40 Burst results for "Harriet"

Fresh update on "harriet" discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

00:40 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "harriet" discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"There was some debate over whether that had been the cause or whether it was something that had happened on the way down or possibly on impact one theory was that quimby had briefly lost consciousness and by the time she came to the plane was too out of control to regain it. Another theory was that william willard was the large man and had been leaning far forward to speak to her in flight might have unwittingly caused the bleriot to become unbalanced. An article appeared in aircraft magazine suggesting that the design of the barrio was fundamentally unstable and that the tail wing was the 'cause obviously safety belts. Were not in use. They were not standard safety equipment yet. There were witnesses who claimed that they did see quimby quote buckle abroad strap across the space in front of her if she did that. She had unbuckled at some point afterward for several months after harriet quimby death articles that she had filed before the final flight continued to be published and one in particular reads a sort of bittersweet It was about the potential for careers in flight for women. She wrote quote. There is no sport that affords the same amount of excitement and joy or exacts in return so little muscular strength is flying. It is easier than walking or driving simpler than golf or tennis. There is no reason why the aeroplanes should not open a fruitful occupation for women to ms so young when she died. Yeah i've listened to that Flights of four. I think it's four female. You said at the beginning of the episode. And now i've forgotten. What the exact title of older episode was. I listened to it once. I way in the past When i was trying to figure out like which which people were discussed in it. And i have forgotten a lot of details the intervening years And so i did not realize when i started out reading through this episode for the first time that that she did die at a very young age and so early in her career as a pilot when that became the thing that she was really known for. Yeah i mean. She was a pilot for a licensed pilot for less than a year of her life whereas she had been a journalist. Or quite some time at that point And had really i like. I said at the top the episode. I'm always a little like when people are like aviator harry's name it's like she was. I don't think she would have necessarily identified that way. I think she would say she was a journalist. I there quotes from her. Where people asked her you giving up your journalism career to fly fulltime and she was like no way she was always still planning to keep writing. She actually had been talking about Leaving journalism and possibly leaving piloting for awhile after that flight where she died so that she could write a novel because it was something she had always wanted to try and had never done And of course it didn't happen Which is terribly sad. But also she's quite a creature she's a can be a little bit conflicting in that in some ways. She is the perfect role of lake. Feminism and you know a woman really being in charge of her life and not defining herself by the men in her life but then she would do things like plays you can safely. Take your wife right..

William Willard Quimby Less Than A Year Harriet Quimby First Time Aviator Four Female One Theory ONE Flights Of Four Harry Several Months
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

02:07 min | 6 d ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"Everyone knows harriet. Tubman as an activist and freedom fighter. We all learned about her in school. Growing up how she led slaves to freedom on the underground railroad but there was a lot more to her than what you probably remember from history class. She was a daughter a wife an entrepreneur and she was something else too. When you think about it she had to be the ultimate outdoors woman. Do what she did. That's right an outdoors woman. We don't often talk about. Harriet tubman in that light. Or if we do. It's kind of cautionary tale. Her experiences in the outdoors must have been so awful. So why would any sane black person wanna go into the wilderness voluntarily it feeds into the narrative. We often hear that african americans are not outdoorsy. But what if there's more to the story. What was harry. Its relationship with nature. How does that shape. The way african americans with the outdoors today and how might a closer look at harriet. Offer a new perspective on who belongs outdoors victoria. Marin has the story so this story was inspired by a podcast called following. Harriet which is about harriet. Tubman the show pulls back the curtain on harry. It's life giving listeners. A deeper context to her story. A story that i think is more layered and probably more relatable than many people realize most of us enter. Harriet tubman is life when she was in her thirties forties fifties and often times. We don't sort of think about how she came to be. Harriet people of my generation people who grew up in the nineteen seventies. We first met harriet in a photo in the corner of a textbook. She looked old. Her skin was stretched tight on her face. Her mouth was pinched. Her head was wrapped in a dark. Kerchief

Latham Tubman tanner harriet virginia
Fresh update on "harriet" discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

00:55 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "harriet" discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Harry. It was already a celebrity in new york by this point. All the way back to her theater article she'd been really popular but becoming a licensed pilot expanded her fame considerably and she gained a devoted following when she made public appearances. Huge crowds gathered to see her both because of the novelty and because she was charming her first paid gig as a pilot was in staten island in october of nineteen eleven so just a couple of months after she got her license and more than twenty thousand people filled the field and they actually had to clear the field for safety and even as she tried to land after her flight. There were spectators running onto the field that caused her to have to make a bouncy and slightly dangerous landing just beyond the target area of she did so successfully. She got paid fifteen hundred dollars for that day. And it was the first of many bookings you would get in the months that followed sometimes on her own sometimes with mathilde moi's aunt who had also successfully tested for her license soon. Harriet quimby and the other pilots who flew exhibitions for the organization were on their way to mexico. City for a festival booking. She was devoted still to her journalism. Career in quimby met her deadlines and sent her articles from on board. The ship that was carrying herself. She was to mexico for two months and she promised to write. Travel accounts for her editors at lesley's but the revolution in mexico. Quickly put an end to this booking. The whole team had to flee the country soon mathilde had given up flying after being burned in an accident when her gas tank exploded and that left harriet. it is the only woman pilot on the more centime. Harriet had rocketed to fame but she still had the feeling that there were people that saw her not as skilled pilot. But as a publicity stunt she did not like that and she wanted to prove them wrong so she plotted away to prove her mettle and for her. That was gonna be flying across the english channel now. This was something that had been done before but not by a woman and really not very often even by mail pilots. Leo stevens from the moi's on team joined her on her journey across the atlantic. And by this point he was managing her bookings and there were rumors that the two of them were a couple. Although that remains unverified they sailed to london on the ss america and once in london. Harriet secured a sponsorship. A five thousand dollars from the london daily mirror in return..

London New York Leo Stevens Harriet Quimby Fifteen Hundred Dollars Mathilde Staten Island Mexico Harry Harriet Two Months TWO October Of Nineteen Eleven Five Thousand Dollars Mathilde Moi Atlantic More Than Twenty Thousand Peop Both First First Paid Gig
Harriet Tubman, the Ultimate Outdoorswoman

Following Harriet

02:07 min | 6 d ago

Harriet Tubman, the Ultimate Outdoorswoman

"Everyone knows harriet. Tubman as an activist and freedom fighter. We all learned about her in school. Growing up how she led slaves to freedom on the underground railroad but there was a lot more to her than what you probably remember from history class. She was a daughter a wife an entrepreneur and she was something else too. When you think about it she had to be the ultimate outdoors woman. Do what she did. That's right an outdoors woman. We don't often talk about. Harriet tubman in that light. Or if we do. It's kind of cautionary tale. Her experiences in the outdoors must have been so awful. So why would any sane black person wanna go into the wilderness voluntarily it feeds into the narrative. We often hear that african americans are not outdoorsy. But what if there's more to the story. What was harry. Its relationship with nature. How does that shape. The way african americans with the outdoors today and how might a closer look at harriet. Offer a new perspective on who belongs outdoors victoria. Marin has the story so this story was inspired by a podcast called following. Harriet which is about harriet. Tubman the show pulls back the curtain on harry. It's life giving listeners. A deeper context to her story. A story that i think is more layered and probably more relatable than many people realize most of us enter. Harriet tubman is life when she was in her thirties forties fifties and often times. We don't sort of think about how she came to be. Harriet people of my generation people who grew up in the nineteen seventies. We first met harriet in a photo in the corner of a textbook. She looked old. Her skin was stretched tight on her face. Her mouth was pinched. Her head was wrapped in a dark. Kerchief

Harriet Tubman Harriet Tubman Harry Marin Victoria
Fresh update on "harriet" discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:13 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "harriet" discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Harriet loved the experience of flying despite her efforts to stay anonymous through this mail presenting disguise. Harry it was found out by a reporter from the new york. Times reporter cornered her at the school one morning and foolishly asked her if she liked flying she replied well. I'm out here at four. Am each day got ought to be answer enough while she was quickly. In that moment this outing forced her to confess to her bosses at lesley's that she had been secretly attending flight school with the intention of writing about it and then she had gotten scooped in the process. I'm going to write this amazing thing. Someone else's coming out with the article. I sorry this might also discredit the paper But those discussions where she confessed what was going on to her. Bosses went really quite well probably because they were a little accustomed to having this writer. Who kind of did as she pleased and then wrote about it. There was no big surprise in the leslie's offices and this venture was kind of seen as a a pretty big potential paper seller consider that this was a woman in flight school which was controversial enough that paper 's wanted to write about their reporter doing it and while the times was planning to go to press with the story before lesley's could it would not have been able to include any of heriot's firsthand accounts of the experience. The times ran their story in early. May and on may twenty fifth lesley's ran the article. How a woman learns to fly. It was the first in a series and that series was very popular. Leslie's weekly was so happy with the series that quimby was actually reimbursed for her expensive flying lessons in a moment. We'll talk about how quimby gained new levels of fame from the pilot's seat but first we will hear from some of sponsors that keeps stuff. You missed in history class. Going throughout the publication of those early articles in the series quimby was still in flight school. She had not yet taken her pilots exam. That didn't happen until august of nineteen eleven and initially the officials. From the aero club of america who facilitated such exams did not even wanna bother testing quimby. They thought this whole thing was a stunt and that it was going to be a waste of their time. The flight school had the schedule her test in the same session as a male pilot candidate just to get those officials to agree to travel to the airfield in the first day of her tests. She did pretty well on the first two segments which involved various flight maneuvers but she misjudged the third test which was landing and she put the plane down too far from the target. She had the chance to re-test the next day so she resolved to do it. Mathilde agreed to also test but wanted to let. Harriet go first so that she could be the first woman to be issued a pilot's license. The day initially looked like it was a bust because of heavy fog conditions but clear up by midday. Despite some gusty wind harriet managed to complete the first two parts of the test again and then in the third section she executed a precise landing when she emerged from her plane. She got in a dig to the ongoing inability of women to vote in the us. By quipping. flying is much easier than voting. That might be my favorite thing. She ever said.

Mathilde Harriet Harry New York Leslie May Twenty Fifth Third Section Third Test August Of Nineteen Eleven First First Day First Two First Two Parts Each Day Aero Club Of America One Morning First Woman Next Day
Juneteenth: A Celebration of Freedom

The Ten News

02:51 min | Last week

Juneteenth: A Celebration of Freedom

"Many people think slavery ended on the day. Abraham lincoln issued the emancipation proclamation in january eighteen. Sixty three but it actually took more than two and a half years for it to become official throughout all of the confederate states. Our correspondent pamela. Kirkland calls up. He's a museum specialists in oral history at the national museum of african american history and culture in washington. Dc to explain a bit more about the history of the holiday. We'll just start with what is juneteenth. June taint juneteenth this great day that is celebrated because on june nineteen eighteen. Sixty five general. Gordon granger arrived in galveston texas with order numbers sri announcing that the enslaved were now free this is important because although the emancipation proclamation had been signed in eighteen sixty three it had a little to no impact almost of the enslaved throughout the south. Because if there weren't union soldiers there to enforce it it literally. Nothing in did not change of your life if you were enslaved human being in texas. Which was the westernmost state. There was very little union presence throughout the war so it was as if nothing had happened in fact there were slave owners. He moved west to continue. The practice of slavery moved to texas for that purpose so this day this was a big day. He arrived with almost two thousand troops. Some of whom were united states colored troops and they enforced this order. What what kind of the history. Of june teeth in the legacy. It's only recently really bad. It's become more widely known. Yes i well. It started in texas so immediately a year. After this announcement they have the first juneteenth In texas in houston. The african americans their a saved up. Money and bought land is specifically for this purpose that became emancipation park and it was practiced throughout texas In also places like oklahoma is started to slowly spread with the great migration in which you see different ways so it was celebrated through the turn of the century than it waned a little. Then you see it's coming back after the after world war two then. There was another big boost after the civil rights era after the sixties. What are some of the exhibits that highlight juneteenth And demands pation. We have an entire gallery devoted to slavery and freedom so there you will find of of many artifacts relating to we have the actual copy of Mation for example we have of many artifacts related to the underground railroad movement. Things that belong to harriet tubman such as show in our

Texas National Museum Of African Ame Gordon Granger Abraham Lincoln Kirkland Pamela Galveston SRI Emancipation Park Washington United States Houston Oklahoma Harriet Tubman
Fresh update on "harriet" discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:48 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "harriet" discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"New york. She spent one night at the pennsylvania hotel and then the next morning she arranged to rent a room in a boarding house at sixty eighth and third. That was a connection she had made through a reference that one of her san francisco editors had given her and after her lodging was sorted she took her portfolio of published pieces from her work on the west coast and some new writing that she had done on the five day trip across the country and she started visiting publication offices looking for work. Her first stop was at leslie's illustrated weekly. Which is a publication that comes up as in the show as having articles about topics that we're talking about she spoke with two assistant editors who seems to like her but she had to return the next day to meet the editor in chief before any decisions could be made after going through one of her samples and verbally telling her all of the edits that he would make which was just not a level of criticism that she was accustomed to the editor. John y foster offered her a job on a trial basis. He also asked if she shouldn't try a more conventional job for a woman and she told him she was a better writer than she was a cook. Three weeks later foster published article curious chinese customs in which she described the tradition of chinese paper offerings but article was picked up by several other outlets right away. Her work with super-popular she in foster actually ended up being great friends For years and years but it was kind of the way it's described. Sounds like a tug of war in the beginning of. Here's everything wrong with this article. You plucky though. They'll try and when he asked her if she shouldn't try doing something. That was a more natural fit for women. Her perception was that it was a test in that. If she was like well maybe he would have been like get out but instead she's like no. This is really all. I do after the success of that first article. She took assignments for lesley's and she wrote a series on the lives of the occupants of tenements in new york. She also campaigned to be given a regular theater review column. She still loved the arts and she was granted that and soon after that she was given the title of drama critic because she did so well. This was a role that she filled with enthusiasm often. Her coverage included interviews with actors in various shows a number of which she had met or been friends with back in san francisco and if she didn't know someone she was still usually able to win them over and get them to consent to a conversation about work on the record one of her great successes as the papers. Drama critic was a section at the end of her weekly column that offered a list of which plays a man might safely. Take his wife or daughter to..

New York John Five Day One Night Next Morning Third Three Weeks Later Two Assistant Editors ONE First Article First Stop Pennsylvania Years Lesley San Francisco Sixty Eighth Next Day One Of Her Samples Chinese
Interview With Daniel Levin, the Man Who Walked Away From a Fortune

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

02:00 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With Daniel Levin, the Man Who Walked Away From a Fortune

"Daniel. Welcome anna stable creative. Thanks so much for taking the time to join us a shiny. It's so good to be here. I've been looking forward to this for a long time yet. You and me both. I know that we've made multiple attempts to record this conversation and thanks to scheduling snafus in technical issues on a trip to india. That didn't quite happen. But i'm really thrilled that we're getting to do this at the very beginning of the year So you having heard up many interviews. Before i like to start asking. What did your parents do for a living. And what impact that end up having on the choices that you've made with your life in your career fabulous question. Might i grew up in a lower middle class family. My dad was a salesman and he sold glass and this was in the time before shopping. Centers were big and he just landed a deal to put the glass windows and in a in the king of prussia shopping center outside of philadelphia and it was only shortly after that that he died and so We grew up in a family that my dad was someone who could care less about how much money was in his bank account but how much love was in his heart was the most important thing to him in the world and i became like my dad. It didn't ever matter to me. He was my idol. He was my. It was my teacher he was i my god he was everything looked too but he died with a mountain full of debt and one black suit and his closet because he gave to everybody else even didn't having it. My mom was a secretary in a synagogue and so She also contributed a little bit. But it was. She was the type of mom who wanted to be home to make cookies. And and for us when we came home from school. So we lived in that ozzie and harriet. You may not even know who those people are.

Prussia Shopping Center Anna Daniel India Philadelphia Ozzie Harriet
Fresh update on "harriet" discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:05 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "harriet" discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"So like when when harry it was you know twenty four. She was still telling people she was. Only fifteen ursula really wanted above all else for her daughter to be a modern career woman again going back to that. Fear that requiring a man to support you would be let down and she specifically wanted her to be a journalist. Because mrs quin be thought that that was a career that would open doors but at the time. Harriet actually wanted to act. She wanted to be an actor and she did without any apparent training. She started acting in plays in the san francisco area and she also worked as a retail clerk of those two jobs. She eventually was supporting herself and largely her parents although they were also still bringing in a small amount of money through their own endeavors. Harriet stage name was hazel quimby. And she really hustled to make this acting dream work along with friends. She convinced san francisco's mayor to lend them the money to rent a theater for the production of romeo and juliet hazel slash. Harriet played romeo. And she'd gotten an entertainment journalist she knew and was friends. With to review the production that led to harriet getting more roles and other shows throughout this time she became deeply entrenched in the city's art scene pretty early on she saw lake. Journalism has a power it can make or break people that becomes more and more important to her but it was through those connections on the art scene and as a member of san francisco's bohemian club. That harriet actually started working herself as a journalist in nineteen o one when it started to become apparent. That acting was not going to bring in enough money. She wrote an article called the artist's colony at monterey for the call and it was a sunday feature and in that article she wrote about the coastal town and its beauty later. She made stabs into writing short fiction including an article called a night at a haunted house which was published on february second. Nineteen two in the san francisco chronicle but news was really where. Harriet quimby florist as a writer and while she primarily covered the arts and san francisco for both the call and the chronicle she also wrote on a variety of topics including everything from sex trafficking to hospital reform. She wrote a great deal about. San francisco's chinese community. She wrote about issues like voting rights for women which she strongly supported although she did identify as a feminist she felt that label and some of the movements associated with it actually caused more discord solutions as she was really starting to develop a pretty solid career. There were rumors about her having various romantic partners. But there's no clear evidence of her ever having been seriously involved with anyone. She seemed to be focused almost entirely on her work which was both gaining her notice and respect and she decided after having gotten a taste of all that that the next logical step for her career was to move to new york and work as a journalist there so in early nineteen ninety-three three. She did just that despite the fact that she knew no one in new york and she didn't even know at the time. We're any of the major newspapers offices. Were we'll talk about her arrival in new york after we take a quick sponsor. Break after harry got to.

Harriet New York San Francisco A Night At A Haunted House February Second Harry Hazel Quimby Two Jobs Fifteen Twenty Four Both Juliet Hazel Harriet Quimby Quin -Three Three Nineteen Two Early Nineteen Ninety Nineteen O One
With ‘The Underground Railroad,’ Barry Jenkins looks squarely at Black trauma

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | Last month

With ‘The Underground Railroad,’ Barry Jenkins looks squarely at Black trauma

"Underground railroad was a network of abolitionists routes to free slaves. But what if it was an actual railroad with a train chugging toward freedom? That's the premise of Colson Whitehead's Pulitzer Prize winning novel, now adapted by Barry Jenkins into a 10 episode miniseries. This isn't a straightforward, inspirational narrative like Harriet. This combines the brutality of roots with the social commentary of watchman and a hint of magical realism like the Polaroids. Press to some ADO is empathetic as the lead Joe Edger tennis sinister as the villain, slave catcher and child star chased Dillon is his precocious psychic. I still have eight episodes to go. But judging by the first two were in for a powerful train ride by a master conductor. I'm Toby Toby film critic Jason Fraley, giving the underground railroad for five stars. So far, dolphin

Colson Whitehead Barry Jenkins Pulitzer Prize Harriet Dillon Tennis Toby Toby Jason Fraley
Harriet Tubman's Father's Home Discovered by Archeologists in Maryland

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:31 sec | 2 months ago

Harriet Tubman's Father's Home Discovered by Archeologists in Maryland

"In maryland say. They believe they've found the home of harriet tubman. Father the home side of ben ross was found on land acquired last year by the us. Fish and wildlife service or the archaeologists who worked on the sites tubman born born era minta. Roz would have live there as a child and would have come back to live there with her father as a teenager. Tubman who was born a slave escaped in eighteen forty nine and guided dozens of others to freedom using in network of safe houses known as the underground railroad. I'm lisa lacerra and this is fox

Ben Ross Era Minta Harriet Tubman Fish And Wildlife Service Maryland Tubman ROZ United States Lisa Lacerra FOX
Chicago school renamed after Harriet Tubman | State and Regional

Bob Sirott

00:25 sec | 3 months ago

Chicago school renamed after Harriet Tubman | State and Regional

"School in Lakeview will be renamed for abolitionists and civil rights pioneer Harriet Tubman. CBS is making the change after years of protest from school families. The school is currently named after a Swiss biologist who's racist teachings were used to justify slavery. Slavery. It is the first CPS building you receive a name change, but more could follow the Board of Education plans to give final approval at tomorrow's meeting.

Lakeview Harriet Tubman CBS CPS Board Of Education
Man In Critical Condition After Hit-And-Run Crash In Chicago

Bob Sirott

00:32 sec | 3 months ago

Man In Critical Condition After Hit-And-Run Crash In Chicago

"Currently in Lombard. We're watching a crash on route 53 North Avenue and again fire activity in university Park at Landau and Union Drive, a hit and run crash in the North Lawndale neighborhood in Chicago, still being investigated at Douglas and Lawndale. Harriet always. They are in good shape. Inbound Stevenson again Heavy on that north bound Dan Ryan ramp also the Dan Ryan on the breaks from the Steven sent up to Roosevelt and roadwork. Westbound. I 88 taking out your two left lanes. Orchard Road to Route 56 until seven o'clock this morning.

Landau And Union Drive Lombard University Park Dan Ryan Lawndale Harriet Douglas Stevenson Chicago Steven Roosevelt
'Genius: Aretha' earns its respect with Cynthia Erivo's showstopping role

Relevant Podcast

02:37 min | 3 months ago

'Genius: Aretha' earns its respect with Cynthia Erivo's showstopping role

"Was sent. The revolt is an award-winning actress. Singer and songwriter. She started shows and films like chaos walking harriet widows the outsider and many more now she stars as aretha franklin on the nat geo show genius aretha genius colin aretha which will debut on the twenty first on nat geo and hulu said the sat down with to tell us about the show and playing such an iconic role as aretha franklin. Here's our conversation with cynthia ariba. I'm running a new song gonna hit you hard thought you a man it'll get under your skin right down to the bone is going to be a whole new vibe that brings people together on just a link in your chain. We only got three courts. We'll make it sound like a million bucks change you've seen movies like widows bad times the roy and harry robots. She got an oscar nomination for best actress now. She's playing aretha. Franklin in the coming season of nigeria's anthology series genius. I asked cynthia about the pressure. Schmo feel about this and we all know who retha is. Many of us have a very clear picture sort of person she was. This isn't a situation where she's introducing people to new character or even a little known character. It's one where people feel very knowledgeable and even protective about their idea of aretha. Franklin wanted to know if that's difficult for her as a performer there is. I guess there is a pressure to to get it right but the fact is you come. You don't have any control over. What right is because everyone has an idea of what is present is in their millions and billions of people in the world. Who have an idea of who aretha is who she should be in. Wish should look like an ashes out And many of him who've never met her and don't know anything and so i'll learning for the first time so you have to trust that you've done the research you've done the wok You have a great team around you. Directors go back rights. the rights news writing The makeup is your bag costume. Has your back to be able to really tell a full story that you will. I major. That was armed with incredible people who were ready to go on the journey with me and mine mine. Main job was to try. And tell the story as fully as i possibly

Aretha Franklin Nat Geo Show Genius Aretha Colin Aretha Nat Geo Cynthia Ariba Schmo Retha Aretha Harriet Hulu Franklin Oscar Cynthia Nigeria
Buckingham Palace Remains Silent in Wake of Racist Allegations

Len Berman and Michael Riedel in the Morning

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

Buckingham Palace Remains Silent in Wake of Racist Allegations

"In the wake of racist racist accusations from Megan and Harriet. Somebody. Somebody high up there in Buckingham Palace was worried that their baby would quote be too dark, their words not ours. Now. Oprah did come out because we thought as Prince Philip, since he has a history of making a politically incorrect comments. But the Harry apparently confided to Oprah that it was neither the Queen or his grandfather, Phillip, So if we begin to play the game of who's the racist and Buckingham Palace? I don't see Prince Charles saying now and see William or Kate saying that I think it could be Camilla. We know very little about Commander. Very that, Camilla. I don't know. We know what her nickname is.

Buckingham Palace Oprah Harriet Megan Prince Philip Harry Phillip Prince Charles Camilla Kate William
Faketinas

Locatora Radio

05:02 min | 4 months ago

Faketinas

"Get started with. I think this person or this story broke during the summer. it's kinda hard to tell now with the pandemic. what time is like but one other prominent ones that i remember seeing that wino- was flooding. Our timeline was the story of jessica. Craig aka or formerly known as jess la. Barletta cringe already awesome early known formerly known best. I'm about that. Let's get started. Let's talk about her. Yes so this woman has allegedly and apparently apparently been taking on different like black and afro sport identities throughout her life. She's an a professor or was a professor and academic where george washington university and university teaching. You know black studies are afrikaner studies and publishing books but at some point she were shifting from being in a north african to being african american and then being afro latin next sand after boaty gua was i think the final landing place for her her official forum her final warm so jessica. Krog just aka justifiable maleta hers combination of black fishing and being a fake tina at the same time and She got called out basically rightfully so rightfully so by a group of professors who are after latina's who had issues with her they were witness to or on the receiving end of like aggression from her and like prejudice and bad behavior while she was masquerading as after let nine different contexts. Apparently being super like belligerent towards black women in my on cool and really I think overcompensating and so trying to be an ex sorted extreme caricature of like this south bronx like her. Allegedly her mother was like a drug addicts prostitutes like this narrative that should created about herself so black women in the academy you know began talking about these different experiences and came forward and said This is not right. Yeah she was definitely performing like whoa kness being extreme radical like it was very performative. She was a published academic author and she also received a ton of accolades rice. She received she was a finalist. For the twenty twenty frederick douglass prize book prize presented by yale's gilder lehrman center the study of slavery resistance and abolition. She also was nominated or a finalist for the twenty thousand nine. Harriet tubman book prize and just received a ton of accolades has really been propelled or was propelled forward and questionably hired because of not solely for her identity. But because of the work she was doing and also the way. She positioned herself as offer latino or body gua and it's very cringe to think about all of the opportunities she stole from actual author. Latinas boras caribbean women. That are doing if not the same work or better work you know. And so it's that was probably one of the first ones that we saw. And then i think it kind of just opened up the floodgates for a lot of others than i don't know about you ma. But in my chicano studies department at uc santa barbara. There were a couple of fake denies that i will not name. They were not. They weren't anyone that i took like. I didn't take any classes with them but they were around. People talked about them. People knew like this person is very white claims this this cheek. Ghana mohican identity. You know is wide. Skin blue is performing she gun. You know some kind of ghana identity wearing that. I had because with the free that carlo ecstatic the whole thing right and it's like you like i they weren't. They were my peers. I was a student right. But i have friends that were graduate students. And they would tell me about these. Things happen. And in their cohort or in their in their seminars. And so you know. I think if if you've been in academia right. I haven't been to grad school. But i was an undergrad but i've i've definitely seen the fake tina's around so they definitely exists and i think this one opened the floodgates for a ton of

Craig Aka Jess La Boaty Gua Krog Jessica Barletta Yale's Gilder Lehrman Center George Washington University South Bronx Tina Latinas Boras Frederick Douglass Harriet Tubman Ghana Caribbean Santa Barbara Carlo Academia
"harriet" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

05:08 min | 4 months ago

"harriet" Discussed on Citation Needed

"Rule that nobody should come in without. They have one hundred dollars now. I want to. I want to make the rule that nobody should come in unless they don't have no money at all and quote as she got older. The problems with headaches got a lot worse she was experiencing a buzzing sound and she couldn't sleep due to pain so she asked the doctors at boston. General hospital to perform surgery on her head. They did this. And she said they quote sought open my soul and raised and now it feels more comfortable one of my favorite part of this shores was that she was given no anesthesia instead. Harriet fucking tubman. Bit down on a bullet like the boy. She worked on in the civil war as they sought her head open. She was awake the entire time. Bridge well yesterday stub my toe and immediately filed for permanent disability. Fuck tubman died in nineteen thirteen of pneumonia. The age of ninety one. Give or take a stupidly amazing lady and one hundred percent worthy of being on our goddamn money. No matter what that walking testicle. Charlie kirk has to say about it right and see sel via to summarize what you've learned in one sentence. What would it be. Charlie kirk is a racist. Are you ready for the quiz. I got one for you. Besides misogyny and racism what possible argument could exist for not replacing. Andrew jackson's raises seidel dollar bill with harriet tubman. Own be luciano obliglated and see. Oh my god. What could that over there being gets definitely. Herman is an official statement. That's ben shapiro destroying you with facts and knowledge. I'm all right see. So what were some alternative names for the underground railroad which were alternately rejected a the in furious mission nearly impossible to see run tubman run. We're d- no country for black man. Oh no i'll know it's d tom. It is so sad so all right see sel last but not least hollywood. Recently dramatized tubman story for us in the movie. Harriet i think think we can. All agree is a terrible title. Should they have called the movie. The toubon ater ater when harry met sally for c. Dirty harry and i don t top man on wire okay. I think it secret answer. E heriot's of fire areas like harriet chariots of fire. It's very very clever. Though all right well you still. You still win. Porn won the porn would have been three minutes. Which is i all right see you. I'm still the winner. Okay no all right. you'll get him noah. Oh okay all right. Tom will end. Noah bosnich for hanging out with us today. We'll be back next week and by then. No we'll be an expert on something else but we now then you can listen to see. Someone noah on their new podcast. Things weren't as bad. When i was a kid is new snapchat feature real. What's a snapchat showing. You can make a donation at dot com slash citation pot or leave us a five star review everywhere. You can get in touch with us. Check out past episodes connect with us on social media or check the show notes. You should check out citation. Pod are tubman and crockett and cut. Excellent everybody i. I'm sorry. I don't want to be picky but Steamboats aren't really great on railroad tracks. San just just read the lines k. Mark also you don't want me to do a black voice because i can't black boys zetino. Why stop fucking making good movies Know mr deniro. Nobody knows why you stopped making good was. I was in really good fucking movies at one point. I know you were man to narrow. Yeah me too. No not really mar. Now now departed was fine was but i was barely in that part of the reason why it was good mousketeers shooting. What does that your. Why was that in the silly. It didn't work..

Andrew jackson one hundred dollars next week Tom yesterday harriet tubman five star harry Harriet sally Mark three minutes today one hundred percent snapchat deniro ben shapiro one sentence nineteen thirteen civil war
Retail sales better than expected in January

WSJ What's News

03:14 min | 4 months ago

Retail sales better than expected in January

"Here to discuss. The latest figures is wall street journal. Reporter harriet tori. She covers the federal reserve and us economy farm. Our washington dc bureau. Harry thanks so for joining us. Hi so retail spending is op. And i'm wondering what people are buying. Well the re buying things across the board. I mean this month was amazing. These strong we saw a five point. Three percent. Seasonally-adjusted increase From a month earlier in every category did well which is unusual in retail sales. But there are. Some country agrees the did kind of well that was Furniture electronics we saw big increase in a lot of categories that related to the home. This is a trend that we've seen during the coronavirus. Pandemic is that people who are working from home and studying from home and just spending more time at home generally a spending a lot of money on making their home spaces better improving them. Buying things like new. Tv's new workout equipment renovating different rooms and things like that. So we definitely saw that reflected in the january retail sales report. What did you think when you saw the figure of five point three percent. I was really surprised because the economists expectations were for an increase of two percent. And of course this is coming off a pretty bad holiday season. We saw declines in retail sales in october november and december which is really unusual. Because that's normally a time. When people are out shopping and spending on halloween and thanksgiving and christmas and so on but clearly. You know economists saying what we're seeing here is the impact of six hundred dollars. Stimulus checks that. Many households received another january because this appears to be related to the stimulus payments. I want to ask you about the purpose of the stimulus. Is it meant to help. Businesses or individuals. Are both economists. Are saying that this is definitely a sign that this to municipalities to be working one concern that people had about the first round of stimulus. Checks came through in march. Two thousand twenty was that a very large share of them were saved. They went straight into savings accounts. A man appeared to be because there was just a lot of uncertainty. The unemployment rate was extremely high. People were very very cautious so they want us to take that money and put it in their bank accounts they would have just in case things got even was also a relatively large serve is used to pay down debt but we'll miss seeing now appears to be more people actually spending the money this could be reflection of the fact that vaccines beginning to roll out so people feeling might. Maybe there's light at the end of the tunnel. Also the improvement in the labor market. It seems like people who have just a bit more comfortable now as she taking that money once it hits that bank account and going and spending it on things that they need. Can you put these new sales numbers in context for us. We often see them. Revised offer down after the fact the month to month data can be volatile definitely and it is subject to larger visions and we were a revision of the december number as well but over will the signal that this report sentences. That january was a really surprisingly strong month for retail spending and it just shows the american consumers Very much in the driving seat of potential growth in the first

Harriet Tori Wall Street Journal Federal Reserve Washington Dc Pandemic Harry United States
Airlines push White House to reject testing for US flights

WBZ Morning News

00:30 sec | 4 months ago

Airlines push White House to reject testing for US flights

"Yellen to make it a priority to put American abolitionist Harriet Tubman on the $20 Bill. Airline's gonna make their case today at the White House to avoid a new coronavirus testing rule. Today, CEOs from the country's biggest airlines will meet at the White House. It comes as the airlines are suffering the new cove it very instant slow vaccine rollout have hampered in airline recovery. The CEO is air pushing back against the plan being considered by the Biden administration and CDC to require negative covert tests

Yellen Harriet Tubman White House Bill Biden Administration CDC
Rochester Police Pepper-Sprayed 9-Year-Old Girl, Footage Shows

Passage To Profit

00:41 sec | 5 months ago

Rochester Police Pepper-Sprayed 9-Year-Old Girl, Footage Shows

"Rochester Police Department is releasing Bodycam footage. Shows a nine year old girl being pepper sprayed while handcuffed in the bank of a cop car. Speaking earlier today, Deputy police Chief Andre Anderson said the girl was detained after nine officers responded to a call about family trouble. He says the girl reported she wanted to kill not only herself, but her mother. Police chief Cynthia Harriet Sullivan told reporters. She's not going to say the Pepper. Spraying a child is OK, adding the department is going to work to ensure these things don't happen in the future. Rochester's mayor, Lovely Warren also comment on the incident, saying it's something that it's not something that really anybody should want to justify.

Rochester Police Department Deputy Police Chief Andre Ande Cynthia Harriet Sullivan Lovely Warren Rochester
Harriet Tubman on the $20? Treasury to move forward with effort

The Boxer Show

00:20 sec | 5 months ago

Harriet Tubman on the $20? Treasury to move forward with effort

"The Treasury Department moving forward to get Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill, former President Trump was critical of the Obama era plan. Ex Treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin delayed the implementation until 2026. But the White House's president Biden steams, exploring ways to speed up the effort period. Tubman was an abolitionist activist. We'll rescue slaves in the Civil War

President Trump Ex Treasury Steve Mnuchin Harriet Tubman Treasury Department President Biden Bill Barack Obama White House Tubman
Biden administration to move forward with Harriet Tubman on the $20

Charlie Parker

00:20 sec | 5 months ago

Biden administration to move forward with Harriet Tubman on the $20

"Department's working to get Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill. Former President Trump was critical of the Obama era plan. Ex Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin delayed the implementation until 2026 for the White House says President Biden's team is exploring ways to speed up the effort. Harriet Tubman was an abolitionist and activist who helped rescue slaves in the Civil War era.

Former President Trump Harriet Tubman Ex Treasury Secretary Steve Mn President Biden Barack Obama White House
"harriet" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:10 min | 5 months ago

"harriet" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Although the veracity of her story was challenged for decades are storyteller of the day is now recognized as the true author of her work. We're talking about harriet jacobs. Harriet jacobs was born in eighteen. Thirteen endan north carolina to delilah and daniel jacobs. Both her mother and father were enslaved. Her grandmother had been emancipated by her former enslavers. When harry it was six her mother died and she was left in the care of her enslavers. Margaret horn blow margaret taught her to read and write an uncommon practice for the time but when harriet was twelve her fortune changed. Margaret passed away and instead of emancipating. Harriet bequeath. terry her three-year-old niece. mary matilda nor calm. Harriet subsequently moved into the nor com household. A family that did not share margaret's relatively more progressive views within three years. Though harry it was just a young teenager she had become the sexual fixation of mary's father. Dr james nor com. His sexual harassment was unrelenting and he refused to allow harry to marry. It was then. Harriet made a calculated decision. She decided to return the advances of another white man. A local lawyer by the name of samuel treadwell sawyer. She hoped that bearing the children of a different white man with spur her master into a rage her goal was to drive doctor nor com to sell her. Her plan did not succeed after bearing two of sawyers children dr nor com punished. Harriet by sending her to do backbreaking labor on his plantation while they're harriet. She fled to her grandmother's house and hit an crawlspace. Harriet remained in hiding at her grandmother's for seven years. During this time she revised her plan. Harriet wrote letters to dr nor com falsely claiming. She described to the north. This time around. She hoped dr nor comet sell her children to their father. Eventually this plan came to fruition and sawyer bought both of his children back from dr nor com soon after sawyer was elected to the house of representatives and moved with the children to washington. Dc desperate to reunite with her children. Harriet to fled north while searching for her children. Harriet found work. As a nurse. Made for the abolitionist. Nathaniel parker willis and his wife cordelia willis dr nor com continued to pursue harriet and. She was frequently forced to go into hiding often relocating between boston and new york eventually in one thousand fifty two the willis family was able to bhai harriet freedom during her time in the north. Harriet became involved with a feminist abolitionist group. It was there that she met. Amy post amy taken with harriet. Personal journey recommended that she read a book about her life. Harry agreed and decided to write her autobiography. Under the pen name brent. Her book called incidents in the life of a slave girl was published in eighteen. Sixty one with the rise of the american civil war. The book quickly faded from public discourse and remained relatively unknown for the rest of heriot's. Its lifetime harry. It was eventually reunited with her daughter. Louisa during the civil war. Harriet worked to aid former slaves who arrived as refugees in washington. Dc dedication to the recently emancipated community. Brought harriet back to the south in eighteen sixty five. Harriet and louisa settled in savannah georgia to continue relief efforts but due to persistent racial persecution forced to flee north once more this time harriet settled in cambridge massachusetts or she opened a boarding house. Not much is known about the final chapters of harry. It's life but we do know that she eventually returned to washington. Dc with her daughter. It was there that harriet died in eighteen. Ninety seven she was eighty four years old. It wasn't until the feminist movements of the nineteen sixties and seventies that incidents reappeared. Initially it sparked controversy. The books editor lydia. Marie child was a white woman. Common thought at the time was the autobiography was actually a novel written by child in one thousand nine hundred. Eighty seven historian. Jean fagin yellen corrected that narrative with her annotated edition of incidents yellen lays bare at the true identity of the author and the limited role child played in publishing the original manuscript at long last. Harry its name was attached to her work. Her role as auto biographer transformed. The significance of the taxed inherits writings. She describes her state of mind. She rejected the advances of dr nor calm in favor of sam sawyer. She explicitly discusses using her sexuality. As a tool to manipulate the white men who sought to further subjugate her harry it also acknowledges the judgement she received as a woman with two children born out of wedlock in her book. She argues that it is cruel to prescribe nineteenth century. Morality onto enslaved women as their fundamental rights had already been so profoundly violated incidents in the life of a slave girl remains one of the most important books of its kind. It is the only first hand account of the life of an enslaved woman at the time and gives unmatched insight into harry. It's perspective as she fought against forces of sexual and racial oppression in doing so. The autobiography occupies a unique space in both african american and feminist literature

harriet Nathaniel parker willis Marie america Harry jenny kaplan harriet jacobs cordelia willis boston Margaret seven years Harriet harry Harriet jacobs mary matilda Jean fagin yellen louisa new york Today six
Storytellers: Harriet Jacobs

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:10 min | 5 months ago

Storytellers: Harriet Jacobs

"Although the veracity of her story was challenged for decades are storyteller of the day is now recognized as the true author of her work. We're talking about harriet jacobs. Harriet jacobs was born in eighteen. Thirteen endan north carolina to delilah and daniel jacobs. Both her mother and father were enslaved. Her grandmother had been emancipated by her former enslavers. When harry it was six her mother died and she was left in the care of her enslavers. Margaret horn blow margaret taught her to read and write an uncommon practice for the time but when harriet was twelve her fortune changed. Margaret passed away and instead of emancipating. Harriet bequeath. terry her three-year-old niece. mary matilda nor calm. Harriet subsequently moved into the nor com household. A family that did not share margaret's relatively more progressive views within three years. Though harry it was just a young teenager she had become the sexual fixation of mary's father. Dr james nor com. His sexual harassment was unrelenting and he refused to allow harry to marry. It was then. Harriet made a calculated decision. She decided to return the advances of another white man. A local lawyer by the name of samuel treadwell sawyer. She hoped that bearing the children of a different white man with spur her master into a rage her goal was to drive doctor nor com to sell her. Her plan did not succeed after bearing two of sawyers children dr nor com punished. Harriet by sending her to do backbreaking labor on his plantation while they're harriet. She fled to her grandmother's house and hit an crawlspace. Harriet remained in hiding at her grandmother's for seven years. During this time she revised her plan. Harriet wrote letters to dr nor com falsely claiming. She described to the north. This time around. She hoped dr nor comet sell her children to their father. Eventually this plan came to fruition and sawyer bought both of his children back from dr nor com soon after sawyer was elected to the house of representatives and moved with the children to washington. Dc desperate to reunite with her children. Harriet to fled north while searching for her children. Harriet found work. As a nurse. Made for the abolitionist. Nathaniel parker willis and his wife cordelia willis dr nor com continued to pursue harriet and. She was frequently forced to go into hiding often relocating between boston and new york eventually in one thousand fifty two the willis family was able to bhai harriet freedom during her time in the north. Harriet became involved with a feminist abolitionist group. It was there that she met. Amy post amy taken with harriet. Personal journey recommended that she read a book about her life. Harry agreed and decided to write her autobiography. Under the pen name brent. Her book called incidents in the life of a slave girl was published in eighteen. Sixty one with the rise of the american civil war. The book quickly faded from public discourse and remained relatively unknown for the rest of heriot's. Its lifetime harry. It was eventually reunited with her daughter. Louisa during the civil war. Harriet worked to aid former slaves who arrived as refugees in washington. Dc dedication to the recently emancipated community. Brought harriet back to the south in eighteen sixty five. Harriet and louisa settled in savannah georgia to continue relief efforts but due to persistent racial persecution forced to flee north once more this time harriet settled in cambridge massachusetts or she opened a boarding house. Not much is known about the final chapters of harry. It's life but we do know that she eventually returned to washington. Dc with her daughter. It was there that harriet died in eighteen. Ninety seven she was eighty four years old. It wasn't until the feminist movements of the nineteen sixties and seventies that incidents reappeared. Initially it sparked controversy. The books editor lydia. Marie child was a white woman. Common thought at the time was the autobiography was actually a novel written by child in one thousand nine hundred. Eighty seven historian. Jean fagin yellen corrected that narrative with her annotated edition of incidents yellen lays bare at the true identity of the author and the limited role child played in publishing the original manuscript at long last. Harry its name was attached to her work. Her role as auto biographer transformed. The significance of the taxed inherits writings. She describes her state of mind. She rejected the advances of dr nor calm in favor of sam sawyer. She explicitly discusses using her sexuality. As a tool to manipulate the white men who sought to further subjugate her harry it also acknowledges the judgement she received as a woman with two children born out of wedlock in her book. She argues that it is cruel to prescribe nineteenth century. Morality onto enslaved women as their fundamental rights had already been so profoundly violated incidents in the life of a slave girl remains one of the most important books of its kind. It is the only first hand account of the life of an enslaved woman at the time and gives unmatched insight into harry. It's perspective as she fought against forces of sexual and racial oppression in doing so. The autobiography occupies a unique space in both african american and feminist literature

Harriet Harriet Jacobs Harry Daniel Jacobs Margaret Horn Harriet Bequeath Mary Matilda Dr James Samuel Treadwell Sawyer Margaret Sawyer Nathaniel Parker Willis Cordelia Willis Bhai Harriet Delilah Amy Post Sawyers Washington
How Spanish Flu Pandemic Changed Home Heat Radiators

All Things Considered

02:28 min | 6 months ago

How Spanish Flu Pandemic Changed Home Heat Radiators

"The northern Us, you might have had a steam radiator. That was way too hot, like so hot that you would actually throw your window wide open in the dead of winter, and it might have made a noise like this. Oh, so familiar. As it turns out radiators that worked too well are partly a result of the 1918 flu pandemic. You see, there was once something called the fresh Air movement called for people to be outside more and for there to be plenty of ventilation indoors. The fresh air movement had some prominent backers, says Dan Holla Han, He's author of the Lost Art of Steam Heating. Harriet Beecher Stowe teamed up with Louis leads who was running the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia. And they had this traveling show where they talked about the national poison, which was the vitiated air and closed rooms where there's people breathing and And they're saying that you know, you've got to have a lot of fresh air. So people took this to heart and opened their windows Not so good during the winter, so heating specialists said to themselves. We need to size the radiators and the boilers to eat the building on the coldest day of the year with the Windows open. That might mean a room is too hot at one end and too cold near the window. At that point, they moved the radiator from the interior wall to under the window to heat that areas is coming in. This design philosophy took off after the 1918 flu pandemic and its threat of airborne viruses. So these radiators were designed to heat a room on the coldest day of the year with the window wide open. And then these radiators got even hotter as people switched from cold. Other fuels See oil and natural gas can be burned in smaller boilers. But often technicians ignored that. The person doing the replacement rather than properly size, it is usually going toe look at the size that's there and give you the same thing, which is crazy. Suddenly you have a super powered steam heater, which is one reason they earned a bad reputation, says Dan Holla Han. He knows that some city dwellers still open their windows during the winter. I could tell you in Manhattan by standing across the street and looking at the windows. Of an apartment building. What kind of heat it has. I could tell that from the outside just by looking at the pattern of open windows mate seem wasteful today, but steam radiators were a response to a respiratory pandemic. Just like the one that we're in right now.

Dan Holla Han FLU Harriet Beecher Stowe Franklin Institute Philadelphia Louis Manhattan
What the Latest Retail-Sales Figures Could Mean for the Holiday Season

WSJ What's News

05:00 min | 7 months ago

What the Latest Retail-Sales Figures Could Mean for the Holiday Season

"Us retail sales rose for a sixth straight month and october but the pace of growth was slower than expected and that suggests that us shoppers or getting more cautious corona virus cases surge. Joining me now with more details is wall street journal economics reporter harriet tori. Hi harry at. Thanks for being here. So the past few months have shown stronger growth in retail sales but october showed less than expected increase. What happened so what we saw. Were steep declines in retail sales in march and april due to the pandemic and then a big pickup in may retail. Sales are up over eighteen percent since then. The group has tapered off but it really did taper off quite a lot compared to the prior month so we saw a month a month increase of north point three percent whereas in september it was one point six percent so it's really slowed pretty considerably and this was also slower than economists expecting. They had pencilled in a zero point. Five percent increase so it did disappoint relative to expectations. What are they attributing the slowdown to certain key. Categories of spending She posted declines last month. So for instance. One of the big ones was grocery stores now. The decline is relatively small. Sales were down zero point. Four percent but still grocery shopping is a big cass. Agree so there was that there was also a drop in clothing sales sporting goods sales and at general merchandise stores so for instance department stores and then a few categories did well contributing to their rogaine so vehicle sales a continuing to perform pretty strongly. They were up electronic sales. Were up and also of course. Non store retailers which are online merchants. Like amazon and october was a pretty good month for them in part because retailers have been pushing promotions to try and get. The holiday season started earlier this year. So we saw that. For instance amazon prime day this year. It was in october rather than july and a few other retailers had other promotional events going on kind of to match that also retailers have just been exploding over the pasta up. Nearly thirty percents from october. Twenty thousand thousand nine. So online spending has really boomed as you mentioned this year. A lot of retailers did roll out the holiday discounts and sales much earlier than usual. Is that a shift. That's working out for them. So far is it a bit too early to tell. It's a bit at least it's hell. I think what's interesting about the situation. That brennan the moment is we have seen of course and they. At the end of the summer we saw the end to the supplemental unemployment benefits. So this extra six hundred dollars a week. That unemployed work had been receiving on the labor market has been improving but the gains in. The labor. Market have been slowing. So what does that mean that. Means that people have generally less income than they did a few months ago so just spending is become a little bit more cautious for big part of the population. These people who are either unemployed or who might have had the hours carpool worried about losing their jobs. Now on the other hand you have another group of people who are able to work from home and can have things delivered to their homes and because they're not traveling then already going out as much dinner than going to the movies means really saving a lot of money The using it to pay down debt and to home improvement projects and things like that and so these consumers are expected to actually spend quite a lot during the holiday season. They might not be spending on vacations but they probably will be spending on nice electronics for their families gifts. Or perhaps they'll be decorating the house improving the house in some way so it's quite early to say but one thing that we're definitely seeing. Is this divide. They call it the qe shaped recovery. So you have. The upper arm of the k. Is generally knowledge workers who can shelter in place. What from home and then on the bottom half of the cave. People who are really struggling with declining in service sector employment as we head into the colder months what are some shifts businesses especially restaurants or considering to help drive sales through the end of the year. We'll it's tough restaurants in you know the northern hemisphere because the cold weather is closing in. So they're having to become pretty creative and then the other thing that we're seeing of course is the fact that a lot of places now introducing new shutdown measures local level so some restaurants are doing things like that trying to push outdoor dining in space heaters and things like that and of course really pushing the curbside pickup and delivery options but it is definitely a very difficult time for those types of businesses. The service sector in person is really really struggling on the other hand you see a lot of businesses that already doing very well in the pandemic so for instance. Today we had the home depots earnings. And that's a company that has seen sales and earnings increase markedly because people are just staying at home. And they're spending money on improving their homes and on doing the painting the garage door and things like that so there are definitely winners and losers in this particular

Harriet Tori Amazon Corona Wall Street Journal United States Harry Brennan
"harriet" Discussed on Sidedoor

Sidedoor

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Sidedoor

"She's slender she's a much younger. Her hair is is wavy. She's wearing a beautiful dress or a skirt with a bodice. That is very sophisticated looking. The top of it is quite delicate on. It has many buttons down the front and the sleeves have rushed. She looks on graceful and she looks at home in her own skin and she's looking at the camera a very direct. Look if you look carefully at her eyes you see so much you see sadness and you see I see righteousness and I see the power. You see incredible power in her eyes. It's it's a very compelling photograph. So was that the moment way you say yes. I'll take on this project. Yeah if I if I hadn't Vocalized it at that moment. It was the next five minutes. Wait on the show In we wanted to bring young Harriet because this is the time in her life where she was doing her most exciting work. Her life lends itself inherently to an adventure story. Yes but we couldn't connect the image of her old almost kindly looking. Yeah but slightly stern to the stories we knew of her heroics and so that was important. It was like we wanted you to feel like you got to sit down with her at a time where she was really involved in incredibly heroic work life.

Harriet
"harriet" Discussed on Sidedoor

Sidedoor

09:45 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Sidedoor

"Is a person who periodically will fall completely unconscious and cannot be waked and also. She had religious trances she would fall into a trance and start kind of moaning to herself and swaying back and forth so she was Absolutely peculiar you know and I think that people might have doubted her but came to believe they met one of these very very special people who might be touched in some way it's visions began after. She sustained a head injury. She went into a market at on. The market was at a crossroads and An overseer pursued a slave who? We're not sure if this was a or not but He was somebody that was off the plantation at that moment and the former was furious and she stepped between them as as the former and whoever it was through a farm wheat from the counter at a brave woman right from the very beginning. And how long was she up because she was unconscious for a corrected usually have A. She was unconscious for quite a while and we know that her head was bleeding. It was cracked open and the kerchief honor head was driven into her head actually and And that they didn't wanNA bleeding all over the place and they put her in a in a room that had a some sort of loom in it and they sat her on the loom and arm and then she was made to work in the fields. And that the blood ran into her is So we know shortly afterwards. While she was still bleeding she was made to work in the fields. And then the vision started at that. Point yes She attributes this to the started her her visions And which are related to some sort of of seizures that she had and that she had as a result of this injury and which she thought brought her closer to God. I often looked at those pictures. And I'm not sure if I can see where the impact of that object hit her or there's always something a little bit better is I'm not sure if I'm making that up or whether you say that too we're not We're not sure exactly where it hit her. Oh thing that I used in. The movie was in very high resolution pictures. You see a mark between her eyes. And that's that's what I used in the film like Collor Hayden. Casey did not see the full measure of Herod Tubman in the famous portrait of her as an older woman. She has in her eyes in the eighteen. Eighty five portrait a deep sorrow. Yes and in her mouth. She has deep sorrow on her face. and one could almost see If we didn't know her story one might even see resignation but of course we know her story. We know it's not resignation at all so The the portrait itself can be misleading in terms of her character but then in two thousand and seventeen something happened that would rock the world of scholars and curator's alike. We began to hear whispers that another portrait of Todman had been found. A photograph lost to history for nearly one hundred and fifty years. I was part of really almost a discovery of the opportunity to see Harriet. Tubman in a new light coming up after a quick break. We hear how Carl Hayden came to collect such a treasured piece of history and Kim shares a suspicion that there might be more tubman photos out there waiting to be discovered love learning new things on side door. Here's something you might not know the Smithsonian relies on support from people like you to make all of the research discoveries exhibitions you hear about possible. Smithsonian are addressing critical issues in the field of science history art and culture issues that affect us all and you can be a part of it. A lot of people listen to side door. Imagine what we could learn next if everyone chipped in just a little find out how at SL that EDU slash contribute. We're back and when we left the ports episode we were hearing about how the Real Harriet. Tubman was a tough woman of action briefly leading troops and helping enslaved African Americans to freedom despite her small stature and serious injury so let's jump into the second segment of portraits. Here's Kim so it's two thousand seventeen and colleague gets coal and colleague on the other end says we have an opportunity to be part of a purchase with the New African American Museum. And so I'm listening and thing okay. And then the person said the first known photograph of Harriet. Tubman and I said what what do you mean? What type of photo? And they said it's it's she's young and that was really she young young as in approximately forty five years old. Carla couldn't believe her is what what do you mean young but said look like and where was it taking so I had a lot of questions so it was exciting and what it was was. The earliest known photograph. Ferret tablet dated from about eighteen. Sixty eight to sixty nine right when she was saying what had happened to her when she was being recorded. When people were recognizing after the civil war Lincoln had been killed. All of these things were going on and here is Harriet. Tubman as you've never seen her before and I remember the first time that I got a chance to really look at the photograph of his. Oh my God this is. This is the woman that led the troops and that was so forceful and it was a nurse and it did all of these things and was so determined. This is very tubman in her prime. The photograph was an album that the library of Congress eventually acquired jointly with the National Museum of African American history and culture at the Smithsonian. It had belonged to a quaker teacher named Emily Howland. Who worked at a Friedmans camp? Emily was also at odd abolitionist and to suffer just and she added photographs to the album over the years. Some family members many were friends and somewhere historical figures like Tubman. I asked Carla. Hayden felt when she saw Thomas new poetry with her own eyes. I'm in that position as Librarian of Congress which was already quite personally significant because professionally first female so you can imagine joy and mud Ville Mark Library being that champion or librarians. Yes however as a person of color to be. The Library of Congress was so personally significant and to be a descendant of people who were punished whipped. There were so many laws about people who looked like me learning to read to then be put in the position to be the head still hard to say that the fans up of the largest library in the world was just overwhelming. Yeah but to have the curator finally bring the item up to the office in a special room with and you can imagine. There were white gloves everywhere and anything because it was very fragile. The through the album itself was think about a pack of cards but very thick and the binding had was loose and it was fragile. You could tell but then to open it up and to have the carefully open it up and into see it there. She actually sat for that. And I'm looking at what came out of that camera in that process was something a copy of young. Harriet portrait also made its way to Hollywood innocence. His Director Casey Lemons again. I was in the office of a producer who had begun to talk to me about making a movie on Harriet Tubman and she showed me this picture that had surfaced that I had never seen before and It's not too much to say that. I fell in love when I saw this picture of Harriet. Tubman cases film focuses on the younger tubman escaping slavery and going back to rescue others. Cynthia revolt plays her as brave and determined but also warm and loving one of the things that I learned about Harriet and learned about her story. That was incredibly moving to me and that I did not know before was that. It's really a love story. Harriet was motivated by love. Love of her family love for husband. And then I'm rescuing people was connected to that. But almost incidental. It started with love.

Harriet Tubman Collor Hayden Smithsonian Casey Lemons Carla Kim Library of Congress Emily Howland Congress Todman Cynthia revolt New African American Museum Librarian of Congress Ville Mark Library National Museum of African Ame Lincoln Hollywood Director
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"Having me. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> I gotTa Bay <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> come the day <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> one <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> you can take. <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> You can take <Speech_Music_Female> Bob <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> Maso. <Music> You can take <Speech_Music_Female> man <Speech_Music_Female> you can take <Music> my <Speech_Music_Female> intake by <Music> <Music> God <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> goes <Speech_Music_Female> you know but <Speech_Music_Female> not <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> to me <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> be <Speech_Music_Female> a <Speech_Music_Female> wall <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> intake my <Speech_Music_Female> body you can take <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you can take <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> Bernard Bass <Music> <Advertisement> so you <Music> <Advertisement> can take <Music> <Advertisement> body intake <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> can take <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> bad. <Speech_Music_Male> Yup <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Fang <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> thing <Music> is clear <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> goes <Speech_Music_Female> to make you <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> can take. <Speech_Music_Female> You <Speech_Music_Female> can take <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> take <Music> <Music> <Music> you can take. <Music> You <Music> can take <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> so <Speech_Music_Male> you can take <Music> <Music> take <Music> you can take <Music> Bob <Music> Berg. <Music> <Music> Take <Music> intake <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <hes> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> Hello again <Speech_Music_Male> if you'd <Speech_Male> like to learn more about <Speech_Male> visiting places <Speech_Male> that tell the story <Speech_Male> of Harriet Tubman <Speech_Male> the underground <Speech_Male> railroad and <Speech_Male> the nineteenth century <Speech_Male> african-american experience <Speech_Male> especially <Speech_Male> in the state <Speech_Male> of Virginia <Speech_Male> good of Virginia Dot. Org <Speech_Music_Male> Slash <Speech_Music_Male> Harriet <Speech_Music_Male> special. <Speech_Male> Thanks to Rianne and <Speech_Male> Giddens. Who is currently <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on tour with her <Speech_Male> new album. Called <Speech_Music_Male> there is <Speech_Male> no other. <Speech_Male> It's a collaboration <Speech_Male> with Italian. Instrumentalists <Speech_Male> Francesco <Speech_Male> Teresi. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> And you can find <Speech_Male> all the information you <Speech_Male> need at Rianne. <Speech_Male> Giddens DOT <Speech_Male> COM following. <Speech_Male> Harry is a production <Speech_Male> by ingredient <Speech_Male> creative <Speech_Male> with Tanya Att <Speech_Male> as the writer and director <Speech_Male> and me Tanner <Speech_Male> Letham as <Speech_Music_Male> executive producer <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> and finally <Speech_Male> following. Harry <Speech_Male> is sponsored by <Speech_Male> the Virginia Tourism <Speech_Male> Corporation <Speech_Male> and <SpeakerChange> the Virginia <Speech_Music_Male> Film Office. <Music>

"harriet" Discussed on Behind The Screen

Behind The Screen

06:04 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Behind The Screen

"Terrance thank you so much for joining us than you have said that throughout the score of Harriet you wanted convey and I quote duality of her existence the strength of character and the grace by which she conducted herself would you elaborate on that war when you look at her life this is a woman our strong conviction but also a woman of strong faith and she would not allow herself to be treated any way but with respect and I love the line in the film what she says give me liberty or give me death you actually he really believe her he says that so I'm needed the music to show how powerful this diminutive person was you know but also show the grace by which she handled herself you know she didn't succumb to their level of treating people you know unjustly even in Harare's times she still relied on faith to carry her through all of this so I wanna music to kind of reflect both things the power and grace of her personality how did you do that would you elaborate on the way you approach the score and your instrument choices will pull it is in the Hamanaka progression that I used you know and the the way I voiced the harmony I tried to use a lot of fifth and fourth intervals in the harmony and use a lot of low brass to kind of convey at so in type strength but those things move and ah pleasant harmonic progression which kind of conveys the grace so when I was composing music you know I didn't want to be too forceful with it and some of the stronger passages you don't hear a lot of percussion you know the percussion is safer more of the transition aw passages you know when they're on the run when they're you know in the woods running from the attacks for me hostile always a universal story and I needed the music to broaden its reach you know I didn't want to write a score that was historically correct you know that that I had no interest in that because hostelry is something still resonates with people today you know and I needed the music to convey that because you know we're living in a time you know when we have the metoo movement going on you know we just have everything else that has gone on and out country right now right let's seems to be kind of crazy or we're not respecting people's thanks I needed the music to have a very broad reach so that's the reason why I use full orchestra in some areas The other reason why I did it is because we need to relate to these characters in different ways than we've related to them in the past a lot of times when we hear that full orchestra a person like Harriet Tubman is not the person that pops into your mind and I want to try to change that you know because we're all deserving you know our respect and she is definitely deserving of all of our respect and gratitude what orchestrated he is and where did you record recorded in Nashville Tennessee and we just contract it a bunch of great musicians to come in and play we also brought in a FOB Amazon the analyst been planning my band for a number of years to perform because he's just one of those uniquely gifted people that I just had to have on the score but Dan this film experience scoring it was unique in that everybody that performed on it felt has to be a part of it you know when we told them with the film was about and we would show them scenes you know people were just happy to be there you know we're just excited to be on the session and say that they had contributed to the film we we had a we had that's an interesting dinner one night we're Nashville Tennessee and trying to drown stereotype but we were in Nashville Tennessee and we went to dinner and there's a young lady who was the waitress and she asks us we started talking Geno compensation you know we go okay so what are you guys here for all we're recording music oh what for moving okay was the movie and we say Harriet Tubman and this young lady she must have been maybe twenty one the two jumped up and down slow screaming I've been waiting for somebody to do something on how on how life you know and I'm going wow that was refreshing because to me it speaks to the power of Harriet that it crosses generations it is hot story is one of strengthen grace key coming back to those two words because you know it's what we're really lacking and our country right now in terms of leadership I should say you know wrentham grace and that's the reason why I feel blessed to be a part of the film because it's one of those moments in time is one of those projects that don't come on often let's listen to some of your music we're going to start with the opening title Heriot's theme would you introduce it sure you know what's interesting about the opening title it actually comes from one of the latest scenes in the film when she's crossing the water because that moment to me was such a powerful moment and when I played it for Casey you know Casey loved it and a central little demo of it and she took it and put it in front of the film the opening and I'm like oh I didn't think it would work there but it works perfectly this oh that's how I became going fell.

Terrance Harriet
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"And so when you sit back and you sort of think about someone. Managing to emancipate close to a thousand people. You know it's breathtaking and that was Harriet. Tubman as we learn about Harriet. We not only peer into the incredible life of one of our country's most iconic heroes. We also get a better understanding of the broader experience for African Americans in the nineteenth century on the next episode. We traveled to museums throughout Virginia and to the presidential homes of Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. To hear how the stories of that African American experience are being told today mulberry. Row is the plantation main street of Monticello where all of the Industrial Labor to place Jefferson and his lifetime. Enslaved over six hundred people. We also knew that we needed to own the fact that our Guy James Madison political genius father the Constitution you know author of the bill of Rights this guy codified the institution of slavery. I'm Celeste Headley and we're following Harriet. If you'd like to learn more about visiting places that tell the story of Harriet Tubman the underground railroad and the nineteenth century African American experience especially in the state of Virginia. Go to Virginia Dot org slash. Carry it in this episode. We heard from several historians Eric Armstrong Dunbar. From Rutgers University Catherine Clinton from the University of Texas San Antonio Jessica millward of the University of California Irvine and L. Patrice Belches Harriet Tubman was portrayed by Krista while rock we had production assistance from Kenny Burns. More curry she ended to Loria and Miranda fillmore following. Harriet is a production by ingredient creative with Tanya aunt as the writer and director. And Tanner Letham as executive producer following. Harriet is sponsored by the Virginia Tourism Corporation and Virginia Film Office. He's Kinda hard not to say. Goodness Gracious. This woman was real. You know she was. She was bad just a bad ass and he can. He says we're back up in some parts. I some ways. I decided not to call her. Bad has sort of reverence just two. I'm in sort of thinking about what my grandmother would say. If she read a book that I wrote in which I called. Harriet Tubman a bad ass sheets. Eric what are you talking about? Watch your mouth. That's like honestly that's the first thing that popped into. That's my my sensibilities as a sort of middle aged black woman who grew up with a black grandmother going to church. That usually don't say those things especially about your elders. And even though that's you know the phrase of the term has we you know we use that now as as a symbol or a sign of respect I know. I kind of decided to to listen to Elsie Armstrong in my in my head and to call her boss lady more frequently..

Harriet Tubman L. Patrice Belches Harriet Tub Virginia Eric Armstrong Dunbar James Madison Harriet Tanner Letham Thomas Jefferson Elsie Armstrong Celeste Headley Virginia Film Office Rutgers University Virginia Tourism Corporation Monticello University of California Irvin Kenny Burns Catherine Clinton University of Texas San Antoni Jessica millward
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

08:42 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"In a shorter way when people ask what caused the civil war. We say it's complicated comma slavery. You know it's a question Stephanie. Weenie GETS A lot. She's the director of education at the American Civil War Museum in Richmond. It's part of the historic tredegar ironworks complex which supplied about half of the artillery used by the confederate states army as well as the iron plating for the Virginia the first confederate ironclad warship. And we hear lots of misconceptions coming out about the cause of the war which ninety nine percent of those go back to the idea of reason slavery so if it was about state's rates was about states rights to own leave people. If it was about the idea of well slavery was dying out anyway. No actually growing and expanding it's our country would not exist without the institution of slavery by the time of the civil war. There's almost four million people in the south in slavery again historian Ed Ayers and you know. We know the story of uncle. Tom's cabin escaping across the Ohio River and so forth the great majority of and slay people would have been so far from any possibility of escape through walking or through any means. Frankly sometimes you teach young people and they said well. I wouldn't have stayed well. It would have been almost impossible to escaped from most of the south in the places that have the largest plantations are in the interior the black belt of Alabama Mississippi or they are secluded like the sugar plantations that we see in twelve years. A slave important thing to remember too is that slavery varied a great deal across the south and many of the young men who were sold out of Virginia or Maryland would have been shipped to Louisiana there. The sugar plantations prefer to hire over ninety percent. Men and the women that would buy would be just barely old enough to bear children and we'd be expected to bear children until they could no longer do so. The infant mortality rate there and in the South Carolina low country where they grew rice boggles our imagination but as the civil war dragged on and the union pushed deeper south. The cracks start to show. Just look at what happened at Fort Monroe Virginia in eighteen sixty one two hundred fifty years earlier. It was known as Point Comfort. Remember that from the beginning of the episode the place where the first enslaved Africans to set foot in what would become the United States were traded for food and supplies. How fitting that. This place would be one of the first to offer. Enslaved people refuge during the civil war so this is the main the central entry point to the historical fortification at Fort Monroe. Maingate would have been staffed. It is actually likely the spot where bigger towns in eighteen sixty one three enslaved men Baker Townsend and Mallory showed up at the main gate of Fort Monroe it was the largest stone fort in the country and it was surrounded by what is essentially a moat. You'll dance of the colonial national historic park. Picks up the story from there. They were being used by the confederate army to construct dishes. And you know. Lightweight fortifications Adjacent to Fort Monroe. They made note. That Virginia seceded from the Union. And on that very night they decided to take that risk in seek their freedom and they came here to form row. It happened to be the Second day that General Butler was here and had taken command and he was confronted with this decision. He had to interestingly enough. He had contemplated in the past the ability to keep freedom seekers and had not found argument that he thought we'd be justified or sustained but upon learning the way that these enslaved men were being used he felt confident he could argue him being a lawyer that they were Weapon being used against the Union army and therefore could be retained as contraband of War. This led to thousands of freedom seekers arriving not only at Portman Road but at other union camps and forts throughout the country and guess who else spent some time at Fort Monroe our hero. Harriet Tubman. So we're standing here at Algernon Oak Astronaut oak is a witness tree In that is a tree that would have been here two as a witness or to observe And been part of that experience of the past so when you think in terms of the place where history happened. This tree is believed to be at least four hundred years old so the potential that it witnessed arrival of English settlers they rival of Africans as well as witnessing Harriet Tubman. Will we know that there is a memorandum from the War Department? That's dated April. Twenty second eighteen sixty five and that's authorizing for free government transport for Harriet. Tubman to come to former so we know that she's here in the spring of sixty five because she has the ability to get here at the cost of the United States government. That's Robin Reid. I'm the director of the case. May Museum here at Fort. Monroe the next thing we know about Harry Todd minutes that the surgeon general of the United States vk barn since communication to the chief medical officer here on the Virginia Department primarily to instruct him to appoint Harry is either a nurse or a matron here at Fort Monroe It is our understanding that she was anticipating serving as Grand Matron at the hospital and that is not the role that she ended up playing see cooked. She did laundry. How long does she stay? We don't know that way. We suspect a couple of months. Because there's no records after that. It's a complex and complicated shared history. Our United States of America. You could be forgiven if you didn't know that James Madison had slaves or Harriet. Tubman was a union soldier. That's because those kinds of details are often left out or lost as were taught a certain narrative about our country but visit places in Virginia. Like Monticello Montpellier and the American Civil War Museum and you'll see how that narrative has evolved to be much more inclusive and two more honestly reflect the reality of our history but when you think of it as the making of America and a shared narrative that we all were experiencing and our ancestors all had to make some really difficult choices. You really begin to understand how important that history is to us today. And that's where we go in our final episode of following. Harriet will pull Harriet Story. And the story of the African American experience in Nineteenth Century America right through to the present. We'll talk about why a movie like Harriet. And how it depicts. The way she lived her life is so important to us as Americans at this time. It's really easy to think about slavery as this monolithic that happened. Twelve million people two hundred years ago that we can kind of ood. That was bad. It happened it's over. I don't really have to process that too much right. Is this thing that happened. I can't really think about it too. Detailed how could you not want to examine the lives of enslaved people? When you're examining history. It doesn't make any sense to me. If you'd like to learn more about visiting places that tell the story of Harriet Tubman the underground railroad and the nineteenth century African American experience especially in the state of Virginia. Go to Virginia Dot org slash. Harriet in this episode. We heard from Ula dance and Robin Reid from Fort. Monroe Historians Ed Ayers of the backstory history podcast and Elvis belches Ni- abates and Gail jessop white from Jefferson's Monticello Christian coats from Madison's Monpellier and Stephanie are to any of the American civil war museum following Harriet is a production by ingredient creative with Tanya ought as the writer and director and tenor Letham as executive producer following. Harriet is sponsored by the Virginia Tourism Corporation and Virginia Film.

Harriet Tubman Harriet Virginia Fort Monroe American Civil War Museum United States confederate states army Fort Monroe Virginia director Ed Ayers Robin Reid Stephanie Union James Madison Union army Harriet Story tredegar ironworks
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> nine. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Show <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> a <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> world <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> a <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I'm Celeste. Headley <Speech_Female> and this is <Speech_Female> following. <SpeakerChange> Harriet <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> if you'd <Speech_Female> like to learn more about <Speech_Female> visiting places <Speech_Female> that tell the story <Speech_Female> of Harriet tubman <Speech_Female> underground railroad <Speech_Female> and the nineteenth <Speech_Female> century African <Speech_Female> American experience <Speech_Female> especially <Speech_Female> in the state of Virginia. <Speech_Female> Go to <Speech_Female> Virginia Dot Org <Speech_Music_Female> Slash Harriet. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> In this episode <Speech_Female> we heard <Speech_Female> from historians. Ed <Speech_Female> Ayers Elva <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Tree spellcheck <Speech_Female> Jessica millward <Speech_Music_Female> Catherine Clinton <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and Eric <Speech_Female> Armstrong Dunbar. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Catherine <Speech_Female> rooted deeply researched <Speech_Female> biography <Speech_Female> of Harriet called. <Speech_Female> Harriet Tubman. <Speech_Female> The road to freedom <Speech_Female> and Erica <Speech_Female> has a new book out called. <Speech_Female> She came <Speech_Female> to slay <Speech_Female> the life and <SpeakerChange> times of <Music> <Advertisement> Harriet Tubman. <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> We also <Speech_Music_Female> heard from NY <Speech_Music_Female> abates and Gail <Speech_Music_Female> jessop white from <Speech_Music_Female> Jefferson's Monticello <Speech_Music_Female> Christian <Speech_Music_Female> coats. For Madison's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Montpellier <Speech_Music_Female> Stephanie Arte Weenie <Speech_Music_Female> of the American <SpeakerChange> Civil <Music> War Museum. <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> Casey <Speech_Female> Lemons director of the <Speech_Female> new focus features <Speech_Female> bio-pic called <Speech_Female> Harriet. <Speech_Female> And Malcolm Jamie <Speech_Female> Jamieson. <Speech_Female> Who owns the Berkley <Speech_Female> Plantation? Where <Speech_Female> parts of the film were <Speech_Female> shot. <Speech_Female> Special research <Speech_Female> thanks to the <Speech_Female> Black History Museum <Speech_Female> in Richmond and <Speech_Female> the city of Petersburg <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Virginia and <Speech_Female> the Petersburg <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> preservation task force. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> We <Speech_Female> had production assistance <Speech_Music_Female> from Derek <Speech_Music_Female> Clements. Ken <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Burns more a curry. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Shannon Loria <Speech_Music_Female> and Miranda full <Music>

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"Historian. Ed Ayers lives in Charlottesville. Anyone who's lived in Virginia or even visited Virginia in Charlottesville would have been shocked that Charlottesville of all places would have been the place where this terrible drama played out Charlottesville acquainted with either Thomas Jefferson or with today and wineries and things right. There was an absence of continuing story of how Charlottesville had evolved. I think that the people of unite the right took advantage of that. Md Zhou to come to Charlottesville and claim the mantle of Thomas Jefferson and then claim the mantle of Robert e Lee anonymously standing in the middle of this beautiful college town. Because people didn't they CHARLOTTESVILLE could ever have such a thing precisely because it was so liberal and enlightened Mister Jefferson University Mr Jefferson's town and frankly very progressive in its politics. Monticello is director of African American history. Ni- abates you know. I think we're living through an interesting political moment. Where for me as a black woman? It is very difficult to do this job every day and to read about the brutality and acted upon these in slate families to read examples of Jefferson's overseers being violent of beating a child who was sick until he couldn't stand up. I mean sometimes reading those things and then going home and seeing the news about what is still going on in society The ways that the legacy of slavery are still carrying out some days. It's it's a lot harder than others to keep it together so I will say most of the time I leave feeling like the work that we're doing is improving the world and those are the best days right that The work that we do here to tell stories about our past and the roots of our nation in slavery Help us understand a moment that we're living in and help us see how easy it is to perhaps Slip back into a time that was unjust for a lot of people and how a lot of our current injustices stemmed from slavery. So we're are we. What can we learn from the life of Harriet Tubman? How does it apply today to understand? What Abraham Lincoln or Harriet Tubman accomplished we need to have a full accounting of what they up against? This is not political correctness. This is not just telling you this because somebody else expects me to. It's the truth and it's the fuller story and it expands the cast of characters and it expands. Our imagining of what America has been in some ways. It makes you appreciate where we are now. We can learn so much from the enslaved experience. First and foremost we can learn that. We are extremely privileged. We can learn that if our iphone doesn't work or if our car isn't working that pales in comparison to not being able to have power over your own body I think it's invaluable to know or expand the narratives as it relates to the black experience We know about the horrors of enslavement and the slave trade. But we also know about the triumphs in the midst of tragedies. These accomplishments in the face of adversity are important. They're not important just for black Americans but they're important because they serve as a source of inspiration for all. I think it's good to be reminded of what can be achieved if you're courage outweighs your fear. So that's that's what I take away if think it the we bow under the weight of the world and and It just seems too much. The problems are too insurmountable. But when you look at a story of what one? Young woman achieved just by being brave. She wasn't fearless go. She had fear but she had determination and her courage outweighed her fear. And I think that's what we need in this time right now. Courage needs to outweigh our fear and we need to believe that through force of will we can change things. We can change our country.

Charlottesville Thomas Jefferson Harriet Tubman Mister Jefferson University Virginia Ed Ayers Md Zhou Robert e Lee Monticello director America Abraham Lincoln
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"To settle the estate his widow began working to sell all their slaves. Three of airmont is sisters. Were sold south. This was likely the moment that spurred her to action. There was one of two things I had a right to liberty or death. If I could not have one I would have the other on September Seventeenth. Eighteen forty nine. Harriet and her brothers Ben and Henry ran away from the farm historian. Erica Armstrong Dunbar. The plan was to escape toward Philadelphia and at some point. Her brothers decided that it was a bad idea got scared they were concerned. They did know if they could actually make it and they decided that they would rather face punishment and even the possibility of sale. Maybe hoping that if they were sold away from their family it would be to a nearby farm or plantation. They decided that risk was a better option than taking their chances in the woods being chased by bounty hunters and dogs and they decided to return and while their sister did not want to return. They forced her dragged her back on. It's really this sort of moment in her life that you know man would ever sort of determine direction again so when they return and they're sort of awaiting their fate. Harriet Tubman makes the decision that she would not sit around and wait and she alone took to the woods and escaped in the late fall of eighteen forty nine. She evaded capture and made it all the way to Philadelphia. When I found I had crossed that line I looked at my hands to see if I was the same person. There was such a glory over everything. The Sun came like gold through the trees and over the field and I felt like I was in heaven..

Harriet Tubman Philadelphia Erica Armstrong Dunbar Henry Ben
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"A building factories and and develop in the economy but that debate loses and historian at air says things start to turn planters and other white people really worried about what those free black people might be doing. They might be doing this thing. Called learning to read and to be able to preach the Gospel to themselves and that's what Nat Turner does. He reads the Bible. He says we are the children of Israel. We are the people who are held in bondage. That have God's favor and the time is going to come now when we shall free ourselves as the people of the Old Testament after Nat Turner's rebellion in eighteen. Thirty one wearing slaved men used knives hatchets axes to kill more than fifty white people. Virginians never again publicly discussed emancipation. Life CARRIED ON FREE. Blacks built businesses. They were barbers. Tailors and lumbermen. Enslaved people also had dreams but far fewer options historian and documentary filmmaker Elvis belches recalls the story of Henry Box Brown who worked at one of the myriad tobacco factories in Richmond Virginia. So while Hillary Brown was at work someone got word to him that his wife had indeed been sold along with at least a couple of the kids but if he wanted to see her one last time. The slave cough cough is a chain of human beings. Oftentimes the were connected by chains and or ropes. And so as he was told. Mr Brown waited on that street for that coffee to come by. Finally he spotted his wife. She was able to step out just a little bit because she was connected to the person before and behind her and as I understand it from his memoirs they clasped hands and he was able to walk with her for perhaps four miles before they had to part never saw his wife and again at that point he was ready to answer the call to freedom having lost his family and so with the next year with the help of Atoms Express. He was placed into a wooden box and he. This was a man who was about six feet tall average science mail. He was nailed into a box. That was about three feet one inch by two and a half feet by two feet. He had maybe three breathing holes and as he described it a little bladder of water and a few biscuits they painted on their this side up but as it is today it didn't mean anything been told. There are times where he was on his head upside down for hours. Not Knowing if he would live or die that evolved into a twenty six hour trip by various means of transportation carriage ride train. Is I understand. In vessel to get to Philadelphia. They were getting a little anxious up there because they knew to wait on him. Finally the boxer right. They prided open thinking that they were probably see. Maybe a deceased person. But once they brought it opened he popped up and stated however you all gentlemen and then he broke into a song of praise thanking God. They said he was so drenched with perspiration that he looked like he had just come out of the Delaware River just a few years after Henry. Box Brown mailed himself north. Everything changes. We'll have that after the break..

Hillary Brown Nat Turner Henry Box Brown cough Delaware River Israel Elvis belches Philadelphia Atoms Express Richmond Virginia
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"I'm Celeste headline and this is following. Harriet in the last episode. We left Harriet story hanging. She was called the Fort Monroe to serve as Grand Matron of the hospital that treated contraband formerly enslaved people who'd escaped to freedom but when she arrived she was quickly put to work cooking and doing laundry. She stayed for just a couple of months. And there's no official record of any additional work with the Union army after that we know. She settled into a quieter life in Auburn New York surrounded by her parents and family. She fell in love with a bricklayer. Who was two decades younger than her and they married and adopted a baby girl named Gertie. Harriet worked as a domestic and saved money to open up the Harriet Tubman home. A place for elderly and indigent F. Americans and she was a suffrage EST when the war ended at the amendments to the constitution were passed and ratified the last being the the Fifteenth Amendment. Giving black men the right to vote many of Harriet Tubman allies. Old Friends. White women were infuriated. They were infuriated. That black men were given the right to vote before them. Rutgers historian Erica Armstrong Dunbar. And there's this sort of interesting relationship that Harriet Tubman has with white suffragettes. These were many of these selfridge's were abolitionists of old. They were people who gave support to have men both financially and helped her with her family members with her parents and so even though they on occasion dispels ideas that were less than progressive regarding the right to vote. Tubman was I think generational a a bit of a bit of a sort of sandwich. She was someone who respected and really connected to in some ways. White Women abolitionists people like Susan B. Anthony and others. She was a part of their organizations. She would speak at their events but it became increasingly difficult to do that. As black women became much more sort of aggravated and in some some ways infuriated with what appeared to be a mounting white suffragette movement among women a movement. That didn't appear to have a place for black women Well I would say that. I probably have a contrarian view of that because I think that Harriet Tubman saw herself as a champion of African Americans her race. Catherine Clinton is a historian at the University of Texas San Antonio and author of the biography here at Tubman. The ROAD TO FREEDOM. She was a champion also of African American women and other women and I believe during her lifetime she reached across the color line she reached across the gender line and she worked quite well in many different domains. I think she wasn't someone who worked. Within the concept that African American women needed a separate movement. The strategy of suffragettes in the eighteen nineties was to bow to racism and to allow for this southern suffrage strategy which was to pander or promote white racism in suggests that women needed the vote because women was intended that time to exclude black women because the inclusion of white women in the vote would allow for white women to secure a better electorate which would not allow the indigent the uninformed the quote colored races to participate on the ballot so white women in the south definitely used racist principles to advance the cause of suffrage. The racial rift came to a head in March of nineteen thirteen in Washington. Dc At an event organized by the National American Woman Suffrage Association. It was the first suffrage parade in the nation's capital on the day of the event. More than sixty black women who had travelled from Illinois were told they'd have to march in the back so they wouldn't upset the southern delegates pioneering investigative journalists and early civil rights activists. Ib Wells Barnett. Refused to do that and she says to to the delegation of Illinois. I'm either going to march with you or not marching all and so it's interesting that we have right at the moment in which. Tubman is really almost lane on her. On her deathbed that the push for suffrage would continue and it would continue with this very kind of divisive and tense relationship between black and white. Suffrage is a relationship that never really mended itself to be perfectly honest on March tenth nineteen thirteen Harriet. Tubman died of pneumonia in Auburn New York surrounded by family and friends. She was about ninety years old just before she died. She told those in the room. I go to prepare a place for you. Tubman.

Harriet Tubman Harriet Tubman home Harriet National American Woman Suffra Susan B. Anthony Auburn New York Fort Monroe Union army Gertie selfridge Erica Armstrong Dunbar official Washington Rutgers Illinois Dc Catherine Clinton Wells Barnett University of Texas San Antoni
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"Most of US enter Harriet. Tubman is life when she was in her thirties forties fifties and often times. We don't sort of think about how she came to be. Harriet I'm Celeste. Headley and this is following Harriet. You know I think for people of my generation people who grew up in the nineteen seventies. We first met Harriet in a photo in the corner of textbook she looked old. Her skin was stretched tight on her face. Her mouth was pinched. Her head was wrapped in a dark. Kerchief we read a couple of paragraphs about how she freed herself from slavery and then became a conductor in the underground railroad. She saved the lives of many other. People guided them safely from slavery to freedom. That was it. That was the whole story. We were told but Harriet. Tubman was so much more than a small woman with a lantern in the woods. She was a wife and mother an entrepreneur. A soldier spy nurse and an activist who fought for women's right to vote. I can honestly say after working on this project. She's really one of the most incredible and brave individuals. I've ever come across. That's Erica Armstrong Dunbar. She's a history professor at Rutgers University. And she's got a new book coming out called. She came to slay the life and times of Harriet Tubman. Erica says in the beginning. Harriet wasn't even Harriet. She was era. Minta or minty as her family called her her parents. Were Harry Green and Ben Ross. And they were both enslaved on the eastern shore of Maryland. They had at least nine children and era. Minta was in the middle born sometime around. Eighteen twenty to one of the things about enslavement. Was that the sale of slaves. The forced movement in migration always left enslaved families vulnerable. And we see that happen for Herod Ben. At a certain point they're separated and tear it is forced to move with her children including Eremita To another farm ten miles away from her husband they would continue to see one another to remain connected but they didn't live together and it was really sort of at that moment that we begin to see. Just how fragile. The lives of enslaved people were airmen to was rented out when she was still a child before she even had a full set of adult teeth. She was pressed to learn how to weave patterns. That would have been difficult for an adult. She was forced to empty the Muskrat traps on one of the farms where she lived. She did domestic work. Getting up very early carrying large loads of water to and from the house Plucking chickens making soap work that that never ended and she was expected to do this no matter her health she got the measles. When she was a small child emptying Muskrat traps and she was still expected to work and on occasion she would come back to her mother's The farm on which her mother lived in would be nursed back to health and then she would be sent out once again to work. When era MINTA was around five? She was hired out to a family who wanted her to help care for their infant. Catherine Clinton is a historian at the University of Texas San Antonio and author of the biography here at Tubman the road to freedom and there were incidents where she recalled that the moment the baby began to cry. The mother instead of reaching for her baby might reach for a switch in order to we. Harriet for letting the baby cry because it was her charge to keep the baby quiet. This shows the kind of abuses the enslaved endured under slavery at a certain point when Arrow MINTA had been hired out. She's we would call her a a tweet her. She was Somewhere between the ages of twelve and fifteen or sixteen and she went for what was supposed to be a quick errand to general store. The local store and It was clear that an enslaved man who lived on a nearby farm was in the act of. We're not certain if it was escape. Or if he was simply running away from an angry overseer someone who was angered by the fact that this enslaved and had created some infraction of the rules and he was chasing him and They run into this general store at the moment. That era mint is there. And overseer says to airmen's editor mandates that she help subdue this man and to help tie up his hands and she refuses. We sort of think about this moment where she perhaps it's her first stance against slavery.

Harriet Tubman Arrow MINTA Erica Armstrong Dunbar Minta US Headley Maryland Rutgers University Ben Ross editor Catherine Clinton Harry Green University of Texas San Antoni
"harriet" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"harriet" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Passenger though, she might be most famous for leading those nighttime escapes through the underground railroad. Harriet Tubman went on to take an increasingly active role in dismantling American slavery over the coming decades. We'll talk about Harry, it's later years and the groundbreaking role. She played in the civil war right after this. Now back to the story in the late eighteen fifties as the United States headed toward an inevitable civil war Harriet, Tubman came to be known as the most successful agent of the underground railroad. It was around eighteen fifty eight when thirty eight year old Harriet met, the famous abolitionist or at our and writer Frederick Douglas. Douglas, it escaped slavery himself some years before and became a leader in the anti slavery movement. He introduced Harriet Tubman to John Brown, a radical white abolitionist who believed the only way to end slavery was through. Violent insurrection Brown and Tubman immediately developed a mutual respect for one another John Brown called Harriet general Tubman and look to her for advice on recruiting escape slaves to his 'cause they'll Harriet did not necessarily share John Brown's beliefs. She supported his goals and through eighteen fifty nine helped him plan an attack on the weapons depot at Harper's ferry Virginia. Brown hope to steal the weapons and use them to arm slaves who could then rise up against their owners and fight for their freedom Harriet used her knowledge of the south and her network of contacts to find support for Brown's plans. Unfortunately, the attack on harpers ferry was a failure. And John Brown was captured and Hong for his actions days after his capture. Brown's home was raided and several incriminating documents were confiscated which implicated his co-conspirators Harriet Tubman. Was one of those named in the documents making her continued abolitionist activities even more dangerous despite this Harriet risk traveling to Boston on December second eighteen fifty nine to be with John Brown's friends on the day of his execution. Brown was a man whom Harriet truly respected and his death hitter, particularly hard..

Harriet general Tubman John Brown Frederick Douglas harpers ferry United States Harry Virginia writer Boston Harper Hong thirty eight year
"harriet" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"harriet" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Harriet Tubman home for the aged was now open things did not start off the way Harriet hope though as the church implem-. Entity hundred dollar entrance fee for anyone wishing to be admitted inherit Harry would later say about this fee. Quote, they make a rule that nobody should come in. Without they have one hundred dollars. Now. I wanted to make a rule that nobody should come in unless they didn't have no money at all. Again, lava by nineteen eleven along a hard life finally was taking a toll inherits body. She's now at least eighty six years old frail and sickly she's admitted to the rest home named in her honor. She would spend the next two years of her life there until she finally succumbed to pneumonia and died on March tenth nineteen thirteen surrounded by those she loved before she passed. She told everybody in the room. I got a excuse me. She told everybody in the room. I go to prepare a place for you thinking of others right to the very end. She will be buried in fort hill cemetery in Auburn New York with military honors and that takes us out of today's times time. Good job soldier made it back. Ben. Man, Herod motherfucking tub and what a life. She led started from nothing started really from you know, with less than nothing. She started her life, technically as property, can you imagine that start with you life in someone else's hands. You know in this country and slaved legally beholden to the whims. And wishes of another another who walked free, you know with their family. You know, while you didn't get to be free with yours. Let's look at some stats really quick to show. Just go remind everyone like the scope of slavery in Harry. It's you know, when when she was born how many meet sacks just like Harriet were tragically enslaved in the history of the trans Atlantic slave trade. Fifteen twenty five eighteen twenty six or I'm sorry. Sorry. Eighteen sixty six twelve and a half million Africans were shipped the new world of them ten point seven million survived. The dreaded middle passage disembarking in North America. The Caribbean South America only about skews me only about three hundred eighty eight thousand we're transport directly from Africa to North America. The vast majority were taking to central and South America and the Caribbean. Think about that hundreds of thousands taking the United States, and then their children became slaves, and then their grandchildren, dating, great, grandchildren, etc. Cetera. And then by eighteen sixty there would be.

Harriet Tubman South America North America Harry Harriet Caribbean fort hill cemetery United States Herod Auburn New York pneumonia Africa one hundred dollars eighty six years hundred dollar two years