35 Burst results for "Harry Truman"

"harry truman" Discussed on Cloud Security Podcast by Google

Cloud Security Podcast by Google

04:33 min | Last month

"harry truman" Discussed on Cloud Security Podcast by Google

"Scanning capabilities became really needed. And became a priority to enhance our DLP roles. The other interesting side is and it's also from the regulatory perspective in the past that you kind of traditional DLP approach is not going to really be sufficient because also the regulators expect increasingly. Correlation of events and correlation of also the data classification and the data, let's say, paths in the organization, the location. So that demands access that correlation to large datasets and really strong capabilities analytics capabilities pairing with inside the threat. So suddenly we have this huge contextual model that needs to be applied and again that's requires the power, the real time analysis and collection of data from masses of endpoints. And then passing it through, of course, really good behavioral analytics to identify what's an anomaly. And that, again, can be changed and it's just a suddenly we don't have just a traditional DLP gate and suddenly perhaps we have a blaring in between what's a deal P control versus what is a data security controls because and inside the thread, for example, because it's all an ecosystem. I really like that idea of blurring. So now that we've blurred that line, I want to zoom us out for a second. And ask you to answer briefly very simple question. Is moving to cloud a net risk reduction? Simple question, yes or no? Depends. First of all, I think how about can it be? It can be both depending on how you do it. Okay. Okay. That's a good answer. I like that. We've gotten different answers to that question. We've gotten yes, just a straight up yes. I think it depends is a good answer. It kind of reminds me of Harry Truman asking for the one armed economist, but we don't need to go there today. It's really depends on how you do it. Yeah. If you're talking about the true migration backed with the organizational transformation, I believe it's a reduction. However, if you do lift and shift, if you do just fragmented approach and kind of end up running

Harry Truman
"harry truman" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:33 min | 3 months ago

"harry truman" Discussed on WTOP

"Four is Ryan Miller. Right now, we're at 81 in national harbor, Sterling checks in at 79, where at 81 at the wharf in southwest east city. We're continuing to get worldwide reaction on the death of Queen Elizabeth and President Biden has a statement. The president says she was more than a monarch and to find an era. He also called her a steadying presence and a source of comfort and pride for generations of Britons. The president also ordered flags at The White House and federal buildings to fly at half staff in her honor. You realize that she met 13 presidents in her time from Harry Truman, to Joe Biden. I mean, just amazing the arc of her service. And that she's been in the public eye since basically a teenager, right? And she, when she officially announced Liz truss as prime minister, it was her 15th prime minister the first, I believe, was Winston Churchill. Right? Yeah, oh my gosh. Quite a life. We'll have more on that as we go through the day here on WTO. Now, to Ukraine, Russia is still launching devastating attacks there, but Ukraine with the help of U.S. weapons and other resources is fighting back and having some significant success. Here's WTO P national security correspondent JJ green. Ukraine continues its counter offensive in the south and they're even taking back territory in the north, near harkey, which has been hard hit by Russia since this war began. Now the U.S. is sending an additional $675 million in military supplies, which include air launched missiles that are designed to destroy enemy radar. This is a part of what we're hearing according to U.S. sources will be a long-term effort to help Ukraine prepare and position itself to fight off Russia, federal headlines is presented by periton doing the can't be done for national security. I'm Peter M surley and here are your top headlines from federal news network. Good news may be coming for inflation weary defense contractors as the Defense Department puts the finishing touches on new policies that would expand the number of contractors who can ask for price adjustments to their fixed price contracts. DoD says small firms in particular could fold if they're forced to absorb inflation costs on their own. And narf the national active and retired federal employees association is getting a new national president, Bill shackelford, who starts his two year term in January. Shackleford retired from federal service in 2006

southwest east city President Biden Ukraine Liz truss national harbor Ryan Miller WTO JJ green Russia Queen Elizabeth Harry Truman Joe Biden U.S. Winston Churchill White House Peter M surley Defense Department narf national active and retired fe
Who Are the Real Climate Criminals?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:39 min | 3 months ago

Who Are the Real Climate Criminals?

"I have to just have you give us some clarity mark on the disparity geographically. So America is lambasted by the likes of Karl Schwab, the World Economic Forum, Greenpeace, you name it, the guy who worshippers. But which countries in the world, I mean, we have an unbelievable record. I know under the Trump administration, after we left the Paris climate accords, we actually improved our CO2 output after we left that outrageous regime. Who are the real big players that pollute the atmosphere and who get away with it and who seemingly don't care Mark yes, well, great question. First of all, the United States, since the first earth day in 1970, we have radically improved air and water quality, while at the same time improving economic growth and big increases in population. Having done all that, the World Health Organization recognizes the U.S. as among the cleanest air and environmental quality in the world. And this is our success story. And yes, you mentioned Donald Trump. Donald Trump pulled out of the UN Paris agreement and the United States drum roll please Sebastian led the world in reducing carbon dioxide emissions. No other country came close. It was because of our technological innovation of fracking, replacing fracking, replacing coal with fracking, which was a lower emitting, more efficient form of energy and less environmentally disruptive. I mean, you would drill a hole in the ground and then drill horizontally and get the gas out that way. So this was a huge success story. But instead of allowing this to continue, this was all collapsed. And we went from the world for the first time since Harry Truman was president in 1952. We were the world's leading exporter of oil and gas. We had more exports than imports. We had more production than consumption. We were sitting pretty. What every president is Richard Nixon claimed they were going to achieve American energy independence actually happened under Donald Trump. And COVID lockdowns came and pulled the plug on everything. Biden came in and further, you can't say he pulled the plug. He poured the cement upon everything and buried American energy, whereas now their intentionally creating energy shortages. This isn't a side effect. Oh, these energy restrictions. This is a feature of the Green New Deal style, great reset policies upon which they're imposing. And the real villains obviously is China.

Karl Schwab Trump Administration America Donald Trump World Economic Forum Paris Greenpeace World Health Organization Sebastian Mark UN Harry Truman Richard Nixon Biden China
"harry truman" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:42 min | 4 months ago

"harry truman" Discussed on WTOP

"Harry Truman made him one of the most popular and influential historians of his time. His fatherly baritone is known to fans of PBS's the American experience and Ken burns epic Civil War documentary. The Civil War was fought in 10,000 places from Valverde, New Mexico and tullahoma, Tennessee. To saint albans Vermont and Fernandina on the Florida coast. The author was also a favorite in D.C. he addressed a joint session of Congress in 1989 and in 2006 received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, according to his publisher, David McCollum died yesterday, David McCullough died yesterday in Massachusetts at the age of 89. 7 48, bob imler with traffic. And Virginia 66 westbound has the crash just before nutley street and that involves a truck, so be alert for that, squeezing by slowly to the right, headed westbound from the beltway on 66. On 95 northbound after lord and the crash remains and blocking the left lane and before you get to the fairfax county Parkway southbound, the lanes rope and running pretty well around the beltway things are generally good to go both in Maryland and Virginia now. Meanwhile, in Maryland on two 70, not going so well, two 70 northbound delays begin before three 70 the crash is after three 70 and squeezing by slowly to the left and the main lanes and the local lanes do get by with a brief slowdown getting past the crash. But the main lanes are jammed badly getting past this crash after three 70. 95 on the Baltimore Washington Parkway each running well between the beltways and 50 out of the bay bridge is doing all right. Bob inland WTO. Storm team four, four day forecast with Ryan Miller. Very muggy, very mild here through the overnight hours, partly Claudia, just the slight chance of a shower, maybe the rumble

David McCollum bob imler Harry Truman saint albans Ken burns tullahoma Valverde Fernandina David McCullough PBS New Mexico Virginia Vermont Tennessee D.C. Maryland Congress fairfax county Florida Massachusetts
Why Harry Truman Refused to Drop the Atomic Bomb

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:14 min | 4 months ago

Why Harry Truman Refused to Drop the Atomic Bomb

"I love the conversational style that Truman uses here. He says, now once in a while, I'll get a letter from some impatient person asking, why don't we get it over with? Why don't we issue an ultimatum make all out war drop the atomic bomb? And for most Americans, the answer is quite simple. We're not made that way. We're a moral people, pieces are gold with justice and freedom. We can not of our very free will violate the principles that we are striving to defend. The whole purpose of what we're doing to prevent World War three, starting a war is no way to make peace. An interesting point of view there because, again, he viewed the involvement in Korea. He viewed the involvement of the use or non use of the atomic bomb, was that they were trying to avoid a war. And at this point in time, the lord had lived with the world he lived 8 years without any kind of other nuclear devices being used, atomic device being used, and he viewed that as a success. Now he also was very adamant in saying that, look, using these devices would end the Cold War. It would end the communists with me, but it also end hours as well. He understood that the forming doctrine of mutually assured destruction and that was what was coming on.

Truman Korea
"harry truman" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:09 min | 4 months ago

"harry truman" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

"Here you had Truman walking in cold to the presidency. No transition, no uptick, no up brief. And it is interesting that the way he talks about this, he spends those first four months. If you think about it, the UN was getting formed, Germany was getting ready to surrender. You had Japan and the battles in the Pacific still going on. And him just finding out about frankly the Manhattan Project and the use of atomic weapon not only finding out about what he could do, but then actually being called upon to use it. And he made the decision. He talks about it in the speech. He said he made the decision to use the bomb so that it was saved in his words and his reasoning was to save hundreds of thousands of lives of not only Americans but Japanese and that's why he used the bomb and now in that matter of four months of becoming president to the time the ending of the war in August in Japan, he began to then have to deal with a economy and a country that was rebuilding after World War II. All of that in. Just a matter of a short a matter of time. That's why I believe when you see the first half of the speech, he talks about what he did. He talks about, you know, the fact that he tried to get Eisenhower up to speed, he talked about the hours that he put in. He talked about. The deals that are coming along that he had to deal with on his desk and how many times he had to shake hands and how many times he had to sign signatures. And you really look at this and discuss it because he makes a point in an issue of making sure that the president's job is a big one. He wanted you to know that it mattered and that he took it seriously. In fact, he makes a point and he talks about his signatures, but he talks about all the government work. And I love how he puts this. He said, the papers, my circular around government for a while, but they finally reach this disk, talking about the president's desk. And this is when he says this. And he said, then and then there's no place to go for ask them to go. The president, whoever he is, has to decide. He can not pass the buck to anybody. No one else can do the deciding for him. That is his job.

Truman Salem media group dinesh d'souza Lago Salem NASA pendergrass Senate Congress Midwest Europe Washington Nagasaki Hiroshima Japan
The Buck Stops Here: A Deep Dive Into Harry Truman's Final Address

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:10 min | 4 months ago

The Buck Stops Here: A Deep Dive Into Harry Truman's Final Address

"Here you had Truman walking in cold to the presidency. No transition, no uptick, no up brief. And it is interesting that the way he talks about this, he spends those first four months. If you think about it, the UN was getting formed, Germany was getting ready to surrender. You had Japan and the battles in the Pacific still going on. And him just finding out about frankly the Manhattan Project and the use of atomic weapon not only finding out about what he could do, but then actually being called upon to use it. And he made the decision. He talks about it in the speech. He said he made the decision to use the bomb so that it was saved in his words and his reasoning was to save hundreds of thousands of lives of not only Americans but Japanese and that's why he used the bomb and now in that matter of four months of becoming president to the time the ending of the war in August in Japan, he began to then have to deal with a economy and a country that was rebuilding after World War II. All of that in. Just a matter of a short a matter of time. That's why I believe when you see the first half of the speech, he talks about what he did. He talks about, you know, the fact that he tried to get Eisenhower up to speed, he talked about the hours that he put in. He talked about. The deals that are coming along that he had to deal with on his desk and how many times he had to shake hands and how many times he had to sign signatures. And you really look at this and discuss it because he makes a point in an issue of making sure that the president's job is a big one. He wanted you to know that it mattered and that he took it seriously. In fact, he makes a point and he talks about his signatures, but he talks about all the government work. And I love how he puts this. He said, the papers, my circular around government for a while, but they finally reach this disk, talking about the president's desk. And this is when he says this. And he said, then and then there's no place to go for ask them to go. The president, whoever he is, has to decide. He can not pass the buck to anybody. No one else can do the deciding for him. That is his job.

Japan Truman UN Pacific Germany Eisenhower
"harry truman" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

The Doug Collins Podcast

08:03 min | 4 months ago

"harry truman" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

"And then in, frankly, into another war of Korea. So it's interesting to see in this speech, I want to talk about it was given on January 15th, 1953, a lot to see, but it also goes into a lot of what basically service is, is from the people like Harry Truman, who believed that their service in life was from a calling of their upbringing. He was the 33rd president who was born in 1884 and lived most of his life as I said outside independence, Missouri. Most people don't realize that he actually early in his life as he was trying to win best, his eventual wife, that he wanted to make something himself. He actually was a farmer, worked on a farm, got jobs, but he opened a haberdashery in Kansas City. So he did men's clothing. The store went okay. It didn't completely pan out. But it was a story of someone who tried in life and succeeded to appoint in business. But that was Harry Truman. This was somebody who was always trying to do more. He also served in World War I, which made a great impact on his thinking, especially as it came later. He also met the pendergrass family during his time in the army which later led him to his public life as a judge and then also which a judge in that time was more of like a county administrator. And ruler, but also he led him then to what became the United States Senate and how he got to Washington D.C.. So a lot just going on there. An interesting couple of side notes not only he had trouble getting into the army. In fact, he couldn't see. He had a very bad eyesight. Outside of his glasses. And the way he got in there is, again, a lot of great individuals in the world adapt and overcome and Harry Truman adapted and overcome. He actually memorized the eye chart. That's how he actually got past his eye exam. So a lot of stuff that went into Harry Truman's life that a lot of people may not know, he was also very accomplished piano player, played piano in The White House, played piano. A lot of places. It was a very much of an icebreaker, a lot of times for Truman. He was also one last thing before we get into this speech itself. He is the last president that we have had that did not have a college degree. And he was the first since McKinley in the 1800s. They did not have a college degree. And since then, of course, there's not many president that we have had since. It is not had a college degree. So very interesting part. So as we dig into this speech, as we've dug into all these speeches, I look for things that speak to us today and speak to this art of when I do call it as an art of public service. And the first thing that you see in him is the duty of the job. And for most people, if you start thinking about a speech that he's giving to the American people from the Oval Office in 1953, you know, he think he would start off in a bigger fashion in a bigger way. But what he really starts off with is he starts talking about the inauguration of general Eisenhower. In fact, he talks about the next Tuesday that Eisenhower will be inaugurated president. And that he's going to go back home to be and I love how he works as he said, he said, I'm going back home to independence, Missouri. I will once again be a plain private citizen of this great republic. He knew his position. He knew he knew his calling in life and he knew who he was. There was never a pretense about the president Truman and his life. But he goes on and it's interesting. He speaks of a couple of three or four paragraphs here where he talks about the role of his role in helping Eisenhower make the transition. I understand they were not the best of Friends. Eisenhower trainman did not see eye to eye on a lot of things, especially Korea. And things that were going on and Truman felt off put by Eisenhower. He never considered himself to be of a showy class and with Eisenhower's role in the big names that he in big jobs that he had held during World War II. I think there's probably a little bit of an inferiority complex. I would the only way to determine if you look at the reading of history and through the graph is of Truman. So they didn't get along very well, but he understood the beauty of his job and for one president who put in perspective and we'll talk about this in a moment. He talks about how he became president of this speech, and I think this emphasized the first few paragraphs here. We talked about the transition. Can you imagine in how he talks about this transition without and how they, each of the cabinet secretaries worked with Eisenhower's potential cabinet secrets, how he sat down with Eisenhower and told him, you know, where things were. He felt a real sense to make sure that the transition went smoothly because even though he was not a fan of Eisenhower's politically, he understood that the office of president still had to go on. I think that speaks a lot to us today about what it means to have a duty of a high office in public life to make sure that the next person understands what to do, how to do it. They may bring their own stamp to it and we may disagree with it, but the people have elected. So he spends a lot of time on that. And you may see him in a while he say that. Why would he talk about the last two months and being an orderly transfer and those kind of things? And I think it goes back to something that makes the biggest impression upon him in the second biggest thing that I would say out of this speech was he talks about how he became president. He gives a little bit of discussion about what the role of president is. And in this speech, he talks about the fact that he works 17 hours. He talks about the countries that he went to. The 77 he traveled a 135,000 miles by air, 77,000 by rail, 17,000 by ship. And but he said his mail always followed him and that he was always the president no matter where he was. I don't know about you, but that sounds like somebody who's trying to make sure that people understood that he was working. It sounds like a man who didn't let the presidency speak for him. He wanted to make sure that people understood just because he had the title of president of the United States that he was actually out there working with people. He was actually out there doing the job that needed to be done. So as you look at these, let's do it a very simple man. A very simple man who has strong convictions. And as you think about that, he even goes into the littlest of details in the list of details is the fact that when you look at his speech, he talks about the fact that he came into The White House in which it was really and this is the residential side. What we see as The White House, not the west wing, but The White House itself. What you see was actually gutted out during Truman's administration. The walls that you see were never taken down, but the whole inside of The White House who's living residences in the others were redone during his administration, because they were literally falling in. And he talks about that. They're for three years him and miss Truman lived in Blair house across the street and he talked about how he even talked about in the speech, how he hated going back and forth in a car. He just wanted to be able to walk. Again, this idea of a president who was not bigger than who had not bigger ideas of who he was as a compared to the job that he was doing. Now, I said earlier, he was an interesting to me why he would spend time discussing the transition period between him and Eisenhower making sure that Eisenhower got a full briefing his cabinet staff got a full briefing. So coming into their jobs, they would not be coming into coal. And I think, frankly, it goes to the very fact of how Truman became president..

Harry Truman Eisenhower Truman Washington D.C. Missouri Korea army pendergrass general Eisenhower Kansas City McKinley White House Oval Office cabinet Senate United States Blair house
Some Things You Probably Didn't Know About Harry Truman

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:15 min | 4 months ago

Some Things You Probably Didn't Know About Harry Truman

"In this speech, I want to talk about it was given on January 15th, 1953, a lot to see, but it also goes into a lot of what basically service is, is from the people like Harry Truman, who believed that their service in life was from a calling of their upbringing. He was the 33rd president who was born in 1884 and lived most of his life as I said outside independence, Missouri. Most people don't realize that he actually early in his life as he was trying to win best, his eventual wife, that he wanted to make something himself. He actually was a farmer, worked on a farm, got jobs, but he opened a haberdashery in Kansas City. So he did men's clothing. The store went okay. It didn't completely pan out. But it was a story of someone who tried in life and succeeded to appoint in business. But that was Harry Truman. This was somebody who was always trying to do more. He also served in World War I, which made a great impact on his thinking, especially as it came later. He also met the pendergrass family during his time in the army which later led him to his public life as a judge and then also which a judge in that time was more of like a county administrator. And ruler, but also he led him then to what became the United States Senate and how he got to Washington D.C.. So a lot just going on there. An interesting couple of side notes not only he had trouble getting into the army. In fact, he couldn't see. He had a very bad eyesight. Outside of his glasses. And the way he got in there is, again, a lot of great individuals in the world adapt and overcome and Harry Truman adapted and overcome. He actually memorized the eye chart. That's how he actually got past his eye exam. So a lot of stuff that went into Harry Truman's life that a lot of people may not know, he was also very accomplished piano player, played piano in The White House, played piano. A lot of places. It was a very much of an icebreaker, a lot of times for Truman. He was also one last thing before we get into this speech itself. He is the last president that we have had that did not have a college degree. And he

Harry Truman Washington D.C. Pendergrass Missouri Kansas City Army Senate United States White House Truman
"harry truman" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

The Doug Collins Podcast

04:21 min | 4 months ago

"harry truman" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

"You're navigator in a volatile world of investments. Hey everybody, it's good to have you back on the Doug Collins podcast. You know, before we get started in today's episode in which we're going to be looking at another presidential speech, Harry Truman's farewell speech to the nation, an amazing individual. I want you just to know I need your help. I need you to go out and take our podcast, like it, share it, comment on it, wherever you get your podcasts from anywhere you download Spotify Apple, Google, wherever you get your podcasts, and need you to make sure that you subscribe to our podcast, but also if you would do me a favor, like it, comment on it, share it with others. Some people may not know about the podcast. What can you do to help me share this because if we continue to take this conservative message after about a cold conservative lifestyle, we got a lot of great things coming up and then I want you to be a part of so I need your help and sharing and being a part of our Doug Collins podcast family. In fact, we've got some neat stuff coming up. If you've not been to the Doug Collins podcast dot com, our website. We've got some things coming up. Join the Collins collective. It's an insider look at what we do here on the podcast, but also things coming up. And I'm just giving you a treat right now. Go there, sign up for the Collins collective. It's simple. Don't call you a thing, but you're gonna get some interesting information coming in the next couple of weeks about some big things coming in September. I want to tip you off, but I can't go to the website and get ready for it today. But let's get started in what we've got today. I've gotten so much comments back from you talking about these speeches and going back to the one we did the speech by Reagan at the end of the year where we put out the time for choosing speech and that rendezvous with destiny that Reagan spoke of and we've talked about the speeches of George Washington and Eisenhower. And Ronald Reagan's last speech that we just did just this past week. Today I want to jump into one that's a little bit interesting for me. It's one of a historical context. I've always thought when I was in Washington and serving in Congress, I always viewed it as an honor, a privilege. It was something that I looked at as a duty. Not just to myself and my family to do the my best I could, but to the people that I represented. Harry Truman was an interesting, interesting individual. This is a man who, again, if you look at it, you would never say, if you took his background, you would never believe that this gentleman would have become president. Much less a senator or anything else. He started off in his life in Missouri. He lived most of his life in independence, Missouri, just outside of Kansas City. Small lived on a farm, very shy, very socially at times if you read biographies about him very socially and awkward. In fact, there's a book. I went to the Truman library. And he actually kept an office in the trim and library up until the time he died in the early 70s. He kept an office and that office is still left the way he left it the day that the last time he was there. And if you look around, you see the simple realities of a man from the Midwest. You see a simple reality of someone who believed that his part in history was important, but that really he wasn't the important part. He viewed what he did is out of a Call of Duty and respect for a country that he loved. And one of the books is I was leaving and I'm a big book person. And as we look at it going forward, I won't talk about books. And one of the books though that I bought there in his presidential library was a book called the accidental president. And I thought to myself when I first looked at this book, I said, they're actually selling this book in president Truman's presidential library. Because if you read the title, the accidental president, you almost, you know, get this idea of that, you know, the old movie that many of you may have forgotten or wanted to forget from about 20 years ago called Dave, where they found this guy who was the identical twin of a president that is doppelganger, and he became president for a little bit. And that was the accidental president. But this was talking about a man who led us at one of the most vital times in our country's history. You can talk about FDR and how he got us through the depression and through World War and into World War II and started that process of defeating nazism and the totalitarianism around the world, but it was true when they finished it up, got us out of that war into what would be the post war growth and troubles and trials that was afflicting the world at the point..

Doug Collins Harry Truman Reagan Truman library Missouri Collins Eisenhower Ronald Reagan Apple George Washington Google Congress Kansas City Washington Midwest Truman Dave depression
Harry Truman: A Simple Man and the 'Accidental President'

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:25 min | 4 months ago

Harry Truman: A Simple Man and the 'Accidental President'

"Always thought when I was in Washington and serving in Congress, I always viewed it as an honor, a privilege. It was something that I looked at as a duty. Not just to myself and my family to do the my best I could, but to the people that I represented. Harry Truman was an interesting, interesting individual. This is a man who, again, if you look at it, you would never say, if you took his background, you would never believe that this gentleman would have become president. Much less a senator or anything else. He started off in his life in Missouri. He lived most of his life in independence, Missouri, just outside of Kansas City. Small lived on a farm, very shy, very socially at times if you read biographies about him very socially and awkward. In fact, there's a book. I went to the Truman library. And he actually kept an office in the trim and library up until the time he died in the early 70s. He kept an office and that office is still left the way he left it the day that the last time he was there. And if you look around, you see the simple realities of a man from the Midwest. You see a simple reality of someone who believed that his part in history was important, but that really he wasn't the important part. He viewed what he did is out of a Call of Duty and respect for a country that he loved.

Harry Truman Missouri Truman Library Congress Washington Kansas City Midwest
Congress honors WWII hero of Iwo Jima with ultimate salute

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 5 months ago

Congress honors WWII hero of Iwo Jima with ultimate salute

"World War twos last remaining Medal of Honor recipient has been given another rare honor in the capital Herschel woody Williams was just 5 6 135 pounds Not the biggest marine Yet he was a force of nature on the battlefield House speaker Nancy Pelosi among those paying tribute to Williams who died last month at 98 He is just the 7th private citizen to lie in honor in the capital rotunda 77 years after Harry Truman awarded him the Medal of Honor for his actions on Iwo Jima With the number of World War II veterans dwindling senator Joe Manchin from Williams home state of West Virginia says this tribute was fitting He was the greatest of the greatest generation Sagar Meghani Washington

Woody Williams Nancy Pelosi Williams Harry Truman Senator Joe Manchin House West Virginia Sagar Meghani Washington
Last remaining World War II Medal of Honor recipient to lie in honor at US Capitol

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 5 months ago

Last remaining World War II Medal of Honor recipient to lie in honor at US Capitol

"A World War II hero who passed away Wednesday will lie in honor at the U.S. capitol Herschel woody Williams was the last remaining World War II recipient of the Medal of Honor the nation's highest award for military valor when he died last week at the age of 98 At age 22 he received his medal from president Harry Truman for heroics during the battle for Iwo Jima in 1945 a marine Corporal Williams went ahead of his unit and took out Japanese machine gun positions The West Virginia native went on to become a longtime veteran service representative and is also remembered for helping gold star families with an annual motorcycle fundraiser In a statement House speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer said that Williams will lie in honor at the rotunda of the U.S. capitol at a date to be announced Schumer described Williams as an American hero who embodied the best of our country and the greatest generation

Herschel Woody Williams Corporal Williams President Harry Truman U.S. West Virginia Chuck Schumer Nancy Pelosi Williams Senate House Schumer
"harry truman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:00 min | 5 months ago

"harry truman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Us a new way to see this old issue. Ruth Bader Ginsburg said she would have preferred to see the court focus not on row, but on a different case, one that had come up in that same term. The case brought by air force nurse Susan struck. Here's the guardian's Jessica Glen's. Harry Truman signed an executive order in 1951, saying that service women could not be mothers, whether by birth or adoption or any other way, pregnancy meant automatic discharge. Once the military discovered captain Susan struck was pregnant, her supervisors were unmoved by her plea to give up her baby for adoption. Take a short leave to recover and then return to her job. She was ordered to leave camron base the next morning and go back to a base on the West Coast. We were having my going away party and all of a sudden I remembered that I had promised myself I would write camera on days sucks on the officers club movie screen before I left months before she had arrived at the base after hours in transit and told there was no food available. She hated the place right away. I remembered it about 10 o'clock at night, past curfew. And so I asked Friends, oh my God, we got to do something. We got to do something. He said, what? I said, can't tell you, I said, but we need some red paint. She showed us the photograph and there it was. CRB sucks, an act of defiance spelled out in huge red letters. Back in the states, there was more to come. A 26 year old air force captain, a nurse, unmarried, expects a baby within a few days, and so the air force is trying to discharge her, but she has blocked it in court by this weekend she figures to be the first officer ever to the air force's knowledge to have a baby on active duty. The legal battle spiked her blood pressure and she spent the last two weeks of her pregnancy in a hospital. Tanya was born in December and she stayed with struck until just after Christmas. Then it was time to hand her over to friends. I flew up to Nebraska to hand over Kanye to them and to sign the

Susan struck Jessica Glen Ruth Bader Ginsburg air force Harry Truman camron West Coast Tanya Nebraska Kanye
Steven Hayward: Joe Biden Threatens Oil CEOs

Mark Levin

01:26 min | 5 months ago

Steven Hayward: Joe Biden Threatens Oil CEOs

"Steven Hayward is a good guy he's a smart guy He's a scholar And he's writing for a site called the pipeline It's not about Heroin and Hunter Biden No the pipeline is about oil He points out senator Joe Biden followed up his war on energy Beginning the day took office With a direct threat wrapped in the flag on Wednesday demanding in a letter to oil company CEOs that they increased production while complaining about their profit margin There's no question Putin is principally responsible for the intense financial pain in the American people and their families are bearing but at a time of war We find a profit margins well above normal being passed directly onto Americans are unacceptable He says his verbally challenge press person corinne Jean ville followed up with a vague threat that Biden might invoke the defense production act Or some other executive power The fate of president Harry Truman's seizure the steel industry in 1952 which was declared unconstitutional Even by a by a pro new deal Supreme Court must've fallen out of the Biden White House history of books

Steven Hayward Hunter Biden Senator Joe Biden Ceos Corinne Jean Ville Putin Biden Harry Truman Supreme Court White House
Ronald Reagan's Evolution From FDR Democrat to 'Happy Republican'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:29 min | 6 months ago

Ronald Reagan's Evolution From FDR Democrat to 'Happy Republican'

"He is a good friend of America first. Professor Paul kango. Welcome back to one on one. Yeah, thanks, Seth. You are in. How did you put it the in salubrious fetid swamp of D.C.? I love that. I got to write that down. That is one of my line is the in salubrious fetid swamp. Yes, indeed. So we've got to have a sense of humor. We've got to be happy warriors is Reagan taught us. But that prediction that I played, even to somebody who's not a talk radio host, somebody who looks at history, dispassionately, it seems like we may have arrived at his prediction, though. Well, it's interesting that Serrano Reagan, who had been a liberal, right? In fact, he described himself as a hemophiliac liberal, a bleeding heart liberal. And we're here talking, this would be Reagan died June 5th, 2004. So this is going on 20 years, almost the 20 year anniversary, I guess, of his death. 18 years ago, this past June. But his life, you know, he saw all of these ideologies, Seb, he had been an FDR Democrat. He had voted for Harry Truman, his father loved FDR. He admired FDR, and then he slowly, through an evolution because of a number of different reasons, among other things, working for General Electric, GE theater and seeing how private enterprise really worked. And also seeing in Hollywood communists dealing with marxists who called themselves

Paul Kango Serrano Reagan Reagan Seth D.C. America SEB Harry Truman General Electric GE Hollywood
WSJ: Baby Formula Shortage Worsens, Hitting Low-Income Families Hard

Mark Levin

01:49 min | 6 months ago

WSJ: Baby Formula Shortage Worsens, Hitting Low-Income Families Hard

"And so all the talk about Our children and look look what's failed Now the non Harry Truman were the buck never stops at his desk Blames everything on everybody else But here's The Wall Street Journal Baby formula shortage worsens hitting low income families hardest So we're going to Brown out some blackouts shortages of electricity We're going to have shortages of gasoline and oil We're going to have food shortages generally It's coming they tell us And now new data suggests that U.S. baby formula shortage is deepening Particularly hitting states in the south and the southwest Well who cares about that right Northeastern liberals right California liberals who cares about that Nationally 23% of powdered baby formula was out of stock one quarter in the week ended May 22 compared with 21% during the previous week according to the latest figures from market research firm IRI The week first week of January and before the recall of formula produced by Abbott labs 11% of powdered baby firmly was out of stock because of pandemic related supply chain shortages and inflation How many of you have before before this time lived through a supply chain shortage None of us How in the hell can you still blame the virus for this or Putin You can't

Harry Truman The Wall Street Journal Brown Abbott Labs IRI U.S. California Putin
"harry truman" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

The Doug Collins Podcast

03:18 min | 8 months ago

"harry truman" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

"Ability. Harry Truman understood that an interesting discussion in a final point of this. It was not a part of the speech after he gave. But when he got back and left, this was far beyond the times of the Secret Service and the post presidential memoirs and setup that we have now for our presidents with money and the government in providing for them. Harry and bass went to the training station basically alone in Washington D.C. and they traveled back and it was sort of interesting if you look at the Truman biography, if you look to determine movie, they portray this fairly well. That he was sort of by himself. He went from one day from being president the next day being, frankly, average Harry Truman playing citizen as he speaks of in his speech. He was graded when he got back to Missouri, but it is just amazing today that it was a simple goodbye from a simple man who we may have disagreed on policy and may have just renal social policy and healthcare and other things. But at the end of the day, he was a man who, as he said, and he's saying, hey, I was given a job and I did the job. And the buck stops with him. You know, in our society today, probably would be a lot better if our leaders understood that concept that the buck stops with them, and that when they bring other people into the mix, they bring others to do the best that they can and when everyone's tried for the greater good America is that it's strongest. That was Harry Truman's message to the country. I think it's a message that we can take today and applying it to the political strife that we're going through because if America is weak, the world is weak. When America is strong, they can look to those shining light on the hill as Reagan said and understand that freedom is still the most powerful Beacon in the world that overcomes ideologies when people can yearn to breathe free and see it lived out. That was Truman's message. That was the message I think that is appropriate for today. So you go out, have a great day, look forward to seeing you again. Hey everybody, I just want to talk about sleep. You know why I want to talk about sleep? It's because I just got out from underneath my pillow bedsheets and my pillow that I keep under my head every night because I like to sleep on my side I'll actually sleep on my back a lot sleep you know I move at night and my pillow is just the best thing that goes under my head. It keeps me getting restless sleep. The sheets are amazing. It's just what you need. Everybody understands you need 7 hours of sleep. Why not sleep in some of the best products out there? And Mike and the folks at my pillow are great folks to do this with and you can go to my pillow dot com or you can call them at 805 6 four 8 four 7 5. You'd code word Collins. COL INS, you won't want to miss this. If you have not got these geezer bedsheets, you need them. They're amazing. They're soft. They don't wear out the you need those to get that sleep against your body at night and provide that cooling just soothing nature. They let you get the most sleep. But you know, they're not just about bed sheets and pillows. They also have the my slippers, amazing. I don't wear, I've talked to you about it before. I don't wear slippers, but I do wear my slippers. They're amazingly comfortable. You can wear them outside. You can wear them inside. Great products. You've got towels. You've got all kinds of stuff. Go to my pillow dot com. It's spring cleaning time. It's spring time to get out there and try and buy new things, replace some of your old stuff. You'll run a place your towels, get some other products for your bedroom, all at my pillow dot.

Harry Truman Washington D.C. America Secret Service Harry bass Missouri Truman Reagan Collins Mike
Harry Truman: A Simple Goodbye From a Simple Man

The Doug Collins Podcast

00:57 sec | 8 months ago

Harry Truman: A Simple Goodbye From a Simple Man

Harry Truman Always Believed in People and Their Ability to Work

The Doug Collins Podcast

00:33 sec | 8 months ago

Harry Truman Always Believed in People and Their Ability to Work

Harry Truman Was Determined to Avoid Isolationism

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:14 min | 8 months ago

Harry Truman Was Determined to Avoid Isolationism

Harry Truman Would Not Let US Return to Isolationism After WWII

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:57 min | 8 months ago

Harry Truman Would Not Let US Return to Isolationism After WWII

"Isolationist was rampant through the after the World War I up until we actually got into World War II. Roosevelt dealt with this in his entire first part of his terms several terms dealing with rod up until World War II. It is firmly believed and you read the writing, you can see his understanding that Roosevelt understood that by the time Hitler was moving, we saw the occupations that he was making and the emphatic discussions from Churchill is that America was going to be into this war at some point. The question was, is when we would get into it. And I think if politically speaking, he would have probably gotten into it earlier, had it not been for the isolationist sentiment here in America. Now let's think about what this isolationist sentiment in America then. It was led by folks like Charles Lindbergh, national heroes who said, look, we only need to be concentrating on here inside our border. We only need to be a part of what we need to say to deal with our country as it exists. And the rest of the world needs to take care of itself. That was the isolation viewpoint. Frankly, if you look at TV and you look at others right now, you will see that that is becoming the discussion that we have right now among isolationist viewpoints and the effect of that of America not being a active world later. Now, I am of the opinion we don't need to be the America's police force. America is not the world's police force. We don't go into every idea and every part and say we're going to fix the problems everywhere. We're going to be a part of making sure though that the world is kept in check because frankly you can not view America and isolation anymore. Truman understood this after World War I into World War II. You have to be sort of understanding that isolationist viewpoint had a great deal of effect on how he dealt with

America Roosevelt Charles Lindbergh Hitler Churchill Truman
"harry truman" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

The Doug Collins Podcast

05:16 min | 8 months ago

"harry truman" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

"So it's interesting to see in this speech, I want to talk about it was given on January 15th, 1953, a lot to see, but it also goes into a lot of what basically service is, is from the people like Harry Truman, who believed that their service in life was from a calling of their upbringing. He was the 33rd president who was born in 1884 and lived most of his life as I said outside independence, Missouri. Most people don't realize that he actually early in his life as he was trying to win best, his eventual wife, that he wanted to make something himself. He actually was a farmer, worked on a farm, got jobs, but he opened a haberdashery in Kansas City. So he did men's clothing. The store went okay. It didn't completely pan out. But it was a story of someone who tried in life and succeeded to appoint in business. But that was Harry Truman. This was somebody who was always trying to do more. He also served in World War I, which made a great impact on his thinking, especially as it came later. He also met the pendergrass family during his time in the army which later led him to his public life as a judge and then also which a judge in that time was more of like a county administrator. And ruler, but also he led him then to what became the United States Senate and how he got to Washington D.C.. So a lot just going on there. An interesting couple of side notes not only he had trouble getting into the army. In fact, he couldn't see. He had a very bad eyesight. Outside of his glasses. And the way he got in there is, again, a lot of great individuals in the world adapt and overcome and Harry Truman adapted and overcome. He actually memorized our eye chart. That's how he actually got past his eye exam. So a lot of stuff that went into Harry Truman's life that a lot of people may not know, he was also very accomplished piano player, played piano in The White House, played piano. A lot of places. It was a very much of an icebreaker, a lot of times for Truman. He was also one last thing before we get into this speech itself. He is the last president that we have had that did not have a college degree. And he was the first since McKinley in the 1800s. They did not have a college degree. And since then, of course, there's not many president that we have had since. It is not had a college degree. So very interesting part. So as we dig into this speech, as we've dug into all these speeches, I look for things that speak to us today and speak to this art of what I do call it as an art of public service. And the first thing that you see in him is the duty of the job. And for most people, if you start thinking about a speech that he's giving to the American people from the Oval Office in 1953, you know, he would think he would start off in a bigger fashion in a bigger way. But what he really starts off with is he starts talking about the inauguration of general Eisenhower. In fact, he talks about the next Tuesday that Eisenhower will be inaugurated president. And that he's going to go back home to be and I love how he works as he said, he said, I'm going back home to independence, Missouri. I will once again be a plain private citizen of this great republic. He knew his position. He knew he knew his calling in life and he knew who he was. There was never a pretense about the president Truman in his life. But he goes on and it's interesting he speaks of a couple of three or four paragraphs here where he talks about the role of his role in helping Eisenhower make the transition. I understand they were not the best of Friends. Eisenhower and Truman did not see eye to eye on a lot of things, especially Korea. And things that were going on and Truman felt off put by Eisenhower. He never considered himself to be of a showy class and with Eisenhower's role in the big names in that he and big jobs that he had held during World War II. I think there's probably a little bit of an inferiority complex. I would only way to determine if you look at the reading of history and through the graph is up for him and so they didn't get along very well, but he understood the beauty of his job and for one president who put in perspective and we'll talk about this in a moment. He talks about how he became president of this speech, and I think this emphasized the first few paragraphs here. We talked about the transition. Can you imagine in how he talks about this transition with Eisenhower, how each of the cabinet secretaries worked with Eisenhower's potential cabinet secretary, how he sat down with Eisenhower and told him, you know, where things were. He felt a real sense to make sure that the transition went smoothly because even though he was not a fan of Eisenhower's politically, he understood that the office of president still had to go on. I think that speaks a lot to us today about what it means to have a duty of a high office in public life to make sure that the next person understands what to do, how to do it. They may bring their own stamp to it and we may disagree with it, but the people.

president Truman Eisenhower Washington D.C. Truman pendergrass Missouri army Kansas City McKinley general Eisenhower Senate Oval Office White House United States Korea cabinet
Who Was Harry Truman Outside of the Presidency?

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:15 min | 8 months ago

Who Was Harry Truman Outside of the Presidency?

A Look Back at the Life of Dwight Eisenhower

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:37 min | 9 months ago

A Look Back at the Life of Dwight Eisenhower

"Of course, was the 34th president of the United States. He served from 53 to 61. Sort of the capstone of his career, you know, most do knowing his president, but most know him again as he is being the supreme ally commander in Europe at the end of World War II and leading the offensive of all of our allies against the axis forces and Hitler and Nazi Germany. These all playing together for this became his final speech and there's a lot written about Eisenhower and I would encourage you just to the wood of Washington. If you want to know more about the man themselves, you want to know about how they grow up how they came about, I would encourage you to read their several books out there to go read about them because they're fascinating in their where they came from and how they got there. In fact, it's a really interesting correlation between sort of three presidents in a row and this is an extra for you podcast listeners today. For listening, you know, if you look at the middle of the century in the United States during the came out of the FDR presidency coming out of the great depression moving into World War II, you had a person who was in essence grown for politics. He was groomed in many ways and his family from his cousin to everybody to be a politician to be a leader of governor or president. That's what FDR Franklin Roosevelt was sort of groomed to be. And then you have the one who became president one of the biographies of his accidental president. Harry Truman was one who was not groomed. He came from very humble backgrounds. He came from a very working class middle of the country background and Missouri to know to the presidency. And took those took that office very seriously because of where he came from and in the desire to serve the country. And then you transition to another midwesterner in Eisenhower. So in the middle of our time frame there in which we went through The Great Depression World War II into what began the use of the atomic bomb, the use of the beginning of the Cold War. And then the space race toward the end of Eisenhower's term that was beginning, again, this buildup of nuclear power, this buildup of military power through Eisenhower's administration and even the beginnings of what we say we see the battle of Korea. And then we see the start of what would be known is from our perspective later in Eisenhower's administration owning the candidates and then Johnson's is the Vietnam War.

Eisenhower Fdr Franklin Roosevelt United States Hitler FDR Germany Europe Washington Harry Truman Depression Missouri Eisenhower's Administration Korea Johnson Vietnam
Former Secretary of Veterans Affairs Robert Wilkie on Trump's Unique Geopolitical Perspective

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:21 min | 1 year ago

Former Secretary of Veterans Affairs Robert Wilkie on Trump's Unique Geopolitical Perspective

"Explain to those who are listening to the millions of people who support president Trump. What was you need about his geopolitical perspective? Interesting that you put it that way because I'll talk about him being Truman esque in one sense. Okay. But he looked at the world from the perspective that America was the indispensable nation. But America wasn't the inexhaustible nation. Very good. And as a result of that, we would do everything that we could. To make sure that our Friends had what they needed to defend themselves. And even though he didn't articulate it this way, it's very much going back to Harry Truman and George Marshall. They have dropped on their desk that that telegram that document from mister X, George cannon. It says gentlemen, this is a threat that the likes of which we've never seen. And immediately, the Truman doctrine is in place. We're going to ship arms to Greece, we're going to ship arms to turkey. We are going to make sure that even though we can't be everywhere. People who share our values. And people who share our contempt and hatred of communism. Will be ready to

President Trump America Truman George Cannon George Marshall Harry Truman Greece Turkey
"harry truman" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"harry truman" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"26 46 Is passionate just pathetic He's funny Get out the phone you big dope And you always learn something My glove end is on the radio The first is got a lot of power It makes me feel like you make me feel like You know what let's slip in a call here first rich Joseph statin was Joseph's there I'm in Ken close San Francisco California the great kso Ken how are you Oh what a pleasure this is to speak to you Mark Put it on Thank you Your comments about the atom bomb dropping really struck a nerve with me today And how despicable they are because one other thing that Harry Truman also did is he sent dangerous missions prior to each bomb drop into all of the possible targets to these and dropped 7 million leaflets in Japanese warning them that there was going to be a major bombing attack in that there's on the target list to try and prevent as many civilian casualties as possible Is it not amazing to you the the contempt that these people who really have achieved nothing there they are phony achievers they are promoted by these corrupt media outlets among other places How quickly they're able to condemn somebody like a Harry Truman or condemn the United States military or condemned Thomas Jefferson and on and on These people are unaccomplished but for the fact that they are promoted by frauds in the culture They've done nothing to support this country In fact they do everything they can to tear it down Does it not amaze you How they get away with this And everything that they have earned and this country has given them or that they have taken from this country and how they are the richest or they are a part of the top 1% and we're talking about the left here And the media The media are the most phony corrupt overpay group of individuals in the country They really are They're disgusting And I believe in a free press I don't believe in a tyrannical press And that's what we're dealing with A tyrannical press And your book was absolutely right And on our side note I'm going to Tampa over Thanksgiving and my gift for my nephew who just started college this year is I bought a second copy of your new book Thank you First copy from premiere for a signed copy for myself and read it And I bought a second book so that my nephew could make it through his first year of college without being lied to and not understand all the lives So that's what I'm hoping for I'm hoping more and more people do that I'm hoping they bring the book to Thanksgiving I mean it's really not something to fight over It's something to tell people read this Read this it may actually change your life It may actually change your entire perspective on things And if we don't get to him before his professors get to him we have a chance That's what I believe And that's what I hope parents and grandparents out there will do Thanksgivings no better place than handed out All right my friend thank you very very much I appreciate it All right mister producer I am how much time do we have Uh oh That's not a lot All right let me look here By the show went fast what happened I'm looking for this ladies and genius style on my computer We're working on it And I'm going to get a new computer to mar and see what we can do about it You know you have homeowners insurance for good reason Because without it a fire flood or burglary could destroy you financially right But there's another major crime.

Joseph statin Harry Truman Joseph Thomas Jefferson San Francisco California Mark United States Tampa
Nikole Hannah-Jones Says U.S. Dropped Bombs on Japan for Financial Reasons

Mark Levin

01:37 min | 1 year ago

Nikole Hannah-Jones Says U.S. Dropped Bombs on Japan for Financial Reasons

"Nicole Hannah Jones tweets over at the federalist they picked it up Sean Fleetwood New York magazine writer and founder of the 1619 Project the call Hannah Jones took to Twitter this week to offer historically illiterate take on why the United States bond Hiroshima during World War II In a course she was promoted by The New York Times or 1619 project cronut but a New York Times Historical scholars from every walk of life came out and said she doesn't know what the hell she's talking about but it doesn't matter You see And now deleted November 6th tweet Jones attempted to argue that the only reason the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the Japanese city was due to financial reasons All you World War II vets listen to this She said they dropped the bomb They I guess meaning her country America When they knew surrender was coming because they'd spent all this money developing it and to prove it was worth it She wrote propaganda's not history my friend Now that is unbelievable She is a complete idiot She is a complete idiot Their first bomb was dropped and then the second bomb was dropped because Japan refused to accept unconditional surrender And that's what Harry Truman insisted on She is a historical illiterate but she can push her Pablo her hate for this country and there's not a single corrupt media platform that wouldn't love to

Nicole Hannah Jones Sean Fleetwood Hannah Jones The New York Times New York Magazine America Hiroshima Twitter Jones Harry Truman Japan Pablo
"harry truman" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"harry truman" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Has you know if I can mention Harry Truman on WABC I think I can get away with it He would speak and people would y'all give them hell Harry and he would say I don't give him hell I tell the truth I just think his help Well you know you reach a point in life and it happens as we get older Is that you're not afraid to take positions You know when we begin as members of the clergy I had a friend of mine who's to say when you start as a member of the clergy you feel badly if you have one enemy in the congregation And when you conclude your career you hope you still have one friend in the congregation You know because you're able to be a little more public about positions perhaps you don't protective of your security Once you've been out there but it's not easy You have to navigate It's a minefield When you're in the pulpit where you're in politics taking positions comes with consequences But that's the price you have to pay If you want to be a respected leader people may not like you but they're not going to like you anymore when you're like a chameleon You know when you apply able yeah and you switch back and forth And look I tell you people respect you when you take a position and you know it's part of your moral conviction especially as a clergy person So I think that celebrated rabbi I think it would make us more valuable and respected by our own congregation Look I've got a congregation of tens of thousands of people They don't all agree with me I'll tell you right now Yeah But I've got Republicans I've got independence you know But they may disagree but they still respect you Because they know our clergy person are reverend speaks from a place of moral conviction And we can disagree with that But you know we can't diminish or can't deny that he speaking for what he thinks is the right position to take as opposed to these I was talked about these computer commandos These people who send out all of these nonsensical emails not based on any fact just all very often hyperbolic they don't even use their real names very often You know I was listening to one of the programs with a played a recording of the threats a representative up to Michigan got because he voted for the infrastructure Bill It was disgusting I mean it was rarely disgraceful And you think to yourself who are you That you can make it like a death threat on elected official because he took a vote on infrastructure But that's a tough one Robbie because I will tell you one of the things that makes our country special is the fact that we can say what we're feeling We can say what we're thinking The problem is when we pass it off as truth instead of saying this is my opinion This is my perspective This is my commentary But no we're putting it off as this is the truth This is verifiable fact when it isn't verifiable You know and not even a fact There is room for disagreement There is room for a heated debate There is no room for human denigration And to call it to say you should die your staff should die and very often you know the Nazi word is used I come from a family of survivors and when people throw around this Nazi word it infuriates me It is so offensive I've heard the vaccine now becomes the yellow star of the badge of shame or whatever I think the craziness out there That's what I can not accept Argue but don't be crazy You know don't be combative but not combatively look to destroy someone We've taken the words I beg to differ with I'm entitled to attack you Mercilessly mercilessly and I don't have and I don't I don't have to base it on fact I can tell you based on pure emotion and you know you wonder what drives these people to behave this way When did we become faculty You know And feckless in terms of not giving you know you're not giving your identity But that's social media has allowed cowards to come off as these brave people with I can say anything they want So and it's assassinated and the money I don't think about the money There are people who are doing it knowing that they don't agree at all with what they're saying and what they are preaching But it makes money Because followers it draws viewers you know They make millions of dollars off of it That's right And that's tough That's why we have a responsibility all of us wherever we are to promote people who take positions some of which we disagree with but yet take them based upon what they feel is principle Those are the people that need to be highlighted Those people that need to be commended I mean I'd love to you invite a speaker to a congregation or you might speak to any program you say I disagree sharply with this person but I admire You know the courageous stance he or she is willing to take take the heat And then are you on the merits You know I come from a ton mutic tradition Arguments Jewish traditions replete with arguments The talmud is predicated on disagreement And yet the scholars respected each other They didn't you know they didn't belittle the person As a matter of fact they commended the person's scholarship and yet they were ready to take a different position and they continued the relationship Their kids were families into the families of one another You mean I can say to you I respectfully disagree with you but and then make my point Yeah You know what Those words I'm afraid those words are becoming part of ancient history Right The word was the word respect is becoming you know arcane Where you see some of the things that are said today and done today is a with respect Why do they behave this way What are the parents like You.

WABC Harry Truman Harry rabbi Robbie Michigan
"harry truman" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

The Stuttering John Podcast

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"harry truman" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

"He met with governors and state legislatures all over the country. He was a guest of the American medical association. All kinds of medical associations and hospital associations. Everybody loved the guy. All the white people anyway, and that's who had all the power in America at that time. And so in 1914, when Teddy Roosevelt proposed as part of his early 1912, excuse me, proposed as part of his square deal program. He was running for reelection, a national single payer healthcare system. The response from in particular the south, 60% of African Americans live in the south. So from white southern racists, was, but wait a minute, if we give healthcare to everybody, black people will get it. We can't, you know, hark, but hop on, you know? And so Teddy Roosevelt had to abandon that. So then, in 1936, and Franklin Roosevelt proposed. Hold on Tom, so he succumb to the white supremacists now. Well, basically what happened was he didn't get elected. And, you know, but when that issue was debated as it were, Teddy Roosevelt never backed down. But it wouldn't have gone anywhere. And the rebuttal always was that. You know, we don't want black people to have healthcare. You can't have it universal. The same thing in 1936 and Franklin Roosevelt proposed it. It was but what about black people? And in 1947, when Harry Truman proposed a single payer national healthcare system. But what about black people? And similarly in 61, when John Kennedy proposed it, you know, it was the same thing. And then in 65, when Lyndon Johnson was writing the Medicare bill with Robert ball, the southern democratic they were Democrats then the Republicans now, but the dixiecrats, the southern white racist senators, the strong thurmans and whatnot..

Teddy Roosevelt American medical association Franklin Roosevelt America Tom Harry Truman John Kennedy Robert ball Lyndon Johnson Medicare
"harry truman" Discussed on The Sean Hannity Show

The Sean Hannity Show

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"harry truman" Discussed on The Sean Hannity Show

"Did he do that. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Bomb them into <Speech_Male> a obliterated <Speech_Male> them <Speech_Male> or no handcuffs. <Speech_Male> Rules of <Speech_Male> engagement. Like <Speech_Male> biden and obama <Silence> didn't exist <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> if you're gonna fight <Speech_Male> a war against <Speech_Male> evil <SpeakerChange> that's <Silence> your only option. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> That's it <Speech_Male> you fight <Silence> you win. <Speech_Male> No <Silence> other option <Silence> <Speech_Male> was <Speech_Male> it wrong. <Speech_Male> For harry truman <Speech_Male> to drop <Speech_Male> those bombs on <Speech_Male> hiroshima-nagasaki. <Speech_Male> All these years later <Speech_Male> it's still debated <Silence> by many people to me. <Speech_Male> He <Speech_Male> made the right. Decision <Speech_Male> is a <Speech_Male> terrible is a <Silence> catastrophic. <Speech_Male> Is it <Speech_Male> sad. <Silence> Yup <Silence> <Speech_Male> who <Silence> started that war <Silence> <Speech_Male> who attacked <Silence> pearl harbor <Silence> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> and i'm provoked <Speech_Male> attack <Silence> sneak attack. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Who killed all <Speech_Male> the uss arizona <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> killed all those <Silence> americans. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Remember <SpeakerChange> the comment <Speech_Male> but japan's <Speech_Male> leader. I think <Silence> it was to- joe i don't remember <Silence> <Speech_Male> we. <Speech_Male> Just i've fear <Speech_Male> that we've just awaken <Speech_Male> the sleeping giant <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and then america <Silence> mobilized <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Male> and this was <Silence> a <Speech_Male> <Silence> nationwide effort <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> guys like my father <Speech_Male> spent <Speech_Male> four years in the navy <Speech_Male> when <Silence> out to fight <Speech_Male> but back <Speech_Male> home <Speech_Male> the support <Speech_Male> from people that either <Speech_Male> were disqualified <Speech_Male> from being able <Silence> to serve <Speech_Male> or all <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> america's women <Speech_Male> rose to <Speech_Male> the occasion producing <Speech_Male> all of the weapons. <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Male> the ships <Speech_Male> the the the <Speech_Male> tanks <Speech_Male> the weaponry <Speech_Male> that munitions <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> to fight that war <Silence> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> and win it <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> victory in <SpeakerChange> europe <Speech_Male> victory. Over japan <Speech_Music_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and america was <Silence> victorious. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> America just left <Silence> have ghanistan <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> the most <Speech_Male> humiliating <Silence> fashion <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> all of it was preventable <Silence> easily. <Silence> <Speech_Male> His joe <Speech_Male> knew that they were on <Speech_Male> the march. We <Speech_Male> now know for a fact <Speech_Male> he knew <Speech_Male> and he was asking <Speech_Male> the afghani president <Silence> to lie <Speech_Male> and he <Speech_Male> didn't lift a finger <Speech_Male> when we controlled <Speech_Male> kabul. <Speech_Male> And we could've <Speech_Male> evacuated <Speech_Male> every american <Speech_Male> every afghan <Speech_Male> ally <Speech_Male> and take it all of our <Silence> equipment home <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and he didn't <Silence> do it <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> and the <Speech_Male> new york post is <Speech_Male> right. Every life is <Speech_Male> on joe. Blood is on <Speech_Male> joe's hands. <Speech_Male> That's right. <Silence> He did this <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> he he <Speech_Male> allowed this to <Silence> happen. <Speech_Male> Never <Speech_Male> in my life <Silence> that i ever think. <Speech_Male> The united <Speech_Male> states of america <Speech_Male> would leave a single <Silence> citizen behind <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> not knowing <Speech_Male> how many behind <Speech_Male> enemy lines <Speech_Male> is. I don't know <Silence> if We'll continue <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> ladies. <Speech_Female> We were going to be <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> all of this and all <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of that too right. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Like i'm a mom <Speech_Female> and a manager and adventurer <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and an advocate. <Speech_Female>

harry truman america biden japan joe obama arizona navy kabul europe new york post
"harry truman" Discussed on Against All Odds with Cousin Sal

Against All Odds with Cousin Sal

09:00 min | 1 year ago

"harry truman" Discussed on Against All Odds with Cousin Sal

"Hedge against. This is all confusing. Todd firmin's big bucks bet. He gains fa- futures bed on fox. Bat live so i had. I need the box. I wanted to bring the bucks down to even or something so i could have done box combined with each team scoring at least one hundred points which they did the sun's disk they had brought at ninety nine with a minute left and they scored like with almost no talk and booker. They let booker go with easy layup. But anyway i stayed away from that and took this market chev- moneyline like you told me and now you're saying it's like the way i think he's gonna win easily market. Chevy's been well the problem. The reason i'm taking the distance house because market chef to win on points is minus one. Twenty the fight to go the distance as minus twenty four. So i just. I just figured actor pretty much the same number i just get the added benefit of i mean he's a minus seven. How knockout even also knock. I could not get plus three thirty by market chavez of submission by him Fifty which. I got to do the double chin. Yeah you can do the job. Knockout and submission. I mean it's very possible. I mean look. He was dominated by. Kitchen was dominic against dober- who i think is a really good fighter. The only thing boys in in one thousand nine hundred has never been stopped. They've all gone the distance fi- five of his last six fights. Five last six fights have gone the distance. Although these are three round fights both guys haven't fought five round fight so Yes over five is less six point. Zero gone the distance market. I think you know Two of his last three of gone the distance at three. For he's minus. He's oh he's when he is he is dominant. He is is is an animal using kid. You could go. you could go. What would you do you go by. Tko plus submission. That's plus one forty or would you go and points minus two wait suit. Was there a tko oser. Knockout or points option. Yeah that's mine that's mine is to nats. Yeah that's the highest. Yeah all right. Let's go the distance. I think he'll he'll i think he'll win almost every round but yeah i think it's this is another one all man i. I hope we don't have to leave this up all his main event. Now he's pretty dominant not to say it's good but yeah Dhammika parlay kid Let's get back to the nba where we know. The officiating is a screwy. what your best. Yes song gonna stick ya. I have The one i gave out the other day fleetwood to finish in the top twenty right now. That would be happening. He's tied for eighteenth. It was several players to wonder couple haller to left. So that's at least as a shot on going to be taking the sons to win and crowder five or more rebounds at plus one. Oh four crowder is gone. Five straight games with over five rebounds seven of his last eight. He's gone over five rebounds. I think the sun's come out. Nah play greg game as we talked about before crowded grabs five. Boards has been very good. He had eight yesterday And that's plus one of four. So i really liked that all right. I'll go with you there. paul ince. he's the most annoying player demand the final. So let him just annoy me a little more right. Let's just re route for all you gonna look. I mean eight six ten nine five that's his rebounding totals before dad who's four. Seven cities is money with these rebounds. He's gonna get five five. Plus i like the fact that it's you know it's five or more kind of like i had cam johnson last night on my extra points pick. I actually thought. I lost Said something because it was ten or more points and he had ten. I was thinking it was like ten the ten plus ten plus and that plus one. Oh wait harry what's got deal it's got right. Can i bet that he'll wear an undershirt. I really think mine is absolutely all right. Listen It's time to take a ride on the riverboat casino. Where once in a while. The degenerate try than i set sail tackling pretend propositions based on sports and pop culture. Our friend harry here. Big time loser is lost. Last three weeks has not won a game but we love him just the same. He's turning fifty years old a half century of losing only boy yes. Fifty turns on. Friday turns fifty and goddess thinking in honor of our harry's fiftieth birthday. Who is the greatest harry to ever walk. The earth is it. Harry gagged on. Yes that's our guy minus. Four hundred. Is it harry carey. Famed chicago cubs announcer three to one odds. Harry truman president. Seven to one odds harry. Houdini famed magician twelve to one odds or the field at even odds. All right brother bribes. First of all say harrison is a much better name. Right harry is just very just seems like a nickname right. is that true areas that even Strong it's not harold. Harold vanass many many times. What your real name and on my birth certificate. Say harry. i'm actually a junior ari junior. I can't believe they have birt's just to give the doctor a non lottery ticket and say thank you. That sounds right. I do like harry carey while we also have. There's harry styles give us. I guess watermelon sugar of the layout of the last year. We have harry. From harry and the hendersons which i was thinking of but he doesn't talk So i'm gonna go with go with harry done What are the all time. Great characters from from my youth dumb and dumber Yeah i think he's worthy. I mean he was the smarter of the two I know if i guess he's dumb right he's dominant and lloyd hammer So yeah you know it's It's a step up from harry. And harry done already done better hair. Better to better ari ari all right paula. Kid first of all harry. Happy fiftieth Well done it talk about against all odds right. Fifty awesome job big brother brian. I unfortunately won't be there but what we're going to be filled in all the hijinks happen. I'm going to say. We'll harry's harry's probably the most infamous harry out of those out of that list right is definitely the most infamous but than say harry houdini because he could make our harried disappear. All right. Not easy to do yeah. Hey didn't harry. Houdini die got punched in the stomach and diet guide fifty two years old. Somebody was like part of a stunt wasn't really a magical stuff. You should do that harry you. Should you know the way two years of your lucky enough to get there but at fifty to challenge someone to do the same Listen We could make fun and and pick these other guys but are harry is the answer. There's just no question. These other harry's have nothing on him. It's been a legendary fifty years. Let's break it. Down to harry. Carey ever turned down a career in broadcasting literally drive by his internship in atlanta continuing onto the bright lights of vegas where you started career as a lead professional for three days before he went flat broke down that he did not did harry. Houdini a kid harry. Houdini ever as treasurer of his dirtbag fraternity brothers to bed on monday night. Football games and those funds disappeared. That's online student apple. That's koroma lines. They went under because of harry. Harry truman ever do a podcast. In costa rica giving out his best golf picks on the phone while a prostitute nibbled on his ear. Yes did i looked at up to do that. That's actually how he got elected the second time. So there you go. Our harry wins at my one hundred hours. I'm thanks good job. Joe baby-faced joel solomon. You have anything to add here. You guys did forget about my favorite hairy a hanukkah harry of course but no of course it's a terry gag. Non part man. Part vending machine is the absolute.

harry Todd firmin booker dober crowder Dhammika cam johnson harry carey paul ince Chevy dominic bucks haller Harold vanass fox lloyd hammer Harry truman nba ari ari greg
"harry truman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:20 min | 1 year ago

"harry truman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A time you write about one of history's little noticed policy decisions directly related to steel workers fringe benefits. The public private welfare state. What does that mean? It was thought during the new deal that eventually they would be able to establish what we would today call Medicare for all. Harry Truman didn't succeed in doing that. And instead the unions that had been agitating for that decided. You know what? Let's just get the employer whether it's gmr US deal. To provide a plan through the private sector. This is really where the idea that you get your health insurance from your job comes from that over the course of the fifties, collectively bargained health insurance bread's really rapidly across the working class health care was a life changing benefit for steel workers and eventually millions of other employees around the country. Western Pennsylvania academic named Jack Metzger. Was moved to write. Quote, if what we lived through in the 19 fifties was not liberation than liberation never happens in real human lives. Wages. We're going up year after year, they would have the strikes and they would win. Had to find benefit pensions in a way that we don't have now they had this health plan that got better and better. You couldn't imagine how few dollars steel workers and their families had to put toward their health care. 1959 steel workers didn't even have Tioga tribute to the premium. They also had power on the job itself. 1959 strike was fought over The question of whether or not managers could just change job assignments arbitrarily. And they couldn't. I mean, this was written into the contract management to change the equipment, and then they could reassign people if they did that, But they couldn't just say You know what to you were doing this job before you used to do that wasn't allowed and again, that's hard to imagine today. In the post World War two period, the Americans still economy was essentially a global steel economy, the facto cartel. That for decades didn't need modernization or manufacturing efficiency to prosper just raised prices. Management and labor. Said at the same trough with ultimately disastrous consequences. Meantime, though, you write a whole social order. Had developed around single male, mostly white bread winners. The way that you get access to these benefits is either you get a job as a steel worker. If it's Pittsburgh or you make yourself illegal dependence of a steel worker, which is to say be his wife would be his kid. This creates these kind of stratified layers of who is in on this golden age and who's not in on it. And what you have to do to be in on it. There are people who don't have such an easy time getting jobs of steel workers. That's racialized. And there are people who have to kind of put up with what their husbands say, because their husbands how they have access to all of this. So a system that's supposed to deliver broad based prosperity. But is that internally divided was a really unstable configuration. So who or what was the arbiter of all that? Well, ultimately, the mill is the arbiter, right? The mill is the reason these people are here. It's the reason their parents, their grandparents came to Pittsburgh. It's what's giving them access to wages benefits. All of this. Ultimately, the household in the family are subordinate to it. And in these mill towns, you say lives were hyper gendered and Also racialized men were heavily overrepresented. Women underrepresented in waged work in Pittsburgh. Even compared to the 19 fifties norm. I didn't mean women weren't working the kinds of work that they did happened more outside of the money economy. Now that was due for white vote for African Americans, even this kind of tenuous security that white people had African Americans really couldn't hang on to it much at all. And that meant that African American women had you bring in wages at much higher rates than white women did already starting in fifties and sixties. And then that kind of goes up over time, and you know, going back all the way to the new deal itself. Domestic work, which was obviously heavily assigned to women. Was not regulated by labor law and from the forties onward healthcare work also was not protected by labor law or minimum wage or ours regulations. And so when women do have to go get these kinds of jobs. They are exiting the protected circle of the new Deal state that their husbands working. It's like they're going into a different country. The racialized structures in the mills were a sort of informal but nonetheless omnipresent Jim Crow. Come to go to job he would do for separating whites want good jobs. Blacks went to Lourdes players job all the craft jobs in the high pens. All right, folks see the black folks at all the dirty job that a white man would come in, and you had to train him. The next two weeks, he oboes in steel, and this was common in a lot of big industries In this time, seniority, which rules everything in the unionized factory was determined at the level. Of the department rather than the whole factory. Even if you were accumulating seniority, you're a long term employee. You are unlikely to be able to change what part of the plan you worked in and that I created these racialized traps in the blast furnace, which was a hot and dirty and hard job in the open heart, which is a hot and dirty and hard job. And worst of all, in the coke ovens with a baked Cole tol turn it into fuel. Is disproportionately work that was assigned African Americans and also you know African American workers because they couldn't get out of these undesirable departments. When there is a cyclical downturn, they would be the first out and the last to be hired back in And if I understand your book correctly, the unions were complicit in this. Absolutely so organizations like the U a W or the United Steel Workers United mine workers would accept African American members and sometimes embrace them. They supported civil rights nationally at the political level. But they didn't really want to disrupt this small scale pattern within the plant who got the good jobs and who didn't get the good jobs. White men who had the good jobs more less wanted to be able to pass them down to their sons. They certainly didn't want the integration of the seniority lines, and there weren't really enough African Americans inside the union to disrupt that politically, so straightforwardly We discussed earlier how the cartel's grip on the global market created. A spiral of higher wages and higher prices and higher wages and so on. Isn't that more or less the definition of an inflationary cycle? Yeah, So if you're gonna organize working class prosperity through attaching large groups of workers to big kind of monopoly employers And this is arrested. You're gonna run into and already in the late fifties. You see, this strange thing happened where inflation is starting to go up. At the same time, unemployment starting to go up and those two things they're supposed to be opposite. It's supposed to be a good one or the other. Now we would know that phenomenon in the seventies later stagflation right? It came back in a big way. But it's a kind of intrinsic feature of the new Deal. State the public private welfare system. And these big industrial corporations that were it's private sector component. This is a structural thought in that system. Meantime, another kind of inflationary phenomenon. Steelworker families really leaned into health care. Now the work was taxing, as you've said, and dangerous and the environment was foul. What does that entirely explain The medical gold rush of the Fifties sixties and seventies. No, it doesn't. So there's a couple key things. First of all, I think it's actually hard to overstate how significant itwas for people who you know, did backbreaking work all day long felt cast off and looked down on and treated like mules in different ways. They could go to this kind of modern house of science..

Harry Truman Jack Metzger Jim Crow Western Pennsylvania U a W today Pittsburgh Fifties sixties World War two late fifties 19 fifties seventies later 1959 two things United Steel Workers United African American First first Lourdes strike
"harry truman" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"harry truman" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Reading the same email. You heard elephant. I think that's what they mean. But that's hardly Oh, For a kid for five year old Be hard for a foreign any year old do If your heart's going 300 beats a minute to just say relax, it'll go away. About that. Hey, John. I have a Chicago Bears Game program, a Chicago Bears game program signed by President Harry Truman. What's it worth? We got a lot of text like that, and I don't know. We just can't take all of the calls. We get. We read some of the text, but baseball in the attic dot com is where you go baseball in the attic dot com For all of these Collective billion questions. A lot of you have and that guy over there is pretty good. I'll bet he'll give you some answers about those little jumper boxes. You can get those little portable car starters, there's a battery jumpers. 630 John. I used my little jumper box several times. It's great. It is the size of a book. You can start a car. These things cost about 100 bucks. Give or take. What a good investment. I've got One I haven't used to get that a neighbor gave it to me is a gift. What a nice guy. And so I've been carrying it around. And yesterday I made sure it was charged, you know? 815 John on battery jumpers. I carry one of my car and I've used it to jump my car in an emergency. But the real benefit is that I use it in the summer to charge my cellphone while I'm camping. John. I've been utilizing and carrying a portable cell phone iPad charger since I started traveling in Europe with you and Steve Bertrand and 2013. Not only has come in handy when traveling, but also useful and bad weather during the possibility of losing power. So if you don't have one of those things, I'm not selling them. I should be. Those would be a good thing to have. When the temperatures of this cold it's 11 15. Something in the John Kass column got a lot of you to text me today. I'll read that in a minute. Good afternoon. Would you like to try a free sample.

John Kass Steve Bertrand Chicago baseball President Harry Truman Europe
"harry truman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:09 min | 2 years ago

"harry truman" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Scott Simon. When Joe Scarborough is a Republican congressman some 20 years ago, he had portrait of two presidents on his office wall. Ronald Reagan that surprised nobody. But also Harry Truman, a Democrat who was Joe Scarborough explains in a new book was derided as a rube and a strange little man. But who has Joe says exceeded all their low expectations. His book Saving freedom. Truman the Cold War in the fight for Western civilization, Joe Scarborough. Morning, Joe and MSNBC joins us. Thanks so much for being with us, Joe. Thank you so much, Scott. It's great talking to you again. What? Nice to talk to you again. Why was Harry Truman up on your wall? You know a S O. I was raised in the 19 sixties and early seventies by conservative parents and the definition of a conservative and are in the Scarborough household was being you know, Cold warriors, and I always thought throughout high school in college when I was reading about the Cold War and studying it that You know, One of those presidents started the Cold War, and one of them ended it. And actually, the starting of the Cold War was far more difficult because Harry Truman and having to confront Stalin and having to confront the you know Soviet Union's efforts, toe expand westward. Hey, not only had deal with isolationist Republicans, but he had to push back progressives in his own party and Truman Truman was simple man compared to the Certainly Roosevelt the person he succeeded, but hey, had more difficult decisions that he had to make. And the first six months of his presidency than most commander in Chiefs have to make over two terms. Yes, we'll run those down for us, because it's kind of stunning and to a no way obviously diminish Franklin Roosevelt's leadership. You suggest that I'm on something's Truman was actually more clear eyed. But Harry Truman in an interview after he left the White House said heroes know when to die, and Truman claimed to be talking about Abraham Lincoln leaving a mess for Andrew Johnson. But actually, I think most people suspect was talking about FDR. And it's interesting for all those who think that Joe Biden is having a difficult transition right now look back to what Harry Truman had to deal with. FDR knew he was dying during the campaign, he told trim and Hey, don't fly in planes. One of us need to stay alive. Truman get sworn in knowing that he was going to be president sooner rather than later. And yet when FDR died, Harry Truman knew nothing of the Manhattan project knew knew nothing of of the secrets and government he found out after his first Cabinet meeting when Stimpson came over and said, Hey, I need to talk to you about something and Within several months, he had to make the decision on how he was going to wrap up the war in Europe, whether he was going to drop atomic bombs onto Japanese cities. And then, of course, this book's talks about what happens a year and a half later, when it becomes obvious that Stalin has designs on grace on Turkey and on Central and Western Europe and then Harry Truman has to get the action and a time when a lot of Americans were just tired of war, right? I mean, most Americans had didn't want did not want to have to confront who they considered to be a good ally during the war, they had been exhausted by four years of war. By 400,000 deaths by rationing. The last thing they wanted to do was beat Nazism back and then have to worry about Soviet communism. But that's exactly that's the you know. Harry Truman had said to his Cabinet, he said, Guys, this is gonna be the toughest selling job I'll ever have is the president is Push people out of the isolationism and peace time That really had been in the American tradition since George Washington's farewell address, Joe while we have you, I have to take advantage of the opportunity. Ask you this question. Donald Trump has been good for cable news ratings. Going to miss him is President. Oh, my God. No. Remember, Remember, the less moon vest? Quote Go bad for America. Good for cables are good for TV ratings. And I remember saying to make a my God I would take cancelation and any any moment, Iet's thoroughly exhausting and a a sort of a 24 7 news culture that's focused on Responding. The Donald Trump's latest shocks his latest tweets, and it's actually bad for America. That sort of news coverage has been bad for America. Where politics and this has been happening over the past 20 years, and the cable news deserves much of the blame, as does the political talk radio and now Facebook, But politics has become a sport. You know we even when even when I was in Congress, I could sit down and talk to the most liberal Democrat, and we could figure out a way to strike a compromise on long term care or on education reform. And we could get it done these days because it's become so tribal and become such a sport. I think, in large part because of the media, uh, it makes it impossible to strike the deal. So you have this sort of deals and Harry Truman did with, you know, Chairman Vandenberg, the past the Truman Doctrine and NATO and And make the changes He made just Scarborough. His book Saving Freedom. Thank you so much for being with us again. Take care. Thank you so much for having me..

Truman Truman Truman Harry Truman Joe Scarborough Joe president FDR Scott Simon Donald Trump Joe Biden Scarborough Ronald Reagan Stalin America Franklin Roosevelt Cabinet congressman MSNBC