8 Burst results for "Harry Benjamin"

"harry benjamin" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

04:09 min | 4 months ago

"harry benjamin" Discussed on WBUR

"A struggle. Red Bull's Max Verstappen went from a tenth place start to win the Hungarian Grand Prix and extend his championship lead, the Mercedes pair of Lewis Hamilton and George Russell claimed a double podium finish coming home in second and third, Harry Benjamin has the details. George Russell for Mercedes held off the two Ferraris in the early stages of the Hungarian Grand Prix, but tyre strategy was the talk of the town and proved crucial in the end as it was Max Verstappen in his Red Bull, starting tenth, managed his tyres the best and with the right strategy worked his way up to win his 8th race of the season. Disaster once again for Ferrari who despite looking fast, Paul strategy calls seeing both Carlos Sainz and Charles Leclerc off the podium. The two Mercedes of Hamilton and Russell rounded off the podium as Verstappen extends his championship lead to 80 points over leclerc. And the Dutch rider annemiek van Vleuten has won the inaugural Tour de France fam finishing three minutes and 48 seconds ahead of compatriot daily following in the general classification, and that's Paul Sarah's now Gareth Barlow's return with some other stories we've been following. The U.S. House of Representatives speaker Nancy Pelosi is due to arrive in Singapore later on Monday for the start of an Asian tour, a White House statement said she would also visit Malaysia, South Korea and Japan to discuss how to further advance shared interests, but made no mention of Taiwan, her reported plans to visit the island have sparked strong warnings from Beijing. Canceled a visit to Taiwan in April after she contracted COVID. The Senegalese president says his ruling coalition parties won 30 of the country's 46 administrative departments, following Sunday's legislative elections. Partial results were announced on national television early on Monday by aminata Toure, the former prime minister tore who led the coalition's list, said it gave them an unquestionable majority. The leader of the main opposition coalition immediately disputed the results, warning that it was not Torre's place to announce them. And American sportsmen and politicians have been paying tribute to the basketball legend Bill Russell, who died on Sunday. He won 11 NBA titles with the Boston Celtics and was also a civil rights activist who marched with Martin Luther King Jr.. President Joe Biden described him as a good man and a great American, while Barack Obama called him a giant. The former player, Michael Jordan, said the world had lost a legend, while Magic Johnson called him the greatest winner the game of basketball had ever seen. Gareth, thank you. In recent weeks, we've heard a lot about the James Webb Space Telescope. You may have even seen some of the frankly spectacular images showing the light from galaxies in the early universe. But there's plenty of other work that astronomers are involved in. One project that's just got underway is trying to discover where the stars that we see in our own galaxy actually came from. The researchers are using the new instrument called weave, which has been installed on the William Herschel telescope, and that's located on a mountain top on the island of la Palma in the Atlantic Ocean. Our science correspondent pallab coach has been there and sent us this report. Our galaxy, the Milky Way is a dense spiral swirl of up to 400 billion stars. But it started out as a relatively small collection of them. It grew from successive mergers with other small galaxies over billions of years. Weave is a multi object spectrograph, which can analyze the light from a thousand stars every hour. It will use the data it gathers to assess their speed age and composition. The aim of the 5 year project is to reconstruct the entire formation of the Milky Way in unprecedented detail. Researchers also hope the project will lead to a leap forward in our understanding of how other galaxies are made. And staying with the stars, tributes are being paid to the actress Nichelle Nichols, best known as the communications officer lieutenant uhura in the original series of Star Trek, who's died at the age of 89. The American space agency NASA said Michelle Nichols symbolized to many what was possible, while her Star Trek costar George Takei, who played sulu, described the black actress as trailblazing and incomparable. Our entertainment correspondent Lisa Musa looks back at

Max Verstappen George Russell Harry Benjamin Red Bull Charles Leclerc Verstappen annemiek van Vleuten inaugural Tour de France Paul Sarah Gareth Barlow Carlos Sainz aminata Toure Lewis Hamilton Taiwan leclerc Martin Luther King Jr. President Joe Biden U.S. House of Representatives Ferrari Nancy Pelosi
"harry benjamin" Discussed on LGBTQ&A

LGBTQ&A

05:30 min | 8 months ago

"harry benjamin" Discussed on LGBTQ&A

"You've made transgender health policy a cornerstone of your work. Yes. When did that begin? When did you realize like, oh, this is the focus. Well, the first thing was when I started my transition, I had just started a new job. And so I got the insurance documents, and I saw something that I had never noticed before in any insurance plan, consciously, but that there was an exclusion for transsexual treatment. That was the language. All transsexual treatment would be excluded and I thought, well, that's a bummer. It was written so broadly. Broadly, that it meant basically that if I got a sore throat, I couldn't go to the doctor. If I broke my leg, I couldn't go to the doctor. It would be transsexual treatment because I was transsexual. And in fact, many people experienced that many people have been thrown out of emergency rooms with lacerations and broken arms and stuff because we don't treat people like you. We can't treat you. We can't treat a trans person. So I tried to figure out how to get insurance exclusions removed and was fairly successful in that. And then I realized if we got exclusions removed and that it was okay for trans people to be treated in emergency basic medical care as well as transition related care, then we would need more providers, so that's why I got involved with the Harry Benjamin international gender dysphoria association. We needed somebody to be a champion organization. We needed somebody with some clout and authority, and they'd been producing the standards of care since 1979. So I joined that organization. I was on the board, and I was elected to another four year was a four year term. I was elected to another four year term in 2007. And then in 2011, I was elected president and was at a presidential term that lasted 7 years. And during that time, I got them to start issuing policy statements, which I wrote. What were the biggest goals you had with those statements? The biggest ones? Well, the first one was about the issue of medical necessity and insurance coverage in the United States. W path being a global organization, you know, if something's just about the United States, it has to be specified. These statements then go out and they are available for activists to use to leverage arguments to move things forward in their own jurisdictions in their regions. And also to influence medical education about human rights about the rights of trans people about actual care, my goal was to change the world..

Harry Benjamin international g United States
"harry benjamin" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"harry benjamin" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Experience today. From the 1880s, being trans was medically classified as a variation of sex development, a form of intersex. Clinically, it was believed there were many trans boys. People assigned female at birth and that trans girls were a rarity, but as a matter of common sense and natural justice. Doctors recognized that people knew their own minds and bodies and aimed to support them in living their authentic best lives. Consequently, the worldwide publicity given to trans woman Christine Jorgensen in the U.S. in 1952 and to her UK counterpart, Roberta Cowell, two years later, had initially stimulated trans affirmative medical care, led by U.S. endocrinologist Harry Benjamin. At the same time, however, a group of U.S. doctors were developing a new set of ideas built around the problem of intersex neonates. If newborn babies had ambiguous genitalia, surgeons routinely corrected them, usually to female. Even though there was no life threatening condition. What if they got the sex wrong? According to psychiatrists, John money and Joan and John hampson, writing at Johns Hopkins hospital in the mid 1950s, that wouldn't matter. Appropriate parenting would condition any child into the sex their doctor desired. They applied their idea of gender identity, not only to the sex of a child, but also to its sexuality and its social behavior. Appropriate parenting would always produce children who were unequivocally male, masculine, and heterosexual or female feminine and heterosexual. The psychiatrists argued. Read today, their work as a payen to social anxiety and the measures they developed were draconian. Influenced by money's work, psychiatrist Robert stoller established a gender identity research clinic at the University of California, Los Angeles in 1962. Like its imitators, the clinic aimed to cure the effeminacy of trans girls and women and the masculinity of trans boys and men with measures that included frontal lobotomy, electroconvulsive therapy. Psychotherapy, aversion therapy. Faradic electric shocks or chemically induced vomiting and induced comas. A new pseudo medicine rejected decades of social acceptance and scientific evidence and in a brief violent turf war between endocrinology and psychiatry. A stubborn will to non knowledge as French philosopher Michel Foucault put it won the day. By 1969, money and his coterie had redefined trans people as mentally ill..

Christine Jorgensen Roberta Cowell Harry Benjamin U.S. John money John hampson payen Johns Hopkins hospital Robert stoller Joan UK University of California Los Angeles Michel Foucault
"harry benjamin" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

The Autosport Podcast

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"harry benjamin" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

"I'm the fast victory for mclaren in nine years. It was mclaren one or two for the team with landowners. Taking second spot on the podium and vow batas taking thaad doctrine excellent comeback from about degrade me. It was a disastrous day to the top contenders with max stopping and lewis hamilton clutching the red woolcott. Winding up on top of the mercedes and as a result neither driver finishing the rice. Max and has since been penalized for the accident. Receiving three place grid penalty and two penalty points on his licence. I'm we're gonna get into all of the discussion surrounding that later. In the podcast. There is a lot unpaid today. There were many stories today that we probably won't get round to discussing but we're gonna have a good guy on joining me to do so. Is it jess mcfadden. Director of strategy might Network hayden call editor of order and a very special guest harry benjamin podcast and commentator. Harry hayden is lovely to have you joining us harry first of all. How are you doing. Thank you very much for having me on. i'm good. Thank you hectic racist. Arson in sunday's always busy birth. Yeah very happy to be on. Thank you for having me and your fast time joining us on the Protests how are you feeling now. Good thank you. It's been a busy well managed to get through it. Just about so at yeah. It's been a good weekend an absolute pleasure. Having you joining us today. Harry and russo yourself hated. We can't wait to get stuck into the conversation now. You guys may not know but we always like to kick off the podcast with a race racing so that is exactly what we're gonna do today. We're going to just fast so that you can yuna so of c- a baseline for what how're we tend to write on. Then we will comet to you guys. jess what that you're gonna give today's yeah again Trekkie race to rates are in. Need because i think up until the red bull pitstop looked like it was going to be quite dull. It looked like it was just going to be quite easy to maintain. It was really tricky to out. There wasn't going to be too much a change in the running older but then we do get gifted these moments again. I say gifted depends on. If you're a red bull mercedes pharma guests gifted with these weird happenings and all of a sudden everything gets right into question. We have a bunch of things happening up and down the field. We had drivers making mistakes. We had a penalties and It was so after that it was quite entertaining. Not so much of a a huge strategy race but the west interesting strategies going up and down most. Interestingly i guess for mercedes pulling out lewis hamilton on hard tyres on the grid when he's in pay for and everyone kind of tanning around and thinking now is going on over here but ended up you know could have been a blinder strategy. Had we seen how that played out but we didn't so i'll get smart racing. I'm gonna give it. I'm gonna give seven. I'm slightly cautious. Only because again. I think had we not had the craziness happening. It might have been in weapon very very different but the second half of that race it was full hall. Pounding kind of edgy statement site and obviously a great great resentful from clara in the end but yet it wasn't it wasn't amazing but i think it had enough that will be talking about this race a for for the rest of the season pay saudi seven guys a decent decent bracing. Harry what you're going to give it out of ten very difficult to disagree with. A lot of justice said there was bit of danger that it was going to be a bit of a stop but i was also thinking of the number seven but actually i'm gonna go with an eight because to see daniel ricardo on the top step of the party once again and mclaren one two and we have fights down the field as well i would have liked to seen a bit more of how latifi go ahead of the the to alpine's at one point and he then oversee fell back a bit but george russell had a bit of a rice. Getting into ninth once again as well so there was action. Sort of all the way through the field. We didn't see much of it. Because naturally the headlines would take by verstappen hamilton which again added to the spice and drama peres. Batas both coming through as well. They looked at one point that he was going to challenge so for me. It had all the right ingredients. We think to get a full time. We were robbed of some of those things playing out by the safety obviously by the snapping at hamilton early retirements but overall i'd say that was a solid eight for me k. One up when jess hayden. What are you giving at definitely go up again nine. Nothing you've been on the selling it. Daniel ricardo winning from fire in.

mclaren red woolcott jess mcfadden harry benjamin Harry hayden lewis hamilton hayden russo Harry max Max jess harry Daniel ricardo latifi clara verstappen hamilton saudi george russell Batas
"harry benjamin" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

06:37 min | 1 year ago

"harry benjamin" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"Plausible accusation of impermissible favoritism to private parties should treat that objection as a serious one review. The record to see if it has merit though with the presumption that the government's actions were reasonable and intended to serve a public purpose. I think that makes a lot of sense. Make sense to me case you want to say yeah if this is nothing but a giveaway divisor if it is just a bought and sold the legislature. Yep you can go to court if it isn't if it's the process of political horse trading then it might not be the best possible outcome but it is certainly a better outcome than saying we are going to constrain the power of local governments to do what they can to serve their communities. This was bitterly condemned by rehnquist scalia. Thomas and o'connor and o'conner wrote the dissent. She makes essentially to arguments in her dissent. And i don't think either of these are very good. The first is she says. This effectively reads out the public. Use claws from the fifth amendment. I think the bit. I just read to you from kennedy answers that it's no more of a reading out than saying we apply the equal protection clause under rational basis. It's not much of a protection. I don't want to oversell that. But it doesn't have to be because the state power comes with. Its own remedy of compensation so that was the first argument kind of reads that into nothingness. And i would say it's no more nothingness than than the rational basis test Which is not nothing and then the second argument was sort of a liberal concern for how urban renewal works Again i sympathize with. But i think this case wouldn't have solved so she's she writes. The specter of condemnation hangs over all property. Nothing is to prevent the state from replacing any motel six with a ritz carlton any home with a shopping mall any farm with a factory. And i kinda wanna combine that into the other argument the last argument you will hear against kilo versus city of new under today. And that is this. Redevelopment plan ultimately went nowhere. It was proposed. And i'm going to quote here from withering criticism in the national review that that winds up being its own goal As for the city of new london justice zarella that was the at the connecticut supreme court and other skeptics turned out to be right. The nodc's flawed development plan fell through as did a number of later efforts and today the land is empty and apparently overrun with feral cats. That's true bow. It's an own goal because the reason pfizer pulled out of new london was because After acquiring another company grodin connecticut built the research facility that they were looking to have built on the new london facility and then pfizer's tax breaks expired in two thousand and nine. So they're like oh look. This other area was able to build the thing that we wanted to get out of the fort trumbull project by the way if that had not been wrapped up in five years of litigation maybe new london could have built that illegi the time. So yes do we still have the endemic problem of the race to the bottom one hundred percent we still have but opposing kilo versus city of new. London will not solve that problem. All it will do is say. It will impose the hard and fast rule that says localities can't engage in urban renewal And i think that is incredibly misguided and so That is our deep dive kilo versus city of new london. What do you think that was fantastic. I was such an appropriate use of i. Five hundred episode. I really that was just such a signature. Andrew torres deep died. I knowing normally save those for the tuesday show you know but like screw it. It's five hundred fantastic. I loved it and yeah so it sounds like the state of the law on this is okay or is this another thing. This horrible court is gonna ruin in some weird way. This is such an angry issue for libertarians and those really engaged in right-wing jurisprudence that i imagined the supreme court will revisit and then we will see all of these articles about how you know keel over. The city of new london is a decision viewed as controversial from both the left. And the right. And i want to highlight that. The the criticisms from the left are intentional. Hijackings of what our good faith motives that this court is is absolutely not gonna solve by by overturning also point a bunch of states have passed laws restricting the eminent domain powers of local mayors. Which again think about this right like governors tend to be republicans mayors tend to be democrats so this is an area where they got public sympathies behind governors taking away local powers democrats and the entire history around this is i feel about keel over city of new london. Roughly the way. I feel about the mcdonald's coffee case. Yeah there you go good callback on that so something. That's kind of widely misunderstood and bashed for bad reasons essentially exactly rent while i love this. What a what. A great way to celebrate five hundred andrew. That was so much fun. Thank you and now. It's time to think our new patrons and i am so excited to think our new patriots on episode. Five hundred was special slice history. You have there. No not really. They don't care but that's fine but you will get a lot awful movies that i have not had time to edit because i've been on vacation i've tried to actually tried to find the time it's been impossible but i'm going to very soon. It's a lot of movies that is cop rock episode to with a special guest. It will be in your email inboxes patrons soon and ear holes. Yeah yeah so the following new patrons. Maybe enjoying that if they are at the Two dollar level. And that is i'll start us. thank you to s. Rubik's tesseract maximum. Bebo chris harry benjamin paul robert sellers and robert ward your turn andrew and thank you to brendan kirby to anne to spencer darling to one twenty seven dot zero dot zero dot one to oliver graph and jacob. Cabal thank you so much for supporting the show. We really appreciate it. It's what Enables us to do this..

brendan kirby Andrew torres pfizer anne Thomas five years jacob chris Two dollar one hundred percent five robert ward andrew today two thousand tuesday first oliver graph fifth amendment o'connor
"harry benjamin" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:24 min | 1 year ago

"harry benjamin" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Hello from wonder media network. I'm jenny kaplan and this is encyclopedia will manteca today. We're celebrating the accomplishments of a computer science pioneer and transgender activist. This woman's contributions to society and science. Tell a story of resilience. Let's talk about lynn conway. Lynn conway was born on january. Second nineteen thirty eight in mount vernon new york initially assigned male at birth. She experienced a disconnect between her gender identity and assigned sex from a young age. Lynn new she identified as girl due to the limited knowledge around gender fauria in the nineteen forties and fifties. Lynn was raised as a boy. Lynn was a shy and reserved high school student. She excelled academically specifically in math and science. Her grades earned her spot at mit at the age of seventeen at mit. Lynn studied physics for two years before dropping out as a result of psychological distress with her gender identity. A few years later in nineteen sixty one linen rolled at columbia university. She earned her bachelor's and master's degrees in electrical engineering during this time. Lynn married a woman and the couple had two daughters together. Violet columbia limbs work caught the attention of professor who is a senior leader at ibm. He offered her a job on the ibm research team. That was covertly developing the world's fastest supercomputer. Lynn had secured her dream job. Then in nineteen sixty seven. Lind learned doctor named harry. Benjamin the leading researcher on transgender people and sex reassignment surgery after counseling and hormone treatments lynn decided to undergo gender reassignment surgery. To ease your transition at work lin planned for ibm to change her name on company records and transfer her to a different lab. No one would have to know but ibm corporate disagreed. They feared employees would be upset. If limb secret got out some instead of honoring their promise of finding her a new department. Ibm quietly fired her. On top of losing her job wins wife left her and banned her from having any contact with their daughters. Fourteen years would pass before. Lynn saw her children again despite being ostracized by her company and family. Lynn moved forward with the surgery and completed her transition in nineteen sixty eight. She changed her name to lynn conway and began her new life in what she called stealth mode while finally able to live as her authentic self. Lynn still feared being outed as a transgender woman. In nineteen seventy-three lind joined xerox palo alto research center better known as park or she quickly made a name for herself. Leading large scale projects. Five years later in nineteen seventy eight. Lynn returned to mit as a visiting associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science alongside. Professor carver mead. She co authored an engineering textbook. The book was adopted by over one hundred universities worldwide. There's an entire generation of engineering students that refer to the text as mead conway lynn and mead revolutionized microelectronics in computing back at park. Lynn took it a step further and created an e commerce infrastructure. That facilitated the high-speed development of thousands of new chip designs in one thousand nine hundred eighty three. Lynn left park to work as the assistant director for the defense department's advanced research projects agency. Lynn closed out her career at the university of michigan as a professor of electrical engineering and computer science there. She met her husband. Charles rogers fellow engineer the two were married in two thousand and two and live together on a twenty four acre property outside of in arbor. Lynn retired as professor emeritus. In nineteen ninety eight stories of lens innovations at ibm began to circulate around the time of her retirement in the year. Two thousand with the fear of exposure and her painful past at ibm looming lynn created a transgender advocacy website and publicly came out. Her goal was to de stigmatize gender identity and gender transition. Her site became a safe space for other transgender people. This newfound activism bolstered. Her confidence and lynn continued to use her platform to speak on. How women and minorities are often written. Out of scientific and technical advancements lynn also successfully lobbied for transgender inclusion in the code of ethics for the institute of electronic and electrical engineers on october fourteenth twenty twenty ibm held a virtual event to celebrate limbs career as a tech trailblazer and transgender pioneer. Much to the surprise of lynn and ibm employees. The company used this occasion to apologize for firing lyn during her transition. Fifty two years later. Lynn got the apology she deserved. Lynn currently spends her days on her family's homestead in michigan her profound advancement in computer science and electrical engineering and her influence over. The inclusivity of those spaces have truly changed those fields all month celebrating pride for more.

Lynn jenny kaplan january Charles rogers Benjamin Lynn conway lynn two one thousand lyn Lind harry park Fourteen years october fourteenth twenty twen thousands of new chip designs over one hundred universities nineteen seventy eight two daughters two thousand
The Life of Lynn Conway: Computer Scientist and Transgender Activist

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:35 min | 1 year ago

The Life of Lynn Conway: Computer Scientist and Transgender Activist

"Lynn conway was born on january. Second nineteen thirty eight in mount vernon new york initially assigned male at birth. She experienced a disconnect between her gender identity and assigned sex from a young age. Lynn new she identified as girl due to the limited knowledge around gender fauria in the nineteen forties and fifties. Lynn was raised as a boy. Lynn was a shy and reserved high school student. She excelled academically specifically in math and science. Her grades earned her spot at mit at the age of seventeen at mit. Lynn studied physics for two years before dropping out as a result of psychological distress with her gender identity. A few years later in nineteen sixty one linen rolled at columbia university. She earned her bachelor's and master's degrees in electrical engineering during this time. Lynn married a woman and the couple had two daughters together. Violet columbia limbs work caught the attention of professor who is a senior leader at ibm. He offered her a job on the ibm research team. That was covertly developing the world's fastest supercomputer. Lynn had secured her dream job. Then in nineteen sixty seven. Lind learned doctor named harry. Benjamin the leading researcher on transgender people and sex reassignment surgery after counseling and hormone treatments lynn decided to undergo gender reassignment surgery. To ease your transition at work lin planned for ibm to change her name on company records and transfer her to a different lab. No one would have to know but ibm corporate disagreed. They feared employees would be upset. If limb secret got out some instead of honoring their promise of finding her a new department. Ibm quietly fired her. On top of losing her job wins wife left her and banned her from having any contact with their daughters. Fourteen years would pass before. Lynn saw her children again despite being ostracized by her company and family. Lynn moved forward with the surgery and completed her transition in nineteen sixty eight.

Lynn Lynn Conway IBM Violet Columbia Mount Vernon MIT Columbia University New York Lind Benjamin Harry LIN
"harry benjamin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"harry benjamin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Newspaper or I looked up medical journals where I went to the library and so the right to Harry Benjamin and asked for help. Sometimes it was just like I'm having trouble explaining to my parents what it means to be trans. Could you write them a letter as a medical doctor and explain, some will say, Can you send me hormones in the mail, you know, And of course, he wouldn't do anything like that. But you would write back to people. And so I have. In some cases, kids writing to him for years, updating him on their lives, telling him about their transitions like what their life was like. It's school, the bullying being institutionalized transphobia parental rejection. Pencil acceptance. It's one of the most exciting moments of my career, because the rest of my research mostly used medical records, you reading what the doctor said about them. Yes, I wanted to tell the stories of these kids and do some justice to them because, Hey, there's our proof that trans kids aren't new. They figure this stuff out before most of us were born before some of us were way. Even within the archive, You found that black Children and white Children's lives were recorded very differently. And I'm wondering if you could describe that and also how it might skew our understanding of trans lives generally. 19th century racist science. The kind of science that argue that there were separate human race is the kind of science that argued in favor of slavery that argued that the white race was somehow the superior race in the world that was also anti Semitic. That kind of science argued that the difference between men and women in white Northern European society was the most evolutionarily advanced is that you know the Victorian era we've got, you know, women should be sort of actually pressed and quiet right. That notion, then actually really informs sex science right because there's still this assumption that The sex. Binary is this racial phenomenon that is somehow white, You know, Binary sex is white civilization by World War two. It that goes out of fashion after the atrocities of the Nazis. There's no more of this explicit race language, and instead it becomes this implicit idea. That white people are more capable of transitioning, and that's something that Harry Benjamin takes on. I don't understand if a black adult goes to Harry Benjamin and says, You know, I feel that I'm in the wrong body. Will you help me being black would work against him because he wouldn't think that the Hormones would work. Yeah. Trans Women from the era in New York City, all in reminiscences from the error will say, Yeah, You don't go to Harry Benjamin. He doesn't see black girls. Absolutely not. You have to be beautiful and white and blonde to get in there. There's actually a scientific history to it. Where the idea of being made normal. It's like well, we can take disorders and make them normal because white people deserve to be made normal so that they can participate in society. As is there sort of birthright. Not only were black trans people turned away from clinics just seen as generally unworthy. Treatment. But in the case of kids Black trans girls in particular. Anytime they said that they were girls who would be taken as evidence that they were criminals were that they were delusional or that they had a mental disability. Actions throws from We're likely to be arrested, put in foster care and end up in psychiatric institutions, juvenile detention and be held against their will for decades, and it has a lot for us to think about today in terms of Whose gender is considered a problem because there's a difference between being considered a medical or psychological problem and be considered a criminal problem, right? Both can be bad, but you know, one is a lot worse than the other. What kind of future do you want to see for trans kids and also for sex and gender? More.

New York City 19th century World War two Harry Benjamin Both today one Victorian era Northern European Nazis black moments decades Semitic