2 Burst results for "Harry endan"

"harry eden" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"harry eden" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Literally the next thread. For three reasons. But. Throughout. What he's talking about. That was getting rid, but by somebody what hangs establishments. What is that? Nothing. Stop. It means nothing is sound when he's intellectually layup. The existentialist threat. Nothing when that, that Iran was existential threat to Israel. He was telling you because of Iran. What invade Israel's with three men Pat entre would employer. That's an existential threat back while lettings petrol. The folks from Santo Americans molecule Salvador, it's come over. That's an ex-. What have we by existential threat? We have an extra central with the border being broken open. That's an existential threat in means our existing voices. Retinal at the as if you don't see that if the night, sorry, do not seeing reality people, right? The tide is shifted way. Make Harry Eden continues. Nevertheless, the lack of the border enforcement, and the Dem's drawing up more, there, yet, hatred among their psychotic base is concerning for sure. That's why for the future of our great nation. Pollock traits with the risk acceleration of censorship on social media. Yes. Absolutely Trump could lose or not think that Jack Dorsey at Twitter. More whatever Carrizo look the other one that his company, Facebook, you think that they're just censoring people because they find it offensive trying to swing in the election democratic end? So since these platforms are a primary form of communication for millions upon millions of Americans today, the government needs to step in and make sure that these companies are put onto the banner of federal agency that can monitor them in Fairmount light, the FCC told you that before it's not rocket science. You make the winter Facebook and the other outlets. Exactly what they are. The women of TV station. Or a radio station and they become under the banner and controlled by follow the rules of the FCC. Why haven't you seen that happen? Why have you not seen Google? Facebook Twitter, put on there on the umbrella of the FCC, which could be done with the stroke of a pen. Why? Because they have so much money they have bought as many congressman, as you can probably imagine. It's lobbying congressmen are cheaper to buy than a woman of the night on Ella street. San Francisco, I hear that cost less, and they last longer. That's a congressman costs, the by today, less than a woman of the night on the cheapest street in your town. The one night may be with you for twenty thirty minutes, the congressman who schmeer off is with you for much longer time, you pay once and you own them forever. And that is why there has been no move to grab these social network companies, which are bigger than most governments and put them under the control of the Federal Communications Commission. Because.

Iran Federal Communications Commiss Facebook congressman Twitter Israel Harry Eden Jack Dorsey San Francisco Pat entre Google Carrizo Pollock Fairmount twenty thirty minutes
"harry eden" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

10:39 min | 1 year ago

"harry eden" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"And let us know what's on your mind. The big impact exists because we want to encourage you with positive and inspiring interviews. So let us know how we're doing. Call the big impact listener hotline at nine eight nine seven eight seven one zero nine three. Welcome back to the big impact where we share interesting uplifting and encouraging stories hosted by Bill Hobson. We are rooting with James Carl Nelson, the author of the polar bear expedition here on the big impact. And in the moments that we have left James. I'm I'm intrigued by some of the people the names the personalities involved in this group of men known as polar bears as I mentioned at the outset of our conversation. A good number of them came from my home state of Michigan and played heroic roles in how all of this played out. I know that in the early part of the book, the prologue, Lieutenant, Harry Mead. What's historian, and what are some of the other names that jump out at us as we look at this unique time in history. Grew up in Valparaiso, Indiana with family ran a boarding house. And in fact, level Thomas, the famous self promoter, journalists globetrotter Lawrence of Arabia promoter at stay there. And airy got to know him, and it was funny because when when the thirty ninth was stationed outside of London before going to Russia, Harry ran into Lao? Thomas is just returned from Saudi Arabia, and they started chatting, and Harry says that lever just about to leave for France Thomas tells us here we go into rough. So so how pretty much the regiment found out that they were on their way Russia, and he went to school at the university of Michigan and went to law school and with the practicing attorney in Detroit when he volunteered for officers training at fort Sheridan, Illinois, the similar story with a lot of the officers. There's another interesting character. Harry Castelo who had been a great football hero of all places. Georgetown University of the football power back then and they called them nine point hairy because he's singlehandedly thing to defeat the university of Kenya. Archrival every year and scored all nine points one game. He was a real character. Real from Connecticut's tough guy. There is Joel Moore who had been football coach and athletic trainer high school teacher even a little bit older. He's about mid thirties when he volunteered for officers training. He was in charge of the company through the war, and Harry Castello came home and wrote a book, very bitter book called why did we go to Russia and Joel Moore, and Harry Eden? Another fellow also came home and wrote a book, basically, a little little more, mild a diatribe. It was a long account history of the American expeditions lighting the bulls. He had which was a great resource. Covered a lot of different areas and in first person fashion. Harry Mead was able to tell the story of what happened in the core in January of nineteen nineteen John Coty another Lieutenant he was from suburban Wisconsin suburban Milwaukee actually town suburb, call cut he there sign of a wealthy family. And when he arrived at company headquarters in the fall Tober of nineteen eighteen hundred feet a river. He ingratiated himself right away. Bring all sorts of treats. Smokes and food and these guys and another soldier PFC, Donald Kerry who was from Michigan rural Michigan farmer son, and he fought with company through the war. And just went spent the rest of his life documenting like day by day. What went on the fighting that went on the day to day interactions, and he became a school principal later in his life have before returning the farming. So it was a mix, you know, as usual lieutenants were well educated the the rest of the men were there was plenty of from inner Detroit. They were far boys. They're small town. Kids of typical Knicks for Doboy regimen. At the time. I would say do they stay brothers for life. When they return form the polar bear, sociation and held reunions. And then just, you know, didn't want their story to go away to die. And I'm sad. They also wanted to honor the dead, and in nineteen twenty nine contingent of these men got permission to go back into Russia, and they searched through the battle areas where they've been small villages and rebel recover. Eighty six bodies disinterred them and sent them back to Michigan. Somebody claimed on the way from different states and nineteen thirty. They commissioned a polar bear monument ecstatic polar bears, actually, quite beautiful and in white white haven cemetery white chapel cemetery in Troy, Michigan and some of. Some of the bodies were buried around. There's like fifty six bodies buried around this polar bear that seems to be guarding them almost that was in September. It was quite a moving place is amazing. And you've written so much about the great war. I'm wondering what it is about that event that motivated you to do such research you've immersed your life into it. Why? Well, my grandfather was Doboy. He was severely wounded on July nineteenth nineteen eighteen left out on the field. And. Bleeding and was picked up in the morning by some of the some Senic Senegalese stretcher-bearers with the French unit. And he lived to be hundred one he never really said much about it except that that little story about how I was shot. And I've just always captivated my magic nation. I was I was interested in military history. And as I got older and older he didn't die until nineteen Ninety-three that hundred one I thought I I need to find out what really happened well with the story. So that's what became my first book remains a company D story of his company, the men in its would explain what he went through through their words where he was unable to do that. It was a Swedish immigrant not a writer talker that then that led to another five lieutenants up five lieutenants with from Harvard educated from who served in the first division that led to my third book. I will hold about a marine. Kristen cates. Who started out with junior officer with the marines, and then became marine? Cod record commandant in nineteen forty nine. And yeah, it's just I think it's just it's started up read my first book, and I just signed fascinating. I think it's overlooked for one. I think the sacrifices that these men went through is overlooked. So we'll work to overshadow will grow one so much our participation in World War One only lasted really about six months of actual combat. Our our losses where fifty three thousand then killed in action Edyta wounds compared to millions on some other countries. So, you know, the it could be overshadowed, but still was all these men regret heroes to go over there. Leave your homes. Many of them jump to enlist in the spring of nineteen seventeen and find that the whole era though, the. The American wonderment the American spirit the spunk. You know? That's what I I love. I was just going to ask you about that American spirit. I have no doubt whatsoever. That today's enlisted men and women have the same level of commitment, and bravery and toughness of that is described in the polar bear expedition. But I'm not so sure that the outside of the military culture does seem like we are little soft these days. What did it require for those back home to help these men succeed? There was a national toughness to it wasn't there. Well, I, you know, I believe people were suffering general. I mean, they they grew out with a very few of the amenities. We have today. Yeah. They were just tougher. They they worked long hours. They they. Quit school held their families help support their families have my grandfather, all my grandparents and say the from Sweden. I guess think it was I think life was hard and then in women became hard Lewis on these photos of people from eighteen eighties wherever they they look like they've lived Hartill hives, and they usually have stern expressions on them. Just wasn't easy and they died younger than they died today. It was just I think a a feeling of Laura knowledge of life is hard. Nobody expecting to be easy. And we just have to do what we have to do. There's more this these days. We're all softer. I think you know, we got our electric appliances ourselves phones video games and the big screen TV's. And there's not that also that spirit of you know, like like would say with Iraq or even at ghanistan. We're not involved as people in that. Right. Our military is you know, what I mean, we separation these days between what's going on militarily, and what's going on socially. There's much bigger. I think these days than it was in the past. They didn't spend a lot of time taking selfies back in nineteen seventeen. Now are feeling sorry for themselves or whatever, you know. Yeah. They're tough people admire them. James the book is fascinating. It's called the polar bear expedition. It's just hot off the presses. You can get it right now. If you're listening to this as a podcast will put the link to the book in the notes to the podcast, if you're listening on the radio, you know, you can go to Amazon or anywhere else and get it. It's the polar bear expedition by James, Carl Nelson, and we're so proud to have a great representation of heroes from the midwest represented in this group. So well done my friend. All right..

Michigan James Carl Nelson Russia Harry Mead Detroit football France Thomas Harry Joel Moore Harry Castelo Valparaiso Bill Hobson Indiana Harry Castello university of Michigan Knicks Georgetown University white haven cemetery white cha London Harry Eden