36 Burst results for "Harvard Business School"

Fresh update on "harvard business school" discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:44 min | 33 min ago

Fresh update on "harvard business school" discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

"With Carol masher and Bloomberg quick takes Tim Steven from Bloomberg radio. We continue to spend a lot of time in rightfully so talking about the big macro themes and realities facing our global economy. What we find always helpful though in understanding our world is also checking out what is going on in our global cities and in particular this week we checked out our U.S. cities. Yeah, we zeroed in on the 14th largest city in the U.S.. We're talking Columbus, Ohio. It's mayor, Andrew ginther, has participated in the Bloomberg Harvard city leadership initiative, along with other selected global mayors. If you're not familiar with that program, it's a collaboration between Bloomberg philanthropies, Harvard Kennedy school and Harvard Business school. Michael har Bloomberg is the founder of Bloomberg philanthropies in Bloomberg LP, which is of course the parent company of Bloomberg businessweek and Bloomberg radio. Mayor ginther's city recently made headlines when Intel broke ground on a new semiconductor manufacturing facility nearby, and we wanted to know why big business is paying so much attention to Ohio's capital. We've had a couple of incredible years with respect to development job creation, obviously a lot of focus is on Intel and the huge impact is going to have there. But if you take a look at the last ten years, the economic growth and job creation, great companies, Google, hyperion, Facebook and obviously Intel really is helping to drive not only Ohio but the nation's economy and really excited about the future of growth. We want to be the most prosperous region in the country, but we want that to be dynamic and inclusive. We want the growth and the prosperity to really involve everybody. You and all the other mayors across the United States tell me, what is it about you? And I was doing a little bit of research that you guys have never seen a dip in your population since its founding. What is it that continues to bring people there? And what do you think about in terms of strategy to make sure that that doesn't change? You know, I think it's because we're really committed to being smart and open. We want to welcome the best and the brightest, not just from around the state, but the country and the world, a place that is welcoming accepting that we embrace our diversity. We have a 100% score from the Human Rights Campaign and BET is always right. This is one of the best places for black families to raise children. So we think that that's part of it, but also the institutions of higher education. That pipeline, a 135,000 students and undergraduate study, 50 different colleges in the university, puts us in the top ten per CAPiTA for undergraduate students in America. I think that pipeline of talent also makes it a place where companies want to come and grow. Do you employees want to be there though and I ask in the context of the overturning of roe V wade. And it's a question that I've posed to mayors in other states that do have very restrictive laws now that roe V wade has been overturned. Ohio is one of those states, abortion illegal after a heartbeat is detected. It should be about 6 weeks before many women know they're pregnant. Are you concerned that that will prevent employees from wanting to relocate there? It's one of those things that we continue to raise with our state legislature and stay wide office holders and members of Congress as well. I mean, we know that for Columbus to continue to drive Ohio's economic recovery and grow our economy as a community, we need to be welcoming and we need to be able to attract people from not just around the state but the country and the world and we believe that the dob's decision and then the actions taken by the state legislature can have a chilling effect on talent and so it's critically important that we continue to advocate and push to make sure that central Ohio Columbus in particular is welcoming accepting safe place for people from all walks of life. You know, I think about you get up every morning. There's probably so much on your plate. What is top of mind for you? I think the next ten or 15 years in Columbus will determine it will be some of the most consequential in our city's history. I think a hundred years from now we'll look back at this ten or 15 years. Did we embrace growth? Did we go about it in a thoughtful dynamic and inclusive way? Housing has been a huge issue. We haven't had enough housing units coming to market since before the Great Recession. And that issue is just greatly compounded over the last 12 years and now with Intel and so many others. We grew by a 100,000 people in ten years. We're going to grow by 200,000 probably in the next ten. And so we need housing and luckily we have the public sector, the private sector, higher education, everyone working together to make sure housing is our number one priority. I got to tell you, Carol, we were driving through Columbus. Yeah, you know this area well. Yeah, my wife is from Cincinnati. We drove back and forth between Cincinnati recently. We were driving through Columbus just a few weeks ago, and she said, this is unbelievable. She went to Ohio State. She said, all of this when I was in college was corn. And I mean, I'm talking about areas that are now homes, office buildings, new highways that have been built. How do you do this though in a sustainable way? You did mention that housing is even an issue. And we're talking about a place that does have quite a bit of land. Yeah. It's really important that we act aggressively and bring public and private. One of the things I've called for in my state of the city this year was to double the number of units coming to market at every price point because we need housing at every price point. Every year for the next 15 years and collectively invest a $1 billion into housing over the next 15 years so that we can grow that way. Dynamically, but inclusively and thinking about that lens of equity. How do we make sure that the people who have made our city and our neighborhoods so special and so great are able to age in place? Well, how has your kind of broad I should say, not rethink, but think about the economy, certainly your economy specifically. How has it changed post pandemic, or how is the pandemic impacted it? Well, it's a real challenge. So only about 1% of local governments in America are funded by income tax. 80% of our general fund cops firefighters public health folks on the front lines. Most people are funded by income tax revenue and remote work clearly has turned things on its head, you know, whether a third of folks are going to be returning may not return at all, maybe at a hybrid. So that's a challenge for us and continuing to figure out how we can plan for the future and invest as we grow as a city when income tax revenue is show up in the air. So we're working with the governor and the state legislature and others, you know, not rushing anything, but looking at the data and how income tax revenue and the taxation system will overall has been impacted by the pandemic. Because we know that the cities in Ohio drive Ohio's economy and folks understand that regardless of their party. And so for the cities to continue to grow and thrive, they got to be attractive places for people to live. So if you could enact something new when it comes to income tax policy, what would it be? I think looking specifically at the data. And seeing how folks who are working in a hybrid or maybe come to the office a few times a week, how that revenue could be shared among several different municipalities and partnership with the state ownership of some of the basic city services. And the most important thing right now is let's not rush into anything. Let's not make decisions until we have good data, good information to base the rationale and decision making. And we're working with our folks already with that, our major employers across the state as well because they need great cities to attract top talent as well. That was Columbus Ohio mayor Andrew guenther. He's a staple of the Bloomberg Harvard city leadership initiative. It's a collaboration between Bloomberg philanthropies, Harvard Kennedy school, and Harvard Business school. Well, as you just heard, we touched on the Supreme Court's roe V wade reversal with mayor ginther. Still had on Bloomberg businessweek, a story in the magazine about how the U.S. justices are about to get back to work this coming week with several other

Bloomberg Radio Bloomberg Philanthropies Ohio Columbus Roe V Wade Intel U.S. Bloomberg Harvard Carol Masher Tim Steven Harvard Kennedy School Andrew Ginther Michael Har Bloomberg Bloomberg Mayor Ginther Bloomberg Businessweek Legislature Harvard Business School Hyperion
Nick Nicholas Jr's Path to HBO

Origins with James Andrew Miller

01:25 min | 6 months ago

Nick Nicholas Jr's Path to HBO

"I wish you could all somehow meet Nick Nicholas junior, and I wish there were more like them in the world. Nicholas was educated at Phillips Andover, Princeton, and Harvard Business school. But with all due respect to that trio of pedigrees, it's doubtful those places taught him as much as his father did. Nick's dad commanded two submarines during World War II. The salmon and the spike fish and was part of the gang known as the Nimitz boys after the great admiral. Nick's dad instilled in his son, a strong moral compass, and a keen work ethic. One of numerous reasons why Nick junior enjoyed such a spectacular rise at time Inc, all the way to the top. But before the powers gave him his own set of keys to the kingdom, IE the company. They sent him to HBO to further test the young stars operational capabilities. It was a challenge. Time Inc was on the verge of closing down HBO. It was in 1976, and my boss dick Monroe, Jake and I used to walk to the station at night. That is to Grand Central from time and life building. At high speed, a little cardio, and he broached the idea. He said, Nick, I'd like you to move to HBO and take over the management. He said things are going well, you know that. He had to lose in a lot of money. The company, meaning time make is going to continue to finance it. So I want you to replace Levin whenever you can do it.

Nick Nicholas Time Inc Nick Nick Junior Harvard Business School Andover HBO Nicholas Princeton Phillips Dick Monroe Jake Levin
"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"I can speculate again based on the existing literature in here. I think it could be dangerous And the reason being that if you outsource everything. You're losing your capability of absorbing knowledge. So there's this concept of absorptive capacity in field of innovation research where it's really that you have to invest in your own capabilities of rnd of doing research of understanding is because otherwise if you are faced with a really cool idea or technology or solution if you don't have that existing stock of knowledge how are you gonna first of all identify it. Second of all what. We're talking about a lot. Today is really integrated. How are we going to make something. That's really amazing. If all you've done is outsourced to others. And there's this trend also that a lot of Corporations are buying smaller startups. That have a new technology. That is great and that is also almost become a way of you know. The goal of a startup is to exit via via acquisition. You know you're not even trying to make a big. You're trying to be sold so there could be some implications going forward. If that's how corporations innovates they may lose their ability to innovate on doing that. Excellent the system. great thanks. i didn't well thank you for the questions and thank you for being skeptical. It's very important. We should always all try to diesel. Thank you this is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations bit leading academics and researchers on a variety of topics. If you like to sponsor this podcast please reach out to info. At scientific sense dot com..

Today scientific sense dot com Second first
"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"That can be tweet to bolster desirable habits. And so i think if you really embrace that There's so much we can learn so much we can do yes. This is a technology adoption. So it's puzzling. To me in a sense that this inflammation every now and so now you know the two companies quoted okay. Good company accede. Do has flown a new technology. And what you're finding here. Is that if company. Ace of are crews to comedy x. Is a high probability that they adopted seeing technology over time Little bit puzzling. In the sense that in inflammation age today. You know we're just google it you i know..

two companies today google
"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"And so. that's what i use to kind of Predict what type of network or street network you find in a certain neighborhood. And that's how i went back in time. I didn't really go back in time. 'cause it's incredibly difficult to find patton data with locations that go back Passed a safety. It's really really tough. But there are some incredible scientists that are working on that and kudos to them. So that's that's just incredible legwork yet it's always kushner coalition which is causation lakes people. Who are you know. Young are and let's say more. Innovative upstairs pressler locations. That are little bit more dense. They go out with their friends after work and so on can be t- south that is just sort of correlation. Or there's some cost is sexy though. I tried my best to make it more a causal story than a correlation of course. There are always issues that i cannot control for completely so i have to be very careful with with saying Is totally causal i. I do suspect that there is a selection going on by going on in terms of what kind of firms actually locate in these areas. Because if you think about it. It earned sata usually the big producers of patents. Have these big r d labs. It's really hard for them to locate in these small dense or more urban like Neighborhoods so if anything. My bias is probably going in the other direction because these other bigger places there's a type a negative selection almost into into dense neighborhoods by sufficient working in data What would you suggest the mortar and cd design. A lot of people are thinking about this. I did cooler at the early. Part of guben cycle were not of moved me from the cd's Prices came down. People going to go out of the white white houses with a lot of space. The plant appears to be the worst thing. Now the movement back into the city's so what what you think happened and asking questions. Ugly for city design in general and in the sort of the cooler ex-post covert shock is going to happen again. This is going to be more speculative than because we don't know what's going to happen Though my one biggest suggestion his do not divide neighborhoods And i'm saying this because we saw this in new york when the highways were introduced a lot of old neighborhoods were divided by highway and this created extreme segregation between people lived in these cities and they're almost different cultures now they're almost completely different environments and if we really want to be able to get people from different communities to speak to each other and i'm also thinking from a diversity standpoint we have to be able to make connections and connections can be very literally bridges like actual Making sure that people can actually meet each other run into each other in that. It's not so tough to to see other humans and other interact and again kind of lazy silver. Probably not going to walk very far so making sure that these spaces that there's many of these spaces where people can actually just sit down and track one of my findings was suggesting that bars are important to And so these kind of things that from city planning that you have in place are extremely important and we'll be Going forward and speaking to your point of like the reversion of i going out now coming back in so i do think first of all our social social beings so we do like to hang out with each other. That's the one thing. The other thing is It depends again. What type of work you do And also as a firm. What type of work you're engages of. What your business is Then you'll need to be more together than apart So let me explain what i mean with that..

new york one one thing one biggest first
"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest is of many roach with an assistant professor of business at harvard. Business school focuses on the production and diffused of knowledge kong-based though the mayor. Hi thank you for having me here today eventually doing this. So you dissipation not says recently wanna price and so our conversation is that and in the thesis you say. Interaction between individuals is crucial for innovation as it enables the exchange and recombination of knowledge necessarily to create new or improved existing technologies processes of products. you seven tobacco the exchange innovation fleets unconscious neighborhoods co working spaces and university laboratories. Yeah i find this video to see my So this this has seen sort of the the common theme that be the bahir people who'd them in a room they come up with ideas faster I used to work for a pharmaceutical company. Long time to go and be have this large canvassers just like high tech companies in the valley but everybody goes and have all sorts of meetings. I little skeptical actually at if putting people together Increase innovation way and in the context of coded and this is a really interesting question before we before we get into the details I guess we can go to the three. You have three different chapters talked with a neighbor. This is really interesting so these are talking about the design of neighborhoods. Just simply gatien's for city planning perhaps in the future cisa. What do you. What do you find here. And what's a be us. Yes first of all. I love the skepticism. And we'll get more to that and how a very good thing especially in this topic So but speaking of my first chapter there. I was looking at st infrastructure. So usually we think about. How do we bring people together etcetera more in terms of like in the office day or are there other ways that we can bring people together and i was like. Hey how about these streets how how people can move around in the city and this was partially motivated for from when i moved to the us from europe where it was used to running around everywhere and bumping into people and then suddenly it was like. Oh my gosh. They're only cars. So that motivated me to look into the deeper and took data on the whole. us used data on the street infrastructure. On the block group level so this is probably the smallest unit of analysis you can have for geographic entities. And there..

europe today three first chapter harvard first three different chapters
"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from science policy economics and technology. My name is jill eappen. We talk with wolves leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation be color a wide variety of domains. Red new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis the most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable.

"harvard business school" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on TechStuff

"An article. That's titled automated. Hiring software is mistakenly rejecting millions of viable job. Candidates and the piece cites a study from the harvard business school. That's looking into such software and you've probably heard about this type of software employers. Use it to come through job applications and they do it so that they can weed out applicants who are just not suitable for a particular position and then just focus on the ones who are quote unquote the best fit. So the whole idea is just you know not to eliminate folks who aren't a good fit but really to find the right people to match with the right job which ideally is the best solution for everyone because the job applicant lands a gig for which they were best suited and the company ends up getting the best candidate to fill a position. Only that's not what's necessarily happening. According to the study the report says that software like what i just described is actually rejecting millions of people who are qualified for the position that they apply for and it contributes to an issue in which there are people who are ready and able and willing to work. But they're not able to land a position because of these issues. That's bad news for everyone in the system. It's really bad news for all the people who are trying to land a job because it means they consistently can't but it's also bad news for the employers because they are potentially missing allen hiring the perfect candidate because some ai software mistakenly put their application on the rejection pile according to the report seventy five percent of us employers and ninety nine percent of fortune..

harvard business school allen
"harvard business school" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

"Just that. Well i you know i i appreciate the chance to kind of go wide into think about this from lots of different perspectives Because you know. I worked for twenty years in business. I regard myself still is a working executive and so i follow all of this stuff with great interest and so for me. This has been so much fun because it hasn't just been we'll tell me what's in your book you know in all of that but it's a chance to really apply the things we're thinking about to all of these different dimensions so i have truly enjoyed and your fun to talk to anyway. We'll thank you sandra. That's very very kind of you and I really appreciate your work. I think it's probably more important now than than ever to be having these conversations conscious capital double bottom line triple bottom line the the existential discussion around business. I think in a post or hopefully soon post covid world but as we move through this thing you know so many of us are asking. Well why do. I do what i do. Why do i spend time with who i spent time with. Why do i live. Where i live his work meaningful to me. Do i have to drive to an office. Or don't what's the future of education. Do i actually have to go to you know. Do i have to go to harvard to go to harvard. You know there's so many existential questions that we're all facing and one of them has to be What's the role of business beyond just earnings per share. And so this work. That you're doing i think is is is more important now than ever before. Now thanks how much i agree. Can i appreciate your saying that. Thanks they you professor and come back anytime. Okay you fat okay. Thank you thank you. Well there she is the legendary harvard business. School professor sandra richer. Her new book is called the power of trust how companies earn it. Lose it and regain it. Pick it up wherever you get a legendary books today. The other thing. I'd like to remind you of is because we're real dialogue podcast. You may notice that in that conversation that professor such an i just had. You did not hear an ad in the middle of that conversation. Because i don't know about you. But i can't stand it when that happens now. Here's the ad that i want you to hear.

twenty years sandra sandra richer today one harvard questions
"harvard business school" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

07:25 min | 1 year ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

"They didn't know whether their drug was making this happen or not but they were leaving no stone unturned. They were taking no chance they were not gonna bullshit the public and if that meant in the short term that the number of people getting vaccinated was going to go down then so be it. They made a choice to be radically transparent. That's how it seemed to me. How did it seem to you. I agree with that assessment. I think that what they did is they said that we need the time to figure out how many people would be impacted by this. They did see enough to let them think that this affects women. It affects women at a certain age group and it has a very particular effect. Which is that. If treated wrongly the side effects From this vaccination can actually be fatal so they had enough of a story that they needed to follow through but they also. I think we're smart and not following through forever because once they conclude okay. That does seem to be so. We're gonna come out with a warning. It's going to be on for everyone. Who takes it including doctors and patients and all of that. So everyone knows that if you're a woman and in this range of ages you probably need to consider whether or not this is the right vaccination for you to get so. I think that that's about as fair as it gets. Which is yeah. So and but the transparency is a path to get there And so i think this was really an effort to try to build trust even if in the short charm you're going to undermine certain amount of trust to get there. Yeah that's how it felt to me but You're the expert which is a desk now. I also if i could before you go so i've lived in silicon valley for over twenty five years and in the time that i've been here professor we've gone. The tech industry's gone from being an and when i say tech i mean specifically startup tech world which is where i spent. The bulk of my professional life has gone from being a cottage industry To being giant major industry and when i first moved here as a young man i it felt like i got to know everybody in silicon valley relatively quickly and i was half a degree of separation at most and prior discussion on trust and reputation. Everybody knew everybody. And so if you're an asshole got around pretty quickly and so what the silicon valley that i knew and drew up with as a young man was one where we could do business on a handshake. Because if you broke your commitment or your word. Got out pretty quickly. We've grown up now. We're much bigger and not only is silicon valley not that way in some ways it's tilted the opposite and even worse you know because that's all sort of inside baseball but to the world now you know facebook's one of the most hated companies in the world and i believe our industries than way more good than bad but i have to sit here today and admit that our industry is doing some some bad some real bad around privacy. Of course that you you hear what's happening to young people around body dismore field with instagram filters and tiktok videos and all these things in. It's like this wonderful technology. They're supposed to bring us all together and an nba. Amazing for humanity is actually fast turning into a cigarette and so whether it's sort of the inside silicon valley Growing up thing where we've lost that that sort of colloquial trust so to speak and to your point earlier when there's mistrust inside than there's mistrust outside now now we become an industry. That's done bad things. And so if i was somebody who wanted to on one hand you know. I'm not trying to be pollyannish about the good old days. I want us to move forward or an industry that moves forward but at the same time we've broken our trust amongst each other. Silicon valley is not of place. You can do business on a handshake anymore. And our industry has become untrusted by millions. So how do we fix a silicon valley professor. Oh i'm so glad you asked me small questions. Christopher j you know it's i really appreciate that so a one the reaction that i have is. Why don't people go after salesforce is so. I've been thinking a lot about mark in the company that he runs. A as. I've been trying to wrack my brain say okay. Where can we find tech giant. That actually doesn't fit the mold of all these other companies and it's quite striking that you know for years if they had this Graphic on the first page of the wall street journal that showed that they're the number one. Crm in the world. I'm thinking but that's like an invitation for an antitrust suit but no one has gone after them right and so i think that it's not a question of is there something intact. That can't be managed. It's really question of who's doing the managing how they think about it. And what it is. They want to grow themselves into You know and so we. Didn't we write in the book about pinterest is another company that actually has done tremendous work around at anti vaccine and all that sort of stuff and has guidelines for what it allows on its site and they are reviewed by people in the guidelines. Change all the time to reflect what's going on in the misinformation to. It's not that these things can't be done. it's really a question of what are the goals of the companies. How do they want to operate so. I don't know what your reaction to that because to me. Salesforce sisters this kind of lonely giant. That no one's going after and i'm still trying because i'm not from the valley to understand. Why is that. I think you know you indicate it with your comments. Mark banney off. He's hard to criticize from the point of view of being a founder. Ceo who's committed to the world around him you know. He's publicly said that he. He thinks the homeless people in san francisco are one of the constituents that matter to his company because they're part of the environment that he operates in and so they want to do something about it and so from the very beginning of the company they've given money. they have encouraged their employers to be philanthropic. They've incurred they've given their employees time to go. Do stay so so it's hard to sort of come out and say oh mark banney offs and asshole you know. Maybe if you're against they'll be q. Rights you you might say that but you know right so he's promoted all sorts of things that interestingly enough and you sort of said this earlier aren't necessarily directly correlated with his own best interest. Why does it matter to him to argue about. Lgbtq writes why does he care about the homeless problem etc etc And so why is he been You know it's a very risky thing for a male. Ceo to be so public about supporting women because that just invites to your point criticism of saying why didn't do this for the women and you didn't give them this thing that you are or whatever it is right..

san francisco facebook pinterest Christopher j Ceo millions instagram Silicon valley first page today over twenty five years Mark banney first Salesforce mark banney street one of one one hand most hated
"harvard business school" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

07:46 min | 1 year ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

"That sounds fantastic. I'm curious there symbolic things that leaders can do that can have great significance. Did dave chappelle his own compaq. Which at that time. He took no bonus two zero bonus and he actually said that he regrets not having come public more open because he said he knew when he was doing this. This was something he felt he needed to do but he didn't talk about it because he didn't yet have the approval of the board that they would let him do that as soon as he went public with it. His own senior leadership team all took the same zero bonus in many of their direct reports. Did as well now you know. He's the first to say it's not like that saved the company financially. Buddy was he understood that people automatically say well. How can you be furloughing people. You know taking away their pay for one to five weeks and you're just going to be the same as you always are. He's a huge believer in fairness which is the art of trust and he said it just wouldn't be fair. yes now. i'm also app to say and you tell me whether this is fair or overly simplistic or just curious. What your reaction is that contracts exist because people are not trustworthy so a contract success and they're critical to a capitalist system any system where you need to specify right and so the reason why we do that is to protect ourselves and other people so that we know what's expected of us in a relationship the problem with contracts is it can never be as specific as the events that occur right so you can anticipate some things and put them in a contract. You will never be able to anticipate everything. And that's why in addition to contracts you action eat trust because there's this whole arena of activity that no one predicts that is going to emerge over time and that's where you need to be working with each other saying okay. Well what do we owed we in this circumstance. We didn't anticipate this. But we think actually this is a place where we need come together and so it's contracts and yes right and i think if you had met me several years ago you would have met somebody who most people would say Is a real pain in the ass about negotiating contracts and there's a quote unquote tough negotiator and and negotiated. Lots of every time. I've been fucked over. It was a new clause in the contract. And i've actually professor done a radical one eighty on that over the last handful of years. I i only do business with people. Who sort of i know if i they and if i don't know directly there's somebody they come to me through somebody i know. So that's part of it and the other part of it my attitude now is if you're gonna fuck me over get on with it like we're either going to trust each other and yes we have to have an agreement with to your point. I it's important to memorialize some things. Make sure we all understand and have a third party lawyers look at so. I'm not being stupid about that. But at the same time to your point you can't deal with every scenario it's either going to work or it's not. I'm planning on it working. I know i may trustworthy person. I know exactly how. I'm going to behave in this relationship. And if you're going to be an asshole while you're going to be an asshole and there's no amount of building this contract that's gonna get me to stop you from being that way. What's your reaction to that. I think that that's a very rational way to approach it. I think that understanding the need for contracts and third limitations is really important perspective as a business person to have. I think the other thing is that if you're smart you do go into business with people who prove their ability to be trusting to you and who you can trust and you back out when you can't right so you know. The trust is what has consequences the lack of trust breach of trust. That's when you say okay. This is someone. i'm just going to write them out. I'm not going to do business with this person. So but i think assuming that the other party will be trustworthy particularly if you say you have some reason for understanding. That is a better way to to approach the world right then. The sort of i'm going to have to wall everything off and figure that i and protect myself. No one's going to protect so. I think you need to be careful who you do that with. But i do think that it's a better approach to have to the world. Because i think he'll do better in business if you approach it that way. Yes it's been my experience. And i'm somebody who's been screwed over many many times but the flip side of that is this afternoon. I have a call with two entrepreneurs that i'm that i'm helping this afternoon. And we've agreed to our terms and conditions of our agreement. The lawyers are still doing their thing. And i i said to the guy said look. We're i'm going to sign this contract. So let's just get started and i. It may take a couple of weeks to get the lawyers sorted out but unless you wanna wait. I'm ready to go. I don't need a lawyer. I don't need your signature on an agreement. We've agreed to it. i trust you. Hey ho let's go. Yeah i actually when. I'm managing person meaning when i'm hiring people. I do that when i'm hiring them. I don't hold them out for the breathless call and all this stuff. It's like i like you. I think this is gonna work will work this out but i want to let you know you have the job and so you know it's so let's keep talking but i don't want you to be in fear that i'm not going to go with this because what i've seen i like and i think that people dinner much more open to talking with you. I'm still a little concerned about acts or can we talk more about why and i think it just opens it up rather than my hr people will get in touch with your people and we'll kind of make this happen. So i think there is this human connection that you can make. It's based on just trying to be open with each other. Now that is part of this trusting relationship. Yes and how do you connect trust and reputation. So reputation is an outcome right. So it's based on people's judgment that you can be trusted and you know most people take data into account and they'll look at your actions and if you do things in a way that builds trust over time you get a good reputation. So when james was famously. Head of the johnson johnson during the tylenol crisis nineteen eighty two. You know he talked about the fact that the only reason why people trusted him when he came back out with repackaging and all this sort of stuff was because of all the things that people had done before. Johnson and johnson and so i think anyone who is starting a business. Now you are building your tale of trust right. You are building the narrative now about what it is that people will do in. You need to call on that at some point in the future when something happens in. So that's why you're always kinda working this issue. It's not reputation management crisis bump in the night. Let's figure out what to do if you haven't been building all the way up to that point. It's very unlikely that you'll be tremendously successful. After them. that make sense to me. It also occurs to me because it's been my experience. But i wanted to check it out with you in. My case is an individual in the case of a company or a brand. I've seen it as well when you build that bank of.

Johnson one dave chappelle five weeks first james several years ago two entrepreneurs johnson two this afternoon zero bonus third limitations eighty tylenol crisis nineteen eighty each
"harvard business school" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

"So professor. It's great to meet you. It's a pleasure to meet you crisper. it really is. Yeah so. I read some of the stuff that people say about you. I and i was delighted and concerned that the economists said That you are off putting to some so so as we got started. I want to ask you off people that you interview our chat with who you are putting too and what did you think about them saying that well. I thanked them for because they've gotten a lot of mileage out of that in deeply indebted the economist for saying that i don't try to be off putting but it turns out. Swear i just. I'm a natural customer. So i i do that and i'm opinionated and listen when people say stupid things and i'll call bullshit on it. I think you know i mean. You're a management professor. I think much of what we taught get taught about management leadership marketing entrepreneurship personal growth. I think the vast majority of it is complete bullshit. And i'm not shy. Yeah but then this is going to be great all right. Okay so trust. What is it you want most people to know about this hugely important topic. The most important thing. I think to know about trust is that it's a relationship right. It's a relationship. Of what can i say of vulnerability Where the party. That you're trusting. Now you're trusting on their actions right they will do right by you. And they're trusting on their motives to this whole moral domain of trust. That makes it more than just like reliability is in so but the the value of thinking about trust is a relationship is we work on relationships all the time. This is not like terra incognita to any of us. It says that trust is something you can get your arms around. It's not either. It's not magic. It's not ferry dust it's result of you know how people understand what you've done what you think about and how much you care about them and how you show that in your actions and is that those sort of where we begin to think about how we become a trustworthy person and of course if. I'm an entrepreneur famous. Eeo or senior executive. I want to build a culture of trust inside my company and of course as a marketer i understand the most powerful thing i can have is trust with our customers and people in our category. Yes so that is definitely true. One of the things that we found in the research is to your point about culture that trust is built from the inside out so most of us think of trust is kind of reputation management. You know and. I'm trying to actually get some control over. How people about me and my company and what we do and what we found in looking at companies that establish trust is that the only way they do that is because the people inside the company trust the management trust with the companies up to and data how they can establish trusting relationships. So if you don't have trust inside the company kiss it goodbye. it's not gonna get it outside the company. Yeah definitely not young. Yeah and so. You know a lot of your research. Which i find incredibly fascinating. The deloitte elements stuff that you're involved with. I mean it's shocking that it seemed seems to be You know we're at a very low point in trust in corporations and trust in government and trust in institutions overall. Can you kind of pop the hood on some of that research. What i've found That leads to this conclusion that you see in the abdomen. Research and what deloitte is up to Is that is the trustees say. It's it's of judgement that people make And they make it based on their understanding of how competent. You're i in then they worry about sort of what mode of do you have. And the way that you work with that is really with sort of whose interests are you serving and we show more of that through our actions than we think in the choices that we make They care about. Do you treat people and institutional players fairly rights to the means that you use to accomplish your goals matter in the last thing that really matters in this. I think makes our research somewhat different. My research somewhat different from the other. Things that i read about is just the important of impact and what i mean by. That is the real on the ground. I can see it. You can't lie about it Impact the company actions have And people you know talk berry importantly about purpose But i think that in addition to that we all see what we see an so. The impact of company actions of government actions. That's heart of a huge part of what we're judging them on. So it's not like we just believe what people tell us. We actually judging on very real things which goes back the point i was making before about trusting relationship. And so you get back. This question will how has my behavior impacted. That person right what what's happened to them as a result of what i've done if they got sick because i haven't protected them against covid airplane. The tragically trag crashed into. Those are the kinds of things or you know as relationship where i love the fact that they take care of me right in in so that impact very positive. So the bisa. It's those four things you know. It's are you competent Do you actually show by your motives that you take other people's interests in as well as your own because we're talking about business and you know of course. These aren't charities. They shouldn't be but we care that they take other people's interest into account We care about whether or not businesses are fair in the means that they used to accomplish their goals and we care a lot about what impact they actually have and most important within that is whether they take accountability for unintended impacts..

One deloitte four things incognita
Professor Tom Eisman: The Real Reason Why Startups Fail Now

The Small Business Radio Show

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Professor Tom Eisman: The Real Reason Why Startups Fail Now

"One of the eternal questions in entrepreneurship is why do so many startups fail here with some answers. Is tom eisman. Who's the howard h stevenson professor of business administration the harvard business school and faculty co chair of the arthur rock center for entrepreneurship thomas. Authored more than one hundred s case studies and his writing has appeared in the wall street journal. Harvard business review in forbes. He's the author of a new book called. Why startups failed tom. Welcome to the show area. Thanks for having me well. How have you been surviving through the pandemic. just great it's A great time to write a book and it turns out. I know i'm ready to yeah plenty of quiet time. So why do startups fail. That's the first question we gotta start with sure Startups fail because they run out of money and they can't raise more Which i guess isn't very helpful. It's like the coroner saying This this person died from loss of blood and so it is because i always say that every business fails because they run out of money and i think that's important because so many entrepreneurs don't value cash flow. They keep looking at sales. So i think it is instructive especially protect startups. Where where there's a tolerance for For losing money under the expectation that if you can big enough you're to make some money but but boy If you get in trouble along the way and you can't raise the next round when you when you're burning through cash you you're on the way failure or you don't listen to customers actually help fund your business in those smaller things that perhaps just a service oriented company exactly so do starts fail also because not. Everyone is meant to be an entrepreneur. I think that over the last. I guess since the internet bubble of the early two thousands. We've kind of romanticized. Starting a business as a get rich. Quick scheme i mean we know we think of mark zuckerberg and elon. Musk is it because sometimes the wrong people start businesses yeah. I don't think there's there's no doubt about that. I think some some sizable fraction of of new businesses fail. Because people aren't cut out for it.

Tom Eisman Howard H Stevenson Arthur Rock Center For Entrepr Professor Of Business Administ Harvard Business School The Wall Street Journal TOM Mark Zuckerberg Elon Musk
The Real Reason Why Startups Fail

The Small Business Radio Show

01:41 min | 1 year ago

The Real Reason Why Startups Fail

"Well one of the eternal questions in entrepreneurship is why do so many startups fail here with some answers. Is tom eisman. Who's the howard h stevenson professor of business administration the harvard business school and faculty co chair of the arthur rock center for entrepreneurship thomas. Authored more than one hundred s case studies and his writing has appeared in the wall street journal. Harvard business review in forbes. He's the author of a new book called. Why startups failed tom. Welcome to the show area. Thanks for having me well. How have you been surviving through the pandemic. just great it's A great time to write a book and it turns out. I know i'm ready to yeah plenty of quiet time. So why do startups fail. That's the first question we gotta start with sure Startups fail because they run out of money and they can't raise more Which i guess isn't very helpful. It's like the coroner saying This this person died from loss of blood and so it is because i always say that every business fails because they run out of money and i think that's important because so many entrepreneurs don't value cash flow. They keep looking at sales. So i think it is instructive especially protect startups. Where where there's a tolerance for For losing money under the expectation that if you can big enough you're to make some money but but boy If you get in trouble along the way and you can't raise the next round when you when you're burning through cash you you're on the way failure or you don't listen to customers actually help fund your business in those smaller things that perhaps just a service oriented company exactly

Tom Eisman Howard H Stevenson Arthur Rock Center For Entrepr Professor Of Business Administ Harvard Business School The Wall Street Journal TOM
Yes, our workdays are getting longer

Talking Tech

05:40 min | 1 year ago

Yes, our workdays are getting longer

"As we've all learned over the past twelve months due to the pandemic tools like zoom in slack at made it a lot easier to get our work done without being in the office but there is a downside to all this money. You're right bret. It feels like your workday has gotten a lot longer and if you feel that way you're not alone because we have tech nearby to help us work. It's become a lot harder to call it a day at the end of the day which we never get to. Sometimes joining now is usa today. Tech reporter terry collins who wrote a story about our longer work days that you can read on tech dot usa today dot com terry. Good too heavy back in man. How bad is it Man well thanks for having again and bread. I appreciate it. It's bad because you know it just comes down to the to be having you know for many of us. We restarted decide when it's time to turn off the switch. It's one of the things we're all experiencing you know and we may be in denial about it for wine. A urine pandemic grape will be working and having jobs in order to pay our bills liberal lives and whatnot and then to. it's just also been a great distraction. Take our minds off of well. We'll still in this pandemic you know trying to ward off trying to be safe from this deadly disease subjects in my story Tina schweiger said quote sometimes to take a shower. Or sometimes i don't. It's still not to do things because of kobe. And if you enjoy working ten scale it up you'll say oh i'll do a bit more. Research knocked email out. She basically said it's very easy to slip out of work. My story i mentioned a harvard business school study of more than three million people worldwide said average workdays increased by almost forty nine minutes from the pandemic early stages now by forty percent and a gartner study damaging story about forty percent. Say the workdays become longer and and gonna research spoke to Alexa cameron said turn workdays are somewhere between the two or three hours longer when we were back mcgrew working in the office. So that gives you an indication that some many ways we were we are working longer. So are there specific trends. That experts have spotted that are pointing to why we're working longer days while we're all remote while some of those reasons. Are you know we have problems disconnecting and we have like digital attractions Overloads hurt bringing noise. We were as as i was talking and the research. I spoke to mix to working longer. It's well said up that there's a growing consensus that That we're we're more more times in stressful working together working Apart from where we were in person and it one of those reasons were having more virtual meetings in debt therefore to be harder to the gate coworkers body language there's more vigil visual information to adjust included slide shows graphics and also being seen on camera curbs need to have you know quote unquote an on air personality. Well that yeah. I think i've felt that way to you. Know yeah hold on you know we get more phone calls for tax. Were emails more messages. Almost what you said. Mike and and you know we are seeing each other in a workplace. So we're always just have this no always on mentality. Why also wonder if you know. Sometimes since i'm working at home i take a break to put a little andrea. Enter to go make a sandwich. And then i feel guilty. When six o'clock comes that. I'm don't stick around longer to any advice. These folks gave you that you found from people that you interviewed that. I'm how to cut back on some of these extra forty nine minutes or two to three hours depending on what craziness year involved in. Yeah yeah they. We should really try to take a break one possible. Whether that's a series of by timothy breaks across the day edition of maybe taken an hour hour long lunch at teachers said than done especially in our line of work. I like one of my subsequent story. Kelly christoffersen who works at a houston based opera company. Said that quote we were just ourselves becoming available as multiple worse are always online whether we admit it or not. And i said we're more vulnerable. And says that i guess is more of a share experience through the pandemic raw trying to adapt and get through it. She example Talked to her depth shit april meetings on on platforms or you can zoom will meet. Microsoft teams webex. Her meeting her. I mean again at seven and then she purposely disconnected by pm and she's doing virtual the following day she tries to go poor rhyme or take a walk and she has her poem with her but she tries to not take a look at her. Feel it when when it's going up. She wants to check. Take that break and so we just have to just try to find the strength to know when when to step away and there are some employers. Who are trying to help do that. As well as i mentioned a company in iowa tech engineering company in austin texas there were gonna initiative to create a better work life balance one things. They've done in begay their workers two weeks off without impacting their vacation time and some of the departments are tested. A no me fridays. It's as we've got into this a year ago to work remotely and we've also got a way to continue to work remotely but also without jeopardizing our welby. I'm sure a lot of listeners would love a no meeting monday in a no meeting tuesday and meeting wednesday and run down the week but thanks as always for joining us. It was great having you and look forward to having you on again. Big appreciate it

Tina Schweiger Alexa Cameron Terry Collins USA Bret Mcgrew Harvard Business School Terry Kobe Kelly Christoffersen Andrea Mike Timothy Houston Begay Microsoft Iowa Austin Texas
Riot Games Loses Alienware as LoL Partner, Denies Allegations Towards CEO

Esports Minute

02:23 min | 1 year ago

Riot Games Loses Alienware as LoL Partner, Denies Allegations Towards CEO

"So we need to talk about Ride game CEO and the allegations against him on the dreams and the sports minute from E Sports Network have to say my last two weeks in the show. Certainly haven't been overly wage doesn't and today is no different. Here's the background on January 7th. Former Ride Games employees Sharon O'donnell filed a lawsuit against her former boss right game CEO Nicola rent in that lawsuit O'Donnell alleged that Lorenz had created a hostile work environment and had fired her after she denied his sexual advances among other issues that lawsuit is still ongoing but this week sought a big piece of news around it. The first was Alienware a major partner of the Legends Esports cutting its deal with Riot games short. According to Jacob Wolfe now at. E sports that deal was set to continue through January 8th 2022, but Alienware wanted to terminated ten months early wolf also has reported that ride games image impacted by allegations like the ones with the rent as well as the ongoing discrimination lawsuit home. And the neon controversy of the last summer played an important part in Alien, we're leaving the deal early right games is still in that lawsuit with many former female employees around sex discrimination in the workplace is an issue that came to light with the Kotaku article from 2018 Ride Games is currently focusing legal efforts in that case on pushing the lawsuit to arbitration the neon controversy centered around right about accepting a sponsorship from a new city in Saudi Arabia at faced immediate backlash from fans casters and parts of the community do to Saudi Arabia's poor record on human rights in a variety of different areas. But the most topical impact on Ride Games image is those allegations towards threat yesterday right games announced that the right games board found no wrongdoing by the rent and recommended no sanctions following a third-party investigation the recommendation of no sanctions came from three people doing the investigating of a law firm to review of the allegations that law firm was hired by Riot but it was not the same Law Firm that is representing them in the case against O'Donnell the three people reviewing the law firms report were young May Moon a Harvard Business School professor and part of riots board as well as two unnamed male c-level Executives at 10 sent the Chinese company that owns Riot for his part. Loretta has denied the allegations in a company-wide email while O'Donnell's lawyers have pledged to follow this up in court.

Sharon O'donnell Ceo Nicola Alienware Jacob Wolfe Donnell Lorenz Saudi Arabia Wolf Harvard Business School Loretta
Opinion: Being successful is about more than pursuing a good idea

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:41 min | 1 year ago

Opinion: Being successful is about more than pursuing a good idea

"Et. al say was up the fire nation. And what's something that you believe about becoming successful. Most people disagree with many believe nothing. In order to be successful. You need only passion for good idea but the reality is much more ashen is one. Listen gregan except enough in order to be a real success through. I really do need passion for the idea. That's obvious determination. Focus and patients most successful business. People who have been more abuses. I'd be there are many obstacles. one has to overcome great something new. You know especially if you are the first thing that feed over. The cost of my life is great. Tree comes owning the factory business which is a former finance. Each company was unique in the first of its kind in the seed amount of projection. One gets from new ideas. These enormous one doesn't believe in his or her idea. More than one hundred percent simply wants work in any new ideas. I you have to educate the market which is very hard are always suspicious affinity new then you have to persuade the investors. The people around view and the list goes on and on. You feel you're going up in most of the times you'll be a low and the loneliness is very hard to accept. Stein goes on in get more experienced. Then it becomes easier and you learn to build on and fix your mistakes from the negative remarks. Along the way you'll be enriched for capricorn's like me into his naturally because rare. Houston it's always about enforce. There's a lot that i want to focus on throughout this entire interview fire nation. But the one thing i wanna pull out about. What a alger said is patients. I mean all of them were brilliant but patients. It is such as something that today. I see more than ever people. Just don't have an seems like the younger generation. The less patience. I have so many people all the time coming up and saying. Hey john like. I've been doing this for two months and i'm not seeing any returns. Think any success and like it's been two months. Where's your patients. Where's your persistence. Wears your you gotta keep at that thing. Fire nation so in doing some research on ual. I saw that you were chosen to be a mentor at the harvard. Business school of. I mean this is top of the top. Why were you chosen. I was invited to comment there at harvard. Business school interpreters enterpreneurial program during two thousand thirteen. I spent on her the per person recognized and identified the Me after by lifestyle Lecture action lecturer. I approach the Was approaching the podium and the right the way after are presenting center students raise their hand. Us meet who is interpreting. Though i had my lecture plan i wanted to follow with students entering pro in prague improvise and said without hesitation that was born today or over the world is it potentially becoming in their furniture but the system. We live in prohibits most of them to become one why because of the barriers that society puts in front of us when the baby was born starts to crotone tone touching breaking things. The current say. Don't do that then. He's babies go through nursery and school and approach daily by new regulations of what they could or couldn't do then that news when they grow and enrolling through diversities and then it lasts. Even when they get married they fiend. The rules are filed on them. The handcuffs are placed on their hands and brains is additional rules imposed or their lives better directed in buxton through what they can't do this. Fact of life interferes in some Sometimes sabres independence and free thoughts of many of us. So my advice to you all. I said to be group is right. Now get hold of the keys. And i threw the keys to them. Release the handcuffs. Allow your brain to think without restrictions feel free to go with any idea thought you may have even if it seems ridiculous or unrealistic at the moment. Thank your dreams to the limit and interpret noor within. You will erupt like the genie out of the bottle. One hundred forty students stood up and they're up with laughter. I knew then but they got the message. I love that genie in a bottle analogy. I mean fire nation. Can't you just picture that. I mean it is such a great analogy. It's so true and it's something that you need to be striving towards and forward

Gregan Harvard Stein AL UAL Houston Prague John United States
US business schools opt to sit out of some MBA rankings this year

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

US business schools opt to sit out of some MBA rankings this year

"Several top American business schools have decided not to participate in MBA rankings this year. The Wall Street Journal. Reports Harvard Business School, the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School Columbia Business School in the Stanford Graduate School of Business there among those who have opted out, they declined to provide data to the economist in the financial times, because they say the pandemic has made it difficult to gather that

Wharton School Columbia Busine Harvard Business School The Wall Street Journal University Of Pennsylvania Stanford Graduate School Of Bu
Transforming Patient Access Through Technology with Emily Tyson

Outcomes Rocket

04:18 min | 1 year ago

Transforming Patient Access Through Technology with Emily Tyson

"Welcome back to the outcomes racket saw marquez here and today i have the outstanding emily tyson joining us as the chief operating officer emily. Tyson drives rakes health's efforts to scale rapidly while building a high performance. Culture committed to improving patient access. Emily joined the company in january of twenty nineteen and from a functional perspective. She leads strategy client experience finance and operations in addition to the ever changing category of other. Say that in air quotes that early stage companies demand prior to join and ratings. Emily served as vice president of product for naveh health recently acquired by optum where she was responsible for the vision and direction of naveh health's product offerings across the health plan and health system businesses. Emily began her career in healthcare technology when she joined a fina health after various roles in the financial services industry in new york and hong kong. Emily holds her business. Administration summa cum laude from washington and lee university and our mba from harvard. Business school. today. We're going to spend a good amount of time talking about this digital front door. And what practices and large-scale health systems could be doing to do a better job of addressing the current area that were in healthcare so Emily such a pleasure to have you here with us today. Great thank you. So i'm looking forward to the conversation. Yeah likewise likewise and so before we dive into rate health and what you guys are doing. Why don't you tell us a little bit more about you. And the things that inspire your work in healthcare. Sure i i would say for me personally. There's there's no debate about whether the health care system is broken and it's really not the patient care itself that's lacking it's it's the back end at the administrative side of healthcare. That's really this nightmare of complex regulations and poorly designed incentives and outdated technology all of which actually negatively impact the cost patient experience and ultimately in many cases the outcomes. You know. I never personally wanted to be a doctor. But i've long been passionate about exciting this side of healthcare trying to make the pipes in the information flow in this pieces work by should really does require reaching beyond just technology alone so this desire instead of my focus on sobbing. The complex administrative challenges can be non-sexist ahead of healthcare but that do impact patient cares. What has led me on my career paths and ultimately now terrific celts of it. Yeah you know. There's there's a ton that needs fixing and optimizing maybe even overhauling in some instances and so having a unique approach that is focused on on on making things better on the back. End of the house is key talked to us about health. What exactly are you guys doing. And how are you. Adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Are we are focused on transforming patient access so Helped mission our mission is to make it easier for patients to see their doctors. It sounds simple but it's much harder in practice on. You know you shouldn't have to know someone who knows someone to know someone to get a quick doctor's appointment and yet that's often how it works in reality today. Deferred care is a really big issue and the industry even setting aside the global pandemic and the dynamics that's created the average. Wait time for someone to see. A provider is almost three weeks in the us at the same time on any given day. Many providers actually have availability in their schedules. So a lot of what we're focused on is how do you bridge that gap and there's a significant amount of complexity underlying yet so it's really idea of improving access. Which is every part of health focused on is about much more than providing digital layer for consumers. That's absolutely part of it. It's also about addressing this underlying operational challenges within a healthcare practice. Your system does that make it hard to manage patient access in the first place so we do both from a market perspective at comes in the form of products around central scheduling work slap locations and self scheduling communication platforms in check in along with best practices for how to think about optimizing patient access in the clinic beyond the technology itself.

Emily Emily Tyson Naveh Health Marquez Lee University Tyson Harvard Hong Kong Washington New York United States
Interview With Dr. Laura Huang

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

04:54 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Dr. Laura Huang

"My wife is retired banker and She reads different things than i do. I'm going to pastor seminary professor and we tend to have this morning routine where we get our coffee and we go to respective wings of the house and we just start going through the news. One day in january. My wife comes to me which he never does and she shoves this article in front of me from the harvard business school. That's hard work isn't enough how to find your edge. And she says you need to get lower wong edged turning adversity into need to get on your podcast and this is coming from a spouse who never to my podcast. And so i go. This is unusual. And i read the article and let me tell you i was fascinated. My guest today is dr laura wong. She is an associate professor at the harvard. Business school before that she was assistant professor at University of pennsylvania's wharton business school. I am so delighted that we're actually having this conversation. I scored major points with my wife. Will i have your wife to think. Then here i was thinking that you wanted me on your podcast but thank you tour. Well i didn't know about you. let your book. But i teach leadership i'm entrepreneurial we're recording this in september while this ongoing pandemic and shutdown is going on and my wife and i one of the conversations we do have is. We're trying to kind of understand how different groups and individuals can thrive going forward. And i think that's what really caught her attention in this. That's one of the lessons. We've been married almost forty years. And i learned that listen very early. So who did you write this book for and why did you. Yeah i actually. I actually didn't intend to write this book. I mean it wasn't one of the things i mean in the back of my mind i was like. Oh maybe someday. I'll write a book but it wasn't actually something that i consciously thought about intil. Because i had been doing research for a really long time unsettling studying like disadvantage inequality and people who are underestimated. And i had been presenting a lot of this research. And i'm kept coming up to people coming up to me and saying you know like this is sort of. What can we do about this right because a lot of my research is is a little bit depressed right. He's like talk about disparity disadvantages. And how people have an how there's all this inequality bias in the workplace and entrepreneurship and just sort of been lies and so people would say like. Hey will this is depressing. What do we do about this and you know. How do we sort of level the playing deals and the thing is all the solutions that i that that that were out there that that i knew about from from research were all these sort of structural solution the system level solutions things. What i what. I mean by that is like you know. Let's have more nerdy critic. Hiring practice or west diversified the top management teams or have more diversity in terms of who gets to be mentors and and so it was like all these solutions where we had this sort of wait around for things to change right for the for the for the structures insistence more meritocratic so it was found that it like leaving people frustrated still because there were these outside in solutions of there were a lot of things that individuals could do as they were waiting around for for things to get better as they were waiting around for things to get more meritocratic and so the last couple of years of my research has been has has all been around like what can individuals do to sort of slip things for themselves to to empower themselves so that they can turn the perceptions stereotypes and the bias that have about them how they could flip them in their favor and create their own edge. And so that's really ridley. The thought behind this book came from and then as writing it was really very much more. I mean i kept thinking about you know people who do people who have sort of gotten to shutdown over and over and over again and people who just keep putting in the hard work by me because we've been taught from a young age like we're work hard work hard moving working hard but yet for whatever reason they're frustrated because they're hard work isn't leading them to the success in outcome that they were promised that they thought that they would achieve. And so how do we actually make our hardware requirements for us. Recognizing that accepts outcomes aren't really about hard work level there about the perceptions in signals in stereotypes of others. While

Dr Laura Wong University Of Pennsylvania's W Harvard Business School Wong Harvard Ridley
Reduce No-shows, Fill the Schedule, and Improve Patient Experience with Michele Perry

Outcomes Rocket

04:10 min | 1 year ago

Reduce No-shows, Fill the Schedule, and Improve Patient Experience with Michele Perry

"Back to the outcomes rockets. All marquez here. Today i have the privilege of having michelle. Perry on the podcast. She is. The ceo of relations has sast based patient centered. Engagement company that utilizes a modern and mobile first approach to improve patient and provider communication. Michelle perry has almost thirty years of experience in software and health technology an undergraduate degree from the wharton school at the university of pennsylvania and her nda from harvard business school. Just the the important topic around how we communicate patients effectively. And how do we do that at scale. It's going to be a great talk and michelle super excited to have you join us today. Thanks for having me excited to be here absolutely and and so before we dive into the awesome way. You guys engage patients at relations. Talk to us a little bit more about you. Michelle wu spires your work and healthcare the patient. You know really. This truly has to be about the patience to have been easier way to access healthcare This pandemic has shed light on. The fact that truth helped get a truly is about the patients. And that's why you know. I joined a company named relation relating to the patient and focusing on the patient. How do we make it easier for the patient because anything related to health care is high and so why don't we make it easy. Yeah and i think the nature of kind of how healthcare works and fortunately that it's complex And the need for that expertise of simplifying and getting a message to the right person at the right time is critical so michelle talked to us about how relations is adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Exactly what you just said you still my words saw. It's all about getting the right Right message to the right person at the right time. And you know the industry's been a little too focused on patient portals and just dumping information they're figuring out the patient would find the information and it's just not working you know we need to make it easier both for the practices and health systems to make it easy for their patients to access healthcare. And we need to do it in a way. That patients are use to communicate. Say and we all carry this phone You know there are a few people in the country maybe not for the most part people have a phone kind. You know in their pants pocket or in the hand of something all day. So how can we make it very easy using that mobile device to get them just that right information and not a data dump just the right information at the right time. Yeah and so there's a flow you know. There's there's a step by step process that kind of we go through when we get care. There's a scheduling. There's there's actually going to see the clinician where you wait. I guess there's a lot of waiting and cars now with with the pandemic reminders etc. So there's a lot of touch points that potentially league we could miss and so talked a little bit about what you feel makes relations special and different than what's there today. Yeah so you know. Unfortunately healthcare has so many rules and regulations Starting with that introducing some of this technology to be patient facing can be really non thing and then you add all all the communications laws which tcp a of the can spam and. This really seems way too. Risky move forward and health care. So that's where many practice of just put it in puerto new best enough but the adoption and usage of portals. It's just really low. So what we focused on is making it just easy to get the critical information at that point in time. Whether it's about an appointment to make sure that you know it and confirm it and we have best practices where we combine own email and chat messages over the course of five three one day to get the best response rate and to get people if they can't make it you know to cancel reschedule and get them back on the calendar that you can get waitlist filled spots that they laughed and moving all of that so really combining all these with one platform that can make this really productive for the practice which would make it productive for the practice can make it easy for their patients totally.

Michelle Michelle Perry Michelle Wu Marquez Wharton School Harvard Business School University Of Pennsylvania Perry
Roblox Valued at $30 Billion

The Business of Esports

09:35 min | 1 year ago

Roblox Valued at $30 Billion

"Roadblocks raises five hundred and twenty million dollars led by ultimate or capital and dragonair investment group so They announced today that they raised their five hundred. Twenty million dollars in a series h a purchase price of forty five dollars per share. If you do the math and all that sort of stuff it values the company at twenty nine point. Five billion dollars. Let's call it thirty right. The i don't know why they priced it. So it's twenty nine point five thirty sound so much pathetic. Let's call it. Thirty billion dollar valuation House spot on where we kind of wish we could sort of You know splice in the conversation. We had honorable extra because not only. Did we say this would happen right. That they would do private round where they've announced that they're going to do a direct thing not an ipo. So this is essentially their ipo fundraise right. That's how it directly thing works you raise the money privately and then you avoid sort of the the raise you do. That's part of the ipo on there for you. Avoid the show you avoid having the price shares and things like that so the has now been priced. It's effectively an ipo. it's not publicly traded. Yet they're gonna do public listing but this is the financing and we called the valuation. Right now i think we said based on unity's valuation. I you know. I think we agree to was probably going to be in this thirty billion dollar bar ballpark and we have longer. It's insane how close they Called it. I'm also surprised at this point. They don't round it up like like i just weird like you could call it a thirty. It's twenty nine point five. You can bow out that up like what who thought that sounded better lake. Like what's half a billion dollars point by. We're joking around. But yeah. I mean this is humongous. It's humongous your particularly william the the quote from the ceo of one of the funds that invested. Because i think this is telling. And maybe you have some thoughts on this it listen to the subtleties in the language here. He says while once viewed as a gaming platform roadblocks has emerged as the definitive global community connecting millions of people through communication entertainment and commerce said. Brad gerstner ceo. Tim under if you didn't know better what would he be describing a social network right. Yes like you don't even have to wait. I was literally like an listening to you. I'm like this. Sounds like facebook like this and most social networks go through that branding period where they get past their initial audience. Right think of facebook. Facebook used to be just for college. Kids right am i mean literally it was supposed to be like this is common knowledge but be supposed to be like the facebook that you've got as a freshman to meet new people right like that's why it's called facebook And now it's now. And i'm sure at the time they were describing themselves as a great platform for college age students to discover each other and forge friendships. And it's the same thing here. They are talking about like they would have said previously were gaming. Now wear something. We've expanded where social platform and that's insane because it. This is first of all what i think. We said. We felt like i think should have done. Ns feels like messaging. That should have come from epic from. This is how they should have been describing fortnight. So it's very it's surprising to see it from rob blocks. it's refreshing because i'm glad somebody has this messaging. Somebody is looking at games as social networks and trying to turn a game into a social network which is really potential right. And i'll see this last like for longtime ever since. I wrote the harvard business school case or co wrote. I should say on world of warcraft. I felt games are social networks. I'm not alone. i mean pretty much. Everybody who's thought about it realizes they're pretty much the same thing Right but it's interesting. To see this. Crossover into an investment thesis with this much money behind. And i think given the success of this. It won't be long before we see other dame's and game companies realize their social networks. Still think it's gone too far right like i was. I'm i've been so pro. Roadblocks right called the valuation called. This move loved the big number here right. it's own good for the industry. There's there's really no downside to any of this right in fact now thirty billion dollars again in kind of the context we're talking in. The context of a social network is a pretty cheap social network. Right when you're talking about the facebook and the twitter like where you're talking valuations in the hundreds of billions This is a pretty cheap social network and so super cheap for the number of users. I'm sure it has in the monetization per user. I bet it's it's bargain-basement steel which is probably part of why they want to calm themselves again. Social networks but like. There's a question of does this go too far right. Where the investor says while once views viewed as a gaming platform as if the daming days are like ancient history when you walk into rox. You're not playing a game right now. Either to be fair. Like i think this is okay like i really think mrs okay. Because like it's fair to say that their social and commerce activity going on and that their primary drivers and i've always been kind of a believer that raw blocks was not and i don't disparage anything here. Blake pound for pound. It's not the best game out there right. I'm sure there are many young kids and fans. That would just be with me. But i think fundamentally the reason why it's been successful is a game is not that the underlying game or game mechanics itself for so incredible or so unique Was because it was a social and ecommerce platform hooked into a game and the game was fun to play because of the socialization features in the commerce hawks. So you don't think language goes too far. I don't think it does in this case. No no like. I and i'll put it this way like if fortnight were describing itself that way without some major changes. I'd say i appreciate the aspiration but that's reaching right now but it's really does have other hooks in it. You know it really does right. So i i mean it's death. Look it's definitely like definitely you know a vanguard language right like it's somebody trying to change perception of the business but as long as the strategy meets the attempt to change perception. I think it's good for them. You know what. Let me let me push this one step further because the article ends with you know. Typical of a press release about blacks about altimeter capital right. There's always like the about sections for the the companies mentioned in the press release. Right and roadblocks. Let me just read the first sentence again. It's like there's a question mark here is this to have we gone too far right and the and the sentence here is roadblocks mission is to build a human co experience platform that enables shared experiences among billions of users so no game gaming in that sense but experience twice human once shared once billions once. You know it's a lot of good word into a lot of good words. No i mean. Look i mean. Clearly clearly it will remain to be seen whether or not their messaging this way to get a great valuation or if they're messing this way because they generally believe the platform can grow into that mission right. I feel like borderline disingenuous in the messaging. I like i said i'm the biggest fan of roadblocks. I love what they're doing. I think they've achieved and probably will achieve what fortnight should have in terms of growing outside of being a game. It's just like when you don't even mention it at all. I would like. I would like somebody who say like most users download custom levels and it would be like reading. A tesla press release and the word car is not used or automobile. Like is why don't they read that way anyway. Toby start with. Tesla is the future of human transportation or something. But i actually really don't know. But i mean i agree but like i mean the end of the day like i'd rather i. I think it's great for gaming e sports. Because i know sometimes we got a little bit of criticized for doing gaming news on east but the reality is this is so core to what's happening in interact entertainment like we can't discuss this right so it's the first then. The second piece is like okay. So you know i get that flake i get. This might be reach. And i think probably internally they're going to say it's a reach but i again i appreciate the fact that the market is recognizing that games can be more than games right. The games can be a bridge into something and fundamentally what games are about like interactive worlds. Can be a lot more than just half life in street fighter. Rife and i think whether or not they execute this change so fully as to earn that mission. I think it's going to make it easier for the next business to message. We're gonna see more businesses messaging mess name as a result will see the games media mature into more

Facebook Ultimate Or Capital Dragonair Investment Group Brad Gerstner Rob Blocks Mrs Okay Commerce Hawks Harvard Business School William TIM Blake Twitter Tesla Press
A Conversation with Whitney Johnson

Accelerate!

06:05 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation with Whitney Johnson

"Whitney. Welcome to the show andy. I am delighted to be here. I'm excited to to talk to you. Because i liked your book a lot. So you know some and we didn't write for sales audience per se but as a lot of very sales specific stuff in there. I thought at least maybe the lens. I read it so i can't wait to chat with you about it but one thing i wanted to ask sign. Hopefully you're well. Were recording this in the midst of the the lockdown sidano omit the formalities. But we are well for asking. I mean it's one of those questions that it used to be just a nice city but it's now a real question is a real question right. What's good and you're joining us from where we live in lexington virginia so my my husband is a professor at southern virginia university which is also near virginia military institute and washington and lee. So we're about three hours driving south west of washington dc. So is that out neuronal them. Yes yes that's our closest airport is about fifty miles away. Wow okay so having lived in big cities or served doing a little more not so rural but smaller city living. It's definitely rural. We completely disrupted ourselves. I mean why give you look outside of our window in the morning we can see deer and there are cows next door to us in fact when we very first moved here. Because we've lived in boston in manhattan in large cities when we first moved here. I remember waking up one morning. And i like hitting hitting but like you know pulling my honey honey. Turn off your phone. Because it was buzzing buzzing any turnover. And he's like those. Are the cows unbend an adjustment for us. I find one. I'm away from manhattan anywhere. I go but like my visit. My sister in wisconsin. And both my wife and i get woken up by the quiet. It's like it's too quiet and it's like wait. Why are we going every week. And you're accustomed to having the noise outside all the time that are. Do you know at some level that that it's too quiet attack keeps me up. I love that looking at by the quiet. So i was gonna ask you. Are you follow soccer fan. Because you wrote that you are going to produce a reality. Tv show about sauerland america and listeners. To show that. I'm a avid soccer fan. Oh i wish. I could say that i am. I got really excited. So this This is actually almost fifteen years ago. Now where i. I was a huge american idol. Fan in a huge. So you think you can dance fan. And and i was doing a lot of work in latin america was equity analyst. And so you know. I've been to mexico fifty times to spend a lot of my doing work a lot. American one of our companies that we followed on as equity analyst was televisa which time was basically abc cbs nbc and fox combined and again this is fifteen years ago and so we thought wait. We have an opportunity here to basically do you know. Soccer meets american idol and just got so excited about the stories of that could have produced on so while. I'm not a soccer fan per se. I am a cinderella story fan and i just thought that that could have been an amazing august show to have produced. I wanna watch for sure. So the regular listeners. Get accustomed going off on soccer stuff here. Tangents everything relates to soccer. Soccer explains the world. There was a book that wrote that. So about that so I think i read that book. Actually it was a good book. Yeah yeah so Pet the author on the show. So so we're talking about transformation personal transformation you. I've really enjoyed your book. Which you've just updated and re released disrupt yourself masterless change and speed up your learning curve. So what was the original impetus. Write the book you know. That's one of those questions that its you can answer many different ways on. But let me see. If i can streamline so that we're not here all day on you know as i just mentioned i was equity analyst. Were keep merrill lynch In a focusing on stocks in latin america like televisa so like america melville and this is back in two thousand three two thousand four. I read the book. The innovators dilemma by christian at harvard. Business school and i remember reading that book and it just was in many a transformative experience. If you will. Because i was looking at wireless at the time in every single quarter america. Mobile was beating my numbers like just every time and and telmex numbers weren't so that was the wireline company. In american mobile was the wireless i read. I read innovators dilemma. I said oh. That's what's going on. Is that wireless is disrupting wireline. And i was just fascinated. That there was a s- theory that could explain to me the world and help me understand what was happening And the more. I read that book it more i started. I think maybe just because of my own personal bent started thinking. Well how does this apply to me. Like i understand. It's explained products and services in companies in countries. But i also remember having this moment in just two thousand four. And i had just had this conversation with Someone in management saying you know what really liked to try something else. I'd like to do something else attorney. I'd like to go into management kind of laughed at me. Kind of snickered. Like ov- outs nice. That's never going to happen. And i remember coming back to that book and being you know what if i wanna do whatever it is. I think i'm meant to do which i had a very vague notion. I think many of us do I'm going to have to disrupt myself. I'm gonna have to leave wall street and go do something else.

Soccer Southern Virginia University Televisa Manhattan Virginia Military Institute Washington Whitney Lexington Andy Latin America America DC Virginia LEE Boston Wisconsin NBC CBS ABC
Bob Rosenberg & the Lessons Learned From Running Dunkin Donuts

Dose of Leadership

07:44 min | 2 years ago

Bob Rosenberg & the Lessons Learned From Running Dunkin Donuts

"Bob Rosenberg on dose of leadership, former CEO of Dunkin donuts. I am so excited to have you on the show. Welcome pleasure. Well, you got this new book coming out in October, round the corner to round the world, your lessons of that you learn running Dunkin donuts I love Dunkin donuts by the way I think copies outstanding pilot. Now, go through the airport I always bypass starbuck's sorry starbucks and I always go straight to Dunkin donuts that coffees just so good to music to my ears. You know I was reading your bio and it said you graduated from Harvard Business School. Told me this right and your twenty five and you became the CEO when you're twenty five is that right? That's correct within weeks of my graduation I had in my early career I basically virtually grew up. Over the store I worked in lots of different jobs within my family business, which is not call Dunkin donuts gone universal food systems and a variety of different jobs I went to hotel school and went into the army, and then went on to graduate school in. Expected to join the family business but Lord knows I had no expectation that it's twenty five I dad who is only forty seven at the time eighth grade educated Guy Returns to me. And asked me if I wouldn't take over the responsibility of CEO. At his business said the REF aching request and that one third few weeks to decide upon. But ultimately best decision I ever made man the yeah. Obviously a life altering one of those decisions in life that that. was definitely a y intersection the road, and you had to make a choice. You went down that path and there was no looking back. Once you did. But Man Twenty, five, I can't imagine you know that was almost twenty seven years ago for me just the the leadership lessons I've learned from twenty five to fifty, two AB. been. I can only imagine you with your experience it had to be a minimum exponential. So the type of leader you were at twenty five to when you stopped in one, thousand, nine hundred and what do you think the big differences were one of the things that was an advantage early on in the first soda, era I break the book down into the six areas that I that I see as the company history from nineteen, sixty, three to. Nineteen Ninety Eight. But in the first era, the big help was business school and it was there that I learned the language to strategy. I would love to say that I came to the job as a copy twenty, five year old into it. All right I think I matured and and made my mistakes and boy did I make a lot of mistakes over those thirty five years if that the thing that I think the grew was my emotional intelligence. To better understand myself an-and away to. Hopefully understand my teammates around me franchise on his and the people that I came in contact with end consumers. and. It was a journey I. Mean I would absolutely say that It's an old saying, but it's true in my case no, you can't put an old hat on a young body. You do have the Soda Lauren through trial and error and I think truthfully, in my case, the setbacks experience were more informative and more useful. than the successes in fact, a big mistake the after the five I five is of tremendous success, the second five years or really difficult, and it really came as a result of the success of the first five years. It became an impediment to future success in it wasn't until. Unfortunately almost led the team off a cliff in the second five-year era that I really began to start to learn the more effective lessons about who I was what my responsibilities were. As a leader. and. It came from a book of all places. Really my my soda moment transformational moment for me. He uses a book that you read was kind of a transformation moment, moment or. Second Year of a second era of Maya my stint as CEO, and after the first five years basically was under pressure to go publican. And when I came out of Business School Isaiah inheritance universal systems where eight little businesses it was it was excused chaos and fundamentally what the team did is we basically narrowed that down a one we had really been experimenting with far too many businesses and we say basically decided to exploit the the sort of the diamond in the rough that we. Had which was a bunch of stores in many cases, soul breakfast lunch called Dunkin donuts and made donuts and coffee, and we decided to focus on our core business and quiz extraordinarily successful and we went from one hundred thousand dollars in pretax profit within five to seven, hundred, fifty thousand and we went public because my dad I've been trying to sell the business. While I was in business school was unable to sell from billion dollars. It'd become the billionaire always wanted to be after taxes and that was the reason he turned to me I. Think at that Young Age is he wasn't quite sure what to do and. Put me in charge. Then I changed the vision, change the dried to keep up unreasonable injectors and. Drove the business off a cliff I was sitting there amidst. Stockholder suits, franchisee lawsuits reading a book called the best and the brightest by David Halberstam. And it was a book about the Johnson and Kennedy Administration of the Vietnamese War, and what he maintained was even though the administration are governmental Mister show run by these Ivy Leaguers the best the brightest our country at the offer they never really went into the hamlets and into the front lines where the war was being waged the final what the true story was while the con-, winning the hearts and minds of the townspeople in the leadership in the towns. And Halbe Sam said the great fault lie in the fact that our leadership. Suffered from what he called Hubris the Greek word for arrogance in sitting in that chair and I remember like it was yesterday I said Oh my God Halberstam could be talking about me. Yeah it was in that and I decided I. You know I was blaming Franchisees for suing us and. Problems that we're having in terms of Mike. One of my key executives left the company because he had lost faith leadership fellow had gone out of business school with. An and basically we convened our management team. We decided that as leadership we'd never blamed. Martine. Mates are followership take a hundred percent of the responsibility hundred other responsibility. And that we that invite, we apologize for the Arab always we invited franchise on his end to noodle out with us what we did on how we can improve it. We decided we're GONNA go each of us to visit a hundred stores a year each in order to touch the front is travel with the district manages visit the store talk to the owners. Get very important in we created an advisory council. So fundamentally, we did a one eighty in terms of our attitude about how were leaders particularly need what my responsibility was in it all came from that that insight that momentary it's insight from that one book that was transformation I love that story the book was called the best and brightest what what was the full in the brightest by David Halberstam? Think Nineteen, seventy-three, it's it's it's bestseller it was. An important book at the time. In my view, it's still a great management.

Dunkin Donuts CEO Harvard Business School David Halberstam Starbucks Bob Rosenberg Lord Advisory Council Halbe Sam Martine Mike Kennedy Administration Johnson
"harvard business school" Discussed on The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

"So I think you know find something that you really believe in and I do believe in science and you Figure out a way to work in that piece of it and bring the skills that you have because as a former journalist, I was very good at explaining things to people and people would go on and on on off and especially in Academia, you know, they just go on and and I used to think. Oh my God, they're just smarter than me. But when I went worked at Harvard Business School for a year as a researcher and what I realized was academics are not the people at Harvard. They might have been better academically than I was but they were not smarter than me. I mean, right because I would go and would say so what's your PhD about right and they would go on and and on and on and I was I would glaze over after about five minutes. I've said took my daughter if you can't explain what you want to do in two sentences. Go back to the drawing board. Well, it's true. I mean Married An MIT PhD doctoral student and dead. He wrote a nine hundred and some-odd Page dissertation. One of the longest ones in the history of MIT and I didn't think he was ever going to finish took years. But when he finally looked at me and he told me into sentences exactly what his dissertation was about. I knew it was done and I think you know, if you can help people do things like that. It's very enervating and it's also satisfied so Amy Stern thank you so much for Walking the Tightrope. Let me ask if somebody wanted to learn about you bring in your company. How would they find you? And and where are you on social media? So I'm I have a PR company called Brave now pr.com nice name, and I also just created a second site called Brave now content Wu. Which has a lot of things that I've written because I find more than many people. Are people I like to write things down. I like to help people do bylined articles. I like to help them get their point of view out there. I like to help them crystallize who they are and what they believe and why it matters and so some of that is is journalistic, but some of it is just understanding content and brand and you know, who should you be? What is your best self? And to me? That's just been my life much better than I hope it makes there's better too and you have the last word. Thank you so much for being on the tightrope today. Thank you. Links.

Amy Stern Harvard Business School Harvard researcher
Shopping for Health Care: How Consumer Can Use Purchasing Power to Get What They Need with Deb Gordon

Outcomes Rocket

04:15 min | 2 years ago

Shopping for Health Care: How Consumer Can Use Purchasing Power to Get What They Need with Deb Gordon

"Welcome back to the outcomes rockets Sal Marquez here, and they have the privilege of hosting for the Second Time Miss Deb Gordon, she's spent her career trying to level the playing field for health care consumers haven't listened to the first podcasts with DAB. You've gotta go listen to it. It's all about the consumer and healthcare. She's all about you. She's all about your employees and how you can get the most for your healthcare dollar. She's the author of the healthcare consumers manifesto how to get the most for your money based on research she conducted as a senior fellow. At the Harvard Kennedy, School Center for Business and government she's a former health insurance executive and health care CEO. She's an aspen. Institute health innovators fellow and an Eisenhower fellow, her research and commentaries have appeared in USA Today, the Harvard Business Review blog, and on network open. She holds a B A in bioethics from Brown University and an MBA with distinction from Harvard Business School and I'm excited to dive into her work again around the consumer's manifesto deb such a privilege to have you back on. Hey, saw. Thanks so for having me back. Yeah, absolutely. So you've been busy. I have been busy. That's true. I spent probably a year doing research for this book and another year writing a not exactly that split but I spend a good two years of my life producing this baby and it is exciting to come back and tell you about it because when we first met, I was just starting to think about it. I was just starting the research and listening to what consumers had to say. So I'm excited to be back to talk more about it the same here and so dab you know obviously. So listeners goal isn't a DEB's podcast. This you get a deeper appreciation about her time as an insurance executive and what has inspired her work and focus in the consumer sphere but a little bit about the book. Dab. You know what's the focus area? What are the takeaways at a high level? Sure. So I wrote the book mainly to expose the human side of healthcare costs like what is really going on for people when we go to the doctor or were phasing an insurance decision and we have to pay. For it and I was really taken with the fact that so many people of all walks of life come to me and say because I used to work health insurance they know I know something about it and they just say what should I do and you know the most extraordinary people who've accomplished so much in their lives walk into my office at the Kennedy School at Harvard and alike, what health insurance should I buy and I. It just dawned on me that if people like that need help and it's Legitimate that they do. It's very confusing and can be overwhelming like what chance is you know everyone else have of making sense of these decisions. So that's the motivation that I I brought into the book and then in doing my research for it, I heard story after story of consumer. So real people who are trying to get value for their healthcare dollars whether they use those kind of terms or not I say like shopping for healthcare is a thing we could do people don't use those words and they don't even. Know what I'm talking about. But you know I interviewed people about their experiences spending money on healthcare and what I learned is that although it feels really foreign to put that into shopping terms or you know we know how to buy things but we don't know how to shop around in healthcare and. It doesn't mean we're not able to. That's I think the biggest takeaway is that we do actually have more power than we might even realize and that the first step is to just ask the question, what if what, if I could get what I needed? What do I need? Why do I need this? Is there an alternative and just almost like re imagine ourselves as a customer when it comes to healthcare this is Dr is nervous and unhappy by the way, but it's not a slight against doctors. It's just you know what I think consumers need for whatever reason we need permission almost to think of ourselves as entitled to get value for our healthcare dollars.

Sal Marquez Harvard Kennedy Harvard Business School Harvard Business Review Deb Gordon Executive DEB Senior Fellow Brown University School Center For Business Eisenhower Usa Today Harvard Kennedy School
You're Right, You Are Working Longer and Attending More Meetings, Harvard Study Finds

WBZ Afternoon News

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

You're Right, You Are Working Longer and Attending More Meetings, Harvard Study Finds

"Working working from from home home is is difference. difference. We We knew knew that, that, but but here here it it is is in in numbers, numbers, CBS's CBS's Debra Debra Rodriguez Rodriguez explains. explains. Feel Feel like like you're you're actually actually working working Mohr from home that you were at the office, you probably are. An analysis by researchers at Harvard Business School finds the average pandemic workday increased by more than 8%. About 48 minutes when the pandemic began. Employees have also been attending 13% more meetings, though they may be shorter than pre Cove it. We're getting more than five per cent more emails a day more than 8% of them are sent after business hours. And about the old 9 to 5 boundaries long gone advice to managers empathize and focus on output, Not ours. Debra Rodriguez, CBS News

Debra Debra Rodriguez Rodrigue CBS Cbs News Harvard Business School Pre Cove Mohr
"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

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Yeah. <Speech_Male> So so you <Speech_Male> can Kinda goosing Reggie <Speech_Telephony_Male> I would like you <Speech_Music_Male> to speculate. So be <Speech_Male> a sixty five days if <Speech_Male> <hes> from <Speech_Male> election. <Speech_Male> whoever. 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Yeah. So I. <Speech_Male> I I'm <Speech_Male> thinking of suggesting <Speech_Male> some sort of a constitutional <Speech_Male> amendment <Silence> reggie that says <Speech_Male> if in <Speech_Male> the future, the country <Speech_Male> finds itself. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> If. Any problem <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> exceeds its <Speech_Male> cutting GDP. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It has <Speech_Male> to get. <Speech_Male> To be <Speech_Male> some sort <SpeakerChange> of a bipartisan. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Various <Speech_Male> that would be great <Speech_Female> because. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> It'll which <Speech_Male> sent her earlier <Speech_Male> in. <Speech_Male> Is actually <Speech_Male> quite <Speech_Male> true. So <Speech_Male> it'd been <Speech_Male> in Congress <Speech_Male> quite a bit <Speech_Male> and the people <Speech_Male> there are <Speech_Male> incredibly brilliant <Speech_Male> some <Speech_Male> so much. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> More clever <Speech_Male> thoughtful <Speech_Male> Ben <Speech_Male> of different <Speech_Male> points of view. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Than <Speech_Male> somebody like <Silence> me would ever <Speech_Female> be. <Speech_Female> But they don't <Speech_Female> really understand <Speech_Male> healthcare <Speech_Male> very <Speech_Male> complicated. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Female> A. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> They a <Speech_Male> depending <Speech_Male> on the day <Speech_Male> they may a <Speech_Male> lot about or <Speech_Male> or. <Speech_Male> You know <Speech_Male> or <Speech_Male> agricultural <Speech_Male> equipment don't whatever. <Speech_Female> But <Speech_Female> Healthier is <Speech_Male> kind of ubiquitous <Speech_Male> problem <Speech_Male> everywhere <Speech_Male> it's nudging <Speech_Male> into any state. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Complex <Speech_Male> your amendment <Speech_Male> would <Speech_Male> force them <Speech_Male> to pay attention <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> superficial <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> summers <Speech_Male> this way <Speech_Male> this way. <Speech_Male> Yet exit <Speech_Male> yet this has been great <Speech_Male> reggie. Thanks so <Speech_Male> much for spending <SpeakerChange> time <Speech_Male> with me I was <Speech_Male> delightful <Speech_Male> Windsor on his. <Speech_Male> CPA <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> accounting sweatless healthcare <Speech_Male> a new <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> have great <Silence> <Speech_Male> Thanks <Speech_Male> I must say <Silence> <hes> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> radio so I <Speech_Male> don't actually know that much <Speech_Male> accounting but <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Okay <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> know quite a bit <Speech_Male> fun. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Looking at your <Speech_Male> record. So <Speech_Female> that's Great <Speech_Male> Gil. <Speech_Male> You from <SpeakerChange> you again, <Speech_Male> all the best. <Speech_Male> Thanks so much. <Speech_Male> Thank you. Bye Bye.

Reggie Allie Windsor Canales. Congress Delano Roosevelt.
"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:26 min | 2 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Are entering. into the market. sometimes, that are significant switching costs you know the consumers and so what you're seeing. You have to sort of pick your battle. In a in a really thought. Similarly, you put it very will but in healthcare, one thing that's missing is calendar what. So just tend another editorial in Bloomberg into sin all books, and that is IB Mon the awful absence of any transparency. To when I buy yogurt right on the can it tells me with ingredients are the prices? The percentage Mike Keller is your. Tells me a lot. That's just yogurt. Suppose I need a mess tech to me would I know a the doctor who's going to perform her team? The hospital loan which she practices enduring mess amies on women like me. I would know zero and I know how to find data in healthcare. So other editorial adjust published. I was I was going to close this. This isn't tight of the US needs at SCC for. System. New Truth Agency he. Could lower costs and improve at you in American medicine. I really liked this idea originally that. You're you're trying to buy products as you say here? with no understanding of the quality or the price trade on products. And you don't even know company different markets exist you could actually buy the same product and Marketing Mark B. You're not even aware of existence. Absolutely you're being it's just stunning when you think let's say about buying Carne much. You know about a product like a car. Be CEO Hugh. Kerr, but occurs actually very complicated electronic device. Most people have no idea how. But because of transparency of good data, it's become veteran cheaper over ton we need a healthcare end. I. I've been preaching this for thirty years now, and nothing has happened all sorts of fake agencies and. Portal. Among. Can't answer my question I need a mess Ado. No. But if I did need one, we're would I find information wanted no her so I, think the seem funding force businesses were just like healthcare or like anybody else he everybody likes transparency accepted S- about them. So the business is now Wonderful. Dare you question? Of until the Great Depression King. Franklin Delano Roosevelt said of had it. You know your Nell going to report data following gap and it will be audited data. If you abuse these rules, the SEC can throw you in jail or penalized financially in a very hefty way. And that cleaned up the market. It's not perfect but the best in the world I think that's what we need. Healthcare Agency that has criminal. US could prosecutorial powers get finding powers and nets dominated. By industry experts who are trying to protect their liberal their steak but I measurement experts you know. Accountants, economists. Epidemiologist people were interested measuring things well. Yes. So it might be that they could be a four light person who's accountable for it. So there's obviously some financial data but also. Performance metrics that could take standardized APPs similar Glenn Absolutely, and it will risk just critical. Because, you're young man. I'm an old woman, clearly the data that are relevant to you or different from what's relevant to me and risk adjusted posed as if it were something like the unified theory of relativity. But in fact A. Mark.

Mike Keller US Bloomberg Franklin Delano Roosevelt SCC New Truth Agency SEC CEO Mark B. A. Mark Kerr Nell Hugh nets
"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"One medical is located in business era is. end its premise is we're going to serve the business customer very convenient. Snow. If you come in here, you're not going to be abashed meaning your wait. Wait be patient we're going serve you. Contrast this with another retail medical center that was located suburban areas, suburban towns, and once we clear what it was going to do was it going to be lower? Than the physicians regular primary care or was it going to serve the consumer as conveniently as one medical? It said it would do both it's impossible to do. Some possible to be low cost and consumer facing. So the one medical, very clear, very clear first-pillar, very clear about what it is. Hell stop all confused. Low cost means you're poorly staffed. Convenient to the consumer means you've got staff running out the door for example. Card is, how will the environment Jewish except you? Let's go back to medical it's in business. Physicians are there in business areas number, pretty, close to zero. So they're not competing with anybody and consumers like them very convenient the employers like instead of the employees saying you..

"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Real cost offending funding are still lower than either obamacare or the commercial premiums. So what this would do is the commercial insurers would get a new line of business, but they would also be spurred to become more competitive than cresent Fli are Severi more bond industry yet so Matt let me just one example mostly. Own You can't do this. You can't see her you can't. You know only on Friday? Whatever. But one thing for example, they could do would ship federal government came up twos could say look if you go to see a doctor Nebraska. which has to Britvic healthcare. which cost much less the mess -Chusetts. For an elective procedure. We're going to lower the cost of your health insurance. The federal government can onto the Putin to clean infeasible. I'm on American citizens to get their healthcare Nebraska. Ramez. So. The commercial insurance just one example. Could create. Kinds of insurance policies that are great value for the money that a government Cana create. So we believe this plan on the only broaden access. And control costs, but it will actually create competition in the private sector which hasn't existed for longtime. Sewed that it's now competing gratefully purchaser, which is the public sector. Yes. So silent do understand mechanics civic ready so Have Medicaid and Medicare administered by the government these large patient pools Medicare believe was about sixty million people or something. and. So what you're suggesting is under the pool is. That is that is called the public caution. That will be managed by private companies. And competing in that pool a pricing does pricing. GOES programs. And employers now. Institute. Of creating data programs or or having private insurance for the employees essentially give them an allocation. Due to let them go to the pool. This public option poor to why didn't show insisted idea. No. Not. Quite a delay is you could buy a united or whatever the employer offers and PPO and HMO, or high deductible FEM united. And you could also by this public ups. And, United Woman the public But Kaoh United would be losing money to the public option because it's going to be lower price than anything they offer. Yes. You've. Going, saying, can I create a competitive product that is lower price than the public option that's still a good product. It's not one of these. You're GonNa have a twenty thousand dollar deductibles or you can see only three doctors or you. Never get covered for this up and my aunt, suzy, can they can they been very uncreative? For example, they can create medical travel policies that would send people for elective cure to the BIZ value for the money sites they haven't done why haven't. On that because it's been no competitive pressure to do it. Yet but be united before to play this public option. Not. So Will the so against make an instant perspective, Kobe? Did they said is that a public option market? The the private companies provide. Or Administer. So. Our. Is whoever the next president ages..

Nebraska. cresent Fli Matt Kaoh United Medicare Putin HMO Britvic healthcare. Kobe president suzy
"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Or we should think about it differently you want to talk a bit about Sure. Sure that article with food published males there. With there was a great deal more data. So the. Republicans want to control cause and the Democrats want to increase access and this bipartisan plan which I co authored with a In California. At Essentially wooded does is urges employers to offer woods, call the public option, which is Medicare to their employees. However Medicare is a tremendously underpriced. It has a deficit with a net present you of police thirty, six, trillion GDP of the you said no good as twenty trillion. Thirty six. Very significantly. Of money implanted means in English is the people on Medicare paid less but their children going to pick up the amount they don't pay, which is this thirty, six trillion. So. Would we want is for the public option to be prized only fear is me name that it doesn't do this intergenerational transfers? It accounts for the costs of Medicare accurately, and it charges the price that's commensurate with at. Even if Medicare costs were measured accurately including things like what's called the IBM. Which is reserve that commercial insurers have four that accounts for expenses that the providers have been curbed but hem reported even if the were included, medicare costs would be lower than those of commercial insurers because of Medicare's scale, it can just extract volume discounts that the commercial insurance. Companies. Have not and perhaps could numb to yet. So that's our proposal. Offered the public option which would use medicare pricing. But it would be administered by private insurance. Companies and. To your employees and we computed the 'cause. It compared to the Obama cure costs and to the cause premiums that are paid by employees of small and medium sized enterprises and the cost the real cost offending funding are still lower than either obamacare or the commercial premiums..

Medicare Obama California IBM
"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"harvard business school" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"So I don't take those statistics terribly seriously even when they're about diseases special diseases much narrower focus than own calls, Moore -delity. However, it's unquestionable. The we spend nearly twice as much as those countries We clearly don't get nearly twice as good results and most of those European countries have universal insurance. That doesn't mean. Everybody in those countries gets access, but it's better than having thirty million people without insurance. So we've got to do better and we can do better. We Love the administrative and. Technological Genius that if it were applied to healthcare, it could do would fedex would say did four. Did for transportation or would microcell. And Gogel. For communication could if if we let those Those. Incredible Resources Get. Successfully focused on this problem, right? Right yeah and a Kuban nineteen mid creates sort of you know exposed. The status quo a little bit I was looking at, you know hospital admissions for coney conditions such as COPD. And Diabetes and be have much higher hospital admissions. This is before over ninety and. Kicked in and as you know these factors for over ninety mortality now you could read this in multiple ways. You could say, maybe we have a sick population as an initial condition to start. Or are we populations? A- differently from. OECD countries either case the cost playstation blades not higher in the US. I'm surprised to hear the because I looked at those same data. And what I thought. was very surprised. We have to it's hospital beds per thousand people yet the UK and Canada have two beds for those people. Spend of GDP on healthcare we spend eighteen percent, but we have the same capacity Germany. which spends a percents. Has Eight beds per thousand pope. Japan has sixteen beds of course, Japanese hospitals includes nursing homes different. Career, which is very similar. The hustles is similar thirteen bids print thousand and Germany Japan careers spend much La's US yet. They have more mentions now they may not have I didn't look at the data by disease you. Had a specific to these conditions. Yeah. Yeah. At two Doug Needs. Chefs and COPD. Will. Again those diseases have genetic factors, socioeconomic factors living condition clearly, for example, COPD or respiratory disease. Is correlated with the cleanliness of the air around you. So, there may be other factors that That explained the hybrid of hospital admissions the grow in general. We have less hospital capacity and fewer admissions and shorter lengths of stay and yet we pay much more. snapped. A toward this. Yeah. Yeah Yeah Yeah that's that's. True in aggregate out.

COPD US Moore OECD Kuban Germany Japan Diabetes coney Japan Doug Needs UK Germany. Canada
John S. Couch: The Art of Creative Rebellion

Leadership and Loyalty

04:27 min | 2 years ago

John S. Couch: The Art of Creative Rebellion

"And Gentlemen, please put your hands together and help me welcome my friend. That's that's an infection. You'd see you too. Thanks for joining us. Really appreciate it. Our say the beginning of the show this is a question I ask everybody because we live in this age of influences although I think that's a terrible title but nonetheless. I'm one of the things I always want to know is who is someone who we might not know or even consider who has been a major influence on you and on your leadership. Well there's The usual suspects that people talk about whether it's talking about Peter. Drucker. From a management perspective and two usual kind of business school books approach to but in reality for me a lot of. My corporate influences have been really nontraditional. So. There is a book called the art spirit by an artist named Robert. Henry from the Ash can school in eighteen. Ten. Nineteen twenty really early times who interestingly enough he He kind of broke down in enlightened my thinking about creativity along time ago and interesting enough I find a lot of the things that that influenced me over time. Or less the business books no less the how books in really more books that were philosophical. So a one level Robert Henry's take on creativity. Of starting with what you have in once you are in working from there was incredibly important. I would say from a strategic perspective when I was a teenager a book called the Book of five rings by Miyamoto Musashi, which is the the book that the probably considered to be the greatest summarize Japan wrote in the sixteenth century about strategy literally ten days before he died. And it's kind of the sun, Suu, art of War for Japan, but it's much center. And actually was adopted by the Harvard Business School. Thirty years ago as required reading and in that book it talked about. How humans are essentially broken down and Thomas elements of wind fire and water in the void. And talked about how you lead teams and so a lot of ways was interesting for me is the fact that this summary. Talked about the fact that human beings are multi variant the metaphor for him. Was the idea that when you're actually pulling together people, you don't try to make one-size-fits-all actually aknowledged what people's capabilities in what their? Lack of talents and whether great talents are without judgment. So the analogy was you're building a house and some would is used to support the house and it's very maybe gnarly and but stick it strong and you hide it behind the walls and you have been near would which is very thin and grab for a beautiful and you put that towards the front and you know the metaphor goes on you know with the idea human beings are the same way and that you wouldn't expect a beautiful. Veneer Wall to be a supporting column of would within the House in the same way to the metaphor goes when you're when you're hiring people and when you're actually trying to build a culture that you hire and you don't thank will this person needs to conform into this particular role that I'm trying to fulfill but you actually look at them and say, well, the role trying to fill is one part of the overall capabilities at this person. On Larry. And if you're. Smart about it, I think what you do you use the Job Description at you're putting out in the world is a way to attract talent. But if you do it correctly, the job itself is just one part of the overall capability of the person. You can actually almost van Diagram Denise between the business and within Russell needs are the personnel are, and if you can kind of do that crossover where they intersect, you can actually unlock two to three x the capabilities of that person. So probably long winded answer to your question, but does two books were interesting of a huge influence to me?

Robert Henry Drucker Harvard Business School Miyamoto Musashi Japan SUU Peter Russell Thomas Larry
Brother helping brother to cure Rare Disease

Sounds of Science

09:24 min | 2 years ago

Brother helping brother to cure Rare Disease

"Welcome rich and Karen. Thanks for having us go to be here. Thank you for coming. I know it's a bit chilly today. So I'm glad that you braved the elements to come on out here anytime anytime. So can you tell us a bit about yourselves? And your personal stake in cure diseases mission. Rich let's start with you. Jor Happy to So as you mentioned I'm the President and founder of cure disease. I started the organization bit over two years ago because I have a younger brother. Terry who has a disease called Duchenne muscular dystrophy as you alluded to Terry's form of do Shan is quite rare. His specific mutation type is very rare and the difficulty. With that is he's not amenable to Clinical trials for the most part because of both his age as well as ambulatory status. These group of rare disease patients aren't left behind. So you grew up with Terry. Obviously was this sort of something that you would always in the back of your mind starting on organization like this or did that idea come to you later. It's a long answer. I was trying to give you the short version of it so Yeah I grew up at Terry. Terry's four years younger than I am. we both grew up in upstate. New York we're big fans of star wars and playing catch outside when he still could Years ago in the back of your mind whether you're me or somebody else. That's impacted by rare disease. You have the idea that you want to do something. Oftentimes you don't know what I struggled with the idea of. I don't know what to do for a long time till I had the opportunity to go to Harvard Business School and partake in the volcanic fellowship at Harvard. Business School and through that I was able to me really really incredible people who were doing really incredible things to advance science and advanced therapeutics that we're lifesaving and lifesaving and one of those individuals. Dr Tim Mu at Boston Children's hospital and that's really where the story begins. Cool so care and let's move on to you. How did you get involved with care rare disease? What's Your Story Shar Well my name is Karen Morales. I'm forty two years old and when I was twenty and a sophomore in college. I was diagnosed with extremely rare form of muscular dystrophy. Though at that time was called my Oshii myopathy so over the course of the last twenty years. I've spent a lot of my time and mental resources on ways in which to keep my health in a positive trajectory ways in which to avoid the most negative of diagnostic outcomes. That I was told about when I was twenty so as part of that I always stayed very open to what was happening in medical research and through the powers of facebook finally enough. I came across a video that riches organization did last spring so spring of twenty nine thousand nine hundred and in that video I heard about the power of crisper something that I had been monitoring. I just hadn't seen anybody doing it for muscular dystrophy given my background in advertising and marketing and now I own my own agency I reached out immediately and told rich. I wanted to talk to him that and turned into coffee and a phone call. And we've been working together ever since. Could you tell us a little bit more about muscular dystrophy? Karen we start with you. Know it probably has different developmental trajectories but can get like a baseline of what the disease looks like. Sure so. There are many types of muscular dystrophy. He's like large Disease categories for most of us. We are missing or our bodies stops producing effectively a certain type of protein. They're different types of protein in different disease states. In my case it's despair Lin In Dijon its destruction and the impact of what that protein does varies by disease type so in my case the digital muscles so the ones away from the center core of my body my calves and my arms weaken over time it for my particular type. It's not a life ending diagnosis. It's potentially a life altering diagnosis right. So there is a large level of variability between the different types. And how they actually present. But the common thread across all muscular dystrophy is is until now they've been untreatable. And the majority of folks facing these really rare diseases have to take a lot of their medical care into their own hands. And I think that is a shared history that both Terry and I and the other patients in this group all have. It's with a lot of personal trial and error and working to advocate for yourself that you're able to receive the care that you need because it is still in many cases an issue that doctors and hospitals and emergency rooms don't see that often So it can be easily mis read misinterpreted and sometimes cared for in ways that are actually have adverse reactions for the patients. Themselves has terry had a similar experience to Karen in terms of his disease. Strict trajectory Terry has had a similar experiences. Karen had in with regard to his disease. In fact he had a recent fall just over the holiday where he collapsed and broke both of his femurs and the difficult challenge was living in an upstate and rural part of New York that there wasn't an immediate care center nearby that could deal with not only two broken femurs but underlying condition of do Shannon and so a lot of work is put into connecting. Terry's neurologist whose doctor Brenda Wong at the University of Massachusetts in a collaborator of ours with the care team at that hospital in upstate. New York to ensure that the proper things were done that propofol was used for instance for anesthesia in instead of a gaseous form of anesthesia. And so it's little things like this that have very big ramifications that we need to be very cautious of across the spectrum of rare diseases. Not just the muscular dystrophy but more broadly taking into consideration the patient's perspective in the patient's point of view in conjunction with the with the care team Rather than I think the traditional dynamic of the doctor being sort of the superior and the patient being the one who who accepts the information advocacy in the hospital setting is of utmost importance because it really does mean the difference between life and death as we found with my brother? What was the incentive for setting up care rare disease? I mean there are many routes. You could have taken to help Terry. So what made you decide to pursue this one? That's A. That's a good question so as I mentioned earlier during my time in business school I had the chance to meet Dr Tim you so I got to know Tim through through a mutual friend of ours and understood what he was doing the process that he was developing to characterize the patient to develop therapeutic construct specific to the patient mutation and then the rapidly test those and then get into dosing the patient all within a year and accomplish the and so meeting him. Obviously the question of mine came to mind is how do we take this applications for Batten's disease? And how do we apply it to a neuro muscular disease? Such as Duchenne Orlin girdle or any of the other number for diseases. That need help and so it was through that process. That was the spark for cure disease. As sort of as a as a patient caregiver sort of you look for those opportunities of hope where you can drive towards something. Quick rather than the traditional ten years and two billion dollars development cycle which forces. Today's patients to likely not be able to see tomorrow's treatments simply because they take too long. Karen what was it about riches organization or rich himself that convince you to sign on and help them out as being on their board of directors. It's the jokes. It definitely was a combination. Having lived through a rare disease for twenty years myself. I have followed the medical research and I've been involved in any trials that were available having also spent the majority of my life working with fortune. Five hundred companies globally introducing new products and working in a combination of Silicon Valley and traditional. Cpg Brands I was noticing that across medical research. It felt like the systems were antiquated. I knew my gene defect in the early two thousands and at that time I was told that there would probably be a five to seven year. Lag Be four therapeutics for available as a patient. I saw riches approach as something that had faster outcomes than what I was used to seeing Across the market. When I met him and I realized that he had put together. Such an incredible team of world renowned leaders across different medical institutions. I immediately was in and I've been a huge supporter ever since I think what this organization is able to do. As a nonprofit drug company will truly revolutionize the way that patients can have hope when they're dealing with these catastrophic

Terry Karen Morales President And Founder New York Rich Business School Harvard Business School Facebook Dr Tim Mu Harvard Myopathy Silicon Valley Duchenne LIN Dr Tim Shan Propofol Boston Children
A Reason to Reveal Your Failures

Curiosity Daily

01:57 min | 2 years ago

A Reason to Reveal Your Failures

"Success is a double edged sword hard work. Ken Come with amazing benefits like more pay more responsibility and and more stability but it can also carry jealousy competition and the resentment right along with it. So how do you keep. The scales tipped toward the positive well. According into new research from Harvard. Business School you can do it by talking more about your failures. This tip might sound counterintuitive. Isn't it important. Talk Your achievements. Don't you want people to know you're successful. Why would you ever highlight year failures right well? The thing is when successful people only talk about their success. They come off as egotistical and that can stir up what the Harvard Business School researchers call malicious envy. That's the kind of destructive envy that makes people wants to harm the successful person according to the researchers if you're really successful then it's likely that everybody already knows about your achievements admits it's more interesting and inspiring for people to learn about your mistakes and that makes sense right. I mean when you reveal both your successes and failures. The the team says you're more likely to stir a benign kind of envy. The kind that drives people to be more like the successful person instead of tearing them down. They found that people don't have less admiration for a leader when they know about the leader's failures and they still respect his or her status. The envy just becomes less harmful and more motivational national and as a bonus revealing past failure tends to make people think you're more deserving of success because that means you had to try harder to get there now you can still talk about your successes. That's especially true for people who are just starting out if you're a paper shuffling intern for example. Your colleagues probably aren't envious of you in the first place but as you claim the letter remember that it's good to talk about your failures to you won't fall down and you might even get to climb higher

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