Join me. Thank you for joining us as well and as usual. We'd appreciate it to share this up with a friend if you're watching youtube if you gives a thumbs up, appreciate it, and if you give us a good rating on whatever podcast application you're listening on, we'd appreciate that to other way. Thanks so much for joining us. We'll see an time God. Bless.

Jesse bloods Boston New York Steve Miller Jesse Colin Young Jesse Colin Hawaii US Tristan Harvard Queens New York City Harvard accountant youtube Fred US Pacific Australia
Hour 1: Zubin Mehenti & Calls

The Paul Finebaum Show

39:34 min | 1 year ago

Hour 1: Zubin Mehenti & Calls

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In about fifteen minutes longtime ESPN anchor. He has just recently been named to The the new morning show at ESPN radio and we'll talk about that. He's also a huge. College football fan in addition to being a rutgers graduate. We will try not to rub that one in but he has a good degree. You just not a good football program, or although it's getting better. We'll talk to Freddy. Call me one of the most popular. Anchors. THAT ESPN is ever. Had you hear Freddie and often. It's been too long since he'd been on this program. We'll look forward to talking to Freddie a Riccar with the normal sports business report, which things are starting to happen a little bit. He'll join us in. From ESPN's College. Game Day Jen. Will join us as well. There's there is some interesting news out today comes from. The West Coast where Stanford which is one of the schools in the country has had one of the better basketball programs longtime. Excuse me bet football programs under David Shaw. Announced today that it is cutting eleven. Varsity sports. it has it has a lot I mean there's no shortage of sports out in Paolo Alto, but the fact that a school Stanford which is a private institution. The endowment is on untold the fact that they are cutting that many sports is an interesting. Sign of. The Times, the eleven sports that will be discontinued or men's and women's fencing. Yes, Field Hockey! Light weight rowing men's rowing coed. and Women's sailing. Squash synchronized swimming men's volleyball. And Wrestling Okay I! Know you're all heartbroken but I'm just I'm just a news reader. Just telling you what then they have thirty six different programs, and whether this means a lot unless you're a parent. Of One of those programs, and they produce a lot of Olympians out there. It is an indicator of the coming times in intercollegiate athletics. We already we've heard from smaller schools, but Stanford is a big one. and that's a big one to fall while we're waiting. For the Ivy League to vote rarely on this program. Do we talk about? Ivy League, football, but They are expected. Throughout this day to announce it, they are putting on the fall and we'll go to spring not many people are expected to follow them by the way. will into that a little bit later on, but it's still an interesting. Concept well. We had interesting week here. a lot of you know calls from all over the planet. And we will continue doing that. Today so, if you WANNA give us a ring, love to hear from you at eight, five, five, two, four two. Seven two eight five. Let's start with PAT calling us from Georgia. Hey Paul Thank you very much I was listening to our four this morning as I was walking and I. Don't remember his name, but he digs graves and he wrapped. In Georgia and I know the cemetery that the next to the stadium where he. Passed that as you walk in on the right, but in he's, he was right. In nineteen forty three there were four teams that played and they announced tech was the conference champion. That was and that was on. The Saturdays in. Saturday's in Georgia, history of the SEC. they covered the war years. and I'm thinking that. The There is precedent. For playing with less than a conference, and you believe in in story Isis. Wouldn't basic things you know? Follows the the judgments that have been made before on settled cases. Then you could crown a conference champion only playing half the teams. I've heard judge judge. Chief Justice Roberts utter utter those that phrase very very often including recently. It's a good point by the way I have to tell you. There are a lot of things about this job I really like. But Pat one of my favorite parts. Are just talking to people and you know you you. You end up running into a lot of people, but in in my life I've never spoken to a grave digger, and and I I mean I. I could've. As some of you probably know and probably were cringing. I have spoken to that guy for an hour. I was I was really fascinated by what he did what he does. Yes, I could tell and I. I enjoyed the conversation this morning when I was listening to the podcast of. wondering it was interesting, four and a half I personally hired him to dig my grave in, and it will be Friday afternoon about six thirty. Well okay, It's it's. It's interesting to sports that Stanford has decided not to have this year. particularly taken aback by synchronized swimming. The Pat I have to tell you. You're talking to a man who has covered synchronized swimming before. About twenty years ago when I was in Birmingham UAB the president at UAB decided she was going to. Set. be a trailblazer for for women sports, she. Announced that they would have a synchronized swimming match and I went out and covered the first match, and did an article on it and I don't think anybody liked. It was maybe a little too cynical, but I have covered one synchronized swimming matching my time. Well well, yes, I have one will not cover a second though I can assure you. I understand and and I. Hope you don't have to. I hope it doesn't come to that ball or we'll all be in trouble. I just have one last thought I want the law school for one quarter in in Athens and I hated. And I decided I did not want to be an attorney and I am time I decided. I wanted to be a CPA so I understand the lingo. and. That's about it when you start when you start dropping star decisive on this show I hear either your either your taken You're you're taking? Saddam Myers place on the court or or you're just having some fun. Hey, thank you very might sugar. Yes, Sir Arthur is in San. Francisco. Hey hold you know I went to Cornell. Already I did not realize that, but It's pretty impressive place. Yeah I I enjoy what I can tell you I, never thought as I sat in the stands, an ethic of watching college football game, which really only had parents and girlfriends, and maybe some older alumni act like the entire Polish football rolls would be focused on the Ivy League. Look Fuller even. Yeah someone once asked me in an interview You know what's your bucket list of games that you've never covered and I put Harvard Yale on my list. Only because when I was a kid I read an article about it. in sports illustrated and it was the usual. More about the tailgating and the money in the, but then the football, but it it's one of those games. I've been I've been pretty close to. It the last five years I've spent part of my weekends in Connecticut, so I I have not been that far away, but I still have not gotten there yet either. I think that'd be. If I wanted to go to made it. And sometimes these programs are I think yield did beat army a few years ago. which is which is quite impressive, but the stakes are just so low. We combined football. It's their own because they don't play in the play offs at least ten games and to be honest, you know you were kind of chuckling your way. Through list of Stanford sports which has been cut, but it's pretty much on the same scale sports so I know the rhetoric to be looking at it I know the Ivy League Made a smart decision in March, the cancer basketball tournament, but they. Today Dan and they want. A bunch of games is packed. In March madness. It's just it's different story with football. Now if you were going to be a on an Ivy League team we wouldn't. Would it make more sense to be unlike the crew team? And, what would be the benefits of that? Let me just sounds good. Yeah, I, I wrote for Harvard. Cornell. We say what she's taking most seriously. Our hockey men's and number one in the country before painted came, and then the cross, of course very the and our wrestling, so those are all kind of. The big weekend of the year it's it's Cornell and. Cornell Harvard hockey that's. That's the biggest rivalry, okay? But You know you're listening. You're base in the southeastern conference. It would be sort of like the the South Carolina's football game. I think even. More interest well, you know I mean southerners view the Ivy League like Georgia Tech's the Ivy League to them. Well. That's too obvious. Yeah No, I understand. So I'm interested. In the decision I do think the ripple effect will see is SDS schools especially nonsol- conference. Patriot Division Two division three high school. They should listen to do it with the IVY. League is. But with major college football that they can consider it I. It's relevant, but I wouldn't based decision. I'm no. I'm not really as interested in the decision as I am the reasoning behind it, and I don't know which I. Don't know what time they're supposed to meet I. Guess They're probably not through it through with lunch at the Harvard Club. In midtown. Hopefully they will. Yeah I I've had the pleasure of eating at the Harvard club and I was nearly thrown out once I. I had I was late for something and I had to. I had to call somebody in the guy behind the counter, said excuse me Sir. We cell phones are not permissible here. Well good for you. You know I think. Take the Little Luster Assiduous Cornell club and I think is required by no for us. That's not an issue. Yeah, I'm good. Yeah, I would like I'm GonNa? That's my new goal is to go to every. One or the IB clubs in New, York thanks for the call or great to have you on. We'll take a break. Guests Start Piling in here in a moment when we come back, you're listening to the Paul Finebaum show podcast. It's your home speaking and I need you to do me a couple of favors I. could you get that blueberry that rolled under the last week? It's throwing my functions. Way Off second thing. Bundle your home and car insurance with GEICO. It's easy, and we could save money. Lastly I know you're thinking of painting the nursery back to off white, but I'm actually feeling. This baby blue didn't think it was my color, but I m pulling it off. GEICO, bundling made easy go to GEICO DOT COM today. We welcome you back here. On a Wednesday afternoon anti joining us longtime anchor at ESPN and it was announced yesterday that he will be part of the new morning team with keyshawn Johnson and Jay Williams on Espn Radio Zubov great to have you on and many congratulations on your new assignment. Oh, it's great to be here I. Really appreciate it and I wanted to tell your audience something that I told you last night when we were emailing. Because I know the fire nation. It's much about the caller is as it is about you, it's just sort of they've been following you and been with you for decades, and and that's something I haven't mentioned to. You couple years ago, twice actually in the last year and a half. Of spend a week down Mississippi, just on my own dime on a little southern food tour little too much Taylor a little too much age but I guess there's never too much of that, but I was walking around the Oxford campus, and it really struck me I went over to that James Meredith statue that many of your listeners may know about especially those that live out there in northern Mississippi and when you see. See that statue of him walking through that door with white students and African American students, everybody just walking past it to different time in a different age, it was really powerful I, stood there, and watched it just literally looked at that image where he's got that right foot forward walking in the door and then I remember I made like the walk back to my hotel, which was just off the square and obviously. Obviously, there's a statue right there on the square in another way that a lot of your listeners know about, but just I thought about you and I thought about the conversations that you're having with your listeners. How long it's been how honest it's been. How amazing it's been sort almost to listen to. And just I'm an Indian guy from New Jersey. Look I'm not from the south, but when I go down there and. And I see that statue, and then not too far away. It was maybe twenty minute walk. I see that other one and I just kind of understand how complex everything is down there you know I grew up in the northeast, totally different atmosphere, but I just wanted to commend you and your listeners for what you've been talking about. There's really nowhere else on the radio or anywhere where I'm hearing discussion like this. Will thank you for saying that and I think he said the keyword, the the people that listener call in because you're not had private conversations about this audience. They can be. They can give you a headache every once in a while, but frustrating, but they are the best college football audience in the world, and and they make this afternoon experience what it is, thank you for saying that I want to talk to you about But the season for a minute because. It is it is really depending on where you are. Sometimes, it's how you view it. and you know you're up in Connecticut What are your thoughts on all the conversation about trying to get this season in college football season? I'm more of an all or nothing Guy Paul. Give you an example. From a conference. You know a little bit about the big ten. Okay. I went to rutgers, university and new. Jersey has had thirteen thousand debts from the Corona Virus I heard Governor Phil Murphy Democrat from New Jersey. WHO's on meet the press? Sunday standing there the Jersey shore, which at this time of the year, should be packed with people They've thirteen thousand deaths in Nebraska course also in the big ten has been largely spared mostly because there's a rural state and they're less people per square mile, but do both. In the same league now how this Kevin Warrant! Whose First Time Commissioner just took the job in January great appointment for diversity in and of itself. HOW IS HE GONNA? Manage that when a state like New Jersey that's a little tiny blip on the map that his eight million people, and is reeling for the most part, and has been since it started and the brass, where they might be ready to dump, obviously, if they play in the spring, the biggest proponent of Lincoln Riley and anytime you go outside of the box office. Office something. That's a little bit bizarre. You need somebody with some cash a to be behind it to legitimize. Obviously, this guy's a great coach. Multiple Playoffs heisman winner heisman runner up the whole thing. I still think he needs somebody. Probably a little above Riley not even a coach, but a conference commissioner, or emerge or somebody, even though it's not really emerge, will to get out there and endorse spring football. Because right now it just seems like an unreal the idea, and I, obviously as you know, we've talked about it for years. The sport had a conference commissioner. If there was some sort of central command that could bring the League's together. It might be doable. I know Larry Scott and Bob Dole's the and swamp bird, and all the power, five commissioners and Warren, and thank you have all been together. For many months during the pandemic having daily conference call, so they're trying to work in concert with each other, but to your point. If you don't have the Central Command, one person that can make a decision. What's going on in Palo Alto? California is going to be a lot different than what's going on in Starkville Mississippi, and I'm a big believer in all systems, go either everyone or no one that might be a little pie in the sky, but I think in terms of. Of If. We want to be equitable and we WANNA. These student athletes with them students virgin athletes second I think that's what you have to do I'm not naive Paul I, but we both know how much TV money pours in for me. SPN ABC and Fox Notre Dame with NBC, and that's a gigantic factor in all of this, but I would love to see either everybody go or nobody go. I don't think the stop. Start instinct is the right way to do it. Yeah and I think. Zubin is you have said on sportscenter and we've all said here every day. The decision doesn't have to be made yet, but it's we're. We're we're not. We're not too far away. I want to transition a little bit because You've done so many different things. At it at Espn you've done a considerable matter radio as well but It was announced yesterday. Of course you'll be part of the new team in the morning and I think it. Certainly a challenge to ever go into to follow the footsteps after Mike and Mike and Obviously What Golick and Wingo have done, but tell us a little bit about This this new venture for you. Yeah I'll tell you I mean Mike in my for eighteen years. I mean I mean I. Don't think it's any way of an understatement to say. It was the most successful show in the history of national sports. Talk Radio. There have been some extremely strong shows like Mike and Mike in New York, or Paul Finebaum on W. J. O. after those out of the mix. Biggest most popular national shows of old time, no doubt about it Mike and Mike and I'm happy to see that Mike Greenberg will be returning to the radio and Mike Golic is an unbelievable job for twenty two years, thousands and thousands of mornings traveling around the country have nothing but respect for him, but the way I would say Paul is I'm sitting next to the number one overall pick in the NFL draft and the number two overall pick in the NBA draft a guy that won the John Wooden Award, and I know it's college country down there where you are, and that's one of the most prestigious accomplishments. have so I got a guy that's seen a ton of stuff in the NFL which let's face it. That's the majority of what we're going to be talking about. Because that's what our listeners and viewers on ESPN two and ESPN, news we're GONNA want and. Provide perspective to the NBA and college hoops, and I think the one thing I don't know when you kind of talked to all of your analysts down there at the SEC network. One thing I love to do with any analyst on any sport whether we're doing it a sports, specific show or something general is instead of sort of finding out. Why did this happen? More people than ever are interested in roster, construction and grace hurting, and you know XS and Os, and all these manusha type things that only coaches used to love, but I would love to just get inside the mind of. Of, these guys like most people in our audience, including me have no idea what it's like to be in the huddle for a huge play at the coliseum with a chance to win the conference, title or J. Will Act Line of be duped basketball game I just WANNA be able to tap into their expertise. We often ask these guys. Why did this happen? Well? Just coverage was busted and this guy with on the block, and whatever and whatever that stuff is great, but they had experienced is that many of us can only dream about knocking helmets in the tunnel or being out there? But Shane, baddie A or today's modern versions die on or whoever it is. These guys have walked in those footsteps before and sometimes I. Think we're so deep into trying to figure out why things happened that sometimes I think fans, listeners and viewers, just to say something as simple as like. So, what was it like when that happened? What was it like when you put on that uniform for the first time? What was it like when you ran out there for the first time in a Duke Carolina game which we could extrapolate to the next do? Do Carolina game so I think sometimes these analysts can provide us a great things, but what I'd really love to do for our listeners and viewers. It's just have US take them there. I think sometimes we take it for granted. They take for granted because they're in a situation where they've done it their entire lives, but we'd just love following that stuff so for me. I would say I'd love to try to do that. It's not something I see a lot of people do, but I think it's something that we can really tap into something different. Well, I think it will be great and I I have done many many programs with you and told you this, and there's never been anybody better, prepared and more inquisitive and more curious, which I think there's too little of. in the industry and I wish you so much excess cannot cannot wait for it to begin Zubin, it's such a pleasure to. Welcome you back to our program. Be well. Thank you so much. Zubin anti joining us a part of the new morning team announced yesterday at ESPN radio. We will take a short break back with your phone calls after this. You're listening to the Paul. FINEBAUM show podcast. Did you know, GEICO's now offering an extra fifteen percent credit on car and motorcycle policies. That's fifteen percent on top of what Geico could already save you. So, what are you waiting for your baby to let you sleep in? Our. Sleep in another half hour. Thanks Sweetheart Eight and. You'll change yourself to. Never been a better time to switch to GEICO. Save an extra fifteen percent when you switch by October seventh limitations apply visit GEICO DOT COM for details. Is your money, not sure what to do with itself right now at ally, they'll help save for the future with their smart savings tools. Bucket your money for the things that matter most analyze you're spending and save automatically all on top of a competitive rate for all things money. You deserve an ally. Visit A. L.. L. Y. dot com slash savings for more INFO ally. Do it right ally bank member FDIC. We welcome you back great to have you here more guests to come, and let's get to the calls and Logan. In North Carolina Logan. Ll. How're you doing doing great? Thank you. Awesome well I'm going to try to keep it non-political today So you were listening some Sports that had been discontinued and you mentioned the squash. not to sound like a Redneck, but you know squash to me. Is You know yellow vegetable? What is what actually just squash? Is that an actual college work? I've seen I've seen people. Play it at the gym. I've never seen it competitively. Say I I didn't hear a lot of sports there. That I'm too choked up about them losing or you. Know Not at all, I mean I. It's surprising that these are actual college sports actually. That surprise me. So I just picked up with something you said earlier. You mentioned something about Friday at six thirty. I. Don't know what with all the ESPN stuff changing I mean I know. You really can't say what's happening, but I mean. I don't know still here, man and We'll follow you wherever you go, but. I don't know. Well let me say this I have I I'll try to avoid the cliches that everyone always says but i. I think I'm good to go for a while. I'll be here. I was. That was a joke about Friday by the way just. I wasn't sometimes. You do a little gallows humor when you. When you when you when you kind of have the the roller coaster ride that we're all on right now. Right I can understand that and the interview with the. They're changing their morning programming. That was interesting that that guy that you interviewed sound really good. I mean I don't know much about that, you know. He sounded interesting to. Zuma's one of the first people I met at ESPN and we used to always be on. He used to have. His show once a week on sportscenter and he is just a great person. yeah. It came out yesterday pretty much the entire ESPN radio lineup has been redone and what I mean by that that that's the ESPN has an. ESPN radio on the show, but we we're. We're our own entity. What I mean by that that's the you know. The ESPN proper network where you know. It, it's underground quarterback change in recent years and it. Doesn't look like it is going under. It's undergoing a lot more change starting a couple of weeks. Yeah and I I mean I just read rumors. You really bad stuff and you know I was just. Wondering. What was going on with? You Man, you know. About me. and. They're their I know that there are a lot of stories out there, but For for the immediate future I would not pay attention to any of them. Awesome well. Thank thank you Paul. Thanks. non-political today. Sorry so we're we're. We're thirty seven minutes into the show, and we haven't had an attack on either presidential candidate, so I feel like this has been a big success Hey, thank you. Great Great Gone cab is up next hey. How you doing so we are doing well. Although it's good to hear man Maslin Twa. Get a call come in, and it's resonated with me man. He kind of went off the grid and attacked you thing you sold your sold. ESPN and authored other stuff man, and I've been a long time listener of a big fan of ball and I just want to tell you even though I. Don't always agree with you. I think most of the people that list your show even if they don't always agree with you, the one thing we do is we love you man and we respect your so and for somebody to claim such things towards many really bothered me. Considering the fact that you allow so many people call in. Say what they want to say, and you'll discuss it with them, and for them to make those kind of accusations. Torch apologised bothered me. Let me, and that's felt like just call you and tell you we appreciate. You can't thank you very much and I. I'm not I'm always. Listen to what people say, but I would bothers me a little bit. It's not about me, but for somebody to to to broad just because of where I work that means that I can guarantee I. don't agree with a lot of things ESPN does. It's a huge company and you know they don't consult me and I. Don't really offer an opinion on what they do because they don't. You know honestly they don't care what I think. I'm one of the five thousand employs ESPN, and one of a ZILLION employees for the parent company and but a of people create false narratives out there that because a company does a certain thing, then everybody at the company is a certain way, and you know for somebody that's done this long as I have I. I find that to be. You know pretty humorous. I understand the people that have been with this show for twenty years it is not the same show because it started out as a local show, and now it's it's a little bit bigger, and and. I haven't forgotten where what what the with the impetus behind this show was, but I mean you do have to alter? The program a little bit as you as you move throughout the food line. Absolutely man in one thing he hasn't done is. You hadn't thank you you. You respect the voice of the people that you work with and the people that you have on his guests, and what? What to me is more impressive about your show is. You also listening to the to the fans of the sport and the fans of the show, and you value our opinions, and you know sometimes they're. They're crazy opinions, but for the most part man you've been real, fair and roll. We'll thinking an open platform for people. We appreciate it well. That means a great deal and kept thanks for saying that, and by the way I think some of this. I think a lot of people You know. Listen! And Guide their views what they see on social media, and there are some false narratives out there, and and by the way that's fine i. don't care what anyone says on on social media. I, really don't I. DON'T I. Don't mean that flippantly i. don't mean that arrogantly. I just? I. Know What we do here every day. I know how hard the people behind the scenes work on this program. And I know how dedicated the folks who listen and watch our and the point is that? Yet political shows are when the host of the program starts the program with a particular. Political View. I don't do that and I never have. because I never thought that. My personal view is really that important I'm I'm quite frankly anything for that matter. I'm not afraid to give it. I'm not afraid to share an opinion, but I do not. This show is not about an ideology. This shows about callers and their opinions and I, I get a little bit. frustrated sometimes when I hear you know this show is that or the show is this but Yeah, that's okay, that's. We. We we we often we. We live a little bit in a in a force fed media where. we just take whatever we are shoveled and subscribe to it whether it, you given it much thought or not. Let's continue with call and Chris is up next in south. Carolina Hello, Chris. Paul all right. I'm well great to hear from you. He has you, too. And I've heard about the shakeup away in the words this morning. I I'm very grateful. You aren't going anywhere. I'm heavy. There no I. appreciate that. Thank you yeah I. You know without quite a few times about this code thing football and Then, you know really need football. I do personally I. Know People out you. Do we need something? To get away from what's been going on, but I just have a hard time seeing football. Happening this fall with the Taylor student resolves is coming out now. And here's the problem with Spring. Making a big assumption that thing going to be better in the spring and I don't know that they are. the only thing that's all made. This better is a magazine and you know they're saying by the end of the year which is. Pretty optimistic. But The fact of the matter is you know I don't know if we can get it in I. Just don't I mean you don't have. It may get started, but. You know when you have you know in my part of the country. Clemson Adelaide thirty four. Football players positive which dead thirty four. And I mean. People just aren't doing eight today. And I just don't know if have. I agree with you. In I just saw something South Carolina is really trending badly which you already know and I don't listen if you're a commissioner, an athletic director, Clemson or South Carolina or anywhere else i. mean you're doing everything you can get, but at some point and I think that time is coming here in about three weeks. You have to take a reality check of Is it worth it? Could you put one hundred people not only on the field and pads, but can you put them in locker rooms with with older coaches and personnel, and is it worth the risk I think ultimately. Yeah I think we've made a grave right already a Mustang, but assumption that this this virus from the seasonal kind of thing, it's not. if you look at Texas and Florida and Arizona and Georgia South Carolina well mass right now you know and. He doesn't affect as they knowing I think too many people are. Are Missing, A. Forget the death which you can't there, there'll be a lot of desk coming out of those states as you know. quit making this political and and just look at it. Realistically, and and I think too too often. We just can't help ourselves. You know, it's kind of people are. You know it's like the old farmer. There's a tornado coming in either why wondering sailor Yup store to House Barstow? Transit Mind Nice to win with both. People are acting. You know I mean there's like nothing samples. And you know I just I. Just don't know how we're going to get better attitude. Thank you very much. It's always. Helpful and informative to hear from me, I think sometimes we'll just. Just literally out there putting out lies to people and they're they're going. They're going to cost. People is if you're not careful I'm not talking about the government. I'm talking about people who Who Do this and how followings we're up against a break, we'll take a break we'll. We'll be back with much more after. Listening to Paul Finebaum show podcast. GEICO gets you access to licensed agents. Twenty four seven, which means that Geico is always there for you. If only everyone was always there for you, like your mom when you fill out really really important paperwork on the first day of a new job name, check birthday, social security thing. Hey, mom, what is my social security number? Mom Mom? Zero zero one seven Gemini Ashtec Done Geico, always there for you with savings and twenty four seven access to licensed agents. We welcome you back on a Wednesday afternoon lot to do today. Let's get some more calls in here. And Ricky is in Alabama Helen Ricky. Most up all I appreciate you. Let me tell. Brother Listen Dr Rashad but tar. Be P. T. A. R.. Is the leading naval officer specialists own all the diseases I mean wanted to top. That's in the world and he is. He is telling the truth about what's going on. He's telling the truth about everything about Dr Five. G. About the Z. The virus. And everybody and there's another one. ABC aired at work. Yeah, go go ahead. I'm sorry. And Judy Malkovich I think her name is. She was the lab tech. The top specialists in the world on viruses AIDS, all she's. She's the real deal and DR fouts. You've done everything he could to destroy her and she got a book out on it. and. She'd been fighting this for I. Don't Know Twenty Years About Valjean Diseases, and she really has to true i. mean when you listen to this girl talk man I'm telling you know she tells us what what is she saying? She say well. You need to look it up for 'cause. She's saying a lot about virus. She's saying that all the data information. They're giving out Bovis and it's and it's absolutely a man made virus to begin with, and we spent three point five well. I built the lab that we built that when I touch daughter, Dr Falcone and Bill Gates used. Dollars to You know to study. And do whatever, but are you saying? This is like a biological virus weapon. Logical weapon. And at best and then. But it's something to do with the foul. Hey Me, this because I I've yet to. Foul, she and and Gates what is assuming this is all true. What is their in game? Well. It's the new world order. They're going chip everybody. They're going to bring it back to the base paper. Don't won't believe in Revelations Bible but I believe this, is it? I believe US exactly what it is to take the whole you know when they bring them that new world order now new system that chip they know digital money. That's going to be the end of in game. You can work with God. They choose, and whatever rules they play, and if you don't want to be part of their system, you ain't GonNa get chip you stay on the outside, and probably you know not be able to work or eat or do anything to so who else is in a based on what you're you've you've learned who else is in on this other than Thao. She and Bill Gates. The one percent of the Ross House the rockefellers. You look at the Rockefeller Foundation. You go their website in two thousand ten. They wrote it down in their Ledger Zach about the virus how they was going to do. It was actually a plan to Albert Pike's and the freemasons in a new order to come up with nineteen eighteen eighty. If you read our Pike's let war three letters what they had planned to begin with. We're feeling it out exactly how? We only have about twenty seconds. So how much longer do we have before they take over? I don't know it's just worn. If trump, if trump wins, and all that comes out, they all go to jail if trump alluded I, don't know you know. We all know about a Hillary and bill and you know in that crew so. We'll keep this conversation go. Hey, thanks so much for sharing. Did you know Gyco now offering an extra fifteen percent on car and motorcycle policies? That's fifteen percent on top of what Geico could already save you. So, what are you waiting for your teenager to help around the house? Okay, mom, I empty the dishwasher vacuum the basement, and folded the sheets out of the dryer. What Oh and next I'm going to clean litterbox. Are we in some kind of prank, show or something? That's a camera, isn't it? There's never been a better time to switch to GEICO. Save an extra fifteen percent when you switch by October, seventh limitations apply visit. GEICO DOT COM for details.

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Coming Full Circle - Our Food Stories

Not A Single Fork

45:07 min | 11 months ago

Coming Full Circle - Our Food Stories

"So we've talked about cooking and we've talked about Shopping Kinda and the holidays days a lot about the holidays and food. But What does food really mean to you? Well, what does it mean to anybody? Do you have memories or threes about food? Yeah that you think of when you eat certain foods. L. Certain things. Yeah for so so they bring up really. Even good or bad. Yeah. Okay. Well, that's what we're talking about in season four were telling food stories I'm Candice Conley on Italian Banja and this is not a single fork another podcast about food and cooking. Yeah. We're going to keep it real. We did these four areas in the can we did it again? Interviews. I mean. The only other interview done is with the butterball hotline lady. and. Daisy Oh that's right. We did everything giving everything. Yeah. Thanksgiving and the we talked to mark. Yes I wrote because he read our museum but that was it not like not like serious long thirty minute Arab or I really likes them in the role so different yeah, I mean everyone. I mean I know we talked about it before and it just so happened like different ethnicities different age ranges totally different backgrounds remember it for every all of them everyone. I mean. We didn't do that intentionally we just kind of pulled from bank. He's all. Could we talk to who would who would talk talk to? Talk me willing to talk to us on the air so or recorded. So but then we got some feedback from our big fans the Brenda? Yeah. They wrote a some food stories. I asked and we've asked yet in the episode to tell us your kids stories. Too Bad for fledgling podcasts. That's right and if you guys still have stories that you think or you thought of while you're listening to our podcast just some of the men. Lay You. Could share them in the reviews on apple podcast or someplace like that or you can go to our website and there's comments section. So we just like to hear from you. That almost any team that is nice I mean we obviously, we always shit to talk about as we just fucking shit all the time, but it's nice to have feedback and have somebody else's work from somebody, and then we can talk about that and I think that was the the best part of doing all these interviews is that we got to know people more and we got to hear different points. Of View and we know they're gonNA to say and we told them like, Hey, like just ever listened to the podcasts and some of them are like yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Some of them I actually I haven't we're like, okay. Listen like anything goes like say whatever the fuck you on you be just you and be open and whatever and they did they did they really did yes and I loved it. It was crazy. So before we get into that and kind of talk about recap this season, let's read and tiffany and Brenda story okay. Sure? Okay. This kind of. Thought it's written down here. Now actually didn't write it down copy and pasted it because I liked to be exacting is A. Up I did just off the top of my head. Okay. So a tiffany starts with funny story had is this I have never liked peas I am with you. Here. Hey. Don't like any. Great Really Down Liking. Alex. Like sugar snap peas is going to know what she's talking to. She's not okay. I have never liked peas like canned `mushie nasty Greenpeace. Yeah. Growing up mom never made them because she disliked to either thank you mom however, my aunt was another story. So once when I was around three or four, I was at my aunt's house and she had made a side of peas for my cousin and I Pretty. Sure. I ate everything else on my plate except the PS not sure whose idea it was but my cousin and I both decided to see who could fit the most peas in our belly button. Okay. So I have to say we've read this earlier obviously because they put it. Finish now it's not finished. It's not finish when I got to this point when I was reading it I was expecting the peace to up her nose. You know somewhere like that I was not expecting belly button is new and I'm going to make a comment about that after I finish. Our shirts were topped up under our Chechens as we both smashed peas in one at a time my aunt walked in and got mad at us. We're making such mess. We still reminisce about desk when we get together, I still don't like peas I can even if they are mixed into a super casserole but not as a side by themselves, billy nutting, bellybutton. Well, I've always had this weird and I don't know where this comes from but you know your belly button is your abilities when Moore okay. So I've always had a thing about anyone touching my belly button because it's like it's my gut since inside and they're going to. Do something my insides. Let me just. Tell another story about candice she doesn't like to be touched anywhere. We just took a little short John's to Texas for a catering and we slept in kings together which we've lots of space. Kansas hates to be touched and I know this and so I'm Lena we were laying weight had a lot of wine. We Don our draw like we were really out of it I lean over and pet her shoulder and immediately like instant like reaction like her body was rejecting my so much. On me. She started on this GonNa. Miss that so I think it's just your belly button that I get what you're saying like. Well, my mom used to take. Huger. Clean it and it just made me insane. So do you ever touch your own million? I'm not very often. God, knows what's in there? Well. It sounds like it needs a good clean. Going in there though. So. Funny. Okay. So so Brenda which is tiffany's mom wrote and said so. Is Disgusting. So this is in reference to Roy's episode where we talked about ploy in a he said, it was one thing that he that many did light or that he thought was gross he tried it and he wasn't crazy about that was everything. So asking us, of course since the boys so we have this whole discussion. So this is Brenda today come. So. Poi- is disgusting we tried it and when we went to Hawaii many years ago it's basically the terror root bait smash into a pace and you're supposed to dip two fingers in and scoop it into your mouth. No flavor can. I believe they eat it because it's an stick to your ribs meal and it should be. And it should be it's like eating sheet rock mud. Never eaten she brought money either. But I knew what? It is I understand that consistency reference yeah yeah. So get ninety young. and. Maybe that fly like. Some maybe it's just A. Say It's got to be like a beans and rice then right like in in reference to it's something that they grow in have it's pride very, very cheap. and. If you don't have a lot of money like that fills you up. Like. Tastes like shit or not poor it doesn't fucking matter food tastes like, no, it's just survival to survive. Yes exactly. So if that's the case, there's probably people out there that like it probably. So because people who like peas let me. Ask. My daughter likes piece to my older daughter. Actually, I don't think shame mines either now mayor and. Now she she wouldn't eat peas right out can without them being warmed Oh Yeah. Well talking about Roy. Oh. I knew Kansas wrote this up in our episode episode Web Page about Roy but I don't know if you guys read that stuff if you should their pictures. Stuck in a fucking writer and the pictures are there and there's all kinds of info about them too. But Roy had a hand in the I can't remember what it's called. Last dance the Michael Jordan episode. Race fucking watching. Cow. was part of the production or no he was interviewed Oh he was in like he's in he's in Oh do you wash? No okay. We need to do that I'm not. I haven't watched it not because I didn't WanNa Watch Roy but because I'm not really a big basketball fan. Yeah. Person I don't really follow I liked a lot of sports but basketball has never been one of them. Yeah. I mean sports follower. MOM now. Yeah. Come on now so. There is. Okay. So that's what I wanted to say about Roy because I already. Round are we going to do this sensibly? Why would we do it since it because you know how I am? Let's fuck sex trying to do it in order. Okay. Well, what would you like to talk about? You and then you can order and then I'll interject. Okay. Sounds fine. Well to tell people what we're doing we're going to recount. What we found to be our memorable moments in the interviews in each interview. And we haven't told each other what they are. Now we have notes mine. I just I mean this is no surprise anybody minor scribbled with a Sharpie on very flimsy, ass shitty looking piece of paper and Kansas typed hers up. So please. Well I think that. That is a psychological. You know just what we do. Okay. So in order our first interview. I know. Go. AHEAD DO Y- Okay. So our first, our first interview was mark. Well I, was us well, yes, but I mean, we always have so many memorable moments i. don't think we need to go through that. Are we going to go through that? Did you wanted to add a couple things on us? We listen to is so okay. So this was her first episode was telling Food Story. Yes, and I listened to all of our episodes before we recording this so that I could recount because it's been awhile since we recorded that first one. Yes. And there was a question that we asked everybody like what is your favorite food and I'm like? In Indian food. I love Indian food. You do I stuck in Indian soon and truck oil not together. truffle oil I can I am like suck in animal in an inner restaurant or somewhere I can smell it. Yeah. I'm on my friends I. Doesn't really matter to you whether it's really good truck oil or it's just run of the mill truffle oil no really no not. Now, put it on the second baked potato and eat it out of my fridge which ended up drunk when I'm so let it out mark. Well I was just GonNa the one of the memorable moments from that interview with mark. That was one of the first ones that we did. Yeah. I and everyone was very giving of their time and their in who they are in life in their could. and. So the thing that I remember most of all of marks interview was when he was talking about his love of Thai food. And he talked about having to leave one of his sets, one of his music. To to go to the bathroom at his own home because he didn't want to blow up the bathroom at the location. Where where he was and? Told US anybody that kind of stuff and now everyone knows. Thing and I feel like we've all been in way Delhi this what they call. It. Never heard that and that's probably rude and racist and I apologize. But I've heard it called that and actually they referred to in that movie longshot with Seth Rogan. Iran because she had deli belly and she ruined a Dolch Gabbana handbag apparently, she shouldn't her handbag she shouldn't her handbag. Okay. Well, I don't know that we've all been in that situation and we definitely aren't musicians playing gigs but we've all been. Fox for the other night in class. In the middle of class listen, there's two of us. From running around trying to give everybody everything. And I'm like Oh. Fuck I poop. poop right now and like when that go to the bathroom I have to right now there's no like holding. And that's Opportune saying. We all all had that whether it's work or whether it's your wedding or you're at wherever and you're like Oh God you don't want to be the one in the like Ooh he knows what you. Leslie there was no one who needed to go to the bathroom and right after that we were all involved in the cooking process A. Yeah. must've been worked out yet but I do I think we've all been in the that's definitely not something. We all talk about that. We've all been in that. Yeah. Because everybody picks very sensitive situation. There's a child's book you know I, do know yeah. So. There you go and also the like my friends are all dead and there's a dinosaur in front of them. What? New about that one. Yeah. There's all kinds of okay. Well I was Gonna say what was not surprising to you about his interview. When did not swear like yeah, that's totally mark I. Think for me it was the way he kind of talked about food and like out fuel to his body and that kind of thing because I've known I mean. I know him but I don't you know what I mean like I don't hang out with him daily I. Don't talk to Mina. We don't tax all the time, but I I've had some conversations with them and I can tell and you can tell just by looking at him liked. His Physique is important to him, and for many reasons I mean he talked about he was arrested earlier an but now he's in front of people. I, mean fuck. If you had to look at yourself all the time. I mean. Yeah. So that didn't surprise me. But. It's funny because I've watched him eat Indian food and Thai food and I think that that goes out the fucking window during that time because he eats so much hoover's it I have no idea where he puts it. Like he has been saving up I guess he saves up space and then like he eats. So fucking much of that kind of food nine I get it. He loves it like I used to do that with Indian food to to the point where I was sick. Well, I kind of don't know if you're well, you know you're having at some point, but you don't know how long it's going to be. So you want really join it. On. Well I was. I. Was not surprised that again he is just this kind and charming. Young, man man to me because he is young. Comedian woman well, we're the same age. I know we. Never, say chummy young woman anyway. One Yard. You're you're the he's twenty five years. Almost, exactly. Yeah he is and he was that time and he just is I mean that's just who he is a good person. He is A. Decent person under some. And moving on his next. Okay. Next is Judy Allen. Judy. Cheese, our food writer and she writes for she's a love. She's a freelancer now but she writes a lot for our local newspaper, the Tulsa World and I'm sure she does a lot of other inches relates laser works, for Martha, she worked for Martha says. She was a creative director for Edible Tulsa. So she sent a lot and she was at Tulsa people as their food editor for. She can remember Yeah. So what was your memorable moment? So it was It was nine eleven like I was thinking about this the other day actually well, after I listened to her episode again and I thought you know we all want most of us I have to realize now that there are some groom younger younger than me grown people that weren't around for that but. We all remember that that was a traumatic experience for all of us even though most of us watch it on TV like even though we were so far away it didn't affect us but it did like it affected everybody and for her to be like event. Part of it like Holy Shit like gives me goosebumps right now like that I just. I can't even. and. The other thing. This is really stupid but yesterday, I came to this realization that not. Everyone's going to laugh at me. Okay nine eleven is nine one one. Is what you call an emergency. Yeah. Like what? The fuck seriously that happened on nine one one. Yeah. They did it on Park Avenue but still, I, don't know why yesterday of all days that I was like. It was my. Yes. That was the that's what I like. Really. I mean I remember other stuff from the interview but that's the thing. Yeah. That was one of the things that I that I found memorable because there's not very many people in Tulsa Oklahoma that you're gonNA run into who they were. They were on basically Ground Zero Graham during nine eleven so that. was very memorable for me and then the other thing is it's a little more lighthearted. Is that her phone can't ringing. So funny. I know it was like up. Old, one job today it was the whole thing was complete technical difficulties. We we couldn't there was a storm that day we couldn't get Internet we couldn't walk something. And then her phone and over over computer or so and then didn't Siri Siri Chemo. Racine like the. Was all going crazy. The interview that was not meant to be apparently, but we did it. Powered spread. Okay. So what was not surprising? Not. Surprising. Okay. So I don't know I don't know if anybody out there. Now, studios ever talked to Judy like to her whole interview regardless of whether it's talking tomorrow about. Martha. Nine one, one, one, nine eleven or whatever she's just so. Calm yeah, and and it surprising. But not because I've seen her before and talk to her before but it's just so funny because she just has this very chill demeanor throughout the whole thing. Yeah and that's just who she is too. Yeah, it is definitely And I agree with you on that one. The other thing that I found not surprising guy knew about her. I I like that she reiterated it during her interview was that her job is to not necessarily critique the local restaurants to support the local restaurants and she said, you know who am I to say that you're popper Dell? Is Not. That day. But she wants everyone to succeed. But that's her because you know other people that are in that position there Dave wanting to. Line criticize every little fighting thing that you do correct. Anyone we mentioned name now there are people out there. Yes. So that's just her on her personality just goes with her cool calm collect demeanor I think because she seen so much been through so much shit that she's like, yeah she's one of those people that she go. Wow I didn't know she's done all that and you wouldn't you wouldn't very unassuming matter-of-fact down to Earth. Person agreed. Anything else fetch Let me check my very. Those now now now we're GONNA go okay. except. Okay. Her guilty pleasure was one of my favorite. Oh, it was a good one her like Tang under the bed powder shit with her sister. That was like the perfect answer for me yeah. I remember. When I was a kid, there were these. What they were called, but it was they were in these paper tubes really skinny like Straw to see suits pixie sticks. Yes. Yeah. It was exactly the same thing. It was just Sweden insurer share color flavor with ending really sour they were almost like I guess like air hip. Them Oh I didn't know that. I didn't SNORT UP MY GES A. Should Adema, because there's sugar in A. Stick. What why would you snore Sugar Lila Ju do half the Shit that people do you put a balls on copy household again, even more trunk like you know people do that. Through their assholes. No. Alex. What's We're back. to Roy Rolling everybody talks about Roy. Have anything else I'm sure I can think of something. Well, he had by far the best food story I agree I agree even though there were a law ruling. I know this belly button. One's got A. Dino, it's close runner up there. Fuck else can say that I don't know anyone and then here comes walking out fucking kitchen. Appeared Dinner Sydney. With ta John Nobody prolific make sure. Yeah but you. Down, well, I don't know that that's the case in the neighborhood she was going to call. You didn't live far. Yeah. So you can I mean he didn't really go into details about who was at that dinner bought. No you can just imagine mucketty mucks Ankle Holy Shit Bill Yeah Yeah people that we will never meet ever know Friday people. We have no idea who they are and I'm sure that does there losing? Their behind the scenes. Yeah. But. Yeah Super Cool Story Super Cool Guy. He's another person like I. Feel like he's seen done a lot and I don't think he gets drunk and lank loose and like. Like I want him but I want him to like I wanted to one day like getting drunk and just like let them just talk about this shit because I'm sure there are seven his bank that like in his mind bank. Yeah. The just would be like what the fuck. I don't think that's ever happened, but maybe we'll have to wait against senile. Shit. Give a shit ask. About the other thing that. I remember is the difficulty or the challenges of being editor of Men's fitness. Yes. Oh yes. He was under scrutiny of everything he like eight physically. His Know how he carried himself whatever you know the people were waiting to make a or something you know. Yeah. Yeah. I. Actually when he was with men's fitness and he was the managing editor, he asked me to do an article for men's fitness and we did a guy friendly dinner. That's right I. Remember that when you did the, what did you do? Do you remember? That wasn't bluffing laughing pineapple. No, no, no, we use. It was it was stuff that was kind of. I would say exotic but something that sort of outside their pride, their comfort zone but not so far that they wouldn't you know. Make it although for big city people are probably wasn't outside their comfort zone either we had on DIV spears that they were stuffed with cheese and then they did lamb chops for dinner and then dessert was no. So I think it was something with puff pastry in longtime ago. Yeah. So about it was more than ten years ago I think so yeah, I found memories of that. That was fun working with his fact Checker and you know the people at the magazine. Then of course, being able to spend more time at least over phone with Roy. So that was fun for me and I obviously can't. Void better than I do because. I've I've that's probably what the second or site because I'm going to mature. Reunion. And Talk to them for a bit. I think I've met him in passing a couple times. This was really the first time. I had an opportunity to sit and talk just three of us. and. I really enjoy him I get like a get while you guys are friends like I. Really liked him. Yeah. Yeah. He's a good guy and very professional. I was GONNA say that that was not very. Surprising part for me is tremendous poise and he so eloquent yes and controlled very intro. Yeah. He he wants he curates. How? He's presented to people so you have to admire him for that. Connects to that yeah yeah. Anything else about Roy. Play. An be daisy day are. The blogger who she was just on. The local news station doing snacks for kids. Yeah Yeah so she does a lot of that. So what was What came up? When we listen to her episode I, thought it kind of made me giggle because. You know we ask people like they're not pleasures them and link like I said earlier judy's was that weird like Tang, powder that she'd like science experiment and under the bed generally sister and as he was like custard. Custody. In why? Because she meant frozen custard because in my mind I'm saying like putting a custard pudding you. Whip up some put in line. Like which I. Don't be good. Yeah. You can be really good that kind of made me chuckle she's very about. The kids and family friendly and can relate although she and she loves it the and she's super is yeah and she she lives Zapper Saana for sure. Yeah. She does the thing that I remember most from her interview was her her food memories weren't created with her mom because your mom was a single mom and always working. So her food memories and the photograph that we used in the blog post. Was For cure her great grandmothers baking and. Food memories were at her grandma's in her and she would let her do anything you can tell looking at that picture. Yeah. She let her do any which is so cool. But in the same instance I'm blank I think like Holy Shit. If a kid came into my house, I mean I guess shoot your ass because you love that child. Imagine the mess that I made like no, she heard we're cousin tour that place. Grandma had flower everywhere. She did days. Yeah. She never phantom and she loved it and she loved every minute in the other part. Food. Coloring in the chicken Dazs. Didn't we just say that the other day about something else we were talking about something else in Kansas might oh, chicken and dumplings doppler. I'm pretty sure sued coloring in that one I used to eat it or when someone made it or whatever the actually it was. This is this is a really memory are. There was a place called the Harvard Club. Wear clothes to wear or maybe even. was where the celebrity club is now I. Have to take back that's on sale. It's on Harvard. It was on Harvard writing. That would make sense because was called the so called Harvard Club, and it was one of those private quote unquote air quotes private clubs back in the day when it was not too long after we repealed prohibitions speakeasy. Probably was because it was a members only thing and they had chicken and don't. You know don't dumplings immunised just a watered oh yeah. I don't understand insane. We're yellow. Yellow yellow color not bright yellow yellow colored. Because I don't think that it's not our. Color can world brawling world dumpling or whatever. So anyway, that's my assignment chicken and no blames. Okay. So that was daisy Shelia Oh my God shelly so I love this one. And I think we kinda talked about it to like we just Kinda giggled our way through this one. But to things stand out to me on this one are the edibles Yeah Michio crack me out again when I listened to it yesterday and I was like Jesus White, she really was telling us something that she seriously secretly aids in the closet Innis she probably wouldn't ordinarily tell someone she works with or in general because she's a great she's a single mom she's got kids and she takes care of those kids. and. So she's not you know she's not just getting fucked up all the time. But I get it like moms can break to knowing that closet. And so but the other funny thing was the Pyeho. Oh. My God cracks me up to and she even referential actual text me sometimes and she's like. I don't even remember what she says she's like well as. Thinks she's. Out. By now pre pay them. Yeah. I think. So yeah, because she's pretty accomplished as a cook the other thing that I remember because it's a favorite of mine actually we did a test kitchen with Latin Asian fusion Oh yes and I haven't you know I mean maybe maybe there are a number of people out there that like those flavors that was interesting. Very Landon Asian flavors. There's a lot of overlap and I was just interested to hear that you know she kinda done that too and she is she is not from either one of those backgrounds. And so it was just yeah that was interesting that those are flavors that she probably loves some. So she wants to smashing together yeah. Yeah. Yeah, I do too. So was there anything that was not surprising? Not Surprising. On I wasn't surprised that she was very. Forthright. You know that she was just transparent basically. Yet because she's just kinda personally. Most of her answers were surprising because we've never had conversations with her like you now. So we don't really know her on that level. But Yeah I. Think. I agree with you on that like. Feels comfortable with us and she thank. God. For that. Yet has she's been great job she's killing it. Yeah. Thank. Thank you. Thank you for talking us. Yes. Yes. She was a stalker I remember that too. Okay last but not least Joe Joe Borough I there's. There's not even. I don't even know I. don't even know where to start with this one. Okay. So it was really funny is I had to tell you guys. After we listened to that candace was like Oh, maybe we need to drink more. During our podcast and I was like, yeah, we do. And get people to like that was. So yeah just just kind of drinks actually just one beer. Yeah it doesn't take much. He's a little person. Yeah. He's a little man, a little man now. FRITO. Is Free Choices, we were in the grocery store. The other day Kennison ionized all the sign that said canned seafood and I was like what the fuck is that gained. Interest. that. Link. So it's just funny. Yeah. I love that about you well, I. His his breakthrough I thought was funny because. His. Early breakthrough like it was like, yeah. Appears is like well, yeah, you love bubble. So of course, you love caviar in the pop they may in their little. Roll around your mouth like bubbles do yeah I also tau. He would talk about how? A particular pairing of. Wine or champagne or whatever with food would that would lift it? Oh, he gets super into that. Yeah. He's not like we've talked about before. He's not pretentious. He knows his shit he came from no food. Which is To say overall like we with all these different people all this different stuff we had a lot of single mom. Relations we had a lot mostly like I didn't grow up with like you know helping cook being apart. Having. Released area knows everybody out I was. Very had very simple food backgrounds or no feedback. Yeah. No. No gang involved in the kitchen and and I don't feel like there was anyone that really like inspired to do that acceptable themselves with all of them. You know what I mean like with marks time food like new vendor like he just when way. Stuff yeah. And Joe Talk about eating like takeout burritos every night because his mom and again like we knew, are I mean I don't get being a single parent being a kid of as a family of that? Yes. you know you do what you get hold of. It's not just eat it. You don't yeah. Other than maybe being or lineup beans or Pete and serpents to. Let's just. Yeah. extraordinary. So is there anything that you were like surprised by or not surprised by which oh? Yeah. I was surprised that it just took a couple of drinks to get get Lucy Yeah because we've done it before in the line. Yeah he really he kills it in the wine classes. Yeah. If you guys haven't been to wind classes, we get him all fucking loomed up before you get there and he is just he's dances. Yeah. He's tells Jones during was a standup comic at one online I remember he tried that yes. I, remember because I brought it up and it embarrassed him In the middle class. So the other thing I want to an and I think a lot of people kind of reference. This one person said it exactly that. When we talked about food and something that you your favorite food or something that you really like a lot of it. If you listened to an totally makes sense because we we are the same way we've discussed this. It's food that you don't make or food like which talked about Sushi. Like if I want to go out to eat, that's what I want to go out to eat Indian food. Same thing like I'm not gonNA, take the time to make all that. So that's what I want when I go out and there were a lot of that. There was a lot of that excuse me. Were all Olo blue. Now season I I think we need to do it again sometime. No for sure. And we obviously want your feedback guys. Did you guys enjoyed the interviews as much as we did or was this just a fucking guilty pleasure for us and we just loved it and you know we don't really care you guys were. CAST. For Anyway. Yeah, we hear ourselves talk normally nobody fucking like that I do show. Season five is coming. Hold on before we go into that. I have I have forgot one thing I wanted to ask for okay. This is sorry. This is a homeowner from me. Okay. So the other day. I was having a rough day. And it happened to be a dance going to get my hair done and I was in. This is just one of those food things that just happened and I went oh, my God it's like it's real not that we didn't already notice sitting there getting my hair done and I can smell something being baked. Like cookies or brad or something sweet smelling French toast. GotTa find smells amazing. So there's a new ice. Cream store, two doors down. They and and my my person, my hair. Extravaganza person said Oh. Yeah. They're making because they they're ice cream cones. So actually it was one of those things that I really liked but I never get I never get ice cream I never buy ice cream Akkas I never. Screen but I never it's never in in my mind I just don't think about it. I thought fuck like going to really rough day like I feel like shed just life and Govan Twenty twenty bullshit. We've all had house like you know what? I'M GONNA fucking. It's lunch lunchtime. I'm Kinda hungry. I'M GONNA get down and I'm going to go next door and get a fucking ice cream cone for lunch for lunch yet and I wanNA starring an cream cone with two scoops of one was salted waffle who and one was brown butter. Yeah. And Ice Cream is delicious but the cone Holy Fuck was so good and it was freshman still warm. Oh man and I ate it and I thought I'm GonNa feel so gross when this and I felt so fucking good. I was happy and in my mind I thought this is why my parents will be like all get Liquor Day let's begin nice cream cone like that sound. So childish menial. It totally turned my day around. It completely turn my day around and I think it's because. I. Don't ever do that. I never treat myself. And then it feels good every once in a while and it's easy to do that until fucking. Being nice to yourself. Be Kind to yourself. In ice cream cone whenever you want to yeah. Well, not all the time it will be special anymore. Special keep it special. Okay. Anyway. That's my food. I. Just it was not moment for me and well, thanks. Thanks for sharing I love ice cream jail Nazis and what we're GONNA do. Well, we're back to the holidays because the holidays are coming, but we can't do what we did last year or season to. Those are second season. Yeah. Yeah. We're all the way to five. Okay. So this is what should we associate? Well, it is what I was gonNA. Say I I always like to recap season show had to do with stress free holiday cooking. Yes. Fun Right. Be Nice to yourself. Kind of thing while also you've got, you've gotta say we've talked about this you like I don't feel like any of this fucking holidays. Rain. Now, I mean with family friendly restaurants with food like. What what are you have to do your own thing? So what better to focus on Ben holiday hotlines and who the fuck knew there were so many Oh, my God holy Shit we're going to be calling holiday hotline episode every episode. Yes, and hopefully we will talk to us the The lady butterball did let Nash. Inadvertent guest as I only ask episode. Like oh hotline I was like Oh. Hi, you're like, what are you play leg? No for real now, I'm going to read a couple thought mindset you that you probably don't know exist like any of them. Well, there's Land Lakes holiday big line Lou There's just a general holiday bake line wait a minute that's underneath a computer can't get a hold of it here it is. Okay. So there's a USDA meat and poultry hotline that sounds exciting. So do you think we should ask the same questions? Maybe notion Suri spanners yeah. Yeah. There and we'll also tell you when they're open. So you can call them if you'd like to because everybody has questions about that kind of stuff. We're also going to talk about crazy questions that that again that they're currently like legendary. Yeah. Questions crazy questions that they've gotten. About Turkey cranberry cranberries and being yeah. Oh I'm sure there some for some Weird Shit Oh here no take that bag out of the cavity. My didn't. So, anyway will be starting season five October twelfth. And we'll run right up to Christmas because after Christmas, the kind of hotlines. You. Don't really Kinda neat them anymore. So Now, we're going to go through the holiday season with hotlines with you and hopefully it'll be. It'll kind of lighten biting things and also. Be Helpful. Hotlines helpful. Holiday hotline. Yes. Because even though where bullshit most the time we do try to be helpful brought to you by candidate Natalia. Guys don't forget to rate and review and subscribe we. We're getting a few reviews here and there or not reviews but like the yeah. Yes we love those because. Those are actually things we get to like see and read and. Crying, in the Wilderness. Another that we're really not just doing this for each other. Yeah. Although we probably are arrested the and we have a lot follower. So. We're happy about that. We also have in addition to. All places you can find us you can also find us on our website. That's where we write about the episodes try to throw in extra stuff. So Oh, and also that's the place you can go directly to if you're interested in patriotic and why wouldn't you be well we? Actually fucking. See US and recipe shower for that Shit. Yeah we have to look. Good As we. S We. Yeah. So stay fresh. Stop It. Covid nineteen better known as Corona virus has spread throughout the world symptoms of this respiratory disease may include fever, cough and shortness of breath. These symptoms may show up to to fourteen days after exposure if you are experiencing these symptoms and have come in contact with or are in an area with an ongoing outbreak, please call a hotline and or consult a physician clean and disinfect high touch services for more information. Please visit CDC dot Gov Slash covid nineteen. Thank you.

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E1070: The Power of Accelerators E7 Ravi Belani, Managing Director of Alchemist Accelerator on why the best entrepreneurs love the process, risk-taking, sourcing & investing in Justin.tv at DFJ & more

This Week in Startups

1:05:23 hr | 1 year ago

E1070: The Power of Accelerators E7 Ravi Belani, Managing Director of Alchemist Accelerator on why the best entrepreneurs love the process, risk-taking, sourcing & investing in Justin.tv at DFJ & more

"This week in startups, the power of accelerators series is brought to you by. Linked in jobs, a business is only as strong as its people and every higher matters to post a healthcare or essential service job for free visit Lincoln Dot. com slash power. Everybody. Welcome back to this week in startups host Jason Candice You can follow me on twitter I'm Jason or Instagram at Jason or Tumbler Jason Tumbler Dot Com. That's just me showing off. And I have. The first name on the services. I don't have the first name on clubhouse though unfortunately. we have been. Cooking with oil with our power of accelerators, series, and accelerators and incubators are very important function in the ecosystem. If you're a new founder. and. You're starting your first company. You're probably wondering. Why would they go to an accelerated? Why would I go to an incubator well? They really serve a small number of There's a small number of reasons of why people go to number one. It's to raise money. Both from the accelerator itself, which usually accelerators give you twenty five K. to one hundred fifty K. second. They introduced a lot of investors. So that might help. They also give advice, but what they really do. At the end of the day. According to venture, capitalist downstream investors is they act as a sorting function and an anointing function. The people who run an accelerator typically get fifty applications or a hundred applications for every person they accept so when we accept seven people to launch accelerator. You can be sure we're going to have. Over seven hundred people apply, and we'll probably interviews seventy five of them in person where we used to and so. That means that the downstream investors from us whether it's capital or craft ventures or trauma Pie Patie- benchmark. They might look at it and say you know. I trust that accelerator to pick the best company so now. I am picking. A company from the Bushel as opposed to from the orchard. That's what we do. We tend to an orchard of a bunch of these really promising beautiful apples, and then we bring them out in a Bushel and say hey, here are some really polished polished apples that you might want to consider for your VC firm or your seed fund, and we decided we'd start this accelerator series. We've done six episodes so far for those of you who have been paying attention and they really have a lot of differences in them. Some of them are incubators where people. People figure out their idea. Other ones are accelerators where they figure out how to grow the products. Some of them verticalised some of them focused on consumer, some focus on enterprise, some focus on China's and focus on biotech. You get the idea and you've probably and some of them. Don't put capital in you, you remember. The mass challenge was more of a contest. We had those on episode. We had mass challenge episode Ten fifty four. We had started ex from Stanford on episode ten fifty one in the series. Dream Adventures on episode ten forty, eight. capital factory my friend Josh on episode, Ten, sixty, three recently, and techstars the other David. David Brown on the podcast in. That's actually the most active one today. we have raw Ravi Baloney and he is the Creator founder and managing director of alchemist accelerator. If. You're wondering where he got the name from. It's from the famous. PAULO! What's his last name? Colo! Colo Colo's the alchemist. Book the outcome wire people so crazy with it? Welcome to the program Ravi. Is that the first question? Thank you, Jason Yeah. Did you hear. Down my first question, yeah, what? What is the what for haven't read the alchemist? You named your You know accelerator after at your incubator after it or the accelerator What was it about that book that spoke to you so much that you brandon's yourself with a tunnel well, I should say that the precursor to the accelerator was a speaker series out of Harvard. Club of San Francisco called the alchemist series that became the accelerator and. And the namesake was chosen from the book, the the Speaker Series about transforming technical entrepreneurs alchemy into business entrepreneurs, but the book. The Real Alchemy of the book is mystical. Allegorical story and I don't want to ruin it, but you should read. It's fairly short. But it's more of a mystical allegorical story about. Getting in touch with what your spirit is released intending to do, and and how that can be the source of your real power I mean that sounds very new way Jian generic, but it's a very very powerful read, and it's also out of the Colo. it's just a fantastic writer, and it is new agey, and it is semi, spiritual and religious. I mean that is exactly what it is. That that is what it is. Yeah, and I think to your point earlier about accelerators, everything you said is right in terms of understanding why accelerators exist in this ecosystem and everything you said is how we sort of get founders to take the leap, but the reality for my experience is that the biggest enduring value for the accelerators is the as how lonely the entrepreneurial path can be. You're starting out and there's a huge value in the connectedness with other with others. Even if you're going down your path whether things you know in times when when times are difficult, it's obvious, but even when times are great, you WanNa be surrounding other small, so there is a spiritual element to. The. Core of who we are and the core of entrepreneurship, which is tried which is. Intended, to be pointed towards in the in the name that it comes from the book the alchemist. And you folk, you chose to focus on bb and for background. People don't know your idea of J. Draper. Fisher, Jurvetson and you did some events there and you famously. Did I believe the Justin TV which eventually became twitch investment correct I did yes I was on the investment team at the FDA for five years, so my first Unicorn investment was the precursor to which which was just TV that draper. Associates Ju- source that deal. Did you did I did I sourced it? I championed it i. was the one, but nobody else believed they? Didn't believe in it. So, what's that like being like the young guy at the firm? Not a partner and you see something like Justin TV. which is was pitched as the Truman show your sickly in the real world. Justin was running around with a backpack with a camera and making like a reality show. It was considered to be candid as goof. People thought it was goofy of a startup. You didn't think Justin was goof. What did you see in that that made? You think that there was something legitimate here in terms of business. Well the big thing when you're an early stage venture capital everything you said is exactly right, so it was not well. I shouldn't say this, but it was not a popular investment. When I was pushing it forward, there was a lot of contentious argument and debate over the investment on just TV. Because everybody was looking at this and saying you know what is this? There's a ton of illegal content on the site so. There's huge liability. and. What does this become? But the ultimate issue I think when you're an early stage, venture, capitalist, or even right now as the head of an accelerator is really, the whole business is not based upon what can go wrong It's really based upon what can go right and. If something does go right. How big can it get and I think we spend a a lot of education being given on analytically assessing startups on what can go wrong and assessing like technology, risk and team, risk and market risk, but there's little discipline spent on. How can something become very very big, and there aren't that many paths to building a company that can become a billion dollars in seven years. Nobody nobody knew that Justin TV woods pivot to twitch right. That was not on the table. So, what was your pitch to the senior partners who didn't want to invest in Justin? TV and what was their objection specifically, I'm curious. Well so my pitch was was that there was a fundamental shift happening in the ecosystem at the time that there was this federation of media consumption at the time. It was really shifting from traditional. TV I mean. This was a bit ago, but this was at the time when there was all these debates about whether or not. Ip driven media so consuming content over laptops and phones was going to overtake traditional media. There were a thousand different ways to cut it, and there was a lot of different questions about how do you monetize? What's the content all that? But there were several paths where it could have become something very very big. That was the point number one and there was a secular shift I, thought in terms of what the younger generations are consuming versus the older generations. And the second thing was the team, so it was a criticality Michael CBA. Who's now running y combinator and Justin Con. An Emmett were all your pass coming on the power of accelerators. Sadly no Michael. It's too busy. Keep going. Well there you go, maybe maybe Michael Will. Have a change of heart, but So that team was fantastic and And so part of this is whether or not you're assessing something in a static way or a dynamic way, and the speed with which that team was iterating. I mean I. Think Everybody knows about Justin. You know bringing his backpack around, but really just an is genius on on being in the flow, but also constantly thinking about how to, and there's a very special combination between Justin and Michael and the rest of the team where they balanced each other really well, so that was part of it, and then the other thing was. There was a platform that you had against which you could see where they were killer apps emerging, so if you can't guess the so the reason why the it was very controversial, was for all the reasons that you would expect. The partnership was thinking that there was a ton of liability in terms of the media being monetize -able. It was at the time. There are a bunch of these big media plays. That were getting hugely funded to take traditional content and put it out and there was a question of. Illegal content was going to actually. Be a liability, and there are a thousand reasons to say no. I'm not I'm not faulting. The I will I would say that what's amazing about the F. Jays that they gave me the rope to even champion and investment, and they had this policy. Where if there is one company that you are passionate about you could actually push through kind of check size. You guys put in at that level. This is the seed round series is the seed round. That was no. It was the series it was. It was it was I think it was technically the second institutional round, but it was it. I think it was a two million dollar. Check that we put in that state five percent ten percents. More, but I should say the I can't disclose. That was. So the had this very generous policy, where if you were passionate about one company per year you could push it through even in the face of opposition if you with with with lower threshold of support effectively so. They were. They gave me the licensed to do that. And that was hugely generous at the time for an associate to be able to champion that. And I think what I learned most that the FDA was thinking about how big something get not about what can go wrong, but what can go right and I think. To really answer your question the way you have to do that is it might not be the manifestation of the company, but it might be having an approach to determine where the killer APPs can emerge and Justin TV had this. Breath of users and different use cases that were emerging where you can have confidence that that approach was going to emerge something, and so when they started to notice that people were using the platform for watching games, and at the time that seemed like a fringe thing. Is that going to be. Can you build a Billion Dollar Company on? Other people watching. Games. That is how emergent new phenomenon. and. The Nice thing was about investing in a platform company is that you don't know what could go right, 'cause? It's a platform in the street finds its own us for that technology. You'll find out in a year or two after it's out what people do with it right? That's right, but the irony is is that if you start trying to build a platform company usually fail so usually. What happens is that you can't think about it like I'm building a platform, because then you get overly funded, you build out these like ridiculous. Things for this vision of the world that actually doesn't come to fruition. Whereas if you're smaller, you're going to Co. create that platform with your users God I'll check a couple of use cases, and then iterating on those use cases. Yeah, that's exactly right. Yeah, I mean I think the genius behind. This is Shaun Ellis Sean on. He's so sean is the chief marketing used? I think he's one of these guys who's been the chief marketing officer at all these. Companies that tipped in in commodities spaces where the big issue was timing I. think that's the essence of what you're asking is. How do you predict the timing on when things are going to take off? And how do you know if something's GonNa take off and. Sean was their dropbox already right all these companies that were relatively commoditised in terms of being these markets that there's a ton of file storage. There's tons of events. Planning gives businesses, and his approach was to really look at where you're getting. high engagement users, and then look at WHO's really using the platform, and how and how big that market. So I think that was what? Justin TV did really well. Are we back from this? Quick Break I WANNA? Know why. D. F. J. did not have a partner slot for you. Despite you hitting this crazy. Unicorn investment. And why they let you leave to start the alchemist accelerator when we get back on this week, concerns. Okay now more than ever. 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An AI engineering. which was really difficult? Because well, it's a pretty unique skill. Set Right. You're an engineer engineer. So they use linked in jobs, and they found the perfect candidate with a PhD in Computer Vision, and this employee has been with them for over a year, and has rolled out several major projects, and it's been a real game changer for for that startup, so here is your call to action to post a healthcare or essential services job for free I want you to visit Lincoln, Dot Com Slash Tower again? Lincoln Dot com slash power. Okay! Let's get back to this amazing. All Right Ravi Alani is here. He was an Associate Jeff J.. He did the Justin TV which became twitch investment, but As you've said. You didn't you weren't on the partner track. You weren't able and didn't see a path to become a partner DJ. And so you wound up starting your own accelerator. which has become successful, and so this leads me to wonder. Why didn't they want you to be a partner there where there are just too many partners? They didn't like you or you were to. You don't work well with other people. You seem like such a nice person. Why didn't they make you a partner? After hitting a Unicorn Investment? Thank you for the question Jason. That's very flattering of you. To ask I should say first of all. The FDA was the original anchor LP and alchemist, so they wrote the first check, and that vote of competence was huge, and I don't. Even alchemist would have existed if D. F.. J. Didn't become the anchor LP. But let me answer your question, so the reality was was that Justin TV, which became twitch to not succeed didn't take. Nobody knew that it was GONNA be big. Until, after I, after I left the F J, and so again I think this is the phenomenal thing about being adventures that you don't really know if you're good or not for seven to ten years. And so. At, the time I was four years into my associate position, and it wasn't clear what was going to happen with. Just TV and which and I should say. Draper associates funded. Just TV which was actually a fund that Tim Draper. Who's part of the partnership has as a special vehicle, so it was a little bit different. Also on that regard, so that's the first thing is that was not a Unicorn at the time that they had to make a decision about my status, and the second thing is I. Don't know if I would've i. think as you know. Jason is the thing about venture capital. Capital firms. It's not really like an industry. That's sort of a false analogy to think that I think is like any other industry like consulting or banking, and you're being promoted to partner. It's much more like little mafiosos like each each each fund is its own family, and they have their own culture, and they have their own ways of making decisions, and really when you think about these big names like diaw, J. or Mayfield or or US VP. It's really like five people like at the end of the day it comes to a small set of people that are making some court decisions, and I think from their judgment. They didn't I. Mean I think? If I think there was a feeling if I'm that Ravi was a nice guy. I'm a nice guy, but I don't have sort of the sharp elbows to become a venture cap-. Interesting I'm not I'm not saying that they actually said that explicitly, but I think if I was trying to be honest on making that assessment that there. I think there wasn't assessment that I was not. A good team member, but I wasn't meant to become a knock cutthroat enough to be a venture capitalist in Silicon Valley. They never said that they never said that just. Satation. I think there's an and I don't even know if they would That's probably overly. Specific! Cynthia would say but I think there was an assessment that I wasn't the right fit for the for the partner path gun. And I I would say though that in general, the the the biggest blessing for me was actually not getting promoted to partner at the F. J., and was having them have have the was having them fund alchemist because yeah. That was my alchemy. That was my path of actually the beautiful thing about entrepreneurship is that I. Think with alchemist. We talk about how. You think about it as the the entrepreneurs, the alchemists, these or she is creating all of this change by transforming industries, but the reality is the path of entrepreneurship actually can alkalis or can change the entrepreneur, the very practice of going through and I and I do think that that's what happened to me. Was that I actually have developed a lot from going down? This alchemist path where I wouldn't have. If I stayed in venture capital, so you start this alchemy and you say I'm GonNa do be to be assuming this was. Y combinator was. Let's face it pretty much. Beata see approach primarily at the time a decade ago seven years ago. I'm not sure. When did you start alchemist? We started in two thousand twelve to five so back at that time Y. combinator. Was You know? Probably consider mostly be to say yeah, so that's why you went to be or was it something about be to be that? You just preferred. Again this so this was something that we co created so everything that we've done. It's been beautiful has been co created. It's been with with. Real Time Ashley Developed. So what happened was we started? And what you're saying is essentially true, but we started at the Harvard Club. Of San Francisco and this is what I was at the Jay I was doing these speaker series events, so I always loved teaching entrepreneurs. And in fact right now, I also teach at Stanford. I'm a lecturer in the department. We put up. All of our lectures at each corner dot. Stanford Dot Edu. But I also knows that the F.. Jay I was running. These speakers series at Harvard Club and we had we did the six week program where we just structured a bunch of the key lessons until six week program, we didn't think about it as an accelerator, but we had all these amazing VP's from salesforce and Oracle and all these big enterprise companies coming and we're like. Why are you coming to this Harvard Club Speaker series and they said because we don't need to raise five million dollars. You know everything that was happening in the consumer side was happening in the enterprise side. You could do five hundred K. could do what five million did ten years prior. But we want all the education and guidance that we would have gotten from a VC funding. Y combinator and five hundred startups are all much more geared towards really building consumer companies. They're designed around coming up with a chart that went up into the right and then injecting foam. Oh, and having everybody read into the tea leaves, and then write a check that I mean that's an oversimplification, but there's A. Bit of the playbook. I mean the the cynical view of accelerators. During that time was they were taken the hundred K. and spending it over twelve weeks a little bit at a time and increasing over each of the twelve weeks to build a chart, and then if you're a savvy investor I would say oh, this is great. Look at that chart. Where can you give me the? Source of each of these customers show me where they came from and like yeah, this game for facebook on my go. That's great Can you break it down on a percentage basis for what's paid, and what's not and you'd be like? Oh? Ninety. percent of this is just you paying to get people to come to the West Side I get it now that not that paid is not real, but you probably would want to wait six months to see of that cohort data. They actually stuck around, and it wasn't just gasoline on a on a log, being charred, but not in a real fire of consumer passion, so many companies have gone through alchemist accelerator, and what is your standard deal GM, one hundred K. for six percent or twenty five K for five percent. What's the deal and how many have gone through it in the last eight years? Three hundred have gone through. And our standard deal is thirty six thousand. US dollars for five percent of equity. That is negotiable, so we do. There is a range and. we do it, we do cater the package. Depending upon the company got it which would be an applied seven hundred thousand dollar evaluation which is roughly half of what we had the you know, a third of what Y combinator has for so you do get people saying hey, that's a low valuation. How do you react when a founder says I? Think my company's worth more than. Seven hundred fifty thousand dollars or seven hundred thousand dollars. What is your response to that? Well, so the reality is that the? The valuation, the cash is really everybody who understands alchemists, not that no one does it for the cash, so if you calculate the valuation that way I understand how you're looking at it. We actually tried to structure the so that it doesn't hurt. The founder come from a fundraising perspective the the cash to. It's a little bit complicated to go into, but we structure the financing so that it's not going to be talking to trigger things that are going to lower the valuation of the company got. Thirty six K and at the whatever the last round was get balancing. Different equity in options or Something, that's essentially yeah, our common shares. Yeah Yeah. That's effectively and. You have to negotiate that every time with every company. No, it's it's. It's fairly standard like the dog. But we do, but I mean we do negotiate with every company so really. We're not yeah, so yeah, we do, so you know that's not be brutal like every company thinks that they're worth ten million dollars, and they're not in many cases, in most cases in this case. And then how do you deal with the fairness of like? Hey, they're all in the same cohort and one says well I. got this deal and I got this deal doesn't because I have the same issue in arms where everybody wants to get a unique deal, and everybody thinks that they're. You know the greatest thing ever, and the other companies are not so. How do you deal with that? I'm curious. It's a conversation to be on, so I think. that. We have any heart, so the first thing is that we like that because we do want the founders to know that it's not cookie cutter. Actually we treat each teams, and this is why we're not why combinator we're not. We're not admitting two hundred companies into a twelve week program, and having them compete against each other or every. We choose the amount of companies that we can take on based on giving them all a lot of individual attention and I think our founders feel that. And, so we enjoy having that convert. We actually welcome that, and then it's just really a conversation about mutual respect so. They need to understand that if they're. So, the question you're asking is a completely fair one. The thirty six K the reality is is that anybody WHO's gone through? alchemists knows that the money. A lot of people don't even care about the thirty six case, so the three six kids supposed to pay for rent just as a background in San, Francisco so our program is six months. You're spending six months in San. Francisco. You have a team of people. It's like three K. to pay for your rent in San Francisco, per, month. And then we provide co working space, and then all your other expenses are basically handled. The spirit is more that do you want alchemists to be a partner with you during this journey and then is that something that you put value on? And so that's that's sort of how we have the conversation, and we do think that there are companies that are different, so some of the companies are further along others, art and then. At the end of the day we WANNA come to an agreement where both sides or contented happy. Then we move forward. It hasn't been an issue actually, so we have. We've been really blessed, but I think it's partly just because we do spend a lot of time at the beginning, making sure that everybody feels comfortable than moving forward. Don't even negotiate anymore. Just tell people like listen. If if you're in the zone for the launch accelerator, we're putting in one hundred for six percent. If you think that hundred K. bought US three percent two percent one percent four percent. You can calculate it and then the rest you just have to decide. Hey, if we paid for three points at one hundred K.. And do we make the company more than three percent more valuable after you get through the accelerator, and then you have to answer that question, and then some people are super valuation sensitive, and if they are super evaluation, sensitive is very simple like you should just go for Max. You know evaluation at all times right go, go find the dentists and asked them to do a party round i. mean I literally just tell people that like. If you really want to go from X. Valuation, just get twenty dentists to give you fifty k. h.. They won't even read the documents. Yeah I. Think, that's a good way I think that's I think that's a good philosophical of approaching it I I think what you're saying is right, so the Roi is if you have to think about do. Does it pay for itself? Here's how you calculate it and I think what you're getting at. which is the heart of it? Is that look? At some level, the accuracy of the valuation is not the important thing it's really about. Do you want to do this partnership and then move forward and I think. I, think also you have a fantastic platform, and so you can just say you know. This is the deal and then go forward we I think we reason. I stopped negotiations just because I felt like it would open up me to. Having issues around fairness with other founders. Now it's just like you know what if like. One founder got a slightly better deal. The other one feels bad. But I understand also I. Ways because i. we were thinking well. Let's just pick a revenue number if you have fifty cam month. This deal, but then you're like well. Wait a second. It was fifty K. and consulting revenue and other person's got marketplace. Revenue is at the take. Rate is at the GM Va. like. How are we going to actually calculate this? And then it gets even more complicated. And it's such a small amount of equity. And the the hit rate so low for accelerators like ours. Like. Yeah, I'm guessing you're you're anticipating. Ninety percent of your returns are GonNa come from how many companies out of the three hundred in your mind. What is Your Power Laurie third there ninety percent right, and then eighty percent of the returns will be how many companies. So ninety percent of the retirees come from ten eighty percent come from the top three I would say other tower, the top ten, the top at the top ten percent and this. Would, people need to understand when you're running one of these accelerators and I? Kind of unpacking this issue as we go through this ten part series that you're the seventh in is these accelerators take massive risks? They take risk on things that VC's are not willing to risk. And, they are therefore there hit. RATE IS GOING TO BE Super Low. Because if you're doing it right, you're taking more risk right. You WanNa. Take a lot of risk at alchemist. That's exactly right, so we are not in the business of going after you know singles like surefire singles or doubles. Fund crazy companies that are going to disrupt the world, so we are in enterprise accelerates. We definitely have phenomenal. That'd be enterprise, APPS and DEVOPS launch darkly, which is now. Doing this fantastic feature flag as a platform a company, but also we have moonshot companies and disruptive companies like Righetti. which is building a quantum computer or matter net, which is building a drone federated network, so we love we love. We love companies that take risk in the sense that they're. If the market's tip, they win big and launched raised over one hundred, million, coming out of the cellar enter yeah! They've they've raised one hundred and twenty million in the three years post the accelerator, but so several rounds of the most successful coming out of it for sure in terms of capitalist Righetti, is the most ridiculous rates two hundred million. Oh, wow, but but yeah, and they've been from gate. Fans like regret. Launched funded by Bessemer. F. Jay which became threshold and read point and. Threshold now. I don't know they change out not so diaw. Jay became four funds just to be transparent, so what happened? The other the other issue here with my story on the FDA is. Imploding at the time in fairness, I'll say that you don't have to draper. dft became draper associates, so tim draper started. Associates Jurvetson wound up. He went to VC and then Jostein and emily. Effectively and Andrea created a version of the that became threshold ventures with Heidi Rosen and then also. Jennifer Fonts Dad started a new fund called. With Theresa. So there were four funds that came out of the F. J.. J. Longer exists as A. This is a growth fund does exist. It's just the growth fund still exist at the early. On I was telling you during the commercial break that you really honest about all this and you seem very introspective. Meditate a lot. Are you like? A very like zen person. You seem very then I'm Hindu so I think you got a little bit. I think I get a bonus point for being born Hindu. Yeah, so, but no, I'm not I. Wish I was more than I can't I do I do I am a bit of a spiritual junkie? So I do like that side, but I'm not unfortunately I. Don't have I wish I did have more of a meditation. Practice is spiritual junkie. How do you deal or reconcile that? Our, business, what you and I do, every day is based on extreme capitalism. And extreme wealth, creation and financial aggressive financial betting. Had How do you reconcile that with? Yeah just. The spiritual and Nama stay sign of all this. Well now we're GONNA get. dumped. You'RE GONNA YOU'RE GONNA take the red pill and just go down the route. I mean this is the essence so I was raised in a Hindu tradition, which is sort of more of like the bug of Gita tradition, and the that's the canonical, even though there's no Bible in Hinduism but there is a canonical allegorical story called the bug of. The. Premise of this is that you have the protagonist who has to basically do this thing that they don't really want to do. They have to actually kill their cousins and the and then God in the form of a charity or comes in and gives them advice. I think it's a similar analogy here in the sense that you know what you're getting at is is that. How do you live spiritual existence when you're doing all this crazy capitalism and the essences to? Build and I think this actually what the market's teach you as well as if you try to chase money. Even if you succeed, you fail, so one is that you may not succeed I. Think I think everybody knows that viscerally. Where if you put all of your attention on the end, not the means it tends to not work out, and the does work out. It's shallow. And you really you really you really don't get joy and you can look at I. Think this is also you know if you want to go down Sandhill road and meet with all the venture capitals who have more money than? The top half of the top half, the top half of the top one percent of people in the world they're not necessarily happier than people who you would see elsewhere, and so I think the essence of this whole entrepreneurial journey, and for us entrepreneurs is it. Entrepreneurship is a bifocals. Exercise like you have to. If you just think about the process and you don't think about the end. You'll hurt. But if you think about the end, and you don't think about the process, you'll also hurt and essence. I don't want to crystallize. Hinduism, but the essence of Hinduism is to be passionate about the process, but detached from the results. So you know ultimately you want to do something for the sake of doing it because you enjoy it, and then at some level, you need to surrender to whatever happens and. Some things might become just in TV's. They may become twitches and become these huge things, and then other things might become web fans, but the real success lies, and if you can make entrepreneurship itself a practice like meditation, where the very act of doing, it is enjoyable, and it's Bader to feed your soul so I mean that's it right now. Let's take a deep breath. Everybody, listen my voice. We're going to breathe in, and we're going to breathe out innovation pre thin. Without innovation and properties. But it is. I WanNa be I want you to dismiss the point, because it's not about being serene like I think you can also relish the grit of entrepreneurship, and that also can create success like if you get off on fundraising right like if you some people hate fundraising, so we have founders. Come up! They're like God I just want to work on my product. I just WanNa talk to customers. Why do I have to go and with all these? VC's but if. But, if you shift that around and you actually get off on the process of fundraising. We don't call it, so we're to be accelerator and we don't call it sales and alchemists. It's not sales because. By the way alchemist we only technical teams Oliver teams are engineers, but we were rated highest accelerator in terms of funding rates per capita or per company and white. Condie was number two, according to like the CB insights steady and the reason. Why is that? We don't call it sales. We don't call it fundraising. We call it commitment engineering. Menu. Engineer Engineer. Yes, you're engineering something new. It's not a product. This process and you need to build this process that you're going to be engineering commitment rowdy. You engineer commitment how? And, then it's not like. Oh, I'm selling or Oh, I've got fundraise. It's Oh I got this I have this this challenge that you need to hack and. The people who are the best entrepreneurs have the best outlier results are the ones who in fact you're correct. Enjoy the process itself of being an entrepreneur, and you better appreciate it and love it because it's so goddamn hard. You know if you're doing it for the money. If you're doing for the outcome, you will quit very quickly because getting punched in the face sucks, and that's really a lot of entrepreneurship is just getting smashed in the face with bricks, cotton me, and you actually might start getting, and I think the best entrepreneurs actually get off on the process. If you really meet the best entrepreneurs, even after they make money, they're itching to get back into the game and you're like. Why are you? Yeah I. Yeah, I know I think what we're talking about here now. Ravi is actually the good stuff. I think this is the good stuff of the episode. We're doing right now. We you and I. Are Co creating right now because there is something. Beautiful and magical about doing something very hard, and getting beat up and it being struggle, and then getting through it right and you know Luke Skywalker went into that cave, and he saw darth Vader, and had to go through that crucible, the the getting through. It is part of this process when you feel that blood in your mouth because you got sucker punched I always remember getting sucker punched. The one time when I was fifteen years old on the steps on seventy s six street in Arlington seventy six then narrows anyway. I punched on the steps in right I just got sucker punched when I was fifteen years old blood in my mouth. You know you remember that taste of the blood in your mouth and metal began like a huge brawl, but I remember that Kinda liked it kind of like the feeling of being in the fight. And the incident. Would entrepreneurs need to do? They have to really enjoy being in that fight after enjoy the painful -ness of raising capital go. That's right and I think the two are interconnected like the joy, and the thrill that you're going to get in life is actually gonNA be tied to the fear, the uncertainty and the Grit and you know I think that you know they say that. This is A. Dangerous analogy, but like when users get, they start to enjoy the prick of the needle. Because They associate that with the thrill. That's about to come and I I don't WanNa. I don't think that I don't want to don't do heroin I'll just. Can't make it clear. We're not advocating doing however. I isn't dangerous false analogy, but but then grit, so it's it's you're actually living life when you're enjoying the pope ability of the moment, yes, and not trying to abstract away the things that you dislike and saying I want to insulate myself from this experience and just code, and that's why I want to work at Google where they have warm toilets and I can sit and have Sushi for lunch and just sort of have the toilet with your Shimmy. You could do both you could. You could you could be making you know a good salary and that, but that is not all right Hughes Yeah, the reality is is that the joy of life actually is tied to that grit and it's tied to. Being in that moment when you are building something and you might at the FDA we funded SPACEX and. Tesla and there were and I. Don't want to go into the confidential stuff there, but there's definitely things where the thrill of that output was tied to some very also challenging times and I think every path that is actually interesting and entrepreneurship is tied, and I think I think the great entrepreneurs you know alchemist and I know we're supposed to get into the details. alchemists, one of the reasons why we we are differentiating ourselves on quality versus quantity, so we'd have a smaller class, and we spend more time on each appropriate this cohort, and how many people are in your cohort, or is it rolling admissions? It's a cohort. Limited to twenty five and we try to do twenty. It's six months instead of three months. Each of the companies typically gets three coaches so coach somebody who just mapped to that company that's working with the company. Is that an so missed accelerator employees or mentor? Part of Your Mentor Network? One of the three coaches is a partner, and then the other two are what's considered faculty with alcohol, so we have our top eighty partners. Typically, the founders are people have built businesses worth one hundred million dollars or more. Is there a session that? That occurs is your twenty six weekly sessions or float in and out of an office, and they have to come to everyone. How does that matter? There's there's twenty four weekly sessions. It's all optional. You want to attend the weekly sessions. There's co working space which obviously right now is not in practice because of Covid, but we have you know you can also be working out of the office in San Francisco and in mountain view, we also have covert. How many people have the twenty companies? How many would be in an office weekly you're. Actually. It would typically be around. The! It's typically around thirty five or in the CO working space, because we also have some of the alums that it'll be worth or two and they overlap. But. Yeah so. Half of them come to the office of third of them. Are there because frankly one is. The companies. We think there's a lot of value in working from home as well you also we also want you to be you know going out and meeting with have have meeting with customers. The office is more the spiritual center. CABLECOM, if they want to be with other people and connect. Prior to Covid nineteen in the pandemic. Was it a requirement to be in the Beira. It it was highly encouraged. We allowed we allowed wrote. Yeah, see I remote, and now we're one hundred percent remote. What are you now? Are you one hundred hundred percent remote. Yeah, we also. It's it's the best of times. It's the worst of times it's both so there are things that are better with remote actually can have more meetings remote. We think it's better for. All of our weekly gatherings remote and we have shifted so a lot. Third of our companies are outside of the US. We do our our weekly gatherings. In the evening we now start off at nine am in the morning. And so that way everybody can participate in real time, but. And it's actually been really effective from an efficiency perspective, because we've put a lot of development into developing our virtual tools, and people really liked them a tool spot, zoom and slack. We use off the shelf. Tools are slack zoom. Asana things like that. Air Table But, we actually have our own proprietary software. We have our own team that software fourth. What is the platform? What are the? What does it do? It's called volt and it's using it for everything. It's like a combination of linked in and salesforce, so you use it to book all of your meetings with mentors with. With customers! We also put up all the content so you can. You can get all the content there and then also there's. A real time support, and also you can look through a directory of. Pre answered questions that have been previously asked. So, it's really efficient like if you need to get to a resource, you can get too much quicker than you could before and provides a lot more flexibility and and digital's also have been good for our founders that have. Felt like they were hurt like so I think for female founders. Fundraising is better digitally interestingly enough as it's more I think fundraising is more meritocratic, even though it's more two dimensional over Zoom, interesting and. As you said some things are lost. Anything's lost in all of this. The connection I think I think it's almost you know we're doing this interview right now. Digital and it's a great interview. I think it's really fantastic and fun, but there is an there is. It'd be better in person for sure twenty percent even. Yeah. I think it's I. Think it where it comes into place. More on the psychological connection piece of entrepreneurship again is that there is something that happens where there is Olympic connection physically when you're in the room with other people were that makes it easier to like I the analogy that I use if you ever need doe. There's a point where if you're kneading dough. It gets to a point where it's really easy to need once once. You've worked for a bit like. If you're working in a co working space with a bunch of other co founders that you all trust and love, it's easier to sort of get in that zone, so there's that and then I do think that there's there's a mentorship piece that is something that you just there's a that's valuable in person, but yeah I I always such an in person person in now here we are in this pandemic and I can't so I've just decided. You know to your point about accepting reality, and you know the the philosophical nature about what we do in this. Pursuit of outlier success. I've just said you know. I'm just going to embrace. It assumed that this is the new normal and even though I hate it I hate zoom. I hate being on zoom all day. It's to me torture, but I have no choice so I must make the best of it. and that's what I. That's what I've chosen to do. The thing that concerns me quiz you and I are sitting here. you know right as San Francisco and the bay area are starting to open up. We're in face to going into ZAN eventually phase three. It's we require this at the end of the May, be coming out in the first week of June in twenty twenty for those of you listening to the archival documents. The question you and I both have to answer is even though we've gotten all these meetings, even though you and I. Writing Small checks you thirty six K into twenty, one hundred to seven almost winds up being the same amount of money. You and I can write those checks. But we'll our companies be able to raise from seed funds and venture funds, the five hundred check the two million dollar check without them being able to meet in person. What does the early signs are early signs? Do you see? A virtual meetings resulting in real cash. I think they will so so the guidance that we got so we've talked. We talked to a set of prestigious. VC funds in preparation for our demo. Day and the guidance that we got was that. They're all most of them are doing. All of them right now, obviously being virtual meetings, they like to do socially distance meetings before they write their check, but we've seen people write checks without ever actually having met. There's a strong today. It's been if you had a previous relationship with that. They know you. That's a huge bonus, but I don't think I. Actually think that it's going to become a lot more meritocratic the ultimate issue is that all these funds especially. If you look at the dry powder, the funds, there's been a lot. Lot of dry powder that was raised the last two years. That's not committed. They need to deploy capital unless they have to worry about their I, are so they still need to write checks and the reality is that it's too cumbersome to try to meet with founders, so you need to set these meetings up and you need to drive things virtually, so if they're not getting the read on the found, or they're not getting the charisma of the founder, and that sort of situation in person. What do you think they're making their decisions on? So they've removed that high touch the the feeling in the room they get. What are they looking at to replace that in their decision making stack downstream? Well I. DO think that all investors have different sticks, and they're not a monolithic group, so there are some investors that pride themselves on. Betting on people and teams and I think those investors will probably invest closer to people that they know or that murder connected to invalidate them in some way, and so I think there are you need to try to find a proxy to get that investor to trust you I think other investors actually are just being. About doing customer diligence like they should looking at the product looking at the data and making decisions based on that. I do think valuations are going down by twenty percent to. Third. and. It's a sad. Reality Probably. Cases Immune here in the valley, so example of that might be a fifteen million dollar valuation. Lashley Lear goes onto what twelve or ten yeah, say ten, so it depends on the and again every company's differentiator there's. But, but I, but my main point here is I. Don't think that's not investing I, think they're? They're correcting for that risk by adjusting valuations. Yeah and. And I. I? Do think that if you're in A. If you're in a market, which is a which is where you're getting. Wins in your sales because of Covid so collaboration cloud ECON ECOMMERCE digital health than. I think there are investors that are moving even more quickly. So how do you deal with? Competitive companies coming to the accelerator. You have some breakout success doing quantum computing now the person comes in and says I want to build a company. That defeats that company. We have a better model. Do Not Invest, or do you invest in the founders of that company? Understand that you're an accelerator and you're going to invest across a wide range of companies. We are rule is that will not invest in a competitor within the class that we admit or within one class after or before that company that? We keep a one class buffer so that the because the the biggest thing that we're building is a trusted space, both physically and virtually, and and so we don't want to compromise that and and and the reality is is that. Companies Pivot all the time so even if we admit somebody that doesn't look like they're competitive, they may end up pivoting into that space and it's been. I should say it's been a big boon for most of our lump, so Righetti is is I, think a fairly famous for quantum computing company. That's graduate ALCHEMISTS. We also have had now this ecosystem of other quantum computing, so you see where and others that will benefit Righetti so and launch darkly. I think is also have a bunch of great devops companies that will come from alchemists that will benefit lunch darkly. Yeah, this is something that outsiders don't understand. As the sequoia folks said no conflict, no interest like. Usually things seem a little conflicted, but even that's okay, because the big company might wind up acquiring the small ones, so if I invest in a company. That is working on sleep but I'm also investing calm. I bet you calm feels pretty good about that. At least they know that. If they were going to acquire that company, they would have somebody who could say. Do a proper introduction, right? Yeah, no, that's exactly right and it's amazing. How in my experience that I understand that founders have this fear of competition. In general I think it's better to jump into situations where there's a lot of people with ecosystem that could be relevant at the F. J.. We three times fund going back to the but three times funded competitors, not intentionally they became competitors, but all three times both companies. Did well they and then he space. There's going to be usually three winners. If there's a market that is ripe for venture opportunity, there'll be one winner that'll be the outlier that nobody can acquire. That will go public, and then the other to get acquired by the incumbents in the space that need to have a strategy there so in general I would not worry, and it's easy to say this, and there are exceptions but founders. Don't worry too much about competition. Worry about learning and the pace of development. How much diligence do you do on? The company's coming into the accelerator because they are very nascent. What is diligence? Look like coming into your accelerator the alchemist accelerator. It's three basic phases a written application that gets assessed on the classic things that you would look for for any company. Then we do second phase, which is the people so we do try to reference the people if we have connections between the founders and alchemists and the community and get thoughts on how those people are, and then there's an in person interview, and in assessment in person that might lead to also further diligence and in the in person interview. Usually, there's three people that are interviewing. startups ones usually representing the BBC's wants usually a former alumni of alchemist, once usually successful founder. Accepting people in these early stages means you're GONNA make a lot of mistakes. That's part of the game. Right is if you're GONNA, get an early. You're going to accept people who you will eventually regret having accepted or. You know who might appoint you How do you deal with having your name on a company? Where you're no longer rooting for the founder, where the founder has disappointed you or behaved badly How do you deal with that as an accelerator with them as a graduate with your logo in their Dick The only way founder disappoints us as if they act unethically if they're acting, which is something? which happens, but it's very rare, so it has happened to us, but it's probably happened once out of the three hundred companies that we funded just to be clear. I wanted to make a distinction between that and not succeeding, so we actually think that it's not necessarily a failure. If you didn't financially succeed as long as you. As long as you did it with all of your heart, and the reality for us is that if we had one hundred percent success, we're not taking enough risk of Quarto. We we. We want to be constantly. Quote Unquote failing. We want to be you know exploring new markets. Funded A anti-matter company called positive. Positons great and you can check them out, but that's going to be a path to figuring out how to build anti-matter to get to Mars. And the timing on that maybe may have been different than Righetti which is a quantum computing company, but I love them both because they're both really true entrepreneurs. They're not starting a company because they want to be a founder, actually change the world so when you have the bad behavior happens once in a while. What do you do? How do you manage that as an investor? That's very unfortunate and this. This is where you have to separate your roles from the coach of the of the company to being the fiduciary for the for the community so I am your first and foremost the cheerleader of the founder, but I also do Sherry for the investors, and for all of our customers, and all the other mentors that are stakeholders that we that that that trust us when we're Jerusalem the company so. It is not. If somebody doing something unethical, basically, what will happen here is that you have to deliberately do something that is unethical or mercer, misrepresenting yourself or doing something that was clearly wrong and I know there can be lines and entrepreneur around this, but I'm talking about something. That's just clear cut. Yeah, and if you did that, then what normally happens is is that we're assessing. The the reality is that what I'm looking at is on I'm looking at the business. I'm looking at the ethical issues, and I'm looking at the legal issues, and then I'm trying to make an assessment of those then make a plan against that I'll usually talk to the founder directly and ideally have a path where there's they're going to be invited to remedy the situation in a mutually consensual way, but that usually will require that founder to take some hard medicine and to accept that. That path, and if they don't accept it, then it has we have to do what's right and we have to protect all the stakeholders that are involved. Yeah, it's it's the unfortunate part about what we do, and you know when you're in this early stage I've had it happen where I just hope. People like you know, you don't need to have me on your Camp Him Oh. Why don't you just rip up the term sheet? Send us back the money and we'll all move on. I've done that as well. Yeah, that's just like life is short like no one investment. Is Likely to make a difference when you get past two or three hundred I mean obviously an outlier outliers will, if you happen to invest in Google or facebook, but in most cases like that company that's happened. The problems is actually not going to be that company. Anyway. Just rip up the term shapes and the money back said half of a bag whatever you know. We've had a, but even if we don't even we've already invested. We'll tell people you know. You don't need to mention us on your cap table, and you can just move forward even if it's been like after the company's graduated but that doesn't happen that doesn't it's not that often? And what are your thoughts? As we wrap up our our together here on the future, you started your accelerator in. Twenty twelve when the market was really starting to heat up again, you. You started right after the the great recession, so that was really good timing. You know things were starting to heat up in two thousand twelve. here we are in the trial. You knew it was coming. I'm sure And here we are in the trowel and looking pretty pretty dark out there. What do you expect the next couple? Years will look like not the short term, but let's call it the mid term. What is the next three four five years the midterm look like? Actually. I'm very bullish. I love this time actually to be honest so I I eat. During during the downturn because the. John Door would say the mercenaries leave in the missionary stay so. Anybody who so this is the best time to be a founder. It's the best time to be a seed stage investor because one. If you're a founder, you have less competition. You're probably doing something you really care about. Your employees are grateful. They're trying to keep them there all. They're grateful for whatever for working for you. And all the big companies are cutting, there are indeed budgets, and so when the markets come back, you know and you can pick your number of the Spanish flu is I like eighteen months. The something between six months and thirty three months, but in the next one to three years within that timeframe, the markets will come back. All the big companies are going to suddenly be focusing on growth, not profitability, and they're going to have a vacuum of innovation and you're gonNA. Get acquired for a huge multiple. We started out of the Amer Adam Persona, who was the CTO. He was one of the founding mentors and Alchemists, and so the company's warehouse out of the office offices in San Francisco and Yam or was funded after the Lehman crisis and in January. Two thousand nine I think. Yeah. Yeah, and then they got acquired in two thousand twelve, for like one point two billion and that. Was the reason why was because nobody had built out at enterprise social network in that time, and then when the market's tipped Microsoft is like Oh. We need an enterprise social network strategy and they paid up for so I love. This is the best time to start a company if you can get the cash and it's the best time I think to be VC. Because founders are grateful for the money, you can invest on fairly good terms. It's the issue is getting the cash to survive the downturn. But what are you advising? People in your portfolio who are coming to you? Saying have the six months of runway I can't raise money. What do I? Do you cut you? Cut Your burn now as painful as it is. If you have any burnt a cut, because again, this is, it's A. It's a non linear return on your runway for every week. That you you. You make that decision earlier so if you cut half of your, burn right now. You're GONNA save six. Six months or three months of time fifty percent. Cut that when you're three months then you're gonNA have like six weeks or four weeks, so cut it now. You'll be surprised how your startup will survive. Even if you don't have roles that you think are critical, it's amazing. How started so true? People think like? I, can't I had one factors like just I? Just shut it all down instead of going from whatever X. number, two fifty percent of that or a third of that and I was like. Yeah, you may want to. Try having a third of the number of employees to see how it feels. And you know what they felt more efficient. Oh yeah, the especially. If you have deadweight, the employees are actually grateful to get rid of the dead weight, and then usually that you go through this little trough where people. It's traumatic shock. But then yeah, it's it's a bit of shock, but then people actually re re get back to their core I would say we're this also happens is is that this is advice for the founders that are listening because if you do have investors, your investors may say hey, you know. Just keep going, and you know we'll bridge you. And, that's a very dangerous scenario that nobody's GONNA necessarily coach you on because you're incentive misaligned so explain. So if you have a board and you have six months of cash, and you bring this issue up to the board, your board of sees may say don't worry about that. Just execute, and we'll try to fundraise three months from now, and if you can't raise, we have your back. We have your back we have. We're managing five hundred million dollars. We can write you a check now if you do that when you're within twelve weeks of cash, and the company's about to die, you're the board. Members have a lot of leverage over you even though they may not. Have this intention. The reality is is that your fate? It's too late for you to fundraise. And so if you go to the board that time, they may provide terms that are not necessarily terms that you would normally want to take when you're six months out. You want to have that honest conversation with the board and say hey I want you guys to bridge me if you don't I'm GonNa. Cut My burn. Bridge you right now so that you can sleep at night. Why May? BE A. Bridge because they they don't want to take the risk, so they want to have somebody else. They want to see if somebody else is gonNA. Come to the fore, and they can wait, and in fact if they wait the also have more leverage on the term so and this is a little bit overly cynical i. don't want to. It's a real. It's a real phenomenon that does occur whether it's intentional or not, in some cases non-intentional, and some gives it isn't digital. Yeah, and this is something that I don't think founders get taught until unless you have a third space, not not your board, your investors, but something else, and so in that moment you need to tell your look if you're not stepping forward, it's okay, but then I will cut the burn for the company, and we will make cuts because I need to make sure that I have at least nine months of visibility, and the where you nine months since the minimum. Yeah, and so you just keep cutting to keep it that. Well, you cut I. Mean if you're in bt you can. There's obviously a bunch of operational things you should accelerate your ables. Delay Your payables do everything you can to preserve cash earlier. Employees Ask employees to make trade offs on cash versus equity, so there's a lot of different things, but you need a ideally weather out the storm, which I think A. I personally, the rule of thumb is nine months i. feel very uncomfortable. I live always been eighteen hundred. Eighteen months I want three years, but like I think I. Think you should try to see if you can get it. Girl thing about eighteen months is you can put your head down and work for nine to twelve months. Just really focus on those con customers in the product and you know At the at the end of the day. What is the most important thing for founders to remember when they're running an early stage company? Well I. Think the most important thing is to. Validate the need before you build the product so your time is your most precious resource and. put faith in your worth in your team and your customers, not your investors or tech crunch. Like it's a it's A. It's a noble job to be a founder, and you should source wire doing this because of the customer that you're serving or the team that you want to work with. I think it's a great place to stop, and you've been a great guest. Thank you for being so candid and honest and to the F. J team. Y. You blew. It here is Ravi. Out there investing in three hundred comedies you let them walk out the door. The man who they twenty five percent of launch starkly so they're doing well. We're. Appreciative of the update. You meet with Josh my boy, Josh. What's it like Josh Oh? We knew you were starved. Have they tried to come back I? Don't know, are you? Have they tried to come acquire? So so join led the investment in launch starkly, so Josh dfds owns twenty five percent of starkly which amazing and look up the valuation, but it'll do well for his fund. And Jay was the anchor LPN alchemist. So Jason a huge. Of alchemists amazing I think Josh is a fantastic investor. I also think that when you're building your own. He's building his own firm using an entrepreneur himself. And in that moment you have to choose who your teammates are going to be. I think certain people are fits, and some people are honestly for me. The biggest blessing on my life was starting alchemist on my own, so I'm very grateful for everything turned out you like being solo founder. It's nice to be a solo found you pursue your amuse well. I think it's I. I think it's good at different phases. I think for me. I think you know I think venture funds are all idiosyncratic and you sort of their character people that will fit people that won't and so for me. I think it was nice to be on my own for a bit, but now I'm so deeply appreciative of Danielle. WHO's the other managing director of alchemists effectively a co-founder? We have a bunch of other managing directors, and the greater team and alchemist would not nearly be what it is if it was just. I'm very techstars raised like forty million bucks. And people are starting to look at Angel. List Y combinator. techstars maybe has their own as their own businesses, and I was talking to David Frum techstars. Hey, ever Dave Brown. You ever think maybe techstars be a public company, said Yeah actually have known about that. These entities that you and I and others are building are becoming bits of brands. They could have value. Your, thank you get approached by anybody to to buy it and team up like maybe we take you and put it with his venture firm. You become the top of the funnel. They become the driving. had a danger of a venture fund I think there's a danger of a VC fund tries to acquire an accelerator because I think it it it. You're killing the goose that lays the golden eggs, which is that we hold the sacred space where we're. Where there's not any signaling risk with the VC. The reason why this space started was because the started doing seed stage deal, and it created the signaling risk conflicts. Yeah that there needed to be at third party space. I think that's dangerous. I think with publicly traded. There is actually a lot of creative structuring on how to how did this which is which is what actually thinking a lot about? Publicly traded companies you know I think that also will confound your effectiveness to invest in private equity because of an SEC law, so I do think that there may be certain constraints around that but I I think Nevada all and you know. It's probably. Has. An others are thinking creatively about some solutions. You think they'll wind up becoming public angels. We certainly raised venture money, so I mean I think the need to have liquidity and I think I. Don't know if that how that. What that path is gonNA look like. Felt is to go public. It was really interesting how the adventure game has changed so radically just in the last ten years, and certainly in the last twenty or I continued. Success and follow Ravi. He's our B l.. A. N. I. Ravi at how missed accelerator, DOT COM. That's right that's right or just check out just google outcome accelerator. Right I look forward to breaking bread with you and and having lunch or dinner. When this is all over stay safe. Okay, brother! Thanks Jason Youtube brother tears, but everybody great job. See you next time on the swing stars by everybody.

founder. partner Entrepreneurship San Francisco FDA US Justin TV Tim Draper Stanford Jason Yeah Jason Ravi Alani Justin engineer WanNa Covid China
Biden's V.P. choice still a mystery

Mark Simone

17:36 min | 1 year ago

Biden's V.P. choice still a mystery

"Saint tallest not the same thing I've seen it at the Fisher House the Fisher House I know is a huge part of recovery for somebody like my husband for them to know that their family members are being taken care of that's a huge burden off of them so they can concentrate on their therapies. Just, having that assurance that no matter what as long as we were there for Anson, that someone would be there to take care of us. Took so much weight off our shoulders. How can you help good fisherhouse dot org. Well, we got all the latest for you get up to speed on everything the latest with the lockdown with the virus with Biden with President trump and you won't believe what's closing what shutting down in New York what's not coming back we'll get to all of that Joe Biden was supposed to pick his vice presidential candidate over the weekend that's been delayed. Now, they're talking about the middle of August Joe Bartlett. Do we know what caused the delay? What happened was all said I I guess they're not happy with the choices. Yeah so They sit a big concern was it didn't want somebody that would overshadow Biden so. What are you gonna get a mummy or some? Kind of overshadow where I mean a a binds almost biden wouldn't be the life of the Party in a coma ward who you'RE GONNA get. Anybody's got more. Shows the Kinda kind of problematic right now. Yeah the problem is He keep hearing Kamala Harris. That's Kamala Harris pushing that she has been on a campaign. She's like Harvey Weinstein at Oscar time with this campaign to get the nomination campaigning campaign. When you keep hearing her name, that's her pushing that she's got a million strikes against her. For the nomination biggest one is head of the nominating commission is Chris Dodd. Remember. Old sleazeball Chris Dodd he hates Kamala Harris. He has done everything to keep her from getting it. Now, the other problem is she is not popular with Democrats Democrats. Don't take her remember the debates with the ten candidate. She was the first one to bomb out. You just never got any traction with Democratic voters and bombed out I won two out of the race. the problem is she first debate she went after Biden calling him a racist. Going through his racist past as far as voting and all of that. So that video won't help. The other thing is not much of a personality. GonNa depressing and moping mopey. So that doesn't help. The only other thing you'd like out of the choice maybe they'll help you win a state, but she's from California. They don't need any help in California. So she doesn't offer any help as far as winning a state and she's Kinda outside and we gotta remember This is a swamp campaign. This is a biden is a vegetable now I mean he should just have birds written on him. He is frozen gone. He is being run by a little committee of Puppet Masters Obama Hillary Valerie, Jarrett, a major donors they run this guy. So. That's the that's the other problem. Kamala Harris is not part of the inside little Group they're the swamp group running it but Susan Rice. And even though she has no qualifications as a candidate, that's why you keep hearing her name she would be new Valerie Jarrett's she's. Directly involved in the Kabul that's running Biden. So Hillary, Obama Soros, whoever whenever get together my season why don't have one of us just attached to him Why have to work through somebody? Well, we'll just put one of us as as the. If God, Forbid Biden wherever elected the day after the election he goes right into a nursing home they'll just. Send him upstairs to the residence at the White House and tell them to stay there. Number One tony. Soprano took over the sporting goods place. And the guy that actually owned it would come eight. But what about he goes back in you're still come out that that's what they would do to buy. They would run the whole thing they like What's passes? First name is Karen Bass. Karen Karen Banks. Banks that they really like her they really like her in fact, a lot of The Washington inside Democratic people are pushing her. African The. Black Congressional caucus they're pushing like crazy. They don't like Kamala Harris you. So they're pushing her the and they like her they really Biden team really liked it. They were about to go with her. The problem is they've dug up this Cuba problem with her she's got A. Oh kind of love affair with Cuba visiting Cuba. When died she wrote about the Great Castro who died she's now saying she's evolved she's learned. To follow since she found out two weeks ago. She's in the lead there. That's when she evolved. What is it? What these people and Castro and And they've been there. You know if you've ever been to Cuba. It's awful. Everybody's living in poverty a supermarket you want cereal. There's some white boxes that say cereal on it with black letters. That's it. There's no brands is no anything. This one cereal that's it. It's a horrible going to the hospital. It looks like. You're watching episode of Ben Casey from Nineteen Sixty. It's the oldest equipment you've ever seen. So they love this Cuba she got to undo that Tammy Duckworth was up there. I don't know why she's a couple of things I. don't like about her, but we'll see it's GonNa be it's GonNa be a while there's already been a delay so we'll see what happens president trump. If you talk to the swamp, the people that live in the bubble who are totally out of out of touch with America, they think it's hopeless. He's lost Biden's Wayne League, and they don't know they. They read all these fake polls and they don't know they. They actually believe all these fake polls by the way. Later in the second hour, we'll have the greatest pollster on earth the real deal we'll have them break down and dissect US fake polls how they're rigged what the real numbers are. We'll go through that later in the show. So the the the convince themselves if you talk to these people, they're all. That's he's lost. Is there no hope? No hope and then they do this other not why doesn't he wear a mask? If only were mask if he would just wear a mask why does he wear a mask? There are six thousand pictures of president trump wearing a mask. He's worn a mask every time it was appropriate to wear a mask. If you had a contest between who wore a mask most trump Cuomo trump wins in a landslide cuomo never wears a mask check out my twitter from a few days ago. You'll see pictures of Cuomo mingling with people hugging people talking to people with no mask. He's not wearing a mask fouled. She doesn't wear a mask the second cameras he rips that mask right off. We've got video of it up on the web page you can see him doing it so. There's this stupid mask myth None of these reporters where Massino you watch the briefing, Jim Acosta Jonathan Karl. That's the question will. They can't even hear him through the mask. The second. A camera goes off. They can't rip those masks off fast enough in fact, the White House secretly. Making video of them, ripping the mask off when the camera goes off. Hey, Joe Bartlett would we all agree the masks work that that's the answer to wear the masks is that what they're telling us? Okay then why did they have to let all the prisoners out just wear masks in prison? Well. Because they would be living in close proximity to each other. Well, not really they're all in separate cells I mean you want to enforce them distancing the supermarket a little circle supposed to stand on nobody role any anyway you know they're oppressed people just let them go don't torture them anymore mark. I know but nobody stands in their circle to sell its absolute social distancing. You think those masks work. Let's try it in the prison. That's the test do it in the prisoner who can't open the schools try the masks. If so effective, you could open the schools at the mask I. Yet one summer camp. Do you see that summer camp that opened? And they had the counselors wear masks. But not the six thousand campers. What was the point of that? It. Didn't make any sense that close in two weeks. baseball same thing that don't really wear masks Baseball Player a twenty two year old who's suddenly making millions not to go to parties not to hang out with the million women in the hotel lobby and see how that works. If it doesn't work over the weekend a number of things were broken up but told you last week they broke up an orgy they found an orgy gone. and they told him You're supposed to be twenty, five percent capacity and your orgy they. Broke it up a a rave took place this weekend where was that under the Brooklyn Bridge Cosco's. No Kosciusko Bridge I. SAW Hundreds of people, hundreds of people is massive rate, but he did what we've been telling you to do. They started it as a black lives matter protests the police did nothing they should up some black lives matters, shirts and signs police. Let it go do whatever you want have while they turned it into a huge dance party and then it was too late to stop. This isn't it? Yeah. That's used pretty smart on their part. The storm is supposed to come late tonight tomorrow supposed to be the bad day. We now have we decided what the name of this storm is. Isa I. US. I'm not saying Isa I what the Hell you're talking. Now there's a famous designer is a and I noticed everybody it's a similar spelling everybody was calling this storm is. Now, what what is it called? I us. Isa I us who the Hell's GonNa say that Isa. The this. People, for sure. We'll call it the storm. The storm is coming into more. and you said, they really worried in lower Manhattan have sandbags going up and barriers and everything. Yeah Now. If this were any other year. We'd be frightened. We'd be worried remember with Hurricane Sandy always final the storms now nothing bothers us this is nothing we will. We'll been through this year. Somewhat. Maybe it'll cool things down a little That's tomorrow. It should be over by early Wednesday morning says this should be one bad day. You kind of escape it down there right you in the eye of it. Well, not the I'm just getting you know south, Carolina, this portion is just getting brush with the outer edge of it, but it's GonNa bend it takes a turn in. It's GonNa. Go Inward Toward North Carolina and then go up straight up the I ninety five corridor to you guys. Now but it could take turn right today it could turn a little not be so bad know hope. Hopefully, it'll tomorrow. Okay. So it's just a lot of rain and wind tomorrow but it won't be that bad. So Hey, there's a book about Barack Obama this had come out before but he apparently come out with another book his half-brother wrote a book about what a cold ruthless awful guy. He is about what a dysfunctional this sound familiar. Didn't. We see a book like this about Donald Trump from a cousin never met. Yeah. Would he on the weekend show? I didn't see him. Yeah. This woman this half cousin of trump or whatever. She is a niece niece that he never met a wrote this book front page of The New York Times front page of the Washington Post massive coverage from tire our with Rachel maddow same exact books in the same exact things about Barack Obama by half brother Guy couldn't get published at self publish it. You think he's getting any coverage anywhere think the New York Times going to story but this book talk about a double standard it's unbelievable. So Oh, here's things you're not allowed to say. we're getting very politically correct. You remember I told you the real estate agents have been instructed. Now they're not allowed to say master bathroom now. You can't say master bedroom you have to call it the main bedroom and can't say master bathroom. It's the main bathroom and you can't say his in her sinks you have to say dual sinks. Now. In the fancy private schools, they don't call it the principle that call the guy, the headmaster. like Brunswick School in Connecticut the headmaster not allowed to call them that anymore they have to come up with a new name. So, pretty soon, you're not going to be the Masters Golf Tournament. You've got to be able to call it that anymore we gonNA call that yeah I don't know I don that Augusta Georgia replace that's I mean it looks like plantation that course that clubhouse you're GonNa have to you're going to have to do something about that. So a lot of changes coming Restaurants. Closing credits. It was estimated that thirty percent of the restaurants wouldn't make wouldn't come back. Then they moved up to forty percent in talking about between forty and fifty percent of the restaurants will not come back a lot of places patrols on the east side that was a the old timers love that place was one of the steakhouse has been there. A thousand years looks like that's coming back Laburnum Dan, which many considered to be the actual finest restaurant in New York City has closed its they're not coming back. For Building, they've auctioned off yet auctioned off the contents of the restaurant they're not coming back now now that place made a fortune a fortune, so it may be they just don't WanNa go through this and they're just going to give up the Bryant. Park Hotel is closed. They're not gonNA come back they'll convert it to an office building You know there's a lot of places that are just you know venues for events event spaces like the new one, the Zig `field theater open and Gotham. Hall. And you've been to all these places these different. ballrooms where they throw these big events. The only income they have these major events, weddings, parties, charity, charity gala. So this is all been off they haven't made any money all year and don't forget the hotels. All the major hotels that have these big ballrooms, that's a major source of their income weddings and constant events in this charity gala. Fundraisers said they've lost off fortunate. Don't know what to do. Private clubs like the University Club, the Harvard Club, Newark Athletic Clubs Major source of seventy, five percent of their revenues from weddings and parties and events all close down and then big article about it. The Paper Day Arthur call I know this guy is a great guy. He's the one of the top event planners you hire him he gets you the all the ballroom people hire him every which way here's a guy he says we haven't done anything in months trying to bring it back, but it's not the same with used to be five hundred people in the ballroom. Now, it's twenty people with masks on. It's not a lot of fun. It's if it's dmed costume Gallup, you could wear mask but this is just ridiculous. Hey, check out the webpage. Did you see how his testimony on Friday? If you don't think this is a double talking worm watch this you know he's talking about. Events and you can't have gatherings you can't have parties you can't have weddings you can't have any event you can't have any gatherings you can't have more than two people you can't. So Jim, Jordan says, well, what about the protests? Would you agree that causes of the Spread Watch faculty to double talk his way out. He will not say that For thousand. People Credit. For protests. He won't say that that could spread the virus watch Jordan Pin FAO down if you never realize what a politician, this guy is when a double talking warm Guy Watch this testimony. Hey, you know Donald trump did throw out the first pitch at a baseball game once. Watch the video. It's pretty impressive. I've never. This is probably the best first pitch ever first of all, he lands in his after in center. Field. Right the Middle Game Lance, the helicopter in Centerfield. Runs out of the helicopter throws the first pitch strike right across the plate. Then back into the helicopter gone, can you do anything more impressive than that? That's pretty cool. Vouchers first pitcher, but watch the videos up on the web page a also what happens when the shark shows up at the Beach Watch this video where the shark shows up right on the Beach Watch these people half of them run half of them run to get their phone and video. It's very funny. It's all up on the web page go to seven ten W. O. R., Dot Com Slash Mark Seven, ten W. O. R. Dot Com Slash Mark San Atallah not the same thing I say not at the Fisher. The Fisher House I know is a huge part of land cover for somebody like my husband for them to know that their family members are being taken care of that's a huge burden off of them so they can concentrate on their therapies. Just having that assurance that no matter what as long as we were there for Anson, that someone would be there to take care of us. It took so much weight off our shoulders. How can you help go to fisherhouse Dot Org?

Joe Biden Kamala Harris Donald Trump President Cuba Barack Obama Fisher House Joe Bartlett Baseball Anson White House Chris Dodd Jim Acosta Harvey Weinstein cuomo Karen Bass US Saint tallest Oscar
How Hip Hop Can Improve Public Health with Lori Rose Benson (HHPH.org) [HHCSA DAILY]

Hip-Hop Can Save America

49:49 min | 11 months ago

How Hip Hop Can Improve Public Health with Lori Rose Benson (HHPH.org) [HHCSA DAILY]

"Peace and love everybody manufactures coming at you live and direct live live streaming hip hop can save America the PODCAST livestream edition. Mondays through Thursdays one PM Eastern for the entire mother September. That's crazy talk. It's ridiculous been a fan of the podcast for some time. You know that we've been doing this for quite some time speaking to luminaries, individuals and organizations that are using hip hop and innovative inspiring, and sometimes surprising ways to uplift humanity and to improve. Society. My name is manny faces. As you can see, it says it down there and as you could hear, you can see on the podcast feed it says it all over the place I do appreciate you taking the time out of your busy day undoubtedly, a Monday on top of that to check into the show and check in some of the things we're talking about. Their sections of hip hop in areas like education science and technology politics and social justice. Big Topic last week. The fine arts also a big topic last week last week was great. Well, every week was great. We just like the tenth one we've done something like that. So if you're just now realizing this thing, pay attention, see if you like it and then go back and binge, and we'll be doing this for the rest of the month. Got Some great guests lined up for the rest of this week. Really good conversations coming up again, the intersection of hip hop in these different areas in ways that can uplift humanity and improve society. So not too much time. You guys a figured it out by now what I'm doing. So, we'll keep it moving this time. One of the things I I sit in this weird place of journalists and active activists guess advocate for hip hop. So I'd like to teach and kind of cheerlead for hip hop. Especially, this stuff that we're talking about the intersection of the use of hip hop in other ways outside just entertainment because I've seen so many good things and so many good examples of how can improve lives and livelihoods and communities. Around The country and around the world. But for this show, we're focused domestic me one of the things that I like to do because I'm a sucker for good argument or or just trying to build up these skills as often. I'll talk to people that are kind of removed from the hip hop ecosystem. You know the they're not familiar with the culture. They may be a cursory knowledge of it through the music side are just whatever they might hear see in mainstream media, which is not often flattering although some of it is warranted but not lot. What you don't get his balance you don't get the stories about you do there in dribs and drabs. You don't get the stores of these intersections of how hip hop does help people can't how people one of my friends who you know just not a hip hop head is not that easy. Living under a rock it's not a head and he's a trauma surgeon. My brother. Go back. You know almost my entire life with this cat and we talk often about these intersections kind of tech guy. So I talked to him about the intersection of hip hop and technology and how I went to a hip hop hacks Elsa hip hop hacks this organization it's a hip hop Pakistan where they blended you know news of music and technology to kind of introduce young people into. Hacking and computer programming, and you know sort of that tech field kind of thing at first that was far. He's like, how do you? What does that mean? Hip Hop hacked I know what Akhavan is I know what hip hop is. So what are those things aside explain? This part of what this show is for I, really hope that people share this with people that are in these fields whether it's education or the fine arts or photography. We had Ernie Pentacle Leon last week and they share this to say, Hey, I just you know I I already know this stuff but you know you're in this field because I do truly feel like any aspect of humanity can be improved by having some hip hop in the mix. And that's a hard concept for people understand. I go back to my doctor friend and I mentioned to him. SORT. Of like the educational aspect of hip hop culturally relevant pedagogy approach of teaching. In a culturally responsible way. that. All folks from different backgrounds don't have the same philosophies and so we try to angle the education system towards people in their unique characteristics that lifestyles their ethos. That's culturally relevant pedagogy. You teach you know and have hip hop is a great way to reach young people particularly young students of color who are you know unfortunately still Very under served by the education system. But also something that can be Kinda universally used because you know a lot of kids love hip hop the hippie very influential in popular culture. So if you go in with this mindset, you can find better ways to connect students. It just makes sense right I just to me. It just makes sense to some educators that may not and they may want to dip their toes and find out more and the show is one way to do that. My doctor friend I said. Well, you know that this could be. Used in the same way in medical settings housing, there was a there was a study. A report said by having a better understanding of the cultural differences that you might have as a as a white male doctor, for example. With. Communities of color where you might be stationed you could actually get a better understanding of their their problems, a dying diagnos better. We've seen many studies, and fortunately that would show that there's some discrimination in the hospital settings or in the health. Industry. where? Doctors would prescribe pain medication less to black and browns patients because there was some sort of implicit bias that would suggest that they. Weren't as is much pain as they say and at a higher pain tolerance. So just to a broader sense of now talk about diversity inclusion, an understanding and belonging, and all these things and and that's why the health industry is very. Especially now during this pandemic. How can we improve relations and how can we improve connecting the communities that aren't often again served properly. And that long preamble is to tell you that this organization hip hop public health has been doing this sort of thing for fifteen years. It's a very large nonprofit organization that's dedicated towards improving health equity using the arts using hip hop in particular, and it was a great pleasure to speak to their CEO and executive director lawyer Rose Benson about the work about the history of the organization, the current landscape of scituate of the organization particularly in the situation we find ourselves in. An upcoming gala event that they're having. And a lot of interesting tidbits about just how effective. Hip Hop culture music sensibilities ethos people. Authentic Intersection can help our fight against all kinds of health issues and all kinds of health inequities across the country. So. Without further Ado I. Thank you for letting me introduced the whole topic. This is my interview, my fascinating talk with Loy- Rose Bentsen in its entirety. Hello good evening. What a great pleasure to talk to you the hip hop public health organizations been on my list for quite some time to have a sit down with because this show is, as you probably know now focuses on the intersection of hip hop music and culture with other areas of society in especially with the idea that we can use hip hop to improve society and uplift humanity organization I think is kind of him is is that kind of intersection So if you could please just let people know on off your bio that's very very Strict. If you could just please let people know who you are and how you present yourself to the world professionally as it relates to hip hop Public Health Organization. Well first of all, thank you so much for having me on disraeli honor My name is Laurie Rose Manson in I. Am the Executive Director and CEO of hip hop public health. Is a nonprofit that was born in Harlem New York City about fifteen years ago, and our our mission is to harness the transformative power of music art end science to really foster positive behavior change in youth and their families. So we are rooted in in social justice in health equity in. Music for change in for positivity and for community and with with young people at its center. Yeah. You know it's funny because all of those topics are suddenly in vogue. They're all you know. Amazing Right. Fifteen years you've been doing this. This is not you're not new to this. Is Not, new to this. You come from a long history of public health work of working in sort of indifferent organizations but with the public health in mind. I like to I say the secretly, I, really hope that no hip hop people watch the show of course I want hip hop he would watch but I love is that when people who are not familiar with hip hop culture and only have a very cursory knowledge of Pop Listen and find out that there are these kind of things happening beneath the surface of what their perception might be What Why Hip Hop Hip Hop public. Why would you take a perfectly good career Laurie. Throat into hip-hop why hip hop with public? What is that connection all about and why is it so? Important Well, I would tell you that I am part of incredible team that was founded by Dr. Williams who is the chief of staff? Of Neurology, at Columbia University Medical Center in. New York. City. End. A little place and he's you know he's a full tenured professor there in an incredible implementation science researcher and you know about twenty years ago. He was really concerned. Particularly, his area really is a stroke. And was really concerned at the time of seeing so many younger people people between the ages of twenty and fifty coming into the hospital. Habur having suffering a having suffered a stroke didn't know that they were suffering. This joke didn't come in early enough. and. He was just wondering how do we get to these working people? Many of whom were single parents very busy. He was also working in Harlem Hospital at the time. This is where all this started and so. He wondered. But if we can teach their kids what have, we can teach their kids, the signs and symptoms of the stroke so that they can get to the hospital early because if you can get to the hospital within four to six hours, there's no altering light saving treatments later. But then why would young people want to learn about stroke and so his hypothesis was would if us hip hop what if we use hip hop? And coming from the roots of social, justice of communication of motivation and inspiration would if we use a couple that with with science with behavior change strategies to really see if they're going to learn the information, they're going to internalize it in an act upon it and it was wildly successful. And years later, we've used that model, which now we coin as the multi sensory multilevel health education model. More, public healthy than hip hop sounding. But basically, you take a social ecological model of influence which has the person at the center. Than the community government policies and we layered on top of it. Hip Hop. Culture music and the neuroscience of learning. So when you combine something as motivating as hip hop music with the neuro science learning and in. Evidence based back public health messages. You can have a really winning combination to I, get kids attention, but then also help change behavior. So that's kind of word all for started. Yeah the and that makes that makes sense. To smart people like yourself. Again we like to say this is the world's smartest podcast. So the vernacular is perfectly in line with perfect. But at the same time, this is not a this has to go back to you know have a Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences and how people learn. You might learn things reading. You might learn things visually might learn things kinetically There's different ways that people absorb information and we do know the power of Song we do not have the power of rhyme. Poetry and we learned ABC saw I teach. The cleanup song because I don't want to clean up the house. And that works because we get. No, it just works on a human level. marketers advertisers have been capitalizing on. Forever right and so sometimes in convincing us to make choices that may not be the best for us. Why don't we use those same strategies that will foster healthy behaviors in the same thing like you said. So alliteration acronyms, repetition all of that is natural. You know we can hip hop and the other reason for hip hop I would also say is. It started because we started in Harlem and we wanted to be culturally relevant particularly within the community of color that we were serving. In now, hip hop is the number one consumed Jonrowe. Crossed. The US. So you know it's it's not just one community is everyone. So how can we use that to motivate inspire when it comes to something that may not be as sexy as as health messages in health education, but have you couple it with something that could be really really enticing I often talk to hip hop based educators. Of course again, we recognize the connection to those communities from wins hip hop came, and how important ordered is because very often they're under served under resourced they don't have it these kind of. Programs in their schools, arts, programs, civics, things that you could teach hip hop that they're not sort of getting anywhere else. But you make a good point that it's also has this kinda universal appeal because you know who doesn't like Bob now, who can't use these tools so is mainly used in areas that are. Most in need, but it's also has universal applications and yet something as we can see right now in the current kind of health crisis that our countries in that ability to reach a lot of people with a concise message. Getting dragged down in the you know. The worthiness of it is super important. While you not think exactly why when we were faced with the krona virus pandemic and you know this is the work that we've been doing. Since since we were founded, know how do you use music to change health behaviors? We started with stroke education than we went onto physical activity in nutrition in more like obesity prevention, young people. Adverse early childhood experiences, toxic stress, and then when we were faced with pandemic, we said we have to use our model to reach those most in need and to have the widest net possible. That's why we created resources. We teamed up with our founding artists dougie fresh. He recruited forty of his closest friends to help show how to wash your hands in other influences. You know everyone from from Jamie Fox to. To cedric the entertainer, and then after we did a this handwashing video, twenty seconds or more. We'd ended another PSA called Domas in Spaniel? For Latino communities around the world Then we last just released on the anniversary of hip hop on August eleven. The forty seven anniversary of the birth of HIP hop. We launched behind the mask which was actually a blend. It was a beautiful aren be track with Rahim devan that had a hook with DMC dougie fresh, really showing how to put on and take off mass properly, and also you know a message of love from from our home base in New York to everyone around the world that if you wear a mask, it's because I have your back and you have mine. And you're not visible behind that mask. I still see you in we can do this together. So so yes, absolutely it's a good message coming from the previous epicenter of. These programs. So you have songs have music F- you know messaging that's that's assembled delivered must be nice. Dougie does aveling forty of his closest superstar friends to put that out there. You know that that doesn't happen every day. But. When it does, it's a I. Guess the programs are songs messaging. How does that get disseminated besides just put it on you so are and doing shows like this what partnerships what kind of you know interactions or intersections you have with schools or other institutions that might help her move this long while we have a long standing partnership with with schools. In our home base in the New York, City Department of Education actually when I first met our founder, I was running the office of school wellness programs for the New York City Department of Education No small district one point one, million kids in eighteen hundred schools have been heard of that place and Dr Williams in I we actually met on the radio met on. A radio interview and it was in two, thousand, six or seven, and we were talking about our respective approaches on you know what we were doing about youth obesity in in new. York City. And after that interview we said, Oh, we need to know each other. How do we not know each other but? Know. We work deeply with with just about every youth serving a physical activity health nutrition facing organization locally regionally nationally, we're part of the act of schools consortium, which was formerly Michelle Obama's let's move to schools. We worked very closely with the Alliance for a healthier generation with shape America, which is the Leading Organization for Health and Physical Education professionals. We routinely. Pre covid. In. person. Attend. Conferences present all around the well, almost the world, the country. Soon to be the world. A now, we do a lot of things remotely presented at a conference with Special Olympics International We're doing a conference with the Delaware a department of Education in October. So you know any organization that went out working with we wanna work with you because all of our resources that we create an manny, it's it's beyond songs, songs, and videos and comic books and instructional tools. Everything that we create is available for free we work really hard. So for example, we have a gala coming up on September twenty second when we do events like this and we work with our sponsors. Wait we go after ground so that we can take that that barrier. Of Access to. Evidence based quality, culturally relevant materials. So schools, any person young person families know parents are the new teachers, many cases now. They can go to our website and they can go to our website. You have to let me know how it goes. We have over a hundred and forty resources available for free. No again ranging from. Nutrition Education Hip. Hop Dance strikes we have a whole series called hike. The rakes helping young people energized, and so all of these can be downloaded streamed used for free So yeah, it the way that we are going to help more young people around the country be more physically active. Make good choices is by. Having. Strong strategic partnerships with health basing organizations with education based organizations so that this work can amplify. So if we're not already working with a reach out to us. We'd be happy to those are. Notable organizations that are ready to take advantage of the partnership in the materials in programs you ask put out. Let me let me ask you this I talked to a lot of educators in folks who are trying to do of the things that your organization does just from A. Advice to others kind of deal because you recognize the power of using her pop culture, it's not all the negative. It does have the there's some negative this things with hip hop that have with but like life and like any other aspect of society I often say there's all kind of fastest aspects for organizations have you received? have. You received push back when trying to approach. Some of these partnerships son saying, Hey, look at us we're public health and you get that kind of first impression jitters and how you deal with that if you have a encountered that. Chore. Absolutely I would say that there are definitely organizations or people that are like. Hip Hop I don't know if that's if that's for us we're not necessarily hip hop adjacent. Right. And may not say that out loud. But I think you know being able to have a conversation. In be able to share the the model because once people you know even when I first met Dr Williams when I was at the New York City Department of Education. What I loved about hip hop public health was at it came from an evidence based research perspective. It wasn't just like Mrs Beautiful Music with great celebrity isn't sounds like is that a good message but from the beginning, it was evaluated, it was researched it was iterative process of refinement in development to me that is that is the gold standard recite away. Like this is this is an incredible organization I WANNA help connect them to as many schools as possible and I think once people get to know us you know many people knew me for example, last year in April we were at the shape America, which is the society. For Health Physical Education, National Conference, and we did the keynote for that conference in trying to about twenty five hundred to three thousand health and physical educators from all around the world. and. A lot of people knew me from my role in in running health and physical education in New York City Department of Ed but they were like, what is this if public health thing and and and you're bringing Darryl DMC mcdaniels from run DMC to teacher conference like Mrs how does this work? And we did about an hour long keynote in in we talked about our research we talked about connections we talked about our evidence space model we showed our hip hop dance breaks. Even DMC sheriff his story and he talked about from when he was younger I was rapping about going to college kids started going to college. I was rabid about my adidas ship and like just by saying you know and so if through hop young people will follow you doing. X., Y.. Z. Will why not use it for health right and he always likes to say like an apple a day that's just like an incomplete bribe. So what can we do? To take it to the next level. So I think you know people that knew that was working with hip hop public health in once they saw us in listen have to be open to listening. They were they were blown away and I can't tell you from that one conference how many partners we started working with because they were like, oh I get it and I I do think. There's definitely some judgments when you when you hear him top in, I could understand why sometimes but we really based in its roots we are based from the perspective of of social, justice of communication being heard and supporting communities so. Yeah, I, think once people. Just start open to the conversation in thankfully more and more are they can understand who we are and what we're all about was just a anecdotally I suppose define that as time goes on as you see other see hip hop in academia more now you see hip hop being respected in these. Long standing institutions that that trickle effect helps out the organs, the work you're doing. I think dies and and. The artists that we work with are all very health conscious in socially conscious select. They are incredible ambassadors. they're not just someone who's lending their voice to a PSA. Are Part of our hip hop public health family, and so I think having advocates like them and for many of them, they are the. The the founders of hip hop they are so well respected. And admired. So it really I think lends a lot of credibility to to the conversation. You mentioned EMC just I've met DMC briefly and what a just fantastic human being by his energy is messaging is always great He. Has An adopted story adopt the EVA's connected on those levels. Just a you know a great ambassador integrate choice for that. Of course, Doug fresh everyone like you said mentioned that the ambassadors are well respected in thing. That's helpful. When it comes to telling these. Trying to get these messages across. Yeah. When I was I was just going to add that. You know I think they care about all aspects of health, but it is interesting how? Doug started with Dr. Williams. With with stroking joke in hip hop stroke. Chuck D has been involved with us on a lot of healthy eating. We have a whole model of it's not like there's bad foods we have go slow and WHOA foods like traffic light model goes green. Slow is kind of like you got to think about it in what was once in a while. So it's not like never is just once in a while and yeah. Days will often. It's about that balance. That's right. As you know, that's what we teach in a chat performed in incorrupt cocoa slow. You know a shanty who is sort of you know aren be adjacent one of our incredible supporters many of her songs that she's worked with us have been more around self esteem Jordin. Sparks well. DMC has done all of our physical activity breaks. He's helped does jump and kick in slide in glide and bouncing good at the core and He's just like you said before his energy is balanced this amazing as. You mentioned a little bit maybe just if there's anything else that you think is relevant to how you guys have had to adjust or had to adapt under the current. Crisis Lockdown Quarantine all the things you're not able to go out and meet kids in public e mentioned a few things I just house the organization adapted and made sure that you're continuing this message particularly now when health is such A. Young. Aspect of. Our life. That's a great question. Many I'll tell you in New York? City. When everything shut down the second weekend in March I think that first week we were very concerned were very concerned. How are we going to do are in schools programs, New York City? How are we going all the conferences that we had planned everything Wasn't going. Absolutely yeah. Absolutely. and. that. Sort of ambiguity lasted maybe five days we've working triple and quadruple overtime ever since. We felt it was imperative to launch these handwashing social distancing mask-wearing videos. They've been seeing millions of times all around the country around the world, and we know that they're helping to save lives. We launched a whole new fitness series in Remix to music with the institute could National Fitness Graham Fitness Pacer test. We're now on a project with Special Olympics which we're going to be announcing a couple of weeks. I can't talk about that too much. But just been, you know we we saw an incredible uptick on our website. We would probably have three to five hundred users on on a daily basis kind of just check in a lot of teachers, and also since we we offer all of our materials for download when someone downloads them, they may not need to come back for a while our website. So it's it's kind of knows the lower number, but it's okay. In April. When most all schools switched to remote learning? We were seeing twenty thousand plus business today. Teachers were were. were. Starving for material that was was innovative that was interesting that can be conducted over zoom that could be easily downloaded. That was free but also great, and so for example, we took our the brakes that I mentioned hip hop dance breaks, hide breaks we rebranded them, and instead of calling hype the brakes we call it hype at home, Shenanigans. We didn't change anything. We these are the same breaks that you could do in a classroom right in A. Gym and we just re marketed it as hype it home and it was getting picked up everywhere. I can't tell you there are there are dozens and dozens of school systems around the country that reached out said, can we put this in the in our learning management system? Can we put this on our local cable access system in the answer is always yes. Yes and yes as long as you're using it for non profit purposes. Absolutely. So I think. You know understanding that we have to. You know make people aware of all the resources that are available to them at their fingertips and I think also thinking about cool the other audiences we wanna serve. So for example, there these incredible teachers that on their own took our twenty seconds or more handwashing video. and. They work with. Students that are deaf and they redid the entire video in sign language was with all the kids doing all the parts in captioned in his absolutely beautiful and we're gonNA remixed that and put that on our website share it with everybody else right in. So we get inspired by the dialogue in the production of what what teenagers and young people are doing out there, and that helps inform us on in terms of what we might want to do next. So making making more resources available online making more complementary resources like more teacher guides, more instructional guides for teachers and for parents is something that we will be doing a lot more of. As. We're into this new school year that is very, very blended for for many families I think it's the cipher right that. We give we receive in its share information. It's not just a one way dissemination of information. It's what makes it pop in educational setting. So powerful because it is that kind of transference, it's not just a lecturing and that that's that's awesome. When when people of the culture hip hop, no minded folks see hip hop being used one of the first things that I think a lot of people look for is by doing authentically are they making sure that that's happening and it's that power the CIPHERS that transfer? And information that that you're talking about right there, which is we're doing we're put it out there taking the authentic voices from the culture with putting it out there people that are using it in and remixing, smack flipping, and doing all the things, and then we're we're learning from them and then reincorporating that into what we do. That's exactly that's done. You know and we year round in in addition to our main board. In our advisory board, we have a used advisory board. We have fifth graders that they give us some serious feedback. They don't they do not hold back I'm sure now and we have to know that something is not corny that passes. You know the task of twenty. Twenty. And you know if it passes the test of near fifth graders and we know it's going to be good everywhere. So did here you can make it here. Yeah. Know without getting too technical our model when you say Cypher and I think I'm going to start saying that more often I mean we talk about our our model is having a child mediated communication process right where the young person. Gets. The knowledge has changed attitude in all in a change in behavior and then translates that knowledge to their families into their community. So I think it will sound a lot. More Fun if we call the Child Cypher centric. Communication model as opposed to you know child mediated. We'll think about. Use I back. That? I won't show. Thanks. Thanks. For the cause but it is and I love that also, I'm glad you mentioned Br bringing on people in part of again, some of the criticisms that people have organizations that are incorporating hip hop that makes like well, don't just have a bunch of the elder spokes folks which are as important in necessary in wonderful as ever, and that's always talking down to you need to have that kind of. Information rising up from the young folk to say, Hey, listen we also know who we are and I wish should be at the table I. think that's admirable. I really commend you for doing that I'm sure it's been eye-opening I'm sure it's helped. I'm sure it's helped the cost so. It's great to do that. Tell me about the gala. Well I hope you're going to join us again. That's another thing you know we had to pivot we we originally had our gala. Planned for June, in person at the Harvard Club Hypothesis, the Harvard Club is kind of Nice that's really were. Cheer is a beautiful events and. We saw pretty quickly that postponing and in person event was not going to happen so so he pivoted to an online virtual events, but we're going to make it very interactive. It is Tuesday evening. September twenty second starting at eight. PM. Eastern. Time in it's hosted by Doug e fresh DMC Chuck D will be visiting. We have a very special. New Resource that we're launching, I can't say to me about it, but we did collaborate with someone name Salts of salt pepper. Rings a bell. So yes. We are doing a song an educational animated video. It's really beautiful animator called Milo the cats along with cartoon worked with us on this their incredible We're GONNA, have a long way working with them because they're just wonderful to work with. No. So we'll be launching the world premiere of New Song with with Cheryl Salt James were also honoring her. Honoring a number of other folks. The folks that actually helped us make the resources. When we said we have to do these videos, but we didn't exactly have funding to do it. So Advisory Board member Melinda Gould. The. Head of the Bristol Myers Squibb Foundation Patio hosts and Helen Shelton who is a senior partner has been partners PR helped us amplifier message in a way that we re never thought. We would be able to say that no. Within a cobbler weeks fan you know s would be viewed millions of times. So we're also honoring Dr Mitchell L. kind who is the president of the American Heart Association. And? Lasted at least Dr Melanie. Samuels. From the campaign against hunger and this is actually quite an interesting story man because COVID hits. We're running a research project after school program in about forty New York City public schools. It's all about nutrition in math in calories in energy balance, and then the program goes remote. Because schools are closed but then we come to find out that many of the families participating in the program were were not just food insecure but were hungry and starving, and we're teaching choose healthy foods but but this was not a matter of choosing about like not having food and so Dr Williams reached out to Dr Samuels who runs the campaign? against. Tonga, have a beautiful urban farm in bed stuy Brooklyn they have a beautiful farm in far rockaway Queens. They have a choice pantry in Brooklyn and they run mobile food trucks in all five boroughs man without blinking an eye doctor, Samuels Supported our families and put them into her mobile food truck delivery program. So we are we are honoring her in her team for all the great work date do in a check them out. They're really really a beautiful organization. She started that organization as as a one person helping one family more than twenty years ago in in May serve millions of meals trial new. York City. So yeah, I mean it's going to be. IS GOING GONNA be a great events a lot of fun people. Behold originals. We hope to get you out of your seat a little bit but you could address out where you can just wear your sweats. You know you can live from your living room have some with us. Get to know us. We have a Greek silent auction I can't tell you all of it, but there might be a cooking with coolio. On online clouds available that could be a federal judge. There you have it. So yes, a hope you can join us you could anyone can register on our website. You can find it h. h. p. h., dot org, slash gala mice. That's a great intersection of all of the above. And you know you meant an inspirational stories of the partners that honoring, and of course, the work that you guys do. It is as we just talked before we started about this time of year in New York, and what that means to people just passing nine eleven and knowing that in times of hardship if I'm happens everywhere but New York's really good this you know coming. Coming together, doing what has to be done, finding ways to navigate and. As. You said before hip hop is really good at that too Yana at. The combination of those things plus obviously our national partners. Everyone who's involved in these? These movements in these programs it's spiring. Thank you so much. Thank you that really means a lot and you know there's actually one of the things that. That I wanted to mention it in relation to our gala, but also in relation to this moment in. So while of course, we're focusing on this moment as a health crisis pandemic. We also feel strongly of of another pandemic. The second pandemic of social injustice We believe strongly that racism is a public health issue. Another beautiful featured Hannele discussion that will be at our gala is a beautiful conversation between Miss Opal. Lee. Who is ninety three years old on a quest to make sure that June teams becomes a federal holiday and Nico Brim a brilliant young rap star who Nico's twenty-three Miss Opel's ninety three they have this unbelievable beautiful friendship in fact they have Co created a sneaker that is part of the hip hop Auction that's happening this week this week. Yes. Yes so and to kind of. Bring together this intergenerational conversation about health about racism about social justice in also as you mentioned before about not coming together and that's the message is not about. It's not about Islands is about. What are our? Where's our common ground in? How do we move forward together? It is those into that ven diagram of health and. Racism and Environmental Justice I. DO another podcast is called newsbeat emerged hip hop with social justice issues So redlining has affected. How the climate change has affected redline neighborhoods in and these neighborhoods are being affected. Their health is being affected negatively by decades long housing policies. There's so many choices there. They have to be addressed There's no better way to do it than by by paying attention and connecting these dots as as your organization does in the just how you just mentioned so. Yeah, you've got all bases covered. There's a lot of work to do, but we we are. We are proud to be part of this this effort this movement we we're excited to work with those that want to join us move forward in in continued to. Foster healthier happier. Just communities in New, York City, and around the world absolutely outlet go I'M GONNA, ask you one question you've you know we've danced around this all night we've mentioned this. Examples or. Proof of concept. For this all night. But if you may be as have one last parting words if you could the name of this show is hip hop can save. And it's kind of a lofty idea. But. The concept to me is that through what we know hip hop culture and music in the participant, and it does that has can do. All of these things can spread positive messages can influence central and positive ways can do all the things in your opinion just by what you've known through life and working with the organization and all the things that you're doing. Why do people need to make sure that hip hop? Music and culture are at the table when discussing ways to improve lives and livelihoods and communities in this country. Why? I mean I feel like this is the conversation that we've been having all evening right it. You want people need to be heard and seen. and. And connected and. You know I was talking with with Nico Brim earlier today and he said you know like hip hop. This is the language of our people right and so and It is so important. As we think about social justice in Racial Justice and we use culturally relevant resources and connect connections and understand that that is a huge part of the conversation needs to be at the table know in we've seen firsthand. It's profound the impact, the behavior change because. Attention is so hard to get these days like there's so much going on. There's so much going on in the world of social media. So much distraction in we're all competing for this attention of you can find tap into something. That can really capture the attention especially of young people. Of Young People in terms of the decisions that they make now and that they want to make as they get older. It's incredibly impactful. We've seen that with with the use of hip hop music coupled with science coupled with evidence based approach. We see at work every day. As I. Said You have the receipts organization has been for quite some time and clearly a adding great value to all of the world's that you have tentacles in whether it's health public health. Hip Hop young people, and again at this time when help is such a the forefront of all of our minds with whether we like it or not It's super important super valuable. I'm happy to spread the the as Ph Gospel and the people tune in at checkout the gala coming up. I hope that you. Guys, doing introducing I'd love to pass along to whoever's. Paying attention over here and I wish you all the best. Ink here. Thank you so much my pleasure. Thank you the pressure. They have shouts who Laurie Rose Benson shouts everyone at the hip hop Public Health Organization as you can see, their h. h. p. h. Dot org information about the gala h. p. h. Dot Org Slash Gallup. I never know if it was gala or gala and I said gala and went with it and I don't know how to pronounce everything but. H H dot org slash gala once again, thank you for watching the live stream version of hip hop can save America the podcast with manny faces. That's me whether it's on facebook at facebook dot com slash many faces official or on Youtube? youtubecom slash manny faces. Please subscribe at a podcast really helps that you might not catch all the lives but if you do have apple podcasts if you have spotify hip hop can save America and then you'll be able to download all the latest episodes. I am also putting out a special bonus episode on Friday. Slash the weekend. This has been a lot of work. So I'm trying to stick to a schedule, but we are here live. Monday through Thursday for the month of September one. PM. Eastern doing it like this Scott this book for the rest of the month I have some amazing guests coming up and I've had some amazing guests so far and again today Laurie. Rose Benson. From hip hop public health really do thank her for her time and her and her organization for their work. The GAL is coming up do swing over Aj speech that lasts gala the D. Whiz in on the check in the mighty Diese Wiz who here will be Zhang the after party. You know he DJ's for Salt, and pepper like this isn't This isn't this isn't low-budget stuff. We got the we got the superstar. So yeah check out that gala and checkout me wherever you need to find me I always wait till the end I'm not a good asker of these things. But if you value this work value all this fancy CNN looking stuff in the cameras, an subscriptions and the zoom in the things you want to help support this work everything you. Bless us with goes right into making sure that we can continue doing this patriot dot com slash many faces south today Destino shouts to any shouts to. So many people are checking today. Elliott. Gan Elliott. Again does great work. We have an interview with Eliot. Gang come. A. Secret. But it's it's already been done I just got to put it together and get out. Stay tuned for that does great work and the intersection of young people mental health therapy through beat making. He's an amazing guy does amazing work checkout Elliott game and his work he never checked in it's a long list and I gotta go Orissa Eddie Josh Misses Server So if you want to check in, I appreciate off for doing this and just taking some time you're busy day and those. Crazy and it's a Monday. So you know what it is homework I gave you this homework last week. So remember your homework for tomorrow if you haven't watched it yet I needed to watch the remix hip hop fashion on Netflix? Yes. In that you know what I'm talking about. We talk about into sexism hip hop and how it's affected society in largely positive we find the positive and uplifting humanity ways to talk about how hip hop into sex with the world I mean the fashion industry. became pop. Hip Hop today for the fashion industry great documentary highlighting a some some great designers that helped make that happen and tomorrow tomorrow I will have. Someone? Who appeared in that documentary like TV star great tune in tomorrow one pm many faces I will let you go I gotta go we gotta turned around and put it up on a podcast feed and do a million other things. Appreciate you tuning in hip hop could save America you don't know now you know peace.

New York City hip hop Public Health Organiza Dr. Williams America manny York City Doug e New York City Department of Ed apple Pakistan Rose Benson Laurie Leading Organization for Healt Chuck D Public Health Organization founder Ernie Pentacle Leon obesity
Rise of the Permian | Chapter 2

Boomtown

34:17 min | 1 year ago

Rise of the Permian | Chapter 2

"I've heard tells about the Santa Rita number one the oil well that started the first boom in west Texas. The site itself is a kind of Mecca and the Permian Basin one recent afternoon. I decided to see it for myself. In the Santa Rita stood alone in a field of mesquite trees and yellowed grass. There was a metal Derek in a tin shack next to it a barbed wire fence surrounded the rig but the gate was unlocked so I slipped inside. The wind rattled the shack. Part of the ceiling had caved in the huge belts that once powered the rigs engine had snapped and rotted in the Sun. I stood on the rig floor and thought about the roughnecks roughnecks who drilled this well almost a century ago must have seen mad to be drilling for oil in the middle of nowhere. They had no idea the The discovery they were about to make would change the world and I'm Christian walls from Texas monthly imperative entertainment. This is boomtown podcast about the historical boom. That's playing out in the Permian Basin. A boom so big. It's reshaping our economy. Our climate and our geopolitics geopolitics. Today we're going to step back in time to truly understand what's happening in the Permian right now you. I have to know how we guy here are. The Permian Basin went from being sparsely populated cow country. To one of the most influential regions in the world This is episode to the rise of the Permian when people think about Texas they tend tend to think of cowboys when I travel outside of the southwest. I'm often asked if I wrote a horse to school for the record I wrote a bike. This enduring stereotype springs from a relatively brief period of time three or so decades following civil war. This was when cowboys drove millions. Ends of cattle out of Texas to railroad hubs like Dodge City. Kansas think of Augusta's mccrae. And Woodrow McCall out on the trail and lonesome dove. But but if the cowboy defined Texas in the late eighteen hundreds it was oil and the wildcatter the define the states next fifty years and it all started did with the most famous strike at the mall spindle top the world changed it spindle top which was big mound out on the swamp flats. It's below Beaumont that's writer. Brian Burrow the author of six books including the big rich the rise and fall of the greatest Texas old fortunes. You know kids there since the civil war had seen things bubbling and it smelled sulfur us And there was one. Arm Guy Petillo Higgins Gins Bud Higgins and he thought well. There's at least a shot. There that there might be some oils we brings in some water well drillers from core scanner and they They sink hole in this big mound which we would call today a salt dome and they hit a gusher classic. Hollywood gusher Out of control. You know rain down black oil on everybody getting everybody dirty. Brian came to Texas monthly studio in Austin to talk to us about the history Texas oil and just to be clear. The American oil industry didn't actually begin in Texas in eighteen fifty nine four decades gates before spindle top. A Yankee named Colonel Edwin Drake was the first to drill a successful oil well in Pennsylvania. Yeah there air had been Oil production in western Pennsylvania. Going back to civil war. Toms and I think there were a couple of wells in in in Kansas. But you know it was. We were still learning how to I use it and what it was for. There was no sense. There was no scramble to find oil. It was guys like but Higgins Sang. Oh let's see if we can find oil in every now and then somebody found something small. He was the first one to find something. Big Petillo but higgins was a troublemaker in his youth raising hell in the small town of Beaumont place where the East Texas piney woods meets the swampy Gulf coast at seventeen. His antics led to a gunfight light. With the sheriff's Deputy Higgins caught a bullet in the left arm and the limb had to amputate higgins eventually straightened out. He taught himself geology. Geology and studied the region subterranean salt domes the tops of which form hills around Beaumont. He spent a decade trying to coax all from what locals called the the Big Hill. After a decade of unsuccessful drilling Higgins published a newspaper ad hoping to attract new investors. The ad caught the attention of a man named Anthony Lucas. The austrian-born engineer believed that Higgins was onto something. Lucas raised enough capital to begin again a new drilling operation. That was in October of one thousand nine hundred and sure enough. The well came roaring in on January tenth. Nineteen O one. A plume of crude oil shot over one hundred feet in the air raining down over the wooden derrick and coating nearby houses it took nine days to get the Lucas Geyser under control troll in looked like snow ended discolored all the houses in town in the self awareness aware and assailed way in your pocket. Where'd quickly spread about the strike at the big hill which was rechristened spindle? Top Beaumont became came. The state's first old boomtown over the next three months the population tripled from ten to thirty thousand. Just one a year later there were two hundred eighty five wooden derrick surrounding spindle top hill and more than five hundred companies vying for a piece of the big black pioneer Nathan. The signal I well produce more oil. That had been produced in the United States like the previous ten years. It was just the explosion. mm-hmm was such a metaphor for for what was going happen in one thousand nine hundred a year before spindle top. There were only eight thousand cars driving throughout the entire United States. Just twenty years later there were ten point five million yes spindle top and Texas oil really was one of the main propellants behind the oil boom. So we'd have impacted everything from Navy's Davies two cars but transform the way America did business the way we got around. I mean an awful lot of horses where out of work there in those first I in years would one created an even greater need for the suddenly abundant black gold flowing out of Texas and other American oil fields after the war ended in nineteen eighteen a British lord famously bragged that the Allies had floated to victory on wave of oil and with the economic economic explosion that followed the war. The demand for oil only increased at the time. All geology was still a crude practice. Many of the early wildcatters simply relied on their nose sniffing around salt domes for the smell of sulfur. Just like Higgins said others drilled based on nothing thing more than a hunch some all seekers turn to the spiritual realm for help and others tried to divine new wells with dowsing rods in other words words. A lot of early wild catting was little more than a crap. Shoot and keep in mind. This was at a time where we had no real idea. What was down there or how it got around? I remember Hugh Cohen who was the richest man in in Houston for years one of the first great welcome centers you know. He thought that oil moved in Rivers. I down below. We had no idea of the geology. They were just beginning to use geophysical stuff he would walk around and find places in the earth I think he just felt like usually low low places he just felt in his bones. If there were oil there some guy was pretty good at it eventually. The great spindle top. Played out there. Were simply too many holes poked in the ground too many straws sucking from the same milkshake if Texas I was going to continue to be a major player in the game it would have to find new reserves up until this point oil had been found in swampy hilly areas like East Texas Texas in western Pennsylvania so the West Texas desert seemed. Like the last place you'd find another spindle top so when people would appear it. Sure doesn't look like western Pennsylvania like there are no trees not much water and it doesn't have hills it's mostly flat. What so if you're looking for oil in places where it looks like you found it before this is not attractive? Dr Dianna hidden is a historian of the petroleum industry. She's lived in Midland the financial capital of the Permian Basin for forty six years and has published six books on the industry. We we spend a morning talking at her home. Far As towns and roads and that type of thing. There's very little at that time. Most roads weren't paved even major arteries this ranch country. The Permian Basin was in the Nineteen Twenty S. Mostly a blank slate. A Pancake Flat Sea of Scrub Brush. Mesquite there are few towns and few people and towns were spaced. I used to some extent in terms of how to get cattle efficiently to the railroad which was why about every twenty five thirty miles along the railroad. There'd be a town. The Permian Basin was still in many ways the land of lonesome dove but there were a few who looked out at the empty empty pastures of West Texas and saw the potential in its arid red dirt in nineteen nineteen. Frank Pickerel was discharged works from the army and traveled to Fort Worth at the time fort worth was the western hub for the nascent. Texas oil industry place where aspiring old promoters went to make deals deals. He just so happened to run into an old army buddy. Who recently assembled the rights to drill on four hundred thirty thousand acres of land surrounding big link a speck speck of a town? Roughly halfway between PASOAN DALLAS SMACK DAB in the middle of nowhere. The land in Reagan County were big lake is located it was dirt cheap. Just ten cents an Acre in fact the land in this area of West Texas was deemed so worthless than in eighteen. Seventy six six. The state legislature gave two million acres to the University of Texas for Free Pickerel and his partner and El Paso businessman named named taming crop acquired the drilling rights and pickerel traveled to New York hoping to round up some investors at one point he even approached a group of Roman Catholic nuns. The sisters pulled their money and took a leap of faith on the harebrained scheme. It took nearly two years but by the end of Nineteen Twenty Twenty pickerel and crop managed to raise over one hundred thousand dollars now they had to actually do something with the land and they had to do it fast. They're drilling permit had an expiration irrigation. Date and if they didn't start drilling before that permit expired all their efforts would be for naught ignoring the advice of his geologist. Just pickerel settled on a drilling location about a dozen miles west of big lick. His choice was more of convenience than fate. It was only one hundred seventy four four feet from the rail line. He purchased some US drilling equipment. Shipped it to the location and on the afternoon of January Eighth Nineteen twenty one just Hours before the permit expired the crew managed to split in on the rigs. Water will needing legal proof that they made the midnight deadline pickerel hill to passing Asan car and persuaded one of the passengers to sign an affidavit saying he had witnessed the event the deal was saved. MM-HMM PICKEREL KRUPP. Now had another three years to find some all but first they had to find driller pickerel was scouting east. Texas says boom towns when he met a hard nosed old patch veteran named Carl Cromwell Cromwell who had a little problem with alcohol. And that's well known so. Nobody can sue me for saying that about a dead man for fifteen bucks day. Cromwell agreed to move his wife and small daughter daughter into one of the two shotgun houses that had been built near the rig the ramshackle lodgings and the rig the only man made structures as far as the I could see the progress proof slow. They discovered that they were going to have to drill a lot deeper than they might have. Originally thought I had to go down almost two four thousand feet. And you're drilling with a cable tool rig essentially you're dropping a heavy pointed wait eight to shatter it and then you're bringing up the rock shatters. The the you know this is how you're you're making whole. It's a slow procedure. The old rig broke down often and it could take days to ship in replacement parts by rail. Sometimes sometimes the crew went weeks without a paycheck. It was at one of these. Low points depict climbed the rigs Derek with a sealed envelope. A gift from the nuns suet. Invested in the project inside were a handful of dried rose petals. Here's frank pickerel himself in hand. Njit New Year and the envelope contains regrowth had been blessed. I in the many of the same estimate in the rose activates on with me without theory and the scattered the rue specialist tesla which by then were ride or whether we and to save five crystal the Santa Rita earn pickerel dedicated. The will the Santa Rita number one after several months of tough drilling Krummel got a lucky break and experience. roughneck named De Lachlan happened to be traveling through the area and was surprised to see an in all rig- running cromwell hired him on the spot. Lachlan's wife Nora. Joined her husband in the Cromwell's at the lonely drilling site awesome People pay and camp just up the other side of the rig and Toward night while we walk walk through you. Just get hungrier. Great to talk to people and how we were they lady asked me said have you lived in West Texas and and she said well. You just don't know any better do you little. We knew the value of that land that we were standing on. They drilled for nearly two years without results but everything changed on May twenty eighth nineteen twenty-three we went to bed. That night dislike always got up. Make Coffee I think that's far as we got. We didn't get breakfast at all. It was the whole world will lose a coral ran out of his house and and hollered real loud and we ran out and that was not baylor going to the top of that eighty six berry and hit the ground block. Failed down to one side and anchor that just play all of oil Kane and the fatter over back in the leg and chickens worldwide anymore and the Pagis Yup of often that said Nikolai and our garden. People from as far away as Fort Worth came to see the well pulse and spew oil all over the Derek which it did for an entire month until Cromwell's crew managed to control the flow. The well quickly filled two large tanks with crude when those field they let the whole run into their slush pit until that too was overflowing soon the big lake filled was one of several new oilfields sprouting and thriving throughout West Texas. The Permian Basin had been born handed. Always been the way that we find oil in some of the most atrocious. Climate's not gonNA say anything atrocious about middle in an Odessa elicit the did the climate and the ground is not a place that people are just dying. Go build their vacation homes you now. People find oil all over Texas and they don't WanNa live. Nobody wants to live in the places that they find it while I actually find much. Richard the Permian Basin quite beautiful. I get Brian Cinnamon. The oil producing parts of West Texas are an acquired taste but despite its atrocious atrocious climate. Once the Santa Rita came in the boom was on an soon wildcatters and boomers were rushing into the Permian. So the now you're in a position by nineteen twenty seven of knowing that okay the Permian Basin even though it doesn't look like other places that have oil even though it's a real headache getting your stuff in and out to drove wells even though there's no place for your workers or your company employees to live you're going to have to develop that But has level and so that's when the first permian basin boom takes off midland with its hotels and banks was probably the nicest of West Texas boom towns but most of the small towns closer to glorify working campgrounds with the living conditions. Were permitted the twenties and thirties with a great time for the classic classic Texas Spoil Boomtown the classic. One I'm thinking of is Wync way out. We're thinking Lincoln someplace You know towns sprung up in the middle of the pasture in like a month and you know initially it's tents and then it's tents and shacks and then it's tents and shacks and hookers in bars. And you know everybody works their rears off all day long when they come home. Young white men being what they they are especially in the twenty S. They want entertainment and so they were loud. They were dangerous There was a lot of gambling and a lot of drinking and in a lot of shooting guns in the air. You know Texas Boone. Towns American oil boom towns were not place for for the the plight and the mannered. They were rough in terms of fun. Not only were they places where you can get booze but nearly all of those places also also had a place where you could gamble and then there were ladies whose occupation involved lying down a lot and they would would operate out of these places where people were having fun and you could also get a fight at the end of the day if you wanted one now. Quick to make here is the lot of the people people in a town like wink. Who are using what I've been describing are single? They don't have families very young. is they'll move with the boom because because they can get a job without asking questions and when the action slows down and the wages begin to taper off they'll move to the next button. As America entered the Second World War the production of all became a matter of national security in fact some will workers were exempted from the draft to ensure ensure there was enough crew to power the allied forces. We'll Texas oil was massively important to the allied effort I remember the very first challenge. Inge was how to get it out of Texas because typically it was Oil Back then was moved by ship and unfortunately with Nazi Zi submarines in the Gulf of Mexico and along Florida an awful lot of the Texas oil that was should be going to Texas ended up washing up on the beaches in Florida. The Roosevelt Administration Russian built the first ever pipelines the call the big inch and the little inch from Texas all the way up to Pennsylvania and once we figured you're now how to get Texas oil up to the East Coast you know. It became the great driver of jet fuel of all manner of airline fuels. Also tanks Everything I mean the Nazis and the Japanese were always hard pressed for oil. That was the reason that you know. Hitler went so hard for Romanian and one of the main ane reasons he invaded. Russia was to get Russia oil of from the Caucasus. Texas oil was widely credited for helping secure the allied victory and afterward. The state's influence only grew while I mean the thing where ultimately Texas really changed the way America lived was with Texas natural gas After World War Two when we got the first pipelines built up to the northeast and gas from the Permian gas from either even further west Texas suddenly only lit up most of Brooklyn You know all of New York all a Broadway. That was all Texas natural gas. After the War America was able to turn its gaze gaze inward in the period of economic growth that followed another Texas phenomenon was born one that would come to live alongside the cowboy in American magin adulation the swaggering Texas wildcatter. It really wasn't until America kind of woke up in nineteen forty six and nineteen forty seven began taking stock of fifteen years of kind of economic and social changes. It had not been widely covered. The people began to understand cheeses crisis a lot of wealthy people in Texas. Where do these guys come from? Rich Texas oilmen weren't a new thing but they were new to the rest the country there was this famous magazine cover of life magazine early. Nineteen fifty I wanNA say in which they put h hunt on the cover. The the ambushed him on on the streets downtown Dallas and in the big headline on the cover was. Is this the richest man in America and East Coast and the north. Everybody was like what. Who are these people? The national press became statuary with these staggering rich colorful characters. One of the most famous famous wildcatters was a guy known as silver dollar. Jim West this roly-poly guy in Texas in Houston who would walk around literally throwing silver dollars hours in the air and chuckling people would scramble for them in Houston. Specially Dallas is always a little bit better behaved. Women almost competed to be the most Outrageous you know this was the air will people bought Tigers for their backyard and start with. Put a like a steamboat. In your swimming pool you know stuff like this from nineteen fifty into the late. Fifties was really the high watermark for press attention. It really created this whole idea of kind of the loud nouveau riche. Texas Oilman mythos surrounding the Texas log. Katter has persisted to this day. Perhaps perhaps the most famous oilmen of all time hills from the eighties and wasn't even a real person without a doubt the most influential oilman broadcasting this larger than life persona to the rest of the world was jr ewing. TV's Dallas us. And if you weren't alive in the seventies just may not remember Dallas and Jr Ewing were the top things on TV the number one thing on TV They ran an episode once where he got shot and it was the most watched episode in television history anywhere in the world but while the fictional antics. Jr Ewing captivated the viewing public real live. Texas oilman found out their money could influence a different audience. Washington DC Texas oil. Money does not immediately move into the political sphere. It needs to be discovered and it was famously discovered by a young unknown. Texas Congressman Name Lyndon Johnson in nineteen thirty eight nineteen thirty nine period. Where he was tasked with raisins money and he said why I've met some of these rich oilman course in Washington they were like rich oilman in Texas? Well Okay Pal and like like. Let's say that was on a Friday afternoon by Monday morning. He Scott like five checks for five thousand dollars each and that's serious money back in the day and suddenly everyone who was like Whoa. There's money down in Texas more importantly the oilman down in Texas wit. Whoa our money actually as we could do something in mean something in Washington and that all money could go a long way toward advancing one's own political agenda whatever it might be but in the state will millionaires the gym wests? The Hugh Collins were beginning of the nineteen thirties beginning to buy newspapers and radio. uh-huh stations to broadcast their kind of politics. And they're kind of politics with rare exception as what we would call today. Ultra conservative. Perfect Anti Union anti-labour anti people of Color. You know it was kind of an old fashioned white. Supremacist politics politics. And so you saw the rise of Pappy O.. Daniel you know Kinda crazy most bigoted governor we ever had their through the forties by the Early Nineteen Fifties Texas oils influence on national politics was well established if you were running for National Office. especially as a present doesn't it became a right of passage to come down and meet with Texas oil millionaire and this was a thing you know. Nixon Came Down Nixon met with with everybody here over and over and over by and large you know Texas Oilman. We're pushing What we would call today a right wing agenda And what changed everything is that They hitch their wagon to Joseph McCarthy in the Early Nineteen Fifties McCarthy of course this was a US. Senator from Wisconsin who famously launched a national inquisition to as he claimed expose communist sympathizers it it became known as the second red scare plenty of Texas Oilman strongly supported his cause but after the backlash to McCarthyism they were more chastened Jason Their political pursuits. This was very popular and very powerful For four or five years in the early fifties where you know a lot of people. We're losing their jobs because they were too liberal but there was finally in Nineteen fifty-three an immediate and powerful backlash powered by in the media but also by Eisenhower who was more of a moderate president who didn't much care for this crazy right-wing stuff the fact that Texas a woman had so vividly vividly sponsored McCarthy there was huge blowback that cost a lot of them really in fact almost all of them to kind of tamp down their political critical involvement there for a period of years. And you really didn't see Texans become visible on the national stage again until the sixties axes with LBJ with the rise of George Bush especially in nineteen forty eight. George H W Bush was a young graduate from yell and a war hero He. He traveled from New England down to West Texas to make his fortune as an oilman to Edessa then midland midland. Stop Middle and Odessa. These were not places on the earth that the rest of the country had ever heard of much less bintu and suddenly you know in the late forties early fifties there so many Ivy League kids moving down there that they open Harvard Club and Yale Club in a Princeton Clubs that these gentlemen will have of an appropriate place to drink. I suppose the Texas oil business was reaching maturity but it wasn't just the character of the almond that was changing the late fifties. We saw tectonic shift across the entire industry. Oil was going global The problem was people started finding Oil Willing even more obscure places in in the Middle East places called Kuwait and cutter that no one had ever heard of and this was a lot cheaper a lot closer to Europe you know by by nineteen sixty by the early sixties. He didn't WanNa be a Texas oilman was a lousy business. The rise of OPEC met the golden age of the Texas. wildcatter was over. You're George Bush looked for a way out of the Permian Basin in nineteen fifty eight. He moved to Houston to run an offshore drilling company called Zapata there. Air Bush got into politics and began to rise to the Republican race. Meanwhile the sixties grew worse and worse for those in the American old business. This domestic production declined while imports of Middle Eastern all skyrocketed. For the first time America grew dependent on foreign oil to meet meet its energy needs in nineteen seventy three during the Yom Kippur War between a coalition of Arab states and Israel OPEC issued an oil embargo oh on America and other Israeli allies over the next few months the price of oil jumped nearly four hundred percent America L. was in a full-fledged oil crisis it's the lowest point told becomes the highest point President Nixon began to tout a phrase that has been repeated by every US presidents residents since energy independence. The federal government pushed American oil companies to invest in domestic projects in skilled doc regulations to make it as cheap as possible to drill for all by the Mid Nineteen Seventy S. The Permian basin was booming. More than ever before a four. So we've got twenty dollars a barrel oil. Thank you OPEC. Now it's going to come up to twenty five thirty so so everybody and his dog is out there getting into the oil industry and your local dentist gets into oil. Your local auto dealer gets into oil. Everybody is out there Looking for oil and gas now. Profitable in nineteen eighty. Ronald Reagan won a landslide victory and on the ticket a Texas Oilman George H W Bush and back in West Texas. The oil business had never been better things peak in nineteen in eighty one. At which point economists out here still think that the boom has no end. We're GONNA not only see forty dollar a barrel oil. We're going to see eighty dollars a barrel while it seemed unbelievable but it seemed plausible. Canley CNN to this well. Oil is a diminishing in commodity. Take it out of the ground and it's going to take you many millions of years to replace. It has no place to go but up four months ago the price of West Texas crude oil was almost thirty. One dollars a barrel today. It was just over thirteen dollars for every dollar. The price robs Texas stands to lose a hundred million dollars in state revenue. You next time on boomtown the crash Boomtown is a CO production of entertainment. Texans executive producer is Jason produced and engineered by Brian Stanford. You also wrote the score. Boomtown is edited by J K Nickel and begging crite. Right Co reported by leak staff. Our theme song is written and performed by Cake Rossi. I'm your host and writer. Christian walls especial. Oh thanks to the DOLPH. Briscoe Center for American history at the University of Texas and the Permian Basin Petroleum Museum in Midland for the use of their archival footage also to the Dallas historical society in October productions. The use of archival through visit Texas monthly dot com slash. Boomtown for more on the sort. And don't forget to tell your friends about boomtown and please leave us a review of Apple podcasts. If you like the show.

Texas west Texas Permian Basin Midland Deputy Higgins Permian United States University of Texas Derek Pennsylvania America Beaumont Frank Pickerel Nineteen Twenty Twenty Big Hill
The Art Of Success In Startup & Blockchain

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

29:41 min | 2 years ago

The Art Of Success In Startup & Blockchain

"This show is proudly sponsored by coincidence. Come that you with the largest range of cryptic conscious. Anyway in the strain market with an ad verification process. You can never be verified using only your driver's laws all possible within seconds, you can instantly deposit funds and instantly not buying and selling your favorite cryptocurrencies in under five minutes. Coincidental. Giving away ten dollars worth of free beacon for H verified user, once they make their first deposit. Just go to coin spot dot com that I you four such Batee see one-two-three. Vitrey to Cobb crypto show talking business in Jane. Hello, everybody. And welcome to the try to come crypt ice show, today's guests. Well, this man has co things in many poet pies. And I'm very much looking forward to digging into his very knowledgeable. Brian I go size nine it's hike high Cobian, and he's trying to us. He's a business development manager pack at next month. And we're gonna cover what next my dozen what the objectives have also advise and mentor s s Vate. Yes, you can Google that. And you will find the results and also pot at prism grew. So as I say a man with lots on his play. Thank you so much for being on the show today. Thank you very much. Great pleasure to be here. Look I want to kick strike off on video background like a little bit of an introduction on who you are. And and also play into what brought you into blockchain. Justin blockchain of what brought you into that. Now. Thank you very much. Good point. So I wear few as you just mentioned. A one of them is that I'm in charge of business development at at makes which is part of the group the US at both the company my job is basically to get to new clients and get to new markets. I'm basically helping spend their magician capable. It's not just on the. But that's takes chat. He do. It's a Trump. So that's one of the heads. I'm wearing the other head is ventures. We choose a culture in some Francisco also American company. Well, tweed do there is so as I fe- firstly is the biggest physique slow rates are in the world has seeks accelerators globally of which two are in Asia. And so my job is to basically help advise on mentor startups, and why I'm qualified five or sort of in this position is because I had to I had to interpret neural adventures of myself. I had to failures and will exit before this two pillars in Egypt and von exit in Mozambique. So basically all of that happened in Africa. So that's why when I can't think where I've actually got invited to be part of the three hundred or so I think mentor pool that associate has globally ever since around three years. I've been basically advising startups across the world, I'm bizarre, by the way, he later stage started up, so Susie or upwards. And to your point how I came to blockchain actually through sweat, see because I was so this was some time April or may too solid seventeen. And I was basically I had three or four advise these and two of them decided to do an ice. Yo at that point. I had early idea. What am I see? Oh, what low chain let on more than I feel. So because I was involved with them for a year or so ready, helping them with dot strategy. I ask them to sort of help me educate me a bit. And because they went through the process, I was in broken that process, and I sort of peaked it up later in September. I was asked to again on officially help. Well, became the first I feel buzzer is in Singapore, cold iconic partners where the time so again, alter hours work, right? So I was doing there white paper. So because I've been an interpreter myself on on because of that that was asked to help with the white paper. So what I did was I wrote the white paper for this company will if Bill so gift, so I think you still considered the foster sideshow in southeast Asia. They raised thirty six million three minutes walls, the so there I feel was in December two thousand seventeen or other way. Yeah. At the time, I mean, December two thousand seventeen as you as you know, as much as I do was the peak for bitcoin peak for full chain, and they they had a very successful ice you because this company or or had the wrong that time around I think hundred twenty million mostly of users. So this is a ritual Disney company out of China. So then help also up poet, which is a third biggest op store same same same thing. And also, the I feel in December two thousand seventeen so after that I was getting a lot of leads and. I that's how I sort of got three lean tool low chain, if you like and in January two thousand eighteen a college university friend of mine was hard thing, this this company this vibe that eventually became prison group on he asked me to basically beat a partner in Asia, which brings me to prison group so prison group what we do is events as well so prisoners now considered I know a lot of blockchain people both of this. But is considered the blockchain economics government's advisory globally advisor. Consider the tall is because not only we have a lot of these in economics from Harvard. But also, so we listed a Nobel laureate in economics, Oliver heart to be senior adviser and the former chief economist of Microsoft prison McAfee who is a very famous general because there's been a lot of publishing. Oh, research papers. So he's also senior adviser so ever since we've had a lot of engagements. I mean, a lot of events as well where the event lost July in Harvard club, which was very successful. We had with partnerships on tops. We might be for example, there crypto economics course, that launched lost July will straight goodbye us. So MIT's Sloan school of business as COMEX course, we've also I mean, we had recently Moscow. I think presentation at DARPA so the defensive best research agency where we presented also about blow chain security. So a lot of lot of engagements and a lot of content on lottery vents, you're right. So so all of this implode, Cheney comics governors base. So that's the three heads that. I'm wearing so part blow chain advisor parts advisor, generally and doing also business develop. On or or won't Mitch group? Wow. Who? I'm just hearing. What was understanding and one of the things that fascinates me in business more than anything else is is really ecosystems. Now when you're a startup as limo the most it's really the rice, it's a rise to survival. It's a rice to revenue. You know, a lot of startup especially tech startups. They they revenue models are long way down the track. And we we see this in blockchain and crypto acids. Now pot of the some businesses that are the startups have revenue streams, but you still gotta survive that startup period. You got to carve at your space in the market. So it's a rice for land. It's a rice for survival on it's a rice for revenue now because of this rice, you do have a there is a starting point. You don't know whether finish lonnie's the finish line can be very fast if you'll burn right? He's high on your weather news, a low on your investment is Neil. Right. So that's the difficult part of the why that he can bridge. Those gaps is by having multiple streams of income under the same umbrella, which brings in multiple partnerships, and it brings in more experts and a big network at what's the biggest case would Voss when you're talking and working with a startup. What do you think he's the biggest pace of advice old most important thing that any startup should really be looking into to help them to win that civil rice? Yeah. It's a very good point. Because that's that's the million dollar question. Basically it any more. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. So I think again having poked a lot of startups ki ki racy, I mean, there's two things one is a pretty normal tender advise that always Luke poor a competitive and sustainable advantage. So I deal with let's say a lot of startups that have let's say marketplace for this marketplace for that. So but entry barrier or opposed to copy that is very is very low. Right. So anyone can do this. Anyone can create the startup you hire an agency you pay them on they do that. But what you cannot create is the kind of a well, you cannot easily replicate that counter intuitively technological thing. So my kid vise usually these for startups to Luke for competitive advantage does not necessarily logical unless it's pets impending technology. So if it's technology to give you an example, I mean. Obesity example, such just Facebook, right? As we is a social network on pretty much any any good agency can recreate what would be sixty seventy percent of capabilities of Facebook technology, cly, right? Yeah. Yeah. Where you can see the news feed you can post articles. But guess what? There aren't so many why because the soft sort of vantage is that that says the economies of scale has the metric and stuff. So he's that community economy of scale if the drug that prevent anyone else coping, right? So my wife is usually to Luke for those things that are intangible that are not knowledgeable that are either network or community or something that that is not easily replicable or coke Bill because that's the thing. That's going to sustain you. That's one key piece of advice that I do. And again, if you look across as the same for Instagram saying for boats up there lot of messengers, but how many there is maybe a few weeks had votes up line. Telegram? Right. A lot of them again have technology clean pretty much. I oversimplified, but they are pretty much a messenger. I mean, it's not that difficult to create a messenger. But yes to jazz all these people on board on keep them is the most difficult thing loss, you have them again to keep them there. So that's that's the kind of sort of an advantage that that always Oskar help startups to come up with which is gonna prevent future competitors or conned competitors to get to their their their piece of a piece of market Sakon event that they can keep point that I had rise is create the serendipity. And what I mean by that is when like a lot of the cases lot of even new business ideas. Business lives come out when you are letting them event you meet someone eventually becomes your partner that you wouldn't have otherwise Mets. So you will told this events you meet people so meeting people putting yourself out there be putting your content out there for some some for people to see. And then you get. Stalled you get. I mean, look, I mean, are you an eye? Eric, good example. I mean, you resolve to me out of blue. I didn't even know about you. Right. And that's a certainty that again, like, maybe I put some competent or for some reasons. So you ended up finding my profile, right? So so creating serendipity I think is very very important thing because in my life, also as you realize, and I'm sure in yours as well. A lot of the -tunities of the things happen because you concede complete do something in business or in life. I'm you create this like you metric here, you pull the content there you talk to this guy that guy, and then something comes that you wouldn't have otherwise guests. So creating that serendipity is very very important because a lot of the kisses when you do this consistently. You are always thing ahead ahead of the game on things always are going to have them. We do because you are consistently creating those things that you're not gonna imagine you have. So this are the truth sort of kid by his I I gave. And I guess I mean, startups are usually pretty at Pete's very again just. Just to give you an idea of the reaction initially is like create certainty. What does that mean? But when I explained I give some examples like did today with you, usually they do this Sunday got begged for me. A number comes lost time was actually like tweaks ago won't start out that I told them to to go to events onto have specific way of peaching. So they did on then few partners tend to them said, oh, we didn't realize guys like this that your brand that you're less partner out. They were super surprised because they're like, oh, well, we didn't realize that just teaching our piece this way this event is going to bring us this multinational company has potential partner on hey, as well, they low that's the same vise. I'll keep right. So two things sustainable and competitive advantage. That's not necessarily technology cO and craving yourself with certainty. Well, it's pretty good at bloody Avaz will give you that much swelled on. Thank you, by the way, pray site that I'm asking for me as much as anybody else. Now, I wanna. Leading to available. It would with that as a segue really in. We've got television shows now about startups. We've we've got the entrepreneurs a bang more sexy now as as in. It's it's it's something that lots of people they say, they are when the not so it's it's a comma a social movement of being an entrepreneur. S startup saying it's cool to be a star of it's cool to being everybody wants us success of as accessible entrepreneur, not everybody's willing to put the work in and dedicate the time. So with that thing the case. At S S A V. You guys must be inundated with opportunity now Assad from how you find what you're looking forward. Do you currently have a focus on a certain pod of the Marcus certain industry, a certain sector that you're chasing off? Because you see that as being the biggest opportunity moving short, medium and long-term. Yeah. No. That's right. I'm that's a great point. So we have. So as I mentioned, we have six oh writers of which two are in Asia between Asia warm is called China accelerator, it's called China there because they think Trump I on that the that serves as like Florida for companies globally that are trying to enter the Chinese market. So we have high ups with Kenji Johnson and Johnson that's a lot of companies multinational companies, and they are also sort of they are bringing their products, and they're on a loophole for for startups that are coming to China. So that sounds. Specializes in China's market, that's particular, especially PM expertise in Chinese market. We the network in China, the second only Asia is mobile only exhilarated that's one of these invite bay in Taiwan. This home is specialized in mobile application. So those companies startups have mobile applications that usually get related thing there and so on and so forth. So we have for example hawks. That's a hardware accelerator that's off US that's based out of USO each of this six or eight dollars has a specific vertical? Or or like, we have hogs. We have for example, bio heck, which is also specialized in in in bio related startups. So each accelerates, our has either let's say hardware. Walnuts. China one is mobile applications each of them has show if he so that pro as part of your questions about how. How would we go ball having having sort of specialization expert these on? Secondly, you're right. I mean, we are getting you know, they could buy by a lot of startups. We have an advantage, and we are by number of investment doing them five hundred startups wear an advantage over everyone else, including by startups in that we provide creek customer acquisition. What does that mean is that when you are a startup you sure, later stage psalms or hundreds of thousands of users? You wanna let say penetrate Chinese market. What you do is you come to us. We do our diligence. We accept you on we provide do customer position. Let's say Chinese market how we do this because we have tops with Sao MI L G A lot of originally treatment, developers or producers as well as at and a lot of the biggest mobile application ING companies. So the way it works is basically loss your startup is accepted. Let's say in China accelerator. Your applicable version is being included in what say an LG poem or as part of mobile advertising network across the world by long the companies, and because of that you'll get a lot of free customized. So they opened their new Algiers and some on basically that your application is part of the original politicians on the phone. So there's appropriate share refund. When there is a new customer is appropriate. Share that SO seeing sort of sets up with with the startup but setup has to pay nothing for this. And there is nice sort of well on this is because as you know, for startups, the most important thing outside of the basically getting out their product. I'm getting some funding is the cost of my position. So we have that success. We have a lot of good startups later started coming because because we provide cuff my vision for free. They have no downside all the outside. It's very interesting. I mean that is that's really interesting. A very very I mean, look, there's so many ways that that can be. I mean, I'm just thinking in my head, and we'll talk off, but that I guess that's of managed to say whether these questions beautifully I've gone just going to say that. And I want to move in the next one now because that's really where that start so through that the story through SSI, they would obviously the incubator, and then the the client acquisition, which is the next pot of once you've got somebody insulted incubator that you're gonna work with its vice sounds like you're going to leverage off the next mode platforms. Let's now stop to have a little bit of chat about that. Because it is very much. Well, there's a huge amount to it. So you wonder what was a little bit about what next month? Does I can see? So clearly now how it works your ecosystem. It's Walker store. Little bit about what it is on some small part that in December two thousand ten any maximize company. So they will provide eight functions so APA something of it is infrastructure. Actor communication capability that you can build into your mobile application, marketplace or website you wanted to have SMS capability, sending bacon force, you can basically use month's API functions. So next start business MS company expanded over time using including voice, including checks like what's up his messenger? Vibrates drought. Now make small into solve them. Sixteen may make smoke got acquired five on his group. So it'd become part of only group ever since basically has been ebbing communication capabilities. So makes phone as it spends right now is a communications capability company provides communications, whether that's takes voice. That's chad. That's video that Email to your company, and it's not an end for that. It's a to be. So basically, if you have let's say a website a yard and ecommerce company you built. You use those commission capabilities to build into your ecommerce product. So that it's able to resemble use video identification or it's able to send SMS medication to someone who is shopping only commerce company, so nice, basically, providing that that capabilities those capabilities for different companies on different mobile now my work at make small centers around opening new markets in southeast Asia because I'm based out of Singapore working with different big accounts. So we're dealing with law. Thanks lot of insurance companies companies like Google Facebook Alibaba by do they are all partners. I in case of Google and Facebook, they're also our I mean, there are clients and partners at the same time. So we serve is pretty much to be as companies in the world as well. As startups. Because everyone want whether you are a small startup company, you do need communication. I mean, we we have a peach usually, I I have a PJ surely that I when I hope to a company, I'm like, do you have communications with your companies to communicate. They're like, yes. Do they respond back? Yes. In that case. I'm sure we can barely because every type of communication that you imagine. Whether that's takes that's always that Email or or video or chat we provide. So we can help you. We can provide this kind of Asia believe it or not. I mean when I got into this industry. I couldn't imagine communication like so much difference. But it does make a lot of defense a lot of difference. I mean, I just can't overemphasize how much defensive makes for a Bank. I mean, you would think Bank banking a product, but without communication all of this. None of their product is going to be out there. None of their product is going to be used properly on. I just realized which extent make small company. He's in the same industry help. So I really love doing it also because it's just communication, which seemingly is a small thing. For a lot of companies, unless you're specializing negation small thing is is it makes such a big difference for a lot of companies in any industry. And unlike unlike let's say, a company that provides long type of product, let's say, you are your P company. You just offer big multinational. Some there is one or two use cases or ways of using your for the in our case communication capability when you provide the capability note, and or like ngelo product, there's so much crazy sort of thinking you have to the way that startup or with multinational company because sometimes they don't realize they can use communication in specific ways. So you go brainstorm with them say what if all bad the best practice in your industries that they use this way on that way? I'm very example semes- can be sent from that point or you can disconnect like this kind of for example. Worcester medication that's very normal in your industry, and they're like oh well. I didn't even know that you can't do that. So we help them come up with this kind of thinking that they implement our capabilities into their products or their services. Wow. There's a big business. That's a very big sector are very very big business. And I mean, that's very interesting. I mean, this I was suggest it's probably where a lot of you Atanas in and given the big clients, and it is what it is. Now. The last thing I wanted to touch on his back to prison. I think it kind of answered at the beginning. My question basically sent his around a lot of the vents that gets put on through through the script. Is there any particular again market sector industry that you're saying the most growth because I say events being a good indication of grassroots Greis? So if there's lots of events you typically events go before the rest of the market catches, a whole because the events occur for us to get together to create the ecosystems to do business partnerships and to grow that spice up now from that point of view. What are you saying is one of the faucets? Growing events markets in the world of the moment. Events markets. Well, I guess on surprisingly for you. I think that would be blockchain at least in this region. I I think the underlying sort of 'rational is that whenever you have the cutting the street new revolution every type of industry like blow chain or a I or that mentor or h computing when those industries are sort of being there are being born on their being they're growing as they are right now there is a need for a lot of information creation and sharing. Right. So blockchain is this industry. Where a lot of this information is crazy. Lot of projects come up a lot of new developments happen to get that across everyone in the system of small small players small startups as well as companies are a lot of events. So there are a lot of events on blow chain. I mean, I can tell you you can say some website every day there is at least on event in Singapore. At least warmly that there. There so many concurrent events. Sometimes you don't know to which one which one you should be it should be attending. So both chain definitely is a very big market in terms of events. A is another beige as not as mature as US, but it's hard. I think lost year Meatloaf year. There's more and more of a related events. Again. I think I mean, it's it's the the 'rational is the same. Right. So the moment you see a bit of technology development there. Some successes successive. A lot of events get crazy because that's how the information is crazy them disseminated across the in the industry. And for us at prison. I mean we have seen to lost year. We were basically agnostic in terms of companies we went off on events events. We didn't spend that much time doing I can tell you this year. It's about enterprises. So we're going after a big multinationals, and we had a Keno that sells by sauce. I actually tweaking to party members spoke on we have keynote that consensus in may. So there there's there there is a lot of events that we getting to to we provide also waving we with a lot of content as I said for MIT inverse of southern California. It's a lot of lot of embarrassed is. So we try to again participating this industry through our only vents as always also little to some like leaving events in the industry tchnology industry technologies different technologies. But especially like we'll chain because that's where we are specializing. Well, look, I could literally talk to you will die. I really couldn't. I'm fascinated speaking with someone of your experience, your knowledge, and I literally could speak to you will die. But we can't do that. Because we go to respect the wishes of the listener. So well on them do right now is just suggest wake. Where can we find out more about what you're doing across different groups or you personally? How do we find it and connect into you? Yeah. But you can visit my website. I I go friend sorts of was the one who insisted I do because before I just said all this thing. So my website is hike so H A Y A H A dot com. I mean on the berry kept see sort of all these different things high up together in some way, you can see all the different companies on partnerships that I I have some my interest, and I blog so he can find some my blog articles. I blow by blow chain blog about a Houston blog about failures because I think. The most impactful type of teacher, I'm more so than success. And so basically my website again, I it's it's high cod dot com. So AJ y H A dot com heights. I WI high A dot com every letdown listeners viewers do the sign that check this, man. He knows what he's talking about. He's very connected. It's been an absolute pleasure. Having you on the show hike? I thank you so much time. And I look forward to bubbling India's event sometime either be really great to catch up. And I'm waste about six hours. If you Tom housing thousand questions. Yeah. Pleasure. Absolute pleasure, Craig. And as you said, I mean, we'll be really great actually meet you in person, I'm poke the whole day of awful this other things. Thank you very much creek. Excellent. Thanks so much lighter. Did I don't have a fantastic day. Boffin now. The trader called crypto podcast is hosted by Craig called all trying to cope courses products and tools can be found at trade kkob dot com because experience met is. This show is proudly sponsored by coincidental comb that you with the largest Ryan of cryptocurrencies anyway in these strain market with not bad at verification process. You can never be verified using only drivers laws old possible. Within seconds, you can instantly deposit funds and instantly not buying and selling your fiber cryptocurrencies in under five minutes coins. Giving away ten dollars worth of free bitcoin for H verified user, once they make their first oppose it, just go to coin spot dot com that I you for such Batee see one-two-three views are the advertiser not try to call all the audio presente.

partner Asia China Singapore blockchain US Google Luke Facebook advisor Francisco Justin blockchain business development manager high Cobian Vitrey southeast Asia Brian Harvard
#192 Fishs Eddy: How a Mom-and-Pop Shop Made It in New York City

Inc. Uncensored

27:49 min | 3 years ago

#192 Fishs Eddy: How a Mom-and-Pop Shop Made It in New York City

"Incan censored is brought to you by FedEx FedEx makes millions of deliveries around the world. But what FedEx really delivers goes beyond packages and pallets for some. It's happiness for others. Rothe hope dreams of simply peace of mind, millions of packages millions of possibilities. Find out more at FedEx dot com as abilities. The following podcast contains explicit language. Hello and welcome to Inc. Uncensored Armand business. Entrepreneurship technology cool companies and just about anything that hits the like buttons of the phantasm people who write and edit for Inc. My name is James Ledbetter on the editor of Inc magazine and Inc dot com, and I'm very pleased to be joined by two of my esteemed colleagues. We have executive director of editor John fine damage could be here. Jim and staff writer William Kowit did morning, Jim. We are very pleased to be joined in the studio today by one of the founders of fishes Eddie, Julie gains. We're gonna be talking to her about her brand new book. And then we're going to discuss the November issue of Inc, which is the future issue. Plus, stay tuned for like buttons, a quick hit on something that we saw this week that we liked I don't want to give too much away. But they will involve a super PACS and Felix salmon. Okay. As I mentioned, you just gave it away. We are very pleased to be joined today by Julius Gaines who has just published. A book called minding the store a big story about a small business. She is one of the co founders of one of my favorite stores. Fishes Eddie, Julie welcomes income censored thank you for having me tell us. How fishes Eddie got started for for people who don't live in New York? Fishes Eddie is this fantastic store. That sells all manner of bowls dishes, plates, mugs, chinaware of all kind of very very durable. High quality and reasonably priced and whimsical if I can put it does. I I don't think we can really I it's hard to get across the kind of wit and spirit. That's behind it. It's it's a very it's one of those places. It's an incredibly welcome addition to the local retail landscape like you walked by the windows, I live near there. So I I get lucky to and it just kinda makes you smile on your day. Absolutely. So how how did the store get founded I'll give you a show. I I sure about thirty years ago. I I walk. Into a little shop, and I met my partner who is working the cash register and I went to school up in Syracuse. So searches China was there. So I always collected Syracuse China restaurant where and I knew about it and my partner he knew how to work a cash register as a literal Andrew. Yeah. So we just started going to flea markets, and and going up to Syracuse China, and and then we started digging around in the Bowery and the Bowery in those days was the restaurant supply. This was one restaurant supply after another though. Did we were in the right place at the right time because we discover that every basement was filled with unused endless bushels and crates and stacks of restaurant where from airlines and academic societies and hotels, and it was crazy. When the first time the first many times that I shopped at vicious Eddie. I would see this stuff that would be like, you know, like the Syracuse convention center, China or or like, some obscure hotel. I thought they were jokes. I thought it was like it was like irony. The like, of course, such a place would never have its own China. But I learned I learned from your book that you discovered all these places that had this stuff, and they they wanted you to take it away. Yeah. And then we were getting calls. We've got calls from the Harvard club. They were sitting on tons of unwanted China and the twenty one club, and you know, people wear like just please take it away. And we were doing them a favor that would not happen today. Right. But. But it was also the combination of that. And this was made for instance, this was commercial where so we introduced the concept of restaurant where to the home and the quality was amazing. So just all the stars were aligned for us. And we discovered that every basement in Barrie was filled and then there's another little supply district on arch street, Philadelphia. So he started going there. And then we started going to manufacturers directly and then one by one the manufacturers started going out of business. So when you were there at the right place at the right time, and we started getting all their wear and even their tools and their cabinetry, and you know, all their cards and things like that. So I really just evolved. Of course, the last ten years things have changed because all the manufacturers are at a business. Now, one of the things I like about this book, and that's very relevant to to ink the ink audience is that even though. Oh, the business was pretty successful from the from the start by some by some metrics. It was never easy. There are all sorts of hurdles that you encounter. Can you talk a little bit about that? Yeah. Aware encountering our biggest hurdle. Now. It's the elephant in the room. It's called Amazon. Yeah. So we've encountered hurdles, and I think we've been through like, I think at this point three recessions, the invasion of big box retailers piss people ordering online it's so much easier to, you know, press send than to actually go out and buy something, and we're small business. So we don't have enough marketing dollars to build a huge website. And you know, of course, our stuff is heavy so shipping. Yeah. And then we've we've encountered so many different. Hurdles, it's been cyclical. We somehow always come out of it. I don't know. We'll do maybe a big sale or something will happen. It's I wrote about it in the book, actually like our skyline pattern after nine eleven. Yeah. Can we talk about a little bit about that too? Again. If you don't live in new maybe you've never seen these place. I have them in my home icon. Skyline pattern kind of hand drawn on a napkin it was originally. And and when I includes several of the best known buildings in Manhattan, and when the twin towers came down on nine eleven you face a choice. Do you keep them in the pattern? Do you take them out talk about that? Well, we're going forward. We decided that people are so passionate about that pattern. And it's a great patterns. It's not touristy. It's just a great pattern. I mean, New Yorkers by absolutely. And it's made on restaurant where so it's just you know, it's beautiful. I love it to its tireless for me. But going forward we decided that we would not include the original trade centers. So the original pieces have the Trade Center. Really? Yeah. But that pattern has its own history main. We were even sued by the port authority chests like four years ago. Yeah. But what would they said we were infringing on their intellectual property. So we hand. Classic fishes, Eddie style. We got a letter an intimidating letter from their lawyers and instead of calling our lawyer we call the John Oliver show. The whole thing on it. Perfect. And they wrote back and said, please stop the self serving publicity. And and they dropped the lawsuit where we were talking before before we started recording. The you have these trays that reproduce the health department posters. That restaurants have to post in their window with a great pending and you've gotten some trouble with that too. Yeah. Is I don't know. We're such a little fish. I literally I don't know why people people think we're bigger than we are no money to be had. Yeah. Yeah. We did a version of the a v and the great pending that some city agencies said that it was too close to the original artwork. And that we were going to have to pay them. Royalty and correct the artwork and use their exact artwork. So what was I going to do? So we did it. They're they're they're very very funny. Where's fishes Eddie gonna go? Is there is there a kind of lifestyle play for fishes, Eddie? Or are you going to just stick to your traditional wears is there is there a big plan in the works? Well, there was I mean in my dreams, or is it big plan in the works that investors would come in. And see that fishes that he could be in every city any you know, we are very urban. But I had this fantasy that that we will go to Chicago. And then we would do pattern with like the Chicago art school because we do a competition right now with Pratt. Every year, you know, and and maybe we do a pattern with like big local chef and Chicago and a charity Chicago and the same thing in Boston. And I we wanted to go down that route. But we're actually not an sweet spot for investment bankers because we're too small. So so my ideal would be to grow the business a little more and hit that sweet spot and take in some investment money. That would be pretty great. Yeah. I mean listeners out there with the Puckett's. This is leveraged entity. I lived here. You talk about how you guys have successfully navigated through the time of big bucks retailers, you mentioned and now Amazon for that matter. How do you do it? Well, we did a window. It said it was a huge window. It said fuck Amazon fishes Eddie as prime. The arrow two fishes any, but the publishers that book called and said take that window down nap. You need Amazon they need to be. Now, of course, I had just ordered toilet paper from them early that morning, but it's a complicated. Really really fucked me. But I've been designated the world's most expensive door greeter because I do greet customers. I love customers. I love talking to them. And and I hear often people coming in and they're looking for a wedding gift, and we have great wedding gifts. But they leave and they're like, you know, I love this store, but I'm just going to get something Amazon. Yeah. So it's like it's so easy to just sit at your, you know, in your bed with your lap. Gosh your phone. Did any major problem for us? And I'm not checking as many bags either. 'cause we do check bags, but I don't check every Christmas. I've checked less and less. I don't like not checking bags I used to check bags from everywhere. The knowns doing that. They're just getting an online. And now I like the challenge where forced to be we have to be more, creative and more entertaining. And and we've gotten political in a way to be entertaining. But now, we have that inner debate, you know, are we taking people off because we definitely have an opinion. So yeah, I remember seeing pictures from the women's March in the window did that whole well, we got Gloria Steinem to the storm. We did a whole event with her. But we just recently did the Trump we did a cardboard version of the balloon and the window. This is the baby. Yeah. And we did that right after and now everybody's you can get neckties with little Trump. But we did that and we actually got some threats, and I go the police department, and then we took the window down. Julie. Could you talk a little bit about a running a family business and any challenges or or unique aspects to? Yeah. Her daughter's sitting right here. It's well, they'd have a lot to say what they would say. What they would say this. I haven't raised them yet. So well, it's weird because it's I have two kids, but really have three kids, you know, and this store. Yeah. And in a in a weird way the stores, the firstborn unless should note that your son been to the stations for this graphic novel that is store. Yeah. And this great because his his line and his protein is very similar to the voice of the store. It's a little wonky. And I wonder where he goes. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So I know it's raising a family in the city is really hard. It's definitely a lot of keeping up with the Joneses. And is more like keeping up with the Smiths. I dunno. I was you know, we were we we were short on rules because we're so frenetic, you know, in the store always needs us. So we are a little short on discipline in the house. Yeah. Well, if you live in New York, please go visit fishers, Eddie help them fight Amazon. And if not you can order from them, align dot com. The book is minding the store of big story about a small business. Julie gains. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for having me. Thanks so much. Thank you. We'll take a quick break for an ad and we'll be right back with the future. Inc. Uncensored is brought to you by cards direct, one of the industry leaders in greeting cards cards direct knows that sentimentality Ken exist in business about seven billion greeting cards or purchased each year with a good portion purchased by businesses using them as way to market their customers hearts direct is no exception. They've been putting their product to the test for over twenty years ago. Seeing more than two thousand percent return on investment, sending cards to their customers. Everyone from small businesses to the entire fortune. One hundred list has seen success using cards in today's digitally dominated world. Sometimes you need to get back to basics. Standout cards. Direct offers holiday cards for new era branded customized and ready to mail. The learn more, go to cards direct dot com slash Inc. And you'll receive twenty five percent off your entire order, plus free shipping. That's cards direct dot com slash. And we're back in the November issue of Inc magazine, we have devoted a substantial portion of the issue to an exploration of the future all kinds of industries and technologies that are changing that John. You were the hunt show on this package. Tell us your highlights I would like to talk about the package very much. But I I think it's appropriate to start with a quote from the movie plan nine from outer space Edwards masterpiece, such as it is with the the the lunch book. And by the narrator, chriswell, greetings, my friends, we are all interested in the future for that is where you and I are going to spend the rest of our lives. So and remember, my friend future events such as these will affect you in the future. So this is where I don't know. I don't know what that had to do with any. That really didn't have anything to do with anything. But it's it's a good quote. What can you do? So the the the idea here is up next is is name of the package, and we're trying to get just a variety of fascinating companies that we think are reinventing specific industries as well as some general trends that are happening or that are just about to bubble up recalling them surfacing that may not be widely known like, for instance, if you're in Texas, you might think that often is the big tech destination. But it turns out that San Antonio is probably the most city in America for cybersecurity startups, and this has to do with all the military they have their, but I'll just talk about a couple of things. I know we'll has some that. He would like to talk to his well there is a piece written by a Matthew yeoman's. We believe is an old colleague an this is a legitimate question. You know in the future where we will be spending the rest of our lives. Employers will have to deal with what we call a blend workforce. And this is where some of your workers. Are humans and some of them are machines or robots? So that actually brings up a raft of interesting things, which he wrote about in a piece called the cyborg workforce. And it is to do with the things where if you're dealing with algorithms you've got for customer service. You know, you will get very strange responses you have to learn how to manage for rights. He talks about a company where the a lot of the business was cold calling. And that that the these consultants came in and basically replaced the cold calling jobs with with these algorithms and guy breaks into tears and at first they think, oh he's really upset because he's losing his job. And he's like, thank you. I don't have to do. It doesn't really boring coming part of my work. I mean, it it it it. It takes sort of a slightly different view on how robots are going to put us all out of work, which are veteran listeners know that that is kind of an ongoing theme here. But at the same time, you know, they're they're a couple of sides to that. We had a piece on a fascinating brother sister duo doing something called the med net. Which is it's essentially a quarter, but that's a closed quarter for medical experts to talk about their most difficult cases. And they they they came out of white combinator they've gotten funding. It's just really interesting stuff and also one of my personal favorites and jeffer- Kevin us bureau. Chief did a story on a company called forever. Labs on forever. Labs allows you to Bank your own stem cells which can be really important if you're going to say have a heart attack restrict it also may be a way to effectively keep yourself young for a long time. The the there's a lot of interesting stuff going on about stem cells. And if I'm if I recall correctly while this business is legal. It is not yet the case that you can use those some stills the stem cells for for a medical procedure in the United States. Did there was a great deal of conversely during the Bush administration over the use of stem cells which were taken from embryos. Yeah. Embryo that. Lead that, but there's not that level of regulation for your own stem cells. So for instance, Jim, I don't know if I could take a syringe in take out your stem cells to use in my body, which would be kinda weird because we work together, there might be some legal issues and a lot of ways, but you you can Bank your stem cells that's Bank them. But I don't think you can yet use them. I think that's still not a FDA approved that could be true. But you never know. And I also think that it's one of those things where for the right amount of cash, you could find someone who I think I'll find somebody in Taiwan to do or or in San Francisco. And and I think I think like one of the things about this package that so great is that we're talking about stuff that I think five to ten years from now we'll be kind of every day incredible. But, but there's no question that there there there's a lot of movement in the stem cell world in Spain. And elsewhere, I think and you point out the the the Bush era of prohibitions have been have been lifted. Yes, they have been put back in place by the current administration. Yeah. Not that I know of and also the and a Bill. Saporito? This isn't just as an amazing did a great piece on that company called fulcrum biosciences, which is basically turning garbage into jet fuel. But they've built it's win win the higher like the entire supply chain, which is super complicated. And the basically built it out with a ton of funding, and I got to use the we got to use the caption a rotten business, which is always kind of fun. It's a terrific package. I encourage people to pick up the November issue, and we're gonna take a quick break for an ad and we'll be right back. So we'll in this this future package. You focus particularly on a company that I think you've written about before zip line. And we talked about it on the podcast, but there's been some developments since then. Yes, oh zip line is based in San Francisco, but it's it's a commercial drone company, and what they're focusing on is medical delivery, so emergency medical so their their bread and butter is blood, and it may sound weird. But you know, they they launched in Rwanda in two thousand sixteen right now, they cover almost the entire country and nurses practitioners doctors in clinics in rural areas, specifically can order blood when they need it. When a when a patient is dying or just a native of of a specific type of blood and a drone will come. And they're pretty much time to like thirty minutes anywhere in the country and the drone is they're they're all a Thomas so they fly over and they don't stop. They just opened up the. The payload and a box falls out and a parachute opens up in it drops to the ground. It's amazing. And is it is it only in Rwanda now or are they are they using them? Elsewhere. So that they're expanding to they're trying to expand to other countries right now. But Rwanda's the only country they're up and running, but they are coming to the US through a pilot program. So the FAA loosened their rules. So the the rules in the US that that have loosened in this pilot program, which is taking place in ten states and one of them is North Carolina. Whereas zip line will launch their program shortly, but the rules were pretty onerous if you were commercial drone operator you had to stay in line of sight of the drone. So if you had an autonomous drone, there is really no point for it to be a Thomas, so they they there's a three year pilot program and zip line is gonna launch North Carolina. They say in twenty nineteen and they've hooked up with a local blood Bank. And this blood Bank covers. Parts of Georgia and South Carolina and North Carolina. And they're they're big vision is to connect with local hospitals and go from, you know, the the Appalachians to the Outer Banks is it is blood the only application for this not at all. They're gonna do medicine. It's the quote that one of the founder Keller Renou, though, said was he he sees it as like a superpower for doctors. So obviously hospitals have to be stocked with tons of medications. Rare blood types, you know, rare and expensive medication or specific types of chemo. But the thing is that you know, if if they're not used they can go bad. So kind of the vision he sees is. You know, the doctor a patient comes in, and they need something very specific and rare, and they can just order it. And it's there in thirty minutes. Amazing. Yeah. Are they the only ones in this space? I mean, I feel like they, you know, they get a fair amount of attention. But you'd think that. The demand is so great that they would be other companies trying to do something similar. Yeah. There are definitely I mean other companies are in the space drone delivery. Specifically is going to be, you know, an industry that we're going to unfold, but big players are specifically there there are a couple of other companies doing medical delivery, but you know, Amazon and apple are in the pilot program. Big companies are are in it. So it's it's cool. That zip line is a relatively small upstart. They've only raised forty one million dollars million. Yeah. Well, compared to you know, going against them. That's really not any bucks. I'm sure Julie gains would be happy with him. Brown round. Well, again, a terrific package in the November issue. I encourage listeners to pick it up. Let's let's take a quick break. And we'll be right back with our like buttons. Have you been searching for a stylish smartwatch at an affordable. Price fossil just came out with their most innovative touchscreen collection to date, the fossil Q gen four smartwatch. Now starting at two hundred and fifty five dollars compatible with iphone and Android phones. They come equipped with all new and impressive features that fit your everyday lifestyle. Now, you can measure your heart rate automatically during a workout from gun running to yoga, you can get heart rate updates while you exercise they sent me one of these watches play with him. It's really cool. It does all these things would need a computer for. But it's right there on your wrist fossils known for standing out with a wide range of customizable. Digital dials and watched apps giving you limitless ways to match personal spot. Grab yours now starting to hundred fifty five dollars at fossil dot com. All right. Let's close out with our like buttons a quick hit on something. We saw this week that we like John so friend of income censored Felix, salmon, the o- of veteran. Business journalist has a new ish newsletter with axios. His new employer comes out on Sunday. It's called axios edge, and I would like to be somehow more poetic or cutting about it. But it's just really fucking goods. Really like, it's really good. And it's it's got such a breadth of general from from, you know, kind of really smart market analysis to architecture. It's it's it's hard work. It I'm looking I'm looking at. It's a great read and I'm looking at a random when this is from October fourteenth. The lead item is about how there's five hundred trillion dollars of wealth on planet earth, and coincidentally he points out that like this came about during the most stable climactic period in world history. So perhaps that there are there are there are. Costs that we're not thinking of with that. He does a building of the week every week. We really lovely letter. We get think he did like a kid home from Sears like a very classic American Home. It's it's really great, actually. It's redick. Subscribe it lands on Sunday, which is just the repeal. I should think about things. Yeah. And it's and it's and it's it's just the like. How does off the I would say I mean axios newsletter game in general is very very very strong Felix is the head and shoulders above. We're big fast will my dislike button this week. So obviously flu season is upon us. And if you do have a fever and you use a smart thermometer. You may be targeted by companies who are paying for data coming from the smart thermometers unbelie. So there is a peace time. Yeah. Absolutely believable. There's a piece in the times about Kenza a San Francisco company. That's venture backed Kleiner Perkins backs it, and they they're they're thermometer hooks up with an app on your smartphone. So for parents. I'm sure it's great you can track. Your your kids fever and see how their symptoms are either getting worse or improving but companies like Clorox are buying a buying data. And they're they're focusing on data zip codes. So they can they can see. Who wear sickness where illnesses are breaking out in cities. And they buy that and target ads to. I think this is Tim cook referred to this week as the weaponization of data my like button this week relates to the political season that we're in. We're gonna political the it has it has long been observed that one of the evils of the American political system is the power of super PACS. And recently, a super was launched called myths are a good team committee superpac. And it turns out that it was a writer for sl. Who's who saw that? This was it was listed in a newsletter and politico we need to try to forget what who's behind mitts are a good team. And so he looked this guy up and said, can you talk? Can you talk at ten in the morning? He's he's a fifteen year old high school stone lives in a suburb of New York who just who wanted to demonstrate that anyone can launch a super Pac and did any money. I think he he doesn't know what to do with it. He. He had to cut the interview short to chemistry tests. But it's a it's a great piece on on dot com. Ca piece that's it for this week. I want to thank my colleagues John fine to you in the future. And we'll Jakko it. Thank you. Jim. If you like income censor, please go to apple podcasts and leave us one liter what you're thinking. And also a great way for new listeners. Divined can also said his feedback to uncensored at Inc dot com. Our producer US zone super package is Manila Morales. I'm James Ledbetter. Please join us next week. Thanks for listening.

Eddie John Oliver Amazon Julie Jim China United States Felix salmon New York San Francisco James Ledbetter FedEx Inc magazine Syracuse Syracuse China FedEx FedEx Rwanda Chicago
Hour 1 Mail In Ballots

Mark Simone

33:16 min | 1 year ago

Hour 1 Mail In Ballots

"Is I don't want to be stuck wearing my old outdated glasses because I want to wake up and just be able to see because enough is enough at the eye center. We've heard it all all the reasons why it's time for lasix over the past thirty years. The center is helped tens of thousands of people realize. The freedom. Lacy Bites now is the time for twenty percents off for a limited time with one of northern Virginia's leading surgeons plus get an additional eight hundred dollars off when you schedule within thirty days, register for your savings and schedule your free consultation. Now at the ice enter dot com, some restrictions apply. Simone on the Voice of New, York seven w part. Well we got all the latest for you up to speed on everything the latest with the lockdown with the virus with Biden with. president trump and you won't believe what's closing what shutting down in New York. What's not coming back with we'll get to all of that. Joe Biden was supposed to pick his vice presidential candidate over the weekend that's been delayed. Now, talking about the middle of August Joe Bartlett, we know what caused the delay what happened was all set I guess are not happy with the choices. So. They sit a big concern was it didn't want somebody would overshadow Biden so What are you going to get a mummy or some? Kind of overshadow I mean a a a a you almost biden wouldn't be the life of the Party in a coma ward who you'RE GONNA get. Anybody's got more. Shows the pickiest kind of problematic right now. Yeah the problem is You keep hearing Kamala Harris. That's Kamala. Harris. Pushing that she has been on a campaign. She's like Harvey Weinstein at Oscar time with this campaign to get the nomination campaigning. So when you keep hearing her name, that's her pushing that she's got a million strikes against her. For the nomination biggest one is head of the nominating commission is Chris Dodd remember old sleazeball Chris Dodd. He hates Kamala. Harris has done everything to keep her from getting it. Now, the other problem is she is not popular with Democrats. Democrats don't take to her remember the debates with the ten candidate. She was the first one to bomb out. You just never got any traction with Democratic voters in bombed-out I won two out of the race. other problem is she first debate you went after Biden calling him a racist going through his racist past as far as voting and all of that. So that video won't help. The other thing is not much of a personality depressing and moping mopey. So that doesn't help the only other thing you'd like out of the choice maybe they'll help you win a state, but she's from California they don't need any help in California so she doesn't offer any help far whereas winning a state and she's kind of outside and we gotta remember. This is a swamp campaign. This is Biden is a vegetable now I mean he should just have birds written on them. He is frozen gone. He is being run by a little committee of Puppet Masters Obama Hillary, Valerie Jarrett, a major donors they run this guy. So. That's the that's the other problem. Kamala Harris is not part of the inside little group. They're the swamp group running it, but Susan. Rice is even though she has no qualifications as a candidate. That's why you keep hearing her name. She would be the new Valerie. Jarrett's she's. Directly involved in the Kabul that's running Biden. So Hillary Obama Soros whoever whenever they get together my season, one of us just attached to him. Why why have to work through somebody? Well, we'll just put one of us as as the. If God forbid Biden River elected. the day after the election. He goes right into a nursing home they'll just. Send him upstairs to the residence at the White House and tell them to stay there. Remember when Tony Soprano took over the sporting goods place And the guy that actually owned up with come on eight. But what about you get your still come out that that's what they would do to buy. They would run the whole thing. They like what what's passes first name is Karen Bass Karen Karen Banks. Banks they really like her really like her in fact, a lot of the Washington inside Democratic People are pushing her. African the WHOA, the Black Congressional caucus they're pushing her like crazy. They don't like Kamala Harris. So they're pushing her the only like her they really Biden team really liked it. They were about to go with her. The problem is they've dug up this Cuba problem with her She's got a Pasi Kinda. Love affair with Cuba visiting Cuba when Castro died she wrote about the Great Castro who died she's now saying she's evolved she's learned. To fall since she found out two weeks ago she's in the lead there. That's when she evolved. What is it with these people and Castro and? And they've been there. You know if you've ever been to Cuba. It's awful. Everybody's living in poverty a supermarket you want cereal there's some white boxes that say cereal on it with black letters. That's it. There's no brands. There's no anything. This one series. Let's it. It's a horrible go in the hospital. Looks like. Let's say you're watching episode of Ben Casey from Nineteen Sixty it's the oldest equipment you've ever seen. So they love this Cuba she's got to undo that Tammy Duckworth was up there. I don't know why she does a couple of things. I don't like about her, but we'll see it's gonNA. Be It's GonNa be a while. There's already been a delay. So we'll see what happens president trump. If you talk to the swamp, the people that live in the bubble who are totally out of out of touch with America gets hopeless. He's lost Biden's Wayne League and they don't know they. They read all these fake polls and they don't know they did they actually believe all these fake polls by the way. Later in the second hour, we'll have the greatest pollster on earth the real deal we'll have him break down and dissect those fake polls how they're rigged what the real numbers are. We'll go through that later in the show. So the the the convinced themselves if you if you talk to these people, they're all. That's lost. Is there no hope no hope and they do this other routine why does anywhere mask if wore a mask if he would just wear a mask why does he wear a mask? There are six thousand pictures of president trump wearing a mask. He's worn a mask every time it was appropriate to where mask if you had a contest between who wore a mask most trump Cuomo trump wins in a landslide cuomo never wears a mask check out my twitter from a few days ago. You'll see pictures of Cuomo mingling with people hugging people talking to people with no mask on he's not wearing a mask foul she doesn't wear a mask the second. He rips that mask right off. We've got video of it up on the web page you can see him doing so. There's this stupid mask myth. None of these reporters where Massino you watch the briefing Jim Acosta Jonathan Karl. That's the question. What will they can't even hear him through the mask. The second, the chemical stuff, they can't rip those masks off fast enough in the White House secretly. Making video of them, ripping the mask off when the camera goes off. Hey, Joe Bartlett would we all agree the mass work that that's the answer to wear the masks? Is that what they're telling you? It's Okay. Then why did they have to let all the prisoners out when just where masks in prison? If they work. Well I guess because they would be living in close proximity to each other well, not really they're all in separate cells you WanNa enforcing distancing the supermarket a little circle you're supposed to stand on nobody rolls it any way you know they're oppressed people just let them go don't torture many more mark I know but nobody standing there circle to sell its absolute social distancing. If you'd think those masks work, let's try it in the prison. That's the test. Let's do it in the prison. You can't open the schools, try the masks if it they're so effective, you could open the schools at the master I yet one summer she that summer camp that opened. And they had the counselors wear masks. But not the six thousand campers what was the point of that but? It didn't make any sense of they had to close in two weeks. Baseball same thing. They don't really wear masks Tell Baseball Player a twenty two year old suddenly making millions not to parties not to hang out with the million women in the hotel lobby and see how that works doesn't work over the weekend a number of things were broken. But told you last week they broke up an orgy they found an orgy gone. And they told them you're supposed to be twenty, five percent capacity in your orgy that they. Broke it up a rave took place this weekend where was that under the Brooklyn? Bridge. caskey's no casual bridge I. Hundreds of people hundreds of massive rape but he did what we've been telling you to do. They started it as a black lives matter protests. So the police did nothing they just showed up with some black lives matters shirts and signs police. Let it go do whatever you want have well, they turned it into a huge dance party and then it was too late to stop. This isn't it yeah and that's used pretty smart. They're the storm is supposed to come late tonight. Tomorrow's supposed to be the bad day. Now have we decided what the name of this storm is? Isa I US I'm not saying Isa I what the hell are you talking now there's a famous designer is I A and I noticed everybody it's a similar spelling everybody was calling this storm is. Now what what is it called? I as-. Isa I us who the Hell's GonNa say that Isa. The. For sure. We'll call it the storm. The storm is coming into more. and you said, they really worried in lower Manhattan if sandbags going up and barriers and everything. Yeah Now if this were any other year. We'd be frightened. We'd be worried member with Hurricane Sandy always. So frightened the storm is now nothing bothers us. This is nothing we've been through this year somewhat. Maybe it'll cool things down a little That's tomorrow. It should be over by early Wednesday morning. So it's just should be one bad day. You kind of escape it down there. Right? You're not in the eye of it. Well, we're not in the I'm just getting you know south. Carolina. This portion is just getting brushed with the outer edge of it, but it's GonNa bend it takes a turn and it's going to go inward toward North Carolina and then go up straight up the I ninety five corridor too you guys. Yeah now it it could take a turn right? today could turn little nothing so bad. No hoping hope. Hopefully tomorrow. Okay. So it's just a lot of rain and wind tomorrow but it won't be that bad. So Hey, there's a book about Barack. Obama this had come out before, but he apparently is come out with another book. His half-brother wrote a book about what a cold ruthless awful guy. He is about a dysfunctional this is sound familiar. Did. We just see a book like this about Donald Trump from cousin he never met. Yes. On the weekend show I didn't see him. Yeah this woman, this half cousin of trump or whatever. She is a niece and niece that he never met. Wrote this book front page of The New York Times front page of The Washington Post. Massive coverage from tire our with Rachel matter. Same exact books in the same exact things about Barack Obama by his half-brother Guy couldn't get a publisher had self publish it. You think he's getting any coverage anywhere near term going to story about this book talk about a double standard. It's unbelievable. So Oh, here's things you're not allowed to say. We're getting very politically correct. Remember told you the real estate agents have been instructed. Now they're not allowed to say master bathroom them. You can't say master bedroom you have to call it the main bedroom. And can't say master bathroom. It's the main bathroom and you can't say his and her sinks you have to say dual syncs. Up in the fancy private schools, they know call it the principle that call guy the headmaster. like Yours Brunswick School, in Connecticut, the headmaster not allowed the column that anymore they have to come up with a new name. So pretty soon, you're not going to be what the Masters Golf Tournament you're going to be able to call it that anymore we got call that yeah. I don't know I don that Augusta Georgia place. I mean it looks like plantation that course that clubhouse you're to have to. You'RE GONNA have to do something about that. So a lot of changes coming Restaurants are closing. It was an estimated that thirty percent of the restaurants wouldn't make it and wouldn't come back. Then they moved up to forty percents in talking about between forty and fifty percent of the restaurants will not come back a lot of places. Pietro's on the east side that was the old timers love that place. Where the state has been there thousand years looks like that's coming back burner Dan with many considered to be the actual finest restaurant in New York. City has closed its the they're not coming back. For building like they've auctioned off the off the contents of the restaurant they're not coming back now now that place made a fortune a fortune, so it may be they just don't want to go through this and they're just going to give up the Bryant Park Hotel is closed. They're not gonNA come back they'll convert it to an office building You know there's a lot of places that are just you know. Venues for events event spaces like the new one, the ZIG field theater opened in Gotham Hall. You've been all these places these different. ballrooms where they throw these big events. The only income, they have these major events, weddings, parties, charity gala this. So this is all been off. They haven't made any money all year and don't forget the hotels. All the major hotels that have these big ballrooms, major source of their income weddings and constant events in this charity Gallison. Fundraisers and also they've lost off fortunate. Don't know what to do Private clubs. You know like the University Club the Harvard Club New York Athletic. All. Major sources you seventy five percent of their revenues from weddings and parties and events. That's all closed down and then big article about it in the Paper Day Arthur call. I know this is a great guy. He's the one of the top event planners you hire him he gets you the all the ballroom people hire them every which way here's a guy. He says, we haven't done anything in months trying to bring it back, but it's not the same with you know used to be five hundred people in the ballroom. Now it's twenty people with masks it's. It's it's not a lot of fun. It's I mean if it's the met costume Gal, you could wear a mask, but this is just ridiculous. Hey, check out the webpage. Did you see how he's testimony on Friday? If, you don't think this FAO is a double talking worm watch this you know he's talking about. Events and you can't have gatherings you can't have parties you can't have weddings you can't have any event you can't have any gatherings can't have more than two people you can't. So Jim Jordan what about the protests would you agree that causes of the Spread Watch fallacy try to double talk his way out. He will not say that A. Thousand people crammed together for protests. He won't say that that could spread the virus will watch Jordan trying to pin voucher doubt if you never realize what a politician this guy is when double talking warming Guy Watch this testimony hey, donald trump did throw out the first pitch of baseball game once. What's the video? It's pretty impressive I've never this is probably the best first pitch ever first of all, he lands in his copter in Centerfield. Right. The Middle Game Lands the helicopter in Centerfield runs out of the helicopter throws the first pitch strike right across the plate. Then back to the helicopter and gone it can you do anything more impressive than that? That's pretty cool. Beats vouches first pitcher, but but watch the video on the webpage they also what happens when the shark shows up at the beach? What's this video where the shark shows up right on the beach? What's these people half of them run half of them run to get their phone and video. It's very funny. It's all up on the web page go to seven and W. O. R. Dot Com Slash Mark Seven, ten, W. O. R. dot com slash Mark Mark Simone Show Mr New York seven ten, W. O. R.. They will take some calls eight hundred three to one, zero, seven, ten, number eight, hundred, three to one, zero, seven, ten, the big storms coming what about the governor Mr preparedness government should be preparing. It's Monday night. Tuesday primarily supposed to be off over by Wednesday morning. Joe Bartlett, did he have a stroke or something went two weeks ago? What's going on? When he's talking to slowly. Started two weeks ago remember the briefing out. So then I had meatballs and then my daughter said. Now when you talk to them it's Monday. Is he trying to become The Joe Biden, vp by talking like him. Well remember they said they looking for a vice president won't overshadow by maybe that's why he's talking even slower than Biden. Can you come up with any? Other explanation though. I mean, here's a storm. You want somebody top of things emergency preparedness. Don't. Want a slow talk we have to do a better job and remote learning. Oh now he's speeds up and it can't just be. Yes. We understand we have to do remote learning. There were many inequities in remote learning. I think he's afraid to talk on the phone. You know some person he talks really fast when he gets in the phone I think he just doesn't You know maybe take Paulie and Goodfellas never talk on the phone if you don't have to never say anything on the phone. So. Oh now he's talking about the schools. Mayor de Blasio is ready to reopen the schools they explain them he doesn't have the authority. It's the state decision because the school district says we're open. Does not mean students are going to go. Okay. What does that mean? You have a choice now because if I had a choice I wouldn't have gone ever. Doesn't mean you don't have to go. But you would have to go online, right? Yeah. You'd have to do it remote. Yes correct. Yes. Okay. So you'd have to show up in some form and actually do it anyway let's take a call or two. Let's go to Donna in New Jersey Donna how you doing? Hi. How you doing. So meanwhile, in New York City. There's record numbers of shooting. Okay. But what does governor Gargoyles face focused on? He puts out a list of all the restaurants that he gave violations kill. He is such a ridiculous character right now, shootings all over the place doesn't say a word, but he's got agents law enforcement all over new. York shutting down Nello people had a drink together Now, if you ask them what about the crimewave it's out of control what about them record number shootings? He'll say, well, it's not me it's new. York, it's not me well, then why are you all over the place arresting bars and it's a very good point. He is the worst right now this crimewave is his responsibility to Blasi. We didn't blame the BLASIO. He's brain dead. He doesn't know where he is he's lost in a cloud of whatever the hell that is he's on But CUOMO, this is him. This crimewave is he owns this. Let's go to Kevin in Connecticut Kevin. Good Morning Mark how're you doing? Good. So I just heard you talking about the greatest first pitch of all time and trump's is awesome. I think George W Bush Post Nine Eleven Yankee Stadium. Bulletproof vest under his jacket. The whole world watching that might be number one. Well, that's true. That's true. That's a good point. Yes. You can watch that online that was an amazing first pitch in the pressure and the emotion and the stress was on because it was days after nine eleven remember If you were watching that game, you were terrified something's going to happen there some terrorist attack or something and apparently they got in a Yankee Stadium area inside where. Pitcher can warm up and throw pitches and Bush was practicing like crazy before he went out there. Let's go to. Vincent. In Brooklyn Vincent how you doing. Come Up Rock Good Morning God Democrats always making a big deal whenever state legislators talk about voters. Have An. Requiring voters to show photo ID cards either a driver's license, a passport or a government issued voter ID card mop most people don't know all the people do if you go into a hospital for any elective procedure, you have to show positive day when I was admitted into the hospital last month for surgery before they even accepted me I had to show positive ID and of course, your insurance card that doesn't apply if you're an illegal alien, you could just show one of those phony Baloney New York City voter. Cards which voter ID's those I photo identification. They give which one day I W up and called the free one one and I asked about the requirements. You could present any thing that I'm they don't check to see if you were in jail or anything like that. But you have to show positive ide- in order to be admitted to the hospital. Now, most Democrats are saying Oh, that's unfair because people can't afford the the ID card most motor-vehicle agencies, they'll present you. Twenty dollars the you could get an ID from the motor. Vehicle Bureau for down twenty dollars and to states that do require. Id. If you're on welfare, they'll pick up the dime for you biggest. So and Michael Goodwin says voter fraud is rampant and only the United States. That's a good point. Thanks for calling Vincent H Bartlett. Hospital with You gotTa have some kind of idea. So. I don't know well, Michael Goodwin speak of the devil. He's written a great column. It's in yesterday's post about this voter ID stuff democrats are into Nihil if they think it's not a big fraud situation we'll talk to Michael Goodwin next on seven ten W. O. R.. Let's get the latest news here's Joe Barton. Mark Simone in your day, get his podcast on demand at seven ten W. O. R., DOT com slash mark. Mark Simone on the voice of new. York. Seven ten W are. Well, Michael Goodwin the best columnist in America proved it again yesterday you can read them every Sunday every Wednesday in the New York Post Pulitzer Prize winner with us. Every Monday Michael Goodwin how you doing good Morning Mark Thank you. Hey. I know that they've all started this There's nothing wrong with male in votes in when you watch the TV news, the president trump said with no evidence that there could be tampering. Jimmy Carter Study said that it doesn't work the former DNC chairman, Debbie Wasserman Schultz said it's dangerous and you wrote the best column yesterday and do Liberals Think they can just deny this claim. Well they're they're. It's odd mark because on one hand their knowledge in the problems in New York where now tomorrow we'll be six weeks since the primaries in two races are still are called. Imagine that happening to the presidency or Congress But at the same time, they want to say that the president's accusations sat will be a disaster are unfounded. Now I don't know I think what we're seeing unfold in front of us is the evidence that if applied to the national scale would be a it would be a miracle if it we're not a disaster imagine the the post office and the election boards right? I mean, those those two agencies. Right there I mean you combine them together maybe you get the DMV? That's how efficient they are They're gonNA mail out a hundred, seventy million ballots and and there's not going to be a problem I mean how can anyone possibly think that's true and so then you talk about well, what would be the problems and you go through the list there are scores of things that can go wrong including audubon are their ballots mailed just one per customer are are the people registered Did they mail it before Election Day or two weeks later appears to have been some of the cases in New York I mean. The. Possibilities are practically endless where this could go off the track and for for people to say, Oh, no, no, it's nothing. How can it be six weeks later We still don't know who won these congressional seats and when when ballots are invalidated. By a judge or an election officials and upheld by judges I in this in the Kyla Maloney Patel race there are more than twelve thousand ballots I've been invalidated. Now that's far larger than the margin of difference between the candidates. So how can you say it doesn't matter you have a judge or election aboard officials deciding to throw out ballots and so then We'll come the plea and it's already being made in this case well, count all the ballots. No matter what wave they'll rules wave their requirements, wave the dates, count everybody. That's the pressure you'll get but that's not fair. That's not what the law says. That's not one man one vote one person one vote it's something entirely different. So I think we are endanger this fall. Of of having all of our elections called into question as to whether they were accurate and honest and I don't think that's good for the country. No matter who wins if you have doubts about the winner that are that are based on judges making all these decisions, I mean. Bush versus Gore was we hoped a one time event where the courts had to step in and make the final call this would be routine if we're GONNA do Universal Mail in ballots. I don't understand what's going on with Carolyn Maloney because that's the democratic machine in tight control of those votes they're being counted at the Queens borough hall by them. Those guys don't usually really count. They pick who they want. I, would they just pick whoever they want and claim the. Well I think I think the issue is that the number of mail in ballots was so large normally. Ballots, you know make up single digit percentage of of the race. But here you had something on the order I think of sixty, five, thousand or seventy thousand absentee ballots returned for this one race overall, there was something like four hundred, thousand absentee ballots returned in the city alone for all the different races as an awful lot of hand counting to do, and then you've also got to make sure that the same person a was registered B didn't vote in person and that they met all the requirements that the ballot was legal that the ballot was received in time. But of course, the post office doesn't postmark everything. So there were so many possibilities here and There probably weren't enough people and the board of elections are saying, Oh, it's coded well, Cova discussion there in the fall. That's the whole reason for talking about this. So it does not give me any confidence that that the way things are going there you're going to be able to rely on the races being called correctly let's say twelve thousand ballots in a race where the in-person difference was something like seven hundred votes Now twelve thousand have been invalidated an enormous number of votes that are thrown out. We only have a minute left Let me just switch subjects governor. CUOMO likes to look like he's the greatest leader in America has populations in New York, there's a crime wave that's out of control with half his population terrified. He never says a word about the does he really think that he's not going to be held responsible for this at some point Interesting to mark that over the weekend, he called for more police enforcement of social. At bars and yeah, I mean that's what he wants to police to do. He doesn't want them apparently to make arrests for murder and things like that. He wants to hang around bars and with with a tape measure and say, now you're gonNA stand over there. You understand that's not what the police are for. Right maybe thrive New York, maybe sure Lane's program for. And a half, maybe they can do something useful. Yeah. But this is insane. I mean, look every time the government makes a rule it has to be enforced. I mean that's the great genius of hijack, Friedrich Hayek of the road to serfdom essentially what he says is. The government tells you you can't. You can't paint your house pink and most people will say, okay, I won't pay my house but somebody will want to paint their house pink and then what but I'm going to pay my house paying no one or two. I. Mean she suggests all these schemes end up the same way men with guns come to your house and that's what happens the more rules. The government makes the more enforcement. There has to be the more onerous penalties the more. Unequal Prosecution there is So now we're down to having the police in four six foot rules in bars I mean, does that make any sense in given given the serious crimes that are being? Left left go on. Oh Yeah well, if you want to read the Michael Goodwin's comets the best on the subject of these mail in ballots in yesterday's New York Post we'd just go online and you get it at any time and read them every Sunday and every Wednesday Michael Goodwin, thanks for being with us. It's a pleasure mark. Thank you. Take Care Hey if you WANNA watch if you weren't convinced that Dr, doughty is a double talking worming politician. Watch him on Friday get caught. You know he's talking about social distancing can't have events can have parties can't, and then Jim Jordan estimate. Wise. Aren't the protests spreading the virus watch found. She just try to double talk his way out of the answer he won't. Won't give them a straight answer. It's it's if it's the real FAO chief at his best it's up on the web page. Also, let's see the best first pitch ever thrown out and watch donald trump at one time. He did throw a first pitch. Pretty Amazing. Take a look at it. Also, what happens when you see a shark on the Beach Watch this video how people react it's all the web page go to seven, ten, W. O. R. Dot Com Slash Mark Seven, ten, W., O., R. Dot, com, slash mark. Because I don't want to be stuck wearing my old outdated glasses because I want to wake up and just be able to see because enough is enough at the eye center. We've heard it all all the reasons why it's time for lacy over the past thirty years. The eye center has helped tens of thousands of people realize the Freedom Lacey. Now, is the time for lacy with twenty percent off for a limited time with one of northern Virginia's leading searches plus get an additional eight hundred dollars off when you schedule within thirty days, register for your savings and schedule your free consultation. Now at the eye center dot, com some restrictions apply.

Joe Biden New York City Donald Trump Mark Simone Michael Goodwin Kamala Harris cuomo president Joe Bartlett America Baseball Barack lacy White House Valerie Jarrett Virginia trump Jim Jordan George W Bush
Hour 3: 11/13/19

The Paul Finebaum Show

38:02 min | 1 year ago

Hour 3: 11/13/19

"The Paul Finebaum show podcast is presented by capital one. Where you can open up a savings account in about five minutes in earn five times the national average this is banking banking reimagined? What's in your Wallet Capital One? NA member FDIC cried packing then pattern tree of college football football leaves the Paul Finebaum show our three podcast. We look back a couple of hours to go on the program and looking forward to visiting with you. Eight five five remember the number here. Eight five five three. What is the number to four to seven to eight five things do happen MARQUEES is up next in Tennessee. Hello marquees going. We're doing great. Thank you good good. How is calling from Birmingham? I would never. What's your plate of Jessica State? But what I was calling about And what's front. It calls a Mac Those first time I've ever had the chase here Interviewer speak And what I wanted to be picking on is the fact that college football I think in my opinion towards that world pay players coach and I feel feel that Matt Room. Is this one today. Listen to them as fast and Maybe the potential of You know him coming. It's just a loose go to Coaching maybe some time in the future after saving retired but I definitely thoroughly enjoyed the interview with him You know his reports from the fact that you got social media and I'll these players access to all this stuff player playoff rankings and And the fact that you can't hide you just have to face the fact that issue of nineteen and Just say ignore work You've got US face it versus saying back and just focus on the next game. What's your opinion on basketball? Yeah well listen MARQUEES I. I don't know match Karol very well met him a couple of times but I came away today as impressed with him as any coach. I've ever spoken to. I mean He. He was that Brilliant in his presentation and in his message thank you very much for the call appreciate it. Joey is up next in Mississippi. Joey Paul thanks for taking my call. Thank you listen. I'm an Alabama Fan. But but I won't the couple of points in Alabama Fan is something I've noticed you know because Alabama doesn't lose that often whenever they do lose a game they're ready to Right off the dynasty. I wanted to point out a couple of things that I've noticed this year. And then I'll get off Number One when people talk about Alabama they tend to talk about the championships. We've had Winning five in the last decade which is obviously very impressive. But one thing they they don't talk enough about is the fact that Alabama's one eighty seven straight games against unranked opponents. Dating back to two thousand seven. And if you think about that Paul as you comparing all the teams across the country the Clemson's the The Notre Dame's the Oklahoma. Whoever look at almost every one of them lose to an UNRANKED team Clemson had lost an unranked team every year until last year? And then this year they turned around and we're two point conversion from losing again. That's one point. I wanted to make that. When people in Alabama you gotta think about consistency? I mean twelve years without a loss against right game. That's unreal the second thing is the by against Alabama. I won't point one thing out and then I'll get off the golf When Florida play South Carolina this year and at the end of the game scored that touchdown pick play that was discussed for two weeks on every media? Show showing the block illegal boy did the exact same play against Alabama and a national championship game scored with one second left and no one set of fun. Well I was just SORTA surprised about that. Anyway I'll I'll hear what you got. Thank you very much. Hank is calling next In Georgia Hello Hank. Hey Paul Love your show. I think it's probably the most entertaining show around and also very insightful so we really like you. Thank you so thank you very much And always always pick my when I pick my kids. We've always got the show. And they love it. They want to say hey cat well thank you can thank your and and just one thing you know I I get so fired up living here in Georgia and listening to some clowns announced calling the show is particularly Darryl Who who loves to talk about? What love is he? A pit of misers of Georgia Fan because he mentioned Herschel Walker in nineteen eighty Nearly forty years ago that That Georgia won the last time. I mean we you know let. Let's talk about really winning. Titles Nineteen Eighty I was three years old so I was pretty good year for me but You know he wants to talk about recruiting these kind of things If there would look two four seven two thousand nineteen he he might want to see. WHO's number one? That's Alabama and three of. Those guys are starting running on the defense because Alabama lost about all the players. They had on defense so The the bad news for Darryl is that his recruits that. Take Komo the line Go Play quarterback at Ohio state and And Alabama's start on defense the next year so It'd be nice if you know a Ah guy wants told me. Don't let facts get in the way of a good story and I think there'll subscribes to that so we love your show Thanks so much and roll old. Todd thank you very very much. Mike is in Georgia's well. Hey Mike taking my call I want to ask you about that was his chase. Young Situation I guess if I'm reading it right. He's got a two game suspension now for the AA for taking that money and Planning Glenn his girlfriend to the ball game you know. Obviously it's not GonNa hurt Ohio state because you know one game was Maryland and the next one is going to be rutgers uptake so it's not gonna earn them but it could. It could hurt them badly and to me. I don't know I just want your opinion. If I'm reading. What he did was actually what he did? It just seems like the NC Double A.. I mean it just losing control. I mean anywhere from you know I mean this is stupid. They're penalized and again my money. Think think about this. You're right he is if you want a chisel this down. He's being penalized because he's poor and if he had add money he could have done it on his own. The other the other part of that is this James. Wiseman situation at Memphis The coach Rise Abboud Sir ask you about that. gave the family eleven thousand dollars to move and they it shows you a little respect the NC double A.. Whereas I mean they they ruled they they they ruled him ineligible he went and got a court order? He's playing right now and and the sentiment seems to be with him well twelve settlement his with it and I mean you know going back to the chase young thing I mean You know it's not hurting them because of the two teams playing but like if you go. The Todd Gurley situation was suspended when we had to play the gators. And when George Jonah the gators yeah talked to a couple of weeks ago and he said he knew what what he was doing. But you know the most amazing thing is the will wait situation last year at Lsu basically you know you you basically dare the NCWA to come after you and the NCW. So an apt have so little quality manpower at most of the time. They're unable unable to do it. Well that's what it looks like. But they just don't have Kim touch some way. I mean they're not they're not going to because it's to the point now where I mean. They they care about making money but they're losing every every important battle. Oh and enforcement I used to be. I got my start as an investigative reporter. I really cared about stuff like this. I really cared that if there was integrity in college athletics you know what might there isn't any integrity and I I mean I I know that may be an affront to my friends who are commissioners and athletic directors. But nobody believes that it's You said that you know basketball's accessible and what is well you know. Football is not great but I talked to coaches all the time and I was talking to somebody the other night about a situation and he said basically. There's so much cheating going on even in football that it's hard to navigate and and it's it's difficult to be honest. I think I think most of the programs that we're familiar with are above aboard but it's like everything else even in business you you almost have to take it to the Ed's to be successful just like the Houston astras. Yeah and then when somebody gets caught cheating cheating we all go. Oh my goodness I mean this is a travesty right. I don't know how much time have you got. You usually allow one of the small little CIDER Jordan Hake may be upset. Because you know I know Darryl mentioned Herschel from forty years ago well I wanted to mention the George Player from actually the early fifties and he'd just passed away with Zeke Bratkowski You know that yeah. He has passed away he was I think eight years old something like that just I order and he was the backup for well. People like Like Chicago appreciate it. You know he was the backup For Bart Bay packers. I met Zeke a couple of times When I've been around Bart Well I? I really didn't know anything about him. I was too young. I'm the same age but you know I was looked at up today. And he's he completed the eight most number of passes at Georgia the quarterback so so the guy had a pretty story career back at a time. When you didn't throw the ball that much? I appreciate you telling me that I did not know that. But I'm sorry. Sorry here off Mike. Thank you tough year. Bar passed away a couple of months ago. And and now Zeke. We are going to take a break. We've had a really good show. I hope your car our interview earlier with Matt Rule. We're coming right back to listening to the Paul Finebaum show podcast. We're trying to get you ready for the game this weekend Georgia yesterday. We had a patent on and now we have our next guest on a couple of weeks a couple of months ago when he won the Honda Classic of the One and only Kevin Mitchell joining us. Right now Kevin good afternoon. Hey Paul I pat and told me to call you. Kevin K- Keith. Yes I do remember the story great to have you on. We had you on right after you won the tournament. And I I think I remember. Was it the the the announcer the headline in the paper. The next day called. How'd you Kevin instead of Keith? It started it's actually happened a couple of times. They called him Kevin when I was walking up. Eighteenth Green on Saturday the the headlights that day. So I I don't think they had a pet week. You've got a name now Keith. And we're delighted to have you on on and I know you got a lot going on with the with the with the tour already underway but We know how big a dog fan you are. And and I'm sure you have been keeping up with the up to down Try travels and trials and tribulations of the dogs this year. What do you think it's? It's funny because I've been nervous about some games that we've we've really been strong on then a game like South Carolina where I was traveling all day to Asia for the next tournament and I completely didn't care about the game barely and then we lost so it's been it's been quite a year to say the least when I mean right now I'm trying to try to figure out The PGA tour it starts in the fall wouldn't is determined overseas are in different places. Well we have three Asia right here. We have one in Mexico. Oh and there's I think there's about eight or nine events in the fall so half in the fall or overseas and then We kick back up and actually uh-huh of next week and so it's just a way to kind of expand expand our our reach. I guess you would say on tour. I get worn out flying to Atlanta. What's it like find Asia? I mean I remember what the buddy this week. And he's still jet lagged. He's he's any comeback ten days ago. It's it's a mess and it's not like you just traveling with an overnight bag either I you know I mean I swear you could fit to humans golf travel bag after I use it With all of our all of our stuff clubs and and rain gear shoes and balls. It's it's it's it's literally like dragging human airport. Listen you've done well. I mean you had a very successful career but winning that tournament. I think that's a Honda. How did how did that change things if they did it? All I mean obviously it makes it a lot easier to have a win under your belt but it but it has to change at all. I'm guessing change pretty much everything about what you do well gives you some more freedom the PGA tour it. It locks you up the ranger of that year the next year and the year after and in golf it's it's a sport that there's no guaranteed contracts. There's no guaranteed pay years that you're going to be until you start winning so our sports very different. We show up to work and we might not get paid that week. We play that and then you know we might have a great week like I did the Honda and and you make the biggest check. You made your life so I think what makes it so different than every other sport is we play week to week for our job instead of You know having an extended period of time that you with a team with an organization. I think that's what people don't understand. It's not like you're on the the Atlanta Falcons where you're still going to get paid and of course you win a term like that It makes it a lot easier. I always loved to ask our friends on the tour about their consumption of college football on the weekends. I'm sure as you mentioned in Asia not the easiest thing to do although the world is pretty Pretty small nowadays as with technology. What's a what's a normal Saturday like for you when you are playing on the tour? It's you know depends ends on your teatime. It would depend on football. You get to watch and it's kind of it's kind of good because if you're not playing great. Ut off early and you get to watch a lot of football so you get that buttressed. There's but if you are playing well and you're in one of the later groups you're happy about that and but you don't get to watch as much football 'cause you might see off at one or two o'clock it'd be finished at six or seven so I mean it's it's kind of a win win for us in the fall but I mean the I remember when I was in out flying to Korea and got off the airplane in Seoul and looked at my phone and I couldn't you couldn't stream. ESPN and Korea. So I couldn't watch the Georgia game. So we're having to refresh the game. CAST in the baggage exclaiming soul watching the Blue South Carolina Yeah I I guess I guess. Cursing sounds the same in English and Korean doesn't it. I'm not really sure I was. I was even at that time in the morning. Alice still all fired up. I think I was talking to a snacker snacker. This year. We're in Nashville. He admitted now again. Vanderbilt fans are different but I think he admitted keeping up with the Games while he was playing on Saturday. Oh definitely I mean I. It's it's there's been times where I've pulled out my cell phone on a weight or tee box or you know you're you and your there's a backup groups on a couple of holes I mean there's it's definitely I can. I can say I've done that before and I want to explain to people in I. I used to play golf. Not really much of a player anymore but golf is a game of concentration. Golf's a game that you're not really supposed to be texting being in and checking the ESPN APP and everything else. I mean you really go. Yeah that's a clown like me playing for a professional. I mean you you. You're not. You're not just idly walking up to the whole you're checking a million different things aren't you. Well I it's you know it's kind kind of a double edged sword whereas if you try too hard you end up going backwards but if you kind of stay relaxed and you can keep your head clear. It's easier to focus on what you're supposed to focus on so I mean there's been times where where I've played well and you know you're in contention and you're just thinking well and it's a little bit easier to to stay focused on what you're doing but if you're having a bad hole you're kind of getting in a funk out there sometimes it hits it's nice to just Kinda take a breather and I mean I I mean I'm casinos on live on your live air that we've looked at our phones. I don't want to say that everyone does that. I want to say I do it. Maybe once or twice a year towards a big game but It's definitely you know that's why we have your caddy out there. Talk About Football It's even fun play with patent and and then you know talking about the Georgia Auburn. I early coming up this weekend. So it's it's we definitely look like we're pretty starting out there but there's plenty of times. We're having a good time talking to Keith Mitchell. So the a game on Saturday I mean we all know how important this game is coming three weeks after the Florida game. I mean Georgia is isn isn't a good spot as as long as long as they win this game but So let's let's get your football acumen at work here Give us give us a preview of what you think's going to happen Saturday. Well if all of our guys that got hurt and the last game are one hundred percent healthy. I mean I'm not I'm saying just playing the game. I mean. One hundred percent healthy because cages are probably our best wide receiver. I mean George chickens is good By cages just made some better place and then our offense is offensive line. I mean Auburn's you got one of the best defensive lines in the country so we were No Okay I think we lost you believe. He's in Mexico City so anyway he was doing anything amazing analysis of the game. That's what anyway we'll catch up with him when he's not over in another country three in a different part of the world. We're taking a break still plenty of time for you to get in right here on the program. You were listening to the Paul Finebaum show podcast. podcast welcome back glide your hero. It's continued more calls and by the way. Let me share this We were talking. I'm at To earlier got some information. You never really know Vegas nose or you know what Vegas knows right now. The the game open and in Vegas Alabama was twenty one point favorite at the offshore in a West Gay right now the the line has dropped to seventeen and and a half. I wonder why let's check out John in Memphis. Hello John Hello Paul. Thanks for taking McCall Quick question comment question question. Is it not true that Matt Jones is graduating in December philly left. I think that is true. Well he needs to get his fax rabies where he says Mac Jones at the answer. These sports writers trying to bury Alabama just to get a headline. This is really stupid and The other question is what do you think we're gonNA see more of to his brother and Stevens in in the next few trash games no are you considering Mississippi State attrash game. Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah okay. Well I hate that. You're saying that because Mississippi state's got a really good program. That's funny running Let's talk to stone who is in Texas high stone doing all we're doing. Well thank you very much. I I just wanted to first start off by saying I really like show I appreciate you having me on. Thank you so I was wondering your opinion. 'cause I kinda have an opinion union because By the way I think it's unfair. How the like I'm a big LSU fan so? I don't have anything to grab that right now but I just think it's unfair about how the playoffs they're Kinda you you know formed and like you know a fourteen playoff I mean how do you do you think they should go to eighteen playoffs or are how do you think they should do. You know So I I do think in eighteen playoff would be more compelling I. I like where we are better than where we were but I didn't like the way the BCS. I was handled. But I mean but but I also I also know. We're not going to at eighteen playoff in the next four or five years. So I I I try not to spend much time on it knowing that the powers that be are very stubborn. Thank you for the call. Really Nice if you'd be with US TRAE is up next. Hey I'm buying. How are you today I am doing well? Hey great question before and I like to give a reason why I don't think we should go to eighteen and then I got a very interesting question for you about two and Jalen If we went to eight teams how how. How big of a game is that Alabama Lsu game and just to even play in that game in the team gets behind by twenty? Do they fight that hard to get back knowing and that they're probably still going to be in the playoffs. If they lose that game we go eighteen. I don't WANNA lose the quality of competition and play in college sports. That's my concerned with that. But let's say Alabama Oklahoma. Don't get into the play offs. We're looking at a sugar bowl. Matchup does Jalen and to apply or they decide I had to sit out because of upcoming NFL perspective. And I listen to you. That's a great question. I can't answer for Jalen. They win because Jalen they have some more approve than to of it. I would have a hard time. Believing tool would play in that game. I know he can dispute it if he wants. But I'm I'm not overly excited by that sugar bowl. Unfortunately when Alabama doesn't go to a national playoff they tend not to play. Well Georgia didn't last year Auburn. Didn't a couple of years ago. Thanks for the call. Do appreciate it cat. Daddy is next. I did not hear from Cat Daddy. We'll try. We'll try rick in myrtle beach. Rick Rick Good afternoon to you Paul. Paul longtime listener I I want to say I really Miss Tammy's calls. I was watching the day she passed. And you know up tears to my eyes and you work your show long enough to Kinda turns into family. Thank you very much. Two three tonight call was. I was watching the playoffs show last night. And I'm GonNa Georgia bulldogs. My blood runs red. And you were talking about Alabama should be ahead of Georgia coast to was playing unhurt versus South Carolina off. But I wanted to remind you how many guys we had her for that. South Carolina Gang true had wide receiver carries Jackson Jackson. CAGER got hurt. We had the same without him. Harry in Vail Toxin Campbell defense backwards out trayvon Walker to fifty van. The end and Jordan Davis Defensive Lineman was outset you my opinion Six starters out carries a little more weight than to with a twisted Michael. WELL THAT'S A. That is a fair comment. Thank you Paul. Keep up work great to hear from you Steve is in Georgia. Hey Steve Good Effingham Paul how you doing. I'm I'm sorry. I mean Galway Paul. That's correct Jack. Thank you for a for knowledge that yeah. I remember the girl I x. l. comment on the same guy who just call. I want to ask you though if Georgia Georges Loses about three point. Drubbing wing back three points to Auburn and Alabama beat them and Ambro by pretty supports the does Alabama love Georgia out in the top. Oh well I if you say Georgia and Georgia wins again. Then they Then they move on and play play. LSU In the SEC game. So I think it's more determining on what happens there. Whatever I'll say Georgia's still be but they'll be over only about three reports? Okay you only makes you let me make sure I understand you correctly Georgia Alabama both beat Auburn and Georgia Beats Lsu. Is that what you're suggesting within Georgia would go to the playoffs. So what happened to ask you Alabama and LSU would go to Alabama would be out in my in my opinion. Do you think that this school speedy. That next year that they're going to get sixteen eighteen called. There's no no listen people what people listen understand this. The playoff is not expanding anytime soon. That has been made clear. It really doesn't matter what happens this year. we're not. We're not expanding the play. They're not expanding the playoff next year. It's still four five years away before they're going to look again they say. Wow Paul I do yes I do I certainly do. I think the more teams that you have of in contention the more exciting. The college football season will be listen. It's really exciting right now. But that's only in the last two weeks and I think college football. Aw now has missed out. On the first ten weeks of the season it was. It's not compelling I know that sounds pretty crazy for someone who talks about it every day but I thought it was talking to my Greenberg this morning and we were fascinated by what's going on here but he said you know what as somebody who lives in New York ORC. I didn't find the first ten weeks very interesting and college. Football has to become more than just a regional sport and by opening putting the playoff up to four more schools. Yeah some games might not be quite as important but a lot but a lot. More Games will be from from coast to coast. Great great to have you on. Tyler is up next. Hello Tyler both have their calling to ask you if you think Gus Malzahn on we'll be done at all but if you lose Georgia Alabama. Yes I do so do you think if he loses his Georgia game this weekend. He's we're GONNA start listening to Arkansas. Listen the Arkansas job is probably there for him. Remember a football coach. He has an agent and just like anybody in any industry the agents do the bidding. The coaches don't own so I'm sure when this game's over his agent who also represents Kirby smart we'll probably see each other for minute and you may call them Sunday and go by the way I think Arkansas wants to hire you and now Zahn will probably say well. Let me let me see what happens. I mean the station does not have to be made but Amazon's concentrating on a three more games. But I'm sure when he goes home midnight. He probably is contemplating with his family. What he wants to do next? If there is an opportunity but I I'll say this again Malzahn lease games. Auburn fans are going to be besides themselves and I'm not sure why I know one thing I wouldn't want to be there. I don't WanNa be someplace where I'm not appreciated. I don't want to be someplace where I'm not respected. I don't WanNa be someplace where I'm not given the benefit of the doubt and I don't think Gus Malzahn Wannabe at Auburn. I if if that happens I mean I don't right now I mean there there is a. There's a tug of war down there. Let's not sugarcoat it. You got some trustees who want Gus Malzahn. They don't care what the record is. They just want him out so so to me. If Malzahn smart he'll examine the circumstances. Let's see okay. I've got this job. Somebody else wants me to want to leave. We're maybe they will appreciate me or maybe they will respect him hard to figure out. We're coming right back. You're listening to the Paul Finebaum show. podcast no one's been part of more first days of work and car heart and in the same way rookies. He's had to keep earning respect car. Heart never stops earning. The respect of hardworking people like you from building rugged dear. That's tougher than any. I are worst day of work. Reengineering the classics to outworked the future. Trust your car hearts to keep doing their job long after you begin doing yours since eighteen eighty nine carts got you're back twenty four seven visit dot com forward slash. CFP welcome back here. And let's continue with more calls at eight five five two four to seven and two eight five about Jay in that route. Shala J. O.. Aw How you doing okay thank. You didn't hear anything. Thank you Jake Eh. Great Clyde is up next in San Antonio how Claude Bellow Paul It's a real pleasure to greet you from South West Texas and and Kudos to my beloved. Lsu Tigers thank you very much all. I called you three years ago and I told you that we have some young boys that were growing up into monsters down in Baton Rouge route and then I called last year talked about him and this August I called you and I said this is the year. I predicted that Alabama and Lsu. You were both be eight no going into nine November. And I predicted the LSU win. I'm proud to say my grandmother might be jumping out of her grade to celebrate that one. Also there's only three roadblocks between them and the SEC championship. And I'll tell you right now. Mike the Tiger is gonna eat that ugly dog in Atlanta in December. There's no doubt in my mind. My only fear is that I'm having nightmares about a replay from two thousand eleven. We've beaten in Alabama and if they squeeze back into the top four. We might have to do it again. And boy I tell you it's It's a nightmare. Remember what happened. Two Thousand Thousand Eleven two thousand twelve. Yeah you know I. It is a nightmare. But you talk about a statement. Think about this. You Beaten Alabama once we all. I know how important the game is. Let say you beat them again. I mean you talk about the damage done to that program by LSU in the span of two two months. I agree with you that had a significant Apollo. Think that Joe Borough One heisman trophy last Saturday. A lot of it has it has to do with with the two offensive coordinator's Brady and and intimate but I really think that That he wanted he might is. We'll put it on a shelf right now. I tend to agree with you on that I I mean. I can't think of a reasonable explanation of why he won't win it. I mean on short of injury or just a shocking upset. LSU still has to consequential games. But I don't know anyone who thinks they're gonNA lose ole miss or home against them. No I am going to be a grudge. VEG- back from that that disaster last year seven over absolutely wanted twice in regulation. Yeah no that I may have been the springboard. LSU has not lost since then case you were wondering Let's continue with more calls and Hal about Dustin Allah and Dustin go right ahead. Hi Paul first time caller. Thanks for taking my call. Thank you I've got a quick in regarding Arkansas. Oh I was just wondering what your thoughts on them going. After last mile I would say there is zero percent chance of them going after less miles. Okay I just kind of wondered. I figured he'd be back in there and that he is shot. Get backing well. Listen let's miles was out for a couple of years. He got the Kansas job. Bob Dunne re really well there. There's no reason for him to leave. I mean it's just to go to a job where he'll have more headaches and he knows what to do with He's done a good job at Kansas. Stay there thank you. Thank you very much. Scott is in South Carolina. Hello Scott Hey Paul how are you A. Ah I want to know. Do you have anything to do with the bumper music that is played in between the songs jazzy. funky music listen. We have great great bumper music. And the answer your question I have absolutely nothing to do with it. Well it's really cool Paul. I'll just tell you that a little something to do with that is your next week. I'm I'm on radio industry and I'm there for radio forecast. I and I like to invite you to the harbour club negative tonight. There's GonNa be a party and if you are this. Is that the one in midtown. It don't time square right down. Yeah I have. I had breakfast there couple years ago and and it was already Tuesday night. Let me know I nearly got kicked out. I had I had a call and then it was a fairly Important call that is so I call I call the person back and the Maitre D.'s. Excuse me you'll have to go outside. I didn't realize the the Protocol at the Harvard Club. Yeah looking there. She might there at The Harbour Club so what what type. What type the party is it? It's it's going to be a radio party. We'll be party for you know a number. It's a radio forecast Okay it happens every year and Radio Industry Types get together and do the forecast for the upcoming year is what it is. I mean if I show up at the door they are they going to turn the away away. I know Paul. I'm going to be there. I'M GONNA say. Hey Paul finebaum shows up. Scott from Charleston is going to get him in well. Listen I appreciate Eh. I will say I have not been to that many nice places in my life but that was one of the most intriguing places. I've I have been well. I've never been tall so it'd be my first time too so I'll be first-timers yeah most most of the thanks. I'll see most of the Ivy League schools SAV clubs in New York where you can you can Breakfast lunch dinner and also stay there. They they have small rooms were you. I'm just going to hang out for the night But yeah I guess I guess. He doesn't have a law degree from Harvard. Eight five two four to seven to eight five. That's our number. We're going to take a short break.

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Missing Link - The Peking Man

GONE

44:21 min | 2 years ago

Missing Link - The Peking Man

"On december eighth nineteen forty one japanese soldiers burst through the doors of the peking union medical college college anthropologist. When chung pay was waiting for them he had feared this would happen since one thousand nine hundred eighty seven though the college college had been left untouched. Even after the japanese army had captured beijing it was only a matter of time before american owned institutions fell to the occupation. The japanese troops went straight for the research lab safe. Their priority was to secure a collection of fossils. The bones known as the peking man were the most valuable items in p. u. M._c. when they broke the safe open they found only a handful of casts made from the fossils bones themselves were missing. Pay breathed a sigh of relief if for he knew they wouldn't find what they were looking for. The peking man collection was already on its way to the american museum of natural history where would be safe from the war the fossils however would never arrive in america where they actually ended up well to this day. No one knows for sure. Welcome to gone a podcast original. I'm ali and i'm richard every other monday. We examined mysterious this disappearances and the theories they spawned from the amber room to michael rockefeller picasso paintings to the trust can language the roanoke colony to the lost russian cosmonauts. If it's gone we're looking for it. You can find episodes of gone and all other podcasts originals for free <unk> on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream gone for free on spotify just open the app tap browse and type god in the search bar today will be looking into the disappearance of the peking man a priceless collection of fossilized bones that were lost lost during the second world war belonging to the homo erectus species of early human. These bones were crucial to advancing the scientific understanding of our own evolutionary history and for over eighty years. The disappearance of these fossils has vexed the scientific community at par or cast. Were grateful for you listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and instagram at podcast cast in twitter at podcast network and if you enjoyed today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review wherever you're listening. It really really does help. In the early nineteen twenties a collection of international geologist's made an incredible discovery in a system of caves near joko deion southwest of beijing they unearth scores wars of early human bones which they called peking man after the european name for beijing despite the singular name the bones do do not belong to one individual rather the title refers to a collection of six goals fourteen cranial fragments six facial fragments vince fifteen jawbones one hundred and fifty seven teeth one collarbone three upper arms one wrist and one shinbone it is believed that these bones came from as many as forty different individuals at the time of its discovery this was the largest collection of early early hominids bones ever unearthed at one site and the first evidence of early man to be discovered in china. This wealth of fossils showed showed that early man could use tools hunt large mammals and harness fire. It was a massive leap in understanding human evolution both culturally literally and physiologically researchers originally maintained that they were between two hundred thousand and three hundred thousand years old new research has led paleontologists to believe that the bones were far older between four hundred thousand and seven hundred thousand years old however these are they're only estimates is all the fossils unearthed between nineteen twenty eight and nineteen forty. One were lost in the early days of world war. Two the last man to study the bones professor france vidon reich attempted to persuade the u._s. government to fund a search for them after the war but he was unsuccessful. There are a multitude of theories about what happened to this historic collection all of them sharing a number of key factors. The first theory is that the marine ship carrying the bones from china to america was sunk by japanese submarines and the bones now l. lie at the bottom of the ocean waiting to be rediscovered. The second theory is that the bones were captured by the japanese and hidden away to prevent bench china from lane claim to one of the most important scientific fines of all time a third more recent theory holds that the bones were taken by a private david individual. Perhaps a marine or soldier serving in china during world war two and are hidden away somewhere in taiwan or even the united states by the end of the eighteen hundreds. The study of human evolution was still in its infancy. Some scattered evidence of hunter hunter gatherer tribes had been discovered but remains of ancient humans were scant during an eighteen ninety one exploration to indonesia dutch dutch paleo anthropologist jen dubois discovered what would become known as the java man an incomplete collection of human looking bones owns including at tooth a skullcap thighbone. Du bois declared this fine to be the missing link between apes and man. This contention aroused much debate in the scientific community. Charles darwin's on the origin of species was around forty years old at the time but the idea that man had evolved from an abe was still a hotly debated theory the fines sparked renewed interest in discovering tangible evidence savoy early man to confirm or debunk darwin's compelling theory swedish geologist joe in goner anderson was likely aware of the java man when he first traveled to china in nineteen fourteen but that was not his original purpose for being there and sean had been brought to beijing and to work as a technical adviser for the chinese government they needed an expert to advise them on oil and coal mining operations a driven and and energetic man under schon help train the first generation of chinese geologists during his first few years in beijing however by nineteen seventeen seventeen. His attention was diverted by the opportunities that existed in the surrounding area. These opportunities were not just geological in nature he had heard stories that led him to believe that there was a wealth of fossils in the earth around beijing waiting to be discovered at the time it was common common knowledge among paleontologists that one of the best places to find petrified fossils were in local drugstores. Many nearby apothecary apothecary would sell these fossils as dragon bones to be ground up and used as homeopathic remedies. It was while visiting one of these drug stores stores that under shawn found petrified human tooth using the tooth as evidence under shawn set out to persuade the chinese geological survey a to trace the origin of these dragon bones for archaeological purposes wherever the locals got these bones could be an excellent opportunity for archaeology on march twenty second nineteen eighteen. He was led to a place in joke odeon called chicken can bone hill a clay pillar rising from an old limestone mine this pillar contained a multitude of undiscovered bird fossils which were interesting but far from the revelatory find under shawn had hoped for he would make repeat trips to joke odeon until in nineteen twenty they won a local directed him to dragon bone hill. A nearby mound said to contain an even greater wealth of these dragon bones well exploring the network of caves in this hill. Something caught under shawn's. I that gave him a surge of excitement he had noticed some fragments of white courts in the cave. A mineral not native to this part of china. This courts could not have formed recently. It had to be remnants of prehistoric geological activity under shun realized the tunnels they were exploring were far older than the locals assumed according to the story he they then turned to his companions and exclaimed. Here is a primitive man. Now all we have to do is find him is assistant. Austrian geologist adoc tokaj danske set to work excavating the site. It was during the summer of nineteen twenty one that they would uncover their first monumental clue. The molar and a premolar the muller was initially thought to be an ape tooth but the premolar confirmed what under shawn had hoped for these teeth breath belong to an early hamad under shawn sent teams to joke odeon every summer over the next five years while preparing to reveal his discovery to the world world on october twenty second nineteen twenty six under shawn presented his findings as well as the two teeth to the crown prince and and princess and sweden in oop sala his announcement caused quite a stir reactions in his field were mixed some <hes> shared his optimism that the discovery of a full early man's skeleton was just around the corner others such as the famous evolutionary theorist pierre the air. Tell ya discharge. Don cautioned him against leading confirmation bias color his investigation at the end of the year under sean turned the teeth he's over to professor davidson black of the peking union medical college after studying them for a number of months black confirmed under sean assertion that these were indeed hominids tees in nineteen twenty seven he declared this early hominids to be genus of man never before seen which he called scene and drops taken n._c.'s while he was still unsure of the era the teeth originated from he wrote enthusiastically suzianne of the find quote. The actual presence of early man in eastern asia is therefore now no longer a matter of conjecture blacks peking union medical college and representatives of the chinese geological survey. We're in agreement. A full excavation of joko. Dan was imperative. Black sought out and successfully received funding for the project through the rockefeller foundation which had established p you m._c. As as well as the chinese medical board while black was nominally in charge of the excavation fieldwork fell on the shoulders of a swede named dr barrier moline bowling visited the caves multiple times over the next couple of years with a pair of chinese assistance when chong pay and cici young in december of nineteen twenty nine black received a telegram from joe co deion it announced that wenchong pay had made the most minute mental discovery of the whole project as far pay had discovered an almost completely intact skull embedded embedded within the rock. The skull provided the most complete piece of the puzzle. They now knew what the facial structure of the scene and throb us looked. I like by this point. The scientific community had started to refer to the bones as the peking man unlike the partial skullcap and shinbone shinbone of the java man. The peking man was firmly identifiable as an early human the detractors who insisted that java man was simply deformed born bones of an ape would not be able to make the same argument with the peking man as tensions between china in japan rose through the late nineteen twenty s and into the thirties the excavation continued an earthling bone after bone unfortunately absolutely davidson black would not see the project completed as he died of a heart condition in one thousand nine hundred thirty four some speculated that his close work with the bones themselves was directly responsible for his early death. When a representative of the american museum of natural history harry l shapiro visited him in nineteen thirty one he noted that black was utterly engaged in studying the fossils applying a dental drill to remove remove bits of rock and mineral deposits that clung to the bones this created a find dust in the air around him as he worked shapiro asked if black usually usually wore a mask to protect his lungs black said he did not shapiro later conjectured that this dust may have contributed to blacks early the death in a eulogy for black colleague dr vk ting mentioned how blacks commitment to science was an all consuming priority in his life life overshadowing even his opinions of china as a nation dr king said in politics black was a conservative but in his dealings with his chinese colleagues he forgot altogether about their nationality or race because he realized that science was above such artificial official and accidental things though black may have put his faith in science over any political or national allegiance the same would not be true of the the empire just across the sea from his university. Only a few short years after blacks death his life's work would fall victim them to a world war. When we return the researchers in beijing try in vain to save the peking man from getting lost to a country country under siege now back to the story the peking man bows discovered by yohan goner anderson and and studied by professor davidson black were among the greatest scientific finds in human history between nineteen twenty one and nineteen thirty seven hundreds of a fossilized bone fragments were unearthed in the site near beijing after the death of professor davidson black in nineteen thirty four the rockefeller. Okay feller institute appointed german professor france biden reich to the peking union medical college as blacks replacement vitamin right leapt did the opportunity the chance to study the peking man was monumental and as a german jew he was glad for the excuse to leave his home country where nazism she is on the rise professor biden reich like many others worried that hitler was going to start a war in western europe as it turns out vidon heidenreich only moved closer to a war zone many believe the second world war began with the invasion of poland by german forces on september her first one thousand nine hundred eighty nine however the sino japanese war began in the east almost two years earlier in early july nineteen thirty seven seven japanese forces opened fire on chinese troops on marco polo bridge a key access route to the city of beijing. The invasion in had begun by august beijing had been captured by japanese forces. The dig site joe deion was abandoned as japan installed a puppet government insecure a foothold in china researcher's involved with the peaking man project scrambled to protect their work work. The remaining bones were moved to the peking union medical college for safekeeping as an institute founded and supported by the american rockefeller institution solution the p._u._m. See was relatively unaffected by the japanese invasion. When the imperial army took over beijing. They left all foreign sites sites including the american embassy and the p._m. See untouched despite this widen reich new the bones could not stay in the midst of a city in turmoil moyle they would need to be moved sooner rather than later at the time. These fossils were the only tangible evidence of this period and human evolution solution. If they were lost the ability to study ancient man would be dramatically set back at some point between nineteen thirty seven and nineteen nineteen forty. One casts were made of the peking man bones so professors could study the fossils without damaging the originals unnecessarily. These copies also provided a form of insurance. If the bones were taken by the japanese some aspects of the research could continue dr vicodin like eventually made plans to travel to america in the summer of nineteen forty one to escape the chaos before that though he had a number of serious discussions with his fellows about what should become of the peking man bones the university had a handful of options they could ship the bones to southern china which was relatively unaffected by the violence hide the bones in a secure vault somewhere in beijing or ship ship them to america according dividing reich's account. He attempted to persuade u._s. Ambassador nelson t johnson to load the bones into official u._s. s. cargo so they could avoid the red tape of customs. He was unsuccessful since the u._s. Was still a neutral party in the war. It's highly possible symbol. They did not see any current threat to the bone safety so vital reich sphere for this artifact would see more like paranoia than legitimate concern at this point. Biden reich even considered carrying the bones in his own personal baggage when flying to the u._s. His quickly discounted the idea. In a letter dated july eleventh nineteen forty one he said we arrived at the conclusion that involve too great a risk to take the originals as part of my baggage considering all the pros and cons we decided at least for the moment it would be wise to leave the originals where they are now that that is in the safe of the sense oik research laboratory in the building of the department of anatomy at the p. you and see aw biden reich left that july carrying with him casts photographs and drawings of the fossils to aid in his continuing studies less than a month after vitamin reich's departure in august of nineteen forty one the director of the institute of geological survey wong when how wrote to embassador johnson asking him to arrange for the bones to follow weinreich to america unlike heidenreich wong wong when how was successful in persuading johnson to transport the fossils the agreement they settled upon was that the bones would go to the american museum of natural history in new york until hostilities between china and japan had subsided johnson arranged for the bones to be loaded onto a marine vessel and taken he can out of china in november of nineteen forty one clare teston vital reich's former assistant loaded all the bones into a pair of crates packing them carefully withdraw as far as we know caged was the last person to ever really is on the peking man bones as soon as she was done packing them away. The crates were turned over to the u._s. Marines stationed in beijing. They were to be shipped out of the country. Within a month the date they set for the departure december eighth nineteen forty one. If they had left china even a day earlier perhaps the peking man would not have been lost on the morning of december. Seventh japanese aircraft craft attack the pearl harbor air force base in hawaii. This attack was a firm declaration of war against the then neutral united states and was the catalyst at pushed america into world war. Two in japanese occupied china. All united states facilities were seized when when chung pay the man who had unearthed the first peaking man's skull was there when soldiers burst into the p. m. c. on december eight they opened the the safe in the senate zoa research laboratory and only found the molds the researchers had made none of the originals were there pays account it does not mention what the imperial japanese military wanted with some five hundred thousand year old bones but he claims that the entire staff was questioned thoroughly as as to their whereabouts during the following week's pay himself was interrogated and later bribed for information but he told the japanese interrogators nothing nothing they accused him of being a spy and confined him to beijing and this is where the location of the peking man bones nhs becomes a matter of speculation according to pay the japanese had a significant interest in securing these fossils so one of the persistent theories he's is that the japanese military eventually acquired them and kept it a secret. There are conflicting reports about where the peking man crates. It's were headed once. They left the college. One popular story is that they were bound for the port city of chinois dow where it would wait for the s._s. Assist president harrison to arrive from manila from there the crates would sail to america but the harrison never arrived in between manila and ching wan dow it was attacked by the nagasaki meru a japanese warship realizing they would not be able to escape capture and not wanting his ship taken in one piece. The captain deliberately ran aground in the mouth of the young see river. The two crates in this story remained in warehouse in qinghuandao until it was raided by japanese soldiers shortly afterward. A conflicting story holds that the two boxes full of bones owns were assigned to the last group of marines making their way out of beijing. This particular group was on a train two t engine. When their journey was halted bolted by japanese soldiers the japanese ransacked all the luggage marines brought with them and the bones were presumably destroyed or captured as the war dragged on neither china nor american governments considered finding the bones a priority when the war ended in nineteen forty-five five professor wide mariah made several efforts to recover the bones writing to washington repeatedly in both nineteen forty seven and nineteen forty eight it insisting the american government opened an investigation his please went unanswered and he died on july eleventh nineteen forty eight at at the age of seventy five with the lack of any new evidence. The bones were presumed lost for good but then almost twenty three the years later in april of nineteen seventy-one harry l shapiro chairman of the department of anthropology at the american museum of natural history received a phone call that piqued his interest it was from the office of dr william foley a physician who had been a medical officer in the marines during the war foley claimed that while stationed in tianjin in the latter half of nineteen forty one he had been asked to transport a pair of footlockers in his personal luggage from out of beijing along with his assistant herman davis. He was directed to board the president harrison on december eighth eighth but they never made it on the ship on the morning of december seventh. The soldiers awoke to find their camp surrounded surrounded by japanese soldiers. All the marines on the base were rounded up and they were only permitted to carry one bag of personal belongings to are there new lodgings. The rest would be shipped as the medical officer fully were treated with a higher degree of respect and permitted to stay in the marine barracks with with semi diplomatic status for about a week fearing that he faced internment fully reached out to some chinese friends of his and ask them if they could hide hi crates for him. There's a slight discrepancy here between the story foley told and the one told by claire hedged in who had packed the crates teijin aged in claimed there were only two footlockers but fully listed four places that he distributed the crates to including the pasture institute the swedish issoire housed in tianjin and to chinese friends he also claimed that he never opened the crates either way after his week of relative freedom foley was imprisoned for four years from nineteen forty one to nineteen forty-five during this time he never received word from any of the individuals he distributed the fossils to at the end of the war. He was released back to america by his own admission. He did not even think about what became the crates until the nineteen seventies when preparing his memoirs his excuse was that as a junior officer he relied lied on senior officers to follow up on the search the new york times piece detailing fully story mentions that fully had the names names and addresses for all the men gave the fossils to but that he feared that any public search for the bones would result in political reprisals from china. He did not go into any further detail about what he meant by that. Perhaps he believed that if they were in china the chinese would wanna lay claim to them as part of their own cultural clarityn or they would want to adhere to the original agreement made with the rockefeller institute that all bones earth in china would stay in china china fully story gives us the strongest possible leads on what happened to the peking man bones during the war since his account was largely verified by davis who who has the pharmacist's mate rarely left his side but just as soon as the public became aware of foley's role in the story the trail grew cold and as far as we know as of two thousand nineteen no one in china has come forth having been given the bones in late nineteen forty one fine however the story does not end here within a year of fully story going public another man with launch a thorough investigation allegation into the location of the bones leading to another flurry of theories when we return a prominent the u._s. Businessmen makes the most famous and controversial attempt at recovering the peking man now back to the story by nineteen seventy one. The peking man fossil's had been missing for thirty years. Dr william foley had spoken into the new york times about his supposed handling of the bones on behalf of the u._s. Marine corps but since then no new information had come to light wait until that is american businessman christopher janice got involved in nineteen seventy one christopher g janice was was a sixty year-old stockbroker in chicago and founding member of the greek heritage foundation. An institution created with the express purpose of of arranging cultural trips abroad for its members janice had seen a golden opportunity. When president nixon announced his plan to visit china on july fifteenth nineteen seventy-one if the famously closed borders of china were about to open. Maybe janice could arrange a visit to china for his foundation. Janice janice was nothing. If not an enterprising man in may of nineteen seventy-two he managed to secure one of the first travel visas china had had issued to an american citizen and made an exploratory trip to china himself janice traveled throughout china and while there heard the story of a new museum being constructed in joko deion curious he stopped by defined that the museum was entirely dedicated to the peking man site right according to janice this was when he met with the director of the museum who change in this meeting he found out about the missing the fossils and who requested genesis help in recovering the peaking ran in his book janice claimed he was thoroughly confused by this but it could not deny the sincerity and the man's voice he agreed to try to help return the bones to china after this meeting janice claimed his guides and even the chinese officials they interacted with treated him differently in his own words he had been singled out out as the man who would help china recover these missing artifacts though janice had no idea how the rumor spread like wildfire by the time he landed in hong kong on june sixteenth nineteen seventy-two janice found himself mobbed by local reporters pressed by the throng wrong reporters jenness began his search the only way he knew how by offering a reward he said the greek heritage foundation would give five five thousand dollars to anyone who could offer information regarding the peking man fossil's almost immediately his office in chicago was swarmed and with letters by july twenty sixth ten days later he had received over three hundred letters telegrams and phone calls from people claiming they had information most of these offers were transparent attempts to get the five thousand dollar reward in many were just people making practical article jokes. Janice was almost immediately disheartened. Genesis investigation was not off to a great start if he thought the only obstacles obstacles standing in the way of finding the peking man fossils after thirty uneventful years was a cash reward he was quickly realizing just astound i-i've this reward offer had been but among the deluge of useless messages a single phone call stood out janice knew something was different about this phone call the moment he received it. Whoever was calling had not reached out to his office in chicago. Oh like every other person had instead. This call came at the harvard. Club and address janice regularly stayed at while in new york when janice answered it. He heard the voice of a woman on the other end. The woman spoke haltingly and identified herself as the widow of marine green. She said she might have something that janice would want to see when pressed by janice. She revealed that her husband had left. A box walks of fossils with her that he told her were of great value. According to her men had been killed over these fossils she did not mention the reward and janice claims. She seemed unsure of what she wanted to do. With this box of bones he attempted to persuade her to meet up with him. With some reticence reticence she agreed to meet him in a public place and suggested they meet at the observation deck of the empire state building. They agreed to meet at at twelve thirty that same day janice arrived at the observation deck at the agreed upon time he wandered there for around ten minutes minutes before he was approached by slender woman with black hair. He noticed that she wore a heavy overcoat far too warm for mid day in june soon. She still did not provide a name but she did give him a photograph. The picture in black and white showed a cluttered handful handful of bones lying in an open crate to genesis untrained eyes this looked promising he exclaimed into light and told hold a mysterious woman that they should have the bones verified before they moved any further sir. The woman hesitated. She insisted that her husband would not have lied about this sort of thing. Janice assured her that he did not mean to insult her husband's memory just that they needed to be sure. The bones were the correct ones he said. If this were the case she had earned the reward. The woman responded that she wasn't thinking of genesis five thousand dollar reward. If this truly was an effort supported by the chinese government they could afford to pay her a half a million dollars for these bounds janice not wanting to alienate khanate this woman who is clearly on edge told her that they could gather the funds but it would all depend on making sure the bones were authentic suddenly eh the woman's eyes darted to a different part of the observation deck janice fallout her gaze where he saw a tourist taking photos in their in general direction assuming the tourist was an accomplice of some kind. The woman panicked snatching the photograph from janice and fled the observation deck. Janice janice was so shocked. It took him a moment to pursue by the time he got to the elevator. He was too late. The woman had left him not wanting to lose his one good. Lead janice put an ad in the new york times requesting the woman call him back this ad ran on august fourth one thousand nine hundred seventy two but as he waited for her response he received yet another lead this time janice was called at his his home in winnetka illinois. The caller introduced himself as andrew z and he claimed to know where the fossils were. He promptly arranged arranged a meeting. When janice met andrew z z almost immediately started berating janice for his methods saying that the publicity he assad would only harm his attempts to find the missing fossils. He claimed they should wait a few years and then begin their search wants the public had forgotton. Auden janice was undeterred insisting that they find the fossils as soon as possible when pressed z. Finally revealed what he knew the fossils he said we're in taiwan with a close friend of his and then after revealing this information he left <music>. Janna scrambled to remain in contact with these two leads over the next couple of months. He's ad in the times was successful and a mysterious woman did reach out again through her lawyer. The lawyer claimed she was afraid of government reprisals for her holding onto the bones for too long which is why she had fled their meeting so suddenly the woman still refused to show janice the bones after some encouragement she sent copies of her picture of the bones to him and he sent them to the american museum of natural history to see if they could authenticate them. The results were uninspiring. The picture which janice includes in his book is cluttered and somewhat out of focus and contains a number of bones that were not in the peking man collection. The the professors claimed some of the skulls might match up with the peking man fossils but it could just as easily be just a box of random owns. Her husband had brought back from the war for andrew z on the other hand grew increasingly hostile to janice over the course of the investigation he claimed the publicity is what kept kept any chinese with information as well as his taiwanese friends from coming forward over the following three years janice attempted to follow up these leads reaching out to taiwanese government sources as well as those in hong kong and china finally in nineteen seventy five he felt his search coach reached a dead end despite failing to make good on his promise to the chinese janice published his story in a book entitled the search for peaking man dan in yet another plea for publicity. The back cover of the book boasts soon to be a major motion picture. There never was motion picture on february twenty fifth nineteen eighty-one christopher g janice was indicted on thirty seven counts of fraud. He was accused of defrauding investors over six hundred thousand dollars for a movie about his search in the end. Janice pled guilty to two counts. He claimed that the fraud was unintentional and that he had merely signed the wrong paperwork. This development casts severe doubt over his entire chapter during the story while janice includes photographs and some documented evidence of his search how much of his story was exaggerated in order to make his search more exciting writing. It's impossible to verify many of the claims he makes in his book meaning that the entire saga may simply be fiction based on a single trip to china after the fiasco surrounding genesis book public interest in the peking man dropped sharply but in two thousand ten the bones entered the public discourse once again in april of two thousand ten paleo anthropologist lee berger of the university city of it bothers rand in south. Africa received an email from the sun a former u._s. Marine richard bowen the e mail claimed that bowen was stationed stationed in chin-wan dow in nineteen forty seven during china's nationalist communist civil war bowen's unit doug many foxholes in tin wong dow while it was under siege in one night they happen to unearth a strange box bowen claimed that the box was full of bones the marines these were so spooked they filled that hole in and doug another a little ways away for their shelter as with every lead supplied by a non paleontologist bowen does not give any evidence to suggest this wasn't just a crude burial site but to investigate further researchers for china's institute for vertebrate paleontology located the site that was once bones marine base to see if they could excavate the area based on boeing's descriptions the expertise of a local historian. They managed to estimate the area where they had seen the bones. It's now a parking lot <music>. So where did the peking man fossils go are they at the bottom of the ocean in a warehouse in japan underneath the parking lot in china of all the possible answers none stand out is more likely than the others the nearly eighty years years since their disappearance is so wide a gulf that new evidence is often colored by vague memory or exaggeration. The only one of our theories is that we can outright. Dismiss is the claim that the bones are in taiwan. Well it is possible. The only evidence for it is in the pages of genesis mrs book which as evidence is suspect at best and useless at worst the other claim that it is gathering dust in japanese warehouse is more likely but it's still only a rumor based on wen-chong pays belief that the japanese soldiers prioritize securing the bones from the university william billion foley's statement that he sent the bones to friends in china is enticing but the fact that they were not turned up after he gave their information to government officials officials cast doubt on this possibility perhaps at the end of the decades long investigation the most likely solution is the simplest that japanese soldiers during the war simply misplaced or destroyed the bones in the chaos that was the second world war few soldiers gers would know to preserve such a crucial piece of humanity's evolutionary history especially when it looks like just a handful. I've really old bones. Thanks again for tuning into gone. We'll be back in two weeks with another episode. You can find all episodes of gone and all other podcast originals for free on spotify. Not only spotify already have all of your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you you too enjoy all of your favourite parkas originals like gone for free from your phone desktop or smart speaker to stream gone on spotify. Just open the app tap. Browse type gone in the search bar several of you have asked how to help us. Have you enjoyed the show. The best way to help is to leave of a five star review and don't forget to follow us on facebook and instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network. We'll see next time. Just that's because it's gone doesn't mean it can't be found gone was created by max. Cutler is a production of cutler media and as part of the podcast asked network it is produced by max and ron cutler sound design by dick schroeder with production assistance by ron shapiro paul moller maggie gi admire and freddie beckley gone is written by robert team stra and stars molly brandenburg and richard rosner.

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Anne Ortelee's November 10, 2019 Weekly Weather

Anne Ortelee Weekly Weather Astrology

30:37 min | 1 year ago

Anne Ortelee's November 10, 2019 Weekly Weather

"Hi everybody welcome to or at least weekly weather. My name is an early. It's a little bit of lake broadcast tonight because it's been a very busy weekend here in the beautiful city of New York We have a lot going on in the sky. We have lot going on in our lives. It's kind of part of the deal right now with everything kinda running a little wild up there One of the things to kind of look at is kind of the news. You're GONNA get that. Might be a little surprising shocking. Or Wow. I didn't know that was going to happen Mercury is Kazimi Azimi the son and of course mercury is going retrograde now. Kazimi is an interesting placement because it doesn't It it's when the sun is is so close to mercury mercury so close to the sun that you It's like when you put your finger in a candle and it doesn't get burned versus when you hold it over the flame top and it gets burned so mercury Kazimi has that quality it's incredibly bedded in the heart of the Sun. That's going to happen tomorrow. But we're in orbit now so mercury is GonNa pass is also at the same declaration as the sun so we're going to have kind of a cool thing tomorrow well In Watch your NASA you know if you're on the Internet looking at NASA stuff you'll see that it's there's very intense energy. And you'll see mercury mercury kind of passing across the face of the sun for a period of about five hours tomorrow Obviously you're not supposed to look at the sun so look at pictures from NASA so but it's the energy of the planet and so the Sun and Mercury at the same declamation. This doesn't happen that often and somebody pointed out. I was doing weekend workshop this weekend. Somebody pointed out is eleven eleven so it's eleven eleven portal which is of course the big Portal for master master numbers and it also is Because of the Kazimi Energy it's very very intense so our job with his intensity as we're running through we're gonna hear really interesting news. Correct make really interesting commitments. It's a great day to commit to things Part of the issue with it though is because mercury is retrograde in Scorpio. Oh you WanNa make sure you commit to positive you know. WanNa say gee my life shitty you know. I have a horrible life. Oh it's terrible you want to kind of go okay. Let's let's do the positive vision. Let's do where we're sending the energy what we're creating is we're heading out make it be It may be a positive energy. You're sending off into the heavens as we work with this energy tomorrow and of course Mercury Comm combust. The Sun is very intense very passionate but it's also so tight it's accelerated and it's amplified and it's augmented so it's super duper super duper mercury son conjunction of course. It is retrograde in Scorpio. So so we're GONNA look back at things and maybe have realizations or a moment so in my life. It's been kind of a busy Busy Week but this weekend particularly I had scheduled the east our certification so we had twenty one lovely people show up and Richard SMOOT and and Vicki his wife Vicky smooth pelt smoke and I conducted the The COP consulting skills for two and a half days twenty hours and had a wonderful group of astrologers hanging out and talking and learning and doing their listening skills and their can't start reading skills. It was a really cool weekend. It was a great deal of fun and then on on Saturday night. Two of my favorite Client slash students slash. I Dunno they become like you know. I feel like they're family on some level both Got Married And they one of them well they actually got married about a month apart. They were like besties and they went to law school together. And so Theresa eloped with her beloved Stephen to the top of a mountain in Sedona Vortex and got married on vortex with a minister and a photographer and Jodi met her beloved Thomas or Tad as he is known to his family and they had a really beautiful wedding at this really gorgeous just cathedral here in New York. Saint Ignatius Loyola and then reception at the Harvard Club. That was probably one of the best bands I've ever danced it at a wedding leading and it was an Italian wedding. And so you know with the Italian weddings you get up and you dance between the courses and then you sit down and I met Jodi and Theresa test is is she's called when they were They were starting to study astrology. They'd come for reading and then started being interested in it and And off we went so now here we are quite a number of years later and they both got married within a month of each other. So it's Kinda cool So that I had a great time I'm at the wedding and then you know we did this consulting skills for twenty hours so I just got to know a bunch of wonderful. twenty-one new wonderful astrologers some of them I knew of course but a lot of ones in from out of town and then I came home tonight after dinner in kind of debriefing with Vicky and Richard because we talked about stuff to who had gotten an e mail or voice message from my neighbor and my neighbor down the hall died And she was coming home Saturday night and she just dropped dead it on the street on First Avenue and that's it So you don't know how you don't know what's going to happen. It's like you know the the intensity of this processing for twenty hours with twenty one people you know. emoting and learning and working on their empathy and the reflection. And they're paraphrasing or freezing and they're they're listening skills and then this party down. You know Dan everybody dance now and then my neighbor dropping dead who. I've lived next door to over forty years Kind of a wild one you know so mercury Kazimi expect really. Intense action has a very intense right. Now just look at the politics you know whenever anybody goes. Why don't you talk about politics? I'm like because that is the outer manifestation Asian of what the world is we've had all these people get caught mark. Gastineau just came out announcing he had been raped as a kid From eleven to fourteen. You know he's like one of the bigger football guys in the world You guys younger may not no one. But he's the one that started making the dancing in the end zone. He's the one that did that. And they used to think it was bad sportsmanship. But that little gay touchdown thing that we take for granted now he did it and it was considered bad form And we've had a lot of revelations about you know murders coming people catching murderers whereas mercury conjuncture son in Scorpio. A lot of dead people talking or secrets are being revealed. You know there's been a lot of found the body you know figured it out finally arrested the person who did it. News and the email l. and that's where that's coming from you know with mercury retrograde in Scorpio on the sun there's a breakthrough in cold cases. And I remember a while back I was talking talking to a cop in Nebraska. And he said You know I've noticed and he kind of basically you know told me it was Saturn. He noticed the Saturn and he knew when one of the cold cases unsolved that all the others would solve to write and Saturday employer were wrapping up the last thirty six years. So they're trying to get the stuff out the door and off the books and and process it and get it out there so people can move onto the next chapter so it's a really intense week ahead so I don't want to minimize how intense. It's going to be but also we're going to have a full moon In tourists and Scorpio. And that's a very fits very fertile moon and that's GonNa take place on choose day and of course when we have a full moon one of the things that we're we're working with is the energy of abundance in how it kind of Heads across the sky so the full moon is On Tuesday at eight thirty four in the morning and the sun is that Nineteen Scorpio and moon is at Nineteen Scorpio so this hearkens back to The energy of if The tourist time which is around a May twelfth of two thousand eighteen and then two around August twelfth of last of this year twenty nineteen when it was an Aquarius and now we have the full moon and we really see the full moon energy of this enter this energy kind of moving forward so it's a big. It's a big one. We also have on this full moon Venus approaching a square to Neptune. So it's kind of unexpected things happening or taking place and then we also have Jupiter and series meeting near to the south node but also in the first house kind of revealing stuff and then Juno at the top at the chart is in the sign of partners with a lot of energy about Sending stuff off into the into the difference into the distance so so knowing that we have a slow moon moving very slowly Across the across the sky well we have this Kazimi mercury so google it. There's it's a really good cool article on the Times in The New York Times with a picture of it going across. I posted it on facebook and they send it out on twitter so you can also I see it there but it's a it's a pretty intense one and Stuff's coming to light. You're seeing secrets. You're learning stuff you're processing you're releasing you're letting go your full mooning thing and then of course the moon then Wayne's down to the new moon in two weeks when the new moon takes place on November twenty six the Tuesday before Thanksgiving living and that one will be in the new of course in sage and that's going to be at four Sagittarius so there's a lot of energy in the sky about releases is letting go moving on the truth being told and learning stuff right because it's just really volatile heavens right now so we're learning all sorts of things you wanna pay attention to what you're learning it's important and it will really shape your future As you as you kind of settle into the knowledge and the wisdom list of what's coming in so Xiao to jody and Tad shout out to Theresa and Steve Married Happily and moving onto the next chapters of their life. Shout to the twenty one students. We just had a wonderful adventure with this weekend. And then tomorrow of course I've got fifteen students sitting for the certification exam on the Mercury Kazimi. Ju Ju make it really smart And it's a forward motion It's a big big week And of course mercury retrograde still retrograde through the twenty twentieth. So it's a great time to do research and figure out what you're doing and kind kind of ask people for things and figure out stuff and I've got a bunch of people with scripts being promoted or deals being pitched and contracts being negotiated. And it's all all this getting ready for January when the new energy commences in a really big way and of course tomorrow is Veterans Day. Eleven eleven the day. Hey when we and right now it's eleven eleven pm. As I'm speaking the day when we honor the vets who have served our country and died for our country and fought for or you know fought for what they believed in for the beliefs that we represent as a country so as with Mercury Kazimi the sun you know the ones that died fought in world World War Two are really dying off pretty quickly. You know 'cause they're getting they're getting up there And what are the beliefs. You're willing to fight for. What are the beliefs you hold true? WHO and Veterans Day? I mean always makes me cry You know seeing them see soldiers marching and just understanding of that passion that service to nation Asian country and belief systems. What do you believe in? And of course with Jupiter and Venus I'm sorry with Venus and in Sagittarius squaring Neptune. It's a really big a belief time. It's really big about you saying this is what I believe and with the mercury son. COMBUST remember Mercury's listing and and he's going is that what you really believe. And then we have Jupiter in the series joined which is very much the energy of creation and of course Jupiter's the energy of long trips the blessing to my neighbor? Peggy who has Mo- zied off into the eternal night Becoming a star. She was a pretty good astrologer to we. Used to talk astrology Yeah forward. Motion changes changes. So let's talk about the moon and the new adventures for all of us. You know and I'm still a little shocked about pig. You just heard about about a half an hour ago so I got the note that she was in the hospital. Go feed the cats. 'cause we trade trade cat feeding and I was like okay. I'll feed the cats and then I know she's dead. Now we have to figure out WHO's GonNa take the cats That's always something you know. Think about your pets pets when you leave. Who who gets them? I know Max and Remo have money in my will they get money. Whoever takes them gets money to take care hear of them but yeah think about who takes your pets? Yeah these are. These are important considerations so only the moon. Today's and tourists it's the tenth is went into tourists tonight around six eighteen pm. And it's going to be in tourist tonight and then all day Monday and it goes void at ten forty eight. AM Tuesday morning and then it goes void. It's got a nice going to try and Pluto so pluto embracing the power and understanding what that is and and figuring out their journey and void all day Tuesday. It goes into Gemini at three forty six in the morning on Wednesday morning and it's in Germany Wednesday Wednesday and Thursday and it goes void at six forty. Am with trying to Mars. On Friday morning and it's void Friday morning and then it goes into cancer Sir at eleven fifteen in the morning and then it's in cancer. The fifteenth Friday the Fifteenth to sixteenth the seventeenth and it goes void at three fourteen PM. He am on Friday the seventeenth with square tomorrow. So that one's a little bit more stressful. That's that's GonNa be on Friday the fifteenth in cancer because cancer of course is up there in the in the in the heavens but it's having a big old fight with Saturn and Pluto and now the last aspect is a square Tamar. So it's kind of a kind of a pushy pushy energy and then the moon on the seventeenth goes into Leo four fifty seven. PM on the seventeenth. Friday night and is in there Friday and all these Monday fries goes in their Sunday. Nights are the seventeenth. It's in their the eighteenth and then it goes void at four eleven pm with square to the Sun. Moon Leo screened sons. Who in Scorpio? So the beginning of the week the tourists Moon Nice the Gemini Moon Nice. We get to Friday around eleven Fifteen eighteen then we start getting a little more of a struggle a struggle energy and then we go into Leo and it's positive but it's also struggle so good week at the beginning to get stuff done and then once you get to Friday. It's a little more tense. The intense weeks the intense days this week of course are the the L. Call tation nation which of Mercury which is because it's the same declaration and you'll look at the pictures and you'll see little mercury running across the sun And then of course the full moon when is a busy day because it's in a very moon is in a really asp really high aspect energy. It's talking of course to the sun but it's also talking to mercury and then it's in 'cause it's tourists it's an a lovely trying to Saturn and Pluto in textile to Neptune so Tuesday that full moon is really pretty juicy and Kinda forward motion and then this week we have Mars in his Once every two years sex to Jupiter on Tuesdays so Tuesdays used as. You're busy day this week. Wednesday's also pretty decent busy but it's more of a working busy because mercury's sex telling Saturn the sun is sex extolling Pluto and mercury is training Neptune. So there's a lot of working on the dreams on Wednesday or clarifying them and then We go forward. There's a Lotta Neptune in the sky. So there's a lot of saying okay. What's that about and then of course once we get to the weekend Saturday night and Sunday or a little tougher because we're working with moon opposite Pluto and then 'cause moons and cancer opposite Pluto and then the end of the day was a little wild because it's got the square to Mars and then when it goes into Leo It has the square to urine us so the weekends a little rocky but the week is easy kind of fun. You're GonNa have a good time going to get a lot accomplished as specially Monday and Tuesday but I would with the full moon and with mercury. Kazimi I would take some some time. You know somebody asked me this week. Did I pick the test date because the Mercury Kazimi and I said I did so because it makes you really sharp group and really paying attention to stuff. It's a it's a really watch. What's coming into your life these next few days and how they work right The the sun is in Scorpio going from eighteen to twenty five and of course it's because he meet tomorrow at ten twenty one eight am and it's parallel nine fifty one am and it's doing this thing. We're across the sun's face for about five hours. The Sun is also in in Quindici with urine Est.. So there can be some health stuff at twelve thirty eight. PM on the eleventh Monday And there's a lot of energy around home and hearth with the son. Opposite VESTA and the Sun Sex Tau Pluto has a forward motion energy. And then there's a quick quadri to the nodes of fate on the sixteenth and they're also is the son in hard aspect to errors goddess of discord. So there's a lot of energy in this chart around. How do we get there? And what do we do from the Sun's point of view getting knowledge figuring things out learning how to work with the energy energy and then making some choices on the sixteenth at the end of the week. Mercury of course is still retrograde has Kazimi thing with the sun on Monday. But he's going backwards from Twenty Scorpio back to eleven almost Yeah eleven and so. He's going back over the energy he brought. Aw for you most important. This week is his health aspect also on the eleventh so we got a couple of things big on the eleventh. Because they're both both the sun and Mercury Career Incan junked urine us which is health aspect and we want to you know obviously pay attention to any health things. In the case of my neighbor. She'd been thinking she was kind. kind of a little dizzy And you know off off. She went mercury's also sex tile to Saturn going retrograde and that's going to happen on the thirteenth eighteenth and then he also has a trying to Neptune so the thirteenth once you get through Monday Tuesday the thirteenth is okay. That's the dream. Let's get that finalized or get a working working deal in place so I did have a lot of people I had one of my clients. WHO's in the process of figuring out in her marriage? You know solved mediation This weekend weekend I had another one got a job offer on Friday. What do I do take it? So it's kind of your dream but it does mean she has to move so everybody's what he's making like their permanent decisions right so you WanNa make permanent decisions in a positive way. The Vision looks like this. This is the vision. I'm working on and kind of push that forward mercury also semi six tell Jupiter on the eighteenth so it can feel a little bit overwhelming meaning that you can feel a little a little bit past your past your push. You know like that stuff's just really flying quickly. And just no because he is retrograde because he is in Scorpio. There's a lot of deep feeling energy running with mercury right now. Venus of courses and sad and she's running from twelve thirty three to twenty one said she's moving pretty quick that is Nine degrees and a week great so. She's clipping along rapidly. She has Aspect back to the nodes of fate on the eleventh so Venus aspects of nodes fate to figure out what to do and she also has a parallel to Jupiter on the twelfth. So there's a real positive to forward motion there and then she has a square. Neptune on the fourteenth and she also has assessed quadri to urinate on the sixteenth and she he also has hard aspects to Saturn and Pluto Saturn on the fourteenth and Pluto on the eighteenth so Venus is in the blind spot spite of Saturn and Pluto. So she's GonNa talk about Venus things right as she works with the Saturn and Pluto. So I'm looking at that and Rosemary and I were talking about welded. Peggy have a will. You know who's who's GonNa figure her stuff out you know 'cause she's our neighbor but we're we got the call that she was in the hospital. Because we're on the contact checklist but I mean it's not our job but like who's GonNa do it so that we'll probably figure out I guess this week So watch what you're figuring out about the structures structures and the reality and the money of them this week as we go to the fourteenth and the Eighteenth Mars of course is moving forward and he's between twenty five and twenty any seven and a half twenty eight and he has his sex style to Jupiter this week on the twelfth. So that's a real positive. Shake your hand. Yep We're going to go do it and of course. He's in libra answering to that nice Venus and Saj and she has aspects with the nodes of fate. So you're going to be making some interesting commitments. This week. The Eleventh Eleventh Twelfth Thirteenth as the planets are saying to you. Don't you WanNa do this or you're going to be going you know. I don't know that I want to do that but I think I WANNA do this. Kind of watch for the commitments commitments coming in that are inspiring or perhaps Shaking you up a bit on. Mars also has a quintile to the south note on the fourteenth. That's an in easy breezy energy. You know where you kind of go. Well this is an easy. This is a no brainer. Of course I would do this. So that's making a commitment or taking some kind of action. It's kind like yeah. Of course I want to and then VESTA has a bike when Jupiter as a bike when tiled avesta on the twelfth. So that's a lot about the expansion in how we get there and then Saturn has a semi square to Athena on the tenth which kind of pushes a little bit of stress around. Well how WHOA. How was the structured? And what are we doing. And you're in. This has hard aspect to relationships on the fourteenth and adjusting aspect. Where and somebody wants to partner in your innocence? I need my freedom and so kind of watch for that energy. You can't tell me what to do or I don't WanNa do that. I WANNA do this instead. I WANNA only be free. I WANNA be out there. So that's kind of part of that. That journey of who are we partnering with. And how are we getting there. And then you're in. His also also has an Incan junked to fina on the seventeenth which is a lot of energy around okay. What direction do we had and where do we go? And what does that look like Because because of that in conjunction is always an adjusting energy and in this case it's to Athena and Sagittarius saying okay. What's the structure? What's the will what's the what's the journey? How are we getting there? And so that's part of the energy of this week and also series enters capra corn on November fifteenth for her in her journey through capricorn. which is of course taking us into the winter months so we're gonNA feel a lot of energy here in terms of the shift in the direction we want to move move in and how we get there so part of the energy is really going? Okay this is what's going on and with Athena in a by quintile to the north node there's a lot of energy in a positive way about this new connection in this new forward motion and this new direction in terms we're headed so that part's really pretty cool. And it's a lot about the commitment is a lot about well. This is my direction. This is what I'm interested in. This is where I wanna go and kind of listening for that. Remember when Mercury's retrograde in any sign he asked us to do the Ari words redo revise revisit anything within our e because he's in Scorpio. It's a lot about revisiting emotions or feelings. Or you know Scorpio do things which are sex death and taxes and so a lot of stuff is coming up you know and people are talking about it or releasing information about it And an honoring that disclosure or that journey of telling right. It's an important journey when we have something that's is carried very deep within us that we have to try and figure out what we're going to do with it and how we're GONNA get there right so there's a lot of energy in this chart or this this week which speaks to the deeper underlying journey of our live and what it is. We're committing to for the next piece or we're revising. 'cause it's retrograde what we're revising our commitment to and how does that look. What does that revision feel like? And I think it's important to kind of think about you know what you're I don't know what your souls path. Is You know we had a lot of conversation this week when we were weekend when we were in the group. You know when you're looking at someone's charter. When you're looking at your own life that a lot of information can be gleaned from the silences and there was an exercise? The students had to do where they had to sit quietly and listen for five minutes. The other person just talked and to get an idea of how powerful it is. Google Emma Emma Gonzalez who did it. When the park lane shooting happened? She stood in front of the people when they were doing. The rally alien Washington. She's I'm just GONNA stand here for the time that the shooter shot and just so you can feel how long that is. And she just stood their quietly and watch the the one where the audience like stands there with her right now. The one that says in five minutes later go through the process with the audience. Were they start to think where they start to a plot were they starting to start to laugh when they try and figure out what to do with that uncomfortableness and I would would encourage all of you to take time over the next few days to sit in silence as Mercury Kazeem as the sun and he meets up with the sun and and he says we are in this incredible intense moment in time and space where we're really seeing things were really understanding things. Were really working with things things on a deeper and more profound level than perhaps we have done in many days and we have to figure out what that looks like and how that feels and how we want to use it and and then once we have the answers to those questions which come from sitting in silence. Mercury Scorpio's a silent mercury. It works on the feeling level. It doesn't work on the communication level works in the spaces of energy and feeling how things shift. It's a swamp mercury and Scorpio's swamp energy. So it speaks to that it That deeper feeling underneath that deeper energy of how we work with us and what we do so it's pretty strong you know. There's a pretty strong energy gene a pretty strong resonance here in terms of all of us and US thinking about well you know. What am I gonNA do? So when I was talking to with my neighbor Rosemary Mary but Peggy dropping dead and you know on First Avenue. I was like wow I mean you know better to die in the street and somebody gets you. The hospital dropped. Dropped it in your apartment right So it's like thinking about things like that you know you know. How long do you have? What what have you been doing? Are you happy with your path which you're next chapter. Where are you going where have you been? How have you gotten into where you are? And what's ahead. The retrograde invites us to remember to revise. Are you were you know. And and think on a deeper level you know what's coming up so I launched all these baby astrologers into the certification process. They're not all babies. Some of them are really full of practicing astrologers but their babies to the certification I watched the second of two wonderful friends get married and you you know with her beloved begin the next chapter of her life and had a great time hanging out with the other best friend like laughing and catching up on stuff. 'cause she now I was in Saint Louis and then my neighbor died. You know so it's like wow. That's an interesting weekend and And I it promises to be an interesting week so hanging there. It's going to be okay but man are things changing and are they change in fast and it'd be wild ride. This is an early signing off from the bright red desk. I know it's a little late but I had a busy weekend. Wishing you all a good week ahead and for my students tomorrow who are taking taking the test. Everybody in the listening audience. Send a little prayer up help. Those students pass the test and become excellent. Certified Astrologers and on that note I will sign off and bid you a warm night with a snugly loved wine or a beloved cat in my case They both like where have you been all weekend. I've been working guys And I wish you a great week ahead take care this is in or at least signing off from the bright red desk in the Isle of Manhattan and Planet Earth. Take Care Bye bye.

Mercury Kazimi Energy Peggy NASA WanNa New York Kazimi Theresa Athena Rosemary Mary Kazimi Azimi Saint Ignatius Loyola Leo facebook US first house football Saint Louis Quindici
Hour 3: 12/4/19

The Paul Finebaum Show

37:44 min | 1 year ago

Hour 3: 12/4/19

"They cried passion and pageantry of college. Football leaves here. The Paul Finebaum show our three podcast cast well a couple of hours ago I was asked about Jim. mcelwain and I Gave an opinion that Didn't I wondered if he would be able to land the University of Missouri Job and it looks like They he may be moving closer to that. Position will update you on that story shortly but The caller knew more than I did mcelwain of course was a Alabama left there to go to Colorado state where he was very successful. Went to Florida. Ardo where he he did get to the SEC championship game but it ended very poorly. He had a really good year This year up in Michigan and and it looks like His career maybe on the way to bouncing back So kudos to the caller and Buddha the host a will update you on that story as as we move throughout the afternoon. Let's talk to Brian Next in Georgia. Hey Brian good afternoon. Hey Paul love your show how much INNOC- fan and and I'm pretty happy where seven and five after big November onto a bowl game and we're third in the SEC. Still what I call that I call that the pre kiffin years so I I just take a moment with you. I'd like to warn Ole Miss and Arkansas fans about jumping on the lane track. Give it gary anything. About being a rebel or hall kiffin cares about himself and money and prestige. So you might get him to come to old miss and he'll be rebel haughty. Taty all this and then harbaugh finally get fired at Michigan and he's GonNa jump at that job or or in a miracle he might go to Arkansas. He'll be hog and silly this then saving retire and he'll jump at the Alabama job and he'll leave your program high and dry he'll you'll leave your recruitment in shambles and you'll be back to square one so if you're jumping on the lane train. Just take it from Tizi Fan. WHO's been ten years of suffering? Don't jump on the train. Thank you for listening. Yeah Yeah Listen I. I'm a little tired of hearing the Tennessee Take on Lane Lane Kiffin which is officially ten years old. I don't think it's Jermaine any longer thing lane. Kiffin is certainly Acquitted himself for the most part. But anyway you want to hold long decade old grudges. Go right ahead Let's continue with more calls. Booker is in New Jersey. Hey Booker Hello Hello Paul. Thanks again for taking my call. Thank you my friend. Yeah I think that the devils swinney Looked around in the caverns of Clemson and after After Charlie Pale and in Tommy Bowden and Dan forward and he found some old frank. Mike how would news conferences. I used to watch frank. How would I grew up in Columbia Anderson Spartanburg and frank would be title channel seven in Spartanburg every Sunday? With the Frank Howard show would would try with Farm agree in in Verna Tate and I had the opportunity I spent. I spent an evening with frank one night and gets in Alabama at a roast and A funnier man. I'm not sure I've ever met ex- exactly whenever he was getting ready to play somebody Ricksen Right was coaching at University of South Carolina. I was living in Glenda's a boy and they would not have clemson when I have a chance to beat South Carolina Frank. How would put put out earlier? The week he's going to run the single weighing in right but fractured all the week. Against and then prego run. What he was always running he always made other team sound around like trying to climb Mount Everest except one team Virginia and he would say Jimmy white meat and they had to cut him off and it didn't sound like the sound in those days? So now it sounds like dabble is taking a script from the past and using old Franko line you may be right. listen I don't know anyone who really doesn't like dabbling sweeny. Who ooh I like it? Yeah but I mean with me It's not personal. I just gave an opinion and yeah and by the way I didn't wake roll out of bed and decide to beat up daboh sweetie I reacted to something. He said that got a tremendous amount of coverage. Hey thank you for the call. Hunter her is in Memphis. Honnor go right ahead. Hey how you doing. We're doing great thank you. Oh so all live here in Memphis and a few hospital coaches and stuff and he was saying that the Norville already secretly shook a handshake with a FSU. So if he does go oh what do you think about Hugh freeze coming to Mrs. You know I heard callous. People in the industry say that Norville Orrville is definitely locked down to FSU. He freezing Memphis. I think would be a phenomenal coach. he knows the area I mean he spent years at Ole Miss Miss. He minded area very well. I think it's A. It's a school that the needs high Falutin offense and and I don't think you could do better than hugh freeze in Memphis. The I was thinking the same thing because I mean who I mean. Not Talking stuff to Arkansas but I mean who would want to go there. Oh let's much all those call to say I'm GonNa tell your fan by the way go tigers. Lsu Baby you've probably heard me say. I grew up a tigers fan and it never it never leaves. You even have moved onto other places but It's pretty it's pretty dear to my heart. As a everyone has those childhood memories in mine are as a Memphis Fan. That sounds kind of crazy considering what I do Thank you very much for the call. Great to have you on again. We'll keep following but it looks like Jim mcelwain. Maybe heading to Columbia. Mike is in South Carolina. And you are next up Hey Mike I help all how you doing. We're doing all right so the rumor mill since my bozeman fired from Colorado state. I've heard that he is a big possibility to be hired. Stop Appiano for their offense coordinator position. What would you think about? Mike Bubba come and two Carolina to be there Osi well. Listen and Mike Bobo to me is is a is a good football coach. He he made a big difference and impact at the University of Georgia so I would say that would be an upgrade. Yes and then Charlie strong fired. I think they should. We'll have to bring Charlie strong back for the beat the the coordinator and either Chad. Moore's Mike I'm not sure about Chad. Morgan listened here. The only the only issue you have to be concerned about is You know there are a lot of job openings out there and Let's be honest must champs not exactly in great shape at the moment considering he he survived they Near coup attempt. But but yeah these are all good ideas. Thank you for the call appreciate it very very much rallies in Mississippi and you are next up up all big fan of your show dude. First Time caller questions though one who would be a slam dunk higher in European bread. Coach at Ole Miss and to which assistant coach in the SEC DC leaving head. Coaching job. Part my money's on our keys now if that's the Slam Dunk Ole Miss. I don't know there's there's no doubt Sarkissian has talked. I've heard again. I'm here are people that are in the nose. Tell me that he's taking talked to Missouri He's talked to Arkansas. And he's talked to Ole miss those are you know. Missouri is indeed fill all filled than he is talked to the other two star Keesey and everyone has flaws but to me. Sarkissian At least has a little bit of starpower especially coming after a a pretty good year at Alabama. Absolutely now. I don't know I haven't heard his name Bra there. I live here in Oxford. I haven't heard his name talked about but man. There's a lot of speculation and rumors floating around town. But I'm just curious. What's what's your take on a slam dunk hire a realistic higher for coach here? Well listen I Never WanNa get on the air and promotes. I'll give an opinion. You know so you know. which name would if you're asking me? which name would draw the most was to tension it would be lane kiffin? Yeah and whether it is the right choice I mean you have to fit certain certain situations Keesing Kiffin I think are very similar in many regards except Kiffin is more dynamic personality You Know Sarkozy and to me is a very strong football coach. He's moved around a lot He went to Alabama he after his Unceremonious firing at USC. He went to the Falcons he got fired. He's been in Alabama year and the bigger question really comes down to Nick Sabin and once again if Sarkissian leaves having to replace one of the most critical positions on on his staff as well as possibly the defensive side of the ball so But but I mean how would you react to lay showing up for work in Oxford man. It would definitely bring some star power some some name recognition recruiting It would put some fans in the seats. I guess if that's what they're looking at I would tell tell you right now. Between Lane Kiffin and Sarkissian Lane Kiffin is going to win the press conference. Oh yeah absolutely man. I appreciate you taking my call Paul. It's the next few days are going to be interesting. Yeah no thank you. Yeah a lot of things are happening right now and And they will continue to over over the next week or two. This is We're we're pretty intense attempts we In the Crazy Season of college coaching. We'll take a break more to come more guests including Bill Hancock at the bottom of the hour listening to the Paul Finebaum. I'm show podcast quarterback. We're glad you're here and a lot of interesting coaching news out there. It's being reported that Clay Helton will definitely remain at SC. That's a surprise because I mean he looked like the dentist coach in America after a couple of early season losses but with the new administration on TAP. He survives That that was a job everyone was assuming would go to urban Meyer well closets interesting to Alabama opened the season against SCC so nick Sabin versus Clay Helton. How does that grab you? Also we've gotten some more information on Missouri apparently Jim mcelwain was in the midst in in in in the thick could things for a while. We don't think that may be Germane any longer. I I must tell you I would i. I'm I'm really surprised. He was even in in the mix six because Mac is told friends that He's thinking getting a coaching and a couple of years anyway but Yeah University Z.. Missouri is obviously beating to it's own drummer but Sarkozy and another name that continues to be linked out there. Coaching Carousel is alive and well but Check in with DJ in South Carolina. How are you doing good here? We're doing good. How about you sir? Doing great thank you for the call. Yes Sir what I'm calling about is the best bet for the weekend coming up here and so if you were any of your callers or any of your listeners. WanNa wins the money I'd be betting on South Carolina. I'm thinking they're going to cover by halftime just like take you know. I don't think South Carolina's looks like they did against the cops. I don't think South Carolina's any games this weekend. But I appreciate your call. Harry is in New Orleans. Hello Harry Hey Paul thanks for fitting me into. They took questions. If I make ball question the number one the the the you know I don't WanNa miss it. He's on TAP. The the plan serving coach Dooley on this week with the Georgia game. Coming up Yeah I haven't haven't seen our schedule yet but we'll be in Atlanta on on Saturday on Friday and Saturday so I'm sure We'll we'll load it up but I but I don't know for sure. Well he's sure worth listening to. I'm GonNa just stick sticking and hope he can get him on secondary. He's one of my favorite guests. Yes Paul since. You've been traveling to New York. I would assume off and then the past fifty years since I had lunch with my dad is a downtown athletic club. My Grandmother All champion. Portrait's parts of the heisman winner. Those warning if you have an opportunity to get down there and have ever have lunch that club. I have never been in a obviously I it was I think thank you was destroyed. Was it not I that's what I was about to ask you for existence because I I tried to Google but I believe I'm almost positive. There's no there is no downtown athletic. I The I have eaten at some of the more Trendy clubs in the New York. I had breakfast one day at the Harvard club which was really cool. I've been to twenty one to twenty one which is most famous John Kennedy's to hang out there. Erin Frank Sinatra never got to the downtown Athletic Club and I think my time this past well. Well now we noted billy cannons picture. No along no longer hangs in the highest enrollments town. Yeah they do the Heisman In Times Square. But it's no longer downtown club right right. Thank you the show. Thank you great to have you on. Brandon is in Chicago. Hey Brandon hey how you doing all we are great. Thank you. You have a couple of questions Were you a big dynasty homer when they were good and also am I. The only Tennessee see fan. Who doesn't still hate Lincoln? Thanks I went to school at Tennessee. I think that's feature itself. Let's Go to hairy next in Florida. Hello very hey thanks for taking my call longtemps start first time caller. Thank you up to two things. One like like to hear your opinion in in this particular topic no matter what anybody thinks. If you in terms opinions of who you think's GonNa win or lose this. This is something I feel like. You're an expert in So what's going to happen with. CBS and the SEC. Their contracts up as wildly awfully unpopular gary dams and his Is it really just about the money. what's GonNa let me address that as best. I can I I made. I gave an honest opinion about Gary Danielson about two months ago. And now neither Gary Danielson or bread Mesler will speak to me because I gave an opinion. And that's okay okay I'm paid to give opinions on not paid. Make friends with people in the media I I don't have anything more to say about Gary Danielson Because I think his work speaks for itself people either like him or they don't and you know he's very polarizing. I mean I think that would be the understatement of the century with Yes sir. One hundred a percent and I I don't I don't hate Gary. Danielson have an opinion other than I don't enjoy personally watching games that he calls and I'll just you know as far ars the contract I will. I will quote. Vince Thomson. Who was on this program the other day because you know he's a media? Expert runs a Sports Media Company Sports Marketing Company and also quote John Alty from AOL DOT com. Who wrote a piece about it two weeks ago? I don't know if you saw it but I would strongly recommend here for you to call that story. Yup it was it was Two weeks ago yesterday tomorrow that story ran and it's about as comprehensive apiece the bottom on the CBS contract. It was done Eleven years ago L. A. for a lot of money at the time but because it was a long term contract I think it was fifteen years The value of it as shot shot up and CBS is not paying very much for it. So according to all the reporting and vincit and with John wrote it runs out in a couple of a years but There was a movement to try to lock it down now and It has become one of the most interesting bid bidding wars That currently exists in college sports and you know the the known players are CBS which became CBS Viacom. Officially today on Wall Street Obviously ESPN which is owned by Disney I'm sure other Entities Fox and NBC. I bought them on. Everyone watched that. CBS Three thirty window because of the value of it. Well I feel like I also just to show you the value of the SEC. And how how powerful fool and How big that brand is? I appreciate it Paul. And I'M GONNA look up this info and Go to referred me to give my opinion on is relevant I would just call up John's article and it goes into tremendous detail about what is at stake right now. What has already transpired? I'm fairly really close to it because the person that represents me Also represents is also a player in that representing the The interests of the League. So I'm I'm terribly conflicted in in offering too much insight That you can't find elsewhere but thank you for the call. I really do appreciate it. We are going to take a break and you can continue calling us at eight five five two four to seven to eight five. We will check in with Bill Hancock Doc. In a little while we'll get his final take on the CFP right after this. You're listening to the Paul Paul Finebaum show podcast back in. Let's go to Jeff in Philadelphia. Jeff Hey Paul okay good afternoon how are you today thank you doing. Well thank you. I just wanted to say I enjoy your show a great deal. You do a super job. Thank you very much South Carolina Fan and it's been a tough year but that being said thinking about the Clinton scheduling you know they're scheduled Texas and they schedule South Carolina. They'll probably when they did that. I'm guessing that you know I am in South Carolina. We're looking like a little bit better schedule than what's my question to you is. Do you see you see the possibility if they would get beat by Virginia does they might start sketch out third strong team being that the ACC is so down lately. You Know Jeff Listen I can't fall to scheduling Clemson I I in fact I give them credit. They didn't have to schedule Texas. Am with South Carolina as your every year Ravel I mean you could. You could have lived with that But the problem is is their own league and And you you just have to believe that. FSU WITH A new. Hire Miami Maybe a couple of other programs are going to get better. Hey thank you for the call. I apologize for running but we have our favorite Wednesay guest who has been with us throughout the College Football playoff and feel Hancock joining joining us. The Executive Director of the College Football playoff bill always great to have you on. Thank you for joining us and Your your recap of of action. The last week well thank you for having me on again Paul. I always look forward to our little Wednesday session Just a couple of old newspaper guys. You're you're talking a little ball you got you can't you can't beat it can't beat it Now the good committee meeting very engaged of a lot of good debate Back and forth. And obviously you saw the rankings. Let me start outside the the the main the the main zone that everybody is focused on Can you explain what you heard or what you can share with us at least in terms of Alabama dropping to where they did. Yep sure can Alabama's Really as as you know boy to top twenty five teams lost the both of them number two and Wars Auburn now eleven so good losses but And and not a lot of wins over over P five teams with winning records Defense strong and as I observed and listen to the discussion Committee was determined that they had to add. Means something in that one with Auburn And then just look who they. They failed below. I think people tend to look at drops without saying wait a minute. What what what? What did the other teams do That that they passed And I'm just trying to think of who lost that was Who else lost? That was in their mix They might have been the only one in their group that in in their ranking. That went down although I I need to be careful about saying that. 'cause I don't know percents that's okay anyway. But yeah you and you have to think about what did the other teams do not. Just what did t may do. But what did everybody else do. Okay one thing. I am interested because we were on a couple of shows today. And I'm not going to get you doing a media analysis we've already been through that but But one one person yeah good point and I want you to expound because the critical games is Friday night. I'm assuming that everyone will watch that game together Can you give us a schedule for the weekend. Yeah sure can and yeah but they will be watching that that game together Actually the committee committee will watch all the Games together this weekend. that's sort of the tradition and what we do the schedule is. We will have a meeting Friday late afternoon soon. go through some administrative things and just talk about any anybody have any feedback on where we were last week. And then Adjourn and and watch the PAC twelve game. Come back Saturday morning. Analyze what we saw in the PAC twelve game can't do any rankings because We don't need the other game results And so we'll just gather for the rest of the day together Watching football and We have two of our members who who's teams are playing Oklahoma and Oregon. And they'll be in there right. There was in the room watching games that is important game if Oregon in wins I suppose it it creates a lot of other possibilities You know we we make assumptions bill And I'm sure on those occasions occasions when maybe you and committee members happened to listen to us We act like we know it all. We don't The predictors think they know it all they don't Can you give us some information on the narrative focus. I mean what what some of the narratives are. The conventional wisdom is X. number of teams teams can afford to lose We're talking about Ohio state in La Shoe Is that fair to say not fair for us to you say We can only deal with the games that have been played right and I I don't I don't disrespect you or or the other who are trying to figure out what might happen and speculating. It's a lot of fun I get that but it's just not a path that we go down with the on week we staff or a week committee committee. You're you're you're asking the right question. That's a good question but it so it all depends. There's so many things that can influence who's in WHO's out and another narrative and I know we talked about this before and I. We were having a big conversation of one of the meetings today that that I know the answer. I'M GONNA ask you for those who had never never never heard it There's a there's a perception out there that's a that's a TV networks. Pick pick the teams for better ratings. I know you've I know you've heard that one before. Oh my goodness I. I've been doing this thirty one years. sixteen years in college in College basketball with the final four or with the NCAA tournament and now. This is my fifteenth year with college football every year. Paul I hear someone say that all of those thirty one years and it is absolutely not true they. TV wouldn't want to be a part of it and even if they did we would say no. So you don't have anything to do with this. Get Out of here. No absolutely not one of these years. I'm going to try to sneak in there and do exactly what you said. Ah never happens and see how far So okay so you mentioned Friday night Saturday. This this is fairly Inside the baseball but we are now into the most critical weekend so they watch the game Friday night. They get up Saturday What's what's the next twenty four hours bill? Well starting with Saturday morning with Some exercise I think that the the hotel tell where we go as a great health club and looks like the weather is going to be good here in Dallas so but some of us to go walking or go for a run outdoors And then we just settle into watch games just like just like so. Many of our listeners are going to be doing all day Saturday and then reconvene when the last games over. It's usually the big ten game ins last. And whatever time that is ten thirtyish central probably reconvened convene get started and analyzing discussing Voting and the first year. I believe we were there until two thirty already The last four years not so late but still late Finish up get where we can where we think we are and then come back again Sunday morning with breakfast at seven and and start the meeting into seven. Thirty and We we'll be finished in time for the revealing of the four teams which we do on? ESPN of course. Is it okay for me to say that ooh anyway we we we. We don't mind okay so she liked our our votes taken on Saturday night. After the big ten I'm game Yeah Yep Yep Yea ranked teams are ranked. And just like we go through our normal processes of of of ranking teams. Yeah those those happen on Saturday night and then they will continue. I'm sure there will be more rankings down on Sunday morning. One good thing is you Sleep on it The committee will say you know. Let's just at some point. Somebody will say I'm ready to sleep on this and come back the next morning and finish shop. So are we voting on that we are. You are your members voting on everything or just the top four Everything everything and if you remember from when you attended the mock exercise that there are seven rounds of voting where committee members independently ranked groups of teams together right. And that's what'll happen. Yeah it's been a while since I did that I may. I may need a refresher course. HORSA keep my keep my license up-to-date Yep Yep love to have you any time and then it asserted Sunday morning. It's just a matter of cleaning it up Packaging how does it. I mean I'm I'm fascinated by this so okay. Let's say at eleven twenty three. Not Everything is done. What happens then? Does somebody come in and pick up a little black box and take it To a private airport and and fly to Connecticut or or is it disseminated in some other way We actually Do it with a phone call all to a select group of people at ESPN. And I'm talking. Select like three or four right who to whom we give the rankings bikings and then they produce? I don't really know what happens on burying but they've been there I've been there four or five years Right there era where it's happening and you've heard restatement say this but nobody nobody in front of the camera and I've been called to pine immediately lately after the it comes out that none of us ever know what happens if we do not know in advance. I think that is great. TV and I don't know who it is being got that idea or or who is being Convince you recently other guys to go along with it. I think at some of the best TV of the year and of course. We're we're watching. We're we're we're done done by the end so we we get to sit back and watch and it's fascinating and people don't realize you can't you draft somebody has to be able to produce the graphics but to ESPN's credit That is A. There's a there's a protocol and they keep keep it secret. I've never really asked her. It's really none of my business. Frankly but You go on the air and there it is. Yep and I'll say something else about this ask we don't call anyone to give them the rankings. Everyone learns the rankings on television coaches. ADP's Commissioners University Presidents bold directors. They're all watching on TV. And so when those rankings are announced at eleven fifteen central. That's when everybody sees it. That's why we haven't had any leaks. Knock on wood 'cause we telling me but we don't tell anybody before it's announced on. Espn you've done better than your old. The colleagues and basketball. Oh my they'll get me going on that one. Oh I felt bad for everybody but yeah we just don't do it. We don't we don't need to now. They have a little different situation. They need to get their teams to get their flights and get going well we we. Don't we got three or four weeks to get people where they need. That is different current. There's there's different. Yep We'll build. This has been interesting. I don't think we'll get to I don't I don't even think we'll make Tim Brando tonight. What about plus even eight I can't I I am going to beg of you to get him Next year I mean you may have to come to him at his salary But even today on I take he proceeded to do the legacy deal. How many games in a row? Clemson is one and They they should be entitled so I want. I Want Stephen a Smith next year to go through a mock. Please do that for me. I love that I'm I'm GONNA stay. You are in charge of Steven. Yeah now you'll probably have to fly the committee to his office but I'm sure nobody will mind well. Great talking to you Paul. One more time take care I look for. We'll talk to you Monday. I hope Thank you all right. Hancock the executive director of the CIP and are friendliest conversation of the year. We had a conversation I think after year one or two that got so contentious that ESPN used at their summit seminar about how to deal with conflict. But not this time around. We'll be right back to and listening to the Paul Finebaum show podcast. Hello everybody you're looking live at Fans Ville a college football. Utopia rivers flow with ice cold. Dr Pepper inched with the air smells. Fresh cut grass artificial turf and smoke meets with a radio only plays marching band breath and being able to read the defenses more important than being able to read asking but what makes fans Ville truly special. Are The people who call it home. Feel the type of people who tailgate before the tailgate asked. The doctor warned afraid to shout. My grandma could have made that kick. Because that's the honest truth passionate fans down by loyalty tradition and the sweet sweet nectar of the college football. God's Dr Member get a taste of fans villas fall during a college football game near you Dr Pepper. The official drink of Fans Ville grab some today. Jackson is up next to Hello Jackson Canaria Yes Jackson. Thank you okay I don't know if you remember. I called you in the earlier earlier in the season saying that. Lsu never had a quarterback back anybody Stayed up at night worrying about. I guess I was pretty wrong on that but Our well and my whole thing is Lsu okay congratulations graduations. You've had a great year You've got one good year out of Joe Borough he's gone and what's the offensive coordinator Brady Is he even gonNA stick around so every LSU fans kinda cool their jets. They're screaming top of the mountain king in the mountain. Well let's see what happens next next year. That's kind of just you know little rant. I want to say on that but My main reason I called it Alabama being twelve. I I mean that's that's a little ridiculous to me because I guarantee you if you lined up other than the maybe the top four teams and. I don't even know about Georgia Georgia Pie. Even and you put Alabama on a neutral say with anybody ranked in front of them and I guarantee you only the top three would probably be favored. Yeah Jackson. You're right losing. A lot of people are bailing Alabama. Nick Sabin Right now. I'm pretty familiar with that theme but They are they are they. They're they're far better than number twelve in the the country and I get it Auburn. Beat them head to head. All of US got three losses. Alabama's only got to. You know I mean that's you. You can argue that one but Like I said in the top three teams I guarantee you. None of them would be favored more than touchdown over Alabama and. That's where the backup quarterback quarterback and you let Ohio State or Lsu or Georgia. Lose their starting quarterback I guarantee you. There's not another better backup quarterback in America then Mack Jones. So I got you I thank you very much for the call a little bit of new and a lot of news out there today John Jennings has been suspended for the first half of Tennessee's bowl game that's not that's not a good story Because of an altercation against Vanderbilt He's a senior series stepped on the The head of of A&E receiver late in the game officials originally did not flag jennings on the play but they later went back. I can ruled. Let's grab cat daddy your next step Zomba interesting show. They rumors running rampant here in Columbia. What are they saying Mike? Bobo has been talked about coming here. Ron Audra liberals pulling a pamphlet. Coke's got talking about him today but it will revert to do what Costa gamecocks talks as a head coach from people talking about Ron Rivera is probably going to have a half it doesn't NFL offers. I don't know why he would go into college football since he hasn't been in college. Football in probably twenty five years Janet Room around here the running one thing today. I can tell you that rumors probably not happening. I probably excited thank so. He's but we are sitting around talking they potter set. Nobody watching them. He's been hearing that anybody borne borne and last but one thing they've been talked about debate and I'm not asking Java Laos to the homes and then later on but we are heading to a break.

Alabama football South Carolina Paul Paul Finebaum Paul SEC Arkansas Jim. mcelwain Tennessee Mike Clemson Football Lsu Erin Frank Sinatra Keesing Kiffin Bill Hancock Georgia CBS Nick Sabin Colorado
Scarface Pt. 1: Al Capone

Kingpins

46:34 min | 2 years ago

Scarface Pt. 1: Al Capone

"Due to the immense popularity of this kingpin the story we tell today is full of events and encounters that may have been greatly exaggerated or fabricated over the almost hundred years since his reign we have taken care to note whenever however the rumor and fact become hard to discern from each other Joseph Hop toad Giunta slurped down the last of his Linguini greedily. This might be the the best meal he ever had beside him his associates John Scalia easy and Albert and Sal me looked similarly satisfied. Their plates were clean of everything but a few streaks of Marinara sauce across from them was the man who'd served them. This feast snarky capone himself dressed in a spotless yellow sued he watched the men contentedly sitting back in his chair. Joseph fell to flicker of pity that a man of such exquisite taste would have to die but he did not know his place his arrogance had turned Chicago into a war zone capone may think himself the most powerful man in this town but Joseph Joseph was the head of the Union E. C. Chill Yana his legacy would outlive capone's scully C. N.. N. Sell me had killed so many for capone it would be fitting for them to do the deed coupon stood and thank the gentleman for dining with him. Joseph return the gratitude before noticing something in Capone's is a certain coldness the doors to the dining room flew open and a half dozen broad-shouldered odd shouldered men filed in some carried rope in their hands and some Joseph had to look over his shoulder to be sure held baseball bats the man nearest to scalise e struck him in the head sending his face is into his plate before hot towed could sit up a hickory bad collided with the site of his head knocking him to the floor. He didn't even see them. Get in sell me as a gentleman carried the days Joseph out of the room home the scarred face of Al Capone filled his vision. He had known about their plan. Someone had talked. I'm Howell heart and I'm Kate Leonard. This is kingpins apar- cast original every Friday we journey inside the ranks of Organized Crime Rings From Street gangs to mafiosos to understand how kingpin in or Queen Pin Rises to the top of the underworld and why they fall as we follow the lives of infamous crime bosses will explore how money and power change them and how it changed the community around them today. We're beginning our story on Al Capone the Prohibition Era Gangster who held Chicago under his thumb from the nineteen twenties through the early thirties he was the Chicago Crime Commission's public enemy number one controlling run running gambling and sex work across the entire city of Chicago and sanctioning a number of ruthless killings none of which the law could ever connect to him this week will explore how the middle a child of a poor immigrant family helped build and run the most infamous organized crime syndicate the United States had ever seen and next week. We'll explore the unconventional way various government agents since brought him to justice at par cast. We're grateful for you our listeners you allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at par cast and twitter at podcast network work and if you enjoyed today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review wherever you're listening it really does help us. We also now have merchandise head to park cast dot com slash merch for more information now. Let's begin the story of Chicago's most famous gangster Al Capone Chicago in the Mid Nineteen Twenty s was the home of a number a powerful and larger than life gangsters big. Jim Carlesimo bugs Moran Johnny Torio but Al Capone was something new. He was a star while his older brother James at run away from home to act and cowboy films capone was the one who wound up becoming a celebrity his meteoric rise to power made him a household name in under a decade without ever having to pull a trigger in late nineteen eighteen twenty five at the Ripe Age of twenty six this first generation Italian American became the sole head of the largest criminal empire in the country the Chicago outfit which he co founded with Jani Theriault. How was a money making machine turning an estimated profit of one hundred five million dollars a year through bootlegging running brothels gambling and racketeering capone himself claimed that the outfit had a weekly payroll of three hundred thousand dollars or just over four million today part of the genius of the Chicago outfit was how labyrinthine the hierarchy was meaning that even over eighty years later historians durians do not know the full extent of its dealings but al Capone didn't just want to be rich or influential he wanted to be loved while most of his contemporaries were content lying low and making money quietly with liquor brothels and narcotics capone made sure the public knew his name whenever he went to restaurants he tipped generously and often you'd give staggering gratuities to paper boys or shoe-shiners? Everyone wanted to be on his good side. In January of nineteen twenty seven reporters from newspapers. All over Chicago were invited to a unique sort of press conference Al Capone's home. This was highly irregular and caused a good amount of buzz. Capone wasn't an elected official. Why did he want to talk to the press? When the wary journalists arrived they were shocked act when scarface Al greeted them at the doorway in slippers and pink apron waving a wooden spoon tipped with tomato sauce the very picture of an Italian man at ease he invited them inside and serve them all a feast of Spaghetti made by his Mother Teresa as the reporters ate and drank the red wine? You provided capone told them how much he despised the gang violence that had overtaken the city of Chicago. He was an honest family man after all and he deplored violence of any kind for a good while after the claim that Al Capone was a friendly man who couldn't stand violence would find its way into a number of stories about the Chicago. Algo Gangland slayings of the time Alec Opponents Facility with the media was legendary at the height of his popularity. It was said that capone could have run for mayor of Chicago and one he presented himself as a Robin Hood like figure a hero to the common man who had achieved his own version of the American dream he may have been involved in the illegal liquor market but he was an honest businessman. Just satisfying public demand. This idealized version of AL capone was an elaborately maintained facade on top of bootleggers smugglers and muscle capone had a number of newspaper men on his payroll. All this ensured there was a steady stream of complementary coverage of his activities to balance out the numerous gangland slayings more critical journalists suspected he had a hand in like the precise prophets. It's of his businesses telling where the real Al Capone ends and the mythical Al Capone begins is a matter of intense debate even to this day two men who met him in person our was charming family man who who was undeniably generous and yet it was hard to square this genial persona with the dozens of lifeless bodies headlining national newspapers of the time Capone's connection to organize crime was an open secret despite the tight hold he kept on his own public image and sometimes every once in a while he would let the jovial facade slip revealing a fiery temper if addressed in a certain way Al Capone was known to fly into a tremendous rage for instance he hated the nickname that had haunted him since he was a teenager scarface and he hated anyone calling him Italian whenever he hurt himself described as such capone would respond with barely contained contempt. I'm no Italian I was born in Brooklyn. This refusal to identify as Italian despite his exclusive association with Italian and Italian American gangsters only really makes sense. If you knew just how hard a young Al Capone fought to free himself from his immigrant upbringing in New York City Gabrielle and Theresa Capone moved to to America from Italy at the turn of the century bringing their three sons with them instead of settling in New York's most populous Italian neighborhood in the lower east side the capone settled in Brooklyn Alfonse Hans Gabrielle Capone was born on January seventeenth eighteen ninety nine the first capone child born in the new world. The Capone family lived on Park Avenue a street popular among all sorts of immigrants. Their apartment was nestled near the very edge of the Italian part of the street neighbor by a variety of eastern European German and Irish families. The Fourth of nine children Al was in a sense the ultimate middle middle child his oldest brother James ran away from home in one thousand nine hundred five when Al was just six years old though they suspected he was going out west to pursue acting in Hollywood his family would not learn what became of him until decades later of his siblings. L. Was especially close with his older brothers Ralph and frank both of whom he idolized for drastically different reasons in a way now was the perfect balance between Ralph and frank. The second eldest Ralph was the first drop out of school and take up with the local street gangs. He was a brutish boy who love fighting wasn't terribly interested in learning frank on the other hand was smart and charismatic preferring to use his intelligence as a weapon rather than his fists how possessed both Ralph's muscle and francs brains he would participate in brawls with the neighboring Irish boys regularly earning earning a reputation as a talented fighter but despite leaving school frequently for these sorts of scuffles capone still managed the equivalent of be grades in English and mathematics demonstrating his mental acuity and capacity acidy for learning even so L. still dropped out of school in sixth grade following in his older brother's footsteps how was frustrated by the way immigrant kids were treated by schools in poor communities and saw live on the streets streets is a quicker route to success al himself would later say that he learned more on the street than he ever would in a classroom despite his delinquent behavior his family was determined the young Ou- leader Respectable Life Life Gabrielle Capone barbershop and Brooklyn the cutting the hair of poor immigrants was hardly enough to keep nine children fed to help support his family. The fifteen year old owl joined Ralph working at a printing plant as a box cutter in nineteen fourteen. Unfortunately just a year later Ralph left for Manhattan to get married now one of only two breadwinners in his home of nine als paycheck of three dollars a week would go straight to his mother and siblings but als respectable job was not completely keeping him out of trouble during his time off Al would frequently join gangs of boys at the docks picking fights or jeering at recently disembarked sailors on their way to nearby brothels. The largest of these gangs was called the boys of Navy Street who chose Capone as a sort of mascot for his enthusiasm. Listen and intimidating physique worried that his association with gangs would get his son into trouble Gabrielle Capone gave young owl shoe shining kit and told him to set up on Columbia Street a very popular place for businessmen businessmen walking to and from work Gabriel's innocent attempt to keep his son in an honest profession backfired dramatically among the businessmen of Columbia Street were scores of less savory individuals specifically <unk> specifically minions of the local gang boss Don Batista Balsamo instead of learning an honest trade like his father hoped Allah observed how lower level mob enforcers operated he saw them offer protection action to businessmen. I E payment for not getting beaten up ditching the idea of shining shoes for a living al well muscled and tall for a fifteen year old started offering his fellow shoe-shiners the same kind of protection election he was joined by other less ambitious boys who just wanted to make a quick buck this new gang dubbed the South Brooklyn rippers would not last long when Don Balsamo found out he had them unceremoniously obviously booted off the street but al had a taste for power now his ability to manipulate the older boys into being his lackeys had filled him with a renewed ambition to be more than just an Italian kid hid in Brooklyn. He was going to find work in Manhattan up next. L. Meets the men who would teach him how to become a professional criminal. 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That's pair of thieves dot com slash king. What would you do to stay alive? Would you drink drink your own urine. Would you wade through snake infested water. Would you cut off your own arm no way I don't think I could go through with any of them. You might be surprised at the lengths you'd go to in order to stay alive every every week. The park has networks show survival tells the high intensity stories of people in life or death situations and explores the strategies they used to survive survival also examines the lasting psychological effects acts of living through a traumatic event and what it's like to return to normal life the stories of survival are extraordinary but the people in them are regular people like you and me and they exemplify the human spirits ability to triumph over deadly adversity new episodes come out every Monday search for and subscribe to survival wherever you listen to podcasts again search survival or visit podcast dot com <music> slash survival to listen now survival. How far would you go to stay alive now back to the story whenever he left his family home to go to work? Get the printing plant Al Capone found himself walking past a club owned by Johnny Torio Seventeen Years Capone Senior Torio was an up and coming figure in the Manhattan Crime World whose cunning had earned him the nickname name the Fox Toro's agents picked out this tall Italian boy as potential muscle and introduced him to the boss sometime around Nineteen Fifteen Toria was thirty three Al was sixteen L. was hired as an errand boy because Orios agents were impressed by his size clear aptitude for fighting but the Fox immediately noticed capone's natural intelligence and talent for numbers capone was quickly league even greater responsibility than other young men hired by Torio to test his skills he was brought into the office where Toro directed him to help his accountant's tally each day's hall. L. Made sure to never let his new boss us down. L. Was a keen student of Toro's business strategy studying him closely whenever he was needed to be an intimidating body in the room. Torio was like an evolved version of Al's brother Frank Inc a fast idiocy and intelligent man who used his charm and brains to convince others to do his dirty work Toria made aware of his shadier business dealings very early on in their working relationship Al learned about all the extortion rackets and brothels Tori Oh hell and noted how he never dealt with any of them. Directly these observations would strongly inform how ran his own business but Torio was not AL's only mentor figure around the same time he grew aware of Frankie Yale a business associate of Toro's who ran an ironically named establishment called the Harvard in we're Torio uh-huh was refined and subtle Yale was violent and showy but undeniably effective at instilling fear and his associates l would wind up working for Yale as a busboy during Toro's many business trips to Chicago. Now one thing capone admired about his new boss was his sense of style. The flashy suits Frank Yale preferred were more to Al's liking than Tori owes more muted fashion choices. He observed Zurve. How yields flair made him stand out at his club as if his very outfit was announcing this man is import a hot blooded boy of seventeen capone had become a frequent frequent womanizer he would often patronize oreos dance halls and brothels with his brother Ralf who moved back to Brooklyn after his first marriage fell apart around this time both of them contracted sexually transmitted the diseases Ralph caught gonorrhea and soon after Al got syphilis though he would not be diagnosed until years later Ralph's disease went away? L. Was not so lucky he never sought treatment preferring referring to enjoy the pleasures of youth without considering the eventual consequences of his actions. This pension for the pleasures of the flesh would have more immediately harmful effects than diseases in nineteen seventeen while working behind the bar at the Harvard Club. A young woman caught his eye. Her name was Lena Guccio. Now an overconfident lad of eighteen years old ala approached her and began to flirt in his own way crudely complimenting her figure she rebuffed his advances moments later. A man approached Al seemingly out of nowhere. It was a shorter Italian man and visibly drunk he introduced himself as Frank Frank and accused Al of insulting his sister before Al could react Frank Luccio punched him he reeled and as he was gaining his balance frank broke a bottle against the bark and struck l. with the jagged edges Al was left with three diagonal scars on the bottom left side of his face and neck the embarrassed Al Capone would never tell the story to anyone claiming that the scars were an old war wound despite never fighting in a war details about what happened became the stuff of legend some claimed the Luccio smashed him over the head with a chair before slashing him three times others claimed it was a single strike from a broken bottle. No matter what weapon caused it this injury would lead to capone's most infamous nickname which he hated scarface. The balancers soon broke up the fight Frankie Yale made al and frank apologized ties to each other. L. wanted revenge but Yale forbade it Frank Lucia was a trusted enforcer for Yale and thus above Al's reach despite this humiliation Al Capone status in the Brooklyn underworld. Underworld was on the rise is paychecks from his various jobs were helping his family and he soon set his sights on a woman who made him forget all about Lena Guccio. An Irish girl named May caughlin. Their relationship was something of an anomaly at the time May's upbringing was as traditionally Irish as als was traditionally Italian and both families were shocked when may gave birth to Al Son on December December fourth one thousand nine hundred eighteen and yet they would marry twenty six days later at Saint Mary Star of the sea despite mutual dislike from their respective parents they stayed married and May's mother even allowed Al to move in with her family capone's career would really kick off in nineteen nineteen. He started working for Torio full-time going out every night to collect money any from tornadoes various gambling halls brothels and clubs in what would become a pattern throughout their married life may stayed home and took care of their son Albert. Sonny Capone was a sickly child L. L. had passed his civilised to May an intern she had passed it on to their son sometime. In Nineteen Nineteen Al Capone received an offer from Johnny Torio Torio had been traveling a lot lately managing interests interests in both Brooklyn and Chicago. Now Torio had a golden business opportunity. Thanks to big Jim Cosimo. The man known as Diamond Jim. Jim Carlesimo was among the most influential crime. Bosses losses in Chicago is network of brothels gambling halls and clubs ran throughout the city and he had just made Johnny Torio his right hand man together they hit expanded Cosimo's influence and secured it against as two rival gangs but now with prohibition looming on the Horizon Toria wanted the twenty year old capone to join them capone didn't hesitate promising may bring them over soon capone left his wife and child behind in the early nineteen twenty s and struck out west to join his mentor in Chicago. They're Torio set him up as a bouncer at a club known as the four deuces at twenty two twenty two south Wabash avenue the four deuces was part saloon part dancehall and part brothel capone loved drinking dancing and women as one of the primary men tasked with the safety of the sex workers. He was rumored to frequently sample the wares. L. Was exactly what Torio needed in Chicago a man whose intellect matched his own but who wasn't afraid to get his hands dirty when needed but in his position as part enforcer part management Al Capone's name would not be put on any official documents his official business cards read Al Brown mm-hmm Secondhand furniture dealer beyond Al's usual talents Torio needed one more thing from him a confidant call a CMO and Torio had started to drift apart and he needed a right hand man he could trust not to betray him to the boss. The rift between Torio and COSIMO began in January of Nineteen twenty when Congress passed the Volts Dead Act prohibiting the sale and distribution of alcohol within the United States many criminals of the time including the rival North side gang saw this as an opportunity to fill a need that legitimate businesses were no longer providing Torio always thinking several steps ahead attempted to persuade swayed Jim Carlesimo to get into the bootlegging game but big. Jim Thought it was too risky. He was growing comfortable with his hold on the Chicago underworld so comfortable that he didn't see the need to take any risks he didn't have to Torio was furious at cosimo's shortsightedness. If COSIMO couldn't adapt with the Times they would have to get him out of the way Torio confided his plan to capone who readily agreed to assist list. They reached out to capone's old boss Frankie Yale with an offer they would bring him to Chicago for a job highly suited to his talents on May Eleventh Nineteen eighteen twenty big. Jim received a phone call from Torio. He needed a shipment of supplies for one of their clubs and big. Jim was the only one who could give the sign off though it was supposed to be as day off Jim Grudgingly Ingley went into his office to sign the Paperwork fifteen minutes later he stepped out of his office and out the door of the four deuces. He didn't notice the gunman lurking near his car. A pair of gunshots on shots struck cosimo in the back of the head and Eagle lapsed on the pavement did on the spot. The shooter was long gone before the body was discovered the murder made National News The New York Times Headline on May Twelfth Nineteen Twenty read James cosimo slain at restaurant door Chicago underworld character is shot dead by an unknown person. The man who would rule the Chicago underworld for almost two ooh decades was no more but the infrastructure is set up remained intact as COSIMO's number two theriault was in the perfect place to fill the power vacuum COSIMO's death opened end up brand new opportunities in L. Capone's is soon he brought his whole family wife child mother and siblings to Chicago. He bought a two family house. At seventy two forty four south prairie avenue. You and the entire Capone clan moved in his brother's Franken Ralph were put Ontorio's payroll as a strategist and enforcer respectively L. new their skills so he knew exactly how the outfit could use them in the south. Prairie Avenue House was more than just a home it was a fortress Capone made sure to install iron bars on the windows and reinforced the garage was steel. Plating Capone was not famous yet it but with the rising prominence of Johnny Torio he knew his days in the shadows were numbered. His prominent plays beside Torio attracted its own amount of attention especially since capone was the more physically imposing of the duo blow around this time he acquired a new nickname which vastly preferred to scarface. They called him snarky capone. Snarky was twenty slang paying for good dresser once he made the leap from Bouncer to businessman Allah had adopted the bold suited fashion of Frankie Yale often dressing in green or yellow he would even start to use face powder to conceal seal the scars on his left cheek his most famous accessory however was always his off white Fidora as capone impressed his newly arrived family with his newfound sense of style Torio took over all. Of Kala simos business interests seamlessly while there was little doubt in the underworld who had ordered the murder of big Jim the men who worked blow him would soon be sated by the influx of bootlegging money their new bosses provided provided under the leadership of Torio and capone this Italian American criminal enterprise would become known as the Chicago outfit it became among the strongest criminal organizations in Chicago alongside the Irish north side gang and the Jenner brothers who represented the Sicilian mafia both capone. N Torio knew that their work was only beginning the late. Jim Carlesimo had been right about one thing. Hang bootlegging was dangerous business they would face competition from other criminals as well as the law killing big Jim Carlesimo as dramatic as it was would be the simplest task in securing hold hold of Chicago up next Al Capone and Johnny Torio pay the price for overstepping their bounds now back to the story story from Nineteen Twenty one to nineteen twenty three the three major gangs and Chicago the north side gang the Jenna brothers and the Newly Christened Chicago outfit. We're in a steady standoff handoff around the liquor trade at this point. It was only a business rivalry. Though all of the involved parties had blood on their hands none took any actions against each other just yet dude alerts shared Italian heritage. There is no desire for competition between the brothers and the Chicago outfit however the North Side Gang under Dino Banyan was another issue entirely where Torio differed from abandon was in his strategy Torio Torio is focused on expansion over all else he already had enough brothels gambling halls in distilleries in Chicago so he began opening operations in neighboring towns and suburbs Torio rarely stayed in one place as for very long often taking trips out of town with his wife and these vacations served two functions keeping the stress of running the Chicago outfit from affecting their marriage and keeping Torio out of range of his rivals hit-men should the rivalry between the gangs ever erupt into violence now in charge of the outfits day-to-day Operations Al Capone relocated his base of operations to the Hawthorne Hotel in the suburb of Cicero it it was during his time in Cicero that capone started to receive personal attention from the papers reporter Roberts Saint John Founded a modest paper called the CICERO tribune in part to ensure that there was at least one local local paper immune to bribery from capone's Latkes one day in nineteen twenty four Saint John Ran into Ralph Capone while walking home from work. He didn't even try to run instead. He crouched into a ball and waited for the inevitable. Beating Ralph Capone hit him repeatedly using one of the Chicago outfit's favored weapons a bar of soap in a sock doc by the time they left the reporter was suffering from severe bruises and some broken bones. He was admitted to a nearby hospital after his recovery when Robert Saint John Attempted to pay his medical bills. The hospital turned his money down he was told they had already been paid by generous man in a white fedora with three scars on his face. One of the main reasons capone received so much attention in an CICERO was his blatant interfering with their local politics. The Capone Organization promoted a whole slate of local and state candidates for the upcoming primary election of April first nineteen twenty four capone own put his brother Frank on the task of bending public opinion toward their candidates in the Republican Party to combat the negative press from the Cicero Tribune the capone's founded their own paper the CICERO life which which became capone's mouthpiece throughout the campaign. The day of the election was one of ruthless and flagrant corruption capone's henchmen led by frank stood watch at the ballot boxes inspecting every ballot before it was deposited posited many democratic poll workers were intimidated or beaten to prevent them from doing their jobs. During the day word of this shameless manipulation made its way to Chicago mayor who dispatched a host of around seventy policemen to restore a fair election. These were not uniformed police but plain clothes cops driving unmarked black sedans frank capone was crossing facing the street when he saw this convoy of black cars rolling down the street towards him. The normally cool headed capone brother was alarmed by this these were the same cars als henchman used but all of theirs were already employed at the ballot boxes around the county. Possibly fearing encroachment from another gang frank reached for his revolver. The cars screech to a halt in front of him seeing his sudden movement policemen Eastman leaped out of their cars and opened fire. Frank Capone couldn't even touch his pistol before a hail of bullets rip through his clothing. He was dead before he hit the pavement. When al heard this he was furious raging against his lackeys at the utter cruelty of the police using the pseudonym Al Brown he took the stand to testify about the shooting Al claim that frank was a law abiding hiding citizen who did not own a gun? The shooting was eventually ruled a justifiable homicide and none of the officers were charged with a crime it took all of Toro's persuasive power to stop capone from exacting acting bloody revenge on all the policemen responsible but capone's fury concealed a slightly deeper feeling grief. If there was anything a callous murderer like capone cared about it was his family. If someone is smart and careful is frank could be gunned down so suddenly it meant that anyone was vulnerable. No matter how many precautions he took the only way to ensure the safety of his family was to have have absolute power power that would be within his grasp in only a year Dino Banyan leader of the north side gang was becoming a problem for the Chicago outfit in May of one thousand nine hundred twenty four a month after capone's election victory cost him his brother O'bannon appro story oh about the Sieben brewery which they co owned abandoned toll theriault that he wanted out of the liquor gain an offer to sell his stake in the brewery not seeing any downside to this tutorial accepted as oh Banyans last shipment was being loaded out. Policemen and prohibition agents stormed the brewery. Arresting o'bannon Torio and several of their henchmen o'bannon was able to get off with a slap on the wrist since he had no prior Prohibition Related Arrests Torio on the other hand had to bail himself and his as men out he had lost up to five hundred thousand dollars and the brewery when o'bannon refused to pay him back Torio realized that he had been played o'bannon had set up the raid or at least I leveraged his prior knowledge of it humiliated and furious theriault told capone to handle o'bannon while he left town to avoid the heat capone reached out once again to his old boss Frankie Yale Aw Dino Banyan spent much of his time at Scofield's flower shop which served as a headquarters for the north side gang in the guise of wanting an arrangement for a funeral Frankie Yale paid multiple visits to this shop and chatted with Obama about the arrangements as they talked frankie casually memorized the layout of the shop. Yale's final visit was on the morning of November Tenth Nineteen Twenty four he entered the shop with two Jenna Associates John scalise easy and Albert and sell me o'bannon emerged from the back room and welcome them Yale extended his hand in greeting when abandoned shook hands with Kim Yale clamp down on his fist and refused to let go and sell me and Schal easy flanked o'bannon and each fired four shots into him as Yale held him in place o'bannon collapsed face down on the floor four and received a final bullet in the back of his head. Oh Banyans death kicked off an infamous period of violence in Chicago history. The North side gang was now led by Hymie Weiss and bugs Moran Dan both of whom were furious that their mentor had been slain so offhandedly they needed payback Torio is hiding out in hot springs Arkansas far from the north side gangs reach but capone was still in town town a ripe target for retribution on January Twelfth Nineteen Twenty Five Al Capone was entering a restaurant for lunch when a line of cars pulled up alongside the building and opened fire L. threw himself into the restaurant as bullets riddled his car and the building beside it. The sound of the machine guns was as deafening as it was shocking. This was the first recorded use of the Thompson submachine gun in Chicago. This weapon would later define gang warfare in the nineteen twenties moments after the volley began the cars pulled away leaving debris and als- destroyed car in its wake capone miraculously was unscathed. WBT Torio was not so lucky believing that this dramatic show of force was the only attempt the north side gang would make for revenge. He returned to Chicago later that month twelve days after the attempt on Capone's life life on January twenty fourth Toria was returning home from a shopping trip with his wife Anna his driver pulled up to his home and the tutorials picked up their groceries and began to head inside certainly a sedan roared down the street and their direction two men stepped out of it and made their way toward the parked car Torio recognize them instantly hymie Weiss and bugs Moran the two men produced shotguns and pistols pistols from their coats and charged. They emptied their weapons at Torio as they approached the gunfire shattered the glass of his car filling it steel casing with holes theriault was hit in several places including the jaw aw lungs and abdomen he collapsed on the ground bleeding heavily. He looked up to see bugs Moran staring down at him pistol raised. The gun didn't fire either Moran Iran had used up all his ammunition in the initial volley or his forty five had jammed the frustrated gangsters began pummeling the prone Torio kicking and hitting him with clubs had a signal from their driver. Moran unwise ran back to their vehicle. The sedan pulled away down the street leaving Torio for dead but Torio was rushed to the hospital and miraculously survived. He spent a month recovering in intensive care once again. Capone was called to testify for the shooting of a man close to him capone denied knowing any of the gangland suspects in the shooting staying true to the unspoken code of silence among gangsters capone's entire testimony was provable false with the exception of the final exchange when the interviewer asked him. Would you tell us if you did know who shot Torio Capone replied no. I value my life too much to tell you if I know around the clock guards stood outside Oreos hospital room capone himself lay in a cot beside Toro's hospital bed every night essentially shielding his boss laws with his own body even hospital staff were wary of entering the room one story Oh recovered he was taken to court for the Sieben brewery incident and sentenced to nine months in prison through bribery he ensured it was a comfortable stay. After a few short months of running the Chicago outfit Capone received word from the prison at the age of forty three Johnny Torio was retiring the entire hire multimillion dollar enterprise was capone's alone now all he had to do was protect his business and his family from those who wanted to put him behind bars while he plotted revenge venture on Bugs Moran and Hymie Weiss his profile grew capone relish the spotlight absorbing positive and negative press with the Glee of a movie star but it was this publicity that would ultimately prove his undoing. Thanks again for listening to kingpins next week. The Chicago outfit finally gains the interest of the F._B._i.. And Al Capone becomes public enemy number one you can find more episodes of kingpins as well as all of our casts other shows on spotify and anywhere you listen to podcasts several of you the best Dada help us if you enjoy the show the best way to help us is to leave a five star review and don't forget to follow us on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network. We'll see you next time. Kingpins was created by AMAC's Cutler is a production of cutler media and is part of the podcast network it is produced by Maxon Ron Cutler with sound design by Kerry Murphy Production Assistance by Ron Shapiro and Paul Libeskind additional production assistance spy Maggie admire and Freddie Beckley. This episode of kingpins was written by Robert Team Stra and stars Kate Leonard and how will target don't forget.

Gabrielle Capone Al Capone capone Johnny Torio Torio Chicago scarface Al Al Capone Chicago Torio capone Al Alfonse Hans Gabrielle Capone Plating Capone Theresa Capone Frank Frank Capone Organization Frankie Yale Toro Jani Theriault L. L. Franken Ralph