5 Burst results for "Harrison Salisbury"

"harrison salisbury" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

05:56 min | 10 months ago

"harrison salisbury" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"The days percent and i call. This was the boss and on okay and he said he had same idea but okay we both had the idea for. His idea was to the new york times to make an improvement tour right. So it'd be the new york times with pick up the bulk and they will be right that we would publish the book as an anthem book. Esther talk and harrison salisbury. Would be the terance she over the poor so there will be other other comments having to do a report so he wanted to fame. And you would've just something that you could have done just anywhere else. And so it was saying isn't market paperback publishing. That's being down the aftermath market companies. Obviously 'cause i worked actually hashing alone sentence you holly scanned it. Because i was the publicity. Fire barry your anti was stealing and so we did a little princeton actually printed in and distributed in eighty hours. So the idea was accommodation. Marsha idea oscar also thinking costing and then bringing the times for the tool that harrison actually decided to do and then waiting for the handed out literally just understand what innocent book worm. port comes out. You get all of this thursday monday. it's for sale. Wow scanned harsh. Because she was you know. I wanted to just fantasy just because gives you timing a. I realized that was really my head of we print beside already learned about publishing. You could quickly and was not any miraculous. When winston churchill died drew middleton who was the new york times in london we have known he was dying so everything was being. I mean that was vile feed the pig. Sure all in need with the park and said he died. Jim from told me the book was for sale on the day of the funeral and lung him instead. Yes very well i mean how did this hour. The sales on these were the very rich the new york times.

harrison salisbury terance the new york times Esther Marsha holly princeton barry oscar drew middleton harrison winston churchill london Jim
"harrison salisbury" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

06:17 min | 10 months ago

"harrison salisbury" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Make me rich man. I i love. I mean this great movie. They're also saying now somewhere along the line. Was there something to do with the warm report yet. Back follows here one morning and the new york times said they're gonna publish the complete one moon for and i worked at down. I was down on just a correction that the government was going release at one report taxes publish overnight current impinging office releases times going publish on new parts of the warm your reports. The commission finished its for gonna release it. And that was punched in government. Printing office book. He'd been slated bread but no they were giving out so book to a publishing entity they could pick up the days percent and i call. This was the boss and on okay and he said he had same idea but okay we both had the idea for. His idea was to the new york times to make an improvement tour right. So it'd be the new york times with pick up the bulk and they will be right that we would publish the book as an anthem book. Esther contol and harrison salisbury would be the terance she over the poor so there will be other other comments having to do a report so he wanted to fame. And you would've just something that you could have gone just anywhere else. And so it was in market paperback publishing. That's being down the aftermath market companies. Obviously 'cause i worked actually hashing colonic sentence you. Holly scanned it. Because i was the publicity. Fire barry your anti was stealing and so we did a little princeton actually printed and distributed in eighty hours so the idea was accommodation. Marsha idea oscar also thinking costing and then bringing the times for the tool that harrison actually decided to do and then waiting for the handed out literally just understand what an innocent book worm. Port comes out. You get all of this thursday monday. it's for sale. Wow scanned harsh. Because she was you know. I wanted to just fantasy just because gives you timing a. I realized that was really my head of we print beside already learned about publishing. You could quickly and was not any miraculous. When winston churchill died drew middleton who was the new york times in london we have known he was dying so everything was being. I mean that was vile feed the pig. Sure all in need with the park and said he died. Jim from told me the book was for sale on the day of the funeral in london. Instead yes very well. I mean how did this hour. The sales on these were the very rich the new york times and and satisfied the point over copy. Well we applied in the fact that an came of the beginning of this whole incident publishing that includes the pentagon papers absolutely and the second one commission for all kinds of commissions and for us can murder case. Can you was married to an older man and edgy was her best friend. It's really yeah. I mean i think that people. Today's yesterday similar bylines for example. She could have twenty thousand words because she had the market distribution machinery plays ruin connected to the way magazines and newspapers just shooting not that they would like the slow vote. Mass market magazines were and so prior to warrant the warren report. Had there been some books that was the first want folks once years ago called. What was their report was there. It is contained looked. But he had vow if you go back and even downtime during war instant. He didn't call it that diesel reports from the.

new york times Esther contol harrison salisbury terance drew middleton Marsha Holly princeton barry government oscar harrison winston churchill london Jim pentagon warren
"harrison salisbury" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

09:01 min | 2 years ago

"harrison salisbury" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Thank you so I mentioned Andrew before I go. I did want to tell you to sort of related stories in a way so. Cancel your reservations. So the what I hope comes across. Is that you gentlemen Moscow Roses Civility. These are in the books our inventions. That's what they are. And but there are aspects of my life or you know that that will percolate up through the narrative and interesting ways and so I just want to give you two quick examples of that. And the first is my. My family goes to Martha's Vineyard in the summer. An island off the coast of Cape Cod Massachusetts. My Grandmother went there as a child. My Mother did I go. My children go on and when I was eight on. Martha's Vineyard one summer I put a note in a bottle and through to the ocean and I said to whoever finds this. I hope it made it to China. I think is what it said. Eight years old so off it goes now weeks. Go by. We go home to the Boston area. And I think you come home and you know all the males piled up from at the end of vacation or whatever and my mother is going through the mail. I remember it very vividly and suddenly this envelope. It's this big as she pulls it out. And there's A. There's a letter typewritten. Letter addressed to more. And it's from the New York Times and I'm like yes my letter. Thank you well. It turned out turned out. The Guy who found the note in the bottle was the managing editor of The New York Times. A guy named Harrison. Salisbury now Salisbury. Salisbury had been a a World War Two correspondent. He was a correspondent. He was the New York. Times correspondent Hanoi during the Vietnam War. After the war he came back to the headquarters and he invented the OP. Ed Page you know the one that faces the editorials which which no newspaper had at the time and now almost all newspapers have an op. Ed Page and I was his invention so he was a great a great great journalist and so we corresponded. From the time. I was eight until I was eighteen. And then when I was eighteen I went and met him in New York which was very exciting and moving and I was an editor on my school newspaper and so that was an exciting part of that too. Well Anyway. When I came up with the idea of writing a gentleman Moscow. I decided okay. I'M GONNA go I'M GONNA. I'm GonNa have never been in the metropole overnight so I'm GonNa go spend a week there when I finished the first draft. Which is what I did for the reasons we talked about earlier so I finished the first draft and I went to Moscow to stay at the hotel when I went. I took with me all these first hand accounts that I've been gathering over the course of a year and a half of various people who had stayed in the metropolitan written about it in their memoirs. And I haven't read them yet but I had found them and Xerox stable them together and had them in a growing pile. So the idea wasn't GonNa go to Moscow and I'm GonNa read these firsthand accounts and begin to revise the book and think through any potential changes but right before I went to Moscow I am looking at glancing at one of these journalists like Eugene Lyons who would hang out with the metropole bar and one of them suddenly says. Oh you know. And that's the day and Salisbury. Came into the bar and we win then headed off to whatever and I was like. Oh my God I completely forgot. Harrison Salisbury was the New York Times Moscow correspondent at the end of the Second World War. So I was like he must have written a memoir of that. So I you know search through Google or rare book stores and things and I find his memoir of his Moscow days. I get it I brand with me to Russia and I opened it up and like the first sentence is I landed at such and such airport and I told the driver take me to the Metropole Hotel because it turned out he lived there the entire time so I read this very moving. He had passed away by then and so I was reading through and and yes I took some of the things that he had seen and they put them in because he was there. When for instance Stalin died and the section in the book where Stalin dies some of the observations of what was going on in the city or from Salisbury himself and threatening that in while says revising the book and then I was like you know what he deserved being the book himself so Salisbury's in the book in under his name the American journal Salisbury's referred to a couple of times and in a certain point. The count needs a trench coat and a hat kind of disguise and he goes to the courtroom and he steals Salisbury's trenchcoat and hat which was sort of for me very satisfying as sort of a gift to this. This gentleman had been so kind to me as a young man. So that's there. You have that kind of thing that influences the book but the probably the biggest example of a personal thing which ends up in the book is the figure of the two young girls early in the book the count is thirty years old in his internment and a nine year old girl. Nina who he meets a really changes experienced in the hotel since I friend during his house arrest many years later in his fifties. He's asked to keep an eye on a five year old girl named Sophia and she has a big impact on the count now. It is not a coincidence that when I had the idea for the story my daughter was five and when I finished the book my daughter was nine now. My daughter is not really likes. Afia or Nina per se. They're different people all three of them. But my daughter was the first person who taught me how shrewd a little girl can be. There are there are not to be underestimated any point so they give you a flavor for that and so you can imagine how this percolates up through the invention of my sophia and my Nina is well here we go. This is a few years ago. We go out on New Year's Eve and it's my wife my son my daughter and I. Hey It's New Year's Eve let's go around the table and we'll share new year's resolutions it'll be fun and my my daughter daughter who was eleven at the. Time Says Dad. Don't you think you should be less focused on your New Year's resolutions and more focused on your bucket list? Yeah exactly as a terrible thing to say so so so. I hit her with my cane. The only appropriate response to a comment like that. What any rate when my daughter was five and my son was eight. Their favorite restaurant in New York City is a little Italian place. Called Paul in. Jimmy's is a third generation. Run spot and it's old school Italian so salt and Boca Spaghetti and meatballs chicken parm. Now my kids loved it and of course they love the food but what they really loved about. It was how they were treated by the staff and when we go to the restaurant the kids would run ahead of me and my wife and they would burst through the door of the restaurant and the staff would say oh does oh print cheap as come in in so we would get there and the kids would be sitting at our table like they own the place so when my son turned nine we said. Hey stokely where do you wanna go for your birthday? We can go anywhere you want within reason and thinking he'd say Paul and Jimmy's and this great wistful way he says wouldn't it be amazing if we could go to Smith Alinsky now for those of you don't Know Smith? Orlansky is a venerable. Old Steakhouse on the east side of New York. And I'm like whereas an eight year old boy. Find out about steakhouse. Well it turns out the year that my son turned nine was the year that they I put televisions. In the back of taxicabs and Smith Orlinsky was the very first company to subscribe to the advertising on the on the service so every time he got a cab there it was. He'd seen it a hundred times so I said listen. If you WANNA go to Smith Orlinsky is we can go to Smith. He's and he.

Salisbury New York Harrison Salisbury The New York Times Moscow Martha Nina Metropole Hotel Ed Page Old Steakhouse Andrew Smith Smith Orlinsky China Boston
"harrison salisbury" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

10:38 min | 2 years ago

"harrison salisbury" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Thank you so the mentioned Andrew before I go I did want to tell you to sort of related stories in a way so cancel reservations. So the what I hope comes across. Is that you gentlemen Moscow Roses Rosa Civility. These are in. My books are inventions. That's what they are. And but there are aspects of my life or you know that that will percolate lead up through the narrative and interesting ways and so I just want to give you two quick examples of that and the first is my. My family goes to Martha's Vineyard Vineyard in the summer an island off the coast of Cape Cod Massachusetts. My Grandmother went there as a child. My Mother did I go. My children go and when I was eight on Martha's Vineyard one summer. I put a note in a bottle and through to the ocean and then I said to whoever finds this I hope it made it to China. I think is what it said. Eight years old so off it goes now weeks. Go by. We go home to the Boston area. And I think you come home and you know all the males piled up from at the end of vacation or whatever and my mother. There's going through the mail. I remember it very vividly and suddenly this envelope. It's this big as she pulls it out. And there's A. There's a letter typewritten. Britain letter addressed to aim more. And it's from the New York Times and I'm like yes my letter. Thank you well. It turned out turned out. The Guy who found the note in the bottle was the managing editor of The New York Times. A guy named Harrison. Salisbury now Salisbury. Salisbury had been a a World War Two correspondent he was a correspondent correspondent. He was the New York Times correspondent Hanoi during the Vietnam War. After the war he came back to the headquarters and he invented the OP. Ed Page you know the one that faces the editorials which which no newspaper had at the time and now almost all newspapers have an op. Ed Page and I was his invention so he was a great a great great journalist and so we corresponded. From the time. I was eight until I was eighteen. And then when I was eighteen I went and met him in New York which was very exciting and moving and and I had was an editor on my school newspaper and so that was an exciting part of that too. Well anyway when I came up with the idea of writing a gentleman Moscow I decided. Okay I'm going to go. I'M GONNA I'm GonNa have never been in the metropole overnight so I'm GonNa go spend a week there when I finished the first draft. So what which is what I did for the reasons we talked about earlier so I finished the first draft and I went to Moscow to stay at the hotel when I went. I took with me all these first hand accounts that I've been gathering over the course of a year and a half of various people who had stayed in the metropolitan written about it in their memoirs and I haven't read them yet but I had found them and Xerox staple them together and had them in a growing pile so the idea wasn't GonNa go to Moscow and I'm GonNa read these firsthand accounts and begin to revise is the book and think through any potential changes but right before I went to Moscow I am looking at glancing at one of these journalists like Eugene Lyons Lions who would hang out at the Metropole Bar and one of them suddenly says Oh you know. And that's the day and Salisbury. Came into the bar and we win then and you know headed off to whatever and I was like. Oh my God I completely forgotten. Harrison Salisbury was the New York Times Moscow correspondent at the end of the Second World War. More so I was like he must have written a memoir of that. So I you know search through Google or rare book stores and things and I find his memoir memoir of his Moscow days. I get it I brand with me to Russia and I opened it up and like the first sentence is I landed at such and such airport and I told the driver her. Take me to the Metropole Hotel. Because it turned out he lived there the entire time so I read this very moving. He had passed away by then and so I was reading through and and yes I took some of the things that he had seen and they put them in because he was there. When for instance Stalin died and the a section in the book where Stalin dies some of the observations of what was going on in the city or from Salisbury himself and threatening that in while says revising the book and then I was like you know what he deserved being the book himself so Salisbury's in the book in under his name the American journal Salisbury's referred to a couple of times and in a certain point? The count needs a trench coat and a hat kind of disguise and he goes to the courtroom and he steals Salisbury's trenchcoat and hat which was sort of for me very satisfying as sort of a gift to this. This gentleman had been so kind to me as a young man. So so that's there. You have that kind of thing that influences the book but the probably the biggest example of a personal thing which ends up in the book is the figure of the two young girls roles early in the book. The count is thirty years old in his internment and a nine year old girl Nina who he meets A. It's a really changes experience in the hotel since I friend during his house arrest many years later in his fifties. He's asked to keep an eye on a five year old girl named Sofia and she has a big impact on the count. Now it is not a coincidence that when I had the idea for the story my daughter was five and when I I finished the book my daughter was nine now. My daughter is not really likes AFIA or Nina per se. They're different people all three of them but my daughter there was the first person who taught me how shrewd a little girl can be. There are there are not to be underestimated needed any point so they give you a flavor for that and so you can imagine how this percolates up through the invention of my sophia and my Nina is well here we go. This is a few years ago. We go out on New Year's Eve and it's my wife my son my daughter and I. Hey It's New Year's Eve let's go around the table and we'll share share new year's resolutions. It'll be fun and my my daughter daughter who was eleven at the time says dad. Don't you think you should be less focused on your New Year's resolutions and more focused on your bucket list. Yeah exactly as a terrible thing to say okay so so so. I hit her with my cane. The only appropriate response to a comment comet like that. What any rate when my daughter was five and my son was eight? Their favorite restaurant in New York City is a little Italian place. Called Paul in. Jimmy's amies is a third generation. Run spot and it's old school Italian so salt and Boca Spaghetti and meatballs chicken parm. Now my kids loved it and of course they love the food but what they really loved about. It was how they were treated by the staff and when we would go to the restaurant the kids would run ahead of me and my wife and they would burst through the door of the restaurant and the staff would say oh does oh apprenticeship as come in come in so we would get there and the kids would be sitting at our table like they own the place so when my son turned nine we said Hey stokely where do you wanna go for your birthday. We can go anywhere you want within reason and thinking he'd say Pauline Jimmies and this wistful way he says wouldn't it be amazing if we could go to Smith Alinsky now for those of you don't know Smith. Orlinsky is a venerable. Old Steakhouse on the east side of New York. And I'm like whereas an eight year old boy. Find out about steakhouse. Well it turns turns out the year that my son turned nine was the year. That they I put. Televisions in the back of taxicabs and Smith and will end. Skis was the very first company to subscribe to the advertising on the on the service so every time he got a cab there it was. He'd seen it a hundred times so I said listen. If you WANNA go to Smith and we'll end skis we can go to Smith. He's and he.

Harrison Salisbury Salisbury The New York Times New York Moscow Smith Alinsky Moscow Roses Rosa Civility Ed Page Metropole Hotel Vineyard Vineyard Old Steakhouse Martha's Vineyard Martha Andrew Nina China Boston
"harrison salisbury" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

06:37 min | 2 years ago

"harrison salisbury" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"The there's a moment a really moving moment which I'll let you describe but but where people wait in a long line specifically so they can sneak away to pray in secret to tell us about that that that is seen with which as you say it's a a group of women who are waiting in a church which has been reclaimed so to speak and turned into a Derry and to what happens is that turns out that women are going kind of across the city to go to this particular Derry because when all of the religious artifacts removed from the church a mosaic was left behind and the women in line will let you leave the line and get come back to your place in line which the Russians did not like to do so that you can go and pray in front of this mosaic kind of in in part was it Jesus in the woman taken adultery of the woman at the well one of those yes woman at the well I think yeah if it's a yes that's right yeah but the the the that was not in the first draft of the book I had the great pleasure of getting to know as a young man the much older Harrison Salisbury whose great New York times that was a mess that's amazing when I read I read that someplace in interview yeah I threw a bottle in the ocean in the thin eight when I was eight years old that's true off the coast of New England and he found it and we began corresponding and we corresponded from the time was eight two is eighteen and then we met about so anyway when I was when I finish the real novel I I went through gathering first hand accounts of life in Moscow and of life at the hotel I I do when I do that I don't research before I write a book I I try to invent the book write it and then do the research that's kind of my process of the Metropol hotel is a real hotel that's right indeed exist today yes it does and so in the search for kind of first hand accounts when the first draft was done I realize the Harrison Salisbury had been the Moscow correspond for the times and he spent a lot of time in the hotel I read his memoir at that point in in it that story that he tells and so that's a real story he was walking through the city one guy you know he would sneak out of a hotel to walk the city by himself this is probably around nineteen fifty you know right after the second World War at the early part of the Cold War and of course and he saw a monster Stalin is in charge yes and if he stumbles on this church is trying to figure out where all these women are doing there and realizes that this is going on so yes that is a true story but it is it is so moving and it seems like it would have to be a two story there's something about it yeah but it it's really moving to think that even around that time the people would be taking time to sneak away to pray and it's it's not as though they couldn't pray any other place but there's something about because of the orthodox Christian world or something wholly about churches and and mows that you know they don't they don't feel like not just the building but I I was just so moved by that and then to think that you you get this I mean that's pretty bizarre when you're telling me that you threw you threw a bottle in the ocean yeah with a note and it was found by this man yeah years later thirty years later whatever turns out that he was in the same hotel I was writing about you know so yeah that's that's a gift that that said rats in a maze it sounds miraculous frankly but I I want to talk a bit about the hotel but before that it getting back to this issue that there there's you do you have a wisdom and and and and and nobility of character at the center of this book you don't pretend as though you know there's no meaning to life and you don't come out in an explicitly religious way but there's a real dignity to the characters and how they process things and I was really struck by the moment early in the book when the count it tears up the thousands is at the thousand ruble Jack or something like that that the that the the annoying aristocrat the one who's who's trying did that that he he sort of tears it up and puts the echo yes place your way let me in his youth yeah right yeah your fans and and in the end it as you're reading it you're cheering for him yes this is an amazing thing that he does but toward the end of the book he has this moment of reflection where he thinks maybe I was being too smug yes No he absolutely was putting his place for his own advantage and and and and repent spat that in a way right which is an extra but that's extraordinary because I would not of expected that I thought while because mark Halperin in his book his character would never repent of that sounds like all of the books are there are you know they're all about these kind of heroic dashing figures doing the noble thing and **** the bad guy one thing about the book is it is it does span thirty years and so that changes if you write a novel it only takes place in one year like rules of civility you can't go through quite the level of self discovery that you're gonna go through over a thirty year time for like you look at yourself imagine yourself you know we were yeah we knew some things there was a lot we didn't know and in our last five or ten years as parents we've learned a lot that we would not know otherwise so so that's a natural thing I think when you take a novel instruction over thirty years that you would hope and expect the you know the main characters to be going through appears of self discovery looking back on their own actions looking back on the relationships their own prejudices prejudices and re thinking them well as I say that's a that's right but it's also rare and beautiful and I'm so glad that you didn't write this book when you were twenty five years old we have to because there's a lot of there's a lot of that kind of was the minute which is just beautiful and I think accessible to everybody this is not a novel for some people I would say it's a novel for for almost everybody it's just there's something about it now the the two questions because we just have moments left in this but when we come back I want to ask you what you're working on now and then I want to ask you about the hotel metropole when we come back more with a more tolls don't go away Hey folks certain taxes here there's something you will need to know about relief factor end about Pete and Seth tell but the father and son owners as you know they're in a real mission help as many people as possible get out of pain and they've been a consistent sponsor of the show for several years in radio sponsors come and go they may even stay for a year or so it sounds like you're doing super and then they're gone well not so with really factor Pete and Seth are consistent year after year and.

thirty years twenty five years eight years thirty year ten years one year