35 Burst results for "Harvard Business School"

Bob Rosenberg & the Lessons Learned From Running Dunkin Donuts

Dose of Leadership

07:44 min | Last month

Bob Rosenberg & the Lessons Learned From Running Dunkin Donuts

"Bob Rosenberg on dose of leadership, former CEO of Dunkin donuts. I am so excited to have you on the show. Welcome pleasure. Well, you got this new book coming out in October, round the corner to round the world, your lessons of that you learn running Dunkin donuts I love Dunkin donuts by the way I think copies outstanding pilot. Now, go through the airport I always bypass starbuck's sorry starbucks and I always go straight to Dunkin donuts that coffees just so good to music to my ears. You know I was reading your bio and it said you graduated from Harvard Business School. Told me this right and your twenty five and you became the CEO when you're twenty five is that right? That's correct within weeks of my graduation I had in my early career I basically virtually grew up. Over the store I worked in lots of different jobs within my family business, which is not call Dunkin donuts gone universal food systems and a variety of different jobs I went to hotel school and went into the army, and then went on to graduate school in. Expected to join the family business but Lord knows I had no expectation that it's twenty five I dad who is only forty seven at the time eighth grade educated Guy Returns to me. And asked me if I wouldn't take over the responsibility of CEO. At his business said the REF aching request and that one third few weeks to decide upon. But ultimately best decision I ever made man the yeah. Obviously a life altering one of those decisions in life that that. was definitely a y intersection the road, and you had to make a choice. You went down that path and there was no looking back. Once you did. But Man Twenty, five, I can't imagine you know that was almost twenty seven years ago for me just the the leadership lessons I've learned from twenty five to fifty, two AB. been. I can only imagine you with your experience it had to be a minimum exponential. So the type of leader you were at twenty five to when you stopped in one, thousand, nine hundred and what do you think the big differences were one of the things that was an advantage early on in the first soda, era I break the book down into the six areas that I that I see as the company history from nineteen, sixty, three to. Nineteen Ninety Eight. But in the first era, the big help was business school and it was there that I learned the language to strategy. I would love to say that I came to the job as a copy twenty, five year old into it. All right I think I matured and and made my mistakes and boy did I make a lot of mistakes over those thirty five years if that the thing that I think the grew was my emotional intelligence. To better understand myself an-and away to. Hopefully understand my teammates around me franchise on his and the people that I came in contact with end consumers. and. It was a journey I. Mean I would absolutely say that It's an old saying, but it's true in my case no, you can't put an old hat on a young body. You do have the Soda Lauren through trial and error and I think truthfully, in my case, the setbacks experience were more informative and more useful. than the successes in fact, a big mistake the after the five I five is of tremendous success, the second five years or really difficult, and it really came as a result of the success of the first five years. It became an impediment to future success in it wasn't until. Unfortunately almost led the team off a cliff in the second five-year era that I really began to start to learn the more effective lessons about who I was what my responsibilities were. As a leader. and. It came from a book of all places. Really my my soda moment transformational moment for me. He uses a book that you read was kind of a transformation moment, moment or. Second Year of a second era of Maya my stint as CEO, and after the first five years basically was under pressure to go publican. And when I came out of Business School Isaiah inheritance universal systems where eight little businesses it was it was excused chaos and fundamentally what the team did is we basically narrowed that down a one we had really been experimenting with far too many businesses and we say basically decided to exploit the the sort of the diamond in the rough that we. Had which was a bunch of stores in many cases, soul breakfast lunch called Dunkin donuts and made donuts and coffee, and we decided to focus on our core business and quiz extraordinarily successful and we went from one hundred thousand dollars in pretax profit within five to seven, hundred, fifty thousand and we went public because my dad I've been trying to sell the business. While I was in business school was unable to sell from billion dollars. It'd become the billionaire always wanted to be after taxes and that was the reason he turned to me I. Think at that Young Age is he wasn't quite sure what to do and. Put me in charge. Then I changed the vision, change the dried to keep up unreasonable injectors and. Drove the business off a cliff I was sitting there amidst. Stockholder suits, franchisee lawsuits reading a book called the best and the brightest by David Halberstam. And it was a book about the Johnson and Kennedy Administration of the Vietnamese War, and what he maintained was even though the administration are governmental Mister show run by these Ivy Leaguers the best the brightest our country at the offer they never really went into the hamlets and into the front lines where the war was being waged the final what the true story was while the con-, winning the hearts and minds of the townspeople in the leadership in the towns. And Halbe Sam said the great fault lie in the fact that our leadership. Suffered from what he called Hubris the Greek word for arrogance in sitting in that chair and I remember like it was yesterday I said Oh my God Halberstam could be talking about me. Yeah it was in that and I decided I. You know I was blaming Franchisees for suing us and. Problems that we're having in terms of Mike. One of my key executives left the company because he had lost faith leadership fellow had gone out of business school with. An and basically we convened our management team. We decided that as leadership we'd never blamed. Martine. Mates are followership take a hundred percent of the responsibility hundred other responsibility. And that we that invite, we apologize for the Arab always we invited franchise on his end to noodle out with us what we did on how we can improve it. We decided we're GONNA go each of us to visit a hundred stores a year each in order to touch the front is travel with the district manages visit the store talk to the owners. Get very important in we created an advisory council. So fundamentally, we did a one eighty in terms of our attitude about how were leaders particularly need what my responsibility was in it all came from that that insight that momentary it's insight from that one book that was transformation I love that story the book was called the best and brightest what what was the full in the brightest by David Halberstam? Think Nineteen, seventy-three, it's it's it's bestseller it was. An important book at the time. In my view, it's still a great management.

Dunkin Donuts CEO Harvard Business School David Halberstam Starbucks Bob Rosenberg Lord Advisory Council Halbe Sam Martine Mike Kennedy Administration Johnson
Shopping for Health Care: How Consumer Can Use Purchasing Power to Get What They Need with Deb Gordon

Outcomes Rocket

04:15 min | 2 months ago

Shopping for Health Care: How Consumer Can Use Purchasing Power to Get What They Need with Deb Gordon

"Welcome back to the outcomes rockets Sal Marquez here, and they have the privilege of hosting for the Second Time Miss Deb Gordon, she's spent her career trying to level the playing field for health care consumers haven't listened to the first podcasts with DAB. You've gotta go listen to it. It's all about the consumer and healthcare. She's all about you. She's all about your employees and how you can get the most for your healthcare dollar. She's the author of the healthcare consumers manifesto how to get the most for your money based on research she conducted as a senior fellow. At the Harvard Kennedy, School Center for Business and government she's a former health insurance executive and health care CEO. She's an aspen. Institute health innovators fellow and an Eisenhower fellow, her research and commentaries have appeared in USA Today, the Harvard Business Review blog, and on network open. She holds a B A in bioethics from Brown University and an MBA with distinction from Harvard Business School and I'm excited to dive into her work again around the consumer's manifesto deb such a privilege to have you back on. Hey, saw. Thanks so for having me back. Yeah, absolutely. So you've been busy. I have been busy. That's true. I spent probably a year doing research for this book and another year writing a not exactly that split but I spend a good two years of my life producing this baby and it is exciting to come back and tell you about it because when we first met, I was just starting to think about it. I was just starting the research and listening to what consumers had to say. So I'm excited to be back to talk more about it the same here and so dab you know obviously. So listeners goal isn't a DEB's podcast. This you get a deeper appreciation about her time as an insurance executive and what has inspired her work and focus in the consumer sphere but a little bit about the book. Dab. You know what's the focus area? What are the takeaways at a high level? Sure. So I wrote the book mainly to expose the human side of healthcare costs like what is really going on for people when we go to the doctor or were phasing an insurance decision and we have to pay. For it and I was really taken with the fact that so many people of all walks of life come to me and say because I used to work health insurance they know I know something about it and they just say what should I do and you know the most extraordinary people who've accomplished so much in their lives walk into my office at the Kennedy School at Harvard and alike, what health insurance should I buy and I. It just dawned on me that if people like that need help and it's Legitimate that they do. It's very confusing and can be overwhelming like what chance is you know everyone else have of making sense of these decisions. So that's the motivation that I I brought into the book and then in doing my research for it, I heard story after story of consumer. So real people who are trying to get value for their healthcare dollars whether they use those kind of terms or not I say like shopping for healthcare is a thing we could do people don't use those words and they don't even. Know what I'm talking about. But you know I interviewed people about their experiences spending money on healthcare and what I learned is that although it feels really foreign to put that into shopping terms or you know we know how to buy things but we don't know how to shop around in healthcare and. It doesn't mean we're not able to. That's I think the biggest takeaway is that we do actually have more power than we might even realize and that the first step is to just ask the question, what if what, if I could get what I needed? What do I need? Why do I need this? Is there an alternative and just almost like re imagine ourselves as a customer when it comes to healthcare this is Dr is nervous and unhappy by the way, but it's not a slight against doctors. It's just you know what I think consumers need for whatever reason we need permission almost to think of ourselves as entitled to get value for our healthcare dollars.

Sal Marquez Harvard Kennedy Harvard Business School Harvard Business Review Deb Gordon Executive DEB Senior Fellow Brown University School Center For Business Eisenhower Usa Today Harvard Kennedy School
You're Right, You Are Working Longer and Attending More Meetings, Harvard Study Finds

WBZ Afternoon News

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

You're Right, You Are Working Longer and Attending More Meetings, Harvard Study Finds

"Working working from from home home is is difference. difference. We We knew knew that, that, but but here here it it is is in in numbers, numbers, CBS's CBS's Debra Debra Rodriguez Rodriguez explains. explains. Feel Feel like like you're you're actually actually working working Mohr from home that you were at the office, you probably are. An analysis by researchers at Harvard Business School finds the average pandemic workday increased by more than 8%. About 48 minutes when the pandemic began. Employees have also been attending 13% more meetings, though they may be shorter than pre Cove it. We're getting more than five per cent more emails a day more than 8% of them are sent after business hours. And about the old 9 to 5 boundaries long gone advice to managers empathize and focus on output, Not ours. Debra Rodriguez, CBS News

Debra Debra Rodriguez Rodrigue CBS Cbs News Harvard Business School Pre Cove Mohr
"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:22 min | 3 months ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. where, we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical. Interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda..

John S. Couch: The Art of Creative Rebellion

Leadership and Loyalty

04:27 min | 4 months ago

John S. Couch: The Art of Creative Rebellion

"And Gentlemen, please put your hands together and help me welcome my friend. That's that's an infection. You'd see you too. Thanks for joining us. Really appreciate it. Our say the beginning of the show this is a question I ask everybody because we live in this age of influences although I think that's a terrible title but nonetheless. I'm one of the things I always want to know is who is someone who we might not know or even consider who has been a major influence on you and on your leadership. Well there's The usual suspects that people talk about whether it's talking about Peter. Drucker. From a management perspective and two usual kind of business school books approach to but in reality for me a lot of. My corporate influences have been really nontraditional. So. There is a book called the art spirit by an artist named Robert. Henry from the Ash can school in eighteen. Ten. Nineteen twenty really early times who interestingly enough he He kind of broke down in enlightened my thinking about creativity along time ago and interesting enough I find a lot of the things that that influenced me over time. Or less the business books no less the how books in really more books that were philosophical. So a one level Robert Henry's take on creativity. Of starting with what you have in once you are in working from there was incredibly important. I would say from a strategic perspective when I was a teenager a book called the Book of five rings by Miyamoto Musashi, which is the the book that the probably considered to be the greatest summarize Japan wrote in the sixteenth century about strategy literally ten days before he died. And it's kind of the sun, Suu, art of War for Japan, but it's much center. And actually was adopted by the Harvard Business School. Thirty years ago as required reading and in that book it talked about. How humans are essentially broken down and Thomas elements of wind fire and water in the void. And talked about how you lead teams and so a lot of ways was interesting for me is the fact that this summary. Talked about the fact that human beings are multi variant the metaphor for him. Was the idea that when you're actually pulling together people, you don't try to make one-size-fits-all actually aknowledged what people's capabilities in what their? Lack of talents and whether great talents are without judgment. So the analogy was you're building a house and some would is used to support the house and it's very maybe gnarly and but stick it strong and you hide it behind the walls and you have been near would which is very thin and grab for a beautiful and you put that towards the front and you know the metaphor goes on you know with the idea human beings are the same way and that you wouldn't expect a beautiful. Veneer Wall to be a supporting column of would within the House in the same way to the metaphor goes when you're when you're hiring people and when you're actually trying to build a culture that you hire and you don't thank will this person needs to conform into this particular role that I'm trying to fulfill but you actually look at them and say, well, the role trying to fill is one part of the overall capabilities at this person. On Larry. And if you're. Smart about it, I think what you do you use the Job Description at you're putting out in the world is a way to attract talent. But if you do it correctly, the job itself is just one part of the overall capability of the person. You can actually almost van Diagram Denise between the business and within Russell needs are the personnel are, and if you can kind of do that crossover where they intersect, you can actually unlock two to three x the capabilities of that person. So probably long winded answer to your question, but does two books were interesting of a huge influence to me?

Robert Henry Drucker Harvard Business School Miyamoto Musashi Japan SUU Peter Russell Thomas Larry
Brother helping brother to cure Rare Disease

Sounds of Science

09:24 min | 10 months ago

Brother helping brother to cure Rare Disease

"Welcome rich and Karen. Thanks for having us go to be here. Thank you for coming. I know it's a bit chilly today. So I'm glad that you braved the elements to come on out here anytime anytime. So can you tell us a bit about yourselves? And your personal stake in cure diseases mission. Rich let's start with you. Jor Happy to So as you mentioned I'm the President and founder of cure disease. I started the organization bit over two years ago because I have a younger brother. Terry who has a disease called Duchenne muscular dystrophy as you alluded to Terry's form of do Shan is quite rare. His specific mutation type is very rare and the difficulty. With that is he's not amenable to Clinical trials for the most part because of both his age as well as ambulatory status. These group of rare disease patients aren't left behind. So you grew up with Terry. Obviously was this sort of something that you would always in the back of your mind starting on organization like this or did that idea come to you later. It's a long answer. I was trying to give you the short version of it so Yeah I grew up at Terry. Terry's four years younger than I am. we both grew up in upstate. New York we're big fans of star wars and playing catch outside when he still could Years ago in the back of your mind whether you're me or somebody else. That's impacted by rare disease. You have the idea that you want to do something. Oftentimes you don't know what I struggled with the idea of. I don't know what to do for a long time till I had the opportunity to go to Harvard Business School and partake in the volcanic fellowship at Harvard. Business School and through that I was able to me really really incredible people who were doing really incredible things to advance science and advanced therapeutics that we're lifesaving and lifesaving and one of those individuals. Dr Tim Mu at Boston Children's hospital and that's really where the story begins. Cool so care and let's move on to you. How did you get involved with care rare disease? What's Your Story Shar Well my name is Karen Morales. I'm forty two years old and when I was twenty and a sophomore in college. I was diagnosed with extremely rare form of muscular dystrophy. Though at that time was called my Oshii myopathy so over the course of the last twenty years. I've spent a lot of my time and mental resources on ways in which to keep my health in a positive trajectory ways in which to avoid the most negative of diagnostic outcomes. That I was told about when I was twenty so as part of that I always stayed very open to what was happening in medical research and through the powers of facebook finally enough. I came across a video that riches organization did last spring so spring of twenty nine thousand nine hundred and in that video I heard about the power of crisper something that I had been monitoring. I just hadn't seen anybody doing it for muscular dystrophy given my background in advertising and marketing and now I own my own agency I reached out immediately and told rich. I wanted to talk to him that and turned into coffee and a phone call. And we've been working together ever since. Could you tell us a little bit more about muscular dystrophy? Karen we start with you. Know it probably has different developmental trajectories but can get like a baseline of what the disease looks like. Sure so. There are many types of muscular dystrophy. He's like large Disease categories for most of us. We are missing or our bodies stops producing effectively a certain type of protein. They're different types of protein in different disease states. In my case it's despair Lin In Dijon its destruction and the impact of what that protein does varies by disease type so in my case the digital muscles so the ones away from the center core of my body my calves and my arms weaken over time it for my particular type. It's not a life ending diagnosis. It's potentially a life altering diagnosis right. So there is a large level of variability between the different types. And how they actually present. But the common thread across all muscular dystrophy is is until now they've been untreatable. And the majority of folks facing these really rare diseases have to take a lot of their medical care into their own hands. And I think that is a shared history that both Terry and I and the other patients in this group all have. It's with a lot of personal trial and error and working to advocate for yourself that you're able to receive the care that you need because it is still in many cases an issue that doctors and hospitals and emergency rooms don't see that often So it can be easily mis read misinterpreted and sometimes cared for in ways that are actually have adverse reactions for the patients. Themselves has terry had a similar experience to Karen in terms of his disease. Strict trajectory Terry has had a similar experiences. Karen had in with regard to his disease. In fact he had a recent fall just over the holiday where he collapsed and broke both of his femurs and the difficult challenge was living in an upstate and rural part of New York that there wasn't an immediate care center nearby that could deal with not only two broken femurs but underlying condition of do Shannon and so a lot of work is put into connecting. Terry's neurologist whose doctor Brenda Wong at the University of Massachusetts in a collaborator of ours with the care team at that hospital in upstate. New York to ensure that the proper things were done that propofol was used for instance for anesthesia in instead of a gaseous form of anesthesia. And so it's little things like this that have very big ramifications that we need to be very cautious of across the spectrum of rare diseases. Not just the muscular dystrophy but more broadly taking into consideration the patient's perspective in the patient's point of view in conjunction with the with the care team Rather than I think the traditional dynamic of the doctor being sort of the superior and the patient being the one who who accepts the information advocacy in the hospital setting is of utmost importance because it really does mean the difference between life and death as we found with my brother? What was the incentive for setting up care rare disease? I mean there are many routes. You could have taken to help Terry. So what made you decide to pursue this one? That's A. That's a good question so as I mentioned earlier during my time in business school I had the chance to meet Dr Tim you so I got to know Tim through through a mutual friend of ours and understood what he was doing the process that he was developing to characterize the patient to develop therapeutic construct specific to the patient mutation and then the rapidly test those and then get into dosing the patient all within a year and accomplish the and so meeting him. Obviously the question of mine came to mind is how do we take this applications for Batten's disease? And how do we apply it to a neuro muscular disease? Such as Duchenne Orlin girdle or any of the other number for diseases. That need help and so it was through that process. That was the spark for cure disease. As sort of as a as a patient caregiver sort of you look for those opportunities of hope where you can drive towards something. Quick rather than the traditional ten years and two billion dollars development cycle which forces. Today's patients to likely not be able to see tomorrow's treatments simply because they take too long. Karen what was it about riches organization or rich himself that convince you to sign on and help them out as being on their board of directors. It's the jokes. It definitely was a combination. Having lived through a rare disease for twenty years myself. I have followed the medical research and I've been involved in any trials that were available having also spent the majority of my life working with fortune. Five hundred companies globally introducing new products and working in a combination of Silicon Valley and traditional. Cpg Brands I was noticing that across medical research. It felt like the systems were antiquated. I knew my gene defect in the early two thousands and at that time I was told that there would probably be a five to seven year. Lag Be four therapeutics for available as a patient. I saw riches approach as something that had faster outcomes than what I was used to seeing Across the market. When I met him and I realized that he had put together. Such an incredible team of world renowned leaders across different medical institutions. I immediately was in and I've been a huge supporter ever since I think what this organization is able to do. As a nonprofit drug company will truly revolutionize the way that patients can have hope when they're dealing with these catastrophic

Terry Karen Morales President And Founder New York Rich Business School Harvard Business School Facebook Dr Tim Mu Harvard Myopathy Silicon Valley Duchenne LIN Dr Tim Shan Propofol Boston Children
A Reason to Reveal Your Failures

Curiosity Daily

01:57 min | 10 months ago

A Reason to Reveal Your Failures

"Success is a double edged sword hard work. Ken Come with amazing benefits like more pay more responsibility and and more stability but it can also carry jealousy competition and the resentment right along with it. So how do you keep. The scales tipped toward the positive well. According into new research from Harvard. Business School you can do it by talking more about your failures. This tip might sound counterintuitive. Isn't it important. Talk Your achievements. Don't you want people to know you're successful. Why would you ever highlight year failures right well? The thing is when successful people only talk about their success. They come off as egotistical and that can stir up what the Harvard Business School researchers call malicious envy. That's the kind of destructive envy that makes people wants to harm the successful person according to the researchers if you're really successful then it's likely that everybody already knows about your achievements admits it's more interesting and inspiring for people to learn about your mistakes and that makes sense right. I mean when you reveal both your successes and failures. The the team says you're more likely to stir a benign kind of envy. The kind that drives people to be more like the successful person instead of tearing them down. They found that people don't have less admiration for a leader when they know about the leader's failures and they still respect his or her status. The envy just becomes less harmful and more motivational national and as a bonus revealing past failure tends to make people think you're more deserving of success because that means you had to try harder to get there now you can still talk about your successes. That's especially true for people who are just starting out if you're a paper shuffling intern for example. Your colleagues probably aren't envious of you in the first place but as you claim the letter remember that it's good to talk about your failures to you won't fall down and you might even get to climb higher

Ken Come Harvard Business School Harvard Business School Intern
Panera Bread/Au Bon Pain: Ron Shaich (2018)

How I Built This

07:27 min | 10 months ago

Panera Bread/Au Bon Pain: Ron Shaich (2018)

"Ron Shake isn't a household name like you say Howard Schultz but you could argue that. What Howard Schultz did for coughing Ron shake did for cheddar broccoli soup or the SEO cheese he's Bagel because like Howard? Ron Wasn't just focused on product. He was interested in creating a space of place where people could hang out for a long time. Maybe even have a PTA meeting or social gathering and really linger over that Bagel or cup soup. This is the famous third-place concept concept that both Howard Schultz and Ron shake wanted to tap into in. That's how Panera became one of the fastest growing restaurant chains in the world. In fact if you've invested the seven thousand dollars in Pinera stock in nineteen ninety nine. You'd be sitting on more than half a million dollars by two two thousand seventeen now. The thing is if you met Ron shake say in high school. This is not the path you've predicted for him. Ron Wasn't even interested in business. Is Passion was politics. His parents were raging liberals and Ron grew up going to rallies and volunteering on campaigns. All over New Jersey eventually went to Clark University where naturally he majored in politics and he was quickly elected to student government. And that could have been Ron's life life except for one day when something happened to Ron and a group of friends something kind of small but something that when you look back on it probably probably changed his entire life. Yeah so we. We were in a local convenience store called store. Twenty four cross the street from the main entrance to the Clark campus and they accused US shoplifting and tossed us out cecily guys just being rowdy earnings or wild. No we were shopping but I came back to campus episode and I was in my dorm with a couple of friends and I said you know. Why are we shopping there? How they can they treat us like this? What supports that store? We said what do we need what we can we can do this ourselves. We can have our own convenience store and I said you know this isn't going to be that hard. Let's go do it. And we approach the university. They weren't so keen on this but I moved the question to student body They voted in support of it and I basically agreed to spend that summer between my sophomore and junior here opening this convenience store guy. Wow So. What'd you guys Sal We sold Everything from drinks to Munchies two cookies and candy and you know our assistant manager would come to my apartment at five in the morning and we actually would go to this deep discount supermarket and buy I don't know ten or fifteen baskets full of merchandise that we'd stocked the store with and We hired twenty or thirty different students to work there. I will be very franken. Saint Joe's more interested in that store than when I was in my own academically. And and your guy who's all still focused on public policy in government but I guess this it was Kinda cool you liked. He kind of liked doing business running a business. Yeah and and you know. I didn't see myself as that kind of guy and it took me a wile to make sense of that but in so many ways running a business is no different than campaign in fact a campaign is a the business that that essentially has one day in which it ends a business campaign that goes on and never ends so at this point in his life. Ron Wasn't quite sure what he wanted to do. Business or politics but people around him saw how how much he loved running that convenience store and a lot of people said. Hey why don't you get an MBA. So Ron did he enrol at Harvard. Business School in Nineteen seventy six. And when he finished unlike a lot of his classmates who went into banking or finance ron decided to go into retail and he took a job in the mid west and a place called held the original cookie company. Twenty stores in shopping malls We grew it to about one hundred and twenty five. I took the job as the third year of the NBA. What I mean by that is I took a job as a district manager? Basically Iran ten or fifteen of these cookie stores half the United States and I spent went My time running around the country and I ended up opening thousands of these cookie stores around the country so as certain point you're learning about the cookie business I guess and then at a certain point you get this idea like hey I can do this myself. I can have my own cookie store yes and and I can literally remember traveling Cross Indiana. I'm away to Fort Wayne Dope a new cookie store and it hit me and I said why are we opening this in a Mav. There's a huge opportunity open these in in an urban setting. Why don't we open one and I can remember going to my boss? I remember him taking me to meet. Beat the CEO of the company. Said I wanNA open an urban cookie. Store looks him and he says we don't do that here. We Open Mall based retail units. I thought to myself well. If you're not GONNA do it. I'd like to go do it. Why shouldn't we and I'm the Kinda guy by Sam going to do it? I want to go do it and it led led me to actually resigning my job and I moved back to Boston and I started looking for real estate and the reality was. Nobody would Li space for cookies. Find any sir for cookie store because they thought it wouldn't make enough money to pay the rent. 'cause I had no credibility. Yeah I had no real money I had you know no balance sheet to sign a lease and so I went to my dad and I said I I want my inheritance. Whatever it's going to be I want the opportunity to use it and I had about twenty five thousand dollars Ned Essentially let me. He gave me seventy five thousand dollars and that one hundred thousand dollars became the GRUB stake the equity. That allowed us to build that. I four hundred square-foot cookie store. Wow in downtown Boston. What did you name the store? We named it the cookie jar and I can remember. We took the toll house recipe. Right it off the bag. I bought a small mixer and I would pass out cookies in front of the stories that we were building. It and I'd start to adjust the recipe based on what I learned talking to customers and and you were the baker. You were making cookies yourself. Yeah we opened. There were three employees. I made it was me and to folks I will never forget at that day. It just seemed like people never stopped walking a coming in and purchase fifty thousand people day going by and I'll never forget it. I got to the end of the day walking past or foot traffic. Yeah but I got to the end of that at first afternoon. We opened one o'clock guide and by six we closed and my back was hurting. Oh and legs were hurting. And I can't in the money and I I realize we only brought in four hundred dollars. I mean you forget when we talk about business what it is the self the four hundred batches of cookies buck each and the amount of energy and work that goes into

Ron Shake Howard Schultz Boston United States Pinera Panera New Jersey Clark University NBA Assistant Manager Indiana Clark Campus Franken Fort Wayne Harvard Saint Joe District Manager Shoplifting CEO Cecily
Overcoming the Impostor Syndrome

The Product Podcast

08:40 min | 11 months ago

Overcoming the Impostor Syndrome

"Everyone my name is kwami. And I used to work in Mexico in product and I recently joined Verizon media about three months ago so putting you to the bay area objects just moved Jeff So the topic that brings us here. Today is a side. Just I used to be something engineering. I moved from sucking can humans product so What brings us here? Today's topic so comments up big from engineering to product overcoming the impostor syndrome Come out generally like to be a conversation on talk so I tried to prepare a few slides as possible so that it can be more conversation. input as well so going forward. This try do that. It's It's going to be a fun all right. So the agenda sell I I. I'd like to talk about next contacts about me What is product management? My jeans product Imposter Syndrome can start Just taking game looking what it is in in some fact surrounded and then some challenges I face and then five issues. I've picked up as more by on the issues that I picked out just Regards which gusset imposter syndrome and then how. I overcame IMPOSITON. Hopefully it'll who can it. It will be useful to you and then some key takeout takeaways that out like you to Renewed Aachen in Tacoma right. So start right with some fun facts about me So I'm originally from Ghana West Africa and I I actually grew up in South Africa. Small country called Swaziland. The Kingdom of size is one of the last remaining market in the world And it has about one point. Four million people so from very small tastes in Africa so I grew up in a family of entrepreneurs by parents. Aaron started off as teachers and I had the I guess I was fortunate. Watch them set up the own businesses whilst they were teachers indeed My Mom's side of the retail business. My Dad started my dad and my mom together started a consulting business in on. I was the African parents that to gifted children involved in your businesses so I I was involved in various aspects sometimes running by MOMS retail business. When shows away in my dad's business As dry vice over as Within the office realm so give me some good experiences. I was growing up so that I started my sneak of business so my mom used to as to start her business she should bring home some goods loss us as you said. Travel there on Welsh because back in she brings him good spots in for me. It was necas most of the time and I used to go to school. So Primary School in high school in I'll be walking. People become mention my sneakers and it took me a long time. Jackie free to create. That can actually make a business again. Why I'm wearing? I can actually bring to the people make some money so I sent it to source some sneakers locally inside. I got them for about twenty dollars. I got the start up capital from my mom I got them between Dawes. in-and-out seldom for about sixty dollars. So I mean some good profits in good the public money off that business I did that for a few years. And then I ventured into music so music writing music producing music. And I'm I'm doing the Polish Abang concerts and stuff like that so Figuring out how the music business works in that giving another arm armaments to learn how to build a business to learn how to make money radium. Each I moved here to the US. When I was nineteen I move for school? ooh And I studied computer science It was very interesting because I actually. I wanted to study business but I remember one time whereas Doing my assignment a friend of mine. Who Mentions me till this day your side Vm? He he told me hey. I think you'd be really good at computer. Sciences should try it out and I tried chided up and I never looked back. Site initially went there to study business and I change into computer science I studied in the smell coach. Westminster College in Fulton Missouri every small casing but again heavy time. GimMe opportunity to focus and to build myself as an engineer Either back on payments in the payments industry so I started off my sophomore year. Interim Mastercard work through software engineering in Minnie eventually a fulltime start working for them within biometric authentication. So that's been my core experience in fulltime. So that's been fun and lastly ask you Just recently moved to the bay air so the months ago I moved here actually three days ago as exactly three months. Oh still new to the area. I'm looking forward to exploring the era meeting more people right so this is just like A visual of my journey so the first one obviously a very happy mander was a struggle. School is struggling computer science met. That's what I studied in the struggle by that was the stock to Mike On right side Suicide my former company mastercard. I was basically working with the team on pitching a new product. And then on the bottom. NAFTA's about two weeks ago at my company Verizon media where I was lunching my product media commerce across Fanti company so that was finding new and in the middle was before I left mastercard. I didn't own your career panel where talking about the importance of knowing you are in making taking that risk to do exactly what you'd like to do in which for me was moving from software engineering product which is really fun. And then on the Bottom Reich. Mike is Me and Harvard. Business School with few Khalid's their house. Basically doing some diversity recruiting which something really passionate about in I still I don You're doing that for her as needed right so started. So what is product management. And so this is the industry definition. I have watched hundreds of Product School Jones and I always see this. Come up all the time if you go if you do a quick. Google search is the same as an intersection said a defining part on the intersection of US tech and business and then in the middle of magic you there. That's what they call the product management. What I agree with this Sunday by actually like using take a few aspects is a big element that's missing so this stakeholder management basically between us experience on January and business which could be marketing in sales and so forth? But there's no immensely add tate's the product manage. I feel like being being a product manager. Also it means that you need to manage yourself so I think that's using here so my a different version. I think it's missing you as a product manager. It's a big element there and you'll see wise relates to imposter syndrome and then there's some other Aspects that could doesn't actually say what you do as a product manager doesn't indicate why you do what you do and then how you GonNa do those things knock greedy evidence within the diagram so wise park management so I think I believe park management basically communists to things. So it's the why and the watts. That's what the product manager owns to the Y.. is going to be the traffic strategy. And then what is is going to be the product roadmap that you define based product strategy And then basically across this you're GonNa define what commensal wet solvent that always problems to solve in product management by product manager. It's your job to kind of define on actually decide what's important to solve in prioritize and in all this is brought together by the product. That's the bottom so this is my definition of park measuring

Product Manager Verizon United States Business School Africa Primary School Swaziland Mexico Aachen Jeff Impositon Ghana South Africa Aaron Nafta Jackie Google Mander
David Rubenstein talks to Ray Dalio

Bloomberg Best

05:33 min | 1 year ago

David Rubenstein talks to Ray Dalio

"David Rudenstine sat down with Bridgewater associates co chairman and co chief investment officer ray Dalio to discuss his early life and how we got hooked on the markets so you grew up in Long Island and where you're from a wealthy family no like that was a jazz musician very lower middle class when you were a young boy were you interested in the financial world or what were you most interested in growing up when I went I got hooked on the markets when I was twelve because I used to caddy and I would take my money and I put in the in the markets and everybody was chatting about the markets so on how did you do well the first stock I bought I book because it was the only company ever heard of that was selling for less than five dollars a share and I figured I could buy more shares of went up and make more money that was my strategy her work and it worked and I have a work because this company was about to go broke and somebody came along and acquired it and it by local it went up and I said this game is easy then decided that I would be involved in the markets in this game is anything but easy so in high school were you interested in academics or were you a good student no I had at our school I did cut classes a fair amount of classes to go surfing did you have a hard time getting into a good school calling all yeah I got into CW post college on probation probation on probation okay and what he did well there I loved college okay I love college because well besides mixing the all the fun that college gives you it also when I like this and I could pick the subjects that I was interested in and I am so I look I love college right you must have done research well because you got into Harvard Business School yeah I did I got the upgrade grades when you graduated what do you do so in my two years it's a two year school in in my summer I like to trade commodities I got in trading commodities now this is down summer of seventy two and so nobody ever for more business school wanted to commodity division but I went to Merrill Lynch's commodity division I said Hey can you give me a job the director of commodities in that summer gave me a job job to help them around nineteen seventy three we have the oil shock bear market in stocks commodities is the hottest thing was hired as director of commodities at Dominic and Dominic having never done anything and the director of commodities but as part of and that's so that's what I say let out eventually though to set up your own firm yeah the so I that was seventy three seventy four big bear market in stocks are the Dominic and Dominic essentially went broke I went to what was sandy Weill's firm CBO Leo Hayden stone at the time became Shearson Hayden stone remain above the law because of our did all those mergers I became in charge of institutional commodities in other words hedging of all different things hi and that put me with all different futures markets and then we got into the environment where seventy four seventy five you got into this environment where the interest rates targus a monetary policy all of those things were driving all the markets so that got me hooked on those markets but anyway I got fired from there because I was a bit rowdy did you find someone that can share some thoughts in the face for the appointment book that's not a good way to prepare for that was but that was it was new year's eve we got drunk on new year's eve and you punish somebody other than your boss didn't think of that anyway he but it didn't last long okay okay so you have to always started the farm because I was and because the clients who want to do business what year was at the start of the firm nineteen seventy five so it grew truth from one or two employees to how many well in nineteen eighty two it was I I think there were eight employees a in here at one point and then I had a terrible eighty two so and then it came down to one employee so nineteen eighty three or so it was just me you have to borrow money from your father yep so let me tell you about the moment so nineteen eighty nineteen seventy nine eighty eighty one I calculated that American banks had lent a lot more money to emerging countries of those countries will get paid back and I anticipate that there would be a debt crisis and with that an economic crisis so that was my thinking and August nineteen eighty to Mexico defaulted on its debt and a number of countries fallout and so because I said that I got a lot of attention about that and I thought that was going to be producing a bear market in stocks and I could not have been wrong more wrong August nineteen eighty two was exact bottom the stock market and I was wrong and as a result of that let's take my employees are lied to let them go I lost money for myself on was money for and I had to borrow four thousand dollars from my dad it was the most painful one of the most painful experiences but it was one of the best experiences that ever happened to me in my life that was Bridgewater associates co chairman and co chief investment officer ray

David Rudenstine Chairman Four Thousand Dollars Five Dollars Two Years Two Year
A Historic Glance at Business Modeling

Digital Business Models

03:11 min | 1 year ago

A Historic Glance at Business Modeling

"Let's have a bit of a story standing about visas. Modern edges want to give you a <unk> overview. I'm not gonna go through the key dates because is a waste. Are we gonna need the probably few hours session for that but the radio to give you a respectable <hes> how the concept of business modeling actually in developed over the years in how he and i think it's very important so that you can understand also the misconceptions around me then you can actually appreciate this this concept even more so this is another episode of the business of the digital business mandis podcasts offer by the floor week m._b._a. Tweet grandma. If we look at the concept of this model actually it wasn't the actually <hes> something that was born. <hes> during the digital earlier i mean was something that was born really throughout the fifties and sixties but as it seems probably the time it was not that really a complete understanding or understanding as we have today or business models but you know there was a date when it actually formed i think is very important to understand because most most of us in mecum price when i started to look into dumping believed that this concept was actually probably born with web of course the web were <unk> delighted about the really the years if we are to today to throughout the fifties and sixties steps when the concept i started the to appear than just give you a beat the historic standing out the seventies and the eighties more precisely in nineteen seventy nine there was an article ah by professor michael porter harvard business school which actually was entitled how competitive forces sheep strategy and it was really intent. Were really the years in which <hes> was born as the framework around the visas strategy and understanding <unk> competitive advantage awebber however <hes> took out the word up he said the concept of business strategy and competitive advantage reading moved along the concept of controlling the supply chain or like controlling owning the assets that would enable you to actually have a control of the supply chain but over the years i really am the whole concept of business strategy especially as we move toward two thousand actually exchanged any was a fleet upside down as we would see she from companies like comments in google and from platform at business modest but it is another day the when we move forward in this time line he's probably the years when we go from ninety six to two thousand four which we can lead to the the really the rise employed alba alba the dot dot com companies so relieved was the boom bust of the dot and if you're not aware of speed the video in which accompanies started to to try to prove the viability of the internet and really <hes> they were not much business tools available at the time if not really

Michael Porter Professor Google
"harvard business school" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"So she's still works for her. Some capacity was around her can't so. Now the question is they can't civil get scanned by her own employees, or is she s the kingpin of the whole entire Harvard Business School online like scam situation. I mean. Her first time being kind of in some shady business because you respect the rocker camera on kinda cough arou- on Twitter YouTube about I giving money from my directors including stuff, and she's just always been involved in shady business, the constant like a lot of hip hop pets. So a sale got to say. Can I say, well, my actually be the person who's running this whole thing? And this Christian guy myself just got in, you know, the short in the stick basically the point is that that that this scam this Harvard Business School acceptance letters scam goes like deeper than just this one guy like there's a whole there's something going on. I also looked up Karen civil and Harvard Business School and she also posted like got into Harvard Business School. So basically, she might have been scanned by her co worker, or she's like helping the scam is what this woman is saying, which I believe will an interesting thing that happens now, so you so it's like like the caller was saying this guy Christian emiliana was working for Garin civil who has this like lifestyle site, like various popular like social media accounts. But she also has this blog this like site, but like a lot of contributors, and so when you Google Christian Emiliano and Karen, civil you get one of the first results is I mean this. This website is constantly this website was updated as recently a couple of days ago. Like, it's it's a current website. And when you Google Karen, civil Christian Emiliano, you get a link to the author page for Christian Emiliano author at live civil and then when you click it it says there's a four oh four era. So it looks like all of his articles have been deleted. She she scrubbed him out of all of her stuff. Oh, so maybe he did fucker over. Yeah. Maybe he fucked her over. I mean, I it's it's hard to talk this point. But like fan. What a weird scam. It does seem like he's the mastermind not her. I mean, I know that the caller was like maybe Karen's involved, but it seems like she's also just being played by this guy. Yeah. But you know, interesting. So it gets it gets really deep. It gets deeper. It always gets deeper there. So many college admission scandals so many there's so many, and this is just a whole new level of of this is now like business school older people scandal higher education is a scam though in general, like even two straight up higher education is a scam. So what's also craziest? We're calling these scam scams. But the basis of all of these is an actual scam. Oh, yeah. You know, Halen in Bobby on. I was listening to your episode about Dr Phil son, and I had stopped in call you because I have a personal story about an interaction with one of doctor Phil's other children. So to speak that I thought you might appreciate long story short. I was working for production company. And we went to go pitch some ideas to Dr so and we were sitting in this conference room and his people came in. And they're like, hey, just say no doctor Phil's about to come in. And he's bringing in. Dog. And we were like, yeah. Then then they're like, no, listen, very carefully. You cannot look at this dog. You cannot pet this dog. This dog is very aggressive. You must pretend the dog not there. And we're like, oh, that's weird. And then Dr Phil comes in with the dog we have to like try not to look at the dog. The meeting goes on the dog is like walking around around going by her feet. It's touching us. We can't touch it. We can't look at it. It was terrifying. Is so confusing, and you know, actually meeting went pretty well. But after that, he asked if we wanted to get a picture with them, and we're like, okay. And then he took us through his office, which I have to tell you I now I I'm sorry. I understand it a bit more because I was shocked, by the way it was decorated..

Harvard Business School Karen doctor Phil Christian Emiliano Christian emiliana Twitter Google Halen Garin Bobby
Jack Dorsey, Shoshana Zubov And Harvard Business School discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

04:06 min | 1 year ago

Jack Dorsey, Shoshana Zubov And Harvard Business School discussed on Recode Decode

"In the red chair is Shoshana Zubov, a professor mirada of Harvard Business School who's written several books about technology and economics. Her most recent book is called the age of surveillance capitalism. The fight for a human future at the new frontier of power, that's a lot there. That's going on. So let's talk a little bit about your background. So people get a sense. This is getting a lot of attention your book. And especially I I've been using the word surveillance quite a lot especially about surveillance economies surveillance states and things like that a longtime issue in human history. But now, it's never more important than ever. So why don't we talk a little bit about how you got to writing this particular book and some things you've done in the past who left here a little bit of your background. Well, I think the impetus for this book, which has been a long time in the making seven years just to produce this book, but many years before that and the the ideas and development. The real driver. Here's the sense that Har hopes and dreams for the digital future. Our sense of an empowering and democratizing. Israel future was at the beginning, which it was at the beginning. And a sense that this dream was slipping away. And that the reasons why it was flipping away the causes of this shift were we're not really clear, not really well understood forces taking shape very much behind the scenes, and it's almost like we woke up and suddenly the internet was owned and operated by private capital under a kind of regime, a new economic logic. That really was not well understood. And so my motivation CARA has come from really wanting to spend the time to understand to name exactly what this economic logic is and how its own imperatives its own compulsions created a completely different trajectory toward the digital future. Something that we didn't buy into yet. We did. Expect and because it's so unprecedented. It is by its very nature difficult to perceive. Absolutely. And also typical control and I like the word compulsion. Because I think that's a really good way to put it. It's it's an emotional word. But it's not it's actually it has to do what it's doing. It has to do what it's doing it to machine that's got to move in a direction that it's moving and the people in it are not bad people. They're not bad actors, but they themselves now are caught up in an economic machine that sometimes they even don't understand very well, and where it's driving and what its imperatives are. And most important what the consequences of those are interesting. I just did an interview on Twitter with Jack Dorsey that was sort of a bit of a goat rodeo. But it was interesting because a lot of the questions like a for specifics, and he couldn't do them. And it was really fascinating people found that part the most fascinating besides the platform being. Terrible to try to conduct any kind of conversation on. But we let me get here for your background talk about some of the things you've done before this. And then I want to get into the term surveillance capitalism, which I think is a fantastic way to put it. Let me hear rectory of your career. What you you've started where to get to this kind of topic? Well, as far as my professional career I began studying the shift to the digital and nineteen seventy eight. So where are you going to care? Fantastic. But I'm actually quite old hats off. So I'll date myself. I'll come right out there and date myself. I mean, I I started in nineteen seventy eight interviewing office workers Linux type workers factory workers who were the first the front line of our workforce that was shifting to the digital medium.

Jack Dorsey Shoshana Zubov Harvard Business School Professor Twitter HAR Israel Seven Years
Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace

HBR IdeaCast

09:58 min | 1 year ago

Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace

"It was the late nineteen ninety s medical mistakes at hospitals were a big problem and researcher Amy Edmonson had a moment of panic. She had been studying different teams in the same hospital. She wanted to know do better teams make fewer mistakes. But what she found was the opposite of what she expected turns out the most cohesive hospital teams reported making the most mistakes, not fewer that surprised her until she realized maybe the better teams weren't making more mistakes. Maybe they were more able and willing to talk about their mistakes this became Edmund since influential nineteen ninety nine paper, titled psychological, safety and learning behavior in were teams since then the research has piled on showing that psychological safety can make nut just teams, but entire organizations perform better it's been ten years since Amy Edmonson was a guest on the HBO idea cast and she's back on the show today. She's. Is a professor at Harvard Business School, and our new book is the fearless organization, creating psychological safety in the workplace from learning innovation and growth, Amy. Thanks so much for coming back on the show. Thank you for having. It's great have you here because psychological safety. I can't tell you the number of times it has come up in each cast interviews in it's fun to talk about it. Now. Also with hindsight of what you've learned over the last couple of decades. Now, this term psychological safety, you say, it's not it's not the best term. Why not you know, the term implies to people a sense of coziness. You know? Oh, I'm just everything's gonna be great that we're all going to be nice to each other. And that's not what it's really about. What it's about his candor what it's about as being direct taking risks being willing to say I screwed that up being willing to ask for help. When you're in over your head. Why is it that probably more people would say that they don't feel psychologically safe at work than than others? I mean, it it still seems like it's not the norm. It is not the norm at all. In fact, I think it's it's. Unusual which is what makes it potentially a competitive advantage. The reason why psychological safety is rare has to do with aspects of human nature human instinct, for example. It is an instinct to want to look good in front of others. It's an instinct to divert blame in. It's an instinct to agree with the boss and hierarchies or places where these instincts are even more exaggerated. We really wanna look good. And we especially wanna look good in a hierarchy and the spontaneous way to try to chief. That goal is to kind of be quiet on less. I'm sure that what I have to say will be very well received especially by the higher ups, and these are like phrases, we we know in real life too. Like better to be safe than sorry. Right. Don't rock the boat. Don't rock the boat. You know, no one ever got fired for silence. Right. And you know, I think we tend to. To play not to lose. Right. We stay safe. I wanna look good. I wanna perform well learning is great. But it will not in front of people. I don't wanna have the part of learning that involves me to fail along the way. I wanna learn from when that other person it carry us learn, yeah. Yeah, they have to learn firsthand that this doesn't work and have everybody. See my failure. I'd rather not. Yeah. Let's talk about a disaster to where psychological safety has not been present. And it led to financial ruin it led to colossal business failures. So one of the best examples recently is Wells Fargo, which in two thousand fifteen was considered one of the world's most admired companies. It was the shining star of banking for anybody who doesn't know at this is a US Bank with a long history, right and very much kind of customer oriented, Bank, household oriented Bank. And their strategy, which I think was a good strategy was to really push on cross selling course once you've made a customer relationship. It's easier to leverage that relationship sell that that customer more products rather than you know, the extra cost of building new relationships made sense to really emphasize cross selling by the men if somebody has a savings and data count a car loan, and maybe get a home loan credit card. And in fact, they had a slogan going for great where it's GR eight read the idea was I should be able to sell you eight different financial services products. So nice idea and soon this idea runs up against the reality of customers limited wallets, but rather than the the executives getting the feedback from those, you know, boots on the ground. Instead the message just kept coming top down. You must do this. You know, people had the sense that they'd be fired if they didn't achieve the targets that they were set the managers were very tough and present. And so rich goal stretch goals. I love stretch goals. Right. I'm a big fan of struggles. But if you wanna have stretch goals, you better have open ears. So I think of the Wells Fargo story as a recipe for failure is stretch goals plus closed ears. So what ultimately happened was? Of course, the sales folks started crossing an ethical line. They started making up fake customers. They lied to customers saying if you buy this product, you also have to buy this product, right? I mean, they did dozen little things that were just inappropriate and wrong. And ultimately as is always the case this comes to light. So the beautiful success of Wells Fargo proves itself to be an allusion of success. Why do you see this as a? As an absence of psychological safety, rather than like, an incentives problem or or an ethics problems. There is an incentive story here. But in I could give you in your job a poor incentive. And you could give me feedback that you could tell me, you know, this actually doesn't work, and in fact, it's encouraging if you think about it, it's an courage in some behaviors you really don't want to encourage. And then I'd say, hey, that's really interesting. You're right. Let's let's tweak. Let's talk together about what would be the best incentive to optimize our performance. And and that's not what happened. So it's a psychological safety story. Because from what I learned people really did not feel it was safe to push back to say, this isn't working. It can't be done. So lovely strategy. But the strategy in execution is discovering some some new and important things about the. Reality of the market and in a in a well, run organization managers middle managers, senior managers executives would be quite interested in those data. And they would not automatically say these people just aren't trying hard enough. Let's push hard. Or what about an example of a company that has mastered psychological safety in the in the workplace and has gained that competitive advantage that that you referenced at the beginning the one industry that is a very challenging industry to succeed in and particularly to succeed in consistently is the movie industry. Most movie producers most movie houses will have an occasional hit. And then a few, you know bombs. So Pixar is a company that has had seventeen in a row. Major box office successes that evolve also been critically acclaimed. It's an unheard of success out. Size. It's outsized. Right. It's way it's way beyond the sort of just pretty good. And at cap mill co founder and longtime leader has gone out of his way and very deliberately to create and keep creating psychologically safe environment. Where candor is expected possible it critical feedback and they do this in two fundamental ways. You know, one is behavioral the other structural and the behavioral is that. That cat mill will often say things like, you know, he'll say, here's a mistake. I made right because leaders have to go first leaders have to show that they know that they're fallible human beings. He shows up with humility with curiosity with interest with fallibility, and then the other structural in a setting up meetings and sessions where they're designed in in thoughtful ways to make it easier for us to give each other candid feedback or to to really critique the movie and. And he'll say things like early on all of our movies are bad in their terrible. And he says that not because that's, you know, necessarily good news. But because he wants everyone to know that's just part of the journey. There's no way to get to magnificent unless we go through bad and inadequate and sappy and boring along the way, and we just keep pushing back, and we keep making it better in this film that I'm making his my baby. I don't want you to criticize my baby. But I have to kind of realize no, I do want you to because I'd much rather get it from you now, then get it in the box office later.

Wells Fargo Amy Edmonson Harvard Business School HBO Researcher Edmund Professor United States Cap Mill Co Founder Pixar Mill Ten Years
Use Your Money to Buy Happier Time

HBR IdeaCast

09:45 min | 1 year ago

Use Your Money to Buy Happier Time

"I keep thinking about something that guests said recently on the show we have been living for several decades is kind of a tenant of life structure that are orgnization has created for us. We know where we're going to be at nine AM Monday through Friday. Our weekends are also structured around that because you know, maybe one day or part of days the day that we do all the chores. We didn't have a chance for that was Theresa a mob lay on episode sixty five she was saying it in reference to her research on retirement, but what really struck me is this idea that your job dictates your weekends, even dictates. How you spend your time off. And that's why I'm excited for today's episode. Our guest today believes people would be happier. If they spent more of the money, they earn at work to get back more of their time when they're not working Ashley Willens researches. The tradeoffs we make between time and money and says we often get those wrong. She says, we should spend more money. Not just on things we like, but to get us out of the things we don't enjoy say yard, work cooking or commuting. Ashley Willens is an assistant professor at Harvard Business School. She's also the author of the HP are article time for happiness. Ashley, thanks for coming on the show. Thanks so much for having me. Your research concluded that the happiest people use their money to buy time. And there's that phrase, you know, money can't buy you happiness. But you're basically saying that if more people used money to buy time that they could use that time to be more happy. Yeah. So we really liked to flip this Benjamin Franklin's adage on its head and say, well, if time has money, maybe also we can think that money can buy happier time, my research really focuses on using money to buy cells out of negative experiences. So subtracting negative minutes from our day subtracting time that we spend stuck in traffic subtracting extra work hours were were just spinning our wheels. And really, we should go home subtracting housecleaning, but really any way that we spend money in a way that might save us time such as also buying ourselves into positive experiences has reliable and positive effects on on the happiness that we. Get from our days or weeks or months and our lives. Even though people feel like the world is busier than ever, you know, you point out in your research that the average American for instance, has more time for leisure than they did forty years ago. And so it sounds like you're saying that now that people have more time, they just spend it earning more money or taking jobs that make them busier rather than using the time. Yeah, I think it's really interesting that, you know, work hours have gone down. But people are feeling more stress than I think, it's exactly that's we think that business is a status symbol, we focus. Our attention on getting ahead, especially in North American culture. So I think there's this element. One of the fact that even though we have more free time, we might fill it more with work or commuting really far away. Because we want to have this really nice house that we don't get to spend any of our time. And we don't get to enjoy because we're always commuting to work. Really, far and ubiquitous connection to the internet. Also means that we experienced what's some researchers have called time confetti, so not only maybe a retrying to filler time with more work in being more productive. But also, our time is more fragmented were more distracted, and that also contributes to these higher feelings of time stress, but also time is very hard to track. And so if we have windfalls of time, we often fritter them away. So it's interesting is that in one of our my clobbered or an ice studies. We find that buying time or spending money on time-saving services predicts greater happiness, reduces stress. Not because of the objective amount of time that we saved just to the simple act of thinking about giving up money to have more free time seems to make people plan their time a little bit better. If I'm going to incur this cost to have this free time, then I'm going to make sure I really enjoy the free time that I have. What do you make the argument though, that that future's uncertain and financial security or your financial future is often uncertain too? And so I guess some of the way we've been trained to think about time versus money as that like if you have time now and can make money you need to save. So that in the future when you're not working you have money to spend. Yeah. And I mean people who feel uncertain about their financial future or more likely to value money, and they get more thought his faction out of having that value. And that makes a lot of sense. If you're not sure what you're next five. Six seven years are your overarching goal in life should be Develey money. So that you can feel like your future is secure and safe much to what you're saying. And and I don't argue that that doesn't mean we shouldn't also be thinking around the margins of whether within our discretionary income bucket within the set of money that we spend in in ways that in. Enable us to enjoy our life that we shouldn't also be thinking about saving time. So that's why make the point. And my clobbered resign often argue that we need to be thinking about every time we open our wallet. What is to make a purchase discretionary income purchase? Is this money? Changing the way that I spend my time. What's one way that you have trained yourself to spend money on other things where maybe was counterintuitive of I, but really makes make sense when you value time correctly, you know, going through grad school, you have no time and no money, and you're constantly trying to cut corners in every way that you can and one thing that I did throw all of graduate school was live really far away from my place of employment. I would spend hours on the bus every single day for five years because it was cheaper. I could live in an of slightly bigger apartment with my partner. And I you save money that way. You know? And so when I moved for my my job, I had this intuition. This really strong sense that I should do the same thing should live in the most economical place, even if it's a little bit further away, and I really had to push against sort of every instinct that was saying, but think about how much money you can save in rent like just written his massive dissertation on the fact that we should value time over money, but we always get it wrong. When making major minor life decisions that I was like, okay. Actually like, you can do it. You can pay a lot of money in rent and live really close to work. So you can walk there. You're going to be new. It's going to be stressful. You have a million things to do. And that was one thing that I did recently. And I think it's added a lot of happiness to my life and really reduce stress. I walked to the office. I can walk. Everything's walking distance to my house. I feel like a lot of my behavior. Does come from. How I you know, I lived coming out of school. From a time when I had more time than money, and then just got used to doing everything myself. And there's also the kind of the American self reliance thing just being able to take care of household chores do things without having to hire somebody to do it. I think I know I I think this is part of the reason we see the effects that we see. So I have a another line of research with Laura park at the university of buffalo, and we look at how experiences in childhood around how much money you had and how how much income inequality. There wasn't an a place where you grew up shapes the way that adults think about their finances and make decisions, you know, fifteen twenty years later, and we do see that growing up in a more uncertain financial environment carries all the way through to adult hood. You know, doesn't Volvo a little bit of retraining again. I really want to return to this idea. That's about taking small act. Actions not doing anything to drastic but just sitting down and thinking about whether there's anything you can outsource that. You really don't like that stresses you out a lot that you can afford. And if there's anything on a daily basis that the answer to that question is yes, you should try it out try spending, some discretionary income that way, you know, other small ways I can be more efficient that I can give up some of my money to have more time direct flights grocery deliveries to my house. Not all the time. Not outsource everything. We show in our data that people who outsource too much experienced the lowest levels of happiness in part, probably because again, they feel like their their life must be so out of control. If they can't you know, if they can't even do one load of laundry on the weekend. So I think you also raise an important point. And we find this in our data. We wanna seem self sufficient one reason that we don't ask for help enough that we don't outsource enough even. When we're paying our hard earned money for someone else's time. As we want to feel like we can do it all especially in North American culture. We have this idea that we're a failure. If somehow we can't have their perfect home

Ashley Willens Theresa Harvard Business School Benjamin Franklin HP Volvo Assistant Professor Partner Laura Park University Of Buffalo Fifteen Twenty Years Six Seven Years Forty Years Five Years One Day
"harvard business school" Discussed on Woman Evolve with Sarah Jakes Roberts

Woman Evolve with Sarah Jakes Roberts

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Woman Evolve with Sarah Jakes Roberts

"So have that ninety as they should be dreams, which is all things work together for the good is a whole word that Romans out on this. Denise is a man I'm experiencing experiencing it now. I can see that lessening in injuries. He's a wow, yes. He use mine when she says setback is set up for a comeback. I loved it so much so yes, regaining hill Joseph to Geoffrey Owens for that alpha wanted to give a hill mayor to Karen civil by before starting the podcast as all that she is with billing her goal of going back to school, and he's going to Harvard Business School, Karen Sobel. If you got now is like, this amazing magical creature of an entrepreneur were who has just taken. I don't want to say social media by storm, but I will say like the entertainment industry completely by storm her bio says she's a media made in a host and author land is and she posted a caption. It was very simple. But when things don't go as change the approach but never the bowl at -taining higher. Education was always a goal in mind in two thousand nineteen the year put that plan into motion rape to explain in a sense, highs potential in the picture her posing outside Arbor business, which she said that I really loved is. When things don't go as expected change the approach but never the goal. How many times do we change the goal and things go as planned in? She decided I may not be going on maybe right after high school right after I do my undergrad that I go online, and I might have to wait ten years to accomplish it. But I never one of those cited that goal. I wanted to share her story because I felt like it was one of Eakins. 'rational for someone who just feels delayed. But the truth is not have business is you're never really delayed in God. You're just expecting something at a time that guy has designed itself. I thought that was awesome. So Jens, caring symbol is our hill. Mary. Another hill. Mary that we have is emitted by a member of the delegation in. When I read the story, I wanted to share it with you guys out to share a little bit of my story. But there's a book by Dr join Brighton in this book is called beyond the appeal at.

Karen Sobel Denise Harvard Business School Geoffrey Owens rape Mary Eakins Jens Joseph ten years
Taking A Bite Out Of The "Tech Burger"

Dishin' Digital

01:28 min | 2 years ago

Taking A Bite Out Of The "Tech Burger"

"You're looking for meaning and purpose in your work. Hello. We all are every year. Harvard Business School executive education helps executives like you re evaluate goals and develop both personally and professionally to turn their careers into their callings. Don't be different each changed. Go start by going to H B, S dot me slash go. That's H B S dot ME slash co. Dish in digital sponsored by h New York's ultimate camera authority building. A better burger digital trends picked a fake burger for their annual list of top tech from the Consumer Electronics Show editor in chief. Jeremy Kaplan got the sink his teeth into the impossible burger two point. Oh, you guys make a vegetarian burger which actually bleeds just like a regular verdict. But there's no beef it we went and try it out and events. And it's surprisingly delicious. It has no Luton zero cholesterol. But it has all of the iron and all of the protein you get in a conventional burger fourteen grams of total two hundred forty calories compared to twenty three grams of fat and ninety calories from a regulator. And if you're curious about the impossible burger two point, oh, it's being offered. Locally at Saxon parole in No-ho and admission Chinese food on the Lower East Side and Bushwick dish in digital. I'm Palmer, Dane, there's more a WCBS eight eighty dot com slash. Dish in digital.

Harvard Business School Jeremy Kaplan Bushwick Editor In Chief New York Executive Palmer Dane Two Hundred Forty Calories Twenty Three Grams Ninety Calories Fourteen Grams
IRS waives some penalties on underpaid taxes

WSJ Your Money Briefing

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

IRS waives some penalties on underpaid taxes

"Withholding didn't line up with changes to their total tax bills taxpayers can normally avoid penalties. If they had paid ninety percent of the current year's tax. Owed under the chain nounce Wednesday by the IRS that number comes down to eighty five percents. A Harvard Business School study focuses on what it calls a caregiver crisis in the US and fines employers underestimate the struggle employs face in balancing, the professional and caregiving responsibilities. But seventy five percent of US workers face, some kind of caregiving responsibility. In of those thirty two percent say they have left a job because they couldn't balance work and family duties, the study found disconnect in the workplace as

United States Harvard Business School IRS Seventy Five Percent Thirty Two Percent Ninety Percent
Space Economics

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:58 min | 2 years ago

Space Economics

"Thirty seven meters. Thirty meters twenty meters seventeen meter standing by for touchdown. These were the sounds inside of Nasr's Jet Propulsion Laboratory near Pasadena, California on Monday afternoon, as the people working there eagerly-hoped Nasr's unmanned spacecraft. The insight would nail the really tricky landing on the surface of Mars touchdown confirmed. Ever gets. It doesn't rats NASA. No, it's thrilling thrilling the landing did the insight which was carrying instruments that will help scientists to study the surface of Mars, and it's an habitants and learn whatever it can about the planet occupied or not this is able to prove it's not occupies. This is all very inspiring stuff. But our interest in space missions here. The indicator is not actually about the science as always it's about the economics. I'm Garcia, and I'm Stacey Vanik Smith and technically Cardiff economics is a science science issue. It's a social science. I think they. This is the indicator from planet money today and tomorrow on the show, we're going to take a look at the economic history of the US space program with a space economist. Yes, there is such a thing as a space economists. There's kind of thing. We'll tell you why the incites mission to Mars is actually a throwback to the way NASA used to do things. And we'll also explain what the economics of space looks like now. This message comes from the indicators sponsor capital. One capital. One's indicator is zero because they offer accounts with zero fees or minimums, and they offer accounts that can be opened from anywhere in five minutes. Capital one. What's in your wallet capital? One NA. Support also comes from SAP. Concur employees can submit expenses from anywhere. It's how the best run businesses make their expenses run better SAP. Concur. Learn more at concur dot com slash NPR. Matt Weinzierl is our space economist, well sort of he teaches at the Harvard Business School. He's an economist, and he has a really passionate interest in space. Matt knows that most people have a fascination with space because of like the grand themes exploration. The search for aliens going to the moon so planets AB someday living on Mars with its other inhabitants. Exactly, not Matt. He got excited about space for a different reason is the over the last decade, really almost two decades. Now, we've seen a real flourishing of a commercial space sector. See back in the Cold War decades, the sixties seventies and eighties. When the US was researching the Soviet Union to the moon and developing the space shuttle, Matt says the US space program was meant to provide Americans with so-called public goods. And this is a really important concept in economics public goods are defined by two things first when someone uses a public good it does not. Prevent another person from being able to use it and second when a person uses a public good. It also doesn't take away from how much someone else can use it. So a computer is not a public good. No, not at all. Because I'm using it. And you. One example of public good is clean air. My breathing. It does not stop Stacey. From also, breathing it or military protection. Just because I'm protected by the US military doesn't mean that Stacey is not protected. Matt gives three examples of the public goods that NASA originally was meant to provide the first one national security being able to defend ourselves from space or do something else space was critical importance to national security the second scientific discoveries. So too early. It's hard for the private sector, which is motivated by profit to do basic research in things that won't obviously be sellable. The third public good something you just really can't put a price tag on national pride. Don't usually talk about as much. But I think if you think back to the Cold War that was clearly a big part of it that we wanted to show that our model. Our our society was was the better choice for other societies to take and as the name suggests public goods tend to be publicly provided or. Vied by the government using taxpayer money because there isn't always an obvious motivation for the private sector to provide these public goods, there just isn't an immediate way to profit from them. And yet these goods are valuable to society. So the government uses its unique ability to direct massive amounts of money into providing those goods, it's a centralized economic model. The government agency in this case NASA decides what to do, and it has no competition for how best to do it and using this model. Matt says NASA has really accomplished amazing things over the years, think of the moon missions. And yes, the Mars landings like the one this week and also helping to build the international space station, which is a research laboratory the size of a football field that orbits the earth. And finally, of course, there was the space shuttle program, which was designed to transport people and stuff into space. But Matt says by the early years of this century NASA was struggling to define what its next mission should be NASA hasn't put a man on the moon. Since nineteen seventy two and the space shuttle program, experienced two tragedies, I when the challenger space shuttle exploded in one thousand nine hundred six and second when the Columbia space shuttle disintegrated in two thousand and three and that says it was a lot more expensive per space shuttle flight than people hoped and it got into space a lot less often in two thousand four the administration of President George W Bush announced that it was canceling the space shuttle program and this left NASA with a problem. How is it going to send cargo and cruise into space to do things? Like, for instance, supply, the international space station without space shuttle program NASA came up with two strategies one was a conventional big government centralized program, which would last many years and cost many billions of dollars and then on the margins. There was this idea to spend a little bit of money to encourage a more decentralised, private sector driven space economy. But basically it turned. Out that that conventional program went over budget and behind schedule and eventually got cancelled. But that little experimental program that involved NASA, partnering with the private sector that worked out. This programme was known as cots c o t s and that is an acronym. For commercial orbital transportation services. Nasa issued a report last year saying that the cots program had been this huge success and a model for the public sector to partner with the private sector. And since then NASA has launched no pun intended, is maybe slightly intended other partnership programs that are just like it. Yeah. And the basic way these programs work is that when NASA needs something NASA tells private companies how much it might be willing to pay for it. And then those private companies get to work on figuring out how to provide it for example, last decade when NASA wanted a better way to send supplies to the international space station, and in fact to private companies orbital sciences and SpaceX convinced NASA that they could use their shuttles to resupply. The. Space station. So NASA paid them combined three point five billion dollars for a total of twenty resupply. Flights to the space station. And there are plenty more examples. Like right now NASA is asking private companies to propose technologies they can build and which NASA will pay for that will be useful for future moon missions. We're going back. Yeah. Matt says that NASA is more of a partner with such private companies than a supervisor NASA sets the goal, but private companies compete with each other to come up with the best way to meet that goal and the private companies, then get to keep most of the innovations that they come up with and which they can use to develop new products that they can sell in the private sector or which they can sell to organizations other than NASA. From an economic standpoint this newer, decentralized model has a lot of benefits there's competition between companies which tends to make products better. There's also a profit motive for those companies and incentive for them to discover new technologies and NASA gets access to these new technol-. Gies for a lot less money than it would have cost to develop them. Plus this model is laying the groundwork. Or Stacey laying the space work. Very nice. Very nice, not very nice for the future. When a lot of activity in space will be driven mostly by the private sector. In other words, these partnerships between NASA and the private sector are creating new marketplace for space technologies. We're one did not previously exist and private companies right now are coming up with technologies that will have actual value that could be bought and sold for actual money in this possible future. So what are these new exciting activities going to be and what weird new economic challenges might these activities themselves create Matt tells us about them on tomorrow's episode to tune in. I'm excited to hear more about the martians. Hey, it's catch out with the code. Switch team few years ago. I adopted this queue, but also shy eagle next from a dog rescue. But I noticed really fast he mostly barked at my friends of color made me wonder is my dog racist. So I went to find out check it out on the next code. Switch podcast.

Nasa Matt Weinzierl United States Stacey Vanik Smith Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Nasr Pasadena Government Garcia SAP Partner Cardiff Harvard Business School Soviet Union Football President George W Bush
I warned you about Sheryl Sandberg

San Francisco Chronicle Business & Technology News - Spoken Edition

04:45 min | 2 years ago

I warned you about Sheryl Sandberg

"You're listening to the spoken edition of the San Francisco Chronicle. I warned you about Cheryl Sandberg by Owen Thomas from business. Welcome back to tech chronicle if you lean in a little you'll find subscribing is the right option. I warned you about Cheryl Sandberg Facebook is drawing scads of negative press. Executives are bailing and questions arising about the company's chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg. My only question is this twenty eighteen or two thousand eight when Mark Zuckerberg hired Sandberg away from Google to be his number two a decade ago. Tech group think consolidated around this storyline. Sandberg would be the adult at the wheel keeping sucker Berg from crashing. Now. It looks like she's the one driving the company into the ditch. The company's bad press seems to be affecting employee. Morale. The one metric that makes Silicon Valley CEO's worry, and the bad press seems linked to areas she oversaw from policy chief Joel Kaplan's. Brow raising appearance at Brett Cavanaugh supreme court nomination hearings to the hiring of dodgy Washington. PR firm to bad mouth. Facebook's critics. It all seemed so familiar to me Sandberg and experienced inside the beltway operator before she joined Google as long lived by Lee atwater line perception is reality. It started before she even joined Facebook officially back in two thousand eight as Sandberg was saying goodbye to colleagues had Google. I was running valley wag Silicon Valley gossip publication, which uncovered all kinds of mischief at her employer. Her reaction, according to sources who spoke to us she promised to shoot the guy who writes valley wag that's one way to manage perceptions. So when you tell me that Sandberg seems more anxious about her own image than the company's fate. I'm not shocked when I read that morale is low. I'm not shocked when departing execs who reportedly clashed with Sandberg tell us how great she is. I'm not. Shocked fibbing about the company next. You'll be telling me there's gambling in a casino. It's all of a pattern with how she behaved when she first got to the company. Here's what would shock me if she actually left in two thousand eight as in twenty eighteen the rumors were when she would hop from Facebook back into the world of politics that door seems permanently closed her carefully maintained reputation stained by Facebook's, many misadventures. She stuck with Facebook and Facebook is probably stuck with her imagine. If Sandberg followed up lean in an option b with a tell all book about Facebook, Laurie. I hope they're tapes, and though Facebook stock has taken a hammering lately, she's made sucker Berg and other Facebook shareholders as well as herself insanely rich, which gets you more or less permanent pass in the world of tech Zuckerberg made clear and a CNN interview Tuesday that there would be no change at the top of Facebook, not even some reshuffling of roles such as him giving up. The job of chairman. He said he hoped to be working with Sandberg for decades here too. I heard echoes of two thousand eight wins sucker. Likewise, defended his embattled Lieutenant while making it perfectly clear who was in charge. No one ever seems to get fired at Facebook. It's bad optics. And perception is reality Owen Thomas. Oh, Thomas said SF chronicle dot com, quote of the week as a parent you want to give your kids so much you want to give them all that. You have all that. You can get you want to give them the world and a better world than the one. You've got it's terrifying to look up in the sky and think about what they'll inherit it's terrifying to realize how little you can do as an individual to make it better buzzfeed's mat Honan writing about the California wildfires reading this made me want to run home and snuggle Ramona, the love terrier coming up. I'm working black Friday as is Malea. Russell hitter up on Twitter at me, Robin. If you're planning to go shopping for toys, I R L I promise she won't L O L what I'm reading Lisa Dwoskin looks. At Instagram's earliest, employee's not only have many quit the company they're quitting the photo sharing service to Washington Post. Caroline said reports on illegal Airbnb that turned into the site of a gang shootout, San Francisco Chronicle and former EBay executive Michael Deering has a must read Twitter thread on what Sandberg should have learned at Harvard Business School, but apparently didn't at G GD.

Cheryl Sandberg Facebook San Francisco Chronicle Mark Zuckerberg Owen Thomas Google Joel Kaplan Chief Operating Officer Silicon Valley Ceo Berg Twitter Washington Post Brett Cavanaugh Buzzfeed Washington Lee Atwater Harvard Business School Lisa Dwoskin Michael Deering
WSJ Tech D.Live: How Should Tech Firms Be Regulated?

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:37 min | 2 years ago

WSJ Tech D.Live: How Should Tech Firms Be Regulated?

"The. With a special edition of tech news briefing. I'm Charlie Turner in New York for the Wall Street Journal technology, firms are facing increased scrutiny over the role. They play in elections, the dissemination of false or biased news and consumer data breaches, but to what extent should tech firms, especially social media companies be regulated at the Wall Street Journal's de live tech conference and Laguna Beach, California industry officials and politicians weighed in with various suggestions democratic u s Representative row Cana of California said any regulation. That's an acted has to be smart as Tim coke putted. We need well-crafted regulation of and it's not regulation for regulation saying let me give you a couple examples of things that I think actually could get bipartisan support, and this of privacy groups, and technology leaders, for example, I think people should have a right to be notified when there's a data breach. It's ridiculous. If you have months and months, go by and people aren't notified you have access. Now to your health records have access to your financial records, probably should have access to know what's happening to your data. You should have some portability which would increase competition if you could take data from one platform to another, but what about possible legislation from states or congress with regard to overseeing the tech industry, AT and T CEO. Randal Stevenson, said don't leave it up to the states. I don't think Washington right now could agree on the freezing temperature a water. But if there were ever an issue that you would think could get bipartisan coalescence, this is one. I mean, we got we had a mess coming at us literally states independently going out and designing their own privacy regulation, you'd people running companies out there trying to think about how you do business newspapers. How do you do business in a world where you have fifty different regulations legislation and rules around privacy? There are a number of states that are now passing their own legislation around. Privacy, and by the way, net neutrality, and what would be a total disaster for the technology and innovation that, you see happening in Silicon Valley and elsewhere is to pick our head up and have fifty different sets rules for companies trying to operate in the United States. So this is where legislation I think is critical pass a body of legislation around customer data protection that shouldn't be that difficult to pull together. Honestly, don't believe Darrell Issa US Republican Representative from California sounded an optimistic note about possible. Regulation from the incoming congress little regulation will occur. We'll be more thoughtful simply because you have highly divided government after this last election, and it tends to mean that the new guys in town in the house are going to be demanding all kinds of things and they're going to walk into. Okay. You'd better demand. Something we were already interested in or you're not gonna get it on the other hand. Steve bomber former Microsoft CEO. And now the owner of the NBA's LA clippers said regulation was preferable to help. The tech industry and not legislation. I happen to think it's a whole lot better to engage with regulators than it is to leave things to legislative action. A lot of discussion in the ecosystem always be we need laws. We need legislation that in every way is probably the worst thing for everybody. Because the regulators can have a real thoughtful discussion about what the technology permits doesn't permit. The legislators never going to do that regulation in the hands of the FTC. Yeah, I get that. Or the DOJ? I get that the differences. Those are people who can put staff on to really understand the details. And those are some thoughts about regulation from the WSJ tech de live conference when we come back. Steve bomber talks about what businesses can learn from sports teams. This is tech news briefing. From the Wall Street Journal, this podcast is brought to you by Harvard Business School executive education is your family office position for growth and success gain best practices in. Family wealth management at the new program building legacy, family, office wealth management. Learn more at H B, S dot ME slash legacy. At the Wall Street Journal de live tech conference. Steve bomber owner of the NBA's, Los Angeles, Clippers and former Microsoft CEO was asked what the similarities and differences were between a company like Microsoft and entertainment franchise like the clippers bomber said. It's all about accountability and winning. Yes, we are in entertainment company, and that's very important thing for me to remember, I tend to think of as a basketball team and yet from a business perspective, we are in entertainment entertainment product. Now, what is the best way to sell tickets? We've done all the statistical analysis. It turns out winning championships is the best way to make your business better. God, it's just like real business. It's all about the product stupid. And frankly, if you win championships got he'll know this. They're still selling a lot of tickets in Chicago years after this guy won a bunch of championships there. So winning the only other thing. Actually that helps you signing superstar having the first pick in the draft. But the best thing is to championships. And so that is what we focus in on. Now, if you think about it, what does that mean, it points to accountability business, you know, people we run around. I we're so we got the quarter getting after the next one. You know, we're marketshare were held accountable. You want accountability? Sports after every game win loose. Sorry. Can't fix it. Next quarter, gone. It's gone. Teamwork. How's your team working your business? How's your team more? Teamwork. Twenty every twenty four seconds. Everybody knows our team work is every twenty four seconds. You can see it. You have to be accountable for it. You think you have customers and shareholders that assess you, yeah, they do, but they're casual casual compared to the millions of fans who are sitting there studying every move who have access to all the perform. Silence data that you do. There's not one piece of information are fans can't see that. We can see that's not true in businesses. So I find a level of count ability frightfully more powerful than I did when I was a CEO that's LA clippers owner Steve bomber on what businesses can learn from sports teams. And that's a special edition of tech news briefing. I'm Charlie Turner in New York for the Wall Street Journal.

Wall Street Journal Steve Bomber CEO La Clippers California Charlie Turner Microsoft Congress New York Representative NBA Los Angeles Tim Coke Laguna Beach United States AT FTC Randal Stevenson Harvard Business School
"harvard business school" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Asked Alan to say hi to him every day for. The rest of their lives Yes sir Twenty two and she was just a. Year younger you did that in? Those, days I had the advantage of Mary's smarter, than that was that helped us law. The way she reads like crazy She's a. Better person than I am I'm married up as they say I've been very lucky phenomenal for for the kids they look up to. Her so much and being able to look up to someone is one of the most important things in life My. Whole life is because of what. Others have made you like to thank you can. Take the credit for what's happened in your life the fact is every place I've ever been because somebody has given me a left Friend of mine had recommended it to people Interview me when I was at Harvard Business School Commonwealth Edison is the largest provider of electricity in Alan noise I wasn't sure what I wanted to do Utility The people that I met Many came across and. Up by joined the company they keep To me that was invaluable somebody was. Paying attention The man who who made the. Most of my life Morgan Murphy who is chairman of the executive committee for, the company and just a great great mentor for me And then. The chairman of the board, who interviewed me at Harvard also indicated we're going to keep an eye on you if. You do your work we're not gonna let you fail for lack of telling you what you need to do So that we can promise you and. He did and that's what, I want to try to satisfy him and others who kept an eye out for me Why did these big time business leaders care about some high-risk kid Yeah he wants a Harvard Business School but there's a couple hundred of them. In every class and a whole world of qualified people out there I think the, fact that I was going into the air force two or three years also gave me an opportunity really With a lot of people have supervisory responsibly for a lot of people and that was a huge thing, in my favorite and I think this is a great value spending some time in the service today that's not as. Common but that was a great time in our is just. Just married being paid two hundred twenty two dollars a month and I thought we had all the money in the world As they say it's all relative after only. Fifteen years at Commonwealth Edison Jim became its president and c. o. leading the largest nuclear power producer in, the country with its thousands of employees for twenty years and said this to my kids repeatedly that that's the key. Thing to have somebody who you hope will look out for I was lucky os The present age. Of forty or something How was huge I. Got very lucky some people took an actress and his mom being his mom took the greatest interest in where. Her son lived she highly encouraged as is the gentle way to describe mother's approach for her son to live in the north shore community called Evanston by mother who knew a lot. About the perish And she thought that would be a great place to go So typically Irish to this I. Think you ought to go That was such a good decision and? So was Jim's. Decision to retire not really tired If I wasn't doing what I've been doing not only would? I go nuts That, would not be a good equation Thankfully Chicago's cardinal stepped in to. Give Jim some work and help him And when we come back we'll. Hear, what that work was Jim O'Connor story.

Commonwealth Edison Jim Alan Harvard Business School Common Mary Jim O'Connor Harvard Business School chairman Harvard president Chicago Morgan Murphy Evanston executive committee producer two hundred twenty two dollars Fifteen years twenty years three years
"harvard business school" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"You get a chance not only learn a lot about leadership and about topics were were i had boyd's ahead studied in the past but muslim poorly you meet really great people and i love i love that fact this weekend as at may fifteenth harvard business school reunion is great to reconnect with people i do think that and i grew up wanting to go to her i decided at fourteen years old i was going to harvard business school and they disagreed the first time applied so it's i had i had applied the second time but but i think you really have to think long and hard about whether or not business school is right for you what exactly are you trying to learn to get done at business school what do you expect to do there that you can't learn as an entrepreneur which was post business school i learned way more as an entrepreneur then i learned sitting in classes reading case studies and so i don't begrudge the experience that i had but the reality is that it's expensive it's not just financially expensive but you take two years out of your career to do it and so if you know exactly what you're trying to get done i recommend it it's a great experience but as an entrepreneur i don't think you have to yeah and every industry is very different and the background necessary to be successful in that industry that's great i love it thank you so much for your time and stopping by are you determined to donate more of your money to planned parenthood in two thousand eighteen do you like supporting sanctuary cities and big government your current big bubble cell phone does this year pledged to.

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"harvard business school" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Gun and violating probation he was a passenger in a car patrol cars stopped that vehicle on fremont boulevard but police say the wanted man got out and began to running toward a gas station officers say he pointed a gun at officers and he was shot and died at the scene is name is not been released yet police say they found a revolver at the man's side ended appeared you'd fired at police but no officers were hurt that shooting continues to be investigated this morning president trump has been taking every opportunity he can to slam amazon dot com and its ceo jeff bezos the us chamber of commerce and other business organizations that were normally speak out against these attacks arkansas you asleep silent why aren't they defending amazon for more of that jeff bell and patty rising spoke with professor nancy cane historian at the harvard business school been other instances where sitting presidents have gone after an individual company the only since i can think of patty is back in nineteen sixty two when president john kennedy decided to coal steel manufacturers to task for raising prices but that's the that's it like you go all the way back to even to nineteenth century even the late eighteen hundred late eighteenth century the founding of the country no presidents don't single out individuals ceo's or heads of companies and they don't usually single out individual businesses let's talk about the reaction to this particular instance where president trump is lashing out at amazon it's been a pretty muted response from other entities out there that are typically pro business it's very interesting isn't it jeff i you know i i think what's going on here is is to things this i is more important i think amazon is such a disruptive big and disruptive force in many different industries whether we're talking about groceries or cloud computing services or ecommerce and retail right brick and mortar retail folks affected by by amazon did i think amazon has a lot of folks that are very wary of it's a one piece of this is if it was a different company i think we'd see a different reaction second i think the chamber and some other spokes e trade groups that are as you said conspicuous conspicuously quiet are.

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"harvard business school" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Into world commend to a tuesday night hero nightsight is tuesday night february 20th as we move toward march 1st if we get out of february but i think we'll be ok i will get a great show coming up tonight what am i a high school classmates who went onto mit you've heard him here before four degrees from mit i did a lot of work as a government contractor for the department of defense and other wellknown of federal agencies doctor jack loo going to talk with us about what is going on in north korea and what may happen with north korea once the olympic games are concluded this sunday and at ten o'clock tonight we're going to take a look at the obama administration in what they knew and when they knew it regarding russia meddling or involvement in the 2016 election we'll get to all of that first of all rob brooks is back rogge took a rare night off last night thanks nice to have you back peter clark did a great job but you're still the top guy here's verizon concern rob brooks my name's dan ran the host of the show the appropriately named nights i would dan rape and first up we are going to have a chat with a professor from harvard business school i sees a historian at the harvard business school and has a um a resume that are not going to embarass serb at stanford the kennedy school harvard business school you have been teaching at the harvard business school for twenty six years do not believe that a professor nancy cane how're you i'm well thanks so much for having me dan i'm just a great book i was way for few days and.

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"harvard business school" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

The IVY Podcast

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

"After discovering that only two out of the three hundred case studies red by first year mba students at harvard business school featured black executives professor stephen us rogers took matters into his own hands according to the washington post quoted rogers decided to write his own case studies and has so far highlighted many black executives in a wide range of industries unquote for more than just case studies rogers has transforming harvard business schools curriculum in this episode of the ivy podcast roger sheds light on a more complete narrative of entrepreneurship discussing the legacy of black entrepreneurs and the importance of inclusion in the marketplace take meyer clock my watch off so that i can and keep the tom and i'm going to be talking to you about black entrepreneurship this evening an uh you know when i look at this watches puts men ahmad of my my mother who is the finest entrepreneur that i ever knew and she we really proud of me today to have the opportunity to speak to such a repressive group of young people on the topic of black entrepreneurship black entrepreneurs is essentially was one of the greatest entrepreneurs that i ever knew and this watch always reminds me of a because in a when she was gravely ill she was in a hospital and she called me into her hospital room and she said to me steve you the oldest so my three children and as i say to before she is the greatest entrepreneur avenue and she said.

harvard business school professor washington post tom stephen us rogers meyer
"harvard business school" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Recode Decode

"The harvard business school to study history and very few leaders that i've coached over the years spend a lot of time thinking about the past him what am i teach us about the president but the harvard business school at that time in the early nineties had a very robust cottage industry called business history where it became very valuable is in your turf karen your in your domain because what we did in that in the course i started teaching a second your course 400 and fifty mba stuck at in 1993 94 95 is trying to understand the reinds of past industrial revolutions w with with what was then being called the computer revolution that became right the smartphone revolution that became the digital revolution so a lot of students were looking at john rockefeller and saying whom is rockefeller like jeff peso swiped by 2000 right right when we understand what some of these new pioneers in in the digital frontier doing by understanding what other path breaker stood so it actually early was a very popular class and in the process of teaching it i learned a hell of a lot about organizations business and an entrepreneur ship which is where i spent the bulk of my time was actually teaching right we're going to get to die entrepreneurship in what history they would make swine because if they are commonalities in a lot of things but one of the things that striking about the tech ensuring to focus more on the technology is the lack of interest in history how lack of interest in thinking that they're breaking new ground almost all the time and that there aren't any lessons to be learned you know i'm i'm flummoxed by that but i'm no i'm an outlier i'm a historian because i can't i can't read history i can't discover a new moment i was just reading a teddy roosevelt speech from nineteen ten in realising everything he saying about daring greatly and moving into a new arena is relevant to new businesses right act even community activism today so you know mark twain once said history doesn't repeat itself but sometimes it does rhyme so i i don't understand why someone that's.

harvard business school president john rockefeller jeff peso swine mark twain roosevelt
"harvard business school" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Triangulation

"Plato had two uh embracing this new kind of a direction that we were clearly all going in and you know from a sort of a harvard business school or just simple start up uh a lesson know one of one kind of thing um you know if you study how the business decisions were made about what to do with plato how to bring it out to the world how to commercialise it had a deal with and cope with the emergence of personal computers and all that what you wind up with is um you know a fascinating history lesson that armed it is another classic example of you know uh when you have this one kind of vision and you hold onto it too long um you're gonna get you're going to have competing visions starting to surround you and flank u n and at at it eventually outpace you and you if you don't adapt constantly and and uh you know uh uh respond to the changes in the marketplace then um you may get left behind and and uh in some ways plato as a business story is a classic you know it got left behind kind of story because it it it it did not change fast enough damn nath while this is at the seoul fascinating and i love the density of the information and the buck that's what makes it even more compelling we're gonna take a very quick break and then come back and i have a question for you about kind of like the software evolution of this because everybody can kinda get on board and check this out uh if they want to our i we're gonna wrap things up with brian here in a second but before we do want to thank the sponsor of today's episode of triangulation that his story blocks story blocks is actually your one stop shop for all of your stock media needs and by the way at a great value we use story blocks here at twit we've a bra.

Plato harvard business school brian seoul
"harvard business school" Discussed on EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Who is ready to rock today fire nation jld here and welcome to episode 1800 in fifty two of your fire right i entrepreneurs on fire seven days a week and shut our free podcasting course fire nation over at free podcast course dot com so you can create grow and monetize your podcast now let's chat with today's featured guest mia dutch now ski media are you prepared to ignite oh yeah yes i am media is the cofounder and ceo of ores and alps this is a direct to consumer men's grooming company providing premium natural products without the markup she graduated from mit and has her m b a from harvard business school near take a minute fill in some gaps from that intro and give us a little glimpse into your personal life sure isaria as you can tell i'm kind of a bit of a nerd and i a profess to that i thought i was going to be an astronaut which is why went to mit couldn't figure out computer science so i studied in new emerging field which was like computational nor science which is a mixture of neuroscience and artificial intelligence i worked at nasa for a couple summers and then this investment bank called goldman sachs found me i had no idea what they did but i decided i would give it a try and i quickly fell in love with the trading floor environment and it was actually on the trading floor where i decided to pivot into my next career move i was on the floor goldman sachs went bear stearns collapse and i saw these people on tv really struggle to explain what was happening in the financial markets and i thought they were doing a huge disservice to the overall population of people who really had at their money tied to the markets in that sense of paranoia was just really disruptive and so i wanted to change that so i applied to harvard business school where half of your great is a final exam the other half.

mit harvard business school computer science artificial intelligence nasa investment bank goldman sachs financial markets mia dutch ceo seven days
"harvard business school" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Masters in Business

"Tell us about that well i call it the my my first behavioral finance inside this was in uh nineteen eightyfour and it was a very early on and behavioral finance so i didn't even know the field existed um but i was at harvard business school really to learn more filling gaps in my knowledge base about business and specifically in transportation i didn't have any idea at that point that i would go and finance but i thought while i'm at harvard i'll take a few investing courses and may be burn back the opportunity cost of taking two years out of your life after you were already had some jobs so did that my grade said that i should have gone to wall street those are among my best grades in business school but i was in one particular class one day where we were studying a quantitative method of investing and i found that fascinating and at the end of the class the professor steps back from the blackboard any kind of tugs on his beard and he says so who among the people in this class think that when you get out of school here and probably go to wall street that you'll be beating this record well this was a pretty fine record it wasn't just beating the market it was it was doing quite well eighty percent in the hands and the class go up and the immediate thought that i had was the 8020 rule eighty percent of the people think they can beat the market but it's probably the other way around and it's probably at that point not the eighty percent that had the discipline uh to do it and if you think about um you know a a top tier of business school of very bright people.

harvard business school knowledge base professor eighty percent two years one day
"harvard business school" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Very good point so you're at harvard business school you meet your cofounder jebby fleiss yes thank god for that how so i've heard this story before the diane blood first emerged story but you've got to tell the diane ron firstenberg story so the two of you you in jenny have this idea we have an idea we decide to cold email dan bunker stenberg and we are were lucky enough to hear back from her that day and in her email it was a onesentence reply said i'll see you tomorrow at five p m and we drove down from boston put on devi f dresses and walked into her office and i introduced myself as the cofounder of front the runway and this was a full kind of two days after having the initial idea for rent the runway so clearly we didn't really know what this was it wasn't a business it wasn't even a fullyfledged idea we were kind of working out what it was with her what was important about the meeting as i heard everything she disliked about the idea and we really took that to heart and we developed an understanding of some of the problems that designers were having at the time in this was in late two thousand eight and a lot of those problems actually have even got an worse over the past eight or nine years as the major vendors for brands department stores have seen declining sales the retail industry has been constricting over that period of time so i understood you know if not for that meeting with diane i wouldn't have thought about the fact that designers were having problems with customer acquisition that younger women were choosing fast fashion over designer fashion and thinking about how my company rent the runway or at that point just my random idea could be something that not only serve the customer but served the fashion industry as well.

harvard business school retail industry diane ron firstenberg boston nine years two days
"harvard business school" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Acquired

"Because essentially aol is a is a sinking ship that just grabbed another ship and brought it to with and didn't sink as for lower is lower you don't reach the bottom but you're still underwater for there's there's got to be there's got to be thirty harvard business school case studies that are telling us that this has to be nf if this is the first f if you're ever going to give an after something in this show that there's also got to be some nice case studies and some sort of like like business at pystem a logical thought have enough that's the right word that i'm trying to get but basically around that question david just ask is it is it the shareholders or is it the business and david is there a difference well corporate behavior of the past fifty years would imply no but i think if you look back further in history and that they're absolutely is a difference if you if you can't save the patient in a like i it's shareholders but like if the enterprise itself dies yet so keeping the enterprise itself a live even in some sort of mutated forum is valuable because i guess if the patient is dead they're dead well it's sort of like i mean i think what we're coming to year and we have been for the whole episode is like exactly what you said brian like they were drowning and they grabbed a you know life vest and that kept them from drowning on the other hand it didn't get them to shore they didn't catch a boat the grabbed like a piece of driftwood i think i'm i think i'm ready to put forth grade i think i give them i give the acquisition a c.

aol david brian harvard business school fifty years
"harvard business school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The golden passport harvard business school the limits of capitalism and the moral failure of the nba a leaf so that sounds pretty populists the nba elite we just had a an election where the populists did well they may not have gotten a majority but they made their way through the electoral college and there was a lot of criticism of the elites how how how much of harvard business school is part of that group that the national populous movement around the world is tilting against it before i looked into it i i would have i as i think i if you'd asked me i would have guessed that hp as was you know dumb in both business and government leadership positions one of the things that's really interesting about them as opposed to say harvard law school or or other places is there are precious few harvard nba's that ever have a career in government you know they go in at the top like hank paulsen or something eric that but like if you look at the top one thousand people in the federal government you probably find five harvard mba sets all yeah so they are not ah they are not part of the governing elite except if you look at ain't liberated business that corporations are essentially ruling this country well too large degree there then yeah so in that regard they are i think the ft came out with a survey its latest survey of the five thousand largest companies in the world or the thousand or something and nba's were not dominant as seat as a percentage of ceos but of those ceos that were nba's harvard was totally dominant they had more than twice as many as the closest one which i think was stanford her in seattle so they have a long history of excel a rating people's climb to the top of whatever greasy pole there climbing let let me throw quote of yours at you and sue you have to say about this harvard business school has not only proven an enormous failure but it's very success has made it positively dangerous discuss i think that one of.

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"harvard business school" Discussed on Wall Street Business Network AM 760

Wall Street Business Network AM 760

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Wall Street Business Network AM 760

"The golden passport harvard business school the limits of capitalism and the laurel failure of the nba elite so that sounds pretty populists the nba elite we just had a uh an election where the populists did well they may not have gotten a majority but they made their way through the electoral college and there was a lot of criticism of the elites how how much of harvard business school is part of that group that the national populous movement around the world's is tilting against it before i looked into it i i would have i as i think i if you'd asked me i would have guessed the age bs it was you know dominant in both business and government leadership positions one of the things that really interesting about them as opposed to say harvard law school or or other places as there are precious few harvard nba's ever have a career in government you know they go in at the top like hank paulsen or something like that but like if you look at the top one thousand people in the federal government you're probably find five harvard nba's that's all yeah so they are not at they are not part of the governing elite except if you look at british business that corporations are essentially ruling this country will too large degree the advent chiasso in that regard they are i think the ft came out with this survey its latest survey of the five thousand largest companies in the world the dow's in or something and nba's were not dominant as the as a percentage of ceos but of those ceos that were nba's harvard was totally dominant they had more than twice as many as the closest one which i think was stanford or in seattle so there they have a long history of accelerating people's climb to the top of whatever greasy pole there climbing let let me throw quota viewers at you and see you have to say about this harvard business school has not only proven an enormous failure but it's very success has made it pas a tivoli dangerous discuss i think one of the things.

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"harvard business school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Golden passport harvard business school the limits of capitalism and the more or failure of the nba elite so that sounds pretty populists the nba elite we just had a an election where the populists did well and they may not have gotten a majority but they made their way through the electoral college and there was a lot of criticism of the elites how how much oh of harvard business school is part of that group that the national populous movement around the world is tilting against before i looked into it i i would have i as i think i if you'd asked me i would have guessed that hb as was you know dominant in both business and government leadership positions one of the things that's really interesting about them as opposed to say harvard law school or or other places is there are precious few harvard nba's that ever have a career in government you know they go in at the top like hank paulsen or something like that but like if you will look at the top one thousand people in the federal government you probably find five harvard mbas that's all yeah so they are not they are not part of the governing elite except if you look at ain clifford and business that corporations are essentially ruling this country will too large degree the then yeah so in that regard they are i think the ft came out with a survey its latest survey of the five thousand largest companies in the world the thousand or something and mba were not dominant as a as a percentage of ceos but of those ceos that were nba's harvard was totally dominant they had more than twice as many as the closest one which i think was stanford her in seattle so they i have a long history of excel a rating people's climb to the top of whatever greasy pole there climbing let let me throw quota viewers at you and sue you have to say about this harvard business school has not only proven an enormous failure but it's very success has made it positive tivoli dangerous discuss i think one.

harvard business school electoral college harvard law school harvard nba hank paulsen ain clifford harvard seattle nba stanford