35 Burst results for "Harriet Tubman"

"harriet tubman" Discussed on Black History Year

Black History Year

02:14 min | 3 weeks ago

"harriet tubman" Discussed on Black History Year

"Harriet Tubman fearlessly risked her life to save hundreds of enslaved black people. But sometimes we forget an important part of her identity and motivation. Like us, Tubman was a human with feelings. After she escaped in 1849, Tubman worked as a housekeeper in Philadelphia, but she felt extreme loneliness. Her heart ate for her family. She refused to return to enslavement, but realized she would have feel free until her community was too. Tubman returned south to rescue her niece and niece's children. With help from other members of The Underground Railroad, her mission succeeded. In 18 50, the fugitive slave law was passed and rescue missions became extremely dangerous, but that didn't stop Tubman. From 1849 to 1860, Tubman rescued anywhere from 70 to 300 people, including her parents. 2022 marks 200 years since Tubman's birth. With celebratory events like those in Maryland and across the nation, we can honor Tubman by gathering our communities and attending one. Before enslavement, many West African cultures knew that in unity, there is strength. Enslaved Africans carried this with them throughout the middle passage and enslavement, and it's why community is still so important for all black people today. While Tubman is a hero, she was also a mother, wife, sister, daughter, and a friend. Like Tubman, we must understand that liberation and building a strong black community go hand in hand. In order to move towards the future, you've got to look to the past. This has been two minute black history, a podcast by push black..

Tubman Harriet Tubman Philadelphia Maryland
Does Joy Behar Know Harriet Tubman Was a Gun Owner?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:05 min | 6 months ago

Does Joy Behar Know Harriet Tubman Was a Gun Owner?

"The Democrats are losing the argument. They really are even after this horrific massacre of these innocent little babies in new valley, Texas. They're losing the debate. A lot of listeners are sending me text messages of pictures and stories of Harriet Tubman. The heroic conductor of The Underground Railroad. She was a gun owner. As joy behar suggests that black people don't have guns, Harriet Tubman, this is historical, and this is a fact, was known to carry a single shot percussion pistol with about a 6 inch barrel and an ivory handle handled saber, both of which are currently on display now at the Florida a and M university in Tallahassee. She was often known to be armed with a rifle during the Civil War. And there's joy behar yesterday, now when the blacks get the guns, boy, then the gun laws will finally change what a filthy disgusting racist thing to say.

Harriet Tubman New Valley Joy Behar M University Texas Tallahassee Florida Behar
"harriet tubman" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:35 min | 9 months ago

"harriet tubman" Discussed on WTOP

"Is WTO news two 52 On this 200th anniversary of Harriet Tubman's birth the National Park Service has added 16 new places to The Underground Railroad network to freedom And three of them are here in Maryland There's the port tobacco jail sites in Charles county and also the mass escape side of the macaw plantation which is now saint Mary's college The other is saint Stephen's AME church cemetery in unionville which is just outside Easton The park service says the network provides insight into the diverse experiences of people who bravely escaped slavery as well as those who helped them And there has been tension in orange Virginia at Montpelier the home of president James Madison but the site's board of directors vows it is committed to sharing power with descendants of enslaved persons About 300 people were enslaved at the plantation of the nation's fourth president the board recently voted to strip power sharing from a committee of descendants of enslaved persons but chairman of the Montpelier foundation Jeanne Hickok insists there's no backing down from telling the site slave history The enslaved community in Montpelier is as much a part of Montpelier's darling and James work Hickok also says the foundation is not backing off its plan to have descendants of enslaved persons hold half the seats on the board of directors It's important to make sure we look at the entire story Particularly on WTO news Critics of the foundation say the board is trying to tell a whitewashed version of history Half a dozen campus buildings associated with slavery and racism are getting new names at the university of Richmond and that includes two buildings at the board of trustees initially wanted to leave alone The trustees thought leaving those names untouched would provide a fuller historical narrative but the school community largely rejected that idea with protests last year and the faculty even expressed a vote of no confidence in the university's rector In other news D.C. in Northern Virginia communities should expect moderate levels of job growth in the next couple of decades that's the latest analysis from the metropolitan Washington council of governments It says the D.C. area as a whole is expected to add about 880,000 new jobs by 2045 Over the next 23 years the biggest job growth is predicted for Arlington and fairfax county is about 27% D.C. and Alexandria are expected to get a slightly lower growth rate Money news at 25 and 55 after a shower and that means we're turning it over to Jeff clay ball Final hour of trading just ahead of us The Dow is up 264 points The.

Montpelier saint Mary's college saint Stephen's AME church cem Easton The park service orange Virginia WTO Montpelier foundation Jeanne Hickok Harriet Tubman James work Hickok Charles county unionville National Park Service James Madison Maryland university of Richmond D.C. metropolitan Washington counci board of trustees Northern Virginia
"harriet tubman" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"harriet tubman" Discussed on WTOP

"Days a week It's 5 21 Harriet Tubman was honored today with the tolling of a historic bell in Arlington during the 2022 national belf festival While her exact date of birth is disputed many scholars believe she was born in 1822 Philosophy bell was rung 200 times at the military women's memorial to mark the years since the birth of Tubman among her many accomplishments Tubman is recognized as the first woman to lead a major military operation in the United States in the first African American woman to serve in the U.S. Military Her great great great grand niece ernestine Wyatt sounded the bill once while the remaining 199 tolls were wronged by veteran American service women from each of the armed forces A case of James W TOP news Workers have taken down the last remnants of the Robert E. Lee statue in Richmond The area where it stood was cleared on Friday just before New Year's Eve The massive monument to the confederacy once one of the biggest in the country stood on the city's famed monument avenue for more than a 130 years After protests broke out over the murder of George Floyd Virginia's governor Ralph northam said the statue would be coming down It was taken down in September and he initially said it's 40 foot pedestal would remain but then later changed his mind And now the pedestal is gone too Workers hauled away the last bit of rubble and then spread straw over the area to encourage grass to grow In recent days two time capsules were found in the pedestal with what historians believe were Civil War era artifacts China stood WTP news New maps establishing congressional and state legislative districts are now in place in Virginia Now that the state Supreme Court has signed off the question is do the new maps hurt any current lawmakers Two democratic local members of Congress saw their districts change under the new maps Jennifer Weston's tenth congressional district still includes loudon county in parts of Prince William county but now extends to Falk here and rappahannock counties 7th district representative Abigail spanberger is affected more she no longer lives in the district under the new boundaries that now includes among other areas the other part of Prince William county and all the Stafford county a bipartisan commission could not agree on the new boundaries so two special masters were appointed to draw the maps The state Supreme Court signed off on their recommendations Kyle kuber WTP news Loudon county law enforcement are investigating what they believe was a homicide at an Ashburn home On Thursday sheriff's deputies were called to a home on Connie Marie terrace where they found an injured 57 year old woman That woman now identified as najat Kim lali good was rushed to the hospital where she later died Investigators say it's not clear who or what caused goods injuries and death Coming up in money news What boosts the D.C. housing market every other year I'm Jeff labeled It's 5 24.

Tubman ernestine Wyatt Robert E. Lee statue George Floyd Ralph northam Harriet Tubman James W United States Arlington Jennifer Weston Virginia Prince William county Abigail spanberger Richmond Supreme Court bipartisan commission loudon county rappahannock Falk
Virginia Removes Robert E. Lee Statue From Capital

All In with Chris Hayes

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Virginia Removes Robert E. Lee Statue From Capital

"All learn the story of the warren school at least the basics of it slavery and the rights and status of enslaved people through america into a civil war from eighteen sixty one eight hundred sixty five north. The union eventually won the south confederate states. That had seceded were vanquished and president abraham lincoln was assassinated. But we are not taught. Hardly ever i certainly was taught this only a little bit. We know less about is what came after after the union's victory which is a successful effort by those same confederate forces to win back white supremacy in the south and to win back. The story of their own nobility and those victories are marked with monuments to the confederacy to the losing side to the traders. Like this one. A robert ugly erected in the former capital of the confederacy in richmond virginia in one ninety twenty five years after lee's surrender napa mathematics and after the thirteenth and fourteenth and fifteen commitments which made slavery illegal and unconstitutional enshrined due process in our constitution and gave men of any color of the right to vote and full citizenship and after the union victory there was a hope born for people like frederick douglass and thaddeus stevens and harriet tubman of a true multiracial. Democracy enshrined in those civil war amendments of equal citizens under law with dignity and respect and freedom and the beginnings of that the period the period of reconstruction the south with federal troops deployed to keep the peace confederacy reduced to shameful abject defeat. Black people were voting. They were registering to vote and they were going to school. Becoming becoming local office. Holders and mayors town councilman and members of congress. Like senator hiram revels of mississippi. I bet you've probably never heard that name. Maybe some of you know it. We don't learn his name. The first african american to serve in the upper chamber these were the actual beginnings of a true genuine multiracial democracy in the south and in america that were then destroyed

Warren School Robert Ugly President Abraham Lincoln Thaddeus Stevens America Frederick Douglass Harriet Tubman Richmond Virginia LEE Senator Hiram Revels Mississippi Congress
Why the Civil Rights Movement Was a Bad Thing for Black People

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Why the Civil Rights Movement Was a Bad Thing for Black People

"What are some of the hot topics we you said you wanted to talk about. Pride month prior month so black people only get twenty eight days but Lgbtq pride month is it's now the month of june and june teeth which is in june cuts into pride month. So it's fundamentally homophobic uh-huh need to talk about that so i'm gonna say something that's groundbreaking and is going to offend. A lot of people are right. The civil rights movement was the worst thing to happen to this nation into the black community. Why because the civil rights movement pivoted this. lgbtq narrative and it's also pivoting. Pedophilia push as a form of sexuality. Follow me for a second. we're gonna have to. This is crazy. But i'm gonna be real with you. People don't tune out. Could this always ends well. But you gotta hang in is heavy so now which helped understand the segregation was not an all of the united states of america. Right it was only in the south correct right so let's talk about. Harriet tubman for a second. I'm as an example slave in maryland. She traveled a hundred miles north to philadelphia. The moment she touched philadelphia. She was a free woman right. So this tells you in the north. Obviously since i found it fathers there was no slavery. It always was in the south. Okay jim crow laws and all of this stuff. This success always in the south. Now you may have. Had the north people like marco mex and all of these people talk about it and take on the culture in a sense of the depravity of what was happening but that wasn't there portion right so now martin luther king comes in. He says listen. We want to have the same abilities in the same access to what white people have but we had it. We have built our own schools. We had owned businesses. Our homes solid right so now. Civil rights comes in Jfk dies and the newborn johnson steps in and he says listen. I understand your struggle. we're going gonna make it equal for everybody but we also do a warm poverty. We're going to give you guys welfare

Philadelphia Harriet Tubman Marco Mex United States Of America Jim Crow Maryland Martin Luther King JFK Johnson
"harriet tubman" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"harriet tubman" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"For a brand new season coming in september. Thanks listening hello for wonder media network. I'm jenny kaplan and this is encyclopedia. Were manteca today's will mannequin. Is well known. But not necessarily for her as a covert spy. She was called moses for the cold night. She spent quietly and urgently leading enslaved people to freedom over the course of eleven years. She helped more than seventy people escaped to the north along the underground railroad then. She became a union army spy and recruiter a hero of the civil war. We're diving into the story of harriet. Tubman as with many enslaved people in the united states. Neither the exact year nor the exact place of harry. It's birth is known born era. Minta minty ross. Around eighteen twenty harry. It was the child of enslaved parents. Harriet green and ben ross manatees. Mother was enslaved by mary. Patterson brutus and leader her son. Edward mary and her husband mendis parents at a plantation in dorchester county maryland. When minty was twelve or thirteen years old she suffered a blow to the head when a white man through an iron weight at a black boy minty suffered from seizures and bats of narcolepsy for the rest of her life in eighteen. Forty four minty. Mary john tubman a free black man. She changed her name to harriet and took her husband's last name. Five years later worried that she and others might be sold. Hair had plotted her freedom. She couldn't persuade her husband to leave with her. So she escaped without him and made her way to freedom in philadelphia. Harriet risked capture and death by returning to maryland some thirteen times over the course of the next decade. She guided her family to freedom among many others. She was so persistent skilled and courageous that she never got caught. The reward for capture eventually reached forty thousand dollars or what would be over one point two million dollars today when the civil war broke out in eighteen sixty one. Harriet went to south carolina to nurse. Black union soldiers there. She was recruited by major general david hunter for a covert operation to become a spy for the union and venture into confederate territory. Formerly enslaved people were thought effective spies because white confederates underestimated their intelligence. These spies were exceptionally courageous. Given that they were not legally free. And we're still considered fugitives though. Harriet couldn't read. She memorized the land and roots of the confederate soldiers. Spies like. Harriet often gathered intelligence from enslaved people behind confederate lines. One such piece of intelligence was the locations of confederate planted barrels of gunpowder. Along a river or the confederates plan to attack union boats on the night of june first eighteen sixty. Three harry led union troops from the sea islands. Up the black waters of south carolina's cumby river under the cover of night. They took up the plant and gunpowder barrels in the river. Sabotage of supply lines burned bridges and rated plantations to free the enslaved at the time harry was the only woman in. Us history to have led a military mission that rate free. Hundreds of enslaved people ended confederate control of the cumby river and destroyed millions of dollars of confederate property. Despite this enormous success harry. It wasn't recognized at first. Her name wasn't used in the story. Published by wisconsin. Paper that lauded the event. She petitioned the government multiple times to get paid for her services. A soldier and was denied carry. It went to live in auburn new york and married a veteran in nelson davis under the emancipation proclamation of eighteen sixty three nelson was eligible to receive a pension for the service but there was still no recognition for black women only when nelson died a few years later did harriet receive a pension not for her courageous acts but as her husband's widow. Harriet tubman died on march tenth. Nineteen thirteen in her nineties. Many mourned her passing and celebrated her extraordinary life and courage. It said that her last words were. I go to prepare a place for you all month..

jenny kaplan Harriet Minta minty ross Harriet green ben ross Patterson brutus Edward mary mendis harriet harry Mary john tubman cumby river Black union maryland Tubman dorchester county minty thirteen times narcolepsy
"harriet tubman" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"harriet tubman" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"She swiftly moved her parents whom she'd freed and other family and friends to this land turning into a sanctuary for those she loved and cared for after the war. Harriet spent most for time on this property devoting her time to a number of charitable causes. Although harriet lived on her own lane and worked for the union army for many years. She'd always suffered financially. This did not prevent her from giving literally all that she had hair. It made it her mission to provide for those who could not provide for themselves until the very end in auburn. Herod began to care for the elderly and orphans people that society had overlooked and usually those who needed the help. The most harry was also an advocate for women's rights and the suffrage movement around the year. Nineteen o four. Harry donated a portion of her land. The african methodist episcopal church which would later become the. Harriet tubman home for the aged. As harry grew older. She watched her family grow with pride. Free although harry was free from bondage unfortunately still suffered from the pain and injuries as she'd received during that time in her life. Harriet eventually had to undergo surgery to help with the seizures and symptoms she experience resulting from her brain injury after her surgery. Harriet it was eventually admitted to arrest home to live out the rest of her days beside her friends and family. Harriet tubman passed away from pneumonia at the ripe old age of ninety three in march of nineteen thirteen. Harry died in a rest home that was named in her honor and buried with full military honors at fort hill cemetery in auburn new york. I mean where. Can i even be game in describing this superhero of a woman. Harry's legacy was and still is immeasurable. This woman was forged from grit steel sand and stone to not only have the strength to bring yourself to freedom but then to have the absolute gonads to turn around and go back to help others. Let's not even mention the fact that she lived through slavery live through leading her family out of slavery and then helped lead the country out of a civil war like what is this woman was doing everything for everybody as an african american women myself. I can't begin to express how stories like these move me. I do get.

Harriet harry Harriet tubman union army auburn Harry african methodist episcopal ch harriet Herod fort hill cemetery seizures pneumonia new york
"harriet tubman" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"harriet tubman" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"Received after fleeing with the passage of this new law. This did not deter or prevent. Harriet from continuing her work in helping those who wanted to escape. After the passage of the law. Harry decided to reroute her final destination from maryland to canada. Where slavery was unequivocally illegal for those. Who harriet off the plantation towards freedom. There was no turning back. Harriet made sure of that by threatening anyone who accompanied her with death for trying to return she was not going to jeopardize the lives of those. She led to freedom which was a huge risk for someone who returned to the plantation. The woman was a force to be reckoned with. Mind you she suffering from all these injuries as well as old age at this time. It's reported that everyone who traveled with her. Harriet never had a defector all who traveled with her made it to the other side all made. It's a freedom. It was one of the underground railroad most famous conductors. Because of this harry it became one of the most wanted women in the south. The rewards offered by plantation owners for harry capture equal close to forty thousand dollars which was quite a hefty sum back in the day while slavery sympathisers viewed herod as their worst enemy abolitionists. Such as frederick douglass viewed. Herod as who. She was a savior arguably one of the most famed abolitionist. John brown held harried in the highest regard. John brown dubbed harry general tubman and consulted with her as he was recruiting supporters for his campaign to storm a federal armory in harpers ferry. Yes you heard that right. John brown asked harriet tubman for help before he stormed berry like. I don't know about you guys but that fact send my brain into a mini meltdown. Just f- why after john's execution. Harriet praise him as a martyr. It also said the she had had visions about john brown's raid before the fateful day in spite of her age in spite of her injuries in spite of her hardships. Harriet continued to fight for the rights of her fellow. Enslaved people throughout the civil war. Harriet participated in any way she could in union war efforts. She worked as a nurse as well as a cook for union forces through her reputation. Harry it also became a spy and was the first woman to lead an armed front in the war. The result of that momentous expedition was the liberation of over six hundred slaves. Harriet it would also work as a spy in confederate territory reporting back viable information in order for union troops to strategize and coordinate better attacks between the years eighteen two to eighteen sixty six. Harriet served in the union forces. Essentially a member of the service. It should also be noted. Harriet was compensated so little for her work that she had to support herself by selling food. That was her main source of income selling homemade goods around early eighteen fifty nine. Harriet had acquired land in.

Harriet John brown harry general tubman Harry maryland frederick douglass Herod harriet tubman canada harpers harry berry john
"harriet tubman" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"harriet tubman" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"Heriot's life around eighteen forty four. Harriet meta free man named john tubman. There isn't much information about john. Their marriage or whether. Harriet had any children with john due to heritage status as harry. It was slaved any children. She would have had would be enslaved as well around. Eighteen forty nine after being married to john for about five years hair. You'd heard that there were plans for her to be sold to another plantation. With this knowledge. Harriet had a decision to make being sold. Meant being torn away yet again from her husband the familiar all that she had known and built without any ability to control where she ended up being thrust into the unknown into a possibly worse situation. That could very well lead to her early demise. At this time. Harriet was older and had just recovered from a long sickness. She wasn't a strong due to her injuries. Making her unable to work thus less valuable and more likely to be killed or mistreated by her owners with all this knowledge. Harriet made a choice. Harry it was going to flee. She knew that her window to freedom was closing fast after living a life being beaten down losing family. No billy to do anything but work in survive enough was enough. sadly john. it's husband would not accompany her. On her journey to freedom. John declined to join harian citing the danger in the journey fearing being caught in hong for their escape harry new all of this as well. She knew the risks new. The capture would result in certain death. Hey decided to leave. In spite of all harriet left the plantation and began her escape in the dead of night around september seventeenth. Eighteenth forty nine ben in harry. Harry brothers initially joined her on her escape in the beginning of their journey. The two brothers saw that a reward has been posted for harry its return. They became unnerved by the large amount of the reward and decided to turn back. Harry continued on alone. Harry used the underground railroad a series of covert trails and safe houses to travel almost one hundred miles to philadelphia. This is a quote from harriet describing the feeling of stepping over the state. Line into the free state of philadelphia. There was such a glory over everything. The sun came like gold through the trees and over the field. And i felt like i was in heaven. Although harriet made it safely different philadelphia. She did not stop there. Harry returned to rescue her family beginning with her sister and her sister's two children after hearing that they may be sold as well. This would mark the first of many trips into maryland to lead her fellow. Enslaved people to freedom via the underground railroad harry it would make more than thirteen trips into marilyn where she aided more than seventy enslaved people in travelling the underground railroad to canada to freedom. This is even more exceptional framed with a historical context of that time period while previously enslaved people were able to escape slavery by entering a free state that completely change when the fugitive slave law was passed in nineteen fifty. This law made it legal for plantation owners to pursue fugitive slaves into free states. This essentially prevented the north from being a free territory and gated the freedom status one.

Harriet Harriet meta john tubman john harry Harry Heriot harriet Harry brothers philadelphia billy hong John maryland marilyn canada
"harriet tubman" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"harriet tubman" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"I will be telling you about a fellow bad ass. Marilyn native who has an absolutely extraordinary story to put it lightly. Actual generations of families would not exist if not for the actions of the single individual. This person was a literal beacon leading those who were willing from the depths of darkness to the liberty of light through their work. This individual earned the title. Of the moses of her people forever immortalized in history as strength power in fortitude personified. Today's story is about the indomitable the incredible the amazing harriet tubman. So let's get right into it. Harriet tubman was born era. Minta ross around eighteen. Twenty in dorchester county maryland. Harriet had nine other siblings. All of whom were born into slavery along with her parents. The suffering of the enslaved african american people during this time period cannot be overstated as early as five years old. Harriet work as a field hand and made as well as cooking and doing a bit of carpentry work on the plantation. Three of harriet siblings were sold to different plantations when the children were very young splitting apart and essentially devastating the family after harriet. Three siblings were sold away. Harry's mother was forever changed an interested plantation owner had traveled from georgia to purchase harry. It's youngest brother. Moses harry witnessed her mother refused to allow her son to be taken a powerful memory. That shows a glimpse of the foundation of harry. It's integrate harry. It suffered several ghastly injuries early on in life including severe lashings that left permanent scarring all over her body. One particular incident resulted in one of the more dire injuries for harriet. Harriet was running an errand in town. When she encountered an overseer and a slave that had left the plantation on their own as harry drew closer. The overseer told harry that she must help him restrain the man who was trying to escape. Harry it flat out refused to help as any nice normal person would in return for harriet. Taking a stand the overseer through a two pound weight that hit harriet in the head. This injury gave harriet a lifelong host neurological issues including seizures narcolepsy and horrible headaches. Harriet had said after the incident that she would experience dream stage that she likened to spiritual religious experiences while suffering through untold physical abuse. Harriet had to endure harrowing psychological abuse as well heriot's family stipulations in the will of a previous owner that granted them all some form of freedom. After a certain age heriot's father was the first to be freed at the age of forty five but the families current owners chose not to honor the contract and free the rest of harriet family due to the lack of legal status for freed african americans. Harry father had no options in order to force his family's freedom. Such was the inhumane treatment endured for most of.

harriet Harriet Harriet tubman Minta ross Moses harry harry foundation of harry dorchester county Marilyn harry drew Harry maryland seizures narcolepsy georgia heriot headaches
"harriet tubman" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"harriet tubman" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Tubman was definitely putting her underground railroad experience to use as a spy in addition to her humanitarian work. Earlier that year she'd been issued a one hundred dollars by the department of the which she had used to create a spy network. Her spies were all contraband who had had experience as boat pilots or doing other work on the water. It ran this network under the auspices of colonel. James montgomery was also by that point. Commanding the newly created second regiment south carolina volunteer infantry african descent that june general hunter wanted to plan a raid of the cumby river which was home to a number of plantations. It's possible that the whole raid was Idea based on intelligence that she'd gathered from her network of spies. Exactly where this idea actually came from is hard to pin down but the fact that tubman played a critical role in it is absolutely undeniable along with the fact that she told hunter she'd only participate if montgomery was in command it also seems as though she and her spy network participated in other similar rates as well but the cumby river raid is definitely the most famous. The plan was to take a force up the cumby river evading and disabling minds that had been laid there and then a rating the rice and cotton plantations that lay along its length. They would take what they could carry. Liberate the enslaved labor force and then torched the rest of it apart from the obviously humanitarian success of liberating hundreds of people from slavery. This would also destroy a source of confederate assets and wealth tubman and the eight or nine scouts that she employed together worked out the locations of all the minds that needed to be disabled and spread the word to the enslaved people on the plantations of what was about to happen. She at least some of these scouts were aboard the lead boat when it set off up the river. Three gunships ships in about three hundred. Black troops were involved as well on june first eighteen sixty three. They started their journey up the river. They raided plantations in colton and beaufort counties. Liberating the enslaved people they're capturing what provisions they could and destroying what they couldn't so the confederacy couldn't continue to use it. This whole thing happened with no injuries to tubman her. Spies or the union fighting force who also participated possibly because the people who owned and ran. The plantations found the sudden appearance of the second regiment armed terrifying farther upriver plantation owners fled in advance of the incoming raid the raid captured. About fifteen thousand dollars worth of property and eight hundred and forty slaves according to a letter from a member of the massachusetts fifty four th colored regiment which was published in the new bedford newspaper. According to a letter that tubman dictated herself. There were seven hundred fifty six slaves who were liberated. It was this and other actions that wound up earning the nickname general with newspapers even going so far as calling her the. Us army's first woman general even though she didn't actually hold an official military rank she is. However the only woman knowns you have led a military operation like this during the.

Tubman James montgomery montgomery one hundred dollars eight tubman cumby river colton Three gunships eight hundred and forty slaves seven hundred fifty six slaves about three hundred nine scouts About fifteen thousand dollars beaufort hundreds of people first woman Earlier that year three june first eighteen sixty
"harriet tubman" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"harriet tubman" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"On religious grounds most likely harriet tubman introduction to the organized anti slavery movement in general and the underground railroad in particular came by a william still who was a free black man who would later self published a book on the underground railroad or it might have come from lucretia or james mod. Tubman started making trips back into maryland to try to free enslaved people beginning in december of eighteen fifty when she went to baltimore to bring back her niece in two children. Her niece's husband who is free helped plan this escape. Another trip to baltimore may have followed but the historical record on that one is a little bit spotty here. In the fall of eighteen fifty one tubman went back dorchester county where she'd grown up to try to get her husband who was free as we said before but he had stayed behind in maryland wins escaped however when she got there she learned that he had buried someone else after she left. Marriages involving enslaved people really had no legal standing so from a legal standpoint. His marriage to harry. It was not really a barrier to him. Marrying someone else after she left for about a decade tubman continued to make trips into maryland to help people liberate themselves many of them members of her family. Because it wasn't enough to make it to a free state. She also established a base of operations in british north america. Which is now canada. She secured some land in saint catharines which was across a suspension bridge from buffalo new york near niagara falls and to get there. She had to guide people from maryland to philadelphia. And then into new york through albany syracuse and rochester. Before crossing the bridge getting started in saint catharines wasn't easy after having liberated themselves most of the people tubman guided there had virtually nothing to live on or to us to make a living. It's a while before tubman real foothold there. And even after she did money continued to be a real problem. According to the letters of thomas garrett by eighteen fifty-five harriet tubman had successfully returned to her old neighborhood. Four times had liberated seventeen family members and friends by eighteen. Sixty that number had grown to eight or nine forays into slave territory. The grand total is probably somewhere in the vicinity of ten to thirteen missions. Leading seventy to eighty people to freedom herself and instructing fifty or so others how to escape on their own. One of these trips was to bring back her parents who were elderly by that point after her father was caught sheltering escaping slaves after she returned with her parents tubman resettled in albany new york but maintained her ties to saint catharines because their parents just were not happy. Living in canada harriet tubman slash trip into maryland was an attempt to bring out a woman described as a sister who sadly died before the trip could actually be made. The journey was documented in the letters of martha coffin wright and some elements of that letter are now firmly rooted in what people quote no again in in those air quotes about the underground railroad for example toubon and the seven people. She was guiding used songs not to convey coded information which has become a popular part of underground railroad war but to help tubman fine the rest of the group after she had left them to forage for food and for them to signal back to her that it was safe to approach these missions that harriet tubman took Between maryland and canada really illustrate how the underground railroad really rated a lot of people envision the underground railroad as being a firmly established network of mostly white conductors. Were secretly enslaved quote. Cargo from deep in the south through a series of fixed hiding places in homes and barns and other buildings known as stations. So you would go from one station to the next one day at a time. In our collective imaginations every stop is planned in advance and as part of a regularly used route from one place to another and while there were white people involved in the underground railroad particularly among quakers as we mentioned earlier and there were definitely people who repeatedly sheltered escaping slaves in their homes or other buildings in reality. The whole thing worked a lot more like what. Harriet tubman was doing here. They were planned but they were also improvisational These trips were mainly into border. States frequently carried out by free escaped. African americans travelling by night hiding by day who made use of connections they had and routes that they knew to do it contrary to popular mythology. Harriet tubman did not invent the underground railroad and the number of people that she got it to freedom before the civil war was much lower than the three hundred that is often cited however none of this should take away from what she was doing. Harriet tubman is liberty and even her life at enormous every time she returned to slip to slave territory and when she was in free states in the company of escaping slaves who were also putting themselves at risk by trying to escape really. She was jeopardizing her own. Life and safety anytime. She was in the united states at all because he had escaped rather than being freed there is also at times a bounty for her capture. Although the number forty thousand dollars that's routinely specified is inflated was probably either twelve hundred or twelve thousand dollars. There's some debate about the existence of that last zero by the late eighteen fifties and into the eighteen sixties. Harriet tubman had become well known and well respected in new england's anti-slavery circles her work guiding escaped. Slaves was at first a secret but became more widely known in the years just before the civil war she earned the nickname moses and at anti-slavery meetings people spoke often of the escaped slave who had returned to slave territory again and again to liberate others. The civil war began in sixty one. Which really changed the nature of periods work. So that is where we are going to pause to pick up. Basically much for joining us on this saturday since this episode is out of the archive if you heard of email address or facebook. Url or something similar over the course of the show. That could be obsolete now. Our current email address is history. Podcast at iheartradio dot com our old. How stuff works email address. No longer works. You can find us all over social media at missed in history and you can subscribe to our show on apple podcasts. Google podcasts the iheartradio app and wherever else. You listen to podcasts stuff. You missed in history. Classes the production of iheartradio for more podcasts. From iheartradio visit the iheartradio app abbotabad calf. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows this episode is brought to you by general motors. Ever drive in evey. You'd know because once you feel the thrill of electric there's no going back and the next generation of vs by general motors are an absolute joy to drive. Imagine an ivy. That can go from zero to sixty in an estimated three and fully electric means. You can feel good about feeling that thrill this pleasure will be made possible by altium. A revolutionary new ev platform from gm. That keeps the good times going. Discover the thrill that awaits g m dot com everybody in..

Harriet tubman twelve hundred ten thomas garrett forty thousand dollars eight philadelphia Tubman seventy fifty maryland harriet tubman twelve thousand dollars facebook Sixty harry eighteen sixties two children canada niagara falls
"harriet tubman" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

07:04 min | 1 year ago

"harriet tubman" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"You say it area some so many requests we had all i mean we'd already been getting alive. Baby started well before the announcement that she is going to be on the new. Us twenty dollar bill. We also had another spike after the drunk. history owed about her If you don't mind lots of bleeped swearwords bathrooms quite funny. Indeed i i watched it three or four times within so most people are familiar with harriet tubman involvement in the underground railroad. But she also as people who have watched that drug that drunk history episode now as she was also a spy for the union during the civil war among many other things i was aimed time Maybe more than anyone else. I can think of in american history. She has a near reputation that makes her kind of tricky person to talk about. Everybody has some tidbits of information and some of that is accurate and some of it is not. Yeah there's a lot about her life and about slavery and the underground railroad in general that people know with no in serious air quotes but is really like. It's really taken for granted but a lot of it is on somewhere on a spectrum between that can't be substantiated and that definitely did not happen and a lot of this is because for a long time children's books really dominated the work written about harriet. Tubman we've talked about that phenomenon before a lot of important figures especially in black history are the subjects of children's books and not serious academic scholarship as much which is frustrating. Even the books for adults for a long time critic uncritically repeated details from these nineteenth century accounts of her life. That were definitely embellished. And really serious. Scholarly examination to tried to get a more accurate picture of harriet. Tubman is live and work has been a lot harder to come by and overall a lot more recent than the things that sort of set the standards of how we think about. harriet tubman. So because there's so much to talk about it because so much of it requires some level setting to be honest we are going to talk about. Harriet tubman and work in two parts. And today's podcast is about her work. Liberating saved people many of them her family members by the underground railroad and then in our next episode. We'll talk about her civil war work in her life as a spy. And what came after that because there are so many misperceptions about the underground railroad in the institution of slavery in the united states. We're going to get into some of that context before we talk about the details of harriet. Tubman is life. The use of unpaid unfree labour began long before the united states became an independent nation. It was a big part of the economy and the labor force. Almost from the moment europeans started trying to establish permanent colonies in north america and we know. Enslavement existed in north america before european arrival. And there's an increasing body of historical research on enslavement of native americans by colonists as well but all of that is outside the scope of today's episode. That is one of the things. People will right to try to dispel talking about slavery. Slavery existed everywhere. Not what we're talking about. So if i this. System of unfree labour in the colonies was based on indenture basically would pay their way from europe to north america through in ventured servitude which was essentially an agreement to work without pay for a particular amount of time in exchange for shelter and food and pass across the atlantic ocean. Sometimes this was a choice. People made it was sometimes under duress and sometimes not it was people just wanted to move and that was the only way they could afford it but other times it was a punishment that they were sentenced to. Although the conditions indentured servants worked under could be appalling and there were definitely cases of people dying before their indenture was over. This denture had some very specific differences. When compared with chattel slavery the first and biggest was that there was an end date involved. Indenture was not supposed to be a lifetime condition. Once the indenture was over that person was free to go and was often granted. Some kind of compensation in the form of supplies or land and injured servitude also wasn't hereditary order tied to a person's race as more colonists started moving to north america and ventured servants included people from places like england ireland scotland germany and africa. The first enslaved africans to arrived in north america landed in virginia colony in sixteen nineteen and the dutch traded them to the colonists as indentured servants however a number of social economic and industrial factors led to the dominant system of unfree labour in the colonies gradually shifting from indentured servitude to chattel slavery these factors included uprisings and rebellions on the part of indentured workers the expense involved in contracting new indentured servants as the old dentures expired and the ease with which white indentured servants end with the rest of white society after escaping from an indenture there were religious elements as well in some cases. It was socially acceptable to hold a non-protestants person in bondage. But if that person converted that was no longer the case. Beginning in the mid sixteen hundred colonies started to pass slave codes which defined exactly what it meant to be a slave. Many of these laws were written in terms of race where whether they described slaves in general or enslaved people of african descent specifically these codes meant that in a lotta places. It became illegal. For an enslaved person tone property and weapons to congregate to get married to travel and to learn to read or write chattel slavery became codified as something that was lifelong. it was hereditary. Based on whether a person's mother was an slaved and it was tied to african descent when the declaration of independence was issued in seventeen seventy six slavery was legal in all thirteen colonies constitution was signed. It didn't include the word slavery but it did include references to the institution Including article four section two clause three which specified that a person held in service or labor in one state would not be discharged from that service or labor if they escaped to another state in seventeen ninety three to jump ahead just a little bit. Eli whitney invented. The cotton gin cotton was already being grown. In the south especially in farming cotton was hugely labor intensive with the invention of the cotton gin it was still labor intensive but it was a lot more lucrative because the process of removing the seeds from the harvested cotton became dramatically faster and easier consequence consequently the prevalence of slavery in the american south increased immediately and dramatically in response to how.

Harriet tubman england north america atlantic ocean africa virginia Eli whitney europe Tubman twenty dollar three harriet nineteenth century today harriet tubman civil war two parts one state american south american
Harriet Tubman, the Ultimate Outdoorswoman

Following Harriet

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Harriet Tubman, the Ultimate Outdoorswoman

"Everyone knows harriet. Tubman as an activist and freedom fighter. We all learned about her in school. Growing up how she led slaves to freedom on the underground railroad but there was a lot more to her than what you probably remember from history class. She was a daughter a wife an entrepreneur and she was something else too. When you think about it she had to be the ultimate outdoors woman. Do what she did. That's right an outdoors woman. We don't often talk about. Harriet tubman in that light. Or if we do. It's kind of cautionary tale. Her experiences in the outdoors must have been so awful. So why would any sane black person wanna go into the wilderness voluntarily it feeds into the narrative. We often hear that african americans are not outdoorsy. But what if there's more to the story. What was harry. Its relationship with nature. How does that shape. The way african americans with the outdoors today and how might a closer look at harriet. Offer a new perspective on who belongs outdoors victoria. Marin has the story so this story was inspired by a podcast called following. Harriet which is about harriet. Tubman the show pulls back the curtain on harry. It's life giving listeners. A deeper context to her story. A story that i think is more layered and probably more relatable than many people realize most of us enter. Harriet tubman is life when she was in her thirties forties fifties and often times. We don't sort of think about how she came to be. Harriet people of my generation people who grew up in the nineteen seventies. We first met harriet in a photo in the corner of a textbook. She looked old. Her skin was stretched tight on her face. Her mouth was pinched. Her head was wrapped in a dark. Kerchief

Harriet Tubman Harriet Tubman Harry Marin Victoria
Juneteenth: A Celebration of Freedom

The Ten News

02:51 min | 1 year ago

Juneteenth: A Celebration of Freedom

"Many people think slavery ended on the day. Abraham lincoln issued the emancipation proclamation in january eighteen. Sixty three but it actually took more than two and a half years for it to become official throughout all of the confederate states. Our correspondent pamela. Kirkland calls up. He's a museum specialists in oral history at the national museum of african american history and culture in washington. Dc to explain a bit more about the history of the holiday. We'll just start with what is juneteenth. June taint juneteenth this great day that is celebrated because on june nineteen eighteen. Sixty five general. Gordon granger arrived in galveston texas with order numbers sri announcing that the enslaved were now free this is important because although the emancipation proclamation had been signed in eighteen sixty three it had a little to no impact almost of the enslaved throughout the south. Because if there weren't union soldiers there to enforce it it literally. Nothing in did not change of your life if you were enslaved human being in texas. Which was the westernmost state. There was very little union presence throughout the war so it was as if nothing had happened in fact there were slave owners. He moved west to continue. The practice of slavery moved to texas for that purpose so this day this was a big day. He arrived with almost two thousand troops. Some of whom were united states colored troops and they enforced this order. What what kind of the history. Of june teeth in the legacy. It's only recently really bad. It's become more widely known. Yes i well. It started in texas so immediately a year. After this announcement they have the first juneteenth In texas in houston. The african americans their a saved up. Money and bought land is specifically for this purpose that became emancipation park and it was practiced throughout texas In also places like oklahoma is started to slowly spread with the great migration in which you see different ways so it was celebrated through the turn of the century than it waned a little. Then you see it's coming back after the after world war two then. There was another big boost after the civil rights era after the sixties. What are some of the exhibits that highlight juneteenth And demands pation. We have an entire gallery devoted to slavery and freedom so there you will find of of many artifacts relating to we have the actual copy of Mation for example we have of many artifacts related to the underground railroad movement. Things that belong to harriet tubman such as show in our

Texas National Museum Of African Ame Gordon Granger Abraham Lincoln Kirkland Pamela Galveston SRI Emancipation Park Washington United States Houston Oklahoma Harriet Tubman
"harriet tubman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:07 min | 1 year ago

"harriet tubman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That I think everybody will have heard of when they encountered this this book, and that's Harriet Tubman. How does Harriet Tubman fit into this picture? So then this was one of the things that I that made me really want to write the book because, you know, we're told stories. And we learned a little bit about Harriet Tubman and grade school. Usually Oh, she was a great conductor on the underground railroad all true, Total American hero, but we didn't learn that much more about her. And when I learned that she had spent almost the last 50 years of her life, and Auburn, New York, I thought You know, how did she end up in Auburn? And of course, she ended up in Auburn through her two contacts on the underground railroad, which was these other two women and she would stop. They became regular stops on her railroad underground railroad journeys and she became very close to them both. Here's what I don't understand. And maybe you're gonna blame me for being too New York City's centric. But why in God's name was all burn? New York of all places? Ah, kind of Greenwich Village of its time, this kind of crossroads of politics and and culture and the way the Greenwich Village was And how could that happen? You are betraying your parochialism, actually. And I wish the Auburn was not remotely like Greenwich Village. If only it were Yes, there were incredibly lively. Or at least it is in the agitators. Yes, because it was on the Lyceum circuit. But actually, Auburn was peopled by, as were many of these towns in western New York state by conservatives. These were bankers and industrialists. And, you know, people pushing the railroads and Francis was very sad Broza about her activities. Martha was incredibly out Spoken and Seneca Falls. She met Frederick Douglass, and she immediately befriended him, and he did speak on the Lyceum circuit across New York state. And he often stopped in Auburn. She would invite him to her house to dinner and sometimes to spend the night because he was usually hotels were not welcoming to black men. For this. She was completely reviled by her neighbors who already thought she was just outrageously, you know, of subversive. And she was that one a dinner once in auburn, and she hears this woman whispering to to another woman. That is Mrs David right? She is a very dangerous woman, and that's because she was socializing. With people like Frederick Douglass. Well, how did Auburn New York take to a woman like Harriet Tubman is arrival? Well, so, but Harriet's happen you have to remember in the 18 fifties. All of this was completely unknown if her neighbors had known That she was sheltering fugitive slaves. And that Francis was doing the same. You know, they would've reported them to the to the authorities. This was completely against the law. The Fugitive Slave act required northern state to return fugitive slaves to the south. And that was one of the big precipitating factors of this growing activism. It actually got even many of these conservatives in New York state really riled up about slavery. These were people who had never thought of it before. Your book starts with a quotation from Harriet Tubman. And it says God's ahead of Master Lincoln. God won't let Master Lincoln beat the South till he does the right thing. And there's a feeling in the book that the Civil War was in a white two wars. The military battle. The Confederacy and the moral battle against slavery and it winning the military battle required winning the Moral battle. It's same time is that how these women saw the entire conflict? Harriet Tubman and the other two all saw the civil what they called it a Holy war. Holy war As of old each one of them believed deeply that God meant for slavery to be abolished the difference between them and Francis stewards anti slavery husband and Abraham Lincoln at the beginning of the war. Those two were politicians. These these people were outsiders, and they were revolutionaries, and it's worth remembering that they were only two generations separated from the declaration of independence, which they believed in literally. And they did not understand why women and black Americans could not have exactly the same rights that would have been promised in in the declaration of Independence. So Dorothy. It's got to be said that these women made very different contributions to the causes of freedom. Francis and Martha raised awareness and money and in a sense lobby, powerful men for change and That was very important, no doubt. But meanwhile Harriet Tubman was putting her life on the line, helping people escape slavery, and she even took part in some military operations. How did you come to think about the different ways that these women worked? Well, for one thing, David I. I think it's important to put Harriet Tubman in a category all her own. There's no one who did anything like what Harriet Tubman did. The mere fact of her going back into the place where she had been enslaved for 27 years of her life. A dozen times, putting her life in danger and the life of those she was helping to escape from slavery and taking them all completely safely. Sometimes all the way back to Canada was just something that other people did not do. So that was One thing it. I think it's it's important to see that everyone had his or her part to play and Martha with her outgoing, very blunt personality. She threw herself into both movements, the abolitionist movement and the women's rights movement, and she became one of the great Leaders of both, you know, and she spoke before mobs and the people you'd stand up on the platform, and people would throw Bibles at you. And you know Hiss and she it was. It took a lot of courage. Francis was very cerebral, very retiring, but she became more and more and more enraged by all of these injustices. She was her husband, her very liberal minded husband, even though he believed in women's right to actually would not allow her to sign petitions to any of the things that a lot of the other activists were doing so instead She channeled her rage into her letters to him and boy. Those letters are are really something, especially as the war gets underway and he is resisting. You know the abolition of slavery, and she accuses him of the train every ideal who's ever stood for, she said. You will go down in history like Daniel Webster, who died a dishonored death. That was a pretty cruel blow. So all of these efforts together were what over the course of the 18 fifties created the Second American Revolution, which was Thies, too great movements of the 19th century, the women's rights movement and the abolition movement. You. Finally the figures in this book Do they serve as inspiration to any modern political activists or figures? Do you find Yeah. So one of my own my desktop here. I have a photograph that one of my friends. Actually, one of our writers took early on because she weird in a conversation about the book and she was interested in Tubman. And you know those those army greenmail collection boxes. She took me on the streets of New York. She took a picture of one and plastered all over it with these details with a photograph. Of Harriet Tubman, and under each one has said Harriet Tubman total bad ass and I just love that because it's so shows how people relate continued to relate to her and what I kept realizing. Over the years I was writing the book is that Thies women and all of their friends met meant to were organized, showed how to organize a major social movement. How do you do it? Well, it's grassroots organizing, and we are seeing versions of the The exact same thing play out today, So there's a lot of in my book. There's a lot of wife battering, and so when the me to movement suddenly sprung up, I thought, Well, it's about time. I mean, this has been going on for a very long time. And, of course, black lives matter. Look at the look at the political effects that black lives matter has had in recent years, and one hopes that it will continue to have Dorothy Wicked did thank you so much. The book is wonderful. It's the agitators. Thanks a lot, David. Great talking to you. Dorothy Weekend in is the author of the agitators, three friends who fought for abolition and human rights. It's out now and in her free time Dark, is executive.

Harriet Tubman Daniel Webster Abraham Lincoln Auburn Frederick Douglass 27 years Second American Revolution New York Dorothy Wicked New York City Martha Francis Tubman Dorothy Canada Harriet Greenwich Village Civil War Seneca Falls David
Harriet Tubman's Father's Home Discovered by Archeologists in Maryland

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Harriet Tubman's Father's Home Discovered by Archeologists in Maryland

"In maryland say. They believe they've found the home of harriet tubman. Father the home side of ben ross was found on land acquired last year by the us. Fish and wildlife service or the archaeologists who worked on the sites tubman born born era minta. Roz would have live there as a child and would have come back to live there with her father as a teenager. Tubman who was born a slave escaped in eighteen forty nine and guided dozens of others to freedom using in network of safe houses known as the underground railroad. I'm lisa lacerra and this is fox

Ben Ross Era Minta Harriet Tubman Fish And Wildlife Service Maryland Tubman ROZ United States Lisa Lacerra FOX
Chicago school renamed after Harriet Tubman | State and Regional

Bob Sirott

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Chicago school renamed after Harriet Tubman | State and Regional

"School in Lakeview will be renamed for abolitionists and civil rights pioneer Harriet Tubman. CBS is making the change after years of protest from school families. The school is currently named after a Swiss biologist who's racist teachings were used to justify slavery. Slavery. It is the first CPS building you receive a name change, but more could follow the Board of Education plans to give final approval at tomorrow's meeting.

Lakeview Harriet Tubman CBS CPS Board Of Education
Faketinas

Locatora Radio

05:02 min | 1 year ago

Faketinas

"Get started with. I think this person or this story broke during the summer. it's kinda hard to tell now with the pandemic. what time is like but one other prominent ones that i remember seeing that wino- was flooding. Our timeline was the story of jessica. Craig aka or formerly known as jess la. Barletta cringe already awesome early known formerly known best. I'm about that. Let's get started. Let's talk about her. Yes so this woman has allegedly and apparently apparently been taking on different like black and afro sport identities throughout her life. She's an a professor or was a professor and academic where george washington university and university teaching. You know black studies are afrikaner studies and publishing books but at some point she were shifting from being in a north african to being african american and then being afro latin next sand after boaty gua was i think the final landing place for her her official forum her final warm so jessica. Krog just aka justifiable maleta hers combination of black fishing and being a fake tina at the same time and She got called out basically rightfully so rightfully so by a group of professors who are after latina's who had issues with her they were witness to or on the receiving end of like aggression from her and like prejudice and bad behavior while she was masquerading as after let nine different contexts. Apparently being super like belligerent towards black women in my on cool and really I think overcompensating and so trying to be an ex sorted extreme caricature of like this south bronx like her. Allegedly her mother was like a drug addicts prostitutes like this narrative that should created about herself so black women in the academy you know began talking about these different experiences and came forward and said This is not right. Yeah she was definitely performing like whoa kness being extreme radical like it was very performative. She was a published academic author and she also received a ton of accolades rice. She received she was a finalist. For the twenty twenty frederick douglass prize book prize presented by yale's gilder lehrman center the study of slavery resistance and abolition. She also was nominated or a finalist for the twenty thousand nine. Harriet tubman book prize and just received a ton of accolades has really been propelled or was propelled forward and questionably hired because of not solely for her identity. But because of the work she was doing and also the way. She positioned herself as offer latino or body gua and it's very cringe to think about all of the opportunities she stole from actual author. Latinas boras caribbean women. That are doing if not the same work or better work you know. And so it's that was probably one of the first ones that we saw. And then i think it kind of just opened up the floodgates for a lot of others than i don't know about you ma. But in my chicano studies department at uc santa barbara. There were a couple of fake denies that i will not name. They were not. They weren't anyone that i took like. I didn't take any classes with them but they were around. People talked about them. People knew like this person is very white claims this this cheek. Ghana mohican identity. You know is wide. Skin blue is performing she gun. You know some kind of ghana identity wearing that. I had because with the free that carlo ecstatic the whole thing right and it's like you like i they weren't. They were my peers. I was a student right. But i have friends that were graduate students. And they would tell me about these. Things happen. And in their cohort or in their in their seminars. And so you know. I think if if you've been in academia right. I haven't been to grad school. But i was an undergrad but i've i've definitely seen the fake tina's around so they definitely exists and i think this one opened the floodgates for a ton of

Craig Aka Jess La Boaty Gua Krog Jessica Barletta Yale's Gilder Lehrman Center George Washington University South Bronx Tina Latinas Boras Frederick Douglass Harriet Tubman Ghana Caribbean Santa Barbara Carlo Academia
Airlines push White House to reject testing for US flights

WBZ Morning News

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Airlines push White House to reject testing for US flights

"Yellen to make it a priority to put American abolitionist Harriet Tubman on the $20 Bill. Airline's gonna make their case today at the White House to avoid a new coronavirus testing rule. Today, CEOs from the country's biggest airlines will meet at the White House. It comes as the airlines are suffering the new cove it very instant slow vaccine rollout have hampered in airline recovery. The CEO is air pushing back against the plan being considered by the Biden administration and CDC to require negative covert tests

Yellen Harriet Tubman White House Bill Biden Administration CDC
"harriet tubman" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

05:32 min | 2 years ago

"harriet tubman" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"20. Bucks says Harriet Tubman was conservative. That's about that Michael Todd made in the form of an op ed in the Wall Street Journal, and it's just entertaining enough to explore. You always get in trouble. If you're a conservative, and you suggest that a new, iconic black figure may have agreed with you on some issues, you know, conservatives aren't allowed to invoke Barn Luther King Jr They're not out to invoke the The work of Frederick Douglass. I mean, actually, what they said what they believed accurately for fear of expropriating a Nikon of the left, But I'm glad Michael Taub was unafraid. He joins us now is a columnist for Troy Media and Loony Politics was a speechwriter for former Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper. Michael Tobe, Thanks for joining us. Appreciate it. Mike Lecture, Dan. Thanks for having me And so the case for Harriet Tubman. She is been re elevated in terms of Let's expedite getting her visage on the $20 bill, replacing Andrew Jackson. I don't know It's something that I'm fine with. It doesn't bother me. She's a great American, but some uncomfortable truths about Harriet Tubman, at least for those Doing things like, I don't know, removing Abraham Lincoln's name from schools in San Francisco. Yes, You're right, though. They're certainly part of them. It's unfortunately many years ago, this sort of intellectual discourse. Yeah, I mean, people would talk about it on the left and the right and there would be obviously some element of frustration. But one way or the other policy would just move along or the idea would move along. It would either be accepted or rejected or so on. It's interesting bone. Unfortunately of the years of going on going on a long and I'm sure you've seen in your radio show to death. Unfortunate people get very, very possessive about ideas and people, places and things. And Harriet Tubman is one of them. You know, Harriet Tubman is a prominent person in the U. S Civil war. She was a spy. She was being created for the North. She was a great woman overall. But when people hear terminology that she was essentially a Republican, as we define a Republican today, and I'm sure we'll get into it a little bit, and that she would have probably been an advocate. Gun rights. When you start sharing terminology like that, people start saying, Well, wait, that's not historically sound that's not historically accurate. But you have to go back to the crux of it, which is looking at her text looking at her writing, or just examining her as a person because I'm not the first person to have ever actually suggest that over the years, Dan But when it came out in the Wall Street Journal just a couple days ago, it's astonishing how people erupted. Or maybe I shouldn't be that astonished. Well, give us a flavor for that. What you get in terms of feedback. There's over 600 people who commented, I can tell you mostly, we're pretty negative, which was unsurprising and it just comes into the same sort of thing. You know. How can you call Harriet Tubman? The conservative was eight for him. Lincoln Really a conservative, Wasn't he a liberal? How can you associate people just because they're talking about gun rights with the Republican Party except Spectra? And the fun part about that is, you know how can you associate the Republican Party with opposition to racism? Just because they party was founded on the abolition of slavery, You know, I mean, you could play. You can play that game all day long. And you're You're so right about how people like tether themselves to a new idea or a time period or person and just will not that go or or won't allow any texture regardless of the facts. No, exactly. And, for example, other people also sort of came back with the argument that Abraham Lincoln, as you know, started off is a week. That's what he originally was, and he eventually moved with about two thirds of the weak members who would go to the National Republican Party or what we now call the Republican Party today, the modern one Because of that a lot of people say, Well, wait. If you look at the history of weeks, both in the United States, the UK and elsewhere, there were elements of liberalism at the time. There were also elements of conservatism if we accept the fact That the word liberal and conservative have evolved over the past couple of centuries, which they certainly have. How can you therefore tie Harriet Tubman to today's conservative movement? Because sometimes, unfortunately, when it comes to political philosophy, or just comes to writing about these things, you have to simplify it so that people understand point A, B and C all connect. Year ago. Yes, Harry Tubman would probably have been different, you know, and she was different at the time she lived in, You know, she was a black woman who lived under slavery couldn't vote and as a woman didn't even have the right to vote in her lifetime. She died in 1913 7 years before the suffragette movement was successful, but there's nothing to save in what she's written what she discussed and what she's meant to so many people that she wasn't on the side of the Republican Party. She sided with many Republicans she was friendly with will In Seward, who was a prominent member of Abraham Lincoln's Cabinet, and, in fact is the whole story in my peace not to spoil the whole thing where she actually left her 10 year old niece with people who you know who actually are still in possession of her gun family members, that is, it's extraordinary how all these things were tight together. But the tie Harry come into anything and argue that she would be part of today's black lives moving black lives matter. The Democratic Party. It's always shell game to some degree. But if you look at Harriet Tubman, the person the thinker and just the individual, she is much more or has much more in common with today's Republican Party than anything else. I want to talk a little bit more about evolution, too. I mean her own evolution in terms of relationship with Lincoln, for example, more with Michael Taub, columnist for Troy. Median, loony politics. Former speechwriter for Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper will.

Harriet Tubman Republican Party Abraham Lincoln Harry Tubman National Republican Party Dan But Wall Street Journal Michael Taub Stephen Harper Prime Minister Democratic Party Michael Todd Frederick Douglass Michael Tobe Nikon Troy Media San Francisco Andrew Jackson Mike Lecture
"harriet tubman" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"harriet tubman" Discussed on KGO 810

"You know, I was looking on Yahoo News, and I saw an interesting piece written by Brittney Cooper about Harriet Tubman. And she says, And this is interesting. She says that putting Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill is not a sign of progress. It's a sign of disrespect. I thought all this must be a conservative, you know, backing Andrew Jackson. But no, it wasn't on. We'll get to that in a minute. You know what should we do to honor Harriet Tubman and we'll talk about that in a few minutes. Also coming up. We'll talk a little bit about, you know who was the biggest liar. In the in the press office for the A lot of notes for the four years that Obama was in office and I'm Obama when Trump was in office, and you know it's interesting when you look at it, and I was trying to think that through and I talked to Eric Wemple, The Washington Post and he'll join us. We'll talk more about exactly you know who that Who that person would be. And why. On No, We don't know much about that aspect, and they're trying to figure that out right now. In fact, a lot of that work is being done at Stanford right now is they're trying to figure out just how deadly how transmissible what this really means. But the rule worry Chip from the beginning has been the South African very and among the multiple, very instead of come up the one in the UK, the one in Brazil. Several of them in the U. S. Because it is believed one. This is more transmissible. It has taken over South Africa it that the rise, causing numerous countries to to ban travel that it really comes down to. This is the first variant that he is having an impact on the the vaccines. We've got out there, not making them Nolan void. Making them it appears less effective. And now you've got the two cases the variant in the US for the first time, South Carolina to people of no travel history, and the belief is that that means it's is spreading in the community. This is Dr Dan Baroque. He runs a lab that's tracking the variance by the time New variant is detected. It's already probably widespread. So, he says. It's probably a lot more places and then where we know right now, and doctors were saying that this is why the vaccine rollout. Has to be sped.

Harriet Tubman Obama Brittney Cooper Eric Wemple Yahoo South Carolina Stanford Andrew Jackson Dr Dan Baroque South Africa US Nolan The Washington Post Chip UK Brazil Trump
"harriet tubman" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"harriet tubman" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Mid Friday. We have a storm on the way, folks, and it's gonna produce some significant rainfall in the valley and some significant snowfall in our country. Okay, we look forward to that. Let's get a little news from your neighborhood now. Albert Purnell joins us Would he have? Yes, it's coming out of the Madeira Tribune so due to a shortage of vaccine supply All planned vaccination clinics that the Social Service building in Madera County County are canceled until further notice. They're not sure when they would get a new shipment. But when they do, they let people know. Okay, the vaccine roll out in California continues to be troubled Harriet Tubman might be on the $20 bill. That whole issue has resurfaced. Okay. Secretary for President Biden said that the Treasury Department taking steps now to resume the efforts to put the 19th century abolitionist leader on the $20 bill that be Harriet Tubman. And would replace Andrew Jackson. Hey, Well, you know, next month is black History month, So that'd be a good time to do it. You know next month would be appropriate to do it would be so anyway, that's don't be surprised if you see a change in your $20 bills in the not too distant future. Yeah. Alright, well coming up, We're gonna be talking about all what were the political folks go when they run for office and they don't make it. Um, they go. They become lobbyists. They want video. Yes, a lot of you. Sometimes they're writing books and as they go on a speaking tour, but sometimes they go to Hollywood. They do Tow act casting companies are snapping up. Politicians left right. Politicians got a little acting in the blood they do and they could make some money off of them, so we'll have more on what's second careers for some of them coming up. Listen up and on your way home for the very latest more reaction today. Local news. We have continuing coverage Half and weather Storm is on the KFBK. Afternoon news was Kitty O'Neil on Sacramento's.

Harriet Tubman Albert Purnell Kitty O'Neil Madera County County Madeira Tribune Andrew Jackson California Social Service Biden Treasury Department Hollywood Secretary Sacramento President
"harriet tubman" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"harriet tubman" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Virus. How sports? Of course, you've got a detailed If you know better parts. About what? That what you wanted. She had sort of moment by moment. But with unity. Are you talking about bipartisanship? I'm talking about something. That's why the popular in the United States. We should go through what Biden was thinking about when he says that he wants to achieve unity. Sure. Sure, sure. Yeah, sure. Why not? Sure. I? Yeah, I almost got to feel bad for Jen Psaki a little bit because you know inside. She's like rolling her eyes and laughing hysterically going. My God, these people You. You don't have to make it so obvious. Okay? Come on. At least try. What does what does Unity mean to Joe Biden? If Joe Biden were a tree? What kind of tree would he be? Well, it depends. What's the dumbest tree out there that sleeps all day? That's question number one very long question. Very long winded question. You would think, Okay, if she keeps talking, she'll reach a point, but no, you would be wrong. Then comes around the burning burning second question. It's one thing that is everybody talking. But nobody is talking about. Just about whether or not Harriet Tubman is going to be on the $20. Bill. I'm not kidding this again. You have a chance to ask. Anything you want of the current administration. And you ask, What is Unity mean to you? And then this cut to go ahead. Made just for another question on the Trump.

Joe Biden Jen Psaki Harriet Tubman United States Trump
Harriet Tubman on the $20? Treasury to move forward with effort

The Boxer Show

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

Harriet Tubman on the $20? Treasury to move forward with effort

"The Treasury Department moving forward to get Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill, former President Trump was critical of the Obama era plan. Ex Treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin delayed the implementation until 2026. But the White House's president Biden steams, exploring ways to speed up the effort period. Tubman was an abolitionist activist. We'll rescue slaves in the Civil War

President Trump Ex Treasury Steve Mnuchin Harriet Tubman Treasury Department President Biden Bill Barack Obama White House Tubman
Biden administration to move forward with Harriet Tubman on the $20

Charlie Parker

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

Biden administration to move forward with Harriet Tubman on the $20

"Department's working to get Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill. Former President Trump was critical of the Obama era plan. Ex Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin delayed the implementation until 2026 for the White House says President Biden's team is exploring ways to speed up the effort. Harriet Tubman was an abolitionist and activist who helped rescue slaves in the Civil War era.

Former President Trump Harriet Tubman Ex Treasury Secretary Steve Mn President Biden Barack Obama White House
"harriet tubman" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

06:38 min | 2 years ago

"harriet tubman" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Diploma online, and then we work with a host of partners. Anywhere from General Assembly and grow with evil to Goodwin Neighborhood Initiative and the bats and Financial Liberty Project to basically give people opportunities to Uh, learn the skills they need to either make a career move. Start their own business. What are the legal issues they have to deal with? Um, You know, these are all things that sure if they have the money they can pay to, um, get a consultant to help them. But we really work with some great partners that are offering this information for communities who don't have that kind of opportunity. And can really benefit from some of the programming through the line. And if you think about it, giving this sort of information, these resource is out to the community to people who haven't had access to this. In the end, it all comes back and it all benefits the community and it helps these people and these neighborhoods thrive. And I think we can all agree. The gift of education is one of the best gift you can give anybody. Absolutely. I mean, when we were open and again once we reopen, I'm looking forward to this. We have Ah Innovation Lab in our Christian Business Library Innovation Center That's just kind of naturally. Started to gather a cohort of under pairs of color who are coming into use that lab to start a variety of projects and In turn. We then asked them if they will present some programs for our users to talk about how they used some of the resources and tools at the library to start their project, So it's really a nice way to give back as well. There's one other thing I wanted to touch on. And I really love this. I'm kind of a genealogy and a history nut. And so then I saw that you were going to be focusing on community stories. And I love this. I really, really love this. You're you're teaming up with Northeastern University, and this is all about telling the stories that we might not have heard in the past. And we, you know, if you hadn't been doing this, there's a chance. We never would have heard them at all. So tell us more about that. Yeah, This is really wonderful. Isn't our community history specialist story Fine and This is a grand funded position that we hope to make permanent down the line. But You know, the Boston Public Library has been a leader in the organization of our collections. And there's so many rich collections about our local history in our community history that we are digitizing and then making available friending and one of the public The problem is, people don't know They exist and don't know they're there. So we're starting to take the next step. And having some public service librarians in this community history special, silly is the first of them. Really worked directly with communities around their histories and take advantage of digital tools. We have so the couple of programs that he's focusing on right now. One is around the Harriet Tubman house in the South, and another is in East Boston. It's really about gathering or histories, really talking to people about some significant historic events in their communities and look warning them, So we have them digitally preserved so that People who wanted to research in the future or just learn about their communities. Local communities history can do so very easily. It's great work. We have Many other possibilities in the you know, waiting in the wings to get started. Once we Charlie's birth to, so it's really It's really wonderful position. So Michael starting to wrap this up, I did want to mention of course, being that you are a library should probably touch on the fact that you do have a great reading program in place. Of course, it's called reading together. And all through this coming year. Certain book choices. You've got some themes for people to get reading. If they have not been already. Maybe now is the time for them to start. So tell us what you've got planned. Sure. So this is our This is our year Long reading challenge, And this was developed by our readers advisory librarians in our Reader Services Department. And it's It's really, um, challenges BPL patrons to basically read a book each month that falls under suggested theme and, you know we chose the themes. Um, Basically the bride and people spread perspectives and encourage people to read under the repairing America seen so Hopefully we'll get people reading together. And we do this every summer with our summer reading, But now we're just expanding into the entire year. So I think people have a lot of time to do some reading right now. Hopefully this allowed to be a program that people really enjoy. If people want to find out more information about what we've been talking about, I'm assuming the website is the place to be right. Yeah, the BPL or slash repairing America Pig will be continuously updated with a lot of the work we're doing. And also, please don't forget to sign up for a library card BPL the orange flash card Because then you can take advantage to all of our digital offerings. Anyone in the state can apply for this card and it we've seen a huge increase. In this registration over this last year, and what we would love to see even more. That's good to know, actually, so you don't have to be in one of Boston's neighborhoods to get Ah Boston Public Library card. Anybody here in Massachusetts can access your services. That's right. We serve the entire state. That's wonderful. That's wonderful. All right. So you personally you, Michael, What are you looking forward to over at the BPL interest in general, as we make our way into 2021. Well, I really do miss a lot of the, um the in person services we provide to those people who really need that direct in person assistance. It's really difficult, helping someone learn how to use a computer when you have to do it. Remotely right? It zbig challenge in our library is really trying to meet that challenge. But, um, you know, I'm really looking forward to Being able to directly help the people who can walk in our door again. It's hard for us to kind of turn. Turning people away like that. Yes, you can come in and pick up your book. But we really are offering any other services at the moment. So important, So that's something I've been looking forward to that and I'm really looking forward to music filling the courtyard again. So worked up in the courtyard. One of our One of our most beloved programs that something I'm missing. Okay, well, Michael Cole for the director of Library services for the Boston Public Library. This has been a great conversation. Lots of important resource is for the people of Boston and beyond. Thanks for taking the time to come on the show. You're welcome. Thanks very much..

Boston Public Library Michael Cole Boston America BPL Ah Boston Public Library Ah Innovation Lab Goodwin Neighborhood Initiativ Harriet Tubman house consultant General Assembly director of Library services East Boston Uh Massachusetts Northeastern University Charlie Reader Services Department
Black Gun Ownership Rises Amid Pandemic, Protests For Racial Justice

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:30 min | 2 years ago

Black Gun Ownership Rises Amid Pandemic, Protests For Racial Justice

"A record number of Americans have purchased guns this year including Black Americans from K. N. UNC in northern Colorado Lee. Patterson reports that incidents of violence against people of color have pushed some to purchase guns for the very first time and warning to our listeners. There are sounds of gunfire in this story. What type of gun is? So this is a Smith and Wesson nine millimeter shield cat trailer bought her handgun this past spring these as she practices at an indoor range with her husband like it's no big deal. But talking through her mask trailer describes how she felt the first time she pulled the trigger is beyond terrified shaking. Hands were sweaty. Trailer is a democratic political consultant who lives in Colorado. At first, she was nervous cleaning and shooting her new gun. And she had a bad experience, the first range she went to she says people were staring she felt unwelcome. Still regardless of the anxiety I had around. All those things. I got into this because I feel like it was necessarily trailer I started thinking about buying a gun when she saw empty grocery store shelves at the beginning of the pandemic. Then she watched racial justice protests unfold across the country. She started thinking about pushback from people who disagree with those efforts if it looks like communities, of Color and people that support communities of color are rising up against white supremacy that could be a problem for us is. It's probably time probably time for them to buy guns a thought that many other Americans have also had in. August. Alone people bought one point eight million firearms according to industry estimates a trade group called the National Shooting Sports Foundation reports the gun sales to customers have grown more percentage wise than for any other racial or ethnic group. With. Her New gun trailer wants to feel like she has a chance during a home invasion or an encounter with police. What we as the family had to determine is, how do we WANNA die? Instead of look at it that way. DO WE WANNA die not being prepared or at least trying to protect ourselves. That's how you weigh that as part of becoming a new gun owner trailer joined the National African American Gun Association Philip Smith is the founder nationally across the board from all over every state. We have people joining all times a day night. You know I I thought something was wrong with computer. Smith was watching membership numbers rise after the death of George Floyd may but black people have been using guns for hunting and protection for a long time historian say that Harriet Tubman carried firearms so did the Black Panthers in the nineteen sixties these days according to a Gallup poll released last year nineteen percent of black people own guns. Smith says his members are not monolithic. Some women join because they've been sexually assaulted some women join because they wanNA teach you some men join because they want to just get really good at self defense people are joining now for different. Reasons some want to support the National African American Gun Association Financially Smith says for others it's more spiritual I. Think people were looking for a home a place where you can kind of event you can belong where you felt your mind having a relief of some sort Bruce Tomlin a truck driver who lives in New Mexico describes his decision to buy a gun response to stress. I'll just say amounting society He felt that way after watching cellphone video showing the death of Ahmad arbitrary a black man who was shot while jogging through neighborhood in Georgia earlier this year don't. Go around arm the rest of my life. That's because he's been feeling under attack for years after the two thousand, twelve killings of Trayvon Martin, for example, and after the mass shooting at a black church in Charleston in two thousand, fifteen by a white supremacist goes like I can just be mine them all business. And if somebody who's a racist, just decide to roll up on me gun meet down. As is decided that like if I go out I'M GONNA go out shooting back. But now that he's an actual gun owner, it's not so straightforward day to day of feel like I can defend myself better defend my loved ones. But I usually get comfortable having it sometime he does not want to kill or injure anyone open carry makes them nervous I would never take my gone to the grocery store and carry around inside or anything like that. But on the other hand I could be in a situation where needed still out in the car or whatever I just like knowing that I have it gun ownership is complicated for Tomlin especially because he's black if he was stopped by police says, he probably wouldn't tell them that he had a gun. And catch trailer says the same thing giving the example of philander casteel he was shot during a traffic stop for years ago in Minnesota after telling an officer that he had a firearm, his car casteel did have a permit to carry it. Cat Trailer believes that gun cost him his life we're not given a fair shake when these conversations are happening automatically worsen tensions are assumed just because we're black, we're gun owners for both of these new black gun owners. It's an identity that comes with risks, but does make them feel safer for

National African American Gun Philip Smith Colorado Bruce Tomlin Cat Trailer National Shooting Sports Found Black Panthers Patterson K. N. Unc Ahmad Harriet Tubman Consultant George Floyd New Mexico Minnesota Trayvon Martin Officer Charleston
White GWU professor at Washington DC's GWU admits she falsely claimed Black identity

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

White GWU professor at Washington DC's GWU admits she falsely claimed Black identity

"It's an unusual confession tonight from a history professor at George Washington University in a blogger Post today, Jessica Krug says that she has lied about being black. Krug wrote that throughout her adult life, she claimed to have North African African American and Caribbean heritage but is in fact white and Jewish. She says her appropriation of black identity was unethical, immoral and anti black. Kruger is an expert in African American history, imperialism and colonialism and is a finalist for both the Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass Book prize is, she says she's battled unaddressed mental health problems since she was a child when she first began claiming a false identity. Krug, right. She believes in can't cancel culture and that she should absolutely be canceled. But she did not say whether she would rot a resign now from G W.

Jessica Krug Harriet Tubman George Washington University Frederick Douglass Professor Kruger
White college professor admits she lied about being Black

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

White college professor admits she lied about being Black

"And unusual confession this evening from a history professor at George Washington University in a blogger Post today, Jessica Krug says that she lied about bleep being black crew growth and throughout her adult life she claimed to have North African, African American and Caribbean heritage. But is in fact white and Jewish. She says her appropriation of black identity was unethical, immoral and anti black. Kruger is an expert in African American history, imperialism and colonialism and is a finalist for both the Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass book prices. She says she's battled unaddressed mental health issues since she was a child. When she first began claiming a false identity, Krug writes that she believes in cancel culture and that she should absolutely be cancelled. But she did not say whether she would resign from the school.

Jessica Krug Harriet Tubman George Washington University Frederick Douglass Professor Kruger
Voting Mechanisms And AI

Data Skeptic

04:49 min | 2 years ago

Voting Mechanisms And AI

"Steven Hi I'm professor RTP OF MATHEMATICS AT USC University of Southern California Excellent, and tell me a little bit about your general interest within mathematics. Before we get into the particular paper, I wanted to talk to you about a few different topics generally speaking probability probability generally construed its relation to computer science in particular theoretical computer science. Would we wind up somewhere near what is it Polynot mealtime? Generators. I don't know about a number. Generous. Followed meal time things more specifically clavo problem that can't be solved in polynomial time, and then you WANNA approximated solution in USA. How well can approximate? How can I prove that? This is the best. You can do things like that under the general category of hardness of approximation suppose why knowing lot of those cases you have one benefit may be many but benefiting a lot of problems. Like that is you can tell if a solution is valid or you have some function you're trying to optimize for I. Don't know if the same is true in voting. Is there a global way that we'd all agree that the outcomes are good or the processes? Good. Maybe that's a good way to get into your topic designing stable elections. Exactly. I mean there's a lot of A. Link to Wikipedia Pedia page somewhere it's a table and it has a list of desirable properties voting methods and there's at least maybe ten or twenty cents properties and it's impossible to have all the desirable properties no matter which voting method you have there's always gonna be some that has some that a dozen but the one property that myself and many other people who focus is how can the voting method be protected from corruption and that could be mostly what people in this community of worked on is looking at random vote corruption. So everybody cast their vote and then Tyson with some small probability they will randomly. Change some votes, and then the question is which method best preserves the election's outcome. So that's the quantity that you want to say maximize. You want to maximize the probability that the voting method preserves the outcome. When you compare the original outcome to the outcome after the votes have been corrupted one quantity, you can try to maximize very interesting. I definitely want to come back and talk more about corruption but you've got me intrigued with those properties and I know there's many of them may be I don't WanNA put your memory test, but could you talk about one or two and maybe discuss you know a Controversy around them or why they're important that sort of thing. Yes. There's a bunch one desirable property of voting method is that it doesn't succumb to the spoiler effect as we know, the Electoral College does. So how can we think about this spoiler effect the main let's change the names to some ancient name. So we don't have to deal with political of discussion in the moment, but let's say we ran election whatever two hundred whatever years ago, and there's George Washington running, and there's also a clone of George Washington running as candidates and I some third candidate on the. Fact factor means the fact that two of these clone George Washington running while people who originally if there just one George Washington, they'll just vote for that first one but two of them you'd imagine you know the original George Washington Supporters A. Vote First Josh Attendance on my vote for Evil George Washington or whatever you call the second one. So the fact that the original supporters of the person gets split between the two separate candidates we know an electoral college that means that it decreases the chance of either one of them winning, and for example, I think a last election cycle Bloomberg said, I'm not gonNA run as an independent because of this effect, you can steal votes away from someone in a sense and it can. Ruin the chance of say some candidate that may be you kind of support or something. So that's a desirable property of voting method that some of them have and some of them don't doesn't have the spoiler effect. That's that's what you are. There mechanisms than the can eliminate things like that. How do we build something like that into voting framework one voting method that avoids this it's become popular to certain people you know on the perfect voting with, but it's called instant runoff voting so. Different than what we're used to thinking about your vote is no longer just your favorite candidate. It's like a ranked list of candidates like for example on. Once going back two hundred years or something maybe your first choice most preferred candidates George Washington may be your second most preferred candidate is out in. Alexandria. Hamilton third most preferred candidate Harriet Tubman or something I don't know every single person makes list of preferred candidates and they all get submitted into whatever the election methods, which is song way of taking all those votes and just saying, okay, here's the winner and so one I think mentioned already one. Popular ranked choice voting method is called instant runoff voting on I believe it's used in Australia might even be used this coming election cycle in I'm not entirely sure but anyway so the important thing is this voting method does not have these spoiler effect

George Washington Usc University Of Southern Cal Alexandria Steven Professor Harriet Tubman Australia Tyson Usa. Hamilton Bloomberg Josh Attendance
Baa-a-a-a-a! Pesky goats block Trump motorcade en route to New Jersey golf resort

Unhappy Hour with Matt Bellassai

02:59 min | 2 years ago

Baa-a-a-a-a! Pesky goats block Trump motorcade en route to New Jersey golf resort

"Talk about the worst news of the Week I. A small herd of goats is responsible for blocking the presidential motorcade last weekend and Don go. Go Young Donald I was trying to travel to his golfers or in New Jersey obviously because we're in the middle of a pandemics where else would the president be but a golf resort? And our our good friends the goats would had the good sense to get in the way disruption protest goats. Did. We have any doubt that are abolitionist goats that we feature regularly on this podcast would be on the right side of history. I did it. I knew. Yeah. Fred started as the Harriet Tubman of goats, and now he's becoming the Malcolm X. of votes. He's saying protests violent protests necessary. I'm just GONNA foment. Insurrection via goat. We love a political goat lava political goat I mean maybe especially because these goats technically work for Donald according to a White House pool report, there was a brief poss- during drive onto the property to make way for a herd of goats that live on trump's property. He gets a tax break a property tax break known as farmland tax break worth nearly eighty thousand dollars a year on his golf resort because it's supposedly doubles as a goat ranch. According to the Wall Street? Journal. Yeah. So I, guess there's like a a loophole for landowners. Who if you say that you're like property is technically like an agricultural project then you get fucking tax break. So you know what this makes me WANNA do. Primal, SCREAM That's fucking primal. Scream I mean within I haven't like truly truly gone off on this pod. It makes me so mad when people call Batman a businessman, he played a businessman on TV he. Hey businessman that's. It's insane. It's like Meryl Streep was not editor in chief of Vogue magazine. Okay. She should be but she's not. But yeah. Apparently, the trump national golf club in bedminster maintains one hundred thirteen acres of hay farming and eight goats, eight goats, and you get eighty thousand dollars a year. It's ridiculous. It's not enough. Goat's remember when that person last time by bought like five goats and it was not one hundred dollars was not that much. So apparently that's all we need. We can go in together on five coats and get. Nearly. One hundred thousand dollar tax break. Let's do it I'm

Donald I Meryl Streep Batman Goat Fred Donald Trump New Jersey DON Harriet Tubman Vogue Magazine White House President Trump Bedminster Editor In Chief
Kim Kardashian West Releases Statement on Kanye’s Mental Health

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

03:40 min | 2 years ago

Kim Kardashian West Releases Statement on Kanye’s Mental Health

"Let's. Let's talk about a Reality Star Kim Kardashian West and her husband Kanye West have been in the news all week. You know talking about his campaign rally his Harriet Tubman statement, those twitter rants. Pale flew to Wyoming to check in on them. Well yesterday Kim broke her silence released a statement about con as mental health, especially with all of those hurtful comments that he has made about her her mom, you know and just a family altogether cam. She talked about Kanye struggle with bipolar, and she and the family are struggling with him as she asked for compassion and empathy can posted as many as you know Kanye has bipolar. Bipolar disorder anyone who has or has a loved one in their life, who who knows exactly incredibly complicated and painful. It is to understand. She went on to say that those that understand mental illness know that the family is powerless unless the member is a minor, Kim said that Kanye is brilliant, but complicated, and on top of being a black man and an artist who has experienced the painful loss of his mother Donda West back in. Two thousand seven. He has to deal with the pressure in isolation that is heightened by his bipolar disorder. She went on to say how the media and the public have to have compassionate empathy when it comes to mental health issues, and she thinks those that express concern, you know true genuine concern Connie, as well being and. That's it. You know it's just Really really sad, you know. Yeah it is. For the children I do in the whole John Him everyone, everyone. Yeah, you don't WanNa. See your husband. Go through things like that thinly meltdown. No, no, no, no Qurna oldness history. There's juice Rome. It's just a lot. He said a lot of hope for things about her. He you know yesterday or day before yesterday was talking about divorcing her, saying she had a private meeting with. Meek mill to talk about prison reform. And then she came back and said the meeting wasn't private. It was public He talked about wanting to divorce her. It is heavy. It has heavy. What is going on with them? Dude, but see I. Don't know anything about bipolar. I. Don't know anything about it. So. Maybe it causes you to do some things that I think is not smart. But I don't see discussing your private life publicly on social media repeatedly. Not, smart is has what they got to do with anything I. Mean Look Man that's got to be not the place to vent I. Mean who you trying to prove it to you. And you got take care of your business at home. Who you are. And, it's just unexcused. Unexcusable, sad thing. you. Don Lemon talked about early. You know to social media used to be a good thing. Then all of a sudden became toxic. So since we all who have good says noted is toxic. Why are you putting your life on the toxic platform and then? Kim Got to come in and say please be understanding well. Wait a minute. Hold on. Wait a minute hold. I understand what she said. That's perfectly right, but decided to those social media in a place of understanding. That, what daddy is!

Kim Kardashian West Kanye Connie Bipolar Harriet Tubman Twitter Wyoming Donda West Don Lemon Wanna
As Statues Come Down Nationwide, Trump Seeks to Establish a 'Garden' of U.S. Heroes

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

As Statues Come Down Nationwide, Trump Seeks to Establish a 'Garden' of U.S. Heroes

"The White House has unveiled an executive order to create a national garden of American heroes. It'll feature statues of prominent Americans, including Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr. Ronald Reagan and Harriet Tubman, just to name a few. The executive order establishes a task force that'll use funding from the Interior Department to establish. The site has 60 days to submit a report to the White House detailing the options for the creation of the National Garden, including potential locations. The president mentioned that order in his speech at Mount Rushmore last

White House National Garden Executive Martin Luther King Jr Harriet Tubman Abraham Lincoln Ronald Reagan Mount Rushmore Interior Department President Trump