27 Burst results for "Harry Houdini"

Mike Gallagher Shares That His Son Is Doing 'Really Well'

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:58 sec | 6 months ago

Mike Gallagher Shares That His Son Is Doing 'Really Well'

"Got to spend some great quality time with my two members of my family over the weekend and the Dallas Fort Worth area. My son, Trevor, who was, you know, last August in a terrible automobile accident with tons of injuries, numerous broken bones, shattered legs, shattered arm, had to kind of learn how to walk again. And he is doing really well. He went to see the lyric stage production of ragtime Saturday night in downtown Dallas at the majestic theater, an absolute brilliant production. It was so strong, it's one of my favorite musicals anyway. Tells the story of America at the turn of the century and Harry Houdini and. The genre of ragtime and racial strife and tension and the gosh did they do a great

Dallas Trevor Majestic Theater Harry Houdini America
"harry houdini" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:51 min | 6 months ago

"harry houdini" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Go for popcorn when that scene was on How long was that scene for dirty dancing It wasn't long but I haven't seen the movie in years I mean I could be wrong about that You got it You got your watch the movie again That was one of the classics right Valentine's Day special if not She was a magician Now I wouldn't say he was like a Harry Houdini style magician right Yeah No no Simple stuff Pulling a rabbit out of the hat Did he do anything else I don't remember sir I don't spend a long time That's why 35 years ago we got to reconnect with dirty dancing The other question was once in his voice resonating throughout the movie as a DJ you didn't see playing stacks of wax I don't remember that sir But I remember it was that amazing Chris skin was the guy in the Johnny Carson show That's right He could sort of read minds We call that But he didn't go out and cold bust those who were performing acts of illusion It was just certain guy who his stock and trade was to come out and bust our bubbles We would see a performance He would sit with Johnny Carson He would sit on the with Sonny Fox And he would tell us what you just saw Absolutely not real And let me show you how they did it And then all of a sudden he would Cole bust that person I know it's one 808 four 8 9 two two two that's one 808 four 8 WABC Let's go to Bruce in Manhattan Oh this kid Valentine's special Your turn to be heard here on WABC boots Okay.

Harry Houdini Chris skin Johnny Carson Valentine Sonny Fox Cole Bruce Manhattan
Senator Ted Cruz Shares His Views on the Debt Ceiling

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:52 min | 8 months ago

Senator Ted Cruz Shares His Views on the Debt Ceiling

"The debt ceiling is the limitation on the total amount of the country can borrow. And it is my view is not that we should never raise the debt ceiling. You sometimes get politicians who say that, but frankly, they're not they're not being serious or credible when they say that because you've got it varies at time to time, but it's roughly 40 cents of every dollar we spend is borrowed. So unless you're prepared to slash federal spending, 40% overnight, you're going to continue to borrow some. And by the way, there is nobody zero members of the Congress who advocate slashing 40% of spending overnight. So if that is the case, then you do have to continue to borrow. My view has always been. We should not raise the debt ceiling. Without using it as leverage to pass real meaningful structural reform that limits spending and addresses the debt that fixes the underlying problem. It doesn't have to be a magic wand. You don't have to solve all of it, you know, we don't live in we don't have Harry Houdini, who can just magically make things go away, but we should use the tools we have to address the real problem. I think that's the responsible way to do it. That's the honest way to do it. In this instance, for several months the position of every Republican in the Senate was, we're not going to help with the debt ceiling. Because the Democrats can do it on their own. They have majorities in both houses. They can raise the debt sailing under budget reconciliation. So if they're going to bankrupt the country, they ought to take responsibility for it and vote for it on their own. Mitch McConnell was very vocal and clear in making that argument repeatedly and urging even some of the wobbly or members of our conference to hold that

Harry Houdini Congress Senate Mitch Mcconnell
Filmmaker Elijah Stephans on His New Documentary 'Send Proof'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:22 min | 11 months ago

Filmmaker Elijah Stephans on His New Documentary 'Send Proof'

"I go. I hear about miracles. Some of them are baloney but most of them are true. They're people that i know and trust and they give you details but we live in a world where people act as though there's no such thing as a miracle or who i've never seen proof i've never That's sort of legitimate In any event. I've often said to friends of mine like ken fish or others. That you know you've got to document this because people they won't take your word for it. They people are very skeptical. Well there's good news. I don't know what it is but there's good news. No there is good news. I know what it is. I know what the good news is. And i know what these small g. Small and good news is today. There's a film out called send proof it's about the very thing i have been discussing with me. Filmmaker elijah stevens. That's you yes. Stevens now you come to us from reading california right. That's far away a long trip. That's where my friends of bill. And benny johnson live and he relation. No no relation or relation. You you made a film called cent proof about the very thing we're talking about so i wanna find out first of all. Tell my audience in thirty seconds. What what is this film. This is my journey to go. See if there's evidence for miracles especially healing miracles. What the doctor say what the philosophers say what the skeptics say. What mike shurmur say or james randi guy who call peter popoff with an ear piece. I try to all those. Those are super skeptics. Super scott who are pretending to be like harry houdini with the spiritualists and they ounces. They're trying to undo the now. Listen that's not a bad thing. Because i get annoyed would be putting it mildly. If there's any tomfoolery. And he phoniness whatever. Now i've not seen any but you know that there's some people out there but the to my mind. Almost all of the people who talk about this stuff are are are straight shooters because there are a tiny handful of frauds out there. Hollywood goes with the fraud narrative and you see all these films about fraudulent faith healing and stuff so it's a great thing that you decided to make a film like

Ken Fish Elijah Stevens Benny Johnson Mike Shurmur Peter Popoff Stevens James Randi Harry Houdini California Scott Hollywood
"harry houdini" Discussed on Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"harry houdini" Discussed on Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

"Away peacefully in her favourite bedroom following the funeral. Her staff is given small portions of her wealth and dismissed from service. At this point. You might think that the servants would finally start talking about what was going on inside that house but still nobody will say thing. Meanwhile sarah's undeveloped land cells pretty easily but the house does not at the time of sarah's death at the place has a maze of one hundred sixty rooms. Ten thousand windows in two thousand doors is just way too complicated in huge for any ordinary family to live there after four months up for auction. Only one person makes an offer. His name is john brown. And he's an amusement park owner. John looks at sarah's old house. And thanks well. I'm not going to live in it but i could buy it and turn it into a tourist attraction so brown purchases the house and eventually renamed it the winchester mystery house and for the first time ever. He invites the public inside and boy. Do people get their money's worth. This place is basically a fun. Housemaids mirrors a staircase with seven turns even though it only goes up one story. There's doors too small to walk through and there's this small nondescript interior room that everyone can't stop talking about it has three doors but only one really works as an exit another door drops you eight feet into the kitchen below and the third leads down a narrow passageway to a closet. Allegedly this room was used for seances as more journalists. Visit the house. Newspapers hint that the winchester mansion may even be haunted. It's enough to attract the attention more visitors more journalists and special guests like the famed magician. Harry houdini in october nineteen twenty four. Houdini is visiting san jose for a performance when he needs. One of the winchester house tour guides. The guide insists that houdini come by for a private tour. Lieven arrange a seance. Now who team doesn't exactly believe in ghosts but he figures he might as well see what all the hoopla's about if anything maybe he can. Debunk this haunted house theory once and for all so reportedly houdini heads to the home just before midnight. For a seance in that strange little private room and not only does houdini fail. To debunk anything. Supposedly he walks away completely freaked out the details of houdini. Experience are scant. But i do know that he saw sarah winchester's old collection robes and somehow learned that she uses a different robe for each spirit which is kind of cagey but many people believe this meant. He saw the ghost of sarah winchester self over the next few decades more creepy stories about the house surface one day. A guide is leading a tour when she hears a cy outside. Sarah's favourite bedroom at first. She thinks no big deal. It's just a guess that fell behind so she goes out into the hallway to look. That's when she sees a small dark form glide around the corner and disappear another time. There's an incident in his room. Sarah called the hall of fires. The room itself is kind of bizarre. It's just as open empty. Space with four large fireplaces. Some say that theory uses this room is a sauna for her aching joints. But who really knows for sure supposedly one evening. A grounds keeper is up on a ladder working on one of the fireplaces. He feels this light tap on his shoulder. he turns around as to me. It's one of his colleagues except there's no one there so the man goes back to work until he feels something push him hard almost like. It's trying to knock him off the ladder. He's so spooked that he drops what he's doing. Climbs off the ladder and runs to a different part of the house. He leaves the job totally unfinished. I mean who could blame him. Then there's the frequent sightings of a ghostly man pushing a wheelbarrow. He's often seen working on a fireplace in the ballroom or the coal shoot in the basement and is believed. Be one of sarah's former handyman. There's a bushy-haired woman in an upstairs window and some even say they've seen the ghost of sarah herself roaming the front lawn. Now it's possible. This is the work of a few overactive imaginations after all if someone tells you that a house is haunted. You're bound at that. Every little bump or breeze is a sign of something spectral. But if we did back into sarah's life we might find something different because as it turns out. Sarah was not only aware of the ghosts in the house. She may have built it for.

winchester mystery house sarah sarah winchester winchester house Lieven john brown Harry houdini Houdini houdini Sarah san jose brown John
"harry houdini" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"harry houdini" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"The early 20th century. 26. I'm going to say Harry Houdini. He was living in O. J. Simpson's guesthouse on that infamous night in 1994 Kato Kaylin Michael Douglas showed us his pianist. Impersonation when when he portrayed him in 2013 is behind the candelabra. Oh, my gosh! Liver Karachi, who? By the way? Was in this very building rock. I don't know if you know that I've seen his autograph downstairs downstairs. We have the cinderblock wall. And each centre block is a different color. And a lot of celebrities have signed it liberates she is there. Richard Nixon. Hulk Hogan. I mean, summer. It's fun. Led Zeppelin. No way. No kidding. Yeah. Okay. I didn't even know that The Led Zeppelin thing was there until goodness not long ago. All right, let me go get done. Well, let's check with Patty. Sorry. Hi, Patricia. The lower You think I went through great. Is Houdini. Really from Milwaukee? He, um, he don't tell Donna but he is. Yeah. Okay. All right. Okay. All right, let me go and Hungary moved to Milwaukee. Patty. What part of Wisconsin are you from? I'm from the revolt. That's okay. Not too far Got. Yeah, I married a Wisconsin woman myself. She's from O'Connor. My walk in between Madison and Milwaukee. Yep. I've enjoyed some time in the in Milwaukee in the clinker cream city as they call it. Because of their cream city. Brick. So, Donna, I'm gonna I'm gonna I'm done talking to Patty for a little bit. And by the way, I did not mention if Patty wins, she's going to win a pair of in person. Movie screening passes to see Joe Bell at the showplace Icon West End on Tuesday. The 20th. How would you describe that movie? Well, I like to say it's a Mark Walberg as a father honoring his son with a cross country journey type film is his son still with us. Um, did not follow the honoring. I have to go see Joe Bell at the showplace icon West end to find out. Donna, I think this is going to go to a tiebreaker. I feel really good about your chances here. I like it. I like it. Okay. Okay. Are you really like the way Milwaukee is spelled? Okay, Let's take that After the you go to a mill and you take a walk off anybody seems like keys, you know, walking All right down. Are you ready? Not really. Okay, We are looking for a Hungarian born Milwaukee raised escape artist, an illusionist who became one of the most famous and highest Spain, entertainers of the earliest early 20th century. Houdini. He was living in O. J. Simpson's guesthouse on that infamous night in 1994. Kato Kaylin Michael Douglas showed us his pianist impersonation skills when he portrayed him in 2013 is behind the candelabra. Oh, gosh! Oh!.

Patricia Richard Nixon Michael Douglas 2013 Harry Houdini Mark Walberg Patty Madison Milwaukee Donna Wisconsin O'Connor Hulk Hogan O. J. Simpson Tuesday Kato Kaylin 1994 Hungary Led Zeppelin early 20th century
The Mystery Of Hudini

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

06:02 min | 1 year ago

The Mystery Of Hudini

"Welcome to kids myths and mysteries from around the world strange and unexplained people places and events often forgotten by history or loss in the midst of time. I'm kit chrome today. Harry houdini to understand houdini magic. It's important to understand the man born eric. Weiss march twenty four th eighteen. Seventy four in budapest hungary. He moved with his family when he was four years. Old to new york. And eventually migrated appleton wisconsin in his youth. He was a natural athlete and had a fascination with magic and adopted the name. Houdini by adding an eye to the last name of his idol. French magician robert who din although there was a gimmick or special effect too many of his escapes. there were those at pressed him physically to the max one story a story mind. You is that of an underwater handcuff escape. Depending on who you talked to. He was in a box. A straightjacket or manacled hand and foot anyway. The story goes that he was in chicago in winter and had a hole cut in the frozen river that he stepped through not taking into factor that the river flowed under the ice easily escaped his manacles but was swept downriver. Above the shivering crowd eventually dispersed fearing that they had witnessed the drowning of the great magician under the ice. He moved from trapped air bubble bubble eventually finding his way out. There are dozens of versions of his story but whatever the case demonstrates his power of concentration. Above all harry. Houdini was a showman dangling from cranes. Skyscrapers upside down in a straitjacket. He would attrac- upwards of fifty thousand. Onlookers necks craned as they watched the dramatic escape. This would guarantee a pack theater that evening but he was always searching for a new effect. He's responsible for bringing the obscure thread the needle from india to the american stage. This is where he would placed dozens of needles in his mouth along with thread. Poss- drink a glass of water then amazingly extract needles threaded with enough threat to cross the stage later. He performed the same illusion with razor blades. Houdini was much more than a magician however he was a man with an insatiable curiosity and was fascinated with movies made several including one where he was to rescue the ever suffering female from iraq on the brink of niagara falls. She was harnessed to a safety line. Houdini would have none of the safety features offered and was nearly swept over the falls. He got out of the movie business because it didn't make money. He was also fascinated with airplanes and in nineteen ten. Was the first man to fly a plane in australia. Sailing for over three and a half miles. Houdini died at one twenty six. Pm tober thirty first. Nineteen twenty six. He was fifty two years old. He was a man who was driven. You might say by the slogan. The show must go on but also by his own physicality take a look at the old newspaper photos of him in various stages of escape remember. This is long before photoshop notice a developed biceps quadriceps and shoulders however by late forties he suffered from appendicitis attacks and on several occasions had to be helped off stage by age fifty despite more sophisticated special effects his performances required longer periods of recuperation is said that he was backstage reclining from a broken ankle from a previous show won a university student questioned. The magicians boasts of the stomach of oak remember. Houdini was fifty to the student. Delivered a series of blows stopped when. Houdini claimed he was not able to stand to prepare for the strikes. No one knows. If this cost the appendix to rupture hours of the event. Houdini went on to perform with a temperature of a hundred and four. Eventually he entered the hospital where he felt. Recovery was eminent but at the end he was heard to say. I'm tired of fighting. Harry had two loves in his. Life is wife bests and sell you steiner weiss. His mother when she died in nineteen thirteen. He visited select mediums in an attempt to make contact with her from the spirit. World appalled the frauds who claim to be able to make contact. He went on the warpath exposing psychics. Fortune tellers mediums and in the process and raging. The industry is most outspoken. Opponent was the blonde. Which of lime street strange seems her. Spirit guide walter in one thousand nine hundred thousand five said that. Houdini would be dead within a year but houdini had devised a code. That only best would know that if indeed there wasn't afterlife he would contact her using net code. The stories surround this aspect of his life and the code between he and his wife would take ten podcast to explain it to say that he did not connect with best using the code. Each halloween for at least four years after his death she would lie to candle. Hold a seance. She continued the sales which involved a candle said to have burned for ten years. It was a nineteen thirty six ten years after houdini. He's passing that. She handed off the candle. And say on tradition to walter. B gibson friend confidante ghostwriter for. Houdini gibson was also the original author of the shadow mysteries writing under the name maxwell grant late in his life. He passe on tradition to magician. Dorothy dietrich who now burns the candle. Every halloween while conducting a seance seems. Houdini is yet to

Houdini Harry Houdini Frozen River Appleton Weiss Budapest Hungary Eric Wisconsin Robert Niagara Falls Steiner Weiss Chicago Harry New York Appendicitis India Iraq Australia
Sordid details of Johnny Depp's private life made public

Len Berman and Michael Riedel in the Morning

03:27 min | 1 year ago

Sordid details of Johnny Depp's private life made public

"I'm fascinated by this because I do think at one point. He was a very, very good actor Johnny Depp. And now his entire life has just fallen apart. What has happened to this man? Is it Is it booze and drugs? Well, it's losing throat. It's also though, in the view of Hollywood, and this time the Hollywood reporter, which is kind of the you know, the newspaper that covers the doings out there has a devastating story in this week, which basically says that he has become radioactive. You might recall it. Obviously back in the summer time. There was this lawsuit where he was suing a newspaper in the UK for saying that he was a wife beater. And in this trial, it was revealed just dozens of emails and horrible behavior that frankly backed up, but the you know what his ex wife and with the newspaper said, and the judge agreed not only to the judge agree that the newspaper that could script called him a wife beater. But they essentially prohibited to him from appealing this case. Meanwhile, he assuming his ex wife, Amber, heard in a court in Virginia that suits about to begin in January. A lot of the same stuff. That was found to be un supportable in the UK trial, so he's seen in Hollywood is just being insanely vengeful. Not to mention a drunk, a drug use or incredibly profligate spending millions upon millions of dollars and in this world now With me to, um, the idea of any Hollywood studio hiring a man who's been labeled a wife beater seems completely implausible. He had a small movie that was supposed to come out last month. At a film festival in Poland. He didn't turn up. The movie was withdrawn. He has a project that he was gonna be doing. Jerry Bruckheimer, huge Hollywood producer on the life of Harry Houdini. He apparently has been dropped from that. And this is a guy who you know has a lot of things and needs a lot of money. As you know his spending his ethics so without these kinds of did paydays God knows what's going to happen to stand still love him, probably. But the fact of the matter is Hollywood will not hire him. So their love is going to have to go back into the catalog and look at old movies. But I don't think anybody's gonna hire him for anything. New. So literally, Larry, Let me ask you when you were the editor of People magazine Back in the day when Johnny Depp was riding high, Did you Did your reporters pick up stuff about bad behavior? Craziness? Did you have any concerns about where that career was headed back when you have good things about him? Let me split that question into Yes. To the first part of the question. No to the second. Yes, we heard about the bad behavior. Look, he didn't make a secret of it right? He was in a rock band. He dressed like Keith Richards. He kind of he played Hunter Thompson. You know, he epically did a lot of drug this was all known about it. It was part of his charm in some degree crazy enough as it may seem, like all things in moderation that makes him charming. And look, we made him the sexy man. I think twice While I was the editor of the magazine, he was someone who then and arguably still might have a lot of appeal. But at a certain point, you know, when you're pushing 60 and you start and you continue to act like this, it's not charming and again when you look at what was accounted in that trial in the UK not only just the text messages using filthy text messages about his wife, written tip Hollywood agents and other colleagues. But the kind of litany of behavior throwing glasses, the bleeding the fights the cutting the screaming, You know, I counted to buy a lot of people, including people who worked for him. Quite frankly, it's impossible to deny. That this guy's personal life is a mess. Now. We don't watch him in movies, you know, thinking about his personal life, but in this world that we live in now it's increasingly difficult to separate that behavior from what appears on strings. Turning our

Hollywood Johnny Depp UK Harry Houdini Jerry Bruckheimer Amber Hunter Thompson UN Virginia Poland People Magazine Keith Richards Larry
"harry houdini" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"harry houdini" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"There. It's 20 in Norwood, 20. In a tick in Belmont, 18. Degrees is 29 degrees and fair skies in Boston. It's easy to fall in love with Subaru. It's 5, 25 and time forthe w. B. C book. Welcome to the W B Z Book Club. This is Jordan Rich. He's been gone for nearly 100 years, but the great Harry Houdini, who died on Halloween. Continues to fascinate people the world over so couple of find books on the subject of Eric Weiss, a Harry Houdini, the world's greatest escape artist. One is simply called Harry Houdini, by Phil Coleman. And in this, we learned that Houdini, of course, was much more than just the great magician and escape biologist. He was a master showman and great publicists born into a Jewish family that emigrated to the U. S from Hungary. Houdini worked hard throughout his life to carve out a better life for himself and his family. The other book that shine some light on the master is the life and after Life of Harry Houdini, by Joe Posnanski. Unit. The author talks about the many magicians or famous today, such as David Blaine and David Copperfield, Penn and Teller whose lives an artform have been so transformed and so inspired by the power of Houdini. Happy Birthday, Harry Houdini, and that's the book Club. W. B Z. Boston's news radio. It's 5 26. The pandemic led to the closure of Disneyland theme park and resorts in Southern California and with no opening date on the horizon. A new wave of lay offs begin this weekend. As many as 30,000 workers could be. Let go of us are safe. I know people that they're with the company 10 years and they've been laid off instead of planning a festive Halloween weekend with her family. We're all just nervous. We're waiting. This Disney cast member is waiting for the other shoe to drop every day. I'm checking my e mail run out to the postman. Some people aren't getting their mail. So it's like you don't even know if you're laid off or not. For 14 years, Linda Rodriguez has worked as a server, the Disneyland resort Eight months ago, she was further She now makes a fraction of her wages and her savings have run out. We don't have food on the table we don't have. We can't give to our Children right now. It's it's back. And that is KCBS TV Stacey Butler reporting. The Duncan chain is being sold for 11.3 billion..

Harry Houdini W B Z Book Club Subaru Belmont Jordan Rich Boston Norwood Hungary David Blaine Stacey Butler W. B Z. Boston Phil Coleman Eric Weiss Linda Rodriguez Disney Southern California Joe Posnanski David Copperfield Teller
"harry houdini" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"harry houdini" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"In a row today. Okay, let's do this. Let's get it done against Terry from Renton. What's up, Terry? Hello. How's it going? Tearing me whispering to over there. That's my wife was always encouraging me to call you guys. Oh, wait. Did she think you really smart, Terry? I don't know if you think I'm smart, because she just want you to publicly humiliate yourself on the radio. Terry. She was playing that he called you guys all the time Floating, like, See? I told you you'd get the room. Yes, that's exactly it. Stop your high for us. Terry is the first time player A lot of people that are repeat players on the show. Terry, this is your first time. How you feelin you nervous? Excited? Numb? Constipated. What are we working with? My gosh, I'm a little nervous. I've never never got anything like this and making me think fast. Difficult. Constipation. Yeah, I'm leaving. I don't want the answer. Let's send broke out of the studio while we do that, Terry, you know how the game's played. You have 30 seconds to answer as many questions as possible. If you don't know, one just say pass and have to be broke. Rightto win. Ready, OK, Your time starts now what famous magician died on Halloween. Oh, When someone did you a do. What language are they speaking? That would, uh, German whose face is on the U. S dime? Uh, Lincoln. I don't know. Money he could chew is a Pokemon that uses what power when fighting. Lightning. What numbers represented by the letter L in Roman numerals. Colorable. That's all right. Let's bring Brooke back into the studio and Terry, it says on my phone screen, or that you have five Children. Yeah, That's a lot of kids. It is a lot of kids. They keep us very busy that day. All yours are we've been We've been married for 21 years. Wow. Cigarettes didn't have any sarcasm in your voice. I just I You know, I have two Children, and it's always amazing to me that after two people want more, so I like Wow. You're acting. I love my Children. Terry just makes really good ones. Yeah, great kids. They're really good kids. My wife's state that the only way I just don't need more of them. That's all. At least that's what you say While she's standing right next to your name and some questions already do this. Your time starts now what famous magician died on Halloween. Oh, my God! Ah, past When someone bids you a do. What language are they speaking do is French. Whose face is on the U. S dime in Washington. Pikachu was the Pokemon that uses what power when fighting hugging. What numbers represented by the letter l in Roman numerals. Ellis 50. What do you call the rotating rod? A rotisserie item is cooked on. Ah, Wei got our answers and let's go to the score board and find out how you did with Jose. I've traveled all across the fabric of space time, okay? Come in. Terry got one correct today. You're almost set it right there. I'm Savini. I know. I know my my family's very ashamed of me. And later dams. Tell my grandfather was a magician. Brooke, you want you got three correct. Terry. I'm sorry. It's all right. You have to face your wife after that, OK a few times. I think he's done better than me every time. Okay, let's go over the answers for everybody here. Harry Houdini is the famous magician who died on Halloween. When someone did you do there, saying goodbye in French thie face That's on the U. S dime would be Franklin Roosevelt. He could choose Pokemon that uses the power of electricity. When fighting Chinese is so disappointed in Roman numerals, the letter l represents the number 50 and the rotating rod that a rotisserie Adam has cooked on is a spit. So, Terry, I'm sorry. No cash today but just for playing you want $25 Ivers gift card. Or you could enjoy fish and chips, delicious clam chowder or just do what Jose always does. In order a clam bam! Thank you, ma'am. That's a plane bucket of whole clams and salty Brian. Which.

Terry Brooke Renton Jose Franklin Roosevelt Ivers Adam Harry Houdini Lincoln Washington Brian Ellis Wei
"harry houdini" Discussed on X96

X96

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"harry houdini" Discussed on X96

"Oh, he was one of a kind. He will be missed. And He was truly amazing person. Yes, the amazing Randi. James Randi, the magician who escaped from jail cells. Underwater coffins straitjackets before becoming a scientific skeptic bent on debunking those who peddle the paranormal and supernatural. He was 92 years old. Age related causes is what they say His death was in a Twitter post pendulum of Penn and Teller called Randy quote our inspiration, our mentor and your friend. He appeared on on occasion on the Showtime documentary, Siri's Penn and Teller. B s in 56 Amazing. Randi appeared live on the Today show 1956. Surviving for 100 for minutes in a sealed metal coffin submerged in a swimming pool. Two better, a record that was held by Harry Houdini. Two decades later, he escape from a straitjacket while suspended upside down over Niagara Falls. On these escapes that he did. We're dangerous. They were very dangerous, but he managed them. He was a Toronto native. He grew up loving magic. He had great stories about going to see. Blackstone. Blackstone was a very famous magician at the time and what a great magician he was. But then Randy sort of became a well known atheist. And if you want to see a really touching sweet movie that's fascinating. What's it called Anonymous wires on honest liar. One a slider? Yeah, it's all about him in its life. Well, Yeah, he started out as a magician. But then he formed James Randi Educational Foundation, and it's about Debunking. Shysters people who use magic essentially on and mental ism to take advantage of people. He particularly hated Uri Geller, the spoon Bender from Israel. He hated Yuri Geller and James Randi said anybody convention spoon. I can show anybody how to do it. He doesn't do it with the power of his mind. It's a trick. It is a trick. And Randy was just incensed about it. He hated Yuri Geller so much, he said. When I die, and I'm cremated, I want somebody to throw my ashes in Yuri Geller. Well, you've said that about your

James Randi Harry Houdini Blackstone Randy Penn Teller Twitter Niagara Falls Siri
James Randi, Magician and Paranormal Debunker, Dies at 92

Radio From Hell

02:36 min | 1 year ago

James Randi, Magician and Paranormal Debunker, Dies at 92

"Oh, he was one of a kind. He will be missed. And He was truly amazing person. Yes, the amazing Randi. James Randi, the magician who escaped from jail cells. Underwater coffins straitjackets before becoming a scientific skeptic bent on debunking those who peddle the paranormal and supernatural. He was 92 years old. Age related causes is what they say His death was in a Twitter post pendulum of Penn and Teller called Randy quote our inspiration, our mentor and your friend. He appeared on on occasion on the Showtime documentary, Siri's Penn and Teller. B s in 56 Amazing. Randi appeared live on the Today show 1956. Surviving for 100 for minutes in a sealed metal coffin submerged in a swimming pool. Two better, a record that was held by Harry Houdini. Two decades later, he escape from a straitjacket while suspended upside down over Niagara Falls. On these escapes that he did. We're dangerous. They were very dangerous, but he managed them. He was a Toronto native. He grew up loving magic. He had great stories about going to see. Blackstone. Blackstone was a very famous magician at the time and what a great magician he was. But then Randy sort of became a well known atheist. And if you want to see a really touching sweet movie that's fascinating. What's it called Anonymous wires on honest liar. One a slider? Yeah, it's all about him in its life. Well, Yeah, he started out as a magician. But then he formed James Randi Educational Foundation, and it's about Debunking. Shysters people who use magic essentially on and mental ism to take advantage of people. He particularly hated Uri Geller, the spoon Bender from Israel. He hated Yuri Geller and James Randi said anybody convention spoon. I can show anybody how to do it. He doesn't do it with the power of his mind. It's a trick. It is a trick. And Randy was just incensed about it. He hated Yuri Geller so much, he said. When I die, and I'm cremated, I want somebody to throw my ashes in Yuri Geller. Well, you've said that about your

James Randi Uri Geller Harry Houdini James Randi Educational Founda Randy Blackstone Teller Twitter Penn Niagara Falls Siri Israel
"harry houdini" Discussed on Capes and Lunatics

Capes and Lunatics

07:06 min | 2 years ago

"harry houdini" Discussed on Capes and Lunatics

"With see that it is in fact, just A. A I while paramour of one of her neighbors and You know for this killer which he does that. You kind of got the impression that he had done that before. Going to Right. He had a very a rock climbers movements. Yeah well, you know you. They rocks back in the thirties and the forties. Not Saying I'm surprised at that I'm surprised that it definitely looked like he'd done it before his ause. Yeah No, and but it's. It's a nice fun little bit that is sort of. That's our cold open. But, then the next morning we have all the girls coming down in meeting complaining about the eggs and you know yeah that you know the breakfast in bed and breakfasts is. Not Up to snuff, but then again. Hey, what are you paying rent for the you know? How much do you really paint in in new? York City even in the stage. Control Laws and whatnot but. We get our great little piece about Harry Houdini which is which is which is delightful That for all of the things he could escape unlock. He could not ascend the stairs and this is. What I love about this is you Kinda? Get the feeling. From the way some girls react that this is a story. She tells a lot and I get the feeling that it's a story that she does tell expressly when one of the girls is going to get kicked out for letting a man into the building. Via No because it dovetails nicely with that yeah I thought it was just because they had a new tenant, but yeah, that makes. The well. They only get the new tenant, because maybe maybe way I. Actually think so. They only get the new tenant. Because the other girl gets kicked out I I. Mean I can't say that for one hundred percent certain, but I do get the feeling that maybe the case which again then raises this question. Gee, isn't that lucky that another tenant just happened to show up now? Maybe there's a waiting list so all that, but it's like Guy Breaks in maybe has broken in a few times before, but this is the time he got caught. Just as this other person needs to to come in into the place. So, maybe she always has somebody on standby that she already has grounds to let go, and when a more suitable ten shows up. Oh guess, we're going to act on the evidence I have oh, that's an interesting read on. It that you know she's just waiting to kick people out I would imagine. His. Say the only reason I don't think that's the case. Is because when the other room was available. Angela mentions it to Carter like three times right before actually concedes to go into the interview. Because and I. Get the feeling that there is this quality of it where it's a were. Maybe it isn't. Which is why that's why I think it might be suspicious that this person shows up. Just as the other person gets kicked out because that room was staying vacant. For a peer, the the original room that Carter took was saying vacant for a period of time, and then as soon as this occurs suddenly. There's a border right there ready. Who meets all the needs? You know even if she is a dancer? and. Just as a just as the fact that she's a dancer that might be. A hinting at something, no spoilers but Saudi under word She does appear in in in future episodes so. Yes and I just to me the first time I saw daddy under I knew there was something up with Daddy I i. don't know. 'cause they highlight her, so so I I, don't think yeah. Say something's up with with Daddy. Wasn't like the song playing in that moment. Watch over you as they are talking about her waitress trend Oh. An End A. and then this woman comes walking in and you're like Oh. That's really on the nose. There, guys, you know. Yeah, yes, Yeah, you know I I didn't notice that but good good catch miles. Yeah you know we also have but also the other advantage of the Houdini. Speech is the idea that you know nothing is impenetrable you now because she says you know, it's more impenetrable than Fort Knox. Though obviously, it wasn't because the guy got in. She knows him and this is where where she gets the idea that Oh. There must have been you know so. They work out how the how the items were stolen from Howard Stark's lab. Right! and it's interesting because before we get to that we get to. We get to the fact that. Of course they have trace at. This is how it starts. Car was at the rocks on implosion And they go and they pick up Jarvis. And they do have him. Come down and this is. This is this is one of these you know. You could argue maybe a big coincidence. You know Carter. She's she's never jobs. Right they tolerate so much from this lady. I wonder why that is because she walks entities like you know. starts at nine am. Is it. Is it just like a thing that she's known for walking whenever she wants or do? They expect so little of her, or is she just a totem pole to have their that? They don't really have any real work for that inconsequential whether she shows up on time or Nah. You know I think that I think that there is because I am BM. Basic thought is because there is so much disdain for her, and they're not gonNA. Give her any work anyway. They they mostly see her. As the bumbling secretary, which is ridiculous, because obviously they know she's not from. You know or maybe they figure that she's only there because she because in their minds cheese, you know caps, ex girlfriend. You gotta put her somewhere after the war. Or something I'm not quite sure where they're going with all of it, but I get! Also she's not there. She's not in their hair. This is true, too, so maybe they don't notice as much and they don't care as much and.

Carter Harry Houdini Fort Knox York City secretary Howard Stark Jarvis Angela
"harry houdini" Discussed on The Brooklyn Boys Podcast

The Brooklyn Boys Podcast

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"harry houdini" Discussed on The Brooklyn Boys Podcast

"Okay. So. Samantha Morton was interviewed now that she is deceased spoiler Alpha's dead. They asked her if she knew her character's fate when she first joined the show or was given the role she said I kinda always knew because when I was in discussions with Angela King in the early stages that I was potentially going to play Alpha. It was very clear this character would have her head chopped off, so I always knew Yup I just knew. KRISTEN KUNA from the insider. Who did the interview says? Did you Geoffrey de Morgan was going to wind up killing you in other words, Megan. She says yes, very clearly on I knew my whole story arc wasn't really surprise. It was all known. So then she's asked. What you think was going through Alpha's mind when she was killed by again. because. She wasn't expecting it. So. Morton says I think it's very quick so I don't think very much is going through a mind other than shock. It's instantaneous. I think when she's dying when she's bleeding out, she's hoping that he will lead the whispers. That's what she's hoping for. And so that's not going to happen obviously. Next question. Do you think Alpha regrets not having killed Megan in the woods when she had a chance? and Samantha Morton says in that moment when she's dying. No, not at all, no regrets and they asked her if she watches the show. What does she think of the show and her performance? She says I. Don't watch anything I'm in I've never watched myself in anything until years later for me, personally, I don't watch myself each week I. Just it just doesn't work for me, If, the directed me to watch something to change my performance. I would, but no I can't watch myself. It's like when you hear your voice on the answering machine message for the first time you're like. Oh, is that what I sound like No, Oh my gosh! I can't do that now. If you remember Andrew. Lincoln also said he doesn't watch himself. I will be honest with you. I occasionally and back to these podcasts to hear what we sound like to make sure they're good, and they're entertaining and that there's enough snappy banter I'm sorry Jamie was in here. For this episode, but if you're at this point in the podcast, thank you very much for being loyal for listening to the whole thing, even though Johnny's not here we all miss her terribly. Please remember to tweet are at the talking, Jamie, and let her know you missed her. And hopefully she'll be back for episode one seventy three so we can break down the shown episode and so I'm going to need your help. I don't have Jamie here. And so you guys all know what time it is right and right now you're saying you. What time is it? So I need you guys to say it with me on the counter three one two three. It's time to shut this down. What Made Vincent Van Gogh, one of the greatest painters and most tortured souls of all time was Harry Houdini predestined to become the great escape. Artists.

Samantha Morton Jamie Alpha Megan Geoffrey de Morgan Angela King KRISTEN KUNA Vincent Van Gogh Harry Houdini Andrew Johnny Lincoln
Talking to the Dead

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:50 min | 2 years ago

Talking to the Dead

"Today we're talking about the seance communicating with the dead has been around for centuries United States just after the civil war when so many men lost on. The battlefields was so little attention to their identification left to be buried until the battle that had killed them had passed often buried in mass graves leaving family and loved ones with no idea what happened to their father. Son Brother husband the grieving American public search for answers in media and through seances across Europe following world. War One sounds flourished often led by celebrities like Sir Arthur conon on and doyle the author Sherlock Holmes but critic arose from the World Magic from roughly nineteen twenty to nineteen twenty. Six Harry Harry. Houdini made a part of his. Life's work to expose. Mediums in the seance but the magician wasn't always so intent on exposing those would communicate with the dead. The great magician had two women in his life his mother and his wife. They were the law of his life when his mother Cecilia. Steiner Weiss died of a stroke. Nineteen Thirteen Harry. Houdini sought out a medium that would allow him to speak with his beloved mother but for decades his axe x his own acts had included. Sounds as were the highest form of deception. When he attended a seance could identify the very tricks tricks adhered used in his own acts? He went on the warpath exposing the fraudulent gatherings. Houdini he's former. Education was slight his self education. Commence the magician had a great love of books and of research built a formidable personal library when in the nineteen twenties he strode into the public public arena to confront fraudulent mediums. He proceeded from home lined with books and manuscripts about their methods of deception. Visitors to the online line collection can view July thirty first nineteen twenty five letter in which we need describes his extensive library of letters and documents related to the spiritualism his attacks stem from both shameless self-promotion sincere commitment to the public photographs and the Digital Houdini collection and show his exposures a rich penelope of psychic fraud sleight riding spirit photographs fingerprinting a spirit and trump and mediums. Who would transmit voices through the musical instrument articles and images present? Houdini greatest challenge many any crandon. The Media Mona's Marjorie. A woman who fooled one established academic mind after another. She found her greatest champion in Sir Arthur CONAN doyle. Genie was never able to expose her as an outright fraud but he did block her progress. Her name was Minna Crandon but the world knew her as Marjorie a pseudonym adopted to protect her from publicity. She lived with her husband successful. Surge in Leroy Crandon on Boston's affluent Beacon Hill. It was there in their house online street in one thousand nine hundred twenty three that she purportedly discovered she had psychic power specifically the ability to levitated objects generator. Called noises. Materialized spirit forms warms. The phenomenon were controlled. She said by the spirit of her deceased brother. Walter who would speak through Mina in a a gruff decidedly unspiritual manner. His No nonsense conference liberally laced with profanities before long binders talents came him to the attention of researchers and she was closely studied on an off for an suing ten years and through examination of the claims and counterclaims counterclaims so the various researchers would require a book length essay. I'm not that ambitious instead what I'd like to do. Compare and contrast the accounts of the initial investigation as presented in two influential books science and Para Science by Brian a angles nineteen eighty-four mediums and mystics. And the occult by Melborn Christopher. Nine hundred seventy five with only occasional forays into other sources verses when necessary and the process. We may not learn anything conclusive about March but we will learn something about the hazards and frustrations nations of studying. The paranormal was Marjorie. A greater magician than Houdini. Or was she the real thing able to call up dead and hold for

Houdini Marjorie Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Harry Harry Minna Crandon Fraud Crandon Sir Arthur Conon Walter Mina Leroy Crandon Europe United States Steiner Weiss Melborn Christopher Cecilia Genie Sherlock Holmes Beacon Hill
Fortune Tellers

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

06:30 min | 2 years ago

Fortune Tellers

"Welcome to kiss myths and mysteries. I'm your host kid crumb all this week. We're going to be looking at psychics and mediums and people oh who read your fortunes and so we'll start out with the question. psychics real fraud on a Monday in nineteen ninety ninety. Five the Oprah Winfrey show hosted a psychic Roseanne. Ultra not her real name. The show's audience that day number. Just over two hundred rid. After a brief interview with Oprah the psychic turned to the audience and the questions began typically referred to as fishing or coal whole readings. The questions were brought. Has someone lost a loved one recently a mother or sister or brother recently then then. She pressed several individuals but nothing really clicked out of two hundred individuals. She was only able to make generalities with only a few specifics. Picks in the end she caught one a woman who lost her mother to cancer. It was a moment that odd the audience and struck Oprah silent if you'd like to watch the technique of cold reading without leaving the comfort of your living room checkout the CBS TV. Show the mental EST if ran. I'm from two thousand eight to two thousand fifteen and I'm sure you can catch it on Netflix. It's a story of a father and son Carnival. Act where the sun pretended tended to be psychic when the boy grew up he created a show where he would connect audience members with loved ones who had passed long story short he connected did with a branch of law enforcement and used his knowledge of fishing and coal readings throughout the seven years to show ran to solve crimes crime. I am show plots aside. It's a great example of techniques used by psychics. A few shows back. This podcast covered the effort by famous. Magician magician Harry Houdini to expose psychics and frauds. The professional rarely makes the declaration he or she watches facial responses to specific question. Did someone here lose a son. A Chin wrinkles is glistening with shed. Tears he hones. It's or she hones in. I sense a tragedy. Yes yes rick. Ground the psychic takes a chance with the name was was Frederick Eric on a boat on large body of water. Yes Frederick was on his father's vote on Lake Michigan. You get the idea and you're probably thinking come on on. Who would fall for all that most people? That's who twenty people pay two hundred dollars each filled with expectations -tations Danta room lights slightly dimmed not enough to be noticed but enough to create an atmosphere. Psychic speaks of the nature of death and dying fine. There may be some low music but wait the title. Today's PODCAST psychics reeler fraud. So here's the other side of the coin at the age of thirteen. Thirteen Ruby Lynch witnessed from a hiding place that brutal murder of her parents during the initial search of the house for Clues Little Ruby was found. She was in shock doc fell into a catatonic state for the next decade. She was institutionalized at twenty three she assigned was assigned a new case worker. A woman woman wanted to get closure for Ruby. She sat in a room with her and read out loud. The police report that cited the capture of the murder still Ruby Ruby remained unresponsive. Then the caseworker decided to take her to a psychic that worked out of a building on the edge of town. The psychic was told only that ruby behead witness a brutal murder of her parents no other details upon their arrival ruby and her social worker were ushered into a room with no windows and only one door. There was a small card table three chairs. The walls were bare and there was no ventilation. The Room was well lit though stuffy. The door was closed as soon as they entered the psychic sat rigidly in a straight back chair with no arms from the time. Ruby and the caseworker. Were seated. No one spoke minutes past than the psychic slot forward over the next thirty eight minutes a psychic describe where Ruby had been hidden too the tiniest. Es detail our parents had been murdered and when she straightened up is close. She described three Special Memories Ruby out of her mother baking cookies for Christmas Christmas helping Ruby prepare for elementary talent show and teaching her to use a sewing machine. When the memories were recounted by the psychic kick Ruby began to sob when the psychic recited details of her father teaching her to drive Ruby began to cry rocking forward and back forward and back feeling that this was somehow more than Ruby? Could handle the caseworker ended. The session took Ruby back to the state facility and went to the police department that handle title case. No no one had requested a copy of the case which had long been sealed. The psychic was not known to the cleese and what her name was entered into criminal database. Nothing came up the next day. The caseworker control to the outskirts of town parked in front of the building with a session with skull. No one answered the door and it was determined that the building had been unoccupied and occupied only occasionally for the past ten years and read recently been purchased and was slated to be demolished today at thirty five Ruby. Lunch lives a quiet life alone and works part. Time I'm in a flower. Shop reformer caseworker. Drop spy and now and then to see how she's doing on one visit. She asked Ruby what she remembered about the visit with the Psychic Ruby looked at her with a blank stare then stated that she had no memory of such a visit psychics. reeler fraud. You you decide. All this week will be taking a look at psychics and fortune tellers and mediums. Well today's Today's podcast was produced. Here night all sounds studio all main some places except for the day and data the Oprah Winfrey show have been changed. The case of Ruby Lynch was summarized memorized from a police report.

Ruby Ruby Ruby Lynch Oprah Winfrey Ruby Fraud Murder Harry Houdini Netflix Frederick Eric CBS Lake Michigan Rick Cleese
"harry houdini" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

12:52 min | 2 years ago

"harry houdini" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"We're talking with John **** who knows all about Harry Houdini which is which I love and we also have Michael in Boston who would like to get in here and get involved so if we go Michael say hi to John and tell us what's up that's awesome John how you doing I think all of us like Michael Harry Houdini hi can you hear me thank you very much I can even I want to now you know I I heard that Houdini could take a punch from any man is that true well it is true and it was something that he would boast about and it was true until he got punched by the wrong guy or rather he was punched before he was ready and it was one of several countries that that happened that kind of led to his death but it was it was something that that at least towards the end of a life there's documentation that he that he would boast that he could take a punch and generally he cut the person head on and he was like not ready for it and that's what they think hidden in the abdomen are the pancreas or something like that that's what caused his death what happened was that he was he was in Montreal and he has lectured at at McGill University where apparently he did make this close that he could be punched in the stomach and even the student tried and their later on he was in a dressing room and there was some student and the student by the name or the white hat J. Gordon white hat asked may is it true you can be consciousness stomach and who can you said yes it's true he was laying on his on his card at the time and either Houdini wasn't ready or who give me just decided to remain lane down but why he came in and started punching him hard several times who do you know like a professional sound man all the guy that did it there's a little bit of a mythology about white hat they stating there but but it's not true he was he was actually he was just a stupid little bit of an oddball he with a thirty year old student he he had some mental problems later in life he was sort of a character and and what happened was when you took the blows but he was experiencing tremendous pain any just sort of you know put it off until it became so bad he finally consulted a doctor and it turned out he had appendicitis and his appendix had ruptured and the great debate is did the punch because the appendicitis or did he have appendicitis and the punch just acted to mask the pain until it was too late people argue about that the doctors concluded that the punch actually killed him and and so that's you know that that's the official story I wouldn't have got to be on the hook for I I don't know manslaughter what we would consider an accident maybe even gaining said there was an accident he asked if he had me and copy a copy wrong so it wasn't considered an attack or anything like that it was it was considered the stuff done really a stuff done well okay so what can you give a couple of the his you know maybe three some of his more intense escapes close calls the big time stuff well I can tell you what one of the most particular skates he did was was a jail break from the Washington DC United States trail across the DC and what he did was was he went there and two days scripted naked they had a doctor examine them he was manacled he was brought to murderers row which was filled with murders and he was locked in a cell with a convicted murder and it happened to be the cell that it once held a presidential assassin so this was that the deepest toughest jail and jail cell you can find the bears who can be locked in on it burgers robots murder and within moments not only had he escaped from the same test escape from the cell but he opened all the cell doors and he switched all the murders from one cell to the next and then and the emerging free in the warden's office and that really I mean that was national news that became headline news that you can eat that this doctor that really helped make him the sensation yeah she repeated this in Boston the following month he escaped from from what they called the tombs I believe that it's the John Adams court house now and it was the same set up he was stripped he was searched he was manacled he was locked in a cell and he again escaped and he didn't want to free other prisoners and switch them around but he found that there were no other prisoners to switch around so he decided just escaped the jail itself so he escaped that that that the entire building and went to the theater and called the Wharton from the feeder and the reporters who were in in the office waiting for they take them to come back and take pictures scaling the wall just so they could have it in the newspaper the next day which it was front page news in The Boston Globe so these jealous gates he did were spectacular and he would always do these sort of public escapes to draw attention to the show in Boston again he he he would do somebody called a bridge and that was would be he would announce that at a certain time he was going to be manacled by the police and he would jump from a bridge into the river and escape under water and thousands of people would turn out to witness it can actually jumped off the harbour bridge there in Boston and I could only but he did this in in many different cities within or without the permission of the police sometimes the police said you were not to let you jump off a bridge and he gave me what they just trying to stop me and that I think a lot of people with with turned out just to see if he would actually do it again he always that it was a really amazing time that he lived the it it science and magic was there are a lot of science things going on and they were kind of magical like Tesla and stuff because I was doing was wasn't that in this around the time yeah and it was amazing time and it was a great in at the time was right for Houdini if he understood his time just for the beginning he understood the power of mass media which was this a note in the newspaper business which was crazy back then you know there were multiple editions of multiple papers everyday and Houdini learn how to use newspapers he wants that I'm not an advertiser I do so he would do these news worthy event that he would just dominate and and he also was fascinated by the emerging technology of the day movies aviation he actually bought an airplane taught himself to fly and became the first man ever to fly in Australia really he was a fascinating man out of his time that he was you know very much taken with with the advances of this time and he actually thought that he would be remembered for his aviation and not his escaping that's true yeah he said the world they forget who they need to escape artist but they must always remember me as the first man ever to fly a plane in Australia and that is just the opposite yeah he was he was I will tell you as far as danger goes flying that plane with the most dangerous thing he ever did I mean he was only the twenty fifth person to ever fly a plane and a lot of those twenty five died I mean these are just like box kites with engines and they crashed all the time and so he didn't keep it up for long and but it was there that was a risky thing and you know for all the the thinking that Houdini what's real secret daredevil he was very cautious is new the skates were very well planned out he was very well trained and he did not take unnecessary or foolish risks hi res the yet it is hi he was quite rich I mean he was very highly paid at one time he was he was the the highest paid performer in vaudeville I don't know any hard numbers but he amassed enough of the fortune that he could do pretty much what he liked unfortunately what he wanted to do was get into the movie that and produce movies and that turned out to be a tremendous strain on on his finances so that that that took its toll but he he he believed was always very well paid and and did very well but he was always you know AT what it wasn't someone who really took advantage of as well I mean right right you know some magicians and you would think Houdini would have done it would buy themselves a private to a train to Seoul traveling they had to do yeah he would travel at third class to save money he need more kind of hand me down clothes he was in a sort of sort of a brilliant man in that way and that he didn't think much about about the trappings of of wealth he was just done to it down to his next project but he lived well and and took care of his family and took care of it took care of people I just I guess I would be a different guy I would get rich in in that I would quit doing is dangerous stuff but he must have not done it just for the money he must've lived for doing it must have given him something that he wanted that he needed well it's funny because he always threatened to retire almost from the beginning he would always say that you know I'm going to do one more tour that I'm going to give it up I kind of think that he would say that the newspapers early on just as smart publicity essentially saying this is my last tour see me now don't wait for me to come back around next year but as he got older he really did want to stop doing that dangerous escaped I mean you know hanging upside down the straight jacket from the building a it was a tremendous you know that strain on his body so he did look for ways that he could continue to earn a good living but not have to do the grind of performing and that's one of the reasons why he went into things like the movie does that's where he thought this might be a way that I can I can sell the escape and that can be shown in theaters and I don't have to do it but he never really was able to escape performing because that's what people want they want a Houdini live accepting challenges on stage doing the spectacular stunts in the streets and he did you know right up to but it's the day he died so couple things if you want to do he wasn't able to cover things we didn't cover as far as escapes into the mail cascade but people started copy that so he he got the Chinese water torture cell can you talk about both amount can escape in the water torture cell yeah what what do the news article you know he did have imitators and a lot of hand cut kings and you know he then appalled to the challenge Hank up or the or the the the general challenge challenge act but then he decided you know to that his own original creations of the milk can was the first and really it was a way to bring death defying onto the stage numbers other escapes up to this point where death to find if he escaped the loss of reputation and Emily ation but not lots of lies with the no can it was an oversized no canceled with water or beer or milk depending on if there was a local brewery wanted to challenge him to sell his came with beer which he did all the time and he would be if you could go inside the can inside the water the king would be locked shut with six padlocks and you will be put into a cabinet and he would emerge free and this was a spectacular suspenseful escape because again now you had a ticking clock that meant failure meant to drowning death which is actually what would be the well on the poster for it did was extremely popular and it was rapidly imitated by others and who do you need of all days into something new and truly spectacular that was his Chinese water torture cell in which it was a terribly large cell not as big as the cells you see today but it will sell a five week hi three feet wide and Houdini whiskey would be locked in stocks he would be turned upside down and lowered upside down inside this tank of water and the stocks would then be locked to it and it had a glass front so the audience could see him which was tremendously dramatic and it was really his master PC sign that kind of brought everything together in that and again it would be concealed and and he would he would he would step three that was not widely imitated it was you know first of all very very expensive piece of magic apparatus and also just too dangerous people did not copy the the the water torture cell full dead but it wasn't like like the Jack and that was really became Houdini's signature feet not his his model act he would regularly do the water torture cell that's what that's what people really enjoy it say okay see more questions if you have the time and we gonna make sure we you have a website we need to give that to your allowed after after this on WBZ JJ Bradley J..

Harry Houdini Michael Boston John
"harry houdini" Discussed on True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"harry houdini" Discussed on True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

"Welcome to kids and mystery. I'm your host kept crumb today the man from beyond nearly killed magician. Addition Harry Houdini. Now the story starts at Niagara Falls. So that's where we'll begin. Most people relate Niagara Falls with the image of someone going over in a barrel. I will take a look at the fall and a flow of water of over three thousand one hundred sixty tons as per second. The word formidable fits the first person to go over. The false was anti Edison Taylor sixty three year old schoolteacher who took took the plunge in an oak pickle barrel five feet long three feet around the year was nineteen o one. The entire event from climbing into the barrel to climbing now took twenty minutes. She died April Twenty Ninth Nineteen Twenty one now. Remember that date magician. Harry Houdini Love I. Love Niagara Falls. Visited them numerous times with his wife. Beth he told her that he was drawn to the false by their sheer power. Houdini Cop Film Own Bug in eighteen ninety nine and nineteen one the same year. That Annie Edson Taylor made her plunge over the falls he made. They dispersed movie. His second film was a Hollywood feature film the grim game and came out in nineteen nineteen. It was successful enough that he went on to make the third film. The man from beyond most exciting action took place at Niagara Falls was filmed the same day as the passing of an Edison. Taylor who was the first to go over the falls in a barrel Harry. Houdini was athlete from a young age in as a teen when numerous metal simple diving and swimming events held in and around New York he could oldest breath for five minutes and had the ability to slow his heart rate although oh he was a magician in that he was accomplished in both cards and coin. Magic he found his calling as an escape artist and the marketing of that talent taking on all challengers in the process the effected combined his skills of Escape and working while underwater was best demonstrated when he was shackled. Cool hand and foot locked in a packing crate and lowered into a river when it came time to film the ban for beyond Houdini is the hero was due to rescue the heroin from going over Niagara Falls. The actress was strapped into a harness with cables could be reeled out or pulled in she. He was filmed clinging to a rock just above the edge of the falls airy was to swim to take her off the raw swimmer to safety but Houdini would have none of the leather harness in cables he started upstream so he could swim with the current but when he neared the boulder heroin clung to the speed of the water was was a champion ten miles per hour as he neared the boulder was cleared to his wife film crew that he was out of control and was be swept along faster Astra than he could swim. The story goes that the actress saw that Houdini was in trouble and extended her arm which he gratefully took and essentially clung to her as she was pulled in needle say that part of the film was cut out and it was also the last film with short lived movie career now. For the controversy there are several counts of how he wore a leather harness. Also these claims are false. The report of his rescue that I use here was taken from a portion of notes. Were not to be released until after his wife's death a similar account came from his biographer. Prefer Walter B Gibson. Gibson was a close friend of both Harry and his wife. BESS for ten years after Houdini. Death best kept a candle burning. And during a CEOS each halloween she would attempt to make contact she finally gave the event and the candle to Walter. B Gibson who who continued with the annual sales until giving charts or the same seance to magician dorothy dietrich the man from beyond that nearly killed Harry. Houdini was produced. I hear at night owl. Sound studio brought to you by the Rogue Valley Metaphysical Library and AL CREEK CABINET RETREAT AT OUT CREEK CABIN DOT COM check could out. I'm kid crump..

The Man From Beyond Nearly Killed Harry Houdini

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:08 min | 3 years ago

The Man From Beyond Nearly Killed Harry Houdini

"Harry Houdini. Now the story starts at Niagara Falls. So that's where we'll begin. Most people relate Niagara Falls with the image of someone going over in a barrel. I will take a look at the fall and a flow of water of over three thousand one hundred sixty tons as per second. The word formidable fits the first person to go over. The false was anti Edison Taylor sixty three year old schoolteacher who took took the plunge in an oak pickle barrel five feet long three feet around the year was nineteen o one. The entire event from climbing into the barrel to climbing now took twenty minutes. She died April Twenty Ninth Nineteen Twenty one now. Remember that date magician. Harry Houdini Love I. Love Niagara Falls. Visited them numerous times with his wife. Beth he told her that he was drawn to the false by their sheer power. Houdini Cop Film Own Bug in eighteen ninety nine and nineteen one the same year. That Annie Edson Taylor made her plunge over the falls he made. They dispersed movie. His second film was a Hollywood feature film the grim game and came out in nineteen nineteen. It was successful enough that he went on to make the third film. The man from beyond most exciting action took place at Niagara Falls was filmed the same day as the passing of an Edison. Taylor who was the first to go over the falls in a barrel Harry. Houdini was athlete from a young age in as a teen when numerous metal simple diving and swimming events held in and around New York he could oldest breath for five minutes and had the ability to slow his heart rate although oh he was a magician in that he was accomplished in both cards and coin. Magic he found his calling as an escape artist and the marketing of that talent taking on all challengers in the process the effected combined his skills of Escape and working while underwater was best demonstrated when he was shackled. Cool hand and foot locked in a packing crate and lowered into a river when it came time to film the ban for beyond Houdini is the hero was due to rescue the heroin from going over Niagara Falls. The actress was strapped into a harness with cables could be reeled out or pulled in she. He was filmed clinging to a rock just above the edge of the falls airy was to swim to take her off the raw swimmer to safety but Houdini would have none of the leather harness in cables he started upstream so he could swim with the current but when he neared the boulder heroin clung to the speed of the water was was a champion ten miles per hour as he neared the boulder was cleared to his wife film crew that he was out of control and was be swept along faster Astra than he could swim. The story goes that the actress saw that Houdini was in trouble and extended her arm which he gratefully took and essentially clung to her as she was pulled in needle say that part of the film was cut out and it was also the last film with short lived movie career now. For the controversy there are several counts of how he wore a leather harness. Also these claims are false. The report of his rescue that I use here was taken from a portion of notes. Were not to be released until after his wife's death a similar account came from his biographer. Prefer Walter B Gibson. Gibson was a close friend of both Harry and his wife. BESS for ten years after Houdini. Death best kept a candle burning. And during a CEOS each halloween she would attempt to make contact she finally gave the event and the candle to Walter. B Gibson who who continued with the annual sales until giving charts or the same seance to magician dorothy dietrich the man from beyond that nearly killed Harry.

Harry Houdini Niagara Falls Annie Edson Taylor Walter B Gibson Heroin Edison Dorothy Dietrich Hollywood Beth Boulder Astra New York Three Thousand One Hundred Six Sixty Three Year Twenty Minutes Five Minutes Three Feet Five Feet Ten Years
"harry houdini" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"harry houdini" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Don't remember the the stats on that but you know there's a there's a forthcoming biography out in the you know so many performers you know live by the philosophy I'm gonna try to outdo Houdini you know he's still a the gold standard for any magician escape artist to do anything I'm going to do what Houdini did but better and but obviously no one to it even duplicate what Houdini's did and and and and that's the one they would be amazing Joe it would be very easy to to make a mockery of this person who try to outdo Lucchini was killed but we didn't want to do that in its repair it that's probably one of the saddest stories in the in the book especially because we were dealing with the sun but I don't think people can try to recreate something from the past right birth. right in our book we kind of several of magicians an escape artist who died trying to outdo Houdini there was one person who was attempting a straight jacket escape walls the suspended on on a rope that was burning of somebody died in his in his milk and water escape and then there's amazing Joe Burris an amazing show died on Halloween night in nineteen ninety the sixty fourth anniversary of Harry Houdini's death and what he was doing was you want to be buried alive in a in a. plastic clear often under dirt and a layer of cement Danny had added tempted the buried alive start back in nineteen fifteen and almost.

Lucchini Joe Burris Harry Houdini Danny milk
"harry houdini" Discussed on Q95

Q95

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"harry houdini" Discussed on Q95

"Ron Goldman were murdered man, quote unquote that remains unsolved by the way to do. Relied a mystery still at large. Yeah. Yeah. Ever know. I do go to Vegas. I think you'll find Dalia. Read that book about how he did it, but didn't really do. Yeah. Yeah. On this date, and now he's still tied with Ray Lewis for the most career murders. How does that work? Yeah. Ran bravery, only have one. Yeah. Theoretically, or allegedly or whatever you want to say, right, okay. Sorry, what else? Nineteen twenty three Harry Houdini, frees himself from a straitjacket, while hanging upside down forty feet above the ground in New York City. Pretty cool down you freedom sell from the straitjacket upside down that Lord Lord of now. It's kind of hard to get stuck in an elevator when you or that guy, you know. You've been able to get out of a straight jacket, and he would get out of underwater harder to get out of a closed elevator. Then it would be a straightjacket, ladies and gentlemen. We all remember the movie Houdini, with Tony Curtis. Is Harry Houdini escaping from a jacket as portrayed by Josh Arnold as Tony Curtis. I was there. From brooklyn. Today. Though today a forty feet in the air. Sure if you're hanging upside down would probably kill you. But by today's standards hang from the top of a big building, then we're now we're talking nineteen Twenty-three, how many big buildings were there. Plenty that weren't you not entertained. Hey, look, I get my zipper undone half the time. So getting out of a straightjacket. I understand the appeal, but I'm just saying in today's world, you'd have to. They would do it legend has it could pick a lock with his feet really. Well, exciting. What else happened? Data nineteen fifty four rock around the clock by Bill Haley was released holds up two total crap. One two, three o'clock, four days city, seven o'clock. It's the why it is. So we could ever right?.

Harry Houdini Ron Goldman Tony Curtis Bill Haley Dalia Vegas Ray Lewis New York City brooklyn Josh Arnold forty feet four days
"harry houdini" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

14:39 min | 3 years ago

"harry houdini" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Next hour. We'll take your stories and questions for them as well. Your ghost stories what time period less were these ghost stories from generally in this book, mostly they're from the Victorian age. And I'm I'm really glad you asked that question because I wanted to come back to a little bit. Your question about Sherlock, Holmes? This is the hey day. This is the the Venus of an the idea that reason science can conquer the world. And at the same time, we have all these stories, and sort of how do they fit together how do those two impulses come together? And I think this is a fundamental question of why people like to read horror. I have my own personal theory, by the way, it should mention Lisa is the president of the horror writers associate. I happen to be the treasurer. So we both given a lot of thought to the genre of horror writing. I have this kind of crackpot theory that horror we read horror fiction because it's practice. It's were hersal it it gives us a sense that we can control scary things because we can close the book, and and we're in charge. And I think that's vinyl. And I think that is a product of the Victorian age in that sense of oh, we're all powerful. We're reasoning humans, and or the empire, and all those things were there any stories less that you rejected. Oh, sure, we, you know, some of the stories that are just so well known or it was just we rejected stories where they were just too many. For example, we had to limit ourselves to only one story by m r James who I think is and maybe at least agrees the finest writer of ghost stories ever. Yeah. And and there's just he's written so many wonderful stories to choose just one was painful. You would say he was probably the best ghostwriter. Yep. Interesting. Why do they call those who help books? I've I've had a lot of authors. Ghostwriter? There unseen. They don't they don't get paid. I dunno minor on my cover with me. Put them right there. Well, those aren't ghostwriters then no writers that that's true. That's a good point as told to. So. But you haven't played Ghostbusters yet for us. I kept expecting that to be the female. Are you never know? I save that for Halloween. So there you go. That the I wanted to get you on now, and they we were talking about. Well, let's say save them for Halloween. But I said now, I mean the books out, right? That's right. Comes out to today timing is publication date. So this is it hot off the press. Lisa, you think my theory. But we're is is crazy. You have your own ideas. I know about why people read or go stories, I think we're pretty well aligned on that. I agree. Almost completely with that. Lisa. Have you had a personal ghost story for yourself? I know you haven't seen a ghost. But have you had any personal episodes? Well, like I said I have participated in a number of paranormal investigations, I did one at the Stanley hotel in Colorado classic place. Exactly. I mean, it's so well known that some people call it the Disneyland for ghost. I didn't overnight investigation in the Queen Mary, which is another venue. That's supposed to be incredibly haunted. And I there were definitely strange things that happened. But I felt like a lot of it had to do with people who wanted to experience something I I said in a pitch black room in the basement of an outbuilding at the Stanley hotel and people around me were were practically screaming, something touched me. And I mean, I'm sitting right next to them. And I'm not experiencing this. I don't just credit anything at all that they said they just experienced something different than I did. And like I said, I would love to know what that was. Why does seem though that the Victorian era? Seemed spookier than now. I think we were still kind of coming out of the dark ages the industrial revolution had only happened a short time before that. I think it was the close. Yeah. We have also I mean, it's hard for us today to keep the perspective that even reading was a new thing for the great middle class of of Europe. People didn't have books they couldn't afford books. Reading with a new idea how they just started premium. Right. Well, yeah. But I mean, it was basically an upper class thing to buy books and reading was taught in the upper class schools, and there weren't public schools that were teaching reading so the growth of the reading public meant that stories could be shared in a different way. It wasn't just ballads. It wasn't just music performances. People writing down their own experiences and sharing them now. Zine the magazines. We're almost bigger than the books. The new printing technologies came around in the second half of the nineteenth century made magazines humongous. Sleep popular, and those magazines needed lots and lots of content. So people were writing a lot of all kinds of stories to fill them up at especially ghost stories. And nowadays, of course, people are sharing ghost videos on their smartphones. And everything else they never had that during the Victorian era, obviously. But technology has changed a lot of things. And I think, you know, the overt ghost story is we we're all little bit more cynical about it now, but we're not still quite ready to dismiss them. I did a panel at the LA times festival of books a year ago with Paul Tremblay whose story called ghosts in ghosts in my head as a terrific novel about what seems to be sort of a a real life exorcist situation. And I trust that as an example of the absolutely current interest in ghost stories and. And those kinds of psychological pails the Gulf stories of the Victorian era were were classic. But they also seem to have more science essay on sizes and mediums and people like that didn't they sure? Well, the spiritualism movement began really in the middle of the nineteenth century with the FOX sisters in in America table, wrapping and all that sort of thing and it spread like wildfire throughout America. And and your and so yes, there was a widespread interest in exactly what you said seances mediums attempts to communicate with the other side. I think that's diminished considerably. I'm not sure with any particularly good reason accepted seem to be a lot less people claiming to be mediums and everything so fragmented now. Yeah. It's interesting that that rise in spiritualism and mediums led to this sort of pseudoscientific side of it too. With DSP are the society for psychical research, which formed partly as a way to sort of debunk a lot of these mediums who we're making tremendous amounts of money symbol them from the high society in London and other big cities and bring very gullible people, you I mean, there was a huge need to believe because we'd gone through you know, with the American civil war. We had the terrible wars in in Europe at the end of nineteenth century. And then of course, we all were one which left so many people bereft they desperately wanted to believe that they could connect to their loved ones they lost. When I have a psychic on the program or a medium, and I find out obviously, they need a living. But the I really appreciate the ones that charge. Minimal dollars to people as opposed to those that charge a lot. I think it's I think that that tells me volumes of who they are. It's it's exposing fake mediums was a great occupation of Conan Doyle himself, and Harry Houdini. Harry Houdini his friend Harry Houdini for a long time in the beginning of the nineteenth twentieth century because there were so many there were so many fakes preying on things. And. Yeah. Conan Doyle's own wife, Jean yourself with medium in whom he believed who didn't Houdini did not Houdini. He he didn't believe but he wanted to he did want to. But he just couldn't believe in her. And he never found. He never found the proof. He was looking for and when Conan Doyle's wife claimed to have channeled Houdini. He's mother was when Houdini broke off his friendship with Conan Doyle. It was very sad that he he so wanted to believe in this. And yet it was there was some there was it was clear evidence in the sand that something there was something wrong. Gene lucky was his wife. Indeed back in ninety got married in one thousand nine hundred seven Gs second time I can't even count back that far. Tully would has done a pretty good job on ghosts. But it is also made things very very scary. Maybe scarier than it really is. What do you think less? I, you know, I actually think that real those stories are scarier than most of what comes out of Hollywood. Especially by the time you start adding in the CGI, and and the amped up music and so forth. I to me one of the scariest ghost movies is the entity from eighties because that was based on a real case. And that they stuck a little bit more in that movie to the real reportings of what that Harding was like, and for that reason, I found that one to be much scarier than some of the ones where everything is flying around in tons of the one of the movies. I thought that felt scary. It really wasn't. When you watch the whole movie, it's a good movie. But it's. Seemed very scary was the lady in white you. Remember that one? Right. I mean, the the way at the end she kind of floated in and all that, you know, the see her little kid, and it just was a weird feeling some of the movies. I mean, it's interesting to see Hollywood stake. Unfortunately, of course, like most of Hollywood many of the movies are sort of what's the word exploitative. I mean, they go for the cheap and easy were instead slow budget. Right. But instead of the sensitivity, and as we tried to say about some of these stories these stories are so interesting because they look at things from the perspective of the ghost or they look at the the strong, human emotions, not necessarily evil at all evil, the strong human emotions of contact between living and dead. A few movies have done that. You look at even the Patrick Swayze ghost movie was it was a smoker serious attempt to look at that. You look at movies like six cents or things like that. And they are fascinating because they're not traditional ghost movies. There's stories really about what it would be like to be a ghost and to have to sort of look through the dark glasses at the human existence. What do you think of these stories of people who, you know, like a see the lady in white hitchhiking, and they pick her up and she wants to be dropped off at some corner. And it turns out to be a cemetery and she disappears. These are real stories. Absolutely. I I don't think the stories are made up. I think people have had those kinds of experiences. Sometimes what they think of is a ghost story. Isn't it? Go story. It's something else. But ghosts. You know, they work is kind of an explanation for some of these things. And maybe some of those are ghosts or spirits, or whatever you wanna call them. Taking ghost kind of worldwide to it's interesting that the I found variations of that in places like Malaysia where they have a legend of something called the Pontiac, which is a woman that that is by the side of the road, and we'll stop and you'll give her a ride, and it never turns out. Well, I'll that's a good point too. We are with less Clinger. Lisa Morton, we're going to take calls next hour stories and definitely your questions. Of course, what are you working on next less? Well, I have a second volume of annotated lovecraft coming out this summer, and then I'm really excited later in the year, Neil Gaiman, and I've been working on the annotated edition of his wonderful American gods novel and that'll come out in the fall super Lisa. How about you? I'm gonna be doing another nonfiction book that I can't discuss too much of yet. But it is related to ghost again. So I'm really excited and you both live out in the Los Angeles area. Right. Yes. Ghosts tend to be really old. There's tend to speak Spanish here. Would you call?.

Lisa Morton Harry Houdini Conan Doyle Hollywood Europe Stanley hotel treasurer Sherlock Neil Gaiman president Colorado Los Angeles America Patrick Swayze Malaysia London James Holmes
"harry houdini" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:44 min | 3 years ago

"harry houdini" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"It wasn't just ballads. It wasn't just musical performances. People writing down their own experiences and sharing them now. The magazines. We're almost bigger than the books. The new printing technologies that came around in the second half of the nineteenth century made magazines humongous popular, and those magazines needed lots and lots of content. So people were writing a lot of all kinds of stories to fill them up. But especially ghost stories and nowadays, of course, people are sharing ghost videos on their smartphones. And everything else they never had that during the Victorian era, obviously. But technology has changed a lot of things. And I think, you know, the overt ghost story is we we're all little bit more cynical about it now, but we're not still quite ready to dismiss them. I did a panel at the only times festival of books a year ago with Paul trembling whose story called ghosts in ghosts in my head as a terrific novel about what seems to be sort of a a real life situation, and I used to trust that is an example of. Of the absolutely current interest in ghost stories, and those kinds of psychological tales, the ghost stories of the Victorian era were were classic. But they also seem to have more science. And mediums and people like that didn't they sure? Well, the spiritualism movement began really in the middle of the nineteenth century with the FOX sisters in in America. Table wrapping and all that sort of thing and it spread like wildfire throughout America. And and your and so yes, there was a widespread interest in exactly what you said seances mediums attempts to communicate with the other side. I think that's diminished considerably. I'm not sure with any particularly good reason, except that seem to be a lot less people claiming to be mediums and everything so fragmented now. Yeah. Interesting that that rise in spiritualism and mediums led to the sort of pseudoscientific side of it too. With the SP are the society for psychical research, which formed partly as a way to sort of debunk a lot of these mediums who we're making tremendous amounts of money. Some of them from the high society in London and other big cities and bring on very gullible people, you you. I mean, there was a huge need to believe because we'd gone through you know, with the American civil war. We had the terrible wars in in Europe at the end of the nineteenth century. And then of course, we all were one which left so many people bereft they desperately wanted to believe that they could connect to their loved ones who they lost. When I have a psychic on the program or a medium, and I find out obviously, they need a living. But the I really appreciate the ones that charge minimal dollars to people as opposed to those that charge a lot. I think it's. I think that tells me volumes of who they are. It's it's exposing fake mediums was a great occupation of Conan Doyle himself in Harry Houdini. Harry Houdini, whose friend Harry Houdini. For a long time in the beginning of the nineteenth. Twentieth century because there were so many there were so many fakes preying on things. And. Yeah. Coming into his own wife, Jean? Herself with medium in whom he believed who didn't Houdini did not Houdini. He he didn't he believe, but he wanted to he did want to. But he just couldn't believe in her. And he never found. He never found the proof. He was looking for and went Conan Doyle's wife claimed to have channeled Houdini. He's mother was when Houdini broke off his friendship with Conan Doyle. It was very sad that he so wanted to believe in this. And yet it was there was some there was there was clear evidence in saying that something there was something wrong. Gene lucky was his wife. Indeed back in nineteen got married in one thousand nine hundred seven Gs second time I can't even count back that far. Hollywood has done a pretty good job on ghosts. But it has also made things very very scary. Maybe scarier than it really is. What do you think less? I, you know, I actually think that real ghost stories are scarier than most of what comes out of Hollywood. Especially by the time you start adding in the CGI, and and the amped up music and so forth..

Harry Houdini Conan Doyle Jean Hollywood America London Europe Paul
"harry houdini" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

03:58 min | 3 years ago

"harry houdini" Discussed on 600 WREC

"And I trust that as an example of the absolutely current interest in ghost stories. And those kinds of psychological tales, the Gulf stories of the Victorian era were were classic. But they also seem to have more science essay on sizes and mediums and people like that didn't they sure? Well, the spiritualism movement began really in the middle of the nineteenth century with the FOX sisters in in America. Table wrapping and all that sort of thing and it spread like wildfire throughout America. And and your and so yes, there was a widespread interest in exactly what you said seances mediums attempts to communicate with the other side. I think that's diminished considerably. I'm not sure with any particularly good reason except seem to be a lot less people claiming to be mediums and everything so fragmented now. Yeah. It's interesting that that rise in spiritualism and mediums led to the sort of pseudoscientific side of it too. With the SP are the society for psychical research, which formed partly as a way to sort of debunk a lot of these mediums who we're making tremendous amounts of money. Some of them from the high society in London and other big cities and bring on very gullible people, you I mean, there was a huge need to believe because we'd gone through you know, with the American civil war. We had the terrible wars in in Europe at the end of the nineteenth century. And then of course, we all wore one which left so many people bereft they desperately wanted to believe that they could connect to their loved ones who they lost. When I have a psychic on the program or a medium, and I find out obviously, they need a living. But the I really appreciate the ones that charge. Minimal dollars to people as opposed to those that charge a lot. I think it's I think that that tells me volumes of who they are. It's it's exposing fake mediums was a great occupation of Conan Doyle himself, and Harry Houdini. Harry Houdini his friend Harry Houdini for a long time in the beginning of the nineteenth twentieth century because there were so many there were so many fakes bring up things and yet Conan Doyle's own wife, Jean yourself with medium in whom he believed who didn't Houdini did not Houdini. He he didn't believe but he wanted to he did want to. But he just couldn't believe in her. And he never found you never found the proof. He was looking for. And when Conan Doyle's wife claimed to have channeled Houdini. He's mother was when Houdini broke off his friendship with Conan Doyle. It was very sad that he he so wanted to believe in this. And yet it was there was some there was it was clear evidence that something there was something wrong. Gene lucky was his wife. Indeed. Back in nineteen got married in one thousand nine hundred seven Gs second time I can't even count back that far. Hollywood has done a pretty good job on ghosts. But it is also made things very very scary. Maybe scarier than it really is. What do you think less? I, you know, I actually think that real ghost stories are scarier than most of what comes out of Hollywood. Especially by the time you start adding in the CGI, and and the amped up music and so forth..

Harry Houdini Conan Doyle Jean America Hollywood Europe London
"harry houdini" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

13:47 min | 3 years ago

"harry houdini" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Hour. We'll take your stories and questions for them as well. Your ghost stories what time period less were these ghost stories from generally in this book mo- mostly they're from the Victorian age. And I'm I'm really glad you asked that question because I wanted to come back to a little bit. Your question about Sherlock, Holmes? This is the heyday this is the the zenith of an the idea that reason science can conquer the world. And at the same time, we have all these ghost stories, and sort of how do they fit together how do those two impulses come together? And I think this is a fundamental question of why people like to read horror. I have my own personal theory, by the way, I should mention Lisa is the president of the horror writers assoc. I have to be the treasurer. So we both given a lot of thought to the genre of horror writing. I have this kind of crackpot theory that horror we read horror fiction because it's practice. It's were hersal it it gives us a sense that we can control scary things because we can close the book, and and we're in charge, and I think that's vital. And I think that is a product of the Victorian age in that sense of oh, we're all powerful. We're reasoning humans, and or the empire and all those things where there any stories less that you rejected. Oh, sure, we, you know, some of the stories that are just so well known or it was just we rejected stories where they were just too many. For example, we had to limit ourselves to only one story by m r James who I think is and maybe at least agrees the finest writer of ghost stories ever. Yeah. And know, and there's just he's written so many wonderful stories to choose just one was painful. You would say he was probably the best ghostwriter. Yup. Interesting. Why do they call those who helped books life? I've had a lot of authors. Ghostwriter? There unseen. They don't they don't get paid. I don't know minor on my cover with me. Put them right there. Those are ghostwriters then no writers. That's true. That's a good point as told to. So. But you haven't played Ghostbusters yet for us. I kept expecting that to be the female. You never know. I save that for Halloween. So there you go. I wanted to get you on now, and they we were talking about. Well, let's stay save them for Halloween. But I said now, I mean the books. How right. That's right comes to today. They timing is publication date. So this is it hot off the press. Lisa. Do you think my theory about were is is crazy? You have your own ideas. I know about why people read or ghost stories. Well, I think we're we're pretty well aligned on that. I agree. Almost completely with that. Lisa. Have you had a personal ghost story for yourself? I know you haven't seen a ghost. But have you had any personal episodes? Well, like I said I have participated in a number of paranormal investigations, I did want at the Stanley hotel in Colorado classic place. Exactly. I mean, it's so well knowing that some people call it the Disneyland for ghost. I didn't overnight investigation in the Queen Mary, which is another venue. That's supposed to be incredibly haunted. And I there were definitely strange things that happened. But I felt like a lot of it had to do with people who wanted to experience something I I said in a pitch black room in the basement of an outbuilding at the Stanley hotel and people around me were were practically screaming, something touched me. And I mean, I'm sitting right next to them. And I'm not experiencing this. I don't this credit anything at all that they said, they just experienced. Something different than I did. And like I said, I would love to know what that was. Why does it seem though that the Victorian era seemed spookier than now? I think we were still kind of coming out of the dark ages the industrial revolution had only happened. A short time before that it was the close. Yeah. We have to also I mean, it's hard for us today to keep the perspective that even reading was a new thing for the great middle class of of Europe. People didn't have books they couldn't afford books. Reading with a new idea. They just started Praemium. Right. Right. Well, yeah. But I mean, it was basically an upper class thing to buy books and reading was taught in the upper class schools, and there weren't public schools that were teaching reading so the growth of the reading public meant that stories could be shared in a different way. It wasn't just ballads. It wasn't just musical performances. People writing down their own experiences and sharing them now. For hanging scenes, the magazines we're almost bigger than the books. The new printing technologies came around in the second half of the nineteenth century made magazines humongous. Sleep popular, and those magazines needed lots and lots of content. So people were writing a lot of all kinds of stories to fill them up at especially ghost stories. And nowadays, of course, people are sharing ghost videos on their smartphones. And everything else they never had that during the Victorian era, obviously. But the technology has changed a lot of things I think, you know, the overt ghost story is we we're all a little bit more cynical about it now. But we're not still quite ready to dismiss them. I did a panel at the LA times festival books a year ago with Paul Tremblay whose story called ghosts in ghosts in my head as a terrific novel about what seems to be sort of a a real life situation. And I trust that as an example of the absolutely current interest in ghost stories. And those kinds of psychological tales, the Gulf stories of the Victorian era were were classic. But they also seem to have more science essay on sizes and mediums and people like that didn't they sure? Well, the spiritualism movement began really in the middle of the nineteenth century with the FOX sisters in in America table, wrapping and all that sort of thing and it spread like wildfire throughout America. And and your and so yes, there was a widespread interest in exactly what you said seances mediums attempts to communicate with the other side. I think that's minist- considerably. I'm not sure with any particularly good reason, except that seem to be a lot less people claiming to be mediums and and everything so fragmented now. Yeah. It's interesting that that rise in spiritualism and mediums led to this sort of pseudoscientific side of it too. With DSP are the society for psychical research, which formed partly as a way to sort of debunk a lot of these mediums who we're making tremendous amounts of money symbol them from the high society in London and other big cities and bring a very gullible people, you I mean, there was a huge need to believe because we'd gone through you know, with the American civil war. We had the terrible wars in in Europe at the end of the nineteenth century. And then of course, we'll one which left so many people bereft they desperately wanted to believe that they could connect to their loved ones who they lost. When I have a psychic on the program or a medium, and I find out obviously, they need a living. But I really appreciate the ones that charge. Minimal dollars to people as opposed to those that charge a lot. I think it's I think that that tells me volumes of who they are. It's it's exposing fake mediums was a great occupation of Conan Doyle himself, and Harry Houdini, and Harry Houdini his friend Harry Houdini for a long time in the beginning of the nineteen twentieth century because there were so many there were so many fakes preying on things. And. Yeah. Coming into his own wife, Jean yourself with medium in whom he believed who didn't Houdini did not Houdini. He he didn't believe but he wanted to he did want to. But he just couldn't believe in her. And he never found you never found the proof. He was looking for and when Conan Doyle's wife claim to have channeled Houdini. He's mother was when Houdini broke off his friendship with Conan Doyle. It was very sad that he so wanted to believe in this. And yet it was there was there was it was clear evidence in San that something there was something wrong. Gene lucky was his wife. Indeed. The I ninety got married in one thousand nine hundred seven Gs second time I can't even count back that far. Hollywood has done a pretty good job on ghosts. But it is also made things very very scary. Maybe scarier than it really is. What do you think less? I, you know, I actually think that real ghost stories are scarier than most of what comes out of Hollywood. Especially by the time you start adding in the CGI, and and the amped up music and so forth. I to me one of the scariest ghost movies is the entity from eighties because that was based on a real case. And that they stuck a little bit more in that movie to the real reportings of what that hunting was like. And for that reason, I found that one to be much scarier than some of the ones where everything is flying around and tons of CGI the one of the movies. I thought that felt scary. It really wasn't. When you watch the whole movie, it's a good movie. But it seemed very scary was the lady in white you remember that one? Right. I mean, the the the way at the end she kind of floated in and all that. You know to see her little kid, and it just was a weird feeling some some of the movies. I mean, it's interesting to see Hollywood stake. Unfortunately, of course, like most of Hollywood many of the movies are sort of what's the word exploitative. I mean, they go for the cheap and easy hor instead slow budget. Right. But instead of the sensitivity, and as we tried to say about some of these stories these stories are so interesting because they look at things from the perspective of the ghost or they look at the the strong, human emotions, not necessarily evil at all evil, the strong human emotions of contact between living and dead. A few movies have done that you look at even the Patrick Swayze ghost movie. I was it was a small serious attempt to look at that. You look at movies like the sixth sense. It's or things like that. And and they are fascinating because they're not traditional ghost movies. There's stories really about what it would be like to be a ghost and to have to sort of look through the dark glass at the human existence. What do you think of these stories of people who, you know, like a see the lady in white hitchhiking, and they pick her up and she wants to be dropped off at some corner. And it turns out to be a cemetery and she disappears. These are real stories. Absolutely. I don't think those stories are made up. I think people have had those kinds of experiences. Sometimes what they think of is a ghost story is into go story at something else. But ghosts, you know, they work as kind of an explanation for some of these things, and maybe some of those are ghosts or spirits, or whatever you wanna call them. The hitchhiking ghost is kind of worldwide to it's interesting that I found variations of that in places like Malaysia where they have a legend of something called the Pontianak, which is a woman that is by the side of the road, and we'll stop and you'll give her a ride, and it never turns out. Well, that's a good point too..

Harry Houdini Lisa Hollywood Stanley hotel Conan Doyle Europe treasurer Patrick Swayze James Sherlock LA times president Colorado writer America Malaysia London Praemium Holmes
"harry houdini" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

14:23 min | 3 years ago

"harry houdini" Discussed on KTOK

"Lisa Morton next hour. We'll take your stories and questions for them as well. Your ghost stories what time period less were these ghost stories from generally in this book mo- mostly they're from the Victorian age. And I'm really glad you asked that question because I wanted to come back to a little bit. Your question about Sherlock, Holmes? This is the hey day. This is the the zenith of an the idea that reason science can conquer the world. And at the same time, we have all these ghost stories, and sort of how do they fit together how do those two impulses come together? And I think this is a fundamental question of why people like to read horror. I have my own personal theory, by the way, it should mention Lisa is. The president of the horror Writers Association. I happened to be the treasurer. So we both given a lot of thought to the genre of horror writing. I have this kind of crackpot theory that horror we read horror fiction because it's practice. It's were hersal it. It gives us sense that we can control scary things because we can close the book, and and we're in charge, and I think that's vital. And I think that is a product of the Victorian age in that sense of oh, we're all powerful. We're reasoning humans, and or the empire, and all those things were there any stories less that you rejected. Oh, sure, we, you know, some of the stories that are just so well known or it was just we rejected stories where they were just too many. For example, we had to limit ourselves SU only one story by MR James who I think is. And maybe at Lisa agrees the finest writer of ghost stories ever. Yeah. And you know, and there's just he's written so many wonderful stories to choose just one was painful. You would say he was probably the best ghost rider. Yup. Interesting. Why do they call those who helped books life? I've had a lot of authors ghostwriter. There unseen. They don't they don't get paid. I dunno minor on my cover with me put them right there. Well, those aren't ghostwriters then no writers. That's true. That's a good point as told to. So. But you haven't played Ghostbusters yet for us. I kept expecting that to be the theme music. You never know. I save that for Halloween. So there you go. I wanted to get you on now, and they we were talking about. Well, let's say save them for Halloween. But now, I mean the books out, right? That's right. Comes to today timing is publication date. So this is it hot off the press. Lisa. Do you think my theory? But were is is crazy. You have your own ideas. I know about why people read or ghost stories. Well, I think we're we're pretty well aligned on that. I agree. Almost completely with that. Lisa. Have you had a personal ghost story for yourself? I know you haven't seen a ghost. But have you had any personal episodes? Well, like I said I have participated in a number of paranormal investigations, I did one at the Stanley hotel in Colorado classic place. Exactly. I mean, it's so well known that some people call it the Disneyland for ghost. I didn't overnight investigation in the Queen Mary, which is another venue. That's supposed to be incredibly haunted. And I there were definitely strange things that happened. But I felt like a lot of it had to do with people who wanted to experience something I I said in a pitch black room in the basement of an outbuilding at the Stanley hotel and people around me were were practically screaming, something touched me. And I mean, I'm sitting right next to them. And I'm not experiencing this. I don't just credit anything at all that they said, they just experienced. Something different than I did. And like I said, I would love to know what that was. Why does it seem though that the Victorian era? Seemed spookier than now. I think we were still kind of coming out of the dark ages the industrial revolution had only happened a short time before that. I think it was the close. Yeah. We have also it's hard for us today to keep the perspective that even reading was a new thing for the great middle class of of Europe. People didn't have books that couldn't afford books. Reading with a new idea. They just started Praemium. Right, right. Well, yeah. But I mean, it was basically an upper class thing to buy books and reading was taught in the upper class schools, and there weren't public schools that were teaching reading so the growth of the reading public meant that stories could be shared in a different way. It wasn't just ballads. It wasn't just musical performances was people writing down their own experiences and sharing them. Now. Hang the magazines. We're almost bigger than the books. The new printing technologies that came around in the second half of the nineteenth century made magazines humongous. Sleep popular, and those magazines needed lots and lots of content. So people were writing a lot of all kinds of stories to fill them up at especially ghost stories. And nowadays, of course, people are sharing ghost videos on their smartphones. And everything else they never had that during the Victorian era, obviously. But technology has changed a lot of things I think, you know, the overt ghost story is we we're all little bit more cynical about it now, but we're not still quite ready to dismiss them. I did a panel at the LA times festival of books. So your to ago with Paul Tremblay whose story called ghosts in ghosts in my head as a terrific novel about what seems to be sort of a real life situation. And I trust that as an example of the absolutely current interest in ghost stories and. And those kinds of psychological tales, the ghost stories of the Victorian era work were classic. But they also seem to have more science essay on sizes and mediums and people like that didn't they sure? Well, the spiritualism movement began really in the middle of the nineteenth century with the FOX sisters in in America table, wrapping and all that sort of thing and it spread like wildfire throughout America. And and your and so yes, there was a widespread interest in exactly what you said seances mediums attempts to communicate with the other side. I think that's diminished considerably. I'm not sure with any particularly good reason accepted seem to be a lot less people claiming to be mediums and everything so fragmented now. Yeah. It's interesting that that rise in spiritualism and mediums led to the sort of pseudoscientific side of it too. With the SP are the society for psychical research, which formed partly as a way to sort of debunk a lot of these mediums who we're making tremendous amounts of money. Some of them from the high society in London and other big cities and bring very gullible people. You you. I mean, there was a huge need to believe because we'd gone through with the American civil war. We had the terrible wars in in Europe at the end of the nineteenth century. And of course, we all wore one which lifts so many people bereft they desperately wanted to believe that they could connect to their loved ones who they lost. When I have a psychic on the program or a medium, and I find out obviously, they need a living. But the I really appreciate the ones that charge. Wjr minimal dollars to people as opposed to those that charge a lot. I think it's I think that that tells me volumes of who they are. It's it's exposing fake mediums was a great occupation of Conan Doyle himself, and Harry Houdini. Harry Houdini his friend Harry Houdini for a long time in the beginning of the nineteenth twentieth century because there were so many there were so many fake spring on things. And yeah. Conan Doyle's own wife. Jean? Yourself with medium in whom he believed who didn't Houdini did not Houdini. He he didn't believe but he wanted to he did want to. But he just couldn't believe in her. And he never found. He never found the proof. He was looking for and when Conan Doyle's wife claimed to have channeled Houdini. He's mother was when Houdini broke off his friendship with Conan Doyle. It was very sad that he so wanted to believe in this. And yet it was there was some there was it was clear evidence in saying that something there was something wrong. Gene lucky was his wife. Indeed. Back in ninety got married in one thousand nine hundred seven Gs second time I can't even count back that far. Tully would has done a pretty good job on ghosts. But it is also made things very very scary. Maybe scarier than it really is. What do you think less? I, you know, I actually think that real ghost stories are scarier than most of what comes out of Hollywood. Especially by the time you start adding in the CGI, and and the amped up music and so forth. I I to me. One of the scariest ghost movies is the entity from the eighties because that was based on a real case. And that they stuck a little bit more in that movie to the real reportings of what that hunting was like. And for that reason, I found that one to be much scarier than some of the ones where everything is flying around and tons of CGI the one of the movies. I thought that felt scary. It really wasn't. When you watch the whole movie, it's a good movie. But it's. Seemed very scary was the lady in white you. Remember that one? Right. I mean, the the the the way at the end she kind of floated in and all that, you know, the see her little kid it. It was a weird feeling some of the movies. I mean, it's interesting to see Hollywood stake. Unfortunately, of course, like most of Hollywood many of the movies are sort of what's the word exploitative. I mean, they go for the cheap and easy horror instead slow budget. Right. But instead of the sensitivity, and as we tried to say about some of these stories these stories are so interesting because they look at things from the perspective of the ghost or they look at the the strong, human emotions, not necessarily evil at all evil, the strong human emotions of contact between living and dead. A few movies have done that you look at even the Patrick Swayze ghost movie. I was it was a mostly serious attempt to look at that. You look at movies like six cents or things like that. And. They are fascinating because they're not traditional ghost movies. There's stories really about what it would be like to be a ghost and to have to sort of look through the dark glass at human existence. What do you think of these stories of people who, you know, like a see the lady in white hitchhiking, and they pick her up and she wants to be dropped off at some corner. And it turns out to be a cemetery and she disappears. These are real stories. Absolutely. I I don't think those stories are made up. I think people have had those kinds of experiences. Sometimes what they think of is a ghost story is into go story at something else. But ghosts, you know, they work is kind of an explanation for some of these things, and maybe some of those are ghosts or spirits, or whatever you wanna call them. Ghost is kind of worldwide to it's interesting that I found variations of that in places like Malaysia where they have a legend of something called the Pontiac, which is a a woman that is by the side of the road, and we'll stop and you'll give her a ride, and it never turns out. Well, that's a good point too. We are with less Clinger. Lisa Morton, we're going to take calls next hour stories and definitely your questions. Of course, what are you working on next less? Well, I have a second volume of annotated lovecraft coming out this summer, and then I'm really excited later in the year, Neil Gaiman, and I have been working on the annotated edition of his wonderful American gods novel and that'll come out in the fall super Lisa. How 'bout you? I'm gonna be doing another non fiction book that I can't discuss too much of yet..

Lisa Morton Harry Houdini Conan Doyle Europe horror Writers Association Hollywood Stanley hotel treasurer MR James president Sherlock Colorado Neil Gaiman London Malaysia Patrick Swayze America Praemium Holmes
Notre Dame No. 1 in preseason women's college basketball poll

Leland Conway

00:59 min | 4 years ago

Notre Dame No. 1 in preseason women's college basketball poll

"Notre Dame is number one in the preseason AP women's college basketball poll, the Irish are the defending national champs. They returned four starters. From last season's team in second is Yukon, followed by Oregon Baylor in Louisville is ranked fifth followed by Mississippi State and magician. Harry Houdini his childhood home in New York City is being dedicated today. It's on east seventy ninth street in Manhattan and was originally a boarding house after the ceremony New York magicians will conduct a seance at Houdini apartment building to try to communicate with the legendary escape artist. Just as they do every year who d- died on Halloween in nineteen twenty six at the age of fifty two your next news update at ten thirty. I'm Paul miles NewsRadio eight forty W H, A S, Kentucky, atas, breaking news, weather, and

Harry Houdini Houdini Apartment New York City New York Paul Miles Basketball Newsradio Yukon Manhattan Louisville Mississippi Kentucky Oregon Eight Forty W