29 Burst results for "Harvard Business Review"

4 Careers To Try If You Find Yourself Easily Bored In Your Job

Work Matters With Ken Coleman

04:01 min | 2 weeks ago

4 Careers To Try If You Find Yourself Easily Bored In Your Job

"I I have adhd I very open about this. I've never taken medication I. Think it's a blessing. Yes it has its negatives. But. The reality is, is that it's a blessing for me because. The things about my adhd that some people think well, Oh, you're you're easily distracted or you've got hyper energy well, that makes me really really good at what I do. Now I have to be careful about the things that are week right and I've gotta tell people about this and I've got to create systems but So I'M GONNA share an article that is very, very personal to me because I want to encourage many of you. Four careers for people who are easily distracted. This is from Harvard Business Review? This is really great psychological research. has suggested that heightened social media usage is linked deficits in concentration. And other negative things whether you have. adhd. Are Not. We are in a world where? The digital social interactions that we have and that that is just they're right there tip of our fingers is creating a more distracted. Culture. However for those of you who are like me, you just naturally are a little bit distracted easily distracted. You've got the attention span of a fruit fly. If you track what, I'm saying I've got this great article share with these four specific careers that actually listen will allow that. What you think is a natural weakness to strength. Here they are entrepreneur. Now let's just think about the entrepreneur the entrepreneur. has to wear several different hats. That's the nature of the game. You are the chief everything officer when you start your venture. So being an entrepreneur has in its normal day tons of distractions, new things coming your way new priorities, all these things, and so what happens is the person who is naturally a person who moves from thing to thing to thing the thing you're GonNa Thrive in this environment because that's the way your brain works number two. Or media. Production. Pr Professionals must be able to absorb and synthesize vast amounts of information. Turning distractions or new things into actual content and stories. Media Production. You're like the consummate generalist. Brainstorming ideas. Executing, on those ideas editing implementing the changes, it's just a fast paced move move move move move type role number three consulting. If you want to avoid monotony and routine consult, he's going to give you that what is consulting really do for you. It's giving you a new set of problems they may be similar, but it's a new challenge if you will and people who need something new all the time a consultant type contracting type consulting role is perfect for you. Right. Here's a challenge I'm going to get everything I got I'm going to solve it and give me the next thing. And then finally, journalist journalists are basically a combination of the three previous if you think about what it looks like day-to-day. Constantly, something new coming at you data new social information breaking news whatever and you're forced to react many times. I can't tell you how many times I've been scheduled to do media. Whether it be national media is usually national media and they'll say, hey, we got scrapped the segment. We'll get you on another day or another time because we got breaking news. So the fast paced. World of journalism constantly having to create constantly having to react. And adjust. That's a great fit. So there you go four careers. That are custom made if you will for the person who is easily distracted or needs a lot of variety here's a final point on this. The reason I share that is if that's the way you're wired stop thinking about it as a negative. Start thinking about is this is the way I'm wired. So I need to go in a place that I can use my natural wiring. It's a break.

Adhd Harvard Business Review Officer Consultant
So Your Boss Doesnt Seem To Like You

Work Matters With Ken Coleman

04:34 min | Last month

So Your Boss Doesnt Seem To Like You

"This work matters with bestselling author and syndicated talk show host. Ken Coleman. Is Thursday August thirteenth. All right. Let's talk about an article here that I saw that I thought was just this is really good and and we get these calls from time to time. and. It's rare that I will take an article like this. That is opinion base not data based. And share but I thought it was a spot on its written by Leeann Davey Harvard Business, review. What do you do if your boss doesn't like you? going. Man Leave well, that is an option. But there are there are a couple of weeks here. Really fig through. And what I like about. What Leeann Davey doesn't article is she really addresses the source of why you think your boss doesn't like you and we're not assuming that it's actually true what you believe but that's what you feel. All right more on that in a moment. So the first thing is trust if trust is the problem and and I believe that trust is. Is Really at the core of this feeling if you feel like your boss doesn't like you. And Trust we're talking about here is not that they think you are a bad person or that you're unethical because if that's the case to probably to let you go pretty quickly. It's really about. Getting, the job. And Trust is really confidence here. I trust that you are going to execute on the job. They don't feel at the competence level is high enough. That's really what we're talking about here. and. So if that's the case you start by clarifying their expectations. Now. I talk about this on the show all the time, the key to getting promoted. is to. A. No your role being clear. B. E. Accepting your role. That's attitude. See Maximize your its effort. So I talk about this all the time. So let's go back to that first point. That's what she's saying here. You've got to make sure that you and your leader. Have the same expectations are you clear? She's done a bunch of research on this and has found that a lot of times. The issue is, is that the leader has it made themselves clear to the worker what is clearly expected? So this poor leadership and poor leadership exists everywhere. So you have got to make sure that you lead your leader by simply going going hey, I want to make sure that we are on the same page released expectations. So once you feel that you are clear on expectations you need an All out effort to show them that you are in fact, competent enough to do the job and they can then rely on you. That's when trust. Comes back and then the second issue connection. If, you and your boss don't feel a natural connection. If you're awesome have connection with you, you're gonNA see pretty easily. The first is body language eye contact. This is. From communication expert Nick Mortgage. Your subconscious is very good at picking up cues from contact and other body language. So if your boss is making significantly less I contact with even. That's a pretty good sign that they don't feel connected to you. Another measure is when your Bossi's avoid spending time interacting with you. So if you want to strengthen connection start by engaging more conversations about work, don't try to Overdo it with the hobbies and the sports and the food and the music topics. We already got a connection issue here. Don't force it. and. So start by engaging with conversations about work and then pay attention to what topics get the bosses, attention and energy. So then you can begin to say, Oh, I see that they really love to talk about this particular television show. You know and you've been to begin to build the connection. Now, why is this important? There's tons of research out there. That shows that your relationship with your boss. Is One of the most important factors in your overall experience at work? I would say that course the research verified that we all understand that. And it's really important. That you not to be best friends, but you need a really healthy. Let's call it healthy relationship with your leader and you have a lot to say about that. So don't put it all on them and don't assume that they don't like you if they're not trusting you a whole bunch and there's not a great connection, it may not have anything to do with whether they like it or not. So you got to be a big boy and a girl and step into this.

Leeann Davey Harvard Business Nick Mortgage Leeann Davey Ken Coleman
Stop Giving Advice, Ask More Questions  with Michael Bungay Stanier

The Futur

05:38 min | 4 months ago

Stop Giving Advice, Ask More Questions with Michael Bungay Stanier

"I'm your producer Greg Gun and we have a very special episode for you today. Our guest is an Oxford Grad and author of the wildly Popular Book. The coaching habit. He's a champion of curiosity. That believes the advice. We so eagerly give is not nearly as good as we think it is. Now I had trouble writing an intro for this one. Because the conversation between he and Chris was so rich with insight and tactics. That couldn't boil it down into just one clear idea. In fact I went back and listened to it twice because Oh so captivated the first time around so I will tell you this. Grab your headphones. A pen and paper subtle into somewhere comfy. And just listen. I promise that you will come out of it. Better equipped to navigate life. And if you're smart you will have covered at least a page with useful notes. But don't take my word for it. Do yourself a favor and enjoy our fascinating conversation with Michael bungay stander. I don't have the ability. Oftentimes to read the book before. I talked to somebody on my podcast. But this is one of those moments where I'm actually able to read your book and I'm so glad that I did first of all. It's a very easy book to read recommended. One hundred people literally this morning on my coaching. Also we'll see what happens there. Thank you okay so I'm GONNA kick it off like this. I asked you very very simple question. So what's more valuable questions or answers? Well I'm going to do the classic on`sharing God well depends because it depends on the context depends on the moment. It depends on everything. I go all the way back Chris to Daniel Goldman. Who Know the name of the guy who popularized the whole idea emotional intelligence and Goldman says in an article he wrote for Harvard Business Review. Way Back in two thousand articles code leadership that gets results says look there are six different styles of leadership and great leaders. Know how to use all six at the right time at the right moment. Each style has its pros and cons. It's punishments in its prizes. But what he pointed to and I think this is interesting. He said look. Coaching is a leadership style. That is massively underutilised. It has a direct correlation to profitability. It has a direct correlation to engagement and as a direct correlation to culture which are all things that people care about but the biggest barriers is people go. I just don't have time for this thing. So part of my championing is trying to make coaching fast. And trying to make it unwed. But absolutely look if there's if you'll building is burning down and you go. What am I supposed to be doing when somebody going? Hey how do you feel about smoke? Want somebody to go. Here's an onsite the exit his. Hey leave the building. So the context is everything but I will say that unbalanced people have an ova develop muscle on giving answers and have an underdeveloped muscle on stain curious a little bit longer. Now in case people don't know who you are. Please introduce US introduce yourself and tell us a little bit about who you are. Sure so Michael Bungay Danielle. I'm best known for being the author of the coaching habit. Book about four years old came out February. The twenty ninth. Two Thousand Sixteen and it's gone on to become the best selling coaching book of the century. About eight hundred thousand copies sold bazillion five-star reviews on Amazon. And the like and I'm a champion for this simple but difficult behavior shift which is look. I want you to stay curious just a little bit longer rush to action advice giving a little bit more slowly. So there's a soundbite in store. You know a mistrial Ian Left. Australia was a Rhodes. Scholar ENDED UP AT OXFORD MARRIED AT OXFORD which that and not becoming a loya to great things at Oxford gave me and then lived in London for Awhile Boston for Awhile now. Live in Toronto founded. A company called box of crayons. And it's focuses helping organizations shift from advice. Driven to curiosity led beautiful. Now I have to ask you this question because this is very. This is unusual that you're the publisher of your own book. Yeah oh I'm good for you because when people say eight hundred thousand copies and I made four dollars on it. I'm like yeah that's the publishing model right. It is more like God. I'm just so happy for you. Man I really am well. Thank you you know. I spent had previous book published with a fancy New York publishers. It was finally did pretty well like killed. One hundred thousand copies three years trying to get them to publish this book and they kept saying. Snow quite dare. I don't quite get it. I don't know and I finally went all right. I've really honed in on the Vision for this book. Is I know it's going to be good? You know me I can. I can sell some books. Part of it's like he played the you play the person. You didn't just play the book but they're like No. We're not going to publish. It and I was gutted but then it was like okay well I can either go and find another publisher and I could probably pull that off if I worked hard enough at it or exit site. Look I'm just GONNA go for it but I'm committed that if I'm self publishing I'm GonNa do it as a professional not as an amateur so when you pick up that book you increase. It doesn't feel like a self published book. It's it it has all the cues this was published by a you know a regular printing press and. Yeah it's going from success to success so not only is the Soda Bunch. I feel smug because published. I Bet I bet on myself and played pretty well

Chris Publisher Daniel Goldman Oxford Michael Bungay Stander Michael Bungay Danielle Greg Gun Producer Amazon Harvard Business Review Toronto New York Ian Left Australia London Boston
Set goals within a range

Before Breakfast

02:56 min | 5 months ago

Set goals within a range

"Set goals within target range. Instead of a specific target number this helps us aim high. Aunts have opportunities to feel satisfaction and accomplishment. Even when life doesn't go entirely as planned. I'm sure that anyone who listens to a productivity podcast news that we're supposed to set goals that are specific and measurable Exercise Four Times Per Week is more motivating than exercise more. We're also better able to assess whether we have achieved goals when they are specific and measurable but specific and measurable goals. Don't have to include a single target number and said they can include a target range for instance are exercised goal becomes exercise three or four times per week. We might aim to right between five hundred and a thousand words per day in a novel. A salesperson might aim to call eight to twelve prospects per day. A few good things happen when we have goals like this. It have a target range rather than a single target number I. We can set a really challenging upper end for the goal on the outer edge of what we can do. We can envision an upper limit. That's achievable when things are going really well having that high upper limit can motivate us to do more than we otherwise would as for the lower limit. Well this reflects what's achievable with life. Being what it is a world in which stuff goes wrong. The lower limit still means steady progress. No world records but an acceptable outcome. If your goal is to run three to five miles every Wednesday and you ran three point one miles. Well you've attained your goal now. You might wonder whether goals with a range lead people to stop pushing themselves once. They've passed the lower limit of the range. Good question but the Harvard Business Review Sites Research on goal setting regarding weight us that found that what they call high low goals lead to more sustainability without a reduced amount of weight loss so no worries that the lower limit to the target range will end up being all you accomplish instead. Having a lower limit allows us to keep going on bad days without feeling like failures. Then we can aim high when the stars align few things in life are exact and we can't predict our inner or outer circumstances we can predict that some days will be better than others so rather than setting goals with a single precise target instead. Try Setting goals with a range. You'll be more likely to achieve them. In the meantime this is Laura. Thanks for listening. And here's to making the most of our time.

Harvard Business Review Laura
The Power of Praise and Recognition

Dose of Leadership

07:13 min | 8 months ago

The Power of Praise and Recognition

"Today. Talk about the power of praise and recognition. I think a critical piece piece. When you're looking at organization creating culture wanted to be intentional about creating a culture it's often overlooked? We know how to do it effectively. No we don't know how to do it effectively. I think when you're looking at a culture of leadership of decentralized leadership or count abilities a huge piece a huge part pardon accountability equation is the praise in recognition piece particular. Your high performers recognition and praise moves the culture engagement needle more than anything else it really does was taken by Harvard. Business Review Study came out about five years ago and I was using it when I was had a ASPECT ASPECT OF BUSINESS. I was really pushing to do internal PODCASTS for organizations. I I use the study in my marketing material and it said when you're looking at organizations where the engagement piece you know. Two thirds of our employees aren't really that engaged. So how do we move that needle and there are three things that moved it more than anything else. And the first this one was consistent communication from senior leader and communicating where this organization's going. And why it's going that way. The second thing that moves the needle is knowing how my job is a key. Stakeholder no visitation if I fully understand how my job fits into where this organization is going and why and then the third thing that moved the needle needle more than anything else was sincere praise and recognition sincere praise and recognition. Why is that? Why is that so effective? Well I mean think about human nature. You're thinking about yourself. I think first and foremost the reason why sincere praise and I'm always saying sincere because it has to be authentic. It has to be genuine. The reason why it's so effective it builds. Let's trust. We know this intuitively right. It builds a culture of trust if our people feel valued and respected if we feel valued and respected and we become intentional consistent about pointing out in recognizing this is key when things are going well when things and talking openly about it all the time. The people are going to start to feel like we have their best interests in mind. You know that is a recipient right if you've if you feel like you're valued respected if you're consistently hearing from your senior leaders and praising you for the little things when things are going well then you're gonNA start to feel like hey maybe this organization. Maybe this leader has their best interests in mind. So I think intuitively. We know that right. It makes sense. This consistency is the key in talk about that more in depth as we go on this conversation nation but when we give praise sincerely and often this is important. This is why the trust it builds so so well because you build up a trust reservoir and you're consistently giving pray sincerely and often particularly when things are going well you build up a trust reservoir. You build up a reserve if you will a reserve that you can draw upon and Nisa key that you can draw upon when things go bad it makes having difficult conversations easier that's why it's so effective to be good and the intentional about this praise and recognition. But why do we do so infrequently. We don't do it enough. I know we don't you know why is it. We only Dole it out twice a year you know. Why do we only give it out once during our performance reviews and we sit down with our folks or or during an annual survey and speaking of surveys? It's always always the number one or two complain. Those annual surveys right. I mean how many years the eighteen years I spent in the corporate arena and all those surveys that I did every year. What always came out on top? The people complaining about look. I just don't feel like senior leadership understands that they don't recognize me for when I do a good job. Not Being recognized recognized for a job. Well done it's always on the top of every surveys and I challenge. I bet you see the same thing you organization. The bottom line is missing out on a tremendous opportunity to move this culture alter needle but why is it so hard. And what can we do about it. I think we make it harder than we need to. It's hard because there's a level of intensity bound it's it's it's hard because it's like exercising any any other habit or personal thing that we know is the right thing to do but it's difficult it. You know an exercising really. Isn't that the mechanics. The thought of it getting up thirty minutes early and doing pushups and setups and drinking. Some water isn't really all that hard in theory but it's hard because I don't know embrace the norms. I I think I think it's hard because we seem to think we shouldn't go overboard on right. I mean that's one of the reasons. There's always that risk of that. We feel like if we give too much praise in pointing out things all the time then it becomes meaningless. It becomes cheap kind of like the participation Trophy Syndrome right that we're all all that seems to be popular like why. Why give everybody a trophy? You know just kind of cheapens the the award right so I think that fear or is there you know. We think that praise should be held out for only the special occasions you know the bank with the ceremony and the re retirement etc right. So I think that's part of it but the other part of it is. I think that were were wired to not see the positive I think culturally our brought up you know in particular as we get into leadership and management were always in the problem solving mode more our existence as leaders and managers are are. Our justice is justified. Because we're we're paid to deal with the uncertainty. The challenges the big problems that plague every day. I mean that's why we get paid paid air quote the big bucks for to solve the problems. We don't notice we're not wired to notice when things are going right right. I mean if you're a parent you don't notice when your kids aren't fighting why to notice when they're not fighting you kind of it's kind of an expectation of an is supposed to fight. We don't notice the absence of problems instead. We become blinded by the problems that we face and because we're blinded by we never fully notice notice really when things are going right or we don't fully appreciate when things are going right. That's tends to be the problem. We typically don't don't have a problem recognizing the big accomplishments right. I think that's that's part of it too. You know the record. Breakers the monumental task the chievements the overcoming the the the unexpected acted. But when you think about it recognizing the big accomplishment or breaking a record. I mean that's to be expected so do it really doesn't quite have the impact of genuine praise right not this is. This isn't the type of phrase that I'm talking about. That really moves the needle. Of course I it should be recognized if I break the company sales record. I'm owed that it's an expectation and I'll be glad to receive whatever reward award that comes with that for breaking the records. I'm but I'm owed that It never regardless of whatever receive on that kind of breaking that big accomplishment. How's it never fully satisfies my human desire for authentic and genuine praise? Everybody wants it. Everybody needs it.

Harvard Nisa Dole
Ego vs. EQ

The LEADx Show

13:35 min | 1 year ago

Ego vs. EQ

"Welcome. Jansher Connie they do. I hope everyone's doing well today. A topic at as she mentioned is ego versus each hugh and I'll give you some tips and sidelines on how to use a little more emotional intelligence particularly when it comes to leadership and many of you may have had this experience. I've had which says very often when an employee is struggling. It isn't about what they know or don't know we have folks that are very savvy very knowledgeable but very often times when they get into trouble it's because of how they're managing their relationships there. Taylor having conflicts with coworkers their self awareness seems to be off a H. I have heard time here in feedback so so this sort of behavioral science of emotional intelligence has become a real focal point or a lot of organizations who are wanting folks that can can manage relationships eat relate well to what they know and to define us. Let me just I give you the quick definition here emotional intelligence so in Q. is sort of nickname and it's made up of three broad components on three skills if you will the the first line is your ability to recognize yourself so it's knowing kind of who you are. It's knowing your strengths but also knowing your weaknesses. It's recognizing what your instincts are telling you in the moment or maybe your behavioral patterns are in certain situations so it's sort of recognizing recognizing the impact. Your behavior is having people around you. The second piece is reading others so it's social awareness. It's picking up on the nonverbal signals that people send you and really reading your audience well and then lastly. It's your ability to respond appropriately so instead of taking either. A one size fits all approach or sort of you know. I'm going to handle you to say my handle using my hand. Regardless of the audience says that is generally lower emotional intelligence mindfully mindfully choosing behavioral response based on what you're doing or who you're with is a higher level of each year so it's recognized read respond. Emotional intelligence is a competency. It was actually identified in Kinda coined in the nineteen eighties. It's a very young behavioral zero science from that standpoint actually it was called emotional quotient at the beginning which is why kio some referred to e Hugh versus. Iq You which might be street smarts versus book smarts but it was actually identified as a form of intelligence in the nineteen nineties and so there's been a lot of academic work done that has documented the benefits of this behavioral science for all of us so let me tell you a little bit about the skill set because the competency competency is recognized reverse but I have to have some skills that allow me to do that. There are several here are just a couple of them self awareness as I mentioned mansion right so this is that ability to know yourself know your strengths. Your weaknesses not even your personality tight or your communication style doc if you've never taken an assessment on either of those I recommend that you do that. I think that's really valuable information to have it's also of course self control manager a yourself not saying we're doing inappropriate things. Adaptability so openness to change and on ability to use is feedback in with it and another one is optimism which is a belief system that positive change is possible in yourself in in others. There are more but these are pretty foundational and if you WanNa work on your e Hugh these recent rate skills to focus Assan unlike cue which is set each hugh learnable and that's the other reason why this is such a powerful concept for us as leaders in employees Louise because we can do something about us. Weakening crease are each hugh over time and see very positive results now some people ask me if you can take an IQ tests. Can you take each you test in the answer's. Yes you can measure national intelligence. There are zebra tools that we use in recommend one is called the issue. I two point now this is published by a company called multi health systems or NHS chess and working with a certified provider knee would send you a late you answer one hundred thirty three questions and that will generate Raider report for you. We give you a total score and that would also give you scores if teens skills I shared with you that there are total of fifteen measured on this tool it Consta- chew versions the leadership version for those that haven't boys reporting to them and workplace report version which is for individual. Oh contributors the data's the same and the record linked business saints about twenty two pages but it's great resource information in a good way to kind of baseline where your issue is now in the re-test over time to see you progress another tool that we use that we recommend is called the Sti st I offered through Korn Ferry and this is what they call a three sixty report so this is a multi breed. I go online online in answer the questions but then I also send it to people in my circle so I might send it to boss peers employees that worked worked for me and then everyone has a chance to answer the questions and comments at the end so this is a pretty powerful report. It's not probably probably for the famous part having done this myself. It's it can't be a little intimidating because you're seeing how you see yourself heard everyone else but it's a great measure of sort bat social self awareness. How aligned is how I see myself in a way I wanna be being perceived by others around me. So this is separate tool. We like to use for coaching again to baseline where someone is coming from and really help narrow down the areas to focus on as far as coaching development us so why is each you important. I mentioned there's been research done and if we look at it in particular color in the context of Leadership Wallace is so important one at the statistics that the Harvard Business Review published five fortune five five hundred CEOS fail in the first eighteen months on the job as you can guess the CEO for five hundred is pretty big job and and it can be quite challenging the executive does not demonstrate self awareness self control and empathy according to the the small business administration two-thirds of businesses fail in the first ten years and a lot of those reasons although we certainly have market conditions or other factors contributes a lot of times I've seen in my almost thirty years now doing some Kinda coaching and development role is the the founder has a very hard time on growing out of that initial startup phase and building bigger business so we'll talk a little a little bit about what happens in a minute and I've got another study. I thought was interesting nut nearly a hundred percent of CEO's that survey said they would like an executive coach each but yet sixty six percent. Don't go get run so a lot of these executives are kind of on their own in a way trade. You're out the best way to behave and try to manage running your companies at the same time. You're managing themselves. So this is the common growing we need. We also have research that shows that employees each you actually make more money a lot love people in when they hear about these they are these your soft skills or these are nice to have skills but actually these do have a very direct impact on somebody's ability to either South Horn. If you're in a sales role as you can guess if I can recognize reading respond more. They'll do a better job probably closing business. If I'm in a leadership role I usually have employees that are engaged with lower turnover which results typically in higher profit margin and if I'm on a bonus plan of any kind that number goes up and might also be recognized more frequently and get promoted more often so there's a lot of reasons why this actually impacts individual earning potential and then there's another great article this recall what makes a leader and this is not a particularly emotional intelligence in business and the quote from the article on the research look into companies and gave everybody assessments and they pulled out. IQ scores technical skills assessments and emotional intelligence scores I and when he compared the ratio of those three things as far as how they type act excellent performance emotional intelligence was twice as important as the other their jobs now as you get to the executive level it becomes a key differentiator because as you can probably imagine as people growing careers on and you get up to a senior executive level a lot of executives even out meaning. They might have a similar education background. They might have the same years of experience career in the industry but what starts to release separate good leaders from matters is their ability to work through others their ability to motivate the engaged the workforce so that's why that hugh you know your technical skills. You're not doing the technical work that way. You need to get that done through others and those require emotional intelligence do it better now. I also read on this research right in. I had also heard that middle middle managers actually in a typical organization have the highest emotional intelligence so thinking about that a middle manager. Sir Has the highest level and I guess if you imagine the rollout middle manager right they're executing on initiatives today's from above they're having to work through the team below They're in sort of a squeeze zone rate. They're in a very what is the feedback pitch environment so I can see how that really helped develop the ability to recognize reader response however when we look at a talk on average the person in the company with the lowest each year is the executive suite with CEO CFO CIO see out now that didn't make a lot of sense to me when I first heard it because I thought will hack a lot of CEO's knows a lot of companies promote from within so if they were middle manager at some point in your career like where did they eat here again. How did it disappear by the time they got promoted to the talks talks and as I started to use my own clients to assess what might be going on here. This was sort of the beginning of this book concept because I was trying to understand. Why is it harder to me. He emotional intelligence at the highest levels of leadership and I started to recognize certain patterns that were happening and nats were these eight ego tracks sorta keen about now. I titled IT E- Gutter versus each year and I want to sort of explain what I love this picture by the way so I don't really refer to ego as arrogance or what he might take ads the self-centered leader. That's it's all about them. What I find happens is we have managers Myers working with a leader time on he was challenged winched. I'll say that his team was struggling with him. I said to him hey if I were to interview your team and ask them to describe arrived your management style to need what would they said and he said Oh. This is really easy on you know I. He had taken one of the suggest profiles from the communication styles in somebody's like I am a High D. that means. I'm very direct that means I. I kinda say what I eat but you know the bottom line is worked to do work. I'm not here to make friends. you know. I love friends outside of work. I don't need more friends organized. Tell how might you know all the time.

Hugh Learnable Executive CEO Taylor NHS Korn Ferry Consta Harvard Business Review South Horn Myers Assan Senior Executive Louise Wallace Ceo Cfo Cio Founder Sixty Six Percent Eighteen Months Hundred Percent
A test can tell you how productive you are

Curiosity Daily

03:19 min | 1 year ago

A test can tell you how productive you are

"Productivity is a major focus of this podcast. And usually you can kind of tell if you're doing a good or bad job of being productive. But if there's any doubt in your mind, then I've got some good news. There's a quiz you can take to find out if all those life hacks. You learned about on this podcast are really making you more productive. I took it, and I had a lot of surprises, actually. But first, let's talk about some common pitfalls that prevent productivity and this is important because Americans aren't necessarily super great at being productive and international Harvard Business Review survey of roughly twenty thousand people recently found that North Americans work longer hours than people in other countries, but get only average scores on productivity typical European Asian and Australian workers in the survey or. All more productive and that productivity problem has its roots in four basic pitfalls. At least that's according to Robert C Pozen a lecturer at MIT Sloan school of management. Here's what he says. They are along with some tips on how to avoid them. I there's aimlessness a productive person devotes most of their time to essential projects. So if you put something like a meeting on your calendar, tried jotting down the objective it serves if you can't think of one then you might wanna think twice about committing your time to it. It will also help if you can streamline or delegate low priority tasks just remember to delegate in a smart way. Because the second pitfall is micromanaging productive people delegate everything they can. But importantly, they also give their subordinates space to make mistakes and learn from them, the third pitfall is over scheduling, if you jam your schedule with so many meetings and projects that one bout of food poisoning could derail your entire career. You might look productive. But you're actually setting yourself up for missing deadlines and important meetings to avoid this block out some time for unforeseen crises and even more for thinking quietly and the fourth pitfall Email. Most emails don't deserve a read, let alone a reply try to check your Email once an hour, or so and only reply when you have to once you've fixed, your aimlessness micromanaging over scheduling and Email problems, you can take productivity assessment from Posen on the Harvard Business reviews website, we've got a link to the assessment in our full right up on this which you can find on curiosity dot com and on our free curiosity app for Android, and I o s but you might want to bookmark the assessment to because posing recommends taking it every year, you know, just to make sure you're not slipping. I check Email all the time. I check Email way too often. I have a notification come up on my computer every time, I get an Email. And usually the Email isn't even important. It's just like a mailing list. But I check it. Anyway, it's bad. I'm. Gonna stop good. How are you going to do that? I'm going to turn off that notification. And maybe all set an hourly reminder to check my Email. Instead, I like that. I took the assessment am I rating was seventy nine out of one hundred five not terrible. That's pretty good. It said, quote, you're in the mid range of your peers on personal productivity. This means your good at many aspects of getting things done, but there are several areas where you could develop better habits or skills to improve your productivity, unquote. And then they give me some suggestions on what I can work on based on my responses. That's great pretty

Robert C Pozen Harvard Business Review Mit Sloan School Of Management Lecturer Harvard Business Posen
What role does government play in innovation?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:43 min | 1 year ago

What role does government play in innovation?

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by the university of Florida Warrington college of business transform your future with an MBA from one of America's top ten universities. Learn more at Warrington dot ufl dot EDU slash MBA. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by equities N a premier platform bringing private markets to the public get access to tech unicorns like Uber. Airbnb and more sign up for free today at equities N dot com slash tech. A look at the secret sauce of innovation and it's less glamorous cousin adaptation from American public media. This is marketplace tech. I'm Tracey Samuelson in for Molly would. If you're a government day, the Chinese government looking to spur more innovation in your country. How do you do that you can think of innovation as a ladder of sorts? It might start with imitation. And then progressed you adaptation like tweaking a foreign idea to develop it for a local market. Finally, hopefully, you reach invention, perhaps even big industry changing ones. But the steps needed to climb that ladder can be elusive murky, and there's only so much governments can do says Regina abroa- me a professor at the university of Pennsylvania's Wharton school of business. I talked to her about China's efforts at state-sponsored innovation. It's something country. Can't cause to happen. It has to happen at a much more micro level, which is gonna what's the form of business organization in your country. Is it a collaborative is it a hierarchical places their scope for collaboration? What's the the nature of your education system? Are you teaching children to be problem solvers or are you rewarding? What are you? Awarding them for are you rewarding them for getting the answer's right or you're rewarding them for seeing something that you did wrong. But you know, I think we've I think we're at a point now where anyone who thinks that it's just about plopping cluster together meaning to say and China has lots of these right? Let's let's have one university in the next. Let's put a little tech park and extra. Let's do this other thing and magic show happen. It doesn't always work then then last, but not least. And this is not a trivial point you need a legal system where intellectual property is protected, right? Which is a chief US complaint about operating in China Raina, right? But it's not just us firms Chinese firms themselves also want to make sure that their IP is protected. It's interesting because the communist party's main in China twenty twenty five planets received a lot of attention recently for its attempts to you know, pick and develop specific Chinese industries is that type of industrial policy successful in fostering innovation. I think it's successful in fostering market leadership. Perhaps even market domination of a given sector within the Chinese context. And also potentially allowing for firms to compete in a way that gives them an advantage in the global marketplace. So it's not necessarily the case that industrial policy equals innovation policy. Yeah. So this idea of like, creative add patient versus a truly innovative breakthrough. But at a patient, you know is innovation. I mean, you know, as at the end of the day, this sort of hacking and making it work is a kind of innovation right? And certainly if we look at Chinese companies and their ability to sort of really target mid range markets, and how successful they've been in that space. It has been because they've been able to sort of make that those those adaptations that are targeted to our particular customer. They're trying to sell to. So it's it's not that China made in twenty twenty five has not succeeded in many ways it has. But that in an insane China the leading innovator in the world today. I think that we have to be a little bit more cautious on that front. Regina balmy at the Wharton school of business. Professor Rami made an important distinction. She said this isn't about the capacity of the Chinese people to be innovative. It's about the context and system they have to innovate within. Now for some related links. Professor brownie wrote an article called why China can't innovate in the Harvard. Business review back in two thousand fourteen much of that still applies today this China Morning Post had a couple of recent articles on China's intellectual property articles how they could be strengthened to meet US demands in the ongoing trade war and foster innovation the number of intellectual property rights cases in China increased more than forty percent last year and finally on the theme of creative thinking, there's this quantum magazine story from two thousand seventeen I just keep going back to it's about a retired statistician who solved a math proof others had struggled with for more than fifty years. He had the idea while brushing his teeth. I love stories of late bloomers. They give me hope. I'm Tracey Samuelson. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM. You trust marketplace to cover more than business news. You rely on us to connect the dots between complex economic issues. And why they matter to you to keep public service journalism going, strong, please go to marketplace dot org today and become a marketplace investor with a donation in any amount, we appreciate your support. This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by Kronos, look into any great business. Whether it's a manufacturer or a hotel a store school or hospital look into each and every one of them and you'll find the same thing. Great people at Cronos believe that great businesses are powered by great people. And with Kronos workforce solutions, it'll help you find them keep them and engage them. Learn more at kronoScom. Kronos, workforce innovation that works.

China Tracey Samuelson Wharton School Of Business Kronos University Of Florida Warringt United States Airbnb China Raina Chinese Government America Regina Abroa Professor Rami Professor Cronos Molly Communist Party Professor Brownie University Of Pennsylvania
Quitting Is Underrated

Curiosity Daily

03:09 min | 1 year ago

Quitting Is Underrated

"Quitting is under rated there. I said it our cultural glorifies perseverance, but there's a lot of research that shows that sometimes quitters do prosper heard work is key to success. Sure. But today, I want to get into the science of strategic. Weekly giving up this goes to home because I did this in college. And it was really hard. What did you quit in college? I dropped my music major. Yeah. Yeah. I ended up with a journalism degree. I was going to double major in. The worst part is it was partly into my first semester, my senior year, and I just looked at my class load and Tang where I was at. And I was just like I this is an well. I kept my music major and look at us. Now, look look who's really using their journalism degree. You play gigs like every weekend. We both got the best of both worlds meet did. But here's the thing. A lot of people look at their life in terms of what a communists, call sunk costs. That's the cost of something you've already paid for the you can't recover, but that's not just about money. It can refer to the amount of time. You spent on something like all the time has been in practice rooms, my freshman, sophomore engineering college. Here's another example. Let's say you wanted to make a living playing video games fulltime, and streaming online on Twitter YouTube or somewhere all that time. You spend building a website and recording editing broadcasts and marketing your show, all of that is a sunk cost, even if you don't see any traction with getting more viewers or making any money, you might think to yourself. How can I quit now you've already put so much time and energy and tear dream, right? You're almost there. But the thing is as Stephen dubner notes on his economics podcast thinking this way means you're constantly looking backward into the past you're focusing on what you've already done, which you can't. Change this often leads to it's known as the sunk cost fallacy. That's when you keep adds something because otherwise you'll feel like you've wasted. All that time. You spent think of this though, everything you do presently right now has an opportunity costs as the communists, put it. You're abandoning all the things you could have done with that same time and effort when you think in terms of opportunity costs the central question of your life, isn't what have I done so far. It's what's my most compelling option right now aren't the only people saying that quitting can be a good thing. Even the Harvard. Business review has positive things to say about it saying that quitting Ken set you free from mundane busy work with minimal payoff quitting. Also opens you up to opportunities that are better suited to your talents. Tried calling your obvious failure of failure early on by failing quickly as a communist Steven Levitt puts it that'll help you try more things and ultimately find that perfect fit for who you are. And by the way. Research shows that when you can let go of impossible dreams without beating yourself up. You're less stressed. You're like the sleep better Panja less likely to have health issues, including stuff like constipation, XM, a- and even depression. Just remember that while quitting is not the answer to every problem. Never quitting is not necessarily something to be proud of either. The real goal is to know when to give up and went to keep

Steven Levitt Constipation Twitter Stephen Dubner Harvard KEN
"harvard business review" Discussed on Safe For Work

Safe For Work

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"harvard business review" Discussed on Safe For Work

"Bring on. So the Harvard Business Review brought this up this phrase. Don't take it personally. It's just business true false somewhere in between go. I think it's both. I think most often when you hear that advice. It's in the context of a negotiation. You are conducting, you know, you're asking for a raise your asking for a promotion, or you're dealing with a client or something. But you're negotiating something. So you have to be willing to don't take it personally. Just go ask if you don't ask you don't get. So in that context. I would totally think it's good advice. However, however there plenty of times when it's bad advice because people are saying something to you that you kind of should take personally like say, you're in performance conversation with your boss, and your boss's say, you know, what I'm thinking Rico that you might want to be in the coming year, just focus on your listening skills, or or maybe, you know, your presentation to the board last. Tweak was fantastic. For your first time. I think you have to read between the lines in some of this stuff some of the performance feedback. You get and take it personally. Well, I think that you're you're right. But isn't the spirit of this phrase that yet take it personally in the sense that yes, this is a comment on you? But you should be taking it in the context of business environment. This is being said to you because our bottom line needs to Yes. Szekely. Which is legit. So it's not that you're terrible person. But you might be terrible at your job. Which is hard. This is I guess my the the big question about this phrase is how can you really not take things personally? Really? Because I mean, the other maximum of business is that, you know, we're in a people industry, or we're here to serve customers or we're here to, you know, like improve lives or whatever there is personality and business, and of course, like we hear all the time about people holding grudges against former and then when they become the boss that crush them. You know, it's true. So obviously, they've taken something very personally. Indeed and say, I've always been impressed in business by the people that can really put their feelings aside, whether it's a negotiation or some kind of coming to terms with an outside vendor about something. And it's just not it's not a win-lose for them. It is more just that like we're going to make the best deal. We can then we all move on with our lives. And sometimes I get my feelings hurt. When people don't do what I want them to do. I know it's no place for people with feelings. Extent. Is run by paths who just don't care? Well, anyway, so, you know, I've occasionally heard this advice, particularly given to women who it's always assumed that we're so sensitive, and we're gonna take everything. So personally. So it's like people just remind you like, it's just business. What's what's the movie phrase for that? Isn't there is the godfather condescension is? Well, yeah. Is that it can feel very condescending. When people say to you. But it can also be worthwhile reminder that it's true. Oh, I know the movie phrases. It's just Chinatown Jake. That's what I feel like that's the best business advice. I've ever heard or given is just Chinatown Jake of the entire economy is just Chinatown..

Harvard Business Review Rico
Beating Procrastination, Sand Science (w/ Vince Beiser)

Curiosity Daily

07:26 min | 1 year ago

Beating Procrastination, Sand Science (w/ Vince Beiser)

"Today. You'll learn a trick for actually using your vacation days, even when you're super busy and the science behind white darkness is actually faster than the speed of light will also learn about the hidden science of sand in a clip from the most popular interview eve done in the last year. Let's satisfy some curiosity in you manage to get away from the office this summer because it's healthy to take a vacation from work. Don't feel like you missed your chance though, because we've got some advice from a time management. Coach might help you use up those days and stay sane at work. I like it. Yes. I feel like I need to take this advice. I feel like you do too. Ashley not that. I don't like seeing you around the office. In two thousand seventeen fifty two percent of American workers with paid vacation days left, some of them unused that added up to a whopping seven hundred and five million unused vacation days overall or two million years, which is about how long it's been since humans appeared on earth and working too much has been linked with heart problems, mental health issues and a decrease in work quality in general. But a recent study by glass door found that worries about job security are the main reasons people don't take vacations, so what can you do in an article for Harvard Business Review business owner and time management? Coach. Elizabeth grace Saunders advocates something that's brilliant in its simplicity micro vacations. That's when you get out of the office, but you use a day or less vacation time. And even just one day comes with a lot of benefits you won't have to find a replacement to handle your work, you won't come back to a mountain of emails, and you can do a micro vacation once every couple of weeks. Nobody said you can only go on one big vacation every year. Year you might want to avoid taking a Monday micro vacations since a lot of people send important emails on Mondays. And you don't wanna come back to his billions messages in your inbox. But how does the three day weekends out? Take off a Friday once in a while. And another big thing is that micro vacations can be free. You don't have to spend time making a vacation itinerary or spend money on plane tickets if your job allows it you could even take a half day to take a long lunch with a friend or catch a met navy movie. You've been wanting to see whatever you do. Don't lose your vacation days. You need a vacation. Trust us. The best employees is take the most vacation days. That's true. You keep saying that to be. I don't understand why. Oh, I'm not gonna say anything. Sinned is one of the most important materials in human civilization and were running out of it. If you don't believe me, that's okay. We've got an expert who might be able to convince you we recently had the chance to talk to Vince buys her author of the world in a grain the story of sand. And how it transformed civilization? Here's what he told us. So we consume more sand than any other natural resource in the world except for water and air. That's how important it is. I mean, I say in the book, it's the literal foundation of modern civilization. And that's that's no exaggeration. Because as you say, it's I mean, you toss off concrete and glass, but really if you stop and think about concrete and glass, that's basically what our cities are completely made of every shopping mall apartment block every building in the modern world that gets built is made out of concrete, and that's an enormous amount. So we use about all in. We are using about fifty billion tons. Of sand every year that's about that's enough to cover the entire state of California about two inches deep every single year. That's quite a bit. That's quite a bit. I've got a giant world map on my wall imbed room and right in the middle. So you know, what's there? It's africa. And right in the northern part Africa. There's a big old desert. So how can there be a shortage? If the Sahara exists that's a really good question. The answer is because that desert sand is basically useless to us, and the reason for that is it the greens or the wrong shape. So desert sand has been eroded by wind over thousands or millions of years tumbling, and tumbling and tumbling and tumbling and that has made those grains, kind of rounded as opposed to the kind of sand that you find in river beds or lake beds. Flood plains even the bottom of the ocean. That sand tends to be more more angular. It's got a lot more angles and corners to it. So it locks together the way the. You needed to form a stable structure? So the thing that we use San by far the most thing that we stand for the most is concrete and to make concrete you need those same greens to lock together and desert sand just is to round to do that. It's like the difference between trying to build something out of a stack of marbles as opposed to building something out of a stack of little tiny bricks, so all that desert sand, totally useless. He's nudie curiosity. You might not know that when we first launched our podcast a weekly show where we interviewed scientists and authors from around the world will back by popular demand. We've been producing brand new feature length podcast interviews for our supporters on our patriotic page before we get to our last story. I want to give a special shout out to some of our patrons. Thank you Genevieve Moffitt Cambronne and day used Banco for supporting our show on patriot. We really appreciate it. If you love our show and you want to support curiosity daily than visit patriot dot com slash curiosity dot com all spelled out any amount helps and we try to give back. Offering cool incentives like bonus episodes, uncut interviews and fun conversations on dischord one more time. That's patriot dot com slash curiosity dot com. Eight one to no it's faster than the speed of light the speed of dark. No, really. It's a thing. That's how fun little physics lesson. And we'll preface this by saying, please don't get mad at us. We promise it's true. Even if it's kind of hard to wrap your head around. Yes. This is the second time we run this article. And we got a lot of emails about it before. And I have done my due diligence. This is absolutely for. Sure. True. All right. Here's how it works. Even though nothing can move faster than the speed of light shadows can still move faster than the speed of light a mentioned, you have a light that's powerful enough to reach the planet Jupiter. Okay. Got that. Now, imagine that it casts to be mccone that's broad enough to cover the entire diameter of the planet. When you pass your finger over that light, the shadow will cross the entire diameter of the planet. That's a distance of more than eighty six thousand miles. The speed of light is one hundred eighty six thousand miles per second. So if it takes less than half a second to move your hand that distance. Then that shadow will have broken the speed of light. Remember how he said that nothing can move faster than the speed of light. Well, that's the key shadows are nothing. A shadow is a not thing shadows are the absence of something specifically photons or particles of light since there's nothing that's actually traveling the distance thing that's moving is an area. Where photons aren't there's no information that's being transmitted faster than light only a blockage or lack of information. That means you're interplanetary shadow puppet. Show doesn't break any physical was which means we're right? And we hope you're not upset with us for this brain teaser. But we promise it's true another way to think about it is that the shadow only has the illusion of moving is actually the region that has light and has no light that is changing. Right. So it's not physically moving across the planet. Right. It just looks like it is right. You love this article. But you kind of hate it too. Oh, yeah. The love hate relationship.

Africa Harvard Business Review Ashley Sahara Business Owner California Elizabeth Grace Saunders Genevieve Moffitt Cambronne Vince Banco Two Thousand Seventeen Fifty T Fifty Billion Tons Two Million Years Two Inches Three Day One Day
One problem with fake news? It really, really works (Replay)

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:06 min | 1 year ago

One problem with fake news? It really, really works (Replay)

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by. Indeed, are you hiring with? Indeed, you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed that com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. And by Kabo this holiday season, give your loved ones the gift of stress free TV with control center Bykov. Oh, the easy way to control everything connected to your TV with just one remote control center is available at C a veto dot com and best buy control center by Kabo one remote that does it all. The problem with fake news. Is that it really really works from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Molly would. This year fake news made a huge splash as companies and governments tried to figure out who should be in charge of spotting misinformation and getting rid of it something they're still dealing with. And we'll be well into twenty nineteen MIT researchers the non Rawl has found that the not true stuff what he calls. False news is not only hard to stop. But that it's really effective. A recent study found that false news travels way, more efficiently and much farther than the truth. In an article published this year in the Harvard Business Review Arale says that misinformation can have some very real costs. There's a story from Brock Obama's presidency where a false tweet that indicated that he was injured in an explosion wiped out one hundred thirty billion dollars of equity value in a single day. These types of stories can have consequential impacts on our democracy on businesses on our national security. And so it's a problem we really need to concentrate on. So what can be done one of the things you talk about changing the incentives for companies, either disincentivising them to spread misinformation or incentivizing them to fight it. What are they doing? What could they be doing? Yes. So when you when it comes to changing, the incentives, we know now that a lot of the false news that spreads is not spread for political reasons, but is spread for economic reasons. The social media advertising ecosystem monetize his attention or eyeballs to content and if false news spreads farther faster, deeper and more broadly than the truth than it is incentivizes producers of false news to produce more false news in order to earn more advertising revenue if platforms like Facebook are to be responsible for the spread of known falsities than they could use policies. Technologies algorithms to reduce or dampen the spray. Of this type of news, which may reduce the incentive to create it in the first place. Talk to me about consumer behavior because changing consumer behavior seems like the most uphill battle of all like, well, this alternately fall on companies and or regulators. So it's interesting you talk about consumer behavior because as we were doing this study. There was a lot of congressional testimony talking about the role of bots or software programs and spreading false news. And what we found was that. In fact, bots spread false and true news at approximately the same rate. So Botts could not explain why false news traveled so much farther faster deeper and broadly than the truth over the ten years of data that we studied on Twitter what that means is human decision making is contributing significantly to the spread of false news. So understanding how to think about consumer behavior is a really important part. Of dealing with the false. News podrumedic, synon- Arale is a researcher at MIT and head of that school's initiative on the digital economy. His paper argues that algorithms will play a huge role in spotting false information online, but twenty nine thousand nine could see a new era of fake news. Forget false articles. We may start seeing lots of fake videos to I'm Molly would and that's marketplace tech. This is a PM December thirty first is coming up fast. And that means time is running out to support marketplace and make your gift go twice as far donate today. Marketplace dot org to invest in news, you value and trust and your contribution in any amount will be matched dollar for dollar by our friends at can Dida thanks for believing in what we do this. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by. Indeed when it comes to hiring. You don't have time to waste you need help getting your shortlist of qualified candidates fast. That's why you need indeed dot com post a job in minutes. Set up screener questions then zero in on qualified candidates using. An intuitive online dashboard. And when you need to hire fast, accelerate your results with sponsor jobs. New users can try for free at indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. Terms, conditions, and quality standards apply.

MIT Molly Researcher Kabo Brock Obama Harvard Business Review Facebook Twitter Synon- Arale Botts Dida One Hundred Thirty Billion Dol Ten Years
"harvard business review" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"harvard business review" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Don prior. This is the Don show Hato. Posting a story on my linked in accounting. This is from my Lincoln account at Todd Jeffries from the Harvard Business Review, we may talk about this this tomorrow. But the headline is stop wasting money on team building talking about businesses. Most corporate team building is just a waste of time and a waste of money. Really, you think so no, I don't think so this is the article in the Harvard Business talking to the author there, and I don't know for sure I know it's a lot of fun. I know it can cost a lot of money. The question is does it. Does it pay him dividends? Do you have a team that becomes more productive? Do they get along better that sort of thing do they inspired? But that story stop wasting money on team building in the workplace in Harvard Business Review. I got it on my linked in account at Todd Jeffrey, it might be hard to direct to to directly connect the results of team building team building. Are you seeing results? Absolutely. Because of that. But I think it is important to get away from the work environment gets. To know each other. What are you like outside of work isn't a Johnny good morning. Good morning guys. Yeah. Yeah. I had a question about the Google better. There changes that are stifling crucial information in regards to elections, but this and not be considered election meddling. Guess it would. Yeah. Maybe should be a department of Justice investigation. Someone should look into that. And spend a lot of time doing it. And a lot of money. It only affects our elections. Are you saying we shouldn't look into it? No. But, but as we know a lot of that is is is a waste of money and time is Google fifty Russians. Oh, man. Now, you're getting into..

Harvard Business Review Harvard Business Todd Jeffries Don Todd Jeffrey Google Lincoln Johnny department of Justice
Do You have a Purchase or Usage Brand?

Crack the Customer Code

06:08 min | 2 years ago

Do You have a Purchase or Usage Brand?

"Then Get ready for the customer code. Your audio guidebook for creating incredible customer journeys your hosts, genie Walters, and Adam to pork are two of the most recognized and respected names in customer experience, and they have dedicated themselves to helping you improve your customer experiences. And now it's time for Adam and Jeannie. So Jeannie run-up there's so I heard. Yeah. So I hear all the time. Question, would you rather have buyers or users. Well, that's an interesting question for my business model, isn't it? I would say I would say users. We want people who are using the services and the products that we provide wall. Can't you have both? Well, they need to buy it. I. Exactly. And that is where I imagining because there was an article in Harvard Business Review called the most successful brands focus on users, not buyers. And my, I just sort of gut reaction was well whilst focus on both what they make a really good case about the strategic difference between the brands focus on buyers and focus on users. And one of these distinctions really hearkens to a message. I think we've talked about about one hundred times on this podcast which is focusing on the customer experience and on retention, but it goes a little deeper than that. I thought it'd be interesting for us to chat about it a little bit today. Yeah, I think it's, you know, the article itself in the study, I think was really interesting because it's basically putting kind of a different lens on what we do talk about. And I would say on, you know, episode three hundred plus we probably talked about three hundred hundred. But the idea of that post purchase experience and how you can really engage people not just to buy your products but to engage with the brand, which is actually what creates that emotional connection in that loyalty. And so I loved the example in the article about, you know, it's basically the makeup counter versus Sephora. And if you think about the makeup counter, which I know you always do at him at a Macy's or something that's really about you might you might ask for some help, selecting something. You might get a little, you know, overdone makeover there, but you're not really engaging with the idea of this is my brand and they're taking care of me and I want to know more about working with them where you might make a purchase and you might make a big purchase, but then going to a Sephora, you have access to not just the products and not. Just the people who want to sell you the products, but they have so much more to the relationship. They give you instruction. There's community involved with their apps and services around the products. And so it's much more reassuring as a consumer to walk into a Sephora and get that kind of support and that kind of experience rather than just buying something that you know they want to sell you. So that example really stood out to me because I think it is essentially the same product. It's just a totally different approach to let spend a lot of money getting them in the store to buy versus let's getting them. Let's get them in the store to provide the experience and outside of the store and really with our brand. So it's a, it's a cool way to think about it. It is because we've always talked about the difference between transactional and relational approaches. They're taking a little bit further. I would say with a strategic approach. Coach from a marketing perspective and a lot of ways, but also from a customer relations standpoint. For instance, one of the takeaways ahead was purchase brands emphasize promotion usage, brands emphasize advocacy, and they use it example of Vail resorts who just change your entire marketing strategy and put out this program called epic mix. And it's basically they had their own social network to the skiers can game a fi at that performance data. They get to use photos and share it with everybody. And you know, this is competing with ski resorts at are focusing on their snow and focusing on discounted lift tickets and all this kind of stuff. So it's a completely different experiential approach. But it's also truly as shift in strategic focus because you really can't do

Airbnb American Express Marriott Vail Resorts Jeannie Walters Cicely Tv Fedex Adam Mike Costco JAY Thirty Minutes
"harvard business review" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"harvard business review" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Data that it gets from the sellers and looks for areas where it can use that information to them compete against those businesses on its platform so one example of this you know from a couple of years ago was a small company and in the bay area that makes these nifty laugh laptop stands it's a company called rain design and they had built up a small but thriving business mainly selling on amazon platform also some through their own website but most of it was through amazon they you know they're stands where your number one two and three in the rankings they had like hundreds and hundreds of you know top consumer reviews on the site one morning i got up and the number one two and three laptop stands in the search results where amazon brand laptops day on that looked exactly like theirs but had the amazon logo instead of their own and their business you know sort of fell dramatically as a result of that we know that this happened systematically in part because folks like there's a study done by harvard business review that found when sellers lists new products within a few weeks about twenty five percent of their most popular items get brought into amazon inventory propublica did a nother analysis where they found that amazon often awards what's called the by box and that's that's the seller that gets the is the default seller on that product page so if you're looking at it and you you just want to choose the default option and put it straight into your shopping cart that's that's the seller that's what they say has gotten to buy box we'll public have found that amazon commonly rewards the awards the by box to itself or other sellers who use it's fulfilment services even if there's a seller that has a lower price or a higher customer review they will be knocked down in in the rankings and seen by many people.

harvard business review propublica amazon twenty five percent
"harvard business review" Discussed on Side Hustle Pro

Side Hustle Pro

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"harvard business review" Discussed on Side Hustle Pro

"The harvard business review and i do occasionally plug articles from there when i'm thinking about like siri so like you know when i'm thinking about like what type of business model i wanna have what i want to consider teams like age are in like how like manage other people i would also say like i mean on a personal of i really love adam grant until i read his books and a lot of the articles that he writes because he does he tackles visits from like a very psychological sense i think for me i constantly trying to get better at understanding consumer consolide consumer psychology and understanding the psychology of like managing other people so that they can be more effective and beneficial for the company as a whole emeals love self help books you guys it's just it's just one bit the best business sorry a lot girl sorry all right number three the lightning round lately is is a black woman entrepreneur that you would want to trade places with four day and why i think for me when entrepreneur want to trade places with day is riana because i the best way to describe it as this like she's she's a great artists left buzek left her personality and being able to really been able to lend that personality in branding into products that she's created in a way that has been authentic in meaningful side love to just kind of go through day of her like working with sephora to create her new products or anti pd collaborating with puma like like new looks and like seeing how involved she would be the i feel that she's really involved has the brand does fill so often tick in terms of creating all of these things that we end up lowering i'm being like that's riyan that's bomb.

harvard business review buzek sephora puma four day one bit
"harvard business review" Discussed on Short Story Long

Short Story Long

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"harvard business review" Discussed on Short Story Long

"Share with everyone and then people think about the story of maybe that song for them right and then that connects it on another level and i found people doing it right another one that and i've used this and it's worked exceptionally well and you might wanna use staff meaning please if everyone bring in a picture the means something of them right whether anything give them thirty seconds to explain why they picked it and what it means to them and go around the room it's crazy grace amazing we'll even that will do oh it will because everyone can relate to stuff right either clients do it in everyone after awhile starts this love the meeting just for that right and it changes the whole dynamic of going in and i didn't even realize this but the surgeon general he was in harvard business review actually did that for a staff and it turned the entire meanings around and got way more productive and when i read it i was like wow that's pretty cool like you do something and someone else smart dozen don't even really realize doing it what those type little small little things to do really draw people out in find ways to connect in belong and you don't need to find a lot of hooks and then it makes your job as the owner of the business or as an executive in the business way easier because then people care more and they'll do a lot more because they can't have this business not be successive right he then they'll do anything for it and that's something that will make a fundamental difference if you're someone in your twenties or thirties or whatever amid people that love working there because they loved you and the people because that's sensible longing is so great and it's harder lure people and all this stuff but you know and then we feel like you know that there's your purpose right up looking for the purpose of purposes every person around that room.

harvard business review executive thirty seconds
"harvard business review" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"harvard business review" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"You have the mulford arkansas questioning federal reserve h hair jay powell 8 head of the in front of the senate banking committee ought to the labour market in particular wage growth for america's workers an article the harvard business review last november last october discussed wage since the 1970s and found that wage gains have mostly accrue to top earners while wages have declined urban stagnant for the bottom half of the income distribution the bottom half the income distribution is comprised of many americans who don't have a fouryear degree many who don't even have a high school diploma research from the economic policy institute shows that american workers without a high school education uh have seen their wages decline by seventeen percent since 1979 adjusted for inflation and for workers the high school education but no college uh wages have declined by two percent the charter to my left displays this shows where i'm talking about you can see the massive wage growth uh for those with a college degree or advance degree and wage declines in real terms for those with a high school degree or less one of my top priorities is to ensure that hard working arkansans and share in the economic prosperity that we see in our country in ways that they have not over the course of my lifetime uh mr chairman you you write that i should say the entire board writes on page two in three of the monetary policy report although there is no way to know with precision the labor market appears to be near orly it'll be on.

arkansas jay powell senate banking committee america harvard business review economic policy institute chairman orly seventeen percent two percent fouryear
"harvard business review" Discussed on Women at Work

Women at Work

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"harvard business review" Discussed on Women at Work

"Hi it's their here thank you so much for listening to women at work doing a series of episodes has really meant a lot to me but we wanna know what it's meant to you we've created a survey for listeners and we really appreciate it if you'd answer some questions about what you liked and didn't like so much about this podcast and what you want to hear about in the future find a survey at each b r dot org slash podcast survey the done you're listening to women at work from harvard business review i'm seared green carmichael executive editor i've nicole choi as associate editor and i made me burned steamed editor of each bjork as ambitious hardworking women it's frustrating even if fury aiding to know that will likely spend at least part of our careers earning less than men doing the same work a lot of us go into our first jobs naive to the discrimination will face but the gender wage gap is a fact and not a simple one when we talk about the wage gap the figure we usually use is eighty cents on the dollar that's the us national average but in fact as she dive into the data what you sees that it's really a series of different wage gaps today we're exploring the wage gaps with a couple of experts amy took a trip into cambridge to talk to her first expert so this is pretty coal we're gonna be talking to one of the experts on the gender wage gap claudia golden she's a harvard economist and she is with the national bureau of economic research really no one knows more about this and she does.

harvard business review executive editor nicole choi associate editor bjork us cambridge carmichael amy national bureau of economic
"harvard business review" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"harvard business review" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"This is episode number six zero four with susan david welcome to this school of greatness my name is lewis howes of former pro athlete turned lifestyle entrepreneur and each week we bring you and inspiring person or message to help you discover how to unlock your inner greatness thanks for spending some time with me today now let the class begin yeah in the may brown said that we can not selectively numb emotions when we phnom the painful emotions weep also numb the positive ones i'm extremely excited about this interview with susan david on the art of emotional agility why because this is the tool that everyone needs to continually take their life to the next level is understanding the power of emotional agility and susan david is an awardwinning psychologist on the faculty of harvard medical school she's the cofounder and codirector of the institute of coaching at mclean hospital and ceo of evidence based psychology which is a boutique business consultancy she is also the author of the number one wall street journal best selling book emotional agility based on her concept that harvard business review heralded as a management idea of the year and has been featured in numerous leading publications like the new york times washed to post time magazine it's cetera hurt ted talk which just came out a couple of weeks ago on the same topic already has over a million views and it's one of the fastest watched ted talks of all time she is an end man speaker and adviser and she has worked with the senior leadership of hundreds of major organisations including the united nations ernst and young and the world economic forum and she has a wealth of research data and information for us today some of the things we talk about our when being k doesn't actually serve you also the power of writing the truth about what we feel the difference between emotional rigidity and emotional agility what happens when we push aside difficult emotions and how it affects our entire life and how to handle grief in a healthy way.

susan david lewis howes harvard medical school mclean hospital wall street journal harvard business review new york times time magazine brown codirector ceo ted united nations
"harvard business review" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"harvard business review" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"Welcome to the each beer idea cast from harvard business review i'm sarah green from ihop before he came to each r i worked at a bookstore and harvard square shelving titles and processing returns order books from publishing houses i didn't worry about getting too many since of our customers didn't buy them we could always just ship them back that's just how it's done in the industry book by back guarantees are one of many management practices that our guest today says don't make any commercial sense freak vermeulen who teaches strategy and entrepreneurship at the london business school urges managers to ask themselves why they're organizations are doing what they're doing because bad management practices spread leg viruses posing as good ideas and even as best practices in his new book breaking bad habits room un explains how these practices emerge persist and take down companies and even industries and while he admits they're hard to spot he tells managers what warning signs they should be looking out for freak thank you so much for joining us today of course thank you sir i think it's interesting that there is value in shaking up your organization and yet it is something that people really push back against they really don't like to do it even when there is a compelling reason to change people often resist change why do you think that is something that we do won't change of course is inevitable i guess the only time a company wound have to change is if it's in a perfectly stable business a new business is perfectly stable the thing is that usually companies wait with change to have trouble in fact it's not all that difficult at that point in time to convince people to change because everybody can see gush over bleeding cash were on the performing our competitors are doing better but then it has become very difficult because the old situation doesn't work anymore and therefore change i guess is difficult don't wait for trouble be proactive because if your proactive then you end up.

harvard business review ihop vermeulen london business school sarah green harvard square
"harvard business review" Discussed on Shareable

Shareable

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"harvard business review" Discussed on Shareable

"That is super exciting and you are speaking to what i perceive to be like the promised land for mutuals multiple income streams i don't know how you can possibly manage that i'm sure i'll just have to read the book and and go through the whole process of it but i have so many side hustles and things i'm interested in that and i'm sure there's a very big difference between having a side hustle on having side for multiple streams of income and and we'll get into that but one thing i also want you to to go a little bit deeper on his this isn't your first book talk a little bit about some of your previous rating and speaking in some of that stuff if you could indeed so entrepreneurial you my newest book is my third book and i guess fourth actually if you count and eib look that i did butts but so my my first my first book was called reinventing you it came out from harvard business review press in two thousand thirteen sabuk about personal branding and professional reinvention truly a book about how do you reinvent yourself into the job or the career that you want my next book can a picked up were that left off that one was called standout which came out in two thousand fifteen and i was really excited because inc magazine actually named at the number one leadership book of 2015 forbes thank you forbes named it one of the top ten business books of the year as well so uh so that was dreary was really well received that is a book about how to become a recognised expert in your field so it's kind of like all right with reinventing you you reinvent yourself to the place want to be and then with stand out it's okay how you.

inc magazine eib harvard business review forbes
"harvard business review" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"harvard business review" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"The aid veer idea catherine harvard business review i'm therapy for medical ray after i renew monthan graduated from college she went in namibia and south western africa to teach english at a rural public school she didn't expect it to be such a lonely challenging year i didn't really see myself making a difference in the future of african people that i was supposedly trying to help she also missed her mother's chinese cooking so to make something that tasted like home she went into town to buy vegetables imported from china the shop owner ended up inviting her to have dinner with him and a group of chinese factory bosses and after several drinks the men were spitting at the table and pulling out their guns may also forever changed the way she thought about development you have people who are extremely practical extremely rough unpolished people but they're creating businesses that create real jobs son asked herself who are these people what are they doing and what sort of impact are they having later as a consultant for mckinsey she toured chinese own factories in africa to study how they were affecting countries economies anthocyanins these she went to one in kenya making spare parts for heavy machinery another in ethiopia producing gel capsules and she saw a kind of entrepreneurship it's totally distinct from what happening in silicon valley it's much riskier she says than venture capitalist investing in tech startups and the payoff can be incredible sons written down what she's discovered through her factory visits and research and her new book and next factory of the world how chinese investment in three saving africa irene thank you so much for joining us today thanks for having me you have visited dozens of factories in africa you have talked to hundreds of people working in those factories you've talked to many unprona earth who started those factories.

harvard business review consultant africa heavy machinery ethiopia namibia kenya venture capitalist
"harvard business review" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"harvard business review" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"Harvard business review once again however his putting all that aside and just getting empirical on our collective ass as it rates the best ceos in the world the best performing ceos ranks the hundred best from the best companies the best people who had these companies and the best person to talk about this is initially he is the editor in chief of harvard business review welcome back audie yeah thanks mike that'd be here now before we get to use number one you're here last you're talking about this list in a dane the lars from novo nordisk was up there where we go well he lost his john you you know it's a it's a fickle business so he was number one in your ranking yes but not in the hearts of novonordisk shareholder suggests essay said the ranking this is not our sense of who is on the rise in his not anecdotal about uh you know uh a man or woman we think is great it's it's there's a formula formula's but to that he had a great run he had a great run and we came to a head he can't do that but we look at two things with a total shareholder return and that's very objective and clear and going all the way back to when a ceo starts his or her career so this is a longterm thing but then we also add on what's called e s cheated environmental social governance and that kind of holds these leaders to the fire in terms of making money but are you doing the right thing and turn to the climate in terms of governance in terms of.

Harvard business review novo nordisk ceo editor in chief mike
"harvard business review" Discussed on Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"harvard business review" Discussed on Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

"And i i realized i was just unnecessarily raining myself in and so i wanted to create a a book that really provided people at a template of how to do it i mean it the book is one thing that i really love the book is out from harvard business review press you know it's been peerreviewed peer review process i wanted this to be like the anti scam e book about how to make money online and elsewhere so the other thing you did in this book that it took me a back and i'm wondering if it this is like a generational thing or or if it's sort of the common would to do things is you're really transparent about like money and i don't mean in a sense of just being transforming like real numbers i was surprised by people who through no love and respect than how opening on as they were about literally how much money they make am my crazy to be so uncomfortable with other knows really like what i couldn't believe it i will i'm actually glad that you had that reaction because that's that's why i wanted to do it money is something that obviously we don't really talk about that much in our culture i mean we the way that we talk about it is a you know it's the two polls right it's either people complaining like why i don't have enough money or that people talk about wealth but in these eight kind of ridiculously abstract weighs about you know people showing pictures of their ferraris in being like look at me but the part it's hard the part that people don't talk about is the actual nittygritty of like what did you do to make them money literally what is your business model and literally how much do you make from doing it and that's the parked it's so mysterious and i really wanted to get into the nittygritty of that deliberately because.

harvard business review
"harvard business review" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"harvard business review" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Feel like you get the columnist shelly from the plan and getting out pride in nature litigation is huge and an harvard business review they do talk about beat benefit and how it helped he yelled it's interesting back to the of volunteering part of this that that would be that there first of all there are there are tons of opportunities you mentioned in the suburbs of the city's i mean what what are we talking about here we talked about like volunteering for school board or or helping with the construction of some charities house so what are we talking about all you can do certain in all of that what we recommend um if that you kind of volunteer tokyo let you really good at an and to help that organisation for example we volunteer eight till 71 which is the city accelerator and koehler king they we get presentation till get a pay occasion unintentional leadership ought to be the leader you wanna be in ill that was really will attend it because they want to learn they wanna learn can escape that we made right and entrepreneurs uh we also work with future founders and out here in the cupboard grabbed three another coup working space where we could meet with people and talk with a one on one one it really just helping the focus hoping and really just kind of get we liked it what they're going to really not unusual in that they're in there in the plate with all of us and we've gone to it illegal to put them so we recommend that people hit in the place where they feel like they can really make an impact sometimes it too high calder so many program now entrepreneurial on program can high school and college it was loud for in lille light entrepreneur yep into that classroom and we we make a difference and i talk about their experience it and the ups and downs and and what they did to overcome them and you starting a bit scary but it overwhelming and it really exciting until it can share their experience battling it really can make a different and he really he'll be entrepreneurs wanna make a difference both we're doing an optimistic and they just really want to reach out but they would feel.

harvard business review shelly lille
"harvard business review" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"harvard business review" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"Looking to the if the idea catherine harvard business review i'm therapy for my all telling executives they need to have clear goals retained talent seems well silly is not just common sense but the truth is so many organisations are failing on the fundamentals and don't even realize it herbert business school professor rafael us june says it's time to go back to the basics and she has the data to prove it so june and other researchers have surveyed 15000 organisations in thirty four countries about core managerial practices and what they found calls into question the conventional wisdom about operational excellence it's not just table stakes nor is it distinct from strategy in fact operational excellence is so rare and so hard to achieve that it actually can be a strategic advantage joining me now as raffaela sadoun she's a co author of the new article widely we undervalue competent management it's in the september october 2017 issue of harvard business view and vailable on each we are dot org rafa thank you so much for being here today thank you are you telling me that the good people of the world are not reading age be are enough they are door aerial you'll do uh what unfilitered is at maybe they read it be our ed they think they're doing what it's worth tells them to do but in practice they don't so though we know that certain practices should be done it's very badly there we go and really selfevaluate.

harvard business review professor harvard
"harvard business review" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"harvard business review" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"Welcome to the hb our idea catherine harvard business review i'm sarah green call to get psyched up for the big game sports teammates give each other pep talks listen to an exciting song during warmups or follow a particular pregame routine then there's the locker room speech often dramatize unpopular movies were the ill inspires individuals to greatness i'm sick and tired irritable what a great full is your go up baron i can but what's the business equivalent of the pap time when you have a big presentation job interview for ending sales meeting or situation where you really need to be on how do you prepare for it if you're like a lot of people you probably think about what you're going to say and what you're going to wear and then you just kind of wealth show up each be are a senior editor dan mcgann things we can all do better than that by taking a cue from how the best athletes and performers prepare he's the author of the article the science of pep talks in the july august 2017 issue of harvard business review and has also the author of the book psyched up how the science of mental preparation can help you succeed dan thank you for joining us today thank you sir so did you have to get psyched up to write this book i did actually writing this book did change the way i get ready to perform my job as a writer every morning or many mornings if you watch sports you become pretty accustomed to seeing the athletes what they do when they warm up they tend to have had phones on and you know that they're listening to a certain set of songs it's not just a chance you're used to seeing locker room speeches used to seeing that gays that locked in look that they have in that focus and they're taught to do that their sports psychologists who teach them exactly what they should be thinking about before a game the argument i have is that more of our jobs or like that these days it's less white factory worker you doing the same thing every day and more about the big pitch the presentation the sales call and that we should learn to do what these athletes due to try to lock ourselves in.

harvard business review writer sarah green senior editor dan mcgann
"harvard business review" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"harvard business review" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"Welcome to the eight bear idea cast from harvard business review i'm saragan carmine while think about the term driverless cars if obvious what that means right the car without a person behind the wheel as new technology comes along we often base their descriptions of the new about what we know of the old but sunday driverless car was on his antiquated as the term horseless carriage which of course is what cars were i called back when the internal combustion engine displaced horses and actually that other word automobile or auto mobile is probably better for the driverless vehicle of tomorrow than it ever was for the carb yesterday but sometimes at technology comes along that so new and so potentially groundbreaking that it's hard to even describe with the language of the past pick blocked chain you might know that it's the revolutionary technology behind that digital currency bitcoin but do you really know what it is can you describe how it works to a friend do you know how could change your industry your business even maybe your life joining us now to help us understand this new technology and its profound implications for commerce is karim laconi professor at harvard business school he's also the co founder of the each bs digital initiative cream thanks for talking with us breaks root beer so what is watching for the most hearts term mr gao jian business is goes save the world is going to cure diseases is going to be amazing um i might have as donald other guys out there who so block chain of of fundamental e r is a ludger so ludger meaning heaps track of transactions now most ledgers tend to be private you know you have your own checkbook.

harvard business review professor harvard business school co founder donald