18 Burst results for "Harry Harlow"

"harry harlow" Discussed on This is Why

This is Why

07:51 min | 4 d ago

"harry harlow" Discussed on This is Why

"You take a you know. A young adult who's striking out on their first venture of university and it should be fun and exciting and instead of funding exciting and parties. And you know study groups and spending time with their classes friends there alone. That home in a tiny little apartment worried about money worried about whether they can you know. Get enough food whether they can manage the knicks homework assignment. Because they're filled subsumed the team and all those other thing so again. This is a pandemic that has huge mental health consequence. Some people will experience that is the consequences of isolation. Being an acute sense of lowly to others is going to vote tie level of anxiety or really suspension grads. And what what is this world going to look like on the other side and for feet for folks where the kind of practical part of life is sorted out. so they don't have a stable income perhaps they've been laid off because they can't do their job in cova financial and practical anxieties supersede in many ways. Things like loneliness because it's hard to quietly with yourself when you're terrified being feed your kid dr macintosh. You gave five six seven examples of different ways. We can feel lonely and anti-icty which i think speaks to. How complicated this issue is. How do we strike that balance. Then if we have things like zoom fatigue. We can't see our friends and family the difficulty to find that balance. I'm thinking is quite great. How do we strike that boy in. And i wish i wish i had like a phd level response to that. You'll be like yes. That's the answer. We're all going to feel better. And i'm sorry to tell you there is. There is some simple things we can do. You know i have. I have a number of colleagues who came to mcgill from other places in the world. They live alone. They haven't been touched since march by another human being like. Just take that information it like if you if you let that sink into your body there are thousands. Maybe millions of people on this planet right now. Who haven't been touched by another human being since march. That's going to have huge consequences in all sorts of way we think about it at a very basic biological touch is hugely important for all those good chemicals in our brains that make us feel cared for loved not lonely safe secure call all all the chemicals that are connected to are the same chemicals that are connected to heroin. Right the reason we're drawn to trucks and various kinds of addictive behaviors is because they make us feel better in the absence of healthy. Loving safe connects so some of the things that we can do. We can let go of the false mythology that zoom us stay connected at least at the biological technology we would not have to the pandemic in you know in some ways as well as we have without being able to see other people but there is a bit of a masala g that it's as good as human contact and it is not and i say this as a columnist but i also say to the human being who also been traveling this pandemic alongside my students and my patients and my friends and family will be long for human connection. Why else would people go out. In their cars to take their baby to the window of the nursing home as opposed to. hey grandma. here's the do take a look at the new baby. There are things that happen in our brain that are connected to the experience of seeing. Someone's feeling someone touching someone in real time so going out for walks and looking at three dimensional space going out for walks and looking at the other human beings who are unlock. It was interesting. You mentioning that there are you know untold numbers of people for whom they have not had physical touch for months on end. I it it for some reason. It triggered memories of psych. One on one with the harry harlow wire mother experiment in which he had young rhesus right. So for for folks who don't are familiar. With the wire mother experiment harlow had took young rhesus monkeys shortly after their birth and prevent and presented to different surrogate. Mothers one was made of a soft terry cloth but provided no food. The other was made of wire but provided nourishment from an attached baby bottle and Harlow found that these monkeys spent most of their time on the terry cloth mother the the surrogate the as apoe and only went to the wire monkey. The wire mother for occasional feedings So that that just tweaked to me. The the showing the importance of physical touch for all of us not just not just rhesus monkeys. But but but for for everybody But i'd like to explore maybe the the the often the opposite side of of of of of not dealing with maybe not not dealing but exploring a gleaning into one's loneliness can there be value found in leaning into one's loan loneliness. You said earlier that our society doesn't really value us being with ourselves. Can there be value in that of course but let choppers. Which are you know fabulous. It's all about dosage right. So isn't it great and it's a therapist. I'm really big component to helping people find ways to to quietly but themselves reflect. Take space to really listen to what's happening inside themselves. Especially if they're trying to make a difficult decision and they're feeling really conflicted. The taking that space to be mindful reflective is huge values and an appropriate dose. Remember perhaps the part you missed the heart. Logan experiment a lot of those funky nine and we would never ever allow that research to be done again. It's now shown as a yes. It's an example of how we understand attachment but it's also shown us an example of really dangerous research so be able to reflect to have time to have a these are really important things. Our society does not value them enough. We are all running around like you know chickens with their kind of trying to get a catch win the belt of stuff done.

Harlow thousands mcgill five harry harlow first venture millions of people harlow march macintosh seven examples rhesus six One Logan one
"harry harlow" Discussed on A New Direction

A New Direction

05:03 min | 3 months ago

"harry harlow" Discussed on A New Direction

"Yeah. We all know the Maslow's pyramid the hierarchy of needs right and you know the history of motivation which by the way, we have constantly in psychological research have said, you know, that's really not true. That really doesn't work that way. And Howard it demonstrates a flaw because well, I'm going to let you tell them, you know his big sure because right because our the primary need a name is that you know, it's it's our it's our physical. It's our physical needs are the primary needs and you it's right but Harry Harlow and I will let you take it away. Okay, great. Yeah. Well actually, you know Abraham Maslow created is model 1943. And for those who don't know is basically model needs is considered to be a foundational model in bondage psychology. And it was really it's really important work because it does have us look at human-to-human a tax people but Amazon created a hierarchical structure for these needs and and as you're saying Jay, it starts at the lowest level with our physiological needs food sleep that sort of thing and above that safety wage above that belonging and above that self-esteem and finally what he calls self-actualization which is when we fully realize ourselves as human beings and and for the most part that that has gone unchallenged wage. 270 years at any major way, but we now realize and and some of it is by sending functional magnetic magnetic resonating imagery. You can see which parts of the brain trigger in certain ways. We now realize that something was wrong that that that that belonging is actually a key human need and it makes sense. If you think about it, you know, what's the most vulnerable type of human being's existence infancy? Right? And if you don't belong to a gym is an infant you die and so for the first get and because human beings are more dependent on others to survive in our first couple of years than any other animal on the planet the key message that we get in the early stages of our life is Faith exists because you exist whether your Mom Dad Grandma Grandpa or whatever and so we've been we've been raw and and when we look at things like, you know a suicide bombing whether it was, you know, the Japanese in World War Two or Palestinians today or or other, I mean obviously completely refutes Maslow's notion because in there you see the need to belong to the needs of my larger group or more important in my physical needs now, he's As a footnote to the shape since I wrote the book and and and talking about this I've spoken a lot as as we talked about already and I was at a major university speaking about this and this guy comes up to me afterwards and he says he was actually a direct disciple of Maslow's. He was a student of Madison mezzo died very young but he died in his fifties or heart attack and he told me that at the time that he was working with mezzo, which was toward the end of his life. I was Furious to everybody put it in this. In this pyramid structure cuz that wasn't his original structure that he never apparently saw it as as as as hardened in a hierarchical structure as it was later drawn up now. I don't know whether that's true or whether the guy loved Maslow and he was trying to protect him or not, but I just don't know but if we look at these needs we can see and and and other people like I said for example would be the great Dutch sociology organization sociologist has said that Maslow's hierarchy also applies more in individualistic cultures. Zinc elected absolutely. So if you go to places like like Asia where the cultures are, mostly collectivist the group needs are by far more important than individual needs. So so it's it's so important that we don't that we behave. Like I said, I've said numerous times that we question some of these models that have been so foundational to us because this need to belong to fit in is undoubtedly primary for most of us. In fact, we know that being excluded from a group home in the door. So posterior insular the brain which is the same part of the brain associated with physical paint, you know, I just as a just as an an anecdotal practical level of them, I say this regularly I said this to the college students when I taught psychology, you know, if if if that pyramid and whether it was true or not that it was a pyramid if that was true age understand that you would not have a desire to text message while you drive if your safety was so important. Exactly, but because you want to belong want to be part of the conversation, you will text and drive at the Peril of your safety physical safety. Look I can give you a more basic need how many people who are listening to us have been in a meeting at work. You had to go to the bathroom and you sat there squirming rather than be the first one to stand up and leave the meeting go to the bathroom right now. There's no more basic physically than that right and yet we could all relate to that story. You didn't want to get out. You didn't want to be the one who stood upright. Yes, and and and it's a prayer mat example what you're talking about the need it in the group and not be seen as an outsider by the group members, even that basic physical need of elimination. So so so we know that this is true as human beings. That's awesome. His name is Howard J. Ross the book entitled everyday bias and you are listening to him here on a new Direction. Hey everybody. I

Abraham Maslow mezzo Asia Amazon Jay
Getting Past Our Bias and Unconscious Judgements  Howard Ross - burst 11

A New Direction

05:04 min | 3 months ago

Getting Past Our Bias and Unconscious Judgements Howard Ross - burst 11

"Yeah. We all know the Maslow's pyramid the hierarchy of needs right and you know the history of motivation which by the way, we have constantly in psychological research have said, you know, that's really not true. That really doesn't work that way. And Howard it demonstrates a flaw because well, I'm going to let you tell them, you know his big sure because right because our the primary need a name is that you know, it's it's our it's our physical. It's our physical needs are the primary needs and you it's right but Harry Harlow and I will let you take it away. Okay, great. Yeah. Well actually, you know Abraham Maslow created is model 1943. And for those who don't know is basically model needs is considered to be a foundational model in bondage psychology. And it was really it's really important work because it does have us look at human-to-human a tax people but Amazon created a hierarchical structure for these needs and and as you're saying Jay, it starts at the lowest level with our physiological needs food sleep that sort of thing and above that safety wage above that belonging and above that self-esteem and finally what he calls self-actualization which is when we fully realize ourselves as human beings and and for the most part that that has gone unchallenged wage. 270 years at any major way, but we now realize and and some of it is by sending functional magnetic magnetic resonating imagery. You can see which parts of the brain trigger in certain ways. We now realize that something was wrong that that that that belonging is actually a key human need and it makes sense. If you think about it, you know, what's the most vulnerable type of human being's existence infancy? Right? And if you don't belong to a gym is an infant you die and so for the first get and because human beings are more dependent on others to survive in our first couple of years than any other animal on the planet the key message that we get in the early stages of our life is Faith exists because you exist whether your Mom Dad Grandma Grandpa or whatever and so we've been we've been raw and and when we look at things like, you know a suicide bombing whether it was, you know, the Japanese in World War Two or Palestinians today or or other, I mean obviously completely refutes Maslow's notion because in there you see the need to belong to the needs of my larger group or more important in my physical needs now, he's As a footnote to the shape since I wrote the book and and and talking about this I've spoken a lot as as we talked about already and I was at a major university speaking about this and this guy comes up to me afterwards and he says he was actually a direct disciple of Maslow's. He was a student of Madison mezzo died very young but he died in his fifties or heart attack and he told me that at the time that he was working with mezzo, which was toward the end of his life. I was Furious to everybody put it in this. In this pyramid structure cuz that wasn't his original structure that he never apparently saw it as as as as hardened in a hierarchical structure as it was later drawn up now. I don't know whether that's true or whether the guy loved Maslow and he was trying to protect him or not, but I just don't know but if we look at these needs we can see and and and other people like I said for example would be the great Dutch sociology organization sociologist has said that Maslow's hierarchy also applies more in individualistic cultures. Zinc elected absolutely. So if you go to places like like Asia where the cultures are, mostly collectivist the group needs are by far more important than individual needs. So so it's it's so important that we don't that we behave. Like I said, I've said numerous times that we question some of these models that have been so foundational to us because this need to belong to fit in is undoubtedly primary for most of us. In fact, we know that being excluded from a group home in the door. So posterior insular the brain which is the same part of the brain associated with physical paint, you know, I just as a just as an an anecdotal practical level of them, I say this regularly I said this to the college students when I taught psychology, you know, if if if that pyramid and whether it was true or not that it was a pyramid if that was true age understand that you would not have a desire to text message while you drive if your safety was so important. Exactly, but because you want to belong want to be part of the conversation, you will text and drive at the Peril of your safety physical safety. Look I can give you a more basic need how many people who are listening to us have been in a meeting at work. You had to go to the bathroom and you sat there squirming rather than be the first one to stand up and leave the meeting go to the bathroom right now. There's no more basic physically than that right and yet we could all relate to that story. You didn't want to get out. You didn't want to be the one who stood upright. Yes, and and and it's a prayer mat example what you're talking about the need it in the group and not be seen as an outsider by the group members, even that basic physical need of elimination. So so so we know that this is true as human beings. That's awesome. His name is Howard J. Ross the book entitled everyday bias and you are listening to him here on a new Direction. Hey everybody. I

Abraham Maslow Howard J. Ross Harry Harlow Amazon Mezzo Madison Asia JAY
"harry harlow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:03 min | 5 months ago

"harry harlow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of team chemistry and welcome Jonah Ryan. Thanks. Michael grew great to be here. How are you doing? Ah, I'm okay. You know, like the rest of us in a pandemic of plotting on and remembering actually a number of years ago when We were on the air together, and you were talking about going over the wall and not just being a sports columnist for a sports reporter. Little did, you know, probably be running about brain science and mirror neurons and oxytocin and recess monkeys. But that's what you've done in this new book, where this all began. Let's go back to where this all began for you in 1918 19. Giants meeting in a reunion in 2009. That's what led to this book. Really? That's right, you know, And, of course, over the years as a sports writer, you know what I loved, most developed covering sports. Was the relationships right? You know, I mean, I just loved watching how these teams and how these men and and mostly what I was covering men's teams and especially baseball. You know how they connected to each other. And I just love watching all of that unfold, and so in in 2009 you're right. I walked into this. Huge tent erected out into the baseball the Giants Stadium. I guess it was a TNT park. At that time, I think of out in the parking lot, and it was a reunion of that 1989 team that won the National League pennant and, you know, play the A's in the world. Siri's, which we know now is the earthquake world. Siri's The Giants were swept, but but that really didn't matter. Those guys are walking through that tent and listening to just see snippets of conversation. And of course, I covered that team. I love that team. And so I'm catching up with guys too. And I'm looking in their eyes and hearing it in their voices that just as in 89 what I saw they still loved each other. And two words kept coming up in their conversations. Team chemistry that this was the best team chemistry team we've ever been on global Bob s O. I'm driving home. And, you know, I've used those two words all the time, too, And I thought about like, Well, what is it? You know, it's not about what we all have beards and we have these, You know, crazy handshakes, and we got to dinner together. I mean, it's clearly much, much deeper than that. So that kind of gripped me for the next 10 years just to figure out well, you know, And this was the time of Moneyball and Analytics. And you know his Bruce Poached, you know, called him in the front office. The propeller heads all these MIT and Harvard Analytics. Math eyes and, um, and team chemistry was sort of dismissed is almost this voodoo. You know this sort of myth we make up in retrospect when, under when underdogs win. So that's what sent me on this path, Michael, and it turned out to be just so much more interesting than I. Then I ever thought it would be. Well, you made it interesting for me is a reader. In fact, there are a lot of naysayers about Team chemistry, one of the most interesting ones in your book, and you did about 160 interviews and read a lot of books and kudos for all the work and research that went into this, But when you talk, for example to Ah, former manager of the Detroit Tigers Jim Leyland, Hey, said chemistry. That's something you learned in school. That doesn't mean anything right? Doesn't mean I'll leave out the expletive here. Then he went on to talk about all these good veteran players and how they affected The team and the team work together and so forth. So you have a really sense in your book that it's real. There's no doubt about it, even with the naysayers, saying its not so real. That's right. And and so now, you know when I talk to people that I hear people and I fall into it, too sometimes that you know, I believe in team chemistry, and I think no, you're recognizing your acknowledging hitting chemistry. You know whether you believe in it or not has no bearing on whether it exists. It does exist. It's just a matter of whether you acknowledge that it is this and and I just find it so Puzzling that you know, guys like Michael Lewis and other analytics, people who are super smart and super curious. That, you know, and I have this in the book that you know, Michael. I was interviewing Michael Lewis on stage for the Marin, Siri's and in the East Band and South Bay for four nights in a row, And in the first night, we were together in the Green Room, and I adore Michael Lewis. I mean, I will buy every book that man ever writes. And I to break the ice I mentioned Oh, you know, we have a mutual friend and its decor Keltner, who's one of the neuroscientist. I was spending a lot of time with at UC Berkeley. And he said, Well, what are you doing with with Baker and I said, Well, you know, he's he's doing some research for a book that I'm writing. What's your book about? Team chemistry. It doesn't exist, he said promptly. And that was the end of that conversation. And so I was just so puzzled by why he and so many others who are just so all about analytics. Are an open minded to say that analytics and team chemistry can co exist. And team chemistry while it can't be quantified now, with a yardstick we now have it is grounded in very clear. Well proven science probably axiomatic that a lot of the reason you get that kind of day saying from people like Lewis is he got these teams that love each other and they're close and they're bonding and everything else. Something about the 2007 Washington nationals, particularly great camaraderie and Get as you point out in your book, not the talent to win. So there's so many to say no talent matters over so called chemistry. It's biology as the onion, I think, put it as you pointed out. Yes. And of course, I mean, team chemistry doesn't invent talent. What team Chemistry does thrill A lot of different avenues is that it elevates performance. So a team that has very little talent still might not win. And it's probably not going to win, but their performance improves and if they're important if their performance does not improve, it means they don't have team chemistry. And so what I'm saying is that team chemistry is not the same as camaraderie. It's not even the same as cohesion. Plenty of teams that have no cohesion and no camaraderie who still perform brilliantly because their team chemistry is just on the field. They don't have that social emotional team chemistry that we all assumed that certainly I did. I thought that it was about going out to dinner and that they bonded that way. No, the going out to dinner. Was the evidence that they already had team chemistry and you see it. For example, as you point out on a lot of people come through in your book, Baseball fans will recognize many of the name's Jake Peavy, for example, gives 100% but says His teammates really make the difference. And then you talk to Tony LaRussa, former A's manager in ST Louis Cardinals manager who has a lot to say about it is well in terms of respect and kind of ties of buying people and so forth. Let's get into the science, though, because that's really I was talking about mirror neurons and you bring up Harry Harlow. And actually, you even get into Local psychiatrist Thomas Lewis has written a book on Love, a very good book, which we featured on form a number of years ago. This gets us into the way people communicate and the way they need to touch and react to each other and eyes and silver all the things that we're missing in this pandemic to a great degree..

Michael Lewis baseball Thomas Lewis oxytocin Siri Jonah Ryan Harvard Analytics Giants Stadium sports columnist National League Harry Harlow Tony LaRussa Jake Peavy Detroit Tigers Bruce Poached TNT park Jim Leyland writer ST Louis Cardinals Bob s O.
"harry harlow" Discussed on Raising Good Humans

Raising Good Humans

11:52 min | 10 months ago

"harry harlow" Discussed on Raising Good Humans

"Low and welcome to raising good humans. I'm Dr Eliezer pressman and I am interviewing one of the most influential scientists as far as I know of child development itself so I'm so honored to have Edward Chronic a professor of psychology at the University of Massachusetts and the Director of the Child Development Unit a Boston. There is a very famous experiment that I'm GonNa ask you add to talk about. That has really helped shape. How active and interactive the relationship between parent and. The child is called. The still face is that right. Is that accurate? The still face experiment and so I wanted to start all the way back to that and get to How you showed the world's about this connection between babies and their parents and then I would love to talk about the beautiful idea of reconnecting when there's been a disconnect. How does that sound? Just those small towns just fine. Okay if I if I can start The the still facing Which I did about probably more years ago than I. I'd like to remember about forty forty years. Ago was in an experiment where I was working with A wonderful pediatrician named Berry Brussels. We were looking at face to face. Interactions between mothers primarily that time and their babies It was something that really hadn't been looked at for because everyone was concerned about cognitive developed to everybody was looking at babies playing with objects or looking check quartz we were trying to understand what capacities the infant had for social engagement and looking at back and forth kind of play between mothers and their babies the sorts of things by the way the one can now see on all over on Youtube. What we saw was an an interaction that looked as if the infant was really active and was able to engage socially and the observation was was really critical but it flew in the face of what everyone was thinking about. Infants at the time Starting with Freud said the baby's just have to states which is sort of quietude in distress and You can go back. Further to Watson the famous Harris who said nobody had a mind every everybody was just dealing with reinforcement and even William James referred to babies being a blooming buzzing confusion and the cognitive work was showing us at babies really had a lot of capacities but no one was thinking about social capacities and so when we were looking at the interaction it looked as if the infants were active participants that they were emotionally engaged with their mothers during the interaction and we did a lot of statistical techniques. It was one of the things I could do to try. And look at it but it wasn't very satisfying. What I wanted to do was to do an experiment. Because that's the way I had been trained. I had been at the University of Wisconsin with Harry. Harlow and in the primate leopard. So I just came upon the idea of looking at at what would happen if the baby was really engaged. Baby was really doing something. What would happen if we stop the mother from doing her normal behavior and the thought was that if the baby's really responding to the mother of babies processing responding to mothers emotions and her actions that if you stop her from doing it it'll have an effect on INS and really we weren't Or certainly I wasn't really prepared for what we saw because when we did literally the very first mother infant hair who were interacting with one another that when we asked the mother to not interact with the infant stop as if stopped stopping in his tracks. He looks at the mother tries to figure out what's going on. Mesa smile at the mother. He turns away but he comes back and he tries to get her to respond again and very quickly his emotions become sort of sad and but he keeps trying to get her back and some of the infants for example. I think it was actually the second infant that we saw in this procedure. This is a baby who kind of a collapses in the infancy that he's in. He's loses posture control. But even while he sort of hunched over he keeps looking back at the mother in half smiles trying to get her back. Again so heartbreaking. What was interesting while it's very hard for people to watch this and they at hand be seen on Youtube the mothers while they could see that the baby was distressed by this really fascinated because these are three four five month old infants. They realized innate they would say that loud oh the baby really knows me. He really cares about as if they the mothers didn't know that the baby really cared about them already. A really the the mothers would see it as a negative experience but they also found that as a really fascinating experience because it was kind of what they expected and then in terms of your question about repairs what was also amazing was as soon as mother resumed getting back into the interaction with Anthony playful with the they very quickly reconnect. And we're back being playful with one enough so that the stress of the still face and it clearly was a negative experience. Could be where we began to talk about it as being repaired even though something negative have so at that time. I was just really happy that I could show that babies were really interacting and that they had social capacities in that they had emotional acidy to engage with the mother and the first time I showed. Videotape was at a conference for the Society for Research in Child Development Conference in Denver and it was a time with society was relatively small so it had maybe three or four hundred members. There was a plenary session and there I am is pretty newly meant minted doctoral students presenting to all my all the junior and senior colleagues in in my media feel than child avail. And I show this still face an way I showed. It was because we couldn't do video was taken the video or recording. I'd nate transferred it to film and so I was actually a sixteen millimeter film the video. Wow I show the play between the mother and the infant. I showed the still face and the baby's reaction to it and then a very brief recovery play area and I finished showing the video and the audience is absolutely silent. And if you WANNA think what the still face might do to mothers I was just terror. I thought I thought this is. I have done something. Just awful in that. I was done. My career really was over and while it seemed like an eternity was probably maybe five seconds they burst into Burst into applause. And then the whole other wave of feeling so it's a really powerful manipulation and really people can see it immediately and they have an immediate reaction to. I have to tell you I've seen it so many times. I can. I try to show it as often as possible because I think it's very difficult to watch but it's also INCR- you know I go through huge feelings. I think everybody does I. Just it's cutting and then it's so heartening to see the reconnection and I cannot watch it without all of those feelings to this day. So it's really a magical way to in a very short couple of minutes. I don't even know if it's takes a couple of minutes. At so short I just want to reiterate or recommend or I don't know what the word is but for if you watched this you can feel in such a quick moment. The power and beauty of that relationship go macro a mother daughter owned vegan Protein Bar Company. That believes a balanced plant based lifestyle is key to healthy bodies sharp lines and bold spirits right now. We really need healthy snacks. I don't know about you but I've definitely been indulging in a lot of unhealthy and go macro is available in sixteen mouth-watering flavors macro bars are packed with one hundred percent plant based ingredients to fuel your body and mind and it's important to support small businesses right now and they make products that have a positive effect on the planet. Everything that they make is simple. High Quality Certified Organic Vegan Gluten Free. Kosher non GMO clean raw and soy free. So when you're looking for that snack for these very long days you can get mouth-watering flavors like oatmeal chocolate chip maple..

Youtube Child Development Unit Dr Eliezer pressman Boston Berry Brussels Edward Chronic professor of psychology Freud University of Massachusetts Director William James Harlow Protein Bar Company University of Wisconsin Anthony Watson Society for Research Denver Harris
"harry harlow" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

13:05 min | 1 year ago

"harry harlow" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Called and lectured widely in both these fields in the US and internationally she is the author of Pulitzer Prize nominated elephants on the edge what animals teachers about humanity and carnivore minds who these fearsome beings really are both published by Yale University Press Dr Brad chills work focuses on trans species psychology a field she founded the theory and methods for the study and care of animals psychological well being and multi species cultures her research expertise includes the effects of violence on and trauma recovery for elephants grizzly bears chimpanzees parents and other species both free living and in captivity she joins us as she has for the past nine years when we met on air and it's since become sisters in care of the animal species of earth whose traumatic experiences at the hands of some humans we all can agree is a tragic consequence of worldwide dissociation as pathological reality she joins us for discussion river recent books part of our minds and talking with bears conversations with Charlie Russell hello sister Dr Brad Shaw a fellow nice to hear you again it's also nice for you to be here for us thank you your cart of our minds which we did talk about one evening who these fears some animals really are a year press twenty seventeen release talked about the carnivore predators great white sharks crocodile or because animals we other animals grizzly or brown bears tell us a little bit about this and what your purpose was in writing carnivore mines after the elephant but came out on the whole topic of looking at non human animals such as elephants and there was a species that you mentioned psychologically was really a new idea it's been happening of course passively yeah and the biomedical research that uses non human animals mice can pansies cats dogs rats etcetera in lieu of human so in other words there's an implicit understanding that these other animals are like us psychological in other words they have thinking you know capacity for thinking and emotions and consciousness at cetera but the elephant when when that came out in terms of diagnosing PTSD showing that wild animals for animals in general were vulnerable to psychological violence it really sort of open to and and that kind of a new chapter it wasn't so much that if animals are sent via and or if the animals feel but rather putting them on the same plane is not so when I wrote carnivore minds which followed a few years later my intent was to focus on a set of species a set of animals that you mentioned like white sharks and rattle snakes and crocodiles is that are really vilified and there's low on people's empathy listed in terms of animals so in an elephant for example a lot of people feel a lot of empathy and connection and really admire elephants and when it comes down to quote unquote predators like the promo white shark and crocodile here's a look there's a kind of a a cringe factor so I purposely applied what I had done and develop it further in more depth and more specificity in the elephant book to these less appreciated and as I said vilified species for the purpose of it was really two fold first want to say you know what we admire and what we can relate to an elephant more readily it's the same thing for all of these other species so it really was a leveling this kind of species valorization hierarchy the second reason is I really wanted to introduce concepts from mental health practices from psychology and later thirty contemplative practices that are used in in terms of human trauma and human trauma recovery in understanding our fellow creatures who is visit people that are studying animals in the wild witcher conservation biologist and ecologist and so while it is so generally speaking psychology is not included within their studies and it's absolutely crucial which is what the elephant diagnosis of PTSD so that if you don't better that these individuals are psychological beings then you what happens is you know the kind of trauma and the symptoms associated with trauma they're not objects there fully conscious feeling beings that are vulnerable to violence like we are and and as we've talked about before you know when you actually understood the post traumatic stress disorder was occurring in the elephant population you began in South Africa almost twenty years ago when those bull elephants were killing rhinoceros which as you pointed out was completely out of character for the species and so you discovered and and you really initiated this entire global scientific and psychological approach their abnormal behavior was calls by their experience of human violence yeah and and I will I will interject here because it is many years later right twenty when this you know when I quote unquote discovered it which was actually just putting the pieces of the puzzle together and as I said in opening my mouth thank you know there's a lot of reticence to acknowledge that non human animals are comparable to act in the capacity that we used to say it makes us unique because when you say that that it basically says we need to not deny them what we have been denied and award them or not deny the rights that we cherish meeting freedom and not being exploited in Houston by a medical experiments etcetera so at that time though which was like you said almost twenty years ago I can't believe it is that I was very conservative I stuck really close to the science which was very conventional neuropsychology the brain and the mind the work that I did putting the pieces together have very deep roots in this whole corpses of neurosciences psychology in biomedical research and so I stayed really close to the language very you know very very strict language up for the purpose of really not leaving any loopholes not making kind of inferences that would not be very easy to substantiate in conservative by conservative science at at the time one of the pieces of that the reason I'm giving this practice is that these young male bulls who had suffered a series of traumas from babies they had decided to just to kind of give an overview for for listeners who may not be familiar is that when they were babies and they were infants their families were slaughtered typically by helicopter gun very helicopters so they witness that they lost their mothers and lost their family they were translocated so all of these things are documented for humans and also in terms of animal models in the laboratory with dating back to Harry Harlow did terrible things to primates nonhuman primates it showing that the other series of trauma which mess up the brain and disallowed any kind of normal regulation you know all the symptoms of PTSD and included within the thirty young elephants not only were killing rhinoceroses but they were sexually assaulting so that at the time you know that was a very important component like I I don't have played it down but I I didn't emphasize it because it has this kind of you know sensational aspects to it you know elephant rating right now and it had they got in on the interview interviewed with a mythologist in South Africa who you know what this debate is because the the the interviewer like you the hostess farewell aren't they weren't they the right I was raped by the elephants and I went to the same explanation I didn't use that term on purpose because of its sensational association and then the biologist who is an apologist animal behavior person said well it it really there it couldn't be called rate because there was no penetration and I made the remark which is true I doubt that the rhino was really making a distinction at that point but anyways what's really important that I see now is that that's just the czar and very upsetting is that another at one species is sexually assaulting sexually engaging another species in in a belligerent way I mean it it's not you know kind of in this you know a playful way it's in the belligerent which ended up in a fatality and I the reason I'm underscoring that is because as you mentioned you know twenty odd well fifteen twenty years later is that that really should stand out and that really should bring some kind of very the reflection of course we see that in human population of children who suffer in war yeah or some kind of ecocide or whatever it is that displaces them separates them from their families where they witness death where they witness violence and of course it plays out in a lifetime often times of not just psychological damage and under for life but a violent life where violence is easily measured out to somebody else or to dog Sir to animals and we see that in these white shooters who most of them are many of them have shared in as children the abuse of animals so if you know it's abuse at any level has such a deep penetrating affect one's soul when psyche so your new book though is very different it hasn't come out yet it comes out twenty twenty so we'll ask you to re visit us for an entire show just on that but it's such a beautiful book and I thank you so much for sending me some of the preliminary chapters talking with bears conversations with Charlie Russell it'll be a man rocky mountain press twenty twenty release and because you introduce me to Charlie before he as I say soared into the heaven rounds I had the privilege of interviewing him a few times and including his beautiful work in my own work on white spirit animal so tell us about this book well back at Charlie and I are met quote unquote shortly thereafter the publication of my book and his book which was greatly hard published and nineteen around nine twenty nine twenty twenty oh nine and Charlie we connected I actually I forget but we basically just click and he lived in Canada and he passed out it'll be two years almost two years year and a half ago and he lived in Canada just across the border from glacier national park in now water can area and I'm again here in Oregon and we corresponded on the phone at least twice a week for ten years and I we initially started because I forgot who connected us in some fashion but he was very intrigued by my scientific credentials and what I was finding even using a scientific lands which normally which from his experience really dismissed and discarded his own observations not necessarily trauma but in terms of the psychological depths of experiences and expressions of his work and time spent with largely grizzly bears and brown bears which are the equivalent in in Eurasia Russia as well as black bears are so Charlie was born and raised as a you know grandson of a pioneer in the most literal sense he the the Russell legal that's is mother's side of the family is a legendary pioneer family in the region and he was it was an extraordinary person I any extraordinary in his ordinary miss you know when we think about extraordinary people there's there's sort of these extraordinary things like they climb to the top of Everest or they have five thousand degrees are they discover something an entirely with extraordinary because he was just we wires and live who he was with the bears as neighbors and friends so you you're the nice thing about your new book that's coming out talking with bears is just that it's.

US Pulitzer Prize Yale University twenty years two years five thousand degrees fifteen twenty years nine years ten years
"harry harlow" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"harry harlow" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"I I do look to scientists because I think they are stimulating in a different way. I enjoy especially if we'RE GONNA have the discourse of activists. I liked to have a nice understandable scientists to blow my mind to open my mind and then sometimes they end up in my play the I liked that joining us now the help blow our minds with science is star talk all start the tally Reagan your science educator specializing in anthropology gas primate anthropology in particular. Yes specific studied spider monkeys brighter among at yes exactly so so what in what way should anthropology sociology I think people in societies in what way might anthropolgy be important in discussing social issues. That's a great question so anthropology is the study of humans and in theory anthropology as a four field approach it studies the past archaeology the present current cultures <hes> linguistics study of language edge and also <hes> biological anthropology which is the study of how humans became human forensic anthropology genetics and so on Anna deavere Smith is a hero of mine because I think that the social sciences have an obligation if you know a need to you inform the audience about what we know about the fact that race there's no biological basis to racial classification. It is a social contract which is real but it doesn't mean that there's actually lines you can cut between the races so we bring different scientists so we have different scientific lenses like we talked about sociology metaphor just so you know I love the metaphor and we also involve activists so there's performance too because we wanted to be all scientists with lived experiences so I kind of set back and it's the scientists that tell their story and use their own work to explain social issues in a way that hopefully promotes tolerance. We have less pro clutching white ladies calling the cops on on kids because that is a thing that needs to stop needs to change Dharthi only issue. If you're talking about social issues is there any lines of research that are just simply taboo because people are afraid what they might find if research and race gender any of these topics. I actually liked it. Turn that around. There's this idea that there is really these differences in deep in the biology of people have different races people have different sexes and genders and that it's taboo have boo for social scientists to explore them and that's not true true. The long lasting myth is that there really are biological racist when in in fact social scientists as well as Evolutionary Biologists and anthropologists have proven that race is invented. It's not a natural division of human beings but yet that idea continues and I think it's the people who want that. I did to continue who claimed that there's a taboo against it. When in fact there isn't at all it's well established in science and it's the scientists and social life biological scientists and social scientists and artists and community activists who have to come together and work to rid science and society of this false claim some of biological division? It's absolutely essential to humanity to equality to human rights busy word you work with spider monkeys in Panama. Is there anything we can learn about human society from other primates well. They can't be jerks but we got that cover jerks I well. This is an interesting study so years ago <hes> Harry Harlow did a study which is very controversial nowadays or even back then we're basically he was studying macaque monkeys and he was giving them <hes> access to a real mother. <hes> had some monkeys had a terry cloth mother soften squishy..

Harry Harlow Anna deavere Smith Reagan Panama
"harry harlow" Discussed on This American Life

This American Life

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"harry harlow" Discussed on This American Life

"WBZ chicago. It's this American I from IRA glass, and let's head back in time back to when being on TV menu sort of half shouted every single thing you said, this is the primate laboratory versity. -versity of Wisconsin. In Madison the year is nineteen sixty in this laboratory, there are one hundred twenty rhesus monkeys the subject of a study that wants to know the answer to the question. What is an infant's love for its mother. Now, the reason they're even was study asking very basic question back when CBS television camera crew to Wisconsin. There's actually the kind of thing that most of us today would find sort of surprising is he the researcher that they're filming a guy named Harry Harlow was trying to prove. I know this is going to sound crazy. He was trying to prove that love is an important thing that happens between parents and children. And the reason why he felt the need to prove this point was at the time. And again, I know this is going to sound kind of out there, the psychological establishment pediatricians, even the federal government. We're all saying exactly the opposite of that to parents. It's actually one of those things that you say how could they have thought that? But psychology just didn't believe in love. And if you go back, and you pull any of the psychology textbooks really almost pre nineteen fifty year. Don't even find it in the index because it was not a word that was used this is Deborah bomb. The biographer of this renegade researcher, Harry Harlow, she writes about how psychology. At the time actually saw loving behavior towards children as a problem. A minutes at one point the head of the American psychological association declared when you're tempted to pet your child remember that mother love is a dangerous instrument. Yeah. That was John Watson. And he say he actually said there are serious rocks ahead for the over kissed child and then defined over kissing kissing your child more than once a year. It was I mean that was the message of almost everything is some point their government pamphlets right with it a warning parents not touch her children, and you quote, some ones as never kiss a baby especially on the mouth don't rock or play with children. Yeah. Not to say that everyone follows what so-called experts do right? But certainly you had an enormous affect of this affection is wrong. Love isn't real. Trust us were scientists that greatly shaped those kind of perceptions. How is this possible? Well, first of all. Psychology was still pretty young psychologists hadn't figured out how to measure love how to quantify it talk about it in a scientific way. So the thinking about Love's wrote was incredibly crude and at the same time. This is all the beginning of the early. Twentieth. Century medicine was still figuring out how bacteria spread infections and pediatricians had noticed it in hospitals. The kids who were picked up a lot by nurses seemed to get more infections. So doctors were saying don't pick up your child. Don't pick up your child don't pick up your child. So you had a kind of conflicts going there, you had pediatricians saying we're telling.

Harry Harlow Love Wisconsin John Watson researcher chicago CBS Madison Deborah bomb nineteen fifty year
"harry harlow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"harry harlow" Discussed on KCRW

"Monica, college and NPR for southern California. Ten o'clock time for this American life. From WBZ Chicago. It's this American life from IRA glass, and let's head back in time back to one being on TV menu sort of half shouted every single thing you said this is the primate laboratory at the university of Wisconsin in Madison the year is nineteen sixty in this laboratory, there are approximately one hundred twenty rhesus monkeys. The subject of a study that wants to know the answer to the question. What is an infant's love or its mother. Now, the reason there even was a study asking it's very basic question back when CBS television camera Khuda, Wisconsin, those actually the kind of thing that most of us today would find sort of surprising. You see the researcher that they're filming a guy named Harry Harlow was trying to prove crazy. He was trying to prove that love is an important thing that happens between parents and children. And the reason why he felt the need to prove this point was at the time. And again, I know this is going to sound kind of out there, the psychological establishment pediatricians, even the federal government. We're all saying exactly the opposite of that to parents. It's actually one of those things that you say how could they have thought that? But psychology just didn't believe in love. And if you go back, and you pull any of the psychology textbooks really almost pre nineteen fifty years even find it in the index because it was not a word that was used this is Deborah bomb. The biographer of this renegade researcher, Harry Harlow, she writes about how psychologists at the. Time actually saw loving behavior towards children problem a menace. At one point the head of the American psychological association declared when you're tempted to pet your child remember that mother love is a dangerous instrument. Yeah. That was John Watson. And he say he actually said there are serious rocks ahead for the over kissed child and then defined over kissing kissing your child more than once a year. I mean that was the message of almost everything. Yeah. At some point they're their government pamphlets you right with a winning a parents, not touch her children. And you quote, some ones has never kiss a baby especially in the mouth don't rock or play with children. Yeah. Not to say that everyone follows what so-called experts do right? But certainly you had an enormous affect of this affection is wrong. Love isn't real. Trust us were scientists that greatly shaped those kind of perceptions how is this possible? Well, her herself psychology was still pretty young psychologists hadn't figured out how to measure love how to quantify it and pack about it in a scientific way. So they're thinking about Love's row was incredibly crude and at the same time. This is all at the beginning of the early twentieth. Century medicine was still figuring out how 'Bacterial spread infections, and pediatricians had noticed that in hospitals, the kids who were picked up a lot by nurses seemed to get more infections. So doctors were. Saying don't pick up your child. Don't pick up your child don't pick up your child. So you had a kind of conflicts going there. You had pediatricians saying we're telling you for health reasons that you should never cuddle your child or indulge them. And guess what psychology says if you follow those rules, if you show your child mo- affection, you will make them a better human being so back off. And this is the way it was for decades.

Harry Harlow John Watson researcher university of Wisconsin Chicago NPR Madison Monica California CBS Wisconsin Deborah bomb nineteen fifty years
"harry harlow" Discussed on Jay and Miles X-Plain the X-Men

Jay and Miles X-Plain the X-Men

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"harry harlow" Discussed on Jay and Miles X-Plain the X-Men

"Like I must assume what an isn't. It babe feels when bereft of the love and war that is it's birthright. Wow. So this is basically a weird wire mother situation. It's hopefully is man. Speaking of anybody who's interested in psychology and comics, especially how the one can be about the other or the other can be about the one I suppose the, oh, yeah. Yeah. The comic wire mothers, which is about some experiments that were done on monkeys that seem kind of unethical in retrospect of really worth reading. Why mothers Harry Harlow in the science of love. It's by Jim out of Yanni and Dylan McInnis who incidentally is the person who designed the amazing, amazing Emma frost stuff that we abused at. At Lincoln. It's a small world after all. Anyway, this is this is under cut. Yes. Strife strikes attempts at at symbolism by the fact that gene clearly has no idea what is going on or what strife is alluding to. Meanwhile, back at stately exempt, your manner silence is sitting vigil over the rapidly worsening executor and preparing to kill him. If need be. She's more into killing teammates than I think most of the x. men you remember that time that havoc showed up and Ceylon was like, hey, havoc. Maybe we should just kill this guy. That was storm too. I know beside Lough was very enthusiastic about it silex a little bloodthirsty. Yeah. Well, anyway, speaking sort of bloodthirsty x force, you know, the former new mutants for allies of cable who were captured by the other heroes last arc there in the Brig which is actually the danger room and all the other heroes are trying to figure out what the hell to do with them jubilee looking on is a very unimpressed with these slightly older than her heroes, and I'll say it again, loser, you're nothing but a winding bunch of head padded hype. Thyroid pigheaded, spoiled, brat. Poorly-dressed overly accessorized, delusional, disadvantaged x-men wannabees in a major needed a total attitude adjustment. It's fascinating to me here because jubilee. I mean she's an audience surrogate kitty Pryde before her in a lot of ways. But at the same time, instead of being the young reader that crossover like this was stencil targeted at, she sounds kind of like to people who've been reading x. men for a long time. And we're like, what the fuck happened to my new mutants will think about when she came into the book. She's the person who impressed on x. men during the Australia era. Oh, so she's kind of me. Yeah, Lopa. Fair enough. Well, up stairs Polaris is worrying that havoc is kind of becoming the man after his actions in the last arc, the kids Alex nobles than we were when we started out what happened life life happened damn bro. Oh, Alex has been through some shit for that matter. So as Polaris arguably worshiped with a whole Saladin thing. But there's no time to wallow because it's actually meeting time. Val Cooper takes the floor and briefs everyone on the Intel. They got from sinister with regards to who might be responsible for both the attack on professor x and the kidnapping of Scott jeananne spoilers it's strife. And so everybody's wondering, ok, strife, what's his deal? All we know as they run the mutant Liberation Front, he seems to hate cable and his fashion sense is horrifying. And he probably never gets to have balloon animals. Well, not for long anyway, so everyone throws out their theories and many of them are kinda serious, but specially enjoy first off jubilees for all anybody knows. It could be cable walking around with an ice bucket on his head. Interestingly enough jubilees actually probably closer than anybody else. Strong guy, meanwhile suggests that maybe strife is mad about the glove. He lost in x. factor number seventy eight. Now, of course, of all of the teams, the ones who have. The most experienced with the MLS and strife are x force so havoc in gambit. I'm not sure why gambits there. I guess just because he was really popular in the ninety s I assume he's like sleazy cop. There we go. Government cops, Lisi cop. Yeah, they both have those same heads sock things. Maybe you have to wear those to be any sort of cop. Maybe they bonded over it and they just didn't want to be apart. There were just sort of doing the twins thing..

Alex nobles kitty Pryde Ceylon Harry Harlow Lincoln Lough Liberation Front Intel Lisi Val Cooper Emma Australia professor kidnapping Jim Yanni Dylan McInnis Scott jeananne
"harry harlow" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"harry harlow" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"An event which provided the excuse for mussalini to seize power both mussolini and hitler were big fans of day a new zero baloney trump was born in novo mesto a solo wien city that was part of fascist italy and later the third reich you cannot turn around in novo mesto the town where malania trump was born without bumping into some monument the reminds you of this history the symbols and slogans are extremely important here malania went to school there and she speaks italian there is simply no way that she is not aware of the history of this slogan i really don't care the slogans resurfaced recently in italy along with the fascist who just wondering election steve bannon subordination gorka and steve miller are all huge fans of the resurgent fascist movement in italy the company that makes the jacket in question is zero a company that was written up in forbes in two thousand fourteen for antisemitism the also produced a concentration camp striped shirt with yellow star a swastika handbag peppy the frog shirt the message of the jacket could be any clearer melanie was telling us that the trumps are fascists and she's tired of pretending otherwise and i'm still wondering how many times they have to show us who they are before we believe them comment meanwhile much of this protest is coming out of the fact that trump is separating children even young children even babies from their mothers back in the nineteen fifties henry harry harlow was a scientist over at pop side dot com was a scientist who was who did studies on rhesus monkeys worth he separated the baby monkeys from their mothers to see what would happen and what happened is shattered the baby monkeys is shattered them so badly that it was so cruel that when this fellow by the name of a glock graduate student of of his wanted to continue this kind of research or or semi saw this kind of research was so horrified by it that he wanted to discontinue this kind of research he wrote a book about the ramifications of conducting research on primates said this is absolutely wrong this should never happen to monkeys because it's so shatters them for the rest of their lives being separate forcibly separated from their parents which is a completely different thing by the way from teenagers mostly teenage boys who are coming here on their own without their parents they have not been forcibly separated from their parents and they're not going through that psychological trauma they are they are here seeking a better life like my great grandfather like my grandfather did when he came to the united states in nineteen seventeen from norway at the age of sixteen same thing anyhow we'll be back it's twenty seven minutes past the hour here on the talent harpen program back with your calls you're listening to the thom hartmann program called to oh to eight hundred eight ninety nine twenty five how do we best respond to.

twenty seven minutes
"harry harlow" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"harry harlow" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Monkeys to better understand human relationships he may die for want of love hollow believes he can use science to study love with a series of pioneering experiments he explores territory where few scientists have ventured harlow said that there was such a thing as a science of love for exam harry harlow work was groundbreaking the video which appears all over youtube from the nineteen fifties we're very disturbing images of baby monkeys separated from their mothers alone in cages and one of his landmark studies actually showed a kind of wire cage scary looking robot looking mother that was full of dripping milk and food on the other side of the cage was a soft cuddly furry stuffed animal of a mother and they thought that the little monkey if he only loved who fed him would spend most of his time over at the mother that was full of milk but it was so sad and the videos all out there on youtube to see little baby monkeys almost starving themselves to death cuddling up on the soft furry monkey because they were afraid of the hard wire monkey and what we learned is that children on and as these these young monkeys grew up of course they were filled with behavioral problems and psychopathology and so it became clear that all primates improbably probably all animals have attachment behaviors early in life that shaped their mental and their physical health the grandfather of attachment theory is a dude named john bobi and john boultbee was of british developmental psychologist and psychiatrist by little side his dad was like the surgeon to the queen the royal family so he was raised very high brow which meant in victorian england or in the early last part of the eighteenth century nineteenth century let me get right you you probably only saw your parents seven or eight minutes a day 'cause you're or raised by a nanny in the upper class in england and when he was four years old his beloved nanny read attachment figure was well we don't know if she was fired but she abruptly left the house and he remembers going through attachment trauma with the loss of this nanny he would go on to create the most studied widespread theory on personality development and attachment because of this and it began really in the nineteen thirties and forties when germ theory came around because we had discovered that oh my gosh we could infect people with our biological germs hospital started changing their policies and when sick children were put in the hospitals they were told barents were told don't visit them don't visit them and when we come back i will tell you what happened to those children once they recovered from their physical illness you're listening to the dock wendy walsh show on kfi am six forty rossiya rivera has the news for us two beliefs officers in san diego have been shots one of the officers was hit in the chest and the second officer was hit in the shoulder the officers were on a disturbance with violence call at ten fifteen last night on relondo court when the shooting happened when the officers arrived the smelled smoke and they called for firefighters and that's when a man begun began shooting at them he was barricaded inside a condo until about one this morning when the swat team entered and.

milk eight minutes four years
"harry harlow" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"harry harlow" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"I don't know where i got that number from read it somewhere but again it we do this to protect children kfi highs in the mid sixties to around seventy at the beaches mid to upper seventies inland areas of low clouds and fog tonight's nights lows will be in the mid fifty s to lower sixties those clouds will stick around through tomorrow morning but then it should open up to sunny skies again with highs in the seventy s at the coast mid seventy s to around eighty s inland yeah i got around a number the of same for for your the the tuesday most recent one i could and find was a twenty bit of sixteen a warm up for wednesday through in that the rest was of the week is then four will be hundred in the thirty seventies seven thousand at the coast this around is good news eighty so see inland i was totally wrong right this now why you it's always seventy need to three go degrees to google in a lisa va it is ho definitely seventy increasing three every in single irvine year by at seventy least eight is degrees still in a burbank lot and of children seventy in foster degrees care in marina and we del know rey that we may have twenty we three lead local hundred more from the kfi this week twenty four hour if newsroom i'm rosiere they don't rivera find a way to reunify some of these kids with their parents so when we the come back new i wanna data talk about my sweet spot as far as my knowledge and study and that is the area in psychology called attachment theory i wanna talk a little bit about the history of attachment theory how we came to know that separation can be hugely traumatic and indeed impact somebody's personality development later in life and you will be i think pretty astounded when you hear some of the research on attachment theory so that's when we come back as well as get ready i've got some news about harry harlow monkeys if you don't know who harry harlow monkeys were until you where to look.

kfi google burbank rivera harry harlow twenty four hour twenty bit
"harry harlow" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"harry harlow" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"To graduate school and got a ph a master's in a phd in clinical psychology because now i look back on it and i'm like wow my brain was just bursting with new synapses growing as my neuro plasticity had a chance to increase you you look at the world differently when you're in a new parent you're a new parent all of a sudden you look at billboards and ads and you're like wait my daughter's gonna read that weight my kid could see that wait a second and all of a sudden the world looks very different to you so while i was pregnant with my first one i read a lot of parenting books i was and a lot of child development and i was concerned about the brain that was developing inside me in the brain that i would be partially responsible for helping to develop once it got outside of me and i stumbled upon an area of parenting literature called attachment parenting i now laugh at that name and simply call it parenting like isn't it just parenting but there is an area of cycle psychology that i'm particularly obsessed with called attachment theory begun by the grandfather of attachment theory john boultbee in england in the middle part of the last century it was a pediatrician who studied children that had become separated from their parents and he followed them through life and looked at mental illness personality disorders all related to attachment long before bowl became along they thought that the child like an animal would just attached to whoever fed it instead remember the harlow monkeys experiments we should put harry harlow monkey experiments from youtube up on my web page joey oh my gosh this is where they debunked the theory by they put these portable they wouldn't be allowed to do these kinds of experiments today because they were so emotionally cruel to baby monkeys they put them in a cage where there was one scary faced wire mother that was cold and awful little robotic thing and she had a feeding tube coming out of her and the other was a soft cuddly furry stuffed animal mother and they found that the babies would almost starve to death cuddling to the soft mother rather than going to the one that feted so debunk that one it's not about feeding our kids it's about feeding them with emotional security so in.

john boultbee england youtube harry harlow
"harry harlow" Discussed on Modern Love

Modern Love

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"harry harlow" Discussed on Modern Love

"Partly because i hope to meet some one i am an independent professional woman living in a progressive city but entire day's pass in which i do not touch another human being i never thought i would be here in this place this time in my life the fear that i'm in some way defective has become harder to stave off each year a bell rang okay that's twenty minutes our host said giving us an opportunity to rearranging cuddle would new people who i wasted no time heading to the bathroom the only space in this little house right could be alone when i emerged everyone was partnered up there was a tangle of bodies in the middle of the room i stood in the kitchen contemplating the snacks dry shortbread cookies and veggies with ranch sauce unfortunately no alcohol that could turn thing sexual our host had explained cuddled parties are not about sex but about setting boundaries in connecting but even with the lights dimmed the entire set up felt more clinical in connective is if we're all enrolled in human interaction one on one i kept thinking about baby monkeys in college i took an intruder psychology course where we learned about harry harlow experiments with rhesus monkeys and how the infant monkeys preferred a cloth mother to one made of wire and would even when the wire mother was the one supplying the food turns out primates prefer a cuddly fake mother to a fake mother who actually keeps them alive.

harry harlow twenty minutes
"harry harlow" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"harry harlow" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Them that neither volunteers were paid to do this apparently and said hey wor some of you are going to get we're going gonna send you jail and some of you were gonna be prison guard yeah okay so they wound up the students that were volunteer that had volunteered to be the prisoner uh and they they pick them up at their homes in a surprise round up handcuffed them take them in prison van their stripped given mox id numbers and there our how they put him in the basement mockup prison block right okay so what they found out that the other group that were that where the prison guard aren't began to take their role very seriously and began to humiliate and taunt the prisoner to that point that the prisoners became more and more depressed and by the end of the the experiment only lasted six days before they had to call it off talk about groupthink think oh yeah okay you know who really knew identifying where i think that also kind of point graf whole mocked the mentality pale very interesting good point now tell me about harlow monkeys about a decade and a half before that okay yeah this is nineteen fifty eight and harry harlow with trying to attack attachment by the childhood attachment and your mother whatever so he had several different scenarios cliff monkey and some of these monkeys were weird with no mother at all others were separated and praised from birth with two different third get mother the one was like a wire monkey shape but it had it had a bottle had food milk and the other with a fluffy monkey like at a petty bear kind of monkey.

graf whole harry harlow six days milk
"harry harlow" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

02:08 min | 4 years ago

"harry harlow" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"What i find so disturbing about harry harlow is that someone who spent so much time thinking about love and the importance of love also came up with experiments especially in his later years that could only be described as disturbing an almost torturous ride shut their horribly haunting experiments and he's probably most famous in there the animal rights community of being one of the most horrible of all primate researchers of the twentieth century for the depression experiments on in which he was looking at depression is sort of a mental isolation can you recover from the and to do that he actually built different devices that would isolate monkeys from everything from their families from the rest of the community from any kind of touch and clothing human touch and he would leave them there um and then he would bring them out and see if they could recover in any meaningful way some of them dead some of them were permanently damaged by the isolation and in a very harlow way he described probably the most infamous of those devices as the pit of despair which was a essentially an inverted pyramid the baby monkey went into the point of the triangle it opened up wide armed with a mesh sean top civil little animal couldn't get bad out couldn't be touched food and water were supplied but it was alone in this point it was terrible i mean we're we're talking about a social species and one that th rise rizon comfort of touch and there was none of the and there are hard to read and hard to understand given what he knew about those animals right and i don't defend them and i i just can't and i don't think many of the.

harry harlow different devices
"harry harlow" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"harry harlow" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Whenever shut allison mcadams story about her conflict blanket i remembered a wonderful book by the ride aplomb explored the powerful role that touch plays in our lives lava goon park tells the story of psychologist harry harlow and his groundbreaking experiments about attachment and affection deborah welcome to hidden brain thank you it's great to be here you describe in your book something that seems very surprising to me which is that back in the nineteen fifties there were many prominent behavioral experts who believe that touch was a problem that children in particular shouldn't be correct excessively shouldn't be held and cuddled excessively talked me by that moment and where these experts were coming from it's so fascinating to look back at that period and think to yourself how could you get that so wrong body grew out of a kind of behavior is idea that kind of you know a solid foundation of affection scientists including ones i wrote about would describe it didn't really matter the mother was there is a food source kept the kid warm a answered it's immediate physical needs but there early books told mothers not to hold their children at all if they could avoid at that it would ruin the moral fiber of the child the child become weak the child would become dependent the child would never become an independent you men beer.

harry harlow deborah allison mcadams