35 Burst results for "Harriet"

Black Gun Ownership Rises Amid Pandemic, Protests For Racial Justice

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:30 min | 2 weeks ago

Black Gun Ownership Rises Amid Pandemic, Protests For Racial Justice

"A record number of Americans have purchased guns this year including Black Americans from K. N. UNC in northern Colorado Lee. Patterson reports that incidents of violence against people of color have pushed some to purchase guns for the very first time and warning to our listeners. There are sounds of gunfire in this story. What type of gun is? So this is a Smith and Wesson nine millimeter shield cat trailer bought her handgun this past spring these as she practices at an indoor range with her husband like it's no big deal. But talking through her mask trailer describes how she felt the first time she pulled the trigger is beyond terrified shaking. Hands were sweaty. Trailer is a democratic political consultant who lives in Colorado. At first, she was nervous cleaning and shooting her new gun. And she had a bad experience, the first range she went to she says people were staring she felt unwelcome. Still regardless of the anxiety I had around. All those things. I got into this because I feel like it was necessarily trailer I started thinking about buying a gun when she saw empty grocery store shelves at the beginning of the pandemic. Then she watched racial justice protests unfold across the country. She started thinking about pushback from people who disagree with those efforts if it looks like communities, of Color and people that support communities of color are rising up against white supremacy that could be a problem for us is. It's probably time probably time for them to buy guns a thought that many other Americans have also had in. August. Alone people bought one point eight million firearms according to industry estimates a trade group called the National Shooting Sports Foundation reports the gun sales to customers have grown more percentage wise than for any other racial or ethnic group. With. Her New gun trailer wants to feel like she has a chance during a home invasion or an encounter with police. What we as the family had to determine is, how do we WANNA die? Instead of look at it that way. DO WE WANNA die not being prepared or at least trying to protect ourselves. That's how you weigh that as part of becoming a new gun owner trailer joined the National African American Gun Association Philip Smith is the founder nationally across the board from all over every state. We have people joining all times a day night. You know I I thought something was wrong with computer. Smith was watching membership numbers rise after the death of George Floyd may but black people have been using guns for hunting and protection for a long time historian say that Harriet Tubman carried firearms so did the Black Panthers in the nineteen sixties these days according to a Gallup poll released last year nineteen percent of black people own guns. Smith says his members are not monolithic. Some women join because they've been sexually assaulted some women join because they wanNA teach you some men join because they want to just get really good at self defense people are joining now for different. Reasons some want to support the National African American Gun Association Financially Smith says for others it's more spiritual I. Think people were looking for a home a place where you can kind of event you can belong where you felt your mind having a relief of some sort Bruce Tomlin a truck driver who lives in New Mexico describes his decision to buy a gun response to stress. I'll just say amounting society He felt that way after watching cellphone video showing the death of Ahmad arbitrary a black man who was shot while jogging through neighborhood in Georgia earlier this year don't. Go around arm the rest of my life. That's because he's been feeling under attack for years after the two thousand, twelve killings of Trayvon Martin, for example, and after the mass shooting at a black church in Charleston in two thousand, fifteen by a white supremacist goes like I can just be mine them all business. And if somebody who's a racist, just decide to roll up on me gun meet down. As is decided that like if I go out I'M GONNA go out shooting back. But now that he's an actual gun owner, it's not so straightforward day to day of feel like I can defend myself better defend my loved ones. But I usually get comfortable having it sometime he does not want to kill or injure anyone open carry makes them nervous I would never take my gone to the grocery store and carry around inside or anything like that. But on the other hand I could be in a situation where needed still out in the car or whatever I just like knowing that I have it gun ownership is complicated for Tomlin especially because he's black if he was stopped by police says, he probably wouldn't tell them that he had a gun. And catch trailer says the same thing giving the example of philander casteel he was shot during a traffic stop for years ago in Minnesota after telling an officer that he had a firearm, his car casteel did have a permit to carry it. Cat Trailer believes that gun cost him his life we're not given a fair shake when these conversations are happening automatically worsen tensions are assumed just because we're black, we're gun owners for both of these new black gun owners. It's an identity that comes with risks, but does make them feel safer for

National African American Gun Philip Smith Colorado Bruce Tomlin Cat Trailer National Shooting Sports Found Black Panthers Patterson K. N. Unc Ahmad Harriet Tubman Consultant George Floyd New Mexico Minnesota Trayvon Martin Officer Charleston
White GWU professor at Washington DC's GWU admits she falsely claimed Black identity

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 2 weeks ago

White GWU professor at Washington DC's GWU admits she falsely claimed Black identity

"It's an unusual confession tonight from a history professor at George Washington University in a blogger Post today, Jessica Krug says that she has lied about being black. Krug wrote that throughout her adult life, she claimed to have North African African American and Caribbean heritage but is in fact white and Jewish. She says her appropriation of black identity was unethical, immoral and anti black. Kruger is an expert in African American history, imperialism and colonialism and is a finalist for both the Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass Book prize is, she says she's battled unaddressed mental health problems since she was a child when she first began claiming a false identity. Krug, right. She believes in can't cancel culture and that she should absolutely be canceled. But she did not say whether she would rot a resign now from G W.

Jessica Krug Harriet Tubman George Washington University Frederick Douglass Professor Kruger
White college professor admits she lied about being Black

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

White college professor admits she lied about being Black

"And unusual confession this evening from a history professor at George Washington University in a blogger Post today, Jessica Krug says that she lied about bleep being black crew growth and throughout her adult life she claimed to have North African, African American and Caribbean heritage. But is in fact white and Jewish. She says her appropriation of black identity was unethical, immoral and anti black. Kruger is an expert in African American history, imperialism and colonialism and is a finalist for both the Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass book prices. She says she's battled unaddressed mental health issues since she was a child. When she first began claiming a false identity, Krug writes that she believes in cancel culture and that she should absolutely be cancelled. But she did not say whether she would resign from the school.

Jessica Krug Harriet Tubman George Washington University Frederick Douglass Professor Kruger
Voting Mechanisms And AI

Data Skeptic

04:49 min | 3 weeks ago

Voting Mechanisms And AI

"Steven Hi I'm professor RTP OF MATHEMATICS AT USC University of Southern California Excellent, and tell me a little bit about your general interest within mathematics. Before we get into the particular paper, I wanted to talk to you about a few different topics generally speaking probability probability generally construed its relation to computer science in particular theoretical computer science. Would we wind up somewhere near what is it Polynot mealtime? Generators. I don't know about a number. Generous. Followed meal time things more specifically clavo problem that can't be solved in polynomial time, and then you WANNA approximated solution in USA. How well can approximate? How can I prove that? This is the best. You can do things like that under the general category of hardness of approximation suppose why knowing lot of those cases you have one benefit may be many but benefiting a lot of problems. Like that is you can tell if a solution is valid or you have some function you're trying to optimize for I. Don't know if the same is true in voting. Is there a global way that we'd all agree that the outcomes are good or the processes? Good. Maybe that's a good way to get into your topic designing stable elections. Exactly. I mean there's a lot of A. Link to Wikipedia Pedia page somewhere it's a table and it has a list of desirable properties voting methods and there's at least maybe ten or twenty cents properties and it's impossible to have all the desirable properties no matter which voting method you have there's always gonna be some that has some that a dozen but the one property that myself and many other people who focus is how can the voting method be protected from corruption and that could be mostly what people in this community of worked on is looking at random vote corruption. So everybody cast their vote and then Tyson with some small probability they will randomly. Change some votes, and then the question is which method best preserves the election's outcome. So that's the quantity that you want to say maximize. You want to maximize the probability that the voting method preserves the outcome. When you compare the original outcome to the outcome after the votes have been corrupted one quantity, you can try to maximize very interesting. I definitely want to come back and talk more about corruption but you've got me intrigued with those properties and I know there's many of them may be I don't WanNA put your memory test, but could you talk about one or two and maybe discuss you know a Controversy around them or why they're important that sort of thing. Yes. There's a bunch one desirable property of voting method is that it doesn't succumb to the spoiler effect as we know, the Electoral College does. So how can we think about this spoiler effect the main let's change the names to some ancient name. So we don't have to deal with political of discussion in the moment, but let's say we ran election whatever two hundred whatever years ago, and there's George Washington running, and there's also a clone of George Washington running as candidates and I some third candidate on the. Fact factor means the fact that two of these clone George Washington running while people who originally if there just one George Washington, they'll just vote for that first one but two of them you'd imagine you know the original George Washington Supporters A. Vote First Josh Attendance on my vote for Evil George Washington or whatever you call the second one. So the fact that the original supporters of the person gets split between the two separate candidates we know an electoral college that means that it decreases the chance of either one of them winning, and for example, I think a last election cycle Bloomberg said, I'm not gonNA run as an independent because of this effect, you can steal votes away from someone in a sense and it can. Ruin the chance of say some candidate that may be you kind of support or something. So that's a desirable property of voting method that some of them have and some of them don't doesn't have the spoiler effect. That's that's what you are. There mechanisms than the can eliminate things like that. How do we build something like that into voting framework one voting method that avoids this it's become popular to certain people you know on the perfect voting with, but it's called instant runoff voting so. Different than what we're used to thinking about your vote is no longer just your favorite candidate. It's like a ranked list of candidates like for example on. Once going back two hundred years or something maybe your first choice most preferred candidates George Washington may be your second most preferred candidate is out in. Alexandria. Hamilton third most preferred candidate Harriet Tubman or something I don't know every single person makes list of preferred candidates and they all get submitted into whatever the election methods, which is song way of taking all those votes and just saying, okay, here's the winner and so one I think mentioned already one. Popular ranked choice voting method is called instant runoff voting on I believe it's used in Australia might even be used this coming election cycle in I'm not entirely sure but anyway so the important thing is this voting method does not have these spoiler effect

George Washington Usc University Of Southern Cal Alexandria Steven Professor Harriet Tubman Australia Tyson Usa. Hamilton Bloomberg Josh Attendance
Baa-a-a-a-a! Pesky goats block Trump motorcade en route to New Jersey golf resort

Unhappy Hour with Matt Bellassai

02:59 min | Last month

Baa-a-a-a-a! Pesky goats block Trump motorcade en route to New Jersey golf resort

"Talk about the worst news of the Week I. A small herd of goats is responsible for blocking the presidential motorcade last weekend and Don go. Go Young Donald I was trying to travel to his golfers or in New Jersey obviously because we're in the middle of a pandemics where else would the president be but a golf resort? And our our good friends the goats would had the good sense to get in the way disruption protest goats. Did. We have any doubt that are abolitionist goats that we feature regularly on this podcast would be on the right side of history. I did it. I knew. Yeah. Fred started as the Harriet Tubman of goats, and now he's becoming the Malcolm X. of votes. He's saying protests violent protests necessary. I'm just GONNA foment. Insurrection via goat. We love a political goat lava political goat I mean maybe especially because these goats technically work for Donald according to a White House pool report, there was a brief poss- during drive onto the property to make way for a herd of goats that live on trump's property. He gets a tax break a property tax break known as farmland tax break worth nearly eighty thousand dollars a year on his golf resort because it's supposedly doubles as a goat ranch. According to the Wall Street? Journal. Yeah. So I, guess there's like a a loophole for landowners. Who if you say that you're like property is technically like an agricultural project then you get fucking tax break. So you know what this makes me WANNA do. Primal, SCREAM That's fucking primal. Scream I mean within I haven't like truly truly gone off on this pod. It makes me so mad when people call Batman a businessman, he played a businessman on TV he. Hey businessman that's. It's insane. It's like Meryl Streep was not editor in chief of Vogue magazine. Okay. She should be but she's not. But yeah. Apparently, the trump national golf club in bedminster maintains one hundred thirteen acres of hay farming and eight goats, eight goats, and you get eighty thousand dollars a year. It's ridiculous. It's not enough. Goat's remember when that person last time by bought like five goats and it was not one hundred dollars was not that much. So apparently that's all we need. We can go in together on five coats and get. Nearly. One hundred thousand dollar tax break. Let's do it I'm

Donald I Meryl Streep Batman Goat Fred Donald Trump New Jersey DON Harriet Tubman Vogue Magazine White House President Trump Bedminster Editor In Chief
Kim Kardashian West Releases Statement on Kanye’s Mental Health

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

03:40 min | 2 months ago

Kim Kardashian West Releases Statement on Kanye’s Mental Health

"Let's. Let's talk about a Reality Star Kim Kardashian West and her husband Kanye West have been in the news all week. You know talking about his campaign rally his Harriet Tubman statement, those twitter rants. Pale flew to Wyoming to check in on them. Well yesterday Kim broke her silence released a statement about con as mental health, especially with all of those hurtful comments that he has made about her her mom, you know and just a family altogether cam. She talked about Kanye struggle with bipolar, and she and the family are struggling with him as she asked for compassion and empathy can posted as many as you know Kanye has bipolar. Bipolar disorder anyone who has or has a loved one in their life, who who knows exactly incredibly complicated and painful. It is to understand. She went on to say that those that understand mental illness know that the family is powerless unless the member is a minor, Kim said that Kanye is brilliant, but complicated, and on top of being a black man and an artist who has experienced the painful loss of his mother Donda West back in. Two thousand seven. He has to deal with the pressure in isolation that is heightened by his bipolar disorder. She went on to say how the media and the public have to have compassionate empathy when it comes to mental health issues, and she thinks those that express concern, you know true genuine concern Connie, as well being and. That's it. You know it's just Really really sad, you know. Yeah it is. For the children I do in the whole John Him everyone, everyone. Yeah, you don't WanNa. See your husband. Go through things like that thinly meltdown. No, no, no, no Qurna oldness history. There's juice Rome. It's just a lot. He said a lot of hope for things about her. He you know yesterday or day before yesterday was talking about divorcing her, saying she had a private meeting with. Meek mill to talk about prison reform. And then she came back and said the meeting wasn't private. It was public He talked about wanting to divorce her. It is heavy. It has heavy. What is going on with them? Dude, but see I. Don't know anything about bipolar. I. Don't know anything about it. So. Maybe it causes you to do some things that I think is not smart. But I don't see discussing your private life publicly on social media repeatedly. Not, smart is has what they got to do with anything I. Mean Look Man that's got to be not the place to vent I. Mean who you trying to prove it to you. And you got take care of your business at home. Who you are. And, it's just unexcused. Unexcusable, sad thing. you. Don Lemon talked about early. You know to social media used to be a good thing. Then all of a sudden became toxic. So since we all who have good says noted is toxic. Why are you putting your life on the toxic platform and then? Kim Got to come in and say please be understanding well. Wait a minute. Hold on. Wait a minute hold. I understand what she said. That's perfectly right, but decided to those social media in a place of understanding. That, what daddy is!

Kim Kardashian West Kanye Connie Bipolar Harriet Tubman Twitter Wyoming Donda West Don Lemon Wanna
Historian Responds to Kayne West's Criticism of Harriet Tubman

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:56 sec | 2 months ago

Historian Responds to Kayne West's Criticism of Harriet Tubman

"Historian is defending the heritage of Harriet Tubman, who's known to have help end slavery. At a presidential rally last night, rapper Kanye West said Tubman did not in fact helped free the slaves, which Oakland University history professor DeWitt Dyke sounds is untrue Fact. He compares her to a former congressman who recently lost his life. I would think that she and John Lewis, very similar persons who are otherwise fairly normal persons for the time period. But you see, an abnormal are unusually A strong need to try to go against the grain he goes on to say with the two wanted to accomplish challenge the things that would keep people insensible bonded spiritually bondage are racially discriminated against and try to do something about it. Like said Tubman's work went on for nearly 20 years, despite the fact that there were bounties on her head.

Harriet Tubman Dewitt Dyke John Lewis Kanye West Oakland University Congressman Professor
Kanye West Breaks Down, Makes Dubious Claim About Harriet Tubman at South Carolina Rally

WBT Afternoon Programming

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

Kanye West Breaks Down, Makes Dubious Claim About Harriet Tubman at South Carolina Rally

"Campaign, kicking off raising a few eyebrows in South Carolina over this past weekend, Kanye West broke down and cried during his first campaign rally on Sunday. The event in Charleston, South Carolina, was part of a campaign to get West on the ballot as a writing candidate in November during the event, spoke about a famous abolition will never actually She just had this night. Kanye then broke down and cried when speaking about his father said said his his father father didn't didn't want want him him because because he he was was too too busy. busy. He He then then broke broke down down a a cry cry crowd crowd reacting reacting saying, saying, But But you you didn't Michelle Pelino Fox news?

Kanye West South Carolina Michelle Pelino Charleston
Kanye West Says He and Kim Kardashian Considered Aborting North West During Campaign Rally

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

Kanye West Says He and Kim Kardashian Considered Aborting North West During Campaign Rally

"Kardashians family expressing concern about Kanye West and his business following his first presidential campaign rally. It was yesterday in South Carolina. TMZ reports It's because West who's married, of course to Kim Kardashian made Dismissive comments about Harriet Tubman also told the crowd about Kim's first pregnancy and how they discussed abortion. She even when I Campaign is expected to announce several more events, including one in New York,

Kanye West Kim Kardashian Harriet Tubman South Carolina New York
Coronavirus in Texas: San Antonio expands free testing to asymptomatic residents

Glenn Beck

00:23 sec | 2 months ago

Coronavirus in Texas: San Antonio expands free testing to asymptomatic residents

"Is expanding Corona virus testing resource is at its test sites to help made high demand, Jennifer Harriet, deputy director of MetroHealth said Wednesday. The city facilitated Corona virus testing sites are now conducting an urgent testing through mouth swabs thes air. In addition to the polyamorous chain reaction tests, which were done with nasal swabs, Herriot says the site is providing the tests and no extra costs.

Jennifer Harriet Deputy Director Metrohealth Herriot
Frederick Douglass statue ripped from base

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:18 sec | 2 months ago

Frederick Douglass statue ripped from base

"A statue of Frederick Douglass has been ripped down from its base at Maplewood Park in Rochester, New York and place right near the Genesee River Gorge. It was on site on the underground railroad were Douglass and Harriet Tubman helped shuttle slaves to freedom. Vandalism took place on the anniversary of one of Douglas most famous

Frederick Douglass Genesee River Gorge Harriet Tubman Maplewood Park Vandalism Rochester New York Douglas
As Statues Come Down Nationwide, Trump Seeks to Establish a 'Garden' of U.S. Heroes

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

As Statues Come Down Nationwide, Trump Seeks to Establish a 'Garden' of U.S. Heroes

"The White House has unveiled an executive order to create a national garden of American heroes. It'll feature statues of prominent Americans, including Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr. Ronald Reagan and Harriet Tubman, just to name a few. The executive order establishes a task force that'll use funding from the Interior Department to establish. The site has 60 days to submit a report to the White House detailing the options for the creation of the National Garden, including potential locations. The president mentioned that order in his speech at Mount Rushmore last

White House National Garden Executive Martin Luther King Jr Harriet Tubman Abraham Lincoln Ronald Reagan Mount Rushmore Interior Department President Trump
Amid furor over monuments, Trump seeks `garden' of US heroes

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

Amid furor over monuments, Trump seeks `garden' of US heroes

"Amid the furor over monuments president trump is proposing to establish a national garden of American heroes a vast outdoor park that will feature the statues of the greatest Americans to ever live president trump's proposed garden would pay tribute to more than thirty Americans from founding fathers in presidents including George Washington Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln to civil rights and social activists like Martin Luther king junior Susan B. Anthony Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman as well as explorers an aviation pioneers such as the Wright brothers in Amelia Earhart trump's initial list includes generals Billy Graham and the late Supreme Court justice Antonin Scalia absent are any native American or Hispanic people the White House declined to comment on how the list was assembled Ben Thomas Washington

Donald Trump Abraham Lincoln Susan B. Anthony Frederick Dou Antonin Scalia White House Ben Thomas Washington President Trump George Washington Thomas Jeffe Martin Luther Harriet Tubman Wright Amelia Earhart Billy Graham Supreme Court
Trump announces plan to create "National Garden of American Heroes"

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:14 sec | 2 months ago

Trump announces plan to create "National Garden of American Heroes"

"As he vowed to defend existing statues. Mr. Trump also promised to set up a national garden of American heroes, describing a vast outdoor park with statues of the greatest Americans who ever lived. Among those on his list. Several presidents Davy Crockett, Harriet Tubman and the Wright Brothers.

Davy Crockett Harriet Tubman Wright Brothers Mr. Trump
Will the Economic Recovery Slow With New Coronavirus Cases?

WSJ What's News

05:47 min | 3 months ago

Will the Economic Recovery Slow With New Coronavirus Cases?

"The latest economic data shows the US on target for a gradual recovery, but a spike in corona virus cases in several states is now making that pace more uncertain. The lack of clear direction led to a choppy day on wall. Street, but all three major indexes ended the day up more than one percent joining me now to talk more about the economic picture. Picture is Wall Street? Journal reporter, Harriet Tori High Harriet high so Harriet. Let's start with weekly jobless claims still very high, but they've been holding pretty steady on the other hand arise rise in Corona. Virus cases could now threaten that as the economy is beginning to reopen. What is your sense of what's happening here? Yes, we saw another week of these claims. Claims at about one point five million. This is you know slightly below last week, but more or less unchanged. It's still phenomenally high though when you think that before the coronavirus pandemic started kms kind of the two hundred thousand poet so now you know they've just exploded compared to that, and although they're not as bad as they were at the beginning of the. The public, there's still a lot of people who are losing their jobs every week and implying for unemployment. So this is just another reminder that the recovery could take them all on. It comes on a day was saying this very worrying increase in coronavirus infections and sentenced states, and just is a fresh reminder that things are not getting back to normal fast. What are we seeing among the states where infections are picking up? There's a fear now that restrictions may be imposed or reimposed in some cases, and as you say, that could further slow the economic recovery. Yes, so we've seen a few things happened in the past couple of days for one there are now quarantines in some states in the northeast, or if you want to travel from from states like in the southwest, and go their vacation, or whatever you have to quarantine two weeks, and that is that was kind of a big. A blow to these reopening efforts, and we've also seen some other things going on in Texas differences, some elective surgeries have been canceled and things like that. These are all just signs of. Hunkering down the hospitals you know reading to focus on on the more and more people come into the ICU because the very very sick with coronavirus infections, and this is just a sign that you know that people are still suffering from this. So this is spreading around and that re-opening efforts might have to to cool off a little because you know. People need to stay home to stay safe in many places. We talk a lot about small businesses and their worries about being able to reopen, and how long they may be able to stay closed at the same time. We're also seeing big companies like macy's which just announced his laying off thirty nine hundred workers, so even larger companies aren't immune to this. Yeah, and for macy's. This is actually the second round of layoffs. They had a layoff of two thousand in February. So this is of the of the retail story that was saying I. Mean we did see retail sales. Increase Law may bounce back off the very severe drops in March and April, so they seem to be improving kind of on this across the board level, but. But one thing that is going on that a lot of analysts talk about. Is that the retail sector? So one thing the pandemic has done is it's really sped up this shift this pivot to online so businesses that have very significant online presences. You know they might be physical brick and mortar stores like say for Instance Walmart, we think of Walmart is like a supermarket and. And in town, but they've made a big effort to pivot to online, and then, of course you have companies like Amazon, and so on so some companies are weathering this pandemic well because they they were kind of faster than others to shift to this to online, and they're able to serve customers very quickly and demand in online fashion because you know with the current ivars pandemic. Pandemic, a lot of people are too scared to go out to the store, or they don't want to be in shopping malls, and so on because of the risk of infection, other companies have really really struggled with that, and that's I. Think we're seeing that reflected in the in the employment situation, you know we have some retailers that cutting jobs and other retailers that hiring. And, what about the consumer spending picture I mean we know this makes up a huge portion of the economy, and if we're talking about reimposing restrictions or further lockdowns. That's going to suffer. We'll see consumer spending data for May Friday morning and consumes Benny's expected to increase a lot eight point seven percent, but this would. This is coming on the back of a thirteen point. Six percent decline the prior month, so it Stephanie Climbing out of a big hole, and it's not back to to where it was pre pandemic. The one thing that is really helping consumer. Consumer, spending the moment is the supplemental on insurance benefits and unemployment insurance benefit, so this is six hundred dollars a week that people are getting alongside regular unemployment benefits. That is hugely beneficial. Some you know some people have actually seen the personal income increase based on this benefits, but they not expected to last beyond July, and that that will be a real crunch point you know whether consumers, particularly the low income spectrum are going to be able to carry on spending. Is They have if unemployment benefits a cuts and the labor market pitcher does not improve. Harriet something you've mentioned even with the consumer spending data. Coming out tomorrow is that all the data were talking about now? We are seeing of course on a lag, and it's not even giving us necessarily the picture of what we've been seeing. Unfold over the past couple of days or a week right? Yes, so this is this is kind of an issue with some of the gunman data we it does come with a quite long lag so today for instance we saw GDP data the final GDP data, but that was for the first quarter which ended in. In March, which was now you know seems like a very long time ago, and we also know now that the economy officially entered a recession in February, so we won't get data for the second quarter for about another month we can look at private data real time data that comes from companies, but it's not quite the same as government data that is very thirty sort of tested and so

Pandemic Harriet Tori High Harriet Walmart Corona United States Harriet Macy Journal Texas Reporter Amazon Benny
Eliza Ann Gardner born - May 28, 1831

This Day in History Class

03:29 min | 4 months ago

Eliza Ann Gardner born - May 28, 1831

"Podcast. The stain history class is production of iheartradio pay. I'm eaves and welcome to this day in history class. A podcast where we bring you a little slice of history every day. I hope you all are still faring. Well I am faring. Well I am still in my closet. Everything is going great and I am so happy to still be bringing you all episodes with that fit on with the show. Today is may twenty eighth at twenty twenty? The Day was may twenty eighth eighteen. Thirty one abolitionist and religious leader Elisa. An was born in new. York Gardner is remembered for founding the Missionary Society of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Garner's family likely became involved in the Ame Zion Church when they lived in New York but when Elisa was young the family moved to Boston where Elisa was raised anti slavery circles in Boston. Her father became a ship contractor. The family lived in the mainly Black West. End Neighborhood in their home was a stop on the underground railroad. A network of routes and locations that enslaved people used to escape to free state in Canada because of this to us acquainted with figures like sojourner truth. Harriet Tubman and William Lloyd Garrison. Once you left school. She supported herself through just making and joined church. Abolitionist circles Gardner became a Sunday school teacher and she became Sunday School Superintendent for Boston. She organized the First Zion Missionary Society in New England at her church the society which later became known as the Ladies Home and Foreign Missionary Society raised money to send missionaries to Africa as Black methodists debated women's role in the Church and Missionary Fundraising Gardner weighed in on the question. She said the following at the eighteen eighty four. Amu Zion general conference. I come from old Massachusetts where we have declared that all not only men but women too are created free and equal with certain inalienable rights which men are bound to respect. She went on to say that women would continue to support the church if it's male leaders supported and respected

Ame Zion Church Harriet Tubman First Zion Missionary Society Elisa York Gardner Boston Amu Zion Missionary Society Of African Methodist Episcopal Ch Foreign Missionary Society Twenty Twenty Iheartradio Massachusetts Black West Sunday School New York William Lloyd Garrison End Neighborhood Garner Canada
'It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia' will be back for record-breaking 15th season

Steve Cochran

00:27 sec | 4 months ago

'It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia' will be back for record-breaking 15th season

"What was this record that it's always sunny in Philadelphia broke team it is about to break the record that was cat has been held by the adventures of Ozzie and Harriet being a live action television series on the year consecutively for fourteen years it's always sunny in Philadelphia when they begin their new season will they will be beginning their fifteenth season as they have just been

Philadelphia Ozzie Harriet
"harriet" Discussed on Sidedoor

Sidedoor

01:51 min | 4 months ago

"harriet" Discussed on Sidedoor

"She's slender she's a much younger. Her hair is is wavy. She's wearing a beautiful dress or a skirt with a bodice. That is very sophisticated looking. The top of it is quite delicate on. It has many buttons down the front and the sleeves have rushed. She looks on graceful and she looks at home in her own skin and she's looking at the camera a very direct. Look if you look carefully at her eyes you see so much you see sadness and you see I see righteousness and I see the power. You see incredible power in her eyes. It's it's a very compelling photograph. So was that the moment way you say yes. I'll take on this project. Yeah if I if I hadn't Vocalized it at that moment. It was the next five minutes. Wait on the show In we wanted to bring young Harriet because this is the time in her life where she was doing her most exciting work. Her life lends itself inherently to an adventure story. Yes but we couldn't connect the image of her old almost kindly looking. Yeah but slightly stern to the stories we knew of her heroics and so that was important. It was like we wanted you to feel like you got to sit down with her at a time where she was really involved in incredibly heroic work life.

Harriet
"harriet" Discussed on Sidedoor

Sidedoor

09:45 min | 4 months ago

"harriet" Discussed on Sidedoor

"Is a person who periodically will fall completely unconscious and cannot be waked and also. She had religious trances she would fall into a trance and start kind of moaning to herself and swaying back and forth so she was Absolutely peculiar you know and I think that people might have doubted her but came to believe they met one of these very very special people who might be touched in some way it's visions began after. She sustained a head injury. She went into a market at on. The market was at a crossroads and An overseer pursued a slave who? We're not sure if this was a or not but He was somebody that was off the plantation at that moment and the former was furious and she stepped between them as as the former and whoever it was through a farm wheat from the counter at a brave woman right from the very beginning. And how long was she up because she was unconscious for a corrected usually have A. She was unconscious for quite a while and we know that her head was bleeding. It was cracked open and the kerchief honor head was driven into her head actually and And that they didn't wanNA bleeding all over the place and they put her in a in a room that had a some sort of loom in it and they sat her on the loom and arm and then she was made to work in the fields. And that the blood ran into her is So we know shortly afterwards. While she was still bleeding she was made to work in the fields. And then the vision started at that. Point yes She attributes this to the started her her visions And which are related to some sort of of seizures that she had and that she had as a result of this injury and which she thought brought her closer to God. I often looked at those pictures. And I'm not sure if I can see where the impact of that object hit her or there's always something a little bit better is I'm not sure if I'm making that up or whether you say that too we're not We're not sure exactly where it hit her. Oh thing that I used in. The movie was in very high resolution pictures. You see a mark between her eyes. And that's that's what I used in the film like Collor Hayden. Casey did not see the full measure of Herod Tubman in the famous portrait of her as an older woman. She has in her eyes in the eighteen. Eighty five portrait a deep sorrow. Yes and in her mouth. She has deep sorrow on her face. and one could almost see If we didn't know her story one might even see resignation but of course we know her story. We know it's not resignation at all so The the portrait itself can be misleading in terms of her character but then in two thousand and seventeen something happened that would rock the world of scholars and curator's alike. We began to hear whispers that another portrait of Todman had been found. A photograph lost to history for nearly one hundred and fifty years. I was part of really almost a discovery of the opportunity to see Harriet. Tubman in a new light coming up after a quick break. We hear how Carl Hayden came to collect such a treasured piece of history and Kim shares a suspicion that there might be more tubman photos out there waiting to be discovered love learning new things on side door. Here's something you might not know the Smithsonian relies on support from people like you to make all of the research discoveries exhibitions you hear about possible. Smithsonian are addressing critical issues in the field of science history art and culture issues that affect us all and you can be a part of it. A lot of people listen to side door. Imagine what we could learn next if everyone chipped in just a little find out how at SL that EDU slash contribute. We're back and when we left the ports episode we were hearing about how the Real Harriet. Tubman was a tough woman of action briefly leading troops and helping enslaved African Americans to freedom despite her small stature and serious injury so let's jump into the second segment of portraits. Here's Kim so it's two thousand seventeen and colleague gets coal and colleague on the other end says we have an opportunity to be part of a purchase with the New African American Museum. And so I'm listening and thing okay. And then the person said the first known photograph of Harriet. Tubman and I said what what do you mean? What type of photo? And they said it's it's she's young and that was really she young young as in approximately forty five years old. Carla couldn't believe her is what what do you mean young but said look like and where was it taking so I had a lot of questions so it was exciting and what it was was. The earliest known photograph. Ferret tablet dated from about eighteen. Sixty eight to sixty nine right when she was saying what had happened to her when she was being recorded. When people were recognizing after the civil war Lincoln had been killed. All of these things were going on and here is Harriet. Tubman as you've never seen her before and I remember the first time that I got a chance to really look at the photograph of his. Oh my God this is. This is the woman that led the troops and that was so forceful and it was a nurse and it did all of these things and was so determined. This is very tubman in her prime. The photograph was an album that the library of Congress eventually acquired jointly with the National Museum of African American history and culture at the Smithsonian. It had belonged to a quaker teacher named Emily Howland. Who worked at a Friedmans camp? Emily was also at odd abolitionist and to suffer just and she added photographs to the album over the years. Some family members many were friends and somewhere historical figures like Tubman. I asked Carla. Hayden felt when she saw Thomas new poetry with her own eyes. I'm in that position as Librarian of Congress which was already quite personally significant because professionally first female so you can imagine joy and mud Ville Mark Library being that champion or librarians. Yes however as a person of color to be. The Library of Congress was so personally significant and to be a descendant of people who were punished whipped. There were so many laws about people who looked like me learning to read to then be put in the position to be the head still hard to say that the fans up of the largest library in the world was just overwhelming. Yeah but to have the curator finally bring the item up to the office in a special room with and you can imagine. There were white gloves everywhere and anything because it was very fragile. The through the album itself was think about a pack of cards but very thick and the binding had was loose and it was fragile. You could tell but then to open it up and to have the carefully open it up and into see it there. She actually sat for that. And I'm looking at what came out of that camera in that process was something a copy of young. Harriet portrait also made its way to Hollywood innocence. His Director Casey Lemons again. I was in the office of a producer who had begun to talk to me about making a movie on Harriet Tubman and she showed me this picture that had surfaced that I had never seen before and It's not too much to say that. I fell in love when I saw this picture of Harriet. Tubman cases film focuses on the younger tubman escaping slavery and going back to rescue others. Cynthia revolt plays her as brave and determined but also warm and loving one of the things that I learned about Harriet and learned about her story. That was incredibly moving to me and that I did not know before was that. It's really a love story. Harriet was motivated by love. Love of her family love for husband. And then I'm rescuing people was connected to that. But almost incidental. It started with love.

Harriet Tubman Collor Hayden Smithsonian Casey Lemons Carla Kim Library of Congress Emily Howland Congress Todman Cynthia revolt New African American Museum Librarian of Congress Ville Mark Library National Museum of African Ame Lincoln Hollywood Director
Ken Osmond, 'Leave It to Beaver' star who played Eddie Haskell, dies at 76

Sean Hannity

00:43 sec | 4 months ago

Ken Osmond, 'Leave It to Beaver' star who played Eddie Haskell, dies at 76

"One of the stars of the famed sitcom leave it to beaver has passed away leave it to beaver ten Osmond play the trouble maker Eddie Haskell on leave it to beaver has died at his home in Los Angeles Osmond whose career began at the age of nine was in several hit TV shows including the adventures of Ozzie and Harriet wagon train and Loretta young show but it was his portrayal of Haskell the campaign the bill hello Sir my father's working today Mr cleaver when you own your own business you have to work on Saturdays he returned to the role two more times with the resurrected series in nineteen eighty three and in nineteen ninety seven film Osment pass rounded by family at the age of seventy six no cause of death

Osmond Eddie Haskell Ozzie Mr Cleaver Los Angeles Loretta Young Osment
"harriet" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

14:31 min | 9 months ago

"harriet" Discussed on Toure Show

"People think they know Tubman. Did you know that Harriet Tubman actually served in the military was the first woman to lead an armed expedition if left out of the story when she goes down to South Carolina still L. A.. Fugitive technically she is asked by the Governor of Massachusetts. Go Down and help the union troops. She agrees he's to do it. She goes down to South Carolina with the intention of being a scout an aspiring and she gathered information of course from enslaved enslaved and free black people in South Carolina enough so that in June of eighty six thousand three. She leads the combined he river read. This is a sort of important victory for the Union but it's also important because it's a moment when many literally emancipates twenty seven and eight hundred heap hall. Harriet Tubman is one of the most extraordinary people in American history in the eighteen. Hundreds at a time in many people were debating whether or not Americans should be able to own and sell people. Tubman was run up on plantations crabbing enslaved people and whisking him up north to freedom. I watched the recent bio-pic about her called Harriet. So powerful and I was so moved. I almost cried during the montage entourage. When she was walking in with group after group of freed slaves people? She had rescued with her guts. Guile ingenuity strength courage her knowledge of how to get from the south to the north undiscovered enter deep faith in God. Harriet who almost made it onto the twenty dollar bill until trump said nope is a well known figure. But there's a lot of people don't know about her during the civil war. She was a spy for the Union army. Who led a raid that freed over for seven hundred people in one night? She's an amazing woman. Who seems like a superhero plus Olympic decathlete level athlete plus US mental level genius? Who could lead all these missions freeing all these people and never losing one? She was a woman of deep faith. Who relied on on God and gave all the glory to him? I learned that and much more from rutgers Professor Erica Armstrong Dunbar. Who wrote the new book? She came aim to slay on her teaching Tubman for years. If you want to know everything about one of the most inspiring and important Americans ever this is a good would place to start is professor. Eric Armstrong Dunbar. Talking about the amazing. Harriet Tubman on Taurus show. Why did you WanNa read a book about Harriet Tubman? Now it well. It actually wasn't i. I wasn't sort of sitting with this I want to write a book about Tubman. It I teach tubman. I've taught Tubman for years. All my work focuses on black women enslaved women in particular but enslaved and free and so my editor Don Davis who's fantastic and she you know was connected with Del Martin Cheese and others who we knew the film was going to be coming out and she said Erica. What do you think about doing something something that is accessible is by graphical is Also aesthetically interesting and to have it come out around the time of the film and I was like well. I just wrote a book about a fugitive woman And that fits in my wheelhouse and I know a lot about Tubman so okay and then it was up to me to sort of think about how how I wanted to modernize tubman how I wanted to bring someone who think about as someone who lived a long time ago and bring her make her more current modern connect to her and I you know I sort of remind my students yes. I remind people that tab lived a really long life and she died in nineteen thirteen like. She died in the twentieth century. So although she was enslaved like you know my grandmother was alive in nineteen thirteen right so That was really. That was the beginning of of thinking about writing about Tubman and then it was up to me to figure out how to make her someone that nineteen year olds would want to know about well. Let's try to at least I make her a little more real from the research that you've done What sort of person was she like if we were to meet her would she be like what would be? What would you be like? I think Tubman was like most people in that she changed over time. Sure right and I think think we're used to seeing an image of Tubman. An older woman head covered can never smiling hands clasped And that's the image that we've often used teaching tab men in highschool or sending school. is she not smiling. Because the and the photography of the time it took a long time so you didn't smile or because she was bitter and tough and or maybe all of the above I think photography in the nineteenth century people did not what's Mile that's a very twentieth century cheese. That's the twentieth century. Nineteenth Century people were not smiling for especially for these formal formal photographs. Photography doesn't become kind of super popular until the middle of the of the nineteenth century. The other other piece though is that Tubman. She had some dental issues as well as most people did in the nineteenth century and it actually just wasn't sort of seen as respectable to do anything else but kind of have this Sincere solemn luck so we should did not take that as evidence of her personality. I think we can take it as evidence of her seriousness. Because the one one thing that I think runs true for her throughout her lifetime was that she was sort of about the business day. One I'm like. Is She not a bitter person or is she an optimistic person. She's deeply optimistic. And the optimism museum was centered in her religion. She was a very religious woman and she really attributed her time on the underground railroad as an her success on the underground railroad. She attributed all of that to God. She never took credit like yeah yeah. I went thirteen times to barrel end and rescued people from the jaws of slavery. It was never her. She was an instrument of God so she was optimistic. There's a moment in her life prior to the civil war and she's having conversations with other abolitionist activists activists who are saying you know slavery is never going to end their. That's never gonNA happen here. We're going to have to leave this nation and Tubman responds. It's not true I've seen it. She had these visions. I've seen it. Our people will be free and she carried that optimism and even after the war after slavery was abolished and life was really difficult for black people. She still held onto onto that optimism. I mean there's a tremendous selflessness in I have gotten my body to freedom I'm GonNa go back and again and again and risking life and limb and who knows what and I mean right. I mean that's I mean this extraordinary gesture. Yeah it's it's almost unbelievable. She Harriet Tubman never learned to read a right and and but she did tell her story her memoir To a novelist later on in her life and she talks about the first moment that she escapes in eighteen forty nine when she makes it to the Pennsylvania border and you would think that this moment you know. Here's this woman who has lived through some of the most tragic traumatic doc difficulties of slavery. And you'd think okay here. She is walking into Pennsylvania a free and I'll use air quotes on that Free State state right and she almost immediately thought to him asked for more meaning. This isn't enough for me me to be free. It isn't enough for my body to be free. What does freedom mean? If my entire family is still enslaved what does freedom the mean. If I enter into a city like Philadelphia and I know no one and it's not enough for me to be. My freedom doesn't matter if everyone everyone I love is still enslaved and really from that moment. She makes us decision a very conscious decision to go back and get all of them and what is so incredible. Almost unbelievable his that she does it. yeah. She seems superhuman human. And the I'm not GonNa ask you to compare the movie to reality but the movie does again put up this notion. Ocean of this is a superhuman person. WHO's traversing many many many miles over and over at night in the winter? I mean issue superhuman and more specifically can you be specific about. How did she make make it? You know from the south to the north and back like wh physically is she doing to be able to make it and not get caught and to have have enough food for the body to be able to go on in these super long journeys and all of that I think you know when you when you think about about the totality of it. You can't help but think okay. is she a little superhuman. How how different is or was Harriet? Tubman and yes. Yeah she she you know I. I'm also I'm hesitant to categorize her as such because I do think black women in particular are Thought of as almost super human rights at the that we don't feel paying the same mm kinds of ways that we can carry burdens and work and And we'll be okay And so there's a little bit of that that kind of seeps over into the Harriet tubman narrative but in reality. I mean this was a woman who in my book I talk about. How the violence of slavery and the difficulties of slavery in many ways kind of primed her to do do this difficult work of the work of freedom right so she was someone as a child ripped away from her parents at the age of five? She's forced to go and work for someone else in the so. We're talking about child. Who doesn't isn't yet have her adult teeth right taken from her mother? Her father was living Ten miles away they were owned by different people on different farms and she at the age of five is tasked with emptying the Muskrat Muskrat traps of of her new temporary owner. So I always think about a five year olds hand trying to pry open a trap. In February February on the eastern shore of Maryland when it's cold and snowy and rainy and removing the dead carcass of a rodent and bring it to the owner for for their pelts right. This is the kind of work. She's doing exactly as a five year old and and the work would she was expected to learn how to do domestic work and she wasn't so great at that beginning she no one told her no one taught her she was as little she was She was required to take care of babies. She was so small when she was required to hold children in and take care of them. Keep them quiet that she had to sit on the floor because she just wasn't big enough to hold a child. She was a child taking care of a baby and as she grew older she was forced to work in the fields and on the eastern shore of Maryland she was doing. She was harvesting harvesting flax. And she was helping with loading wagons and just the most kind of physical difficult labor. And it's during this time. Her body is developing and becoming strong in a way of course she didn't know it at the time but it's sort of preparing her physically to deal with what the the underground.

Harriet Tubman South Carolina Erica Armstrong Dunbar Massachusetts heap hall Union army Maryland Eric Armstrong Dunbar professor Del Martin Cheese rutgers trump Philadelphia editor Pennsylvania Don Davis
"harriet" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

01:39 min | 9 months ago

"harriet" Discussed on What'sHerName

"Will in order to come to us. Jacobs Dr James Com witnessed a codicil oversell when this woman died that stated that Harriet Jacobs specifically was willed to Dr James Daughter. This codicil was not signed but the word of two white men. Oh serious that this was taken again as truthful and Harriet. Jacobs was transferred to names Arkham daughter who is a young girl so effectively. James James Markham. Wow she probably didn't even know that she probably had no idea. It's not knowledge. That necessarily would have been helpful to her at the time but looking back at it now. It's something that's really painful to recognize. This situation is entirely different. James Nor workum begins pursuing Harry Jacob sexually from the moment. She enters his house. She's a child and she is trying to fend off. Sexual advances from a man who has absolute control of her and her life and her body. Oh Dr nor come begins to threaten to do things like send her to a cabinet. He's going to build on the plantations where he can keep her to himself. This becomes for her of really defining students versus what her narrative narrative.

Harriet Jacobs James James Markham Dr James Daughter Dr James Com James Nor workum Harry Jacob Arkham
"harriet" Discussed on Christian Podcast Community

Christian Podcast Community

12:22 min | 10 months ago

"harriet" Discussed on Christian Podcast Community

"Of the spirituals I when I was watching some of the more documentary nature videos that I could find on. Harriet tubman coming. They made the comment that this the slaves in the south actually used their spirituals to communicate. They were codes so they they would actually Sing a song about you. Know a meeting in the forest and that would be indicating what time the slaves would would leave their Homes in the middle of the night to go have a prayer service in the in the fields away from the the plantation houses. And they would they would actually pass code teach other by singing in in the fields as to when they were GonNa meet or and it was very interesting to find out that you know all these spirituals that have made it you know into our Himal alleges of modern era. A lot of them were actually coded messages to each other. And that's what. Harriet Tubman used it for because she he would often sing to draw the slaves to her when she was a conductor on the underground railroad. We should probably say that Even no no. This is the first impression there will not be a no spoiler section since this is the life and times of an actual historical person. Yeah uh-huh so sorry but one hundred fifty years is long enough for you to have a cotton spoiler. Yes yes we're not gonNA worry about those and and to be honest. We really highly recommend that. If you're going to see this movie to to to educate yourself on Harriet not just watch the movie but Check out some of the the stuff on YouTube Some of the articles that have been put out and we'll put some links in our show notes to kind of guide you and some of that. I also found a documentary. That's available for free on Amazon Prime. If you're an Amazon. Prime member called Harriet Tubman. They called her Moses. which was I found very informative and it goes through to her whole life with historical movies? I always like to go back and see what anachronisms it may have or how they might have modified history in order to tell the dramatic story and for the most part aside from the very last scene they did really really good job. Several of the characters breath are fictionalized. Optional Yeah Yeah they're they're What is it called when they take composites composite? Yeah that's the word I was looking for. Yes they composite at some of the characters to China give to give flesh out people that might have been inherits life but they ah that they may have not been specific person they kinda wrapped them all together into one person and had that person appear in a fictional the biggest biggest one I think is What was her name? Marie Marie from the from the Boardinghouse Marie in the fill in the Philadelphia Boarding House. She was completely completely fictional character but they needed her in there to kind of I guess be a friend to Harry it when and help her learn how to be a free a free person after escaping slavery. So yeah you know. I don't really have a problem with composite characters like that. Because you're compressing so much I I am into two hours. Yes you really have to be able to communicate certain aspects well and they did a good job with Marie and the other big composite in this one is Gideon in the the slave owners son son slash slave owner himself. Yes who also served a very specific purpose purpose in the movie right and this kind of love hate almost intimate relationship that the from all historical that that I could find really only exist so they kind of built that in I guess to kind of create some kind of a relationship that between a Harriet and her masters it may not have actually existed. Now as we come into. This movie's been out a couple of weeks. I would say I saw it as a press preview. So it's it's been a while since I've seen the movie and it's coming in as they the reviews are very mixed when I was looking on the IMDB comments comments. I was finding that people either giving it five stars and raving about it where they were giving one stars and just couldn't stand it and so they seem to. We'll be all the way on the extremes. There's very few people that just like the movie they either hate it or they loved it and I think that's kind of true a lot of times when you're portraying a a real person and a fictional environment is that people they either want it to be truly historical and they get mad when it isn't or they're just happy with if it because it. It portrays the character that they want to know more about and so they enjoy the movie. So I think that that. Just kinda shows the different ways that people approach which bio-pics I think the And this actually ties in to a little bit of my first impression. It's very easy to look at the the people who are giving it bad reviews and say oh they have sociological. Paintings are racist undertones at that. They don't want to like it or they're automatically gonNA disparage it. You remember like Captain Marvel know that movie was review bombed. I I think is what it was called in rotten tomatoes before it had even come out by people who wanted to review it poorly because of its star. But I don't think that's the case in the few negative reviews that I've read. It really did come. Come down to like you were saying that. They wanted to historical to be more historical more accurate and they wanted more of her accomplishments stuffed into the two Our block which I think would have made it very crowded. Yeah it was interesting because the I took a friend with me to see the movie and she came out of the movie thinking that it was a movie she could recommend people but she felt like there is a major agenda in the gender turned her off which surprised me because I didn't feel like this was an agenda movie. I know that there are some people who could turn it into an agenda because of you know the whole Oh slavery and right and racism and all that stuff. That's going on in our culture but I really felt like the movie didn't Ram home an agenda and so they were just telling a story about a true person and as accurate away as you could with a movie. I do believe there are other movies about Tomlin's life this is just one one of many and I don't know I haven't seen indeed other so I don't know how this win. Stacks up against some of the others but I didn't really feel like it was agenda driven but I could be wrong I mean of course that is also kind of a you know personal perspective where it hits you between the is what you watch it did. Did your friend share what she felt the agenda was I think that she thought it was another of a kind of the women's Lib. Kinda thing you know where women are powerful and and I can see a little bit of that but to be honest this was a super strong woman who lived in an era where she was not free so I I really felt like that. They were portraying her strength character in an accurate way. So it didn't bug me but you know works at getting so hypersensitive to this kind of stuff. Now that I don't know yeah. Actually that hyper sensitive. Nature is what made me uncomfortable comfortable with this movie. Don't get me wrong. This movie. I thought was well done. I think that Cynthia Ribaud did a excellent excellent on job as mentese slash Harriet I think honestly I think all the actors in here did a great job. I think the Director Tur- did a great job putting together a very compelling story however I come to the movie with baggage I am a white male Protestant entitled individual. At least that's what society has been beating into my head head for the last couple of decades and you know with with all this sensitivity about confederate monuments and don't going after historical figures simply because they own slaves or and stuff like that. I felt a little little bit like I was being asked in the movie to atone for the sins of my forefathers which may may or may not be accurate And I think that's where that cultural sensitivity comes into play. I I feel like the emphasis in society recently on being woke and recognizing entitlement and turning away from people who were heroes of the confederacy or even founding fathers simply because they own slaves. I think that's made me more sensitive to what I might feel like is blamed being directed it at my social class. Yeah but like I said shut. It's probably not even accurate. I honestly don't think that this movie does that and the reason I don't think it does that is because it shows in the movie. How many white white people were on the side of the abolitionists you know the The underground railroad would never have existed have been successful if it weren't for all of the White Americans who thought slavery was horribly evil and they risked themselves and their property a lot of times if they'd been caught harboring fugitive slaves. They would've been sent to jail. They would have lost a lot of there. They would have been forced to pay fines and lost their wellbeing. I mean there were tons of people In the south throughout the north who were risking a lot to help fugitive slaves in this movie shows them. You know like the the family with the farm. I'm that helped Terry. It and then later on help period as further on with more slaves fugitive slaves. They did it with all without any lines which I really really liked and they just they kept pointing it out and even you know near the end where they after. The fugitive slave bill was passed and and she was meeting with a bunch of white people about you know how do we keep rescuing slaves. And how far do we have to take them. It was she was one of the very few black people in that room. It was almost all white people who are discussing how they were going to keep the the rescuing of the slaves going and so yeah I honestly feel like they went out of their your way to show that this was not a racial thing that there were just people who believe slavery was wrong and they were willing to risk risk at all And there it was a lot of discussion towards the end. Obviously where they were coming to the conclusion that Oh civil war was going to be necessary to stop slavery and I thought that was interesting that you know that it was a discussion. You know we. This country cannot abide this evil. And we can't deal with it the right way and so. Oh it's GONNA end up being a civil war. They were discussing that. I thought that was very interesting. Yeah yeah that's one of the hard parts of doing movie like that is because the events events that are depicted in this movie are over the course of I WanNa say twenty to twenty five years from her initial escape escape all the way up through the civil war the yeah. The scene in the civil work ended. It's always hard to give that sense of time in a movie but actually the the fugitive slave act was one of the things that was sort of rearranged in Harriet They put it later in her life to to add a certain amount.

Harriet tubman Marie Marie Amazon YouTube China Gideon Boardinghouse Marie Harry Captain Marvel IMDB Tomlin Cynthia Ribaud Philadelphia Boarding House Terry
"harriet" Discussed on Are You Just Watching?

Are You Just Watching?

13:12 min | 10 months ago

"harriet" Discussed on Are You Just Watching?

"Attention and to add conflict but in reality the fugitive slave act was passed. I almost within months. I think of her initial escape so she had been occupying on the the underground railroad the entire time with the fugitive slave. Act there. There wasn't that much time that she was getting folks only Philadelphia and she's having to run them all the way to Saint Catherine's so I'm just pointing out the stuff I didn't like because there's a lot less of that the other other part of this movie that made me uncomfortable was how they took. Harriet Tubman strong faith and and combined talk of her seizures and her reports that she spoke directly to God and they they turned it into do they. They turned her into a profit. They they really create in the movie. They created a parallel with Moses. Well D- he real Moses. Well that's the thing. Is that if you win. You read the documentaries. That's really what it was. I mean that was the whole point of the documentary on Amazon. And he called her Moses CICIS. That was that's recorded do understand that. But Moses was fulfilling God's specific promise of rescuing the people out of his out of Egypt shipped and bringing them back to the promised land area did was not fulfiling specific. I get what you're saying but what I'm saying is that wasn't the film that did that. That was historical that she was called Moses and that she had visions of God and all of that. That's historical the film. Didn't do you. Then sell okay. Yes the film pointed out that she had visions of God but the film also made it very clear that they felt that the visions were genuine. Or at least the film presented them as genuine visions where they gave her her a sense of coming danger and and I would say that that his historical because that's what was written. I mean I'm just saying that. The film portrayed trade what was historical based on the remembrances of Harriet. And the other I mean. All of the bio-pics I watched. I mean documentaries and stuff that I watched pointed that out that she she recorded all of this stuff that you know she would have visions and that. I'm just saying that the film didn't do this. It was they were just representing what has been historically historically recorded about her poker. I I can see why it makes you uncomfortable but I don't think it was the film doing anything wrong. I think that was they were portraying. What is historically understood in fact if you read I was just reading this In the wikipedia course Kapiti as not the catch all for all the truth but if it's there it's true but they did say that that she broke her skull at thirteen eighteen. Yes as after the incident time and frequently experienced extremely painful headaches. She also began having seizures falling unconscious although she claimed to be aware of surroundings and then later on. It said that she claimed that that these was when she heard God's voice and that he talked her and all that stuff so So these were claims that she made and I think that in later on our discussion. We're GonNa talk about you know whether they were genuine or not Yeah we may have differing views on that. But let's finish our first impressions before we delve into that. Okay well it's I. I mentioned that I really thought the portrayal of Tuchman was very good. The the actress did an excellent job presenting a woman who had to be incredibly eh unbelievably strong to do what she did. I remember growing up in Michigan as a teenager. There was actually an the underground railroad house there that we did a field trip to I don't think they ever claimed it that Harriet Tubman went through that one but I tell you one thing. We live a lot closer to her route than I do. They had the secret compartment under the floor. And all that so seeing it all in use in the movie was very impactful so the last thing was for me and it's unfortunate because it was the very one of the very last scenes of the movie it shows how Harriet Tubman led this raid that rescued I wanna say hundreds of of of slaves during the civil war at the end. Yeah Yeah during the civil war that the COM- high coma he river raid aid which did happen and she was the guy. She was a commander in the raid. So all that was accurate the parts of the bugged me was they showed three ironside ships. Yeah they showed her and and all the soldiers in in row boats coach and in the background are these three hundred side ships none of which existed at the time. Yeah Yeah I noticed that too. When I saw the movie I was like wait a minute? What are those doing? Yeah Oh and they were. They were the confederate ones. They were the Monitor. They were the merrimack not the Monitor. They were the confederate ones. Yeah whatever and that bugged me because yeah I know you have to do a lot for drama. And everything like that number of ships right in the type of ships the Kinda ships if the just the kind of ship that they fixed. I'd have been okay with it. Yeah that was annoying anachronisms but besides that I did like the movie A set for the uncomfortable parts for me. Yeah well. I thought that one of the things that I've seen bandied about is that they presented her in like a superhuman human superhero kind of presentation. which we've been doing a lot of superhero movies this year and I thought it was really kind of Nice to be able all to talk about the exploits of a real historical hero whether or not the movie portrays everything about her in a more or realistic standpoint or what was really real about her The fact that we are actually going to talk about somebody who really did amazing things with their life life and amazingly enough and covered quite well in this movie gave God the glory for most of that and I really appreciate gate that they did not leave her faith out of the movie and so easy nowadays with faith being such a a bad word really in our culture her to have made the movie and made her faith less than genuine or somehow something she believed in that wasn't real but they actually played up her faith breath and I appreciate that because she in real life really did give God the glory for which she was able to accomplish with her life. It's sort of the the polar opposite or the flip side of the coin to what they did with them wrinkle in time which which was a book that had good faith elements though not necessarily theologically strong But they even not only did. They removed those for the movie but they perverted them into this multicultural Balderdash yeah. It was horrible and then presented granted it. Yeah they did a good job with with portraying a genuine faith and the the trust and love the Harriet Tubman inspired among her peers. On the underground railroad were both Really well done yeah. Well let's move quickly into our themes because we don't want to spend the whole podcast talking about our initial reactions. We want to get into the Nitty Gritty of this movie. And probably the biggest thing thing in this movie that's repeated over and over again is liberty or death and this was the battle cry for the revolution. When are when Americans I? I decided to split off from England. They wanted to be free. They didn't want to be under a king they wanted. They didn't want taxes. And and that was the whole. Don't tread on me the and then We come later on and in fact I've been listening to a lot of Political commentary in the last week. That's been discussing whether our founding founding fathers really built this country on slavery Ben Shapiro just this week. Did a a speech at one of the colleges with the young Americans Americans Foundation in which that was the topic of his speech was was America built on slavery or was it built on liberty and he pointed out how how everything that. Our founding documents in our founding fathers believed was liberty they had to make allowances for slavery because so many of the there were so many slaves at the time of our founding but there is a lot of indication that they were already trying to figure out how to abolish slavery even from the beginning of our country. It just took a while to accomplish it and so our our country was actually founded on liberty but it took us a while to catch up and and so we hear I want. I'd rather live free or die. You know I'd rather be free or die liberty or death. It was repeated over and over again in this movie and there was a phrase That she says actually near the end where she meets up with Gideon again towards the end of of her time. I'm in the of being a conductor on their underground railroad where she tells Gideon that God doesn't mean for people to own people and So yeah it's it's like this obviously a movie about slavery in escaping slavery but I thought you had an interesting question he wrote. Here's that were were questioned to take his life to avoid being enslaved as it wrong and I it draws to mind her jumping off the bridge. I don't think she she was a temporary suicide there. She was just no no no she wasn't she was trying to get away from them and the only way to get away from them was to jump into the river. I don't think that counts as taking your own life. I think that's just escaping sheet. A her last words before going over the side though we're live free or die so I mean clearly she she thought there was a possibility that it would be a fatal choice but the while I had that scene in in mind when I when I penned this question I do mean it more of a a a general thing because let's face it the the the play of the American slave in the The late eighteenth century and early early nineteenth century was horrid. Yeah and it's not hard to sympathize with the the desire to die. I rather than continue face that horrific existence. Even in that I question you know it. Is it still wrongs still sinful. Kill escape now now to to to take your to die rather than N. B. Enslaved. There's not really a scene in the movie but I. I can't imagine that there weren't slaves who didn't take their own life rather than be captured recaptured. Rather 'cause really being cat recaptured. After escaping would be for a face worsen death right AH for most runaway slaves. Yeah a lot of times. They were beaten to an inch of their lives anyway and the and sold and into worse conditions than they'd been before. Yeah it's slavery slavery is not beautiful and it's not especially the kind of slavery we had. In the American south south it was the worst kind of slavery. And I can't I can't even wrap my mind around what it would have been like to have been in that that in those situations but yet and I want to bring this up because this is something I think. A lot of our cultural discussions nowadays does not bring into account is that slavery still exists. We always talk about it in the past tense because we we think of slavery as being what it was in the American south where the the black men were brought in and sold on the block and it was legal to have them and it was legal to.

Harriet Tubman Moses CICIS Gideon Philadelphia Amazon Saint Catherine Americans Americans Foundation N. B. Enslaved Ben Shapiro Kapiti Michigan Tuchman Egypt England America
"harriet" Discussed on Are You Just Watching?

Are You Just Watching?

12:22 min | 10 months ago

"harriet" Discussed on Are You Just Watching?

"Of the spirituals I when I was watching some of the more documentary nature videos that I could find on. Harriet tubman coming. They made the comment that this the slaves in the south actually used their spirituals to communicate. They were codes so they they would actually Sing a song about you. Know a meeting in the forest and that would be indicating what time the slaves would would leave their Homes in the middle of the night to go have a prayer service in the in the fields away from the the plantation houses. And they would they would actually pass code teach other by singing in in the fields as to when they were GonNa meet or and it was very interesting to find out that you know all these spirituals that have made it you know into our Himal alleges of modern era. A lot of them were actually coded messages to each other. And that's what. Harriet Tubman used it for because she he would often sing to draw the slaves to her when she was a conductor on the underground railroad. We should probably say that Even no no. This is the first impression there will not be a no spoiler section since this is the life and times of an actual historical person. Yeah uh-huh so sorry but one hundred fifty years is long enough for you to have a cotton spoiler. Yes yes we're not gonNA worry about those and and to be honest. We really highly recommend that. If you're going to see this movie to to to educate yourself on Harriet not just watch the movie but Check out some of the the stuff on YouTube Some of the articles that have been put out and we'll put some links in our show notes to kind of guide you and some of that. I also found a documentary. That's available for free on Amazon Prime. If you're an Amazon. Prime member called Harriet Tubman. They called her Moses. which was I found very informative and it goes through to her whole life with historical movies? I always like to go back and see what anachronisms it may have or how they might have modified history in order to tell the dramatic story and for the most part aside from the very last scene they did really really good job. Several of the characters breath are fictionalized. Optional Yeah Yeah they're they're What is it called when they take composites composite? Yeah that's the word I was looking for. Yes they composite at some of the characters to China give to give flesh out people that might have been inherits life but they ah that they may have not been specific person they kinda wrapped them all together into one person and had that person appear in a fictional the biggest biggest one I think is What was her name? Marie Marie from the from the Boardinghouse Marie in the fill in the Philadelphia Boarding House. She was completely completely fictional character but they needed her in there to kind of I guess be a friend to Harry it when and help her learn how to be a free a free person after escaping slavery. So yeah you know. I don't really have a problem with composite characters like that. Because you're compressing so much I I am into two hours. Yes you really have to be able to communicate certain aspects well and they did a good job with Marie and the other big composite in this one is Gideon gotten the slave owners son son slash slave owner himself. Yes who also served a very specific purpose purpose in the movie right and this kind of love hate almost intimate relationship that the from all historical that that I could find really only exist so they kind of built that in I guess to kind of create some kind of a relationship that between a Harriet and her masters it may not have actually existed. Now as we come into. This movie's been out a couple of weeks. I would say I saw it as a press preview. So it's it's been a while since I've seen the movie and it's coming in as they the reviews are very mixed when I was looking on the IMDB comments comments. I was finding that people either giving it five stars and raving about it where they were giving one stars and just couldn't stand it and so they seem to. We'll be all the way on the extremes. There's very few people that just like the movie they either hate it or they loved it and I think that's kind of true a lot of times when you're portraying a a real person and a fictional environment is that people they either want it to be truly historical and they get mad when it isn't or they're just happy with if it because it. It portrays the character that they want to know more about and so they enjoy the movie. So I think that that. Just kinda shows the different ways that people approach which bio-pics I think the And this actually ties in to a little bit of my first impression. It's very easy to look at the the people who are giving it bad reviews and say oh they have sociological. Paintings are racist undertones at that. They don't want to like it or they're automatically gonNA disparage it. You remember like Captain Marvel know that movie was review bombed. I I think is what it was called in rotten tomatoes before it had even come out by people who wanted to review it poorly because of its star. But I don't think that's the case in the few negative reviews that I've read. It really did come. Come down to like you were saying that. They wanted to historical to be more historical more accurate and they wanted more of her accomplishments stuffed into the two Our block which I think would have made it very crowded. Yeah it was interesting because the I took a friend with me to see the movie and she came out of the movie thinking that it was a movie she could recommend people but she felt like there is a major agenda in the gender turned her off which surprised me because I didn't feel like this was an agenda movie. I know that there are some people who could turn it into an agenda because of you know the whole Oh slavery and right and racism and all that stuff. That's going on in our culture but I really felt like the movie didn't Ram home an agenda and so they were just telling a story about a true person and as accurate away as you could with a movie. I do believe there are other movies about Tomlin's life this is just one one of many and I don't know I haven't seen indeed other so I don't know how this win. Stacks up against some of the others but I didn't really feel like it was agenda driven but I could be wrong I mean of course that is also kind of a you know personal perspective where it hits you between the is what you watch it did. Did your friend share what she felt the agenda was I think that she thought it was another of a kind of the women's Lib. Kinda thing you know where women are powerful and and I can see a little bit of that but to be honest this was a super strong woman who lived in an era where she was not free so I I really felt like that. They were portraying her strength character in an accurate way. So it didn't bug me but you know works at getting so hypersensitive to this kind of stuff. Now that I don't know yeah. Actually that hyper sensitive. Nature is what made me uncomfortable comfortable with this movie. Don't get me wrong. This movie. I thought was well done. I think that Cynthia Ribaud did a excellent excellent on job as mentese slash Harriet I think honestly I think all the actors in here did a great job. I think the Director Tur- did a great job putting together a very compelling story however I come to the movie with baggage I am a white male Protestant entitled individual. At least that's what society has been beating into my head head for the last couple of decades and you know with with all this sensitivity about confederate monuments and don't going after historical figures simply because they own slaves or and stuff like that. I felt a little little bit like I was being asked in the movie to atone for the sins of my forefathers which may may or may not be accurate And I think that's where that cultural sensitivity comes into play. I I feel like the emphasis in society recently on being woke and recognizing entitlement and turning away from people who were heroes of the confederacy or even founding fathers simply because they own slaves. I think that's made me more sensitive to what I might feel like is blamed being directed it at my social class. Yeah but like I said shut. It's probably not even accurate. I honestly don't think that this movie does that and the reason I don't think it does that is because it shows in the movie. How many white white people were on the side of the abolitionists you know the The underground railroad would never have existed have been successful if it weren't for all of the White Americans who thought slavery was horribly evil and they risked themselves and their property a lot of times if they'd been caught harboring fugitive slaves. They would've been sent to jail. They would have lost a lot of there. They would have been forced to pay fines and lost their wellbeing. I mean there were tons of people In the south throughout the north who were risking a lot to help fugitive slaves in this movie shows them. You know like the the family with the farm. I'm that helped Terry. It and then later on help period as further on with more slaves fugitive slaves. They did it with all without any lines which I really really liked and they just they kept pointing it out and even you know near the end where they after. The fugitive slave bill was passed and and she was meeting with a bunch of white people about you know how do we keep rescuing slaves. And how far do we have to take them. It was she was one of the very few black people in that room. It was almost all white people who are discussing how they were going to keep the the rescuing of the slaves going and so yeah I honestly feel like they went out of their your way to show that this was not a racial thing that there were just simple who believe slavery was wrong and they were willing to risk risk at all And there it was a lot of discussion towards the end. Obviously where they were coming to the conclusion that Oh civil war was going to be necessary to stop slavery and I thought that was interesting that you know that it was a discussion. You know we. This country cannot abide this evil. And we can't deal with it the right way and so. Oh it's GONNA end up being a civil war. They were discussing that. I thought that was very interesting. Yeah yeah that's one of the hard parts of doing movie like that is because the events events that are depicted in this movie are over the course of I WanNa say twenty to twenty five years from her initial escape escape all the way up through the civil war the yeah. The scene in the civil work ended. It's always hard to give that sense of time in a movie but actually the the fugitive slave act was one of the things that was sort of rearranged in Harriet They put it later in her life to to add a certain amount.

Harriet tubman Marie Marie Amazon YouTube China Gideon Boardinghouse Marie Harry Captain Marvel IMDB Tomlin Cynthia Ribaud Philadelphia Boarding House Terry
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

04:47 min | 11 months ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"Having me. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> I gotTa Bay <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> come the day <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> one <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> you can take. <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> You can take <Speech_Music_Female> Bob <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> Maso. <Music> You can take <Speech_Music_Female> man <Speech_Music_Female> you can take <Music> my <Speech_Music_Female> intake by <Music> <Music> God <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> goes <Speech_Music_Female> you know but <Speech_Music_Female> not <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> to me <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> be <Speech_Music_Female> a <Speech_Music_Female> wall <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> intake my <Speech_Music_Female> body you can take <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you can take <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> Bernard Bass <Music> <Advertisement> so you <Music> <Advertisement> can take <Music> <Advertisement> body intake <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> can take <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> bad. <Speech_Music_Male> Yup <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Fang <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> thing <Music> is clear <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> goes <Speech_Music_Female> to make you <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> can take. <Speech_Music_Female> You <Speech_Music_Female> can take <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> take <Music> <Music> <Music> you can take. <Music> You <Music> can take <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> so <Speech_Music_Male> you can take <Music> <Music> take <Music> you can take <Music> Bob <Music> Berg. <Music> <Music> Take <Music> intake <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <hes> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> Hello again <Speech_Music_Male> if you'd <Speech_Male> like to learn more about <Speech_Male> visiting places <Speech_Male> that tell the story <Speech_Male> of Harriet Tubman <Speech_Male> the underground <Speech_Male> railroad and <Speech_Male> the nineteenth century <Speech_Male> african-american experience <Speech_Male> especially <Speech_Male> in the state <Speech_Male> of Virginia <Speech_Male> good of Virginia Dot. Org <Speech_Music_Male> Slash <Speech_Music_Male> Harriet <Speech_Music_Male> special. <Speech_Male> Thanks to Rianne and <Speech_Male> Giddens. Who is currently <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on tour with her <Speech_Male> new album. Called <Speech_Music_Male> there is <Speech_Male> no other. <Speech_Male> It's a collaboration <Speech_Male> with Italian. Instrumentalists <Speech_Male> Francesco <Speech_Male> Teresi. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> And you can find <Speech_Male> all the information you <Speech_Male> need at Rianne. <Speech_Male> Giddens DOT <Speech_Male> COM following. <Speech_Male> Harry is a production <Speech_Male> by ingredient <Speech_Male> creative <Speech_Male> with Tanya Att <Speech_Male> as the writer and director <Speech_Male> and me Tanner <Speech_Male> Letham as <Speech_Music_Male> executive producer <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> and finally <Speech_Male> following. Harry <Speech_Male> is sponsored by <Speech_Male> the Virginia Tourism <Speech_Male> Corporation <Speech_Male> and <SpeakerChange> the Virginia <Speech_Music_Male> Film Office. <Music>

"harriet" Discussed on Behind The Screen

Behind The Screen

06:04 min | 11 months ago

"harriet" Discussed on Behind The Screen

"Terrance thank you so much for joining us than you have said that throughout the score of Harriet you wanted convey and I quote duality of her existence the strength of character and the grace by which she conducted herself would you elaborate on that war when you look at her life this is a woman our strong conviction but also a woman of strong faith and she would not allow herself to be treated any way but with respect and I love the line in the film what she says give me liberty or give me death you actually he really believe her he says that so I'm needed the music to show how powerful this diminutive person was you know but also show the grace by which she handled herself you know she didn't succumb to their level of treating people you know unjustly even in Harare's times she still relied on faith to carry her through all of this so I wanna music to kind of reflect both things the power and grace of her personality how did you do that would you elaborate on the way you approach the score and your instrument choices will pull it is in the Hamanaka progression that I used you know and the the way I voiced the harmony I tried to use a lot of fifth and fourth intervals in the harmony and use a lot of low brass to kind of convey at so in type strength but those things move and ah pleasant harmonic progression which kind of conveys the grace so when I was composing music you know I didn't want to be too forceful with it and some of the stronger passages you don't hear a lot of percussion you know the percussion is safer more of the transition aw passages you know when they're on the run when they're you know in the woods running from the attacks for me hostile always a universal story and I needed the music to broaden its reach you know I didn't want to write a score that was historically correct you know that that I had no interest in that because hostelry is something still resonates with people today you know and I needed the music to convey that because you know we're living in a time you know when we have the metoo movement going on you know we just have everything else that has gone on and out country right now right let's seems to be kind of crazy or we're not respecting people's thanks I needed the music to have a very broad reach so that's the reason why I use full orchestra in some areas The other reason why I did it is because we need to relate to these characters in different ways than we've related to them in the past a lot of times when we hear that full orchestra a person like Harriet Tubman is not the person that pops into your mind and I want to try to change that you know because we're all deserving you know our respect and she is definitely deserving of all of our respect and gratitude what orchestrated he is and where did you record recorded in Nashville Tennessee and we just contract it a bunch of great musicians to come in and play we also brought in a FOB Amazon the analyst been planning my band for a number of years to perform because he's just one of those uniquely gifted people that I just had to have on the score but Dan this film experience scoring it was unique in that everybody that performed on it felt has to be a part of it you know when we told them with the film was about and we would show them scenes you know people were just happy to be there you know we're just excited to be on the session and say that they had contributed to the film we we had a we had that's an interesting dinner one night we're Nashville Tennessee and trying to drown stereotype but we were in Nashville Tennessee and we went to dinner and there's a young lady who was the waitress and she asks us we started talking Geno compensation you know we go okay so what are you guys here for all we're recording music oh what for moving okay was the movie and we say Harriet Tubman and this young lady she must have been maybe twenty one the two jumped up and down slow screaming I've been waiting for somebody to do something on how on how life you know and I'm going wow that was refreshing because to me it speaks to the power of Harriet that it crosses generations it is hot story is one of strengthen grace key coming back to those two words because you know it's what we're really lacking and our country right now in terms of leadership I should say you know wrentham grace and that's the reason why I feel blessed to be a part of the film because it's one of those moments in time is one of those projects that don't come on often let's listen to some of your music we're going to start with the opening title Heriot's theme would you introduce it sure you know what's interesting about the opening title it actually comes from one of the latest scenes in the film when she's crossing the water because that moment to me was such a powerful moment and when I played it for Casey you know Casey loved it and a central little demo of it and she took it and put it in front of the film the opening and I'm like oh I didn't think it would work there but it works perfectly this oh that's how I became going fell.

Terrance Harriet
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"And so when you sit back and you sort of think about someone. Managing to emancipate close to a thousand people. You know it's breathtaking and that was Harriet. Tubman as we learn about Harriet. We not only peer into the incredible life of one of our country's most iconic heroes. We also get a better understanding of the broader experience for African Americans in the nineteenth century on the next episode. We traveled to museums throughout Virginia and to the presidential homes of Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. To hear how the stories of that African American experience are being told today mulberry. Row is the plantation main street of Monticello where all of the Industrial Labor to place Jefferson and his lifetime. Enslaved over six hundred people. We also knew that we needed to own the fact that our Guy James Madison political genius father the Constitution you know author of the bill of Rights this guy codified the institution of slavery. I'm Celeste Headley and we're following Harriet. If you'd like to learn more about visiting places that tell the story of Harriet Tubman the underground railroad and the nineteenth century African American experience especially in the state of Virginia. Go to Virginia Dot org slash. Carry it in this episode. We heard from several historians Eric Armstrong Dunbar. From Rutgers University Catherine Clinton from the University of Texas San Antonio Jessica millward of the University of California Irvine and L. Patrice Belches Harriet Tubman was portrayed by Krista while rock we had production assistance from Kenny Burns. More curry she ended to Loria and Miranda fillmore following. Harriet is a production by ingredient creative with Tanya aunt as the writer and director. And Tanner Letham as executive producer following. Harriet is sponsored by the Virginia Tourism Corporation and Virginia Film Office. He's Kinda hard not to say. Goodness Gracious. This woman was real. You know she was. She was bad just a bad ass and he can. He says we're back up in some parts. I some ways. I decided not to call her. Bad has sort of reverence just two. I'm in sort of thinking about what my grandmother would say. If she read a book that I wrote in which I called. Harriet Tubman a bad ass sheets. Eric what are you talking about? Watch your mouth. That's like honestly that's the first thing that popped into. That's my my sensibilities as a sort of middle aged black woman who grew up with a black grandmother going to church. That usually don't say those things especially about your elders. And even though that's you know the phrase of the term has we you know we use that now as as a symbol or a sign of respect I know. I kind of decided to to listen to Elsie Armstrong in my in my head and to call her boss lady more frequently..

Harriet Tubman L. Patrice Belches Harriet Tub Virginia Eric Armstrong Dunbar James Madison Harriet Tanner Letham Thomas Jefferson Elsie Armstrong Celeste Headley Virginia Film Office Rutgers University Virginia Tourism Corporation Monticello University of California Irvin Kenny Burns Catherine Clinton University of Texas San Antoni Jessica millward
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

08:42 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"In a shorter way when people ask what caused the civil war. We say it's complicated comma slavery. You know it's a question Stephanie. Weenie GETS A lot. She's the director of education at the American Civil War Museum in Richmond. It's part of the historic tredegar ironworks complex which supplied about half of the artillery used by the confederate states army as well as the iron plating for the Virginia the first confederate ironclad warship. And we hear lots of misconceptions coming out about the cause of the war which ninety nine percent of those go back to the idea of reason slavery so if it was about state's rates was about states rights to own leave people. If it was about the idea of well slavery was dying out anyway. No actually growing and expanding it's our country would not exist without the institution of slavery by the time of the civil war. There's almost four million people in the south in slavery again historian Ed Ayers and you know. We know the story of uncle. Tom's cabin escaping across the Ohio River and so forth the great majority of and slay people would have been so far from any possibility of escape through walking or through any means. Frankly sometimes you teach young people and they said well. I wouldn't have stayed well. It would have been almost impossible to escaped from most of the south in the places that have the largest plantations are in the interior the black belt of Alabama Mississippi or they are secluded like the sugar plantations that we see in twelve years. A slave important thing to remember too is that slavery varied a great deal across the south and many of the young men who were sold out of Virginia or Maryland would have been shipped to Louisiana there. The sugar plantations prefer to hire over ninety percent. Men and the women that would buy would be just barely old enough to bear children and we'd be expected to bear children until they could no longer do so. The infant mortality rate there and in the South Carolina low country where they grew rice boggles our imagination but as the civil war dragged on and the union pushed deeper south. The cracks start to show. Just look at what happened at Fort Monroe Virginia in eighteen sixty one two hundred fifty years earlier. It was known as Point Comfort. Remember that from the beginning of the episode the place where the first enslaved Africans to set foot in what would become the United States were traded for food and supplies. How fitting that. This place would be one of the first to offer. Enslaved people refuge during the civil war so this is the main the central entry point to the historical fortification at Fort Monroe. Maingate would have been staffed. It is actually likely the spot where bigger towns in eighteen sixty one three enslaved men Baker Townsend and Mallory showed up at the main gate of Fort Monroe it was the largest stone fort in the country and it was surrounded by what is essentially a moat. You'll dance of the colonial national historic park. Picks up the story from there. They were being used by the confederate army to construct dishes. And you know. Lightweight fortifications Adjacent to Fort Monroe. They made note. That Virginia seceded from the Union. And on that very night they decided to take that risk in seek their freedom and they came here to form row. It happened to be the Second day that General Butler was here and had taken command and he was confronted with this decision. He had to interestingly enough. He had contemplated in the past the ability to keep freedom seekers and had not found argument that he thought we'd be justified or sustained but upon learning the way that these enslaved men were being used he felt confident he could argue him being a lawyer that they were Weapon being used against the Union army and therefore could be retained as contraband of War. This led to thousands of freedom seekers arriving not only at Portman Road but at other union camps and forts throughout the country and guess who else spent some time at Fort Monroe our hero. Harriet Tubman. So we're standing here at Algernon Oak Astronaut oak is a witness tree In that is a tree that would have been here two as a witness or to observe And been part of that experience of the past so when you think in terms of the place where history happened. This tree is believed to be at least four hundred years old so the potential that it witnessed arrival of English settlers they rival of Africans as well as witnessing Harriet Tubman. Will we know that there is a memorandum from the War Department? That's dated April. Twenty second eighteen sixty five and that's authorizing for free government transport for Harriet. Tubman to come to former so we know that she's here in the spring of sixty five because she has the ability to get here at the cost of the United States government. That's Robin Reid. I'm the director of the case. May Museum here at Fort. Monroe the next thing we know about Harry Todd minutes that the surgeon general of the United States vk barn since communication to the chief medical officer here on the Virginia Department primarily to instruct him to appoint Harry is either a nurse or a matron here at Fort Monroe It is our understanding that she was anticipating serving as Grand Matron at the hospital and that is not the role that she ended up playing see cooked. She did laundry. How long does she stay? We don't know that way. We suspect a couple of months. Because there's no records after that. It's a complex and complicated shared history. Our United States of America. You could be forgiven if you didn't know that James Madison had slaves or Harriet. Tubman was a union soldier. That's because those kinds of details are often left out or lost as were taught a certain narrative about our country but visit places in Virginia. Like Monticello Montpellier and the American Civil War Museum and you'll see how that narrative has evolved to be much more inclusive and two more honestly reflect the reality of our history but when you think of it as the making of America and a shared narrative that we all were experiencing and our ancestors all had to make some really difficult choices. You really begin to understand how important that history is to us today. And that's where we go in our final episode of following. Harriet will pull Harriet Story. And the story of the African American experience in Nineteenth Century America right through to the present. We'll talk about why a movie like Harriet. And how it depicts. The way she lived her life is so important to us as Americans at this time. It's really easy to think about slavery as this monolithic that happened. Twelve million people two hundred years ago that we can kind of ood. That was bad. It happened it's over. I don't really have to process that too much right. Is this thing that happened. I can't really think about it too. Detailed how could you not want to examine the lives of enslaved people? When you're examining history. It doesn't make any sense to me. If you'd like to learn more about visiting places that tell the story of Harriet Tubman the underground railroad and the nineteenth century African American experience especially in the state of Virginia. Go to Virginia Dot org slash. Harriet in this episode. We heard from Ula dance and Robin Reid from Fort. Monroe Historians Ed Ayers of the backstory history podcast and Elvis belches Ni- abates and Gail jessop white from Jefferson's Monticello Christian coats from Madison's Monpellier and Stephanie are to any of the American civil war museum following Harriet is a production by ingredient creative with Tanya ought as the writer and director and tenor Letham as executive producer following. Harriet is sponsored by the Virginia Tourism Corporation and Virginia Film.

Harriet Tubman Harriet Virginia Fort Monroe American Civil War Museum United States confederate states army Fort Monroe Virginia director Ed Ayers Robin Reid Stephanie Union James Madison Union army Harriet Story tredegar ironworks
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> nine. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Show <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> a <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> world <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> a <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I'm Celeste. Headley <Speech_Female> and this is <Speech_Female> following. <SpeakerChange> Harriet <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> if you'd <Speech_Female> like to learn more about <Speech_Female> visiting places <Speech_Female> that tell the story <Speech_Female> of Harriet tubman <Speech_Female> underground railroad <Speech_Female> and the nineteenth <Speech_Female> century African <Speech_Female> American experience <Speech_Female> especially <Speech_Female> in the state of Virginia. <Speech_Female> Go to <Speech_Female> Virginia Dot Org <Speech_Music_Female> Slash Harriet. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> In this episode <Speech_Female> we heard <Speech_Female> from historians. Ed <Speech_Female> Ayers Elva <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Tree spellcheck <Speech_Female> Jessica millward <Speech_Music_Female> Catherine Clinton <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and Eric <Speech_Female> Armstrong Dunbar. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Catherine <Speech_Female> rooted deeply researched <Speech_Female> biography <Speech_Female> of Harriet called. <Speech_Female> Harriet Tubman. <Speech_Female> The road to freedom <Speech_Female> and Erica <Speech_Female> has a new book out called. <Speech_Female> She came <Speech_Female> to slay <Speech_Female> the life and <SpeakerChange> times of <Music> <Advertisement> Harriet Tubman. <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> We also <Speech_Music_Female> heard from NY <Speech_Music_Female> abates and Gail <Speech_Music_Female> jessop white from <Speech_Music_Female> Jefferson's Monticello <Speech_Music_Female> Christian <Speech_Music_Female> coats. For Madison's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Montpellier <Speech_Music_Female> Stephanie Arte Weenie <Speech_Music_Female> of the American <SpeakerChange> Civil <Music> War Museum. <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> Casey <Speech_Female> Lemons director of the <Speech_Female> new focus features <Speech_Female> bio-pic called <Speech_Female> Harriet. <Speech_Female> And Malcolm Jamie <Speech_Female> Jamieson. <Speech_Female> Who owns the Berkley <Speech_Female> Plantation? Where <Speech_Female> parts of the film were <Speech_Female> shot. <Speech_Female> Special research <Speech_Female> thanks to the <Speech_Female> Black History Museum <Speech_Female> in Richmond and <Speech_Female> the city of Petersburg <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Virginia and <Speech_Female> the Petersburg <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> preservation task force. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> We <Speech_Female> had production assistance <Speech_Music_Female> from Derek <Speech_Music_Female> Clements. Ken <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Burns more a curry. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Shannon Loria <Speech_Music_Female> and Miranda full <Music>

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"To settle the estate his widow began working to sell all their slaves. Three of airmont is sisters. Were sold south. This was likely the moment that spurred her to action. There was one of two things I had a right to liberty or death. If I could not have one I would have the other on September Seventeenth. Eighteen forty nine. Harriet and her brothers Ben and Henry ran away from the farm historian. Erica Armstrong Dunbar. The plan was to escape toward Philadelphia and at some point. Her brothers decided that it was a bad idea got scared they were concerned. They did know if they could actually make it and they decided that they would rather face punishment and even the possibility of sale. Maybe hoping that if they were sold away from their family it would be to a nearby farm or plantation. They decided that risk was a better option than taking their chances in the woods being chased by bounty hunters and dogs and they decided to return and while their sister did not want to return. They forced her dragged her back on. It's really this sort of moment in her life that you know man would ever sort of determine direction again so when they return and they're sort of awaiting their fate. Harriet Tubman makes the decision that she would not sit around and wait and she alone took to the woods and escaped in the late fall of eighteen forty nine. She evaded capture and made it all the way to Philadelphia. When I found I had crossed that line I looked at my hands to see if I was the same person. There was such a glory over everything. The Sun came like gold through the trees and over the field and I felt like I was in heaven..

Harriet Tubman Philadelphia Erica Armstrong Dunbar Henry Ben
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"A building factories and and develop in the economy but that debate loses and historian at air says things start to turn planters and other white people really worried about what those free black people might be doing. They might be doing this thing. Called learning to read and to be able to preach the Gospel to themselves and that's what Nat Turner does. He reads the Bible. He says we are the children of Israel. We are the people who are held in bondage. That have God's favor and the time is going to come now when we shall free ourselves as the people of the Old Testament after Nat Turner's rebellion in eighteen. Thirty one wearing slaved men used knives hatchets axes to kill more than fifty white people. Virginians never again publicly discussed emancipation. Life CARRIED ON FREE. Blacks built businesses. They were barbers. Tailors and lumbermen. Enslaved people also had dreams but far fewer options historian and documentary filmmaker Elvis belches recalls the story of Henry Box Brown who worked at one of the myriad tobacco factories in Richmond Virginia. So while Hillary Brown was at work someone got word to him that his wife had indeed been sold along with at least a couple of the kids but if he wanted to see her one last time. The slave cough cough is a chain of human beings. Oftentimes the were connected by chains and or ropes. And so as he was told. Mr Brown waited on that street for that coffee to come by. Finally he spotted his wife. She was able to step out just a little bit because she was connected to the person before and behind her and as I understand it from his memoirs they clasped hands and he was able to walk with her for perhaps four miles before they had to part never saw his wife and again at that point he was ready to answer the call to freedom having lost his family and so with the next year with the help of Atoms Express. He was placed into a wooden box and he. This was a man who was about six feet tall average science mail. He was nailed into a box. That was about three feet one inch by two and a half feet by two feet. He had maybe three breathing holes and as he described it a little bladder of water and a few biscuits they painted on their this side up but as it is today it didn't mean anything been told. There are times where he was on his head upside down for hours. Not Knowing if he would live or die that evolved into a twenty six hour trip by various means of transportation carriage ride train. Is I understand. In vessel to get to Philadelphia. They were getting a little anxious up there because they knew to wait on him. Finally the boxer right. They prided open thinking that they were probably see. Maybe a deceased person. But once they brought it opened he popped up and stated however you all gentlemen and then he broke into a song of praise thanking God. They said he was so drenched with perspiration that he looked like he had just come out of the Delaware River just a few years after Henry. Box Brown mailed himself north. Everything changes. We'll have that after the break..

Hillary Brown Nat Turner Henry Box Brown cough Delaware River Israel Elvis belches Philadelphia Atoms Express Richmond Virginia
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"Most of US enter Harriet. Tubman is life when she was in her thirties forties fifties and often times. We don't sort of think about how she came to be. Harriet I'm Celeste. Headley and this is following Harriet. You know I think for people of my generation people who grew up in the nineteen seventies. We first met Harriet in a photo in the corner of textbook she looked old. Her skin was stretched tight on her face. Her mouth was pinched. Her head was wrapped in a dark. Kerchief we read a couple of paragraphs about how she freed herself from slavery and then became a conductor in the underground railroad. She saved the lives of many other. People guided them safely from slavery to freedom. That was it. That was the whole story. We were told but Harriet. Tubman was so much more than a small woman with a lantern in the woods. She was a wife and mother an entrepreneur. A soldier spy nurse and an activist who fought for women's right to vote. I can honestly say after working on this project. She's really one of the most incredible and brave individuals. I've ever come across. That's Erica Armstrong Dunbar. She's a history professor at Rutgers University. And she's got a new book coming out called. She came to slay the life and times of Harriet Tubman. Erica says in the beginning. Harriet wasn't even Harriet. She was era. Minta or minty as her family called her her parents. Were Harry Green and Ben Ross. And they were both enslaved on the eastern shore of Maryland. They had at least nine children and era. Minta was in the middle born sometime around. Eighteen twenty to one of the things about enslavement. Was that the sale of slaves. The forced movement in migration always left enslaved families vulnerable. And we see that happen for Herod Ben. At a certain point they're separated and tear it is forced to move with her children including Eremita To another farm ten miles away from her husband they would continue to see one another to remain connected but they didn't live together and it was really sort of at that moment that we begin to see. Just how fragile. The lives of enslaved people were airmen to was rented out when she was still a child before she even had a full set of adult teeth. She was pressed to learn how to weave patterns. That would have been difficult for an adult. She was forced to empty the Muskrat traps on one of the farms where she lived. She did domestic work. Getting up very early carrying large loads of water to and from the house Plucking chickens making soap work that that never ended and she was expected to do this no matter her health she got the measles. When she was a small child emptying Muskrat traps and she was still expected to work and on occasion she would come back to her mother's The farm on which her mother lived in would be nursed back to health and then she would be sent out once again to work. When era MINTA was around five? She was hired out to a family who wanted her to help care for their infant. Catherine Clinton is a historian at the University of Texas San Antonio and author of the biography here at Tubman the road to freedom and there were incidents where she recalled that the moment the baby began to cry. The mother instead of reaching for her baby might reach for a switch in order to we. Harriet for letting the baby cry because it was her charge to keep the baby quiet. This shows the kind of abuses the enslaved endured under slavery at a certain point when Arrow MINTA had been hired out. She's we would call her a a tweet her. She was Somewhere between the ages of twelve and fifteen or sixteen and she went for what was supposed to be a quick errand to general store. The local store and It was clear that an enslaved man who lived on a nearby farm was in the act of. We're not certain if it was escape. Or if he was simply running away from an angry overseer someone who was angered by the fact that this enslaved and had created some infraction of the rules and he was chasing him and They run into this general store at the moment. That era mint is there. And overseer says to airmen's editor mandates that she help subdue this man and to help tie up his hands and she refuses. We sort of think about this moment where she perhaps it's her first stance against slavery.

Harriet Tubman Arrow MINTA Erica Armstrong Dunbar Minta US Headley Maryland Rutgers University Ben Ross editor Catherine Clinton Harry Green University of Texas San Antoni
"harriet" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Passenger though, she might be most famous for leading those nighttime escapes through the underground railroad. Harriet Tubman went on to take an increasingly active role in dismantling American slavery over the coming decades. We'll talk about Harry, it's later years and the groundbreaking role. She played in the civil war right after this. Now back to the story in the late eighteen fifties as the United States headed toward an inevitable civil war Harriet, Tubman came to be known as the most successful agent of the underground railroad. It was around eighteen fifty eight when thirty eight year old Harriet met, the famous abolitionist or at our and writer Frederick Douglas. Douglas, it escaped slavery himself some years before and became a leader in the anti slavery movement. He introduced Harriet Tubman to John Brown, a radical white abolitionist who believed the only way to end slavery was through. Violent insurrection Brown and Tubman immediately developed a mutual respect for one another John Brown called Harriet general Tubman and look to her for advice on recruiting escape slaves to his 'cause they'll Harriet did not necessarily share John Brown's beliefs. She supported his goals and through eighteen fifty nine helped him plan an attack on the weapons depot at Harper's ferry Virginia. Brown hope to steal the weapons and use them to arm slaves who could then rise up against their owners and fight for their freedom Harriet used her knowledge of the south and her network of contacts to find support for Brown's plans. Unfortunately, the attack on harpers ferry was a failure. And John Brown was captured and Hong for his actions days after his capture. Brown's home was raided and several incriminating documents were confiscated which implicated his co-conspirators Harriet Tubman. Was one of those named in the documents making her continued abolitionist activities even more dangerous despite this Harriet risk traveling to Boston on December second eighteen fifty nine to be with John Brown's friends on the day of his execution. Brown was a man whom Harriet truly respected and his death hitter, particularly hard..

Harriet general Tubman John Brown Frederick Douglas harpers ferry United States Harry Virginia writer Boston Harper Hong thirty eight year
"harriet" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Harriet Tubman home for the aged was now open things did not start off the way Harriet hope though as the church implem-. Entity hundred dollar entrance fee for anyone wishing to be admitted inherit Harry would later say about this fee. Quote, they make a rule that nobody should come in. Without they have one hundred dollars. Now. I wanted to make a rule that nobody should come in unless they didn't have no money at all. Again, lava by nineteen eleven along a hard life finally was taking a toll inherits body. She's now at least eighty six years old frail and sickly she's admitted to the rest home named in her honor. She would spend the next two years of her life there until she finally succumbed to pneumonia and died on March tenth nineteen thirteen surrounded by those she loved before she passed. She told everybody in the room. I got a excuse me. She told everybody in the room. I go to prepare a place for you thinking of others right to the very end. She will be buried in fort hill cemetery in Auburn New York with military honors and that takes us out of today's times time. Good job soldier made it back. Ben. Man, Herod motherfucking tub and what a life. She led started from nothing started really from you know, with less than nothing. She started her life, technically as property, can you imagine that start with you life in someone else's hands. You know in this country and slaved legally beholden to the whims. And wishes of another another who walked free, you know with their family. You know, while you didn't get to be free with yours. Let's look at some stats really quick to show. Just go remind everyone like the scope of slavery in Harry. It's you know, when when she was born how many meet sacks just like Harriet were tragically enslaved in the history of the trans Atlantic slave trade. Fifteen twenty five eighteen twenty six or I'm sorry. Sorry. Eighteen sixty six twelve and a half million Africans were shipped the new world of them ten point seven million survived. The dreaded middle passage disembarking in North America. The Caribbean South America only about skews me only about three hundred eighty eight thousand we're transport directly from Africa to North America. The vast majority were taking to central and South America and the Caribbean. Think about that hundreds of thousands taking the United States, and then their children became slaves, and then their grandchildren, dating, great, grandchildren, etc. Cetera. And then by eighteen sixty there would be.

Harriet Tubman South America North America Harry Harriet Caribbean fort hill cemetery United States Herod Auburn New York pneumonia Africa one hundred dollars eighty six years hundred dollar two years