37 Burst results for "Harriet"

Fresh update on "harriet" discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

00:41 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "harriet" discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

"A list of conservative donors. And talk a little bit about the letter and your reaction to it. So of course this is a chain letter, but here it goes. Dear Debbie, as an unapologetic conservative in the United States House of Representatives, I'm honored to lead the charge for our Republican agenda and help shape a better future for our party and our nation. Oh, my God. Now I gotta say, you know, looking over the letter. The letter itself is quite conservative. It talks about tax cuts, it talks about stopping Biden and talks about stopping Biden's border policies. It hits all he talks about the Green New Deal and the radical legislation, it attacks build back better. You know, together we will stand strong against the Biden administration's attack on our fundamental principles. Now, yeah. Here's one thing it doesn't talk about. Not one word about the January 6th committee, which is kind of interesting. If Liz Cheney was so proud, she felt that she's standing up for true Republican principles. You would think that front and center it's not often you have a congresswoman from Wyoming kind of be the lead figure in a national commission to investigate this important incident, but not a word about January 6th. Yeah, yeah, and the human rights violations that is taking place with conservatives being locked up right now. Not a word. Not a word, not a word. No, interestingly, she had a debate with the other candidates, including Harriet hagman, and the election issue came up. And she's like, you know, Liz Cheney is like, you won't admit that this was the most secure election ever. And Harry hickam to her credit actually mentioned 2000 meals and mentioned that it wasn't the most secure election. And my point of Liz Cheney is Liz, where is the proof? Who has ever shown that this was the most secure election ever or to put it differently, that there was less fraud in 2020 than in all previous elections. Where's the demonstration? Where's the evidence that shows that? Liz Cheney, even though she has this letter that acts like she is just super conservative and doesn't like Biden clearly she wants to get Biden on her side because as you know, we talked about this, she's the darling, really, of the Democrats right now. And she's the one that's going to be asked to go on CNN when she loses her election because she will. And so she's going to go on MSNBC. She's going to be the liberal, the conservative token, I guess. She's the left's favorite Republican. And she's happy to play that role. She's willing to do that. The other thing that's interesting is that she has been appealing to Democrats. That's right. That's right. She actually did that. She wants them to cross over. Thankfully, yes, thankfully, and you pointed this out because they have open elections, right? So they can do this. But you pointed out, and don't worry, there's not that many Democrats in Wyoming. Not enough to save Liz Cheney. And she is 30 points behind Harry and Hagen in this election. I'm only going to lose that election and I hope she does. Let's talk about Cassidy Hutchinson. Here's my latest tweet on it. By my estimate that canonization, the halo around Cassidy hutcheson lasted just a few hours. Already her defenders have stopped talking about her. She was useful to them for a brief moment and then she wasn't. And now she returns to the obscurity from which she came. Initially, they were trying to salvage her. They were like, well, she was merely narrating what she had been told. But of course, that was the bombshell. That was what the media jumped on to the idea that Trump's throwing his food, the idea that Trump is grabbing for the steering wheel. This is the salacious detail that made the story. As you know, I mean, the commission, they asked her to come on because they wanted people to think that this was true. They probably knew it wasn't. I mean, this is hearsay from hearsay from hearsay. Who admits that in the evidence ever, right? But they wanted people to think that Trump was this kind of person. They wanted him. It was unhinged. They wanted people to think he was completely unhinged, that he would reach over and try to I mean, imagine trying.

Liz Cheney Biden Biden Administration Harriet Hagman Harry Hickam Wyoming House Of Representatives Debbie United States Cassidy Hutchinson LIZ Cassidy Hutcheson Msnbc CNN Hagen Harry Donald Trump
Fresh update on "harriet" discussed on Bloomberg Surveillance

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:30 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "harriet" discussed on Bloomberg Surveillance

"Analysts in over a 120 countries. This is Bloomberg radio. Now, a global news update President Biden is ripping the Supreme Court's ruling on EPA authority. Trey Thomas reports. In a statement Biden called it another devastating decision that aims to take our country backwards. The EPA no longer has the authority to enact sweeping regulations to combat climate change. Republican Liz Cheney is fighting to keep her congressional CD in Wyoming, the co chair of the House January 6th committee sparred with her for Republican challengers in a debate Thursday night. Cheney is trailing in the polls in Wyoming behind Harriet hagman, who is endorsed by former president Trump. Ukrainian officials say 17 people are dead after Russian missiles hit a resort and an apartment building near the port city of Odessa, Ukraine's emergency ministry says one missile hit a 9 story building early Friday morning, and that a rescue mission was underway for people buried inside the rubble. Gas prices are falling again, triple-A says

President Biden Trey Thomas EPA Liz Cheney House January 6Th Committee Bloomberg Wyoming Harriet Hagman Biden President Trump Supreme Court Cheney Odessa Ukraine
Harriet Hageman: Conservatives Are Welcome to Move to Wyoming

The Dan Bongino Show

01:54 min | Last week

Harriet Hageman: Conservatives Are Welcome to Move to Wyoming

"I mean it from the bottom of my heart it is just a beautiful state if you have any trouble believing the existence of the almighty go to Wyoming for a sunset or a sunrise and it will disabuse you of that silly notion right away But you have a lot of people moving into Wyoming I'm trying to turn a very red state maybe a little less red or maybe even a little purple You know it's great to have people want to come to your state but do you find that that local pressure you know down here in Florida we thankfully have a lot of conservatives moving in which is turning Florida redder but are you finding that Wyoming that's becoming a bit of an issue people taking their liberal values over to this conservative state I think for a period of time we did and first of all thank you for talking about my state that way That's exactly how I feel about it I am born and raised here fourth generation my great grandfather came here on a cattle trail in 1878 from Texas So I've got a deep deep roots in Wyoming and I love my state What I am finding is that we are getting locked down refugees So I believe more conservatives are moving into this state For a period of time I think we were getting liberals but over the last two years we're getting an influx of folks from Oregon Washington and California because they are truly escaping the madness from there And so I as I have been campaigning and I'm now at almost 29,000 miles in Wyoming since I since I started this driving around the state I have met a lot of people who are moving here because of our conservative values And I welcome them all with open arms We want people to come to Wyoming but we want them to understand our culture our history who and what we are We don't want to change that We are all for innovation We're all for those kinds of things but our conservative values are what has made Wyoming what it is So we welcome people with open arms if they want to come here and be a part of this great state

Wyoming Florida Texas Oregon Washington California
Harriet Hageman: Liz Cheney Was Never a Supporter of President Trump

The Dan Bongino Show

01:58 min | Last week

Harriet Hageman: Liz Cheney Was Never a Supporter of President Trump

"She blew it on some of the most important issues of our time But just assuage some of the listeners here You are in fact a constitutional conservative We get the best of both worlds Someone who won't weaponize the government against us and you'll get conservative votes too Am I wrong No you're absolutely correct What you say is spot on If we can all be good conservatives in name but if we don't if we're not there when it counts it really doesn't matter Correct At the times when it counted such as when president Trump has put forward his America first policies one of his biggest oppositions was Liz Cheney not just about this and this is an absolute failure I agree with you on that But the issue of Syria the issue of her attacking him about when Russia was allegedly putting bounties on our soldiers had in Afghan Afghanistan She came out and attacked him vociferously four months before the election in 2020 on that And it turned out to be false The story wasn't true but she didn't wait to find out whether it was true or not which for me was the first moment when I realized that she was against Donald Trump She never said that but when she came back out and attacked him the way that she did something went sideways in my head and I knew that this wasn't right And now we see that She was never a supporter of Donald Trump And when she had the first opportunity to attack him and try to hurt him and his followers the people who are the constitutional conservatives the America first troops she jumped in with both feet and that's where we are right now She saw that she had an opportunity to hurt him to destroy him It hasn't worked out slight She thought it would but that's why she's on that January 6th committee It's not about finding out the truth It's not about that What it's about is she wants to destroy president Trump And they've said that repeatedly that the purpose of this is to prevent him from ever running for reelection Again And we didn't send her back there for that purpose Again she has failed us She has failed our country

President Trump Liz Cheney Donald Trump America Syria Afghanistan Russia
Harriet Hageman: Liz Cheney Has Failed & Betrayed Wyoming

The Dan Bongino Show

01:49 min | Last week

Harriet Hageman: Liz Cheney Has Failed & Betrayed Wyoming

"Our leaders are therefore us This is a government of by and for the people Yet what we have is we have people who are intentionally hurting the citizens of this country None of them not under our constitution None of them were elected to adopt policies to hurt the people of the United States of America or Wyoming specifically That isn't why they're elected We didn't elect her to be the judge and jury of president Trump We elected her to push back against policies that hurt the state of Wyoming She's not doing that And not only is she not doing it she is aligned herself with the people who are So she's not only failed in her job but she has betrayed us in the process And when she comes out and she talks about the various things she does the insurrection and overthrowing the government we all know that that's hogwash We all saw what happened And we also know that this is political theater Here's the reality nobody that they are attempting to attack through this process are receiving due process As a constitutional attorney as someone who's tried over 30 lawsuits in my life you always have the right of confrontation You always have the right of cross examination You always have the right of due process You always have the right of notice and an opportunity to be heard This is a show trial They are not going to present one snippet of evidence or one witness or one document or one photograph or one piece of video that shows a contrary contrary narrative to what they're putting forward In other words this is a Soviet stalinist show trial We out here in the real world know it They seem to forget that we're a lot smarter than a lot of those people back there They think they can pull the wool over their eyes They can't They're failing us She's failing us They all need to go

President Trump Wyoming United States Of America
Harriet Hageman: We're Turning Into a Third World Country

The Dan Bongino Show

01:50 min | Last week

Harriet Hageman: We're Turning Into a Third World Country

"You are running specifically to do this in this office And people want to see I am going to let you you are going to do what right What you just said is perfectly encapsulates Liz Cheney's entire career She saw an opportunity to grab the microphone and weaponize this January 6th committee and continue to talk about things Harriet everything that's been said about January 6th has been said We're not changing any minds Everybody everybody's had a chance to say it is time to fix the inflation crisis the gas prices crisis and she's not talking about any of that She's wasting her time going after Donald Trump in the last election Well that's exactly right And that's why she has become a useful tool for the Democrats while she continues to try to attack and hurt the Republicans and the people that can actually solve these problems We're turning into a third world country before our eyes We are airlifting baby formula into the United States of America We have a situation where as I said we're going to have a food crisis We've got a supply chain crisis We have an energy crisis all because of horrific policies coming out of Washington D.C. These are not natural crises These are not natural catastrophes They are man-made and they are man-made by the uni party that has been running Washington D.C. for the last 40 years perhaps even longer But that's why we need to have normal everyday average folks like Harriet hagerman step up and say no more We're not going to let the elitists make the decisions They put us $30 trillion in debt They're in the process of destroying our schools And I often say that there is a special place in hell excuse my language for people who adopt policies that are intended to increase the cost of energy food and housing because it hits the poorest and the middle class among

Liz Cheney Washington D.C. Harriet Donald Trump Uni Party Harriet Hagerman United States Of America
Harriet Hageman: I'm Running for Wyoming, Taking on Liz Cheney

The Dan Bongino Show

01:58 min | Last week

Harriet Hageman: I'm Running for Wyoming, Taking on Liz Cheney

"Awesome Harriet hagerman you decided to take on Liz Cheney which I have an enormous amount of respect for you for She has done something in my mind that is unforgivable I am a Christian I believe in the power of forgiveness but you know you're gonna have to take that up with Jesus Christ and the afterlife politics right now forgiveness hasn't been doing as much good because they continue to attack us She is weaponized this January 6th committee and used it as a platform for herself to attack Republican she dislikes and try to interfere in I believe another election by dissuading activists from getting involved who may choose to support president Trump Was that one of the reasons you decided to take Quran along with many Let me hear from your perspective why you decided to take on this dynastic family in American politics Well there are many reasons why I make the decision to run for office But one of the first things I would say is that I'm not just running against Liz Cheney I am running four Wyoming and that's why I made the decision to do this We are not being represented Wyoming only has one congressional representative where the least populated state in the nation we have 580,000 people and right now we have someone who has completely taken her eye off the ball in terms of what are the important issues for us So we are the largest coal producer in the nation We're one of the top oil and gas producers in the nation We're a top cattle producer in the nation And all of the things that are affecting us from federal lands to the water issues to all of those are addressed oftentimes addressed in the natural resource committee and this is just one example of where she's failed She's no longer on the natural resource committee For the first time in Wyoming history we don't have someone on the natural resource committee or our congressional representative which is devastating to the state of Wyoming Because we don't have a voice on the very issues that affect the vast majority of us in this state

Liz Cheney Harriet Hagerman President Trump Wyoming Natural Resource Committee
Liz Cheney's Statement at Today's Jan. 6 Hearing

The Dan Bongino Show

00:46 sec | 2 weeks ago

Liz Cheney's Statement at Today's Jan. 6 Hearing

"There she is again giving her a statement at the January 6th star chamber And Liz Cheney I have no actual credentials other than my Chinese last name Let me tell you the white Christian nationalist is hiding around every corner We will use this hearing to get to the bottom of this dastardly threat And I will use my last name to try to desperately stay in power and this congressional seat And fight back the onslaught from that evil person Harriet hagerman coming from my seat Oh you Republicans shall genuflect before me to honor my legendary last name You shall show fields these are The Crown I can't believe this man

Liz Cheney Harriet Hagerman
Harriet Hageman: Wyoming Is Excited for Upcoming Election

Mark Levin

01:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Harriet Hageman: Wyoming Is Excited for Upcoming Election

"How's your reception in Wyoming is taking on Liz Cheney at the grassroots level Oh my gosh Mark you can not believe the reaction that we're having here in Wyoming We had Donald Trump Jr. here last night and this morning we had an event at 9 o'clock on a weekday in a town of 650 people There were 200 people that showed up and stayed for an hour and a half Wow I mean it has been rocking and rolling Our signs all over the state people in the restaurants that were interacting with and meeting with people are so incredibly excited about the election We have more volunteers You can't even believe the number of volunteers that we have The number of people who are walking doors the number of people who are out there they want to buy radio advertisements They're just doing everything they can They drive around their communities with our signs on top of their cars Excitement and the people that just really embraced us and embraced the message that we're presenting the message of hope and excitement all of the things that are happening in Wyoming it is just it's been an incredible spring and people are really really really excited for us And people anybody who wants to go and learn more about me make donations she's got a $7 million war chest about sort of thing but they can go to hegemon for Wyoming dot com They can learn more They can see our writings They can listen to our interviews with you Every time I'm on your program Mark you can not believe the reaction I get Everybody in this state loves you They know that you are a constitutional scholar They have so much respect for you And when I'm on your program I probably get more comments than almost having anything else So I still appreciate you giving me the opportunity to visit with you

Wyoming Liz Cheney Donald Trump Jr. Mark
Harriet Hageman: Liz Cheney Has Always Hated President Trump

Mark Levin

01:51 min | 2 weeks ago

Harriet Hageman: Liz Cheney Has Always Hated President Trump

"Now she had a hate on for Donald Trump long before January 6th didn't she She any rumor about him she would embrace And I think the Republican Party came before this committee that had enough of her which is why they voted her out of the leadership position I don't ever remember that happening I mean this is not pretty much the case She just has had a hate on and never trumper since day one You know it's interesting and she tries to embrace being a conservative and people will say well she voted with president Trump 92% of the time But the things that really counted were the things that she opposed to him and she opposed him hard on So where I started really questioning what was going on with Liz Cheney was about 6 months before the November 2020 election When she came out and embraced the idea that there were a Russian bounties on our soldiers in Afghanistan Now that story was eventually debunked which most of the allegations and accusations against president Trump are by that time most of us recognize that whatever story the press was peddling all you needed to do was wait a week ten days 7 days four days whatever it was and it would be proven to be untrue They did it over and over and over again Now the Russian collusion narrative took longer to debunk but a lot of the other things truly it was a matter of a news cycle and then we were like oh yeah that was just another lie And she knew that too but she came out and embraced that and attacked him in a way that was very very aggressive And I thought very much directed at that 2020 election And I started really questioning what she was doing I just never had an opportunity to ask her about it because she doesn't come back to land link to talk to her constituents So there were some things that absolutely she has had some real challenge to president Trump for a long time even before the 2020 election

President Trump Liz Cheney Donald Trump Republican Party Afghanistan
Harriet Hageman: Liz Cheney Has to Stay Aligned With Democrats

Mark Levin

01:52 min | 2 weeks ago

Harriet Hageman: Liz Cheney Has to Stay Aligned With Democrats

"And that's a big deal You're not California with 1200 representatives you know You need your representative to actually say something and she's spending all this time on this cockamamie committee appointed by Nancy Pelosi Are you concerned about go ahead I'm sorry And I go even one step further I think that she's actually muted from being able to say anything because she's so aligned with the Democrats right now She can't come out and criticize Joe Biden Or come out and attack him for what he's doing to our country and to our state She's so deeply embedded with them she has to stay aligned with them She works with them every single day So she's actually picked which side she's on it It's not ours And why did she get elected in the first place Was it basically because of her name I mean she has spent most of her career in life in and around Washington D.C. And is that what she hopes will carry her through again I think so And I think that that is what happened I think that's clearly what happened is her name She came back here and she's articulate you know she can sell a good story But one of the things that you realized about Liz Cheney is that Liz always very much limits her interaction with people on the campaign Always has So in contrast I do two two and a half hour town halls where I will do an opening statement gives some information about my background And I'll answer our questions for two hours Liz Cheney has never campaigned that Wait what she'll do is she comes in visits with a few people She'll talk for maybe 15 minutes and then they'll say well we've got another event We've got to get on from here Or she will only go to a home where there are two or three or four people maybe 5 people She only exposes herself in a very controlled way And she's always done

Liz Cheney Washington D.C. Nancy Pelosi Joe Biden California LIZ
Harriet Hageman: When's the Last Time Liz Cheney Was in Wyoming?

Mark Levin

01:16 min | 2 weeks ago

Harriet Hageman: When's the Last Time Liz Cheney Was in Wyoming?

"Primary When is the primary again It is August 16th and early voting starts on July 1 When's the last time Cheney was in Wyoming for say a three day period Does anybody even know Oh gosh I don't know that anyone could identify a period of time when Liz Cheney would have been in Wyoming for three solid days I couldn't answer that question I'm not sure anybody else could What has she been doing lately given the high rate of inflation and fuel Wyoming is an awfully big state So people need a lot of fuel What has she been doing lately to try and help out the people of Wyoming Do you know Absolutely nothing The only thing that she's been doing lately is pursuing a political get vendetta against president Trump and helping the Democrats to deflect attention from the disastrous policies of this administration and Nancy Pelosi And it's not just that it's a big state We're one of the largest oil and gas producers in the nation where the largest coal producer in the nation fossil fuels are absolutely critically important to our ability to provide services they provide a good paying jobs She's done nothing for Wyoming She's focusing on the swamp issues in Washington D.C.

Wyoming Liz Cheney Cheney President Trump Nancy Pelosi Washington D.C.
Does Joy Behar Know Harriet Tubman Was a Gun Owner?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:05 min | 3 weeks ago

Does Joy Behar Know Harriet Tubman Was a Gun Owner?

"The Democrats are losing the argument. They really are even after this horrific massacre of these innocent little babies in new valley, Texas. They're losing the debate. A lot of listeners are sending me text messages of pictures and stories of Harriet Tubman. The heroic conductor of The Underground Railroad. She was a gun owner. As joy behar suggests that black people don't have guns, Harriet Tubman, this is historical, and this is a fact, was known to carry a single shot percussion pistol with about a 6 inch barrel and an ivory handle handled saber, both of which are currently on display now at the Florida a and M university in Tallahassee. She was often known to be armed with a rifle during the Civil War. And there's joy behar yesterday, now when the blacks get the guns, boy, then the gun laws will finally change what a filthy disgusting racist thing to say.

Harriet Tubman New Valley Joy Behar M University Texas Tallahassee Florida Behar
President Biden Responds to SCOTUS Leak

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:53 min | 2 months ago

President Biden Responds to SCOTUS Leak

"Let's go to Joe Biden, cut number 5 in The White House. Change the law saying that children who are LGBTQ can't be in classrooms with other children. Is that legit under the way that the decisions are written? What are the next things that are going to be attacked? Because this mega crowd is really the most extreme political organization that's existed in American history. In recent American history. Let's just unpack that. First of all, put aside the Ku Klux Klan, put aside the Nazi sympathizers, put aside the John birch society, put aside antifa, put aside the January 6 protester, the maga kraut. In reference to the Supreme Court decision by 5 justices, three of whom were nominated by president Trump, all of whom were distinguished jurists long before president Trump came down the escalator as candidate Trump. And of course, the chief justice and clarence Thomas had been on the court for a very long time in justice Alito was a George Bush appointee as well. W Bush appointee. And I'd be sure that that HW Bush, let me George W. Bush appointee. And I'm just here to he came up after Harriet Meyers with withdrawn. So it's cheap justice Roberts than justice Alito. I'm just sure to tell you, the uniter in chief, that's just not true. This is such an over the top comment that, again, it's like the Pope saying NATO is responsible for invading Russia. Maga is the most extreme. And by the way, LGBTQ children, I understand some children so identify, I also understand that no teacher in America would ever separate them and they also understand that that would fail rational basis review. It is the reddest of herrings I have ever heard. It's the stupidest thing I've actually ever heard Joe Biden say.

President Trump Joe Biden John Birch Society Alito Hw Bush George Bush White House Harriet Meyers Clarence Thomas Supreme Court Donald Trump Bush Roberts Maga Nato Russia America
Harriet Hageman States Her Case to Represent Wyoming in Congress

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:00 min | 4 months ago

Harriet Hageman States Her Case to Represent Wyoming in Congress

"Because you've got to sell yourself on why you would be best for the constituents of Wyoming, or is our Liz Cheney's actions enough to have her get defeated? Mike, you know, that's a really good question. And you're the first person to ask it, but it's something that I address every single day, both with my team as well as internally in my own head. And the reason I say that is because you do have to have that balance. And what I often say to people is that I'm not just running against Liz Cheney, I am running four Wyoming. I am a lifelong Wyoming height. I'm fourth generation, my great grandfather came to Wyoming on a cattle trail in 1879. I come from a ranch. I have a lot of family members here. I went to Casper college on a livestock judging scholarship in the 1980s, then went to the university of Wyoming and graduated with both my bachelor's and my law degree. I have the credentials and the experience and the knowledge to be ineffective congresswoman. It's just that simple.

Liz Cheney Wyoming Mike Casper College University Of Wyoming
Dorchester County Council Member Swaps Parties

The Larry Elder Show

00:52 sec | 4 months ago

Dorchester County Council Member Swaps Parties

"This is a woman named Harriet, Holman, she is a councilwoman, South Carolina, longtime Democrat. I am Harry hallman, and our proud to represent district one on dorchester county council. My faith, family values and love a country. Have gotten my life and my service to you as a member of county council. It is my love for America that inspired me to serve my country in the United States Army where I retired as a lieutenant colonel. It was my belief growing up in Alabama that taught me anyone can be successful through hard work and perseverance. My faith is what got me through my most too difficult days. Reuniting families with their loved ones at The Pentagon, following the terrorist attack on 9 11. And losing my son and our historical home in a tragic fur.

Harry Hallman Dorchester County Council Holman Harriet South Carolina United States Army America Alabama Pentagon
Jan. 6 Committee Subpoenas Trump Jr. Advisers, Ex-White House Official

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:30 min | 6 months ago

Jan. 6 Committee Subpoenas Trump Jr. Advisers, Ex-White House Official

"His Liz Cheney, weaponizing this January 6th committee. It's a special kind of evil. Do you hear what she's doing? You hear what they're doing on that January 6th committee? They've sent a subpoena to three advisers to the Trump family, Andrew Charlie and Arthur Schwartz, who advised Donald Trump Jr. and Ross rush Worthington who played a role in drafting Trump's speech on January 6th. Each of them have been handed a subpoena. Now, one of them, he is advising the Wyoming, the Wyoming values political action committee in support of Cheney's primary challenger Harriet Hagen. This guy had, according to the Washington, the federalist, this guy had zero involvement with The White House riots or protest during the time period that the rally was being organized. This charade guy Andrew Serra was overseeing a super PAC in support of Republican Senate candidates in Georgia. Charade is a close friend, according to his attorney, charades a close friend to Donald Trump Jr. and is running a super PAC that opposes the reelection of one of the members of the committee. I'm talking to you Liz Cheney. That's

Liz Cheney Donald Trump Jr. Andrew Charlie Arthur Schwartz Ross Rush Worthington Wyoming Values Political Actio Harriet Hagen Donald Trump Andrew Serra Wyoming Cheney White House Washington Charade Senate Georgia
Anthony Fauci Tells George Stephanopoulos to 'Prepare for the Worst' Despite Mild Symptoms

Mark Levin

01:52 min | 7 months ago

Anthony Fauci Tells George Stephanopoulos to 'Prepare for the Worst' Despite Mild Symptoms

"Now with this in mind and Fauci knows nothing Now it's absolutely nothing He's on every Sunday show Harriet get Fauci my God the ratings are down We gotta hyper Kanaan everybody Come on Come on Let's go So here he is Tony Fauci on ABC's this week with weak stephanopoulos 8 cut a go Like to be seeing more lockdowns again new lockdowns more mandates Why does he jump to this How about what do you know when did you know it and what can you tell us No no no Should we expect to be seeing more lockdowns again new lockdowns more mandates Yes yes more tyranny More totalitarianism Yes This is your media today Corrupt as hell Just corrupt narcissists ego maniacal egomaniacs and what does Fauci say go You know I don't know George It's really too early to say we just really need to as I've said so often prepare for the worst and it may not be that we're going to have to go the route that people are saying We don't know a lot about this virus So we want to prepare as best as we can but it may turn out that this preparation although important may not necessarily push us to the next level What is the preparation exactly What's the preparation What do you want us to do What do you want to get vaccinated Well they just said Half the people who got it in South Africa under 40 and were not vaccinated Do you know what that means mister producer Can't the people were

Fauci Kanaan Tony Fauci Stephanopoulos Harriet ABC George South Africa
ZOA's David Schoen Addresses Pending Suit Against Steve Bannon

Mark Levin

01:59 min | 8 months ago

ZOA's David Schoen Addresses Pending Suit Against Steve Bannon

"Well I mean you've got it all in a nutshell What you just said let me be clear from the beginning since we've got a pending case here I don't generally address pending cases But I am addressing this case because I think I have an obligation to respond because the attorney general Garland saw fit to issue a press release on Friday after mister Bannon was indicted And in it he said that the charges against mister Bannon reflected department of justices steadfast commitment to pursuing equal justice under the law I can't think of much that's further from the truth than that This is in no way the pursuit of equal justice under law to put it in perspective by the way for people since 2008 have been referred for criminal contempt And that's what mister Bennet is charged with criminal contempt to the Justice Department Not one of them was ever charged with criminal contempt Lois learner Eric holder Harriet Myers Josh Bolton all across the board politically This is what we're seeing today from the Biden administration from this Congress is the politicization of the criminal process for a vindictive reasons And what they did in those other cases and three of the four is they had a dispute over whether the document should be turned over And so they initiated a civil enforcement action to get a judge to decide whether they should be turned over That's all mister Bennett asked for here From a president Trump invoked executive privilege mister Bannon's lawyer received a letter directing him not to appear and not to turn over any documents because privilege has been invoked His lawyer advised him to honor that mister Ben wanted to honor that for the former president because it clearly does apply former president We know from the case Nixon versus general service administration a former president Ken invoked privilege and it's very important privilege in the mazars case The court said this is a privilege of the highest sanctity executive privilege Why Because the president of the United States has to be able to speak freely to advisers even if they're no longer on the staff We often call that president often calls on former advisers because their wealth of knowledge they knew something then They know something now and they're kept in

Mister Bannon Department Of Justices Mister Bennet Harriet Myers Josh Bolton Biden Administration Garland Mister Bennett Eric Holder Justice Department Lois Mister Ben General Service Administration Congress Donald Trump Nixon KEN United States
The Life of Anna Leonowens

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:31 min | 10 months ago

The Life of Anna Leonowens

"Anna leeann. Owens was born and harriet. Emma edwards in india in november of eighteen. Thirty one anna came from a mixed race family. Her father sergeant. Thomas edwards was english. Her mother mary. Ann glass scott was the daughter of an anglo indian. Marriage on anna was just three months old. Her father died and her mother remarried an irish catholic corporal named patrick donahue as a result of patrick's unit assignments. The family moved frequently but eventually settled on a city on the western coast of india in eighteen. Forty one some of anna's childhood remains murky anna and her older sister elisa attended the bombay education society's girls school which was known for admitting mixed race daughters of deceased or absent military fathers but in her memoirs and i wrote that after her father died and she and allies were sent to boarding school in england and returned to india as teenagers. Whichever's true it's clear that animator purposeful effort to hide her ethnic background and lower social class on christmas day of eighteen. Forty nine anna married private. Thomas leinen owens who was an army paymasters clerk from ireland. On the marriage license thomas combined his middle and last names making them the liens after her marriage anna cut off all ties to her family. In india in december of eighteen fifty anna gave birth to a daughter selena but the baby only survived for seventeen months in eighteen fifty. Two and thomas emigrated to australia while on the boat. Their son thomas was born tragedy struck again and baby. Thomas died at the age of thirteen months during their four years in australia. Anna and thomas had two more children. A daughter named avis in eighteen. Fifty four and a son named luis eighteen fifty six the following year in april of eighteen. Fifty seven the family moved to malaysia. Where thomas found work as a hotel keeper. He died suddenly two years later. Anna was left alone with very little money and two small

Anna Anna Leeann Emma Edwards Thomas Edwards Ann Glass Scott Patrick Donahue India Bombay Education Society's Gir Harriet Owens Thomas Leinen Owens Thomas Elisa Patrick Mary England Selena Ireland Army Australia
"harriet" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"She swiftly moved her parents whom she'd freed and other family and friends to this land turning into a sanctuary for those she loved and cared for after the war. Harriet spent most for time on this property devoting her time to a number of charitable causes. Although harriet lived on her own lane and worked for the union army for many years. She'd always suffered financially. This did not prevent her from giving literally all that she had hair. It made it her mission to provide for those who could not provide for themselves until the very end in auburn. Herod began to care for the elderly and orphans people that society had overlooked and usually those who needed the help. The most harry was also an advocate for women's rights and the suffrage movement around the year. Nineteen o four. Harry donated a portion of her land. The african methodist episcopal church which would later become the. Harriet tubman home for the aged. As harry grew older. She watched her family grow with pride. Free although harry was free from bondage unfortunately still suffered from the pain and injuries as she'd received during that time in her life. Harriet eventually had to undergo surgery to help with the seizures and symptoms she experience resulting from her brain injury after her surgery. Harriet it was eventually admitted to arrest home to live out the rest of her days beside her friends and family. Harriet tubman passed away from pneumonia at the ripe old age of ninety three in march of nineteen thirteen. Harry died in a rest home that was named in her honor and buried with full military honors at fort hill cemetery in auburn new york. I mean where. Can i even be game in describing this superhero of a woman. Harry's legacy was and still is immeasurable. This woman was forged from grit steel sand and stone to not only have the strength to bring yourself to freedom but then to have the absolute gonads to turn around and go back to help others. Let's not even mention the fact that she lived through slavery live through leading her family out of slavery and then helped lead the country out of a civil war like what is this woman was doing everything for everybody as an african american women myself. I can't begin to express how stories like these move me. I do get.

Harriet harry Harriet tubman union army auburn Harry african methodist episcopal ch harriet Herod fort hill cemetery seizures pneumonia new york
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"That was victoria. Marin she's a writer and audio maker based in brooklyn new york you can find her on social media at vic's marin that's v. i. x m. a. r. i n. the story was co produced by sheba. Joseph sheba is an independent producer and marketer in new york and she's also the audience growth director for out there. This episode was her idea and she spearheaded the collaboration between out there and the folks behind the following harriet podcast. Speaking of which. I'd like to give a shoutout to tanner latham and his podcast studio at ingredient they produced following harriet for the virginia tourism corporation. And tanner has been so helpful. Helping us make this episode of success. Speaking of virginia tourism. We'd also like to extend a special thank you to their team especially caroline logan taylor. Paul jane. lemay andrew cawthorn and patricia anderson. You can listen to the entire series of following. Harriet wherever you get your podcasts. And if you'd like to learn more about the rich history and land in virginia as it relates to the black experience head over to virginia dot org slash black travel. The folks at virginia tourism have created loads of interesting resources such as sites connected to the underground railroad and harriet tubman and even a black history walking tour again. You can check that out at virginia dot org slash black travel If you enjoyed this episode had liked to invite you to check out a playlist we put together called black outdoorsy. It's a collection of stories. We've run over the past few years that highlight black experiences outside for example. There's an episode about a black thru hike on the appalachian trail. There's a love story involving black kayaker. There's a piece about the unexpected benefits of walking to work and much more You can find that playlist on spotify and at our website out their podcast dot com. Just click on the blog. I'm also linking it to the show notes and that playlist is called black.

patricia anderson Paul jane Joseph sheba new york tanner latham sheba Marin tanner spotify caroline logan taylor harriet tubman lemay andrew cawthorn brooklyn new york harriet Harriet marin vic past victoria virginia tourism
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"Let's be clear not all black. Americans feel trepidation about the outdoors. Angela crenshaw's a great example. Unlike me she's always felt comfortable being outside and claiming it as part of her identity. I is a girl scout and later as a park ranger. But she's the exception. Not the rule. I acknowledged that there are very few african. Americans working in the outdoor industry and Having worked at tubman and other parts. I hear that every other week if not every single week you know. It's i didn't expect to see you. It's good to see you know what people are saying when they say that They're trying to be polite. But i know exactly what they mean So i find that. When i'm doing interpretation sharing taubman's life if what i'm interpreting doesn't mean much to me that comes through but if i can connect my own personal story with that my passion and my emotional connection comes through and that really speaks volumes to people. Teaching people about harry history and weaving in her own. Experiences is angeles way of subverting the traditional narrative of who belongs outdoors and hopefully forming a legacy of her own. This history has been hidden on purpose. And i see a big part of my job as turning a light on it and letting people know that it's out there and that these people did these amazing things and that we are indeed standing on the shoulders of giants. I would not be here if it was not for harriet. Tubman i lived in church creek maryland. Which was a town built on creating and building slave ships to go back and get more enslaved people from africa. I was living there. I was thriving. I was telling people this that story. That is not lost on me. History isn't a static thing. It's an often changing story. We write together as a society and our personal experiences can influence our interpretation of it. It's important to recognize that history stories can change over time as we learn the nuances of what happened through new lenses. Learning about harriet tubman. The outdoors woman has offered me new insight into what she means. Symbolically to black. Americans hurried is a beacon of what so many of us ourselves. She symbolizes strength courage. Tenacity and freedom itself all of which is exemplified in her relationship with nature in the outdoors. Getting to know this side of restoring makes me hopeful that i can recalibrate my own relationship with outdoors to be one of empowerment and belonging and for the first time ever as central to my identity. I'm not an outsider. When i go outside after all the complete opposite is actually true. When i go outside i'm home. I'm free by telling a story like this one. That centers the complex experiences of black.

Angela crenshaw harriet tubman africa harriet Tubman first time taubman single week african tubman maryland Americans
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"On my honeymoon a few years ago. We went out with a group hoping to swim with whale sharks. The group leader ferried our boat out into the middle of the ocean and directed us to jump into the water when she spotted the shark. The water was really choppy and we quickly separated from the boat..

few years ago
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"Remember. This wasn't just one trip to free just herself. Which was heroic enough on. its own. what amazes me about tubman is she. Did it multiple times once. Amazing twice as amazing three four but she got up in the double digits and the fact that she was a woman to there were very few women who conductors on the underground railroad and the fact that she was wanted herself. That's a big deal. That is a big deal. Even considering the pre industrial time period it kind of blows my mind to think about everything. Harry it was capable of and everything she did. She could walk for hundreds of miles. She can navigate using only the stars she could forage for all the food. She and an entire group of enslaved fugitives needed in the woods. She could imitate birdsong given all that. Why is there this stereotype today. That black people don't know our way around the outdoors. If you ask my mom part of it comes down to a lack of opportunities. I lived in saint louis missouri. As a young girl we didn't have much outdoorsy. Life i think they had a slide and maybe a couple swings but so many families and they never kept the things repaired so somebody was always fallen out of a swing that was never repaired and my mom lived in the projects in the middle of the city as a kid. It's not like she had easy. Access to beaches trail heads and remember the camps that did exist were segregated and poorly resourced as for spending time in the urban outdoors. My mom said that just wasn't safe. A lot of violence and gangs and police. Brutality forced a lot of young black folks to stay home. Safety mother major. Stay home because you hear gunshots. I guess the upshot of all of this is the my mom does not consider herself outdoorsy. But she doesn't think that it's because of her personality alone product of environment has a lot to do with them whether or not you want to go. Skydiving or climb. Mount kilimanjaro or anything.

Harry Mount kilimanjaro hundreds of miles twice today saint louis missouri three tubman once double digits four one trip couple swings pre time
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"Hi i'm willow belden and your listening to out there. The podcast that explores big questions through the stories outdoors. Everyone knows harriet. Tubman as an activist and freedom fighter. We all learned about her in school. Growing up how she led slaves to freedom on the underground railroad but there was a lot more to her than what you probably remember from history class. She was a daughter a wife an entrepreneur and she was something else too. When you think about it she had to be the ultimate outdoors woman. Do what she did. That's right an outdoors woman. We don't often talk about. Harriet tubman in that light. Or if we do. It's kind of cautionary tale. Her experiences in the outdoors must have been so awful. So why would any sane black person wanna go into the wilderness voluntarily it feeds into the narrative. We often hear that african americans are not outdoorsy. But what if there's more to the story. What was harry. Its relationship with nature. How does that shape. The way african americans with the outdoors today and how might a closer look at harriet. Offer a new perspective on who belongs outdoors victoria. Marin has the story so this story was inspired by a podcast called following. Harriet which is about harriet. Tubman the show pulls back the curtain on harry. It's life giving listeners. A deeper context to her story. A story that i think is more layered and probably more relatable than many people realize most of us enter. Harriet tubman is life when she was in her thirties forties fifties and often times. We don't sort of think about how she came to be. Harriet people of my generation people who grew up in the nineteen seventies. We first met harriet in a photo in the corner of a textbook. She looked old. Her skin was stretched tight on her face. Her mouth was pinched. Her head was wrapped in a dark. Kerchief we read a couple of paragraphs about how she freed herself from slavery and then became a conductor in the underground railroad. She saved the lives of many other. People guided them safely from slavery to freedom. That was it. That was the whole story. We were told but harriet. Tubman was so much more.

Harriet tubman Tubman harry willow belden thirties harriet Marin nineteen seventies Harriet first today african americans couple of paragraphs forties fifties
"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

Following Harriet

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Following Harriet

"Everyone knows harriet. Tubman as an activist and freedom fighter. We all learned about her in school. Growing up how she led slaves to freedom on the underground railroad but there was a lot more to her than what you probably remember from history class. She was a daughter a wife an entrepreneur and she was something else too. When you think about it she had to be the ultimate outdoors woman. Do what she did. That's right an outdoors woman. We don't often talk about. Harriet tubman in that light. Or if we do. It's kind of cautionary tale. Her experiences in the outdoors must have been so awful. So why would any sane black person wanna go into the wilderness voluntarily it feeds into the narrative. We often hear that african americans are not outdoorsy. But what if there's more to the story. What was harry. Its relationship with nature. How does that shape. The way african americans with the outdoors today and how might a closer look at harriet. Offer a new perspective on who belongs outdoors victoria. Marin has the story so this story was inspired by a podcast called following. Harriet which is about harriet. Tubman the show pulls back the curtain on harry. It's life giving listeners. A deeper context to her story. A story that i think is more layered and probably more relatable than many people realize most of us enter. Harriet tubman is life when she was in her thirties forties fifties and often times. We don't sort of think about how she came to be. Harriet people of my generation people who grew up in the nineteen seventies. We first met harriet in a photo in the corner of a textbook. She looked old. Her skin was stretched tight on her face. Her mouth was pinched. Her head was wrapped in a dark. Kerchief

Latham Tubman tanner harriet virginia
"harriet" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"harriet" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Although the veracity of her story was challenged for decades are storyteller of the day is now recognized as the true author of her work. We're talking about harriet jacobs. Harriet jacobs was born in eighteen. Thirteen endan north carolina to delilah and daniel jacobs. Both her mother and father were enslaved. Her grandmother had been emancipated by her former enslavers. When harry it was six her mother died and she was left in the care of her enslavers. Margaret horn blow margaret taught her to read and write an uncommon practice for the time but when harriet was twelve her fortune changed. Margaret passed away and instead of emancipating. Harriet bequeath. terry her three-year-old niece. mary matilda nor calm. Harriet subsequently moved into the nor com household. A family that did not share margaret's relatively more progressive views within three years. Though harry it was just a young teenager she had become the sexual fixation of mary's father. Dr james nor com. His sexual harassment was unrelenting and he refused to allow harry to marry. It was then. Harriet made a calculated decision. She decided to return the advances of another white man. A local lawyer by the name of samuel treadwell sawyer. She hoped that bearing the children of a different white man with spur her master into a rage her goal was to drive doctor nor com to sell her. Her plan did not succeed after bearing two of sawyers children dr nor com punished. Harriet by sending her to do backbreaking labor on his plantation while they're harriet. She fled to her grandmother's house and hit an crawlspace. Harriet remained in hiding at her grandmother's for seven years. During this time she revised her plan. Harriet wrote letters to dr nor com falsely claiming. She described to the north. This time around. She hoped dr nor comet sell her children to their father. Eventually this plan came to fruition and sawyer bought both of his children back from dr nor com soon after sawyer was elected to the house of representatives and moved with the children to washington. Dc desperate to reunite with her children. Harriet to fled north while searching for her children. Harriet found work. As a nurse. Made for the abolitionist. Nathaniel parker willis and his wife cordelia willis dr nor com continued to pursue harriet and. She was frequently forced to go into hiding often relocating between boston and new york eventually in one thousand fifty two the willis family was able to bhai harriet freedom during her time in the north. Harriet became involved with a feminist abolitionist group. It was there that she met. Amy post amy taken with harriet. Personal journey recommended that she read a book about her life. Harry agreed and decided to write her autobiography. Under the pen name brent. Her book called incidents in the life of a slave girl was published in eighteen. Sixty one with the rise of the american civil war. The book quickly faded from public discourse and remained relatively unknown for the rest of heriot's. Its lifetime harry. It was eventually reunited with her daughter. Louisa during the civil war. Harriet worked to aid former slaves who arrived as refugees in washington. Dc dedication to the recently emancipated community. Brought harriet back to the south in eighteen sixty five. Harriet and louisa settled in savannah georgia to continue relief efforts but due to persistent racial persecution forced to flee north once more this time harriet settled in cambridge massachusetts or she opened a boarding house. Not much is known about the final chapters of harry. It's life but we do know that she eventually returned to washington. Dc with her daughter. It was there that harriet died in eighteen. Ninety seven she was eighty four years old. It wasn't until the feminist movements of the nineteen sixties and seventies that incidents reappeared. Initially it sparked controversy. The books editor lydia. Marie child was a white woman. Common thought at the time was the autobiography was actually a novel written by child in one thousand nine hundred. Eighty seven historian. Jean fagin yellen corrected that narrative with her annotated edition of incidents yellen lays bare at the true identity of the author and the limited role child played in publishing the original manuscript at long last. Harry its name was attached to her work. Her role as auto biographer transformed. The significance of the taxed inherits writings. She describes her state of mind. She rejected the advances of dr nor calm in favor of sam sawyer. She explicitly discusses using her sexuality. As a tool to manipulate the white men who sought to further subjugate her harry it also acknowledges the judgement she received as a woman with two children born out of wedlock in her book. She argues that it is cruel to prescribe nineteenth century. Morality onto enslaved women as their fundamental rights had already been so profoundly violated incidents in the life of a slave girl remains one of the most important books of its kind. It is the only first hand account of the life of an enslaved woman at the time and gives unmatched insight into harry. It's perspective as she fought against forces of sexual and racial oppression in doing so. The autobiography occupies a unique space in both african american and feminist literature

harriet Nathaniel parker willis Marie america Harry jenny kaplan harriet jacobs cordelia willis boston Margaret seven years Harriet harry Harriet jacobs mary matilda Jean fagin yellen louisa new york Today six
"harriet" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"harriet" Discussed on What'sHerName

"But once her children in our at least safe if not free. Harriet Jacobs finally make her way north. After seven year by dressing as a sailor they learn and being transported to a ship and finally does escape to where she gets a job as a nursemaid a nanny in the home of man named Daniel Parker Willis Willis is especially interesting because he's a very prominent imminent literary figure literary editor especially in the nineteenth century. He is not as well known today. Although he was very famous in the nineteenth century the person that does have a lasting reputation as his sister who we now know today as Fanny fern. That was her pen. Name Sarah Era Peyton Willis. Who wrote a novel called Roots Hall as well is was very very popular mistake? Homeless Jacobs becomes very close. With both of Nathaniel Parker Willis wives but is very fearful that he will discover that she he is a self emancipated slave because she is afraid he will turn her in as part of the fugitive slave. Back at some point. Nathanael Parker Willis's second wife Cornelia Grinnell Willis learns that nor comes daughter and her husband has been are in town trying to find Jacobs and Cornelia gives Jacobs the baby that Jacobs's there to help care for and says take the baby go out of town so that if they come to the house they won't be able to find you and that's how much he cares about and cares for Jacobs that she she gets.

Daniel Parker Willis Willis Harriet Jacobs Nathanael Parker Willis Cornelia Grinnell Willis Peyton Willis Roots Hall Fanny fern Sarah Era
"harriet" Discussed on What'sHerName

What'sHerName

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"harriet" Discussed on What'sHerName

"Will in order to come to us. Jacobs Dr James Com witnessed a codicil oversell when this woman died that stated that Harriet Jacobs specifically was willed to Dr James Daughter. This codicil was not signed but the word of two white men. Oh serious that this was taken again as truthful and Harriet. Jacobs was transferred to names Arkham daughter who is a young girl so effectively. James James Markham. Wow she probably didn't even know that she probably had no idea. It's not knowledge. That necessarily would have been helpful to her at the time but looking back at it now. It's something that's really painful to recognize. This situation is entirely different. James Nor workum begins pursuing Harry Jacob sexually from the moment. She enters his house. She's a child and she is trying to fend off. Sexual advances from a man who has absolute control of her and her life and her body. Oh Dr nor come begins to threaten to do things like send her to a cabinet. He's going to build on the plantations where he can keep her to himself. This becomes for her of really defining students versus what her narrative narrative.

Harriet Jacobs James James Markham Dr James Daughter Dr James Com James Nor workum Harry Jacob Arkham
"harriet" Discussed on Christian Podcast Community

Christian Podcast Community

14:07 min | 2 years ago

"harriet" Discussed on Christian Podcast Community

"Attention and to add conflict but in reality the fugitive slave act was passed. I almost within months. I think of her initial escape so she had been occupying on the the underground railroad the entire time with the fugitive slave. Act there. There wasn't that much time that she was getting folks only Philadelphia and she's having to run them all the way to Saint Catherine's so I'm just pointing out the stuff I didn't like because there's a lot less of that the other other part of this movie that made me uncomfortable was how they took. Harriet Tubman strong faith and and combined talk of her seizures and her reports that she spoke directly to God and they they turned it into do they. They turned her into a profit. They they really create in the movie. They created a parallel with Moses. Well D- he real Moses. Well that's the thing. Is that if you win. You read the documentaries. That's really what it was. I mean that was the whole point of the documentary on Amazon. And he called her Moses CICIS. That was that's recorded do understand that. But Moses was fulfilling God's specific promise of rescuing the people out of his out of Egypt shipped and bringing them back to the promised land area did was not fulfiling specific. I get what you're saying but what I'm saying is that wasn't the film that did that. That was historical that she was called Moses and that she had visions of God and all of that. That's historical the film. Didn't do you. Then sell okay. Yes the film pointed out that she had visions of God but the film also made it very clear that they felt that the visions were genuine. Or at least the film presented them as genuine visions where they gave her her a sense of coming danger and and I would say that that his historical because that's what was written. I mean I'm just saying that. The film portrayed trade what was historical based on the remembrances of Harriet. And the other I mean. All of the bio-pics I watched. I mean documentaries and stuff that I watched pointed that out that she she recorded all of this stuff that you know she would have visions and that. I'm just saying that the film didn't do this. It was they were just representing what has been historically historically recorded about her poker. I I can see why it makes you uncomfortable but I don't think it was the film doing anything wrong. I think that was they were portraying. What is historically understood in fact if you read I was just reading this In the wikipedia course wikipedia is not the catch all for all the truth. But if it's there it's true but they did say that that she broke her skull at thirteen eighteen. Yes as after the incident time and frequently experienced extremely painful headaches. She also began having seizures falling unconscious although she claimed to be aware of surroundings and then later on. It said that she claimed that that these was when she heard God's voice and that he talked her and all that stuff so So these were claims that she made and I think that in later on our discussion. We're GonNa talk about you know whether they were genuine or not Yeah we may have differing views on that. But let's finish our first impressions before we delve into that. Okay well it's I. I mentioned that I really thought the portrayal of Tuchman was very good. The the actress did it an excellent job presenting a woman who had to be incredibly eh unbelievably strong to do what she did. I remember growing up in Michigan as a teenager. There was actually an the underground railroad house there that we did a field trip to I don't think they ever claimed it that Harriet Tubman went through that one but I tell you one thing. We live a lot closer to her route than I do. They had the secret compartment under the floor. And all that so seeing it all in use in the movie was very impactful so the last thing was for me and it's unfortunate because it was the very one of the very last scenes of the movie it shows how Harriet Tubman led this raid that rescued I wanna say hundreds of of love slaves during the civil war at the end. Yeah Yeah during the civil war that the COM- high coma he river raid aid which did happen and she was the guy. She was a commander in the raid. So all that was accurate the parts of the bugged me was they showed three ironside ships. Yeah they showed her and and all the soldiers in in row boats coach and in the background are these three hundred side ships none of which existed at the time. Yeah Yeah I noticed that too. When I saw the movie I was like wait a minute? What are those doing? Yeah Oh and they were. They were the confederate ones. They were the Monitor. They were the merrimack not the Monitor. They were the confederate ones. Yeah whatever and that bugged me because yeah I know you have to do a lot for drama. And everything like that number of ships right in the type of ships the Kinda ships if the just the kind of ship that they fixed. I'd have been okay with it. Yeah that was annoying anachronisms but besides that I did like the movie A set for the uncomfortable parts for me. Yeah well. I thought that one of the things that I've seen bandied about is that they presented her in like a superhuman human superhero kind of presentation. which we've been doing a lot of superhero movies this year and I thought it was really kind of Nice to be able all to talk about the exploits of a real historical hero whether or not the movie portrays everything about her in a more or realistic standpoint or what was really real about her The fact that we are actually going to talk about somebody who really did amazing things with their life life and amazingly enough and covered quite well in this movie gave God the glory for most of that and I really appreciate gate that they did not leave her faith out of the movie and so easy nowadays with faith being such a a bad word really in our culture her to have made the movie and made her faith less than genuine or somehow something she believed in that wasn't real but they actually played up her faith breath and I appreciate that because she in real life really did give God the glory for which she was able to accomplish with her life. It's sort of the the polar opposite or the flip side of the coin to what they did with them wrinkle in time which which was a book that had good faith elements though not necessarily theologically strong But they even not only did. They removed those for the movie but they perverted them into this multicultural Balderdash yeah. It was horrible and then presented granted it. Yeah they did a good job with with portraying a genuine faith and the the trust and love the Harriet Tubman inspired among her peers. On the underground railroad were both Really well done yeah. Well let's move quickly into our themes because we don't want to spend the whole podcast talking about our initial reactions. We want to get into the Nitty Gritty of this movie. And probably the biggest thing thing in this movie that's repeated over and over again is liberty or death and this was the battle cry for the revolution. When are when Americans I? I decided to split off from England. They wanted to be free. They didn't want to be under a king they wanted. They didn't want taxes. And and that was the whole. Don't tread on me the and then We come later on and in fact I've been listening to a lot of Political commentary in the last week. That's been discussing whether our founding founding fathers really built this country on slavery Ben Shapiro just this week. Did a a speech at one of the colleges with the young Americans Americans Foundation in which that was the topic of his speech was was America built on slavery or was it built on liberty and he pointed out how how everything that. Our founding documents in our founding fathers believed was liberty they had to make allowances for slavery because so many of the there were so many slaves at the time of our founding but there is a lot of indication that they were already trying to figure out how to abolish slavery even from the beginning of our country. It just took a while to accomplish it and so our our country was actually founded on liberty but it took us a while to catch up and and so we hear I want. I'd rather live free or die. You know I'd rather be free or die liberty or death. It was repeated over and over again in this movie and there was a phrase That she says actually near the end where she meets up with Gideon again towards the end of of her time. I'm in the of being a conductor on their underground railroad where she tells Gideon that she that God doesn't mean for people to own people and So yeah it's it's like this obviously a movie about slavery in escaping slavery but I thought you had an interesting question he wrote. Here's that were were questioned to take his life to avoid being enslaved as it wrong and I it draws to mind her jumping off the bridge. I don't think she she was a temporary suicide there. She was just no no no she wasn't she was trying to get away from them and the only way to get away from them was to jump into the river. I don't think that counts as taking your on life. I think that's just escaping sheet. A her last words before going over the side though we're live free or die so I mean clearly she she thought there was a possibility that it would be a fatal choice but the while I had that scene in in mind when I when I penned this question I do mean it more of a a a general thing because let's face it the the the play of the American slave in the The late eighteenth century and early early nineteenth century was horrid. Yeah and it's not hard to sympathize with the the desire to die. I rather than continue face that horrific existence. Even in that I question you know it. Is it still wrongs still sinful. Kill escape now now to to to take your to die rather than N. B. Enslaved. There's not really a scene in the movie but I. I can't imagine that there weren't slaves who didn't take their own life rather than be captured recaptured. Rather 'cause really being cat recaptured. After escaping would be for a face worse than death right Ah for most runaway slaves. Yeah a lot of times. They were beaten to an inch of their lives anyway and the and sold and and into worse conditions than they'd been before. Yeah it's slavery slavery is not beautiful and it's not especially the kind of slavery we had. In the American south south it was the worst kind of slavery. And I can't I can't even wrap my mind around what it would have been like to have been in that that in those situations but yet and I want to bring this up because this is something I think. A lot of our cultural discussions nowadays does not bring into account is that slavery still exists. We always talk about it in the past tense because we we think of slavery as being what it was in the American south where the the black men were brought in and sold on the block and it was legal to have them and it was legal to chase them down if they ran away and all the stuff but slavery still exists assists in our country. And we're we have open. Porous borders on the south where women and children are being trafficked every single day into Horrible conditions as sex sex slavery and all kinds of other kinds of slavery. It's still exists. It's not legal but it still exists and it's it's not the same kind of slavery because these slavery that existed during the American south was state-sponsored. Well it was not only state-sponsored absurd but it was evolutionary sponsored. Let's put that way. They believe they really believed that. Because of The Prominence Eminence Prominence of evolutionary thought that the black man was a animal that he was not the same level as of human as the white man..

Harriet Tubman Moses CICIS Gideon Philadelphia Saint Catherine Americans Americans Foundation Ben Shapiro Amazon Michigan Tuchman wikipedia Egypt N. B. Enslaved England America
"harriet" Discussed on Christian Podcast Community

Christian Podcast Community

12:22 min | 2 years ago

"harriet" Discussed on Christian Podcast Community

"Of the spirituals I when I was watching some of the more documentary nature videos that I could find on. Harriet tubman coming. They made the comment that this the slaves in the south actually used their spirituals to communicate. They were codes so they they would actually Sing a song about you. Know a meeting in the forest and that would be indicating what time the slaves would would leave their Homes in the middle of the night to go have a prayer service in the in the fields away from the the plantation houses. And they would they would actually pass code teach other by singing in in the fields as to when they were GonNa meet or and it was very interesting to find out that you know all these spirituals that have made it you know into our Himal alleges of modern era. A lot of them were actually coded messages to each other. And that's what. Harriet Tubman used it for because she he would often sing to draw the slaves to her when she was a conductor on the underground railroad. We should probably say that Even no no. This is the first impression there will not be a no spoiler section since this is the life and times of an actual historical person. Yeah uh-huh so sorry but one hundred fifty years is long enough for you to have a cotton spoiler. Yes yes we're not gonNA worry about those and and to be honest. We really highly recommend that. If you're going to see this movie to to to educate yourself on Harriet not just watch the movie but Check out some of the the stuff on YouTube Some of the articles that have been put out and we'll put some links in our show notes to kind of guide you and some of that. I also found a documentary. That's available for free on Amazon Prime. If you're an Amazon. Prime member called Harriet Tubman. They called her Moses. which was I found very informative and it goes through to her whole life with historical movies? I always like to go back and see what anachronisms it may have or how they might have modified history in order to tell the dramatic story and for the most part aside from the very last scene they did really really good job. Several of the characters breath are fictionalized. Optional Yeah Yeah they're they're What is it called when they take composites composite? Yeah that's the word I was looking for. Yes they composite at some of the characters to China give to give flesh out people that might have been inherits life but they ah that they may have not been specific person they kinda wrapped them all together into one person and had that person appear in a fictional the biggest biggest one I think is What was her name? Marie Marie from the from the Boardinghouse Marie in the fill in the Philadelphia Boarding House. She was completely completely fictional character but they needed her in there to kind of I guess be a friend to Harry it when and help her learn how to be a free a free person after escaping slavery. So yeah you know. I don't really have a problem with composite characters like that. Because you're compressing so much I I am into two hours. Yes you really have to be able to communicate certain aspects well and they did a good job with Marie and the other big composite in this one is Gideon in the the slave owners son son slash slave owner himself. Yes who also served a very specific purpose purpose in the movie right and this kind of love hate almost intimate relationship that the from all historical that that I could find really only exist so they kind of built that in I guess to kind of create some kind of a relationship that between a Harriet and her masters it may not have actually existed. Now as we come into. This movie's been out a couple of weeks. I would say I saw it as a press preview. So it's it's been a while since I've seen the movie and it's coming in as they the reviews are very mixed when I was looking on the IMDB comments comments. I was finding that people either giving it five stars and raving about it where they were giving one stars and just couldn't stand it and so they seem to. We'll be all the way on the extremes. There's very few people that just like the movie they either hate it or they loved it and I think that's kind of true a lot of times when you're portraying a a real person and a fictional environment is that people they either want it to be truly historical and they get mad when it isn't or they're just happy with if it because it. It portrays the character that they want to know more about and so they enjoy the movie. So I think that that. Just kinda shows the different ways that people approach which bio-pics I think the And this actually ties in to a little bit of my first impression. It's very easy to look at the the people who are giving it bad reviews and say oh they have sociological. Paintings are racist undertones at that. They don't want to like it or they're automatically gonNA disparage it. You remember like Captain Marvel know that movie was review bombed. I I think is what it was called in rotten tomatoes before it had even come out by people who wanted to review it poorly because of its star. But I don't think that's the case in the few negative reviews that I've read. It really did come. Come down to like you were saying that. They wanted to historical to be more historical more accurate and they wanted more of her accomplishments stuffed into the two Our block which I think would have made it very crowded. Yeah it was interesting because the I took a friend with me to see the movie and she came out of the movie thinking that it was a movie she could recommend people but she felt like there is a major agenda in the gender turned her off which surprised me because I didn't feel like this was an agenda movie. I know that there are some people who could turn it into an agenda because of you know the whole Oh slavery and right and racism and all that stuff. That's going on in our culture but I really felt like the movie didn't Ram home an agenda and so they were just telling a story about a true person and as accurate away as you could with a movie. I do believe there are other movies about Tomlin's life this is just one one of many and I don't know I haven't seen indeed other so I don't know how this win. Stacks up against some of the others but I didn't really feel like it was agenda driven but I could be wrong I mean of course that is also kind of a you know personal perspective where it hits you between the is what you watch it did. Did your friend share what she felt the agenda was I think that she thought it was another of a kind of the women's Lib. Kinda thing you know where women are powerful and and I can see a little bit of that but to be honest this was a super strong woman who lived in an era where she was not free so I I really felt like that. They were portraying her strength character in an accurate way. So it didn't bug me but you know works at getting so hypersensitive to this kind of stuff. Now that I don't know yeah. Actually that hyper sensitive. Nature is what made me uncomfortable comfortable with this movie. Don't get me wrong. This movie. I thought was well done. I think that Cynthia Ribaud did a excellent excellent on job as mentese slash Harriet I think honestly I think all the actors in here did a great job. I think the Director Tur- did a great job putting together a very compelling story however I come to the movie with baggage I am a white male Protestant entitled individual. At least that's what society has been beating into my head head for the last couple of decades and you know with with all this sensitivity about confederate monuments and don't going after historical figures simply because they own slaves or and stuff like that. I felt a little little bit like I was being asked in the movie to atone for the sins of my forefathers which may may or may not be accurate And I think that's where that cultural sensitivity comes into play. I I feel like the emphasis in society recently on being woke and recognizing entitlement and turning away from people who were heroes of the confederacy or even founding fathers simply because they own slaves. I think that's made me more sensitive to what I might feel like is blamed being directed it at my social class. Yeah but like I said shut. It's probably not even accurate. I honestly don't think that this movie does that and the reason I don't think it does that is because it shows in the movie. How many white white people were on the side of the abolitionists you know the The underground railroad would never have existed have been successful if it weren't for all of the White Americans who thought slavery was horribly evil and they risked themselves and their property a lot of times if they'd been caught harboring fugitive slaves. They would've been sent to jail. They would have lost a lot of there. They would have been forced to pay fines and lost their wellbeing. I mean there were tons of people In the south throughout the north who were risking a lot to help fugitive slaves in this movie shows them. You know like the the family with the farm. I'm that helped Terry. It and then later on help period as further on with more slaves fugitive slaves. They did it with all without any lines which I really really liked and they just they kept pointing it out and even you know near the end where they after. The fugitive slave bill was passed and and she was meeting with a bunch of white people about you know how do we keep rescuing slaves. And how far do we have to take them. It was she was one of the very few black people in that room. It was almost all white people who are discussing how they were going to keep the the rescuing of the slaves going and so yeah I honestly feel like they went out of their your way to show that this was not a racial thing that there were just people who believe slavery was wrong and they were willing to risk risk at all And there it was a lot of discussion towards the end. Obviously where they were coming to the conclusion that Oh civil war was going to be necessary to stop slavery and I thought that was interesting that you know that it was a discussion. You know we. This country cannot abide this evil. And we can't deal with it the right way and so. Oh it's GONNA end up being a civil war. They were discussing that. I thought that was very interesting. Yeah yeah that's one of the hard parts of doing movie like that is because the events events that are depicted in this movie are over the course of I WanNa say twenty to twenty five years from her initial escape escape all the way up through the civil war the yeah. The scene in the civil work ended. It's always hard to give that sense of time in a movie but actually the the fugitive slave act was one of the things that was sort of rearranged in Harriet They put it later in her life to to add a certain amount.

Harriet tubman Marie Marie Amazon YouTube China Gideon Boardinghouse Marie Harry Captain Marvel IMDB Tomlin Cynthia Ribaud Philadelphia Boarding House Terry
"harriet" Discussed on Christian Podcast Community

Christian Podcast Community

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"harriet" Discussed on Christian Podcast Community

"Do you hear the Voice of God. The movie Harry. It provides a good foundation for discussion on slavery from both historical and spiritual perspective. Are you just watching episode ninety eight. Harriet welcome to the PODCAST. That shares critical thinking for the entertained Christian. I'm e Franklin. I'm Tim Martin. And we're going to go back in time a little bit with this movie or I guess it's more like a fictional version of beckon tie. Well everything everything. I read suggests that some stuff is fictionalized. But it's accurate inasmuch as the story of tells. Yeah Yeah I think that there's a lot of truth Bruce Senate and I think there's some fiction in it as well so it's I think the nice balanced we didn't go to see. A documentary. Went to see a movie. It's so it's not as accurate as documentary would be but it was more entertaining than a documentary so I think that it is best of both worlds granted. There are entertaining documentaries out there. We don't want to buy the art. Yes yes yes this movie was. I thought a pretty good good movie. It is actually fairly clean so I think that there would be a perspective where you could take. Maybe school aged children to cozy this to kind of open up a level of discussion on you know the history of slavery in the United States and an other aspects of the story I think get safe to take kids to. Because they kept the violence down there was teensy bit a language that plugged in online found. But I didn't notice it and there's there's really no sexual content. There's a you know some states of undress for Harriet but Other than that nothing. That's so horrible purpose that you couldn't have kids in the room to see basically a heriot's rated PG thirteen which coming out of A. I was a little surprised because there are much worse. PG Thirteen movies out there. As far as content much much I think this probably could easily have gotten a PG if not even and maybe even a g except for the the difficult content of it well the violence in and there was some language. And I don't Kaji would be a major stretch but PG maybe I could see a PG but pg thirteen is as a good safe rating for it. And I think that you could very well take school aged children to see this movie Obviously really young kids would not be interested in it but it would be a good discussion starter from an educational standpoint important for a school age children. In fact I I was talking to some people at work about this. And they said they'd actually seen whole classes of kids coming out of the theater and they. I thought that they'd gotten to see Harriet. So could see you know being a classroom exercise to see this movie. The music was by another new composer to I've never heard of fits His name. I'm assuming it's a him. Terence Blanchard is very atmospheric. And there were when you listen to it as kind.

Harriet Terence Blanchard United States Bruce Senate Tim Martin e Franklin Kaji
"harriet" Discussed on Are You Just Watching?

Are You Just Watching?

07:33 min | 2 years ago

"harriet" Discussed on Are You Just Watching?

"God directed her pass but he didn't direct her to safety. He directed her through a lot of really bad circumstances and Dan she just followed so and e- even the the difficulties that she faced. It was a gift from God because it it What is it Phlippines one twenty nine this is the IV version for. It has been granted to you on behalf of Christ not only to believe in him but also to suffer for him and we know that the suffering that we endure as Christians works in our favor favor it works to to build us in Christ. Yeah Yeah Yeah and I fighting really hard not to not to whip out Romans. Eight twenty eight here to say yeah. There's a lot more we could say about this one thing that we can just you know to cap it off. Harriet Tubman didn't stop after the civil war. She opened. She bought a house and took in aged slave aged freed slaves and and cared for them in the later years of her life. she Stood up very strongly for women's suffrage and she Kit Campaign for women them into the right to vote so that women would not be slaves either in in our in our new world and She was a major hero in all the things that she didn't her life and and A beautiful person who gave God the glory for All she did and this movie portrayed that well I mean it comes down to it. This movie did a good job of training net. Yeah it's I think you'd mentioned at the very beginning of the episode that entire classes. We're going to see this and I think this movie I think this movie is worthy the of that kind of attention which is really very high praise from. Yeah Hi this is. Andrew Rappaport the host of of Andrew Rap reports reports wrap with two peas. Because if you only use one P you're GONNA get one about rap music and that's not me I gotTa tell you this is a treat. I have been listening to our. You're just watching and for those who know me know. That's Kinda bizarre. Because I'm not a movie goer but I will admit meant that listening to this. PODCAST has gotten me to watch more than a couple of movies because I was just curious after listening to the discussion and so so I don't mind spoilers but I got to go and see a movie before it airs and that is the new movie coming out about Fred Rogers as many you know him as Mr Rogers. It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood. We got to go see a prescreening and Eve said that it'd be neat for me. The nine movie goer to give a review folks. You don't know how strange to think about me going and watching a movie but the thing is is that I thought was very interesting movie. I'm not going to spill the beans and give spoilers but it was really based off of one magazine writer. who had to do a piece on Fred Rogers and he? He wrote this piece for Esquire magazine many years ago and I guess the movies based off of that piece so it's it's much about his life as much is about Mr Rogers. It's really about the character of the man of Fred Rogers. They put some references in to him praying and his background as a Christian not too much but they did have some and it really showed you a man in who at least from the way they depict it really cared for who ever he was talking to. I will say this about the movie. It makes you realize that none one of us are really good encourages as much as we could be. It seems if accurate that Fred Rogers was a man who wasn't dressed someone someone tried to encourage people on TV but was a man who always was encouraging people. Whoever he met and would always take time to to spend with? WHO's ever in front of him? It seemed that that was really what they wanted to portray about him. As I said much of the movie movie is more about this reporter and his relationship that was developed with Mr Rogers so it wasn't so much about the TV show but it does bring you back in time if you did watch that show but I think it was really encouraging for people to see and to think about you know what we live in a world where it's it's not too nice out anymore and it would be good to have more people being like that and being more encouraging I can't speak to the background grounded. His his church background. I don't really know I there's rumor he was a baptist but but they didn't really emphasize a lot of that. Though from what I understand it did play a lot into who he was as an individual and so I think that this is an encouraging movie to go check out now. I'm I'm sure that you'll get a much better review from even Tim when they go to see this. If they do. And they'll I'll give you all the background that I can't give 'cause I just went and watched it with my wife. Went of this was neat. Okay so but then again I am a guy who's I marvel movie that I saw was endgame and told me that wasn't the one I was supposed to start on. I guess explains why didn't I didn't watch or understand anything about the plot of that movie. So keep listening to. Are you just watching because well usually usually. I'm not just watching 'cause I'm not watching it all. But this podcast gets me encouraged to watch a whole lot more. But I'm way more educated needed when I do go to watch so. Are you just watching. Well if you have enjoyed this podcast we would hope that you would support our podcast We had a one gift supporter. Who gave us five dollars? For the month of November. His name was Josh. David Chill He it left. He left patriotic as soon as he gave the gift. So I don't know whether Patriot on made him angry or we made him angry. But we thank you for your five dollar gift gift. And if there's some other way that you would wish to support us please let us know you can go and actually interact with us if you go to community at are just just watching dot com. That takes you to our facebook discussion. Page or discussion group. I should say and That will allow you to interact with us and really people out therre if our method of taking support to Patriot as a problem for you. Please let us know. And we'll explore other options. There's other ways that we can can get money so if if you want to support us and patriots not your preferred method than please let us know How we can what we can set up to make that available able to you We do want to thank our current patrons Craig. Hardy Stephen Brown the second. Peter Chapman for their very generous support They these are all three of them have have been supporting us for a long time and we really appreciate it and we could use more financial support..

Fred Rogers Harriet Tubman Esquire magazine facebook Dan Peter Chapman Andrew Rappaport Stephen Brown Andrew Rap Eve Craig Tim David Chill Josh
"harriet" Discussed on Are You Just Watching?

Are You Just Watching?

13:12 min | 2 years ago

"harriet" Discussed on Are You Just Watching?

"Attention and to add conflict but in reality the fugitive slave act was passed. I almost within months. I think of her initial escape so she had been occupying on the the underground railroad the entire time with the fugitive slave. Act there. There wasn't that much time that she was getting folks only Philadelphia and she's having to run them all the way to Saint Catherine's so I'm just pointing out the stuff I didn't like because there's a lot less of that the other other part of this movie that made me uncomfortable was how they took. Harriet Tubman strong faith and and combined talk of her seizures and her reports that she spoke directly to God and they they turned it into do they. They turned her into a profit. They they really create in the movie. They created a parallel with Moses. Well D- he real Moses. Well that's the thing. Is that if you win. You read the documentaries. That's really what it was. I mean that was the whole point of the documentary on Amazon. And he called her Moses CICIS. That was that's recorded do understand that. But Moses was fulfilling God's specific promise of rescuing the people out of his out of Egypt shipped and bringing them back to the promised land area did was not fulfiling specific. I get what you're saying but what I'm saying is that wasn't the film that did that. That was historical that she was called Moses and that she had visions of God and all of that. That's historical the film. Didn't do you. Then sell okay. Yes the film pointed out that she had visions of God but the film also made it very clear that they felt that the visions were genuine. Or at least the film presented them as genuine visions where they gave her her a sense of coming danger and and I would say that that his historical because that's what was written. I mean I'm just saying that. The film portrayed trade what was historical based on the remembrances of Harriet. And the other I mean. All of the bio-pics I watched. I mean documentaries and stuff that I watched pointed that out that she she recorded all of this stuff that you know she would have visions and that. I'm just saying that the film didn't do this. It was they were just representing what has been historically historically recorded about her poker. I I can see why it makes you uncomfortable but I don't think it was the film doing anything wrong. I think that was they were portraying. What is historically understood in fact if you read I was just reading this In the wikipedia course Kapiti as not the catch all for all the truth but if it's there it's true but they did say that that she broke her skull at thirteen eighteen. Yes as after the incident time and frequently experienced extremely painful headaches. She also began having seizures falling unconscious although she claimed to be aware of surroundings and then later on. It said that she claimed that that these was when she heard God's voice and that he talked her and all that stuff so So these were claims that she made and I think that in later on our discussion. We're GonNa talk about you know whether they were genuine or not Yeah we may have differing views on that. But let's finish our first impressions before we delve into that. Okay well it's I. I mentioned that I really thought the portrayal of Tuchman was very good. The the actress did an excellent job presenting a woman who had to be incredibly eh unbelievably strong to do what she did. I remember growing up in Michigan as a teenager. There was actually an the underground railroad house there that we did a field trip to I don't think they ever claimed it that Harriet Tubman went through that one but I tell you one thing. We live a lot closer to her route than I do. They had the secret compartment under the floor. And all that so seeing it all in use in the movie was very impactful so the last thing was for me and it's unfortunate because it was the very one of the very last scenes of the movie it shows how Harriet Tubman led this raid that rescued I wanna say hundreds of of of slaves during the civil war at the end. Yeah Yeah during the civil war that the COM- high coma he river raid aid which did happen and she was the guy. She was a commander in the raid. So all that was accurate the parts of the bugged me was they showed three ironside ships. Yeah they showed her and and all the soldiers in in row boats coach and in the background are these three hundred side ships none of which existed at the time. Yeah Yeah I noticed that too. When I saw the movie I was like wait a minute? What are those doing? Yeah Oh and they were. They were the confederate ones. They were the Monitor. They were the merrimack not the Monitor. They were the confederate ones. Yeah whatever and that bugged me because yeah I know you have to do a lot for drama. And everything like that number of ships right in the type of ships the Kinda ships if the just the kind of ship that they fixed. I'd have been okay with it. Yeah that was annoying anachronisms but besides that I did like the movie A set for the uncomfortable parts for me. Yeah well. I thought that one of the things that I've seen bandied about is that they presented her in like a superhuman human superhero kind of presentation. which we've been doing a lot of superhero movies this year and I thought it was really kind of Nice to be able all to talk about the exploits of a real historical hero whether or not the movie portrays everything about her in a more or realistic standpoint or what was really real about her The fact that we are actually going to talk about somebody who really did amazing things with their life life and amazingly enough and covered quite well in this movie gave God the glory for most of that and I really appreciate gate that they did not leave her faith out of the movie and so easy nowadays with faith being such a a bad word really in our culture her to have made the movie and made her faith less than genuine or somehow something she believed in that wasn't real but they actually played up her faith breath and I appreciate that because she in real life really did give God the glory for which she was able to accomplish with her life. It's sort of the the polar opposite or the flip side of the coin to what they did with them wrinkle in time which which was a book that had good faith elements though not necessarily theologically strong But they even not only did. They removed those for the movie but they perverted them into this multicultural Balderdash yeah. It was horrible and then presented granted it. Yeah they did a good job with with portraying a genuine faith and the the trust and love the Harriet Tubman inspired among her peers. On the underground railroad were both Really well done yeah. Well let's move quickly into our themes because we don't want to spend the whole podcast talking about our initial reactions. We want to get into the Nitty Gritty of this movie. And probably the biggest thing thing in this movie that's repeated over and over again is liberty or death and this was the battle cry for the revolution. When are when Americans I? I decided to split off from England. They wanted to be free. They didn't want to be under a king they wanted. They didn't want taxes. And and that was the whole. Don't tread on me the and then We come later on and in fact I've been listening to a lot of Political commentary in the last week. That's been discussing whether our founding founding fathers really built this country on slavery Ben Shapiro just this week. Did a a speech at one of the colleges with the young Americans Americans Foundation in which that was the topic of his speech was was America built on slavery or was it built on liberty and he pointed out how how everything that. Our founding documents in our founding fathers believed was liberty they had to make allowances for slavery because so many of the there were so many slaves at the time of our founding but there is a lot of indication that they were already trying to figure out how to abolish slavery even from the beginning of our country. It just took a while to accomplish it and so our our country was actually founded on liberty but it took us a while to catch up and and so we hear I want. I'd rather live free or die. You know I'd rather be free or die liberty or death. It was repeated over and over again in this movie and there was a phrase That she says actually near the end where she meets up with Gideon again towards the end of of her time. I'm in the of being a conductor on their underground railroad where she tells Gideon that God doesn't mean for people to own people and So yeah it's it's like this obviously a movie about slavery in escaping slavery but I thought you had an interesting question he wrote. Here's that were were questioned to take his life to avoid being enslaved as it wrong and I it draws to mind her jumping off the bridge. I don't think she she was a temporary suicide there. She was just no no no she wasn't she was trying to get away from them and the only way to get away from them was to jump into the river. I don't think that counts as taking your own life. I think that's just escaping sheet. A her last words before going over the side though we're live free or die so I mean clearly she she thought there was a possibility that it would be a fatal choice but the while I had that scene in in mind when I when I penned this question I do mean it more of a a a general thing because let's face it the the the play of the American slave in the The late eighteenth century and early early nineteenth century was horrid. Yeah and it's not hard to sympathize with the the desire to die. I rather than continue face that horrific existence. Even in that I question you know it. Is it still wrongs still sinful. Kill escape now now to to to take your to die rather than N. B. Enslaved. There's not really a scene in the movie but I. I can't imagine that there weren't slaves who didn't take their own life rather than be captured recaptured. Rather 'cause really being cat recaptured. After escaping would be for a face worsen death right AH for most runaway slaves. Yeah a lot of times. They were beaten to an inch of their lives anyway and the and sold and into worse conditions than they'd been before. Yeah it's slavery slavery is not beautiful and it's not especially the kind of slavery we had. In the American south south it was the worst kind of slavery. And I can't I can't even wrap my mind around what it would have been like to have been in that that in those situations but yet and I want to bring this up because this is something I think. A lot of our cultural discussions nowadays does not bring into account is that slavery still exists. We always talk about it in the past tense because we we think of slavery as being what it was in the American south where the the black men were brought in and sold on the block and it was legal to have them and it was legal to.

Harriet Tubman Moses CICIS Gideon Philadelphia Amazon Saint Catherine Americans Americans Foundation N. B. Enslaved Ben Shapiro Kapiti Michigan Tuchman Egypt England America
"harriet" Discussed on Are You Just Watching?

Are You Just Watching?

12:22 min | 2 years ago

"harriet" Discussed on Are You Just Watching?

"Of the spirituals I when I was watching some of the more documentary nature videos that I could find on. Harriet tubman coming. They made the comment that this the slaves in the south actually used their spirituals to communicate. They were codes so they they would actually Sing a song about you. Know a meeting in the forest and that would be indicating what time the slaves would would leave their Homes in the middle of the night to go have a prayer service in the in the fields away from the the plantation houses. And they would they would actually pass code teach other by singing in in the fields as to when they were GonNa meet or and it was very interesting to find out that you know all these spirituals that have made it you know into our Himal alleges of modern era. A lot of them were actually coded messages to each other. And that's what. Harriet Tubman used it for because she he would often sing to draw the slaves to her when she was a conductor on the underground railroad. We should probably say that Even no no. This is the first impression there will not be a no spoiler section since this is the life and times of an actual historical person. Yeah uh-huh so sorry but one hundred fifty years is long enough for you to have a cotton spoiler. Yes yes we're not gonNA worry about those and and to be honest. We really highly recommend that. If you're going to see this movie to to to educate yourself on Harriet not just watch the movie but Check out some of the the stuff on YouTube Some of the articles that have been put out and we'll put some links in our show notes to kind of guide you and some of that. I also found a documentary. That's available for free on Amazon Prime. If you're an Amazon. Prime member called Harriet Tubman. They called her Moses. which was I found very informative and it goes through to her whole life with historical movies? I always like to go back and see what anachronisms it may have or how they might have modified history in order to tell the dramatic story and for the most part aside from the very last scene they did really really good job. Several of the characters breath are fictionalized. Optional Yeah Yeah they're they're What is it called when they take composites composite? Yeah that's the word I was looking for. Yes they composite at some of the characters to China give to give flesh out people that might have been inherits life but they ah that they may have not been specific person they kinda wrapped them all together into one person and had that person appear in a fictional the biggest biggest one I think is What was her name? Marie Marie from the from the Boardinghouse Marie in the fill in the Philadelphia Boarding House. She was completely completely fictional character but they needed her in there to kind of I guess be a friend to Harry it when and help her learn how to be a free a free person after escaping slavery. So yeah you know. I don't really have a problem with composite characters like that. Because you're compressing so much I I am into two hours. Yes you really have to be able to communicate certain aspects well and they did a good job with Marie and the other big composite in this one is Gideon gotten the slave owners son son slash slave owner himself. Yes who also served a very specific purpose purpose in the movie right and this kind of love hate almost intimate relationship that the from all historical that that I could find really only exist so they kind of built that in I guess to kind of create some kind of a relationship that between a Harriet and her masters it may not have actually existed. Now as we come into. This movie's been out a couple of weeks. I would say I saw it as a press preview. So it's it's been a while since I've seen the movie and it's coming in as they the reviews are very mixed when I was looking on the IMDB comments comments. I was finding that people either giving it five stars and raving about it where they were giving one stars and just couldn't stand it and so they seem to. We'll be all the way on the extremes. There's very few people that just like the movie they either hate it or they loved it and I think that's kind of true a lot of times when you're portraying a a real person and a fictional environment is that people they either want it to be truly historical and they get mad when it isn't or they're just happy with if it because it. It portrays the character that they want to know more about and so they enjoy the movie. So I think that that. Just kinda shows the different ways that people approach which bio-pics I think the And this actually ties in to a little bit of my first impression. It's very easy to look at the the people who are giving it bad reviews and say oh they have sociological. Paintings are racist undertones at that. They don't want to like it or they're automatically gonNA disparage it. You remember like Captain Marvel know that movie was review bombed. I I think is what it was called in rotten tomatoes before it had even come out by people who wanted to review it poorly because of its star. But I don't think that's the case in the few negative reviews that I've read. It really did come. Come down to like you were saying that. They wanted to historical to be more historical more accurate and they wanted more of her accomplishments stuffed into the two Our block which I think would have made it very crowded. Yeah it was interesting because the I took a friend with me to see the movie and she came out of the movie thinking that it was a movie she could recommend people but she felt like there is a major agenda in the gender turned her off which surprised me because I didn't feel like this was an agenda movie. I know that there are some people who could turn it into an agenda because of you know the whole Oh slavery and right and racism and all that stuff. That's going on in our culture but I really felt like the movie didn't Ram home an agenda and so they were just telling a story about a true person and as accurate away as you could with a movie. I do believe there are other movies about Tomlin's life this is just one one of many and I don't know I haven't seen indeed other so I don't know how this win. Stacks up against some of the others but I didn't really feel like it was agenda driven but I could be wrong I mean of course that is also kind of a you know personal perspective where it hits you between the is what you watch it did. Did your friend share what she felt the agenda was I think that she thought it was another of a kind of the women's Lib. Kinda thing you know where women are powerful and and I can see a little bit of that but to be honest this was a super strong woman who lived in an era where she was not free so I I really felt like that. They were portraying her strength character in an accurate way. So it didn't bug me but you know works at getting so hypersensitive to this kind of stuff. Now that I don't know yeah. Actually that hyper sensitive. Nature is what made me uncomfortable comfortable with this movie. Don't get me wrong. This movie. I thought was well done. I think that Cynthia Ribaud did a excellent excellent on job as mentese slash Harriet I think honestly I think all the actors in here did a great job. I think the Director Tur- did a great job putting together a very compelling story however I come to the movie with baggage I am a white male Protestant entitled individual. At least that's what society has been beating into my head head for the last couple of decades and you know with with all this sensitivity about confederate monuments and don't going after historical figures simply because they own slaves or and stuff like that. I felt a little little bit like I was being asked in the movie to atone for the sins of my forefathers which may may or may not be accurate And I think that's where that cultural sensitivity comes into play. I I feel like the emphasis in society recently on being woke and recognizing entitlement and turning away from people who were heroes of the confederacy or even founding fathers simply because they own slaves. I think that's made me more sensitive to what I might feel like is blamed being directed it at my social class. Yeah but like I said shut. It's probably not even accurate. I honestly don't think that this movie does that and the reason I don't think it does that is because it shows in the movie. How many white white people were on the side of the abolitionists you know the The underground railroad would never have existed have been successful if it weren't for all of the White Americans who thought slavery was horribly evil and they risked themselves and their property a lot of times if they'd been caught harboring fugitive slaves. They would've been sent to jail. They would have lost a lot of there. They would have been forced to pay fines and lost their wellbeing. I mean there were tons of people In the south throughout the north who were risking a lot to help fugitive slaves in this movie shows them. You know like the the family with the farm. I'm that helped Terry. It and then later on help period as further on with more slaves fugitive slaves. They did it with all without any lines which I really really liked and they just they kept pointing it out and even you know near the end where they after. The fugitive slave bill was passed and and she was meeting with a bunch of white people about you know how do we keep rescuing slaves. And how far do we have to take them. It was she was one of the very few black people in that room. It was almost all white people who are discussing how they were going to keep the the rescuing of the slaves going and so yeah I honestly feel like they went out of their your way to show that this was not a racial thing that there were just simple who believe slavery was wrong and they were willing to risk risk at all And there it was a lot of discussion towards the end. Obviously where they were coming to the conclusion that Oh civil war was going to be necessary to stop slavery and I thought that was interesting that you know that it was a discussion. You know we. This country cannot abide this evil. And we can't deal with it the right way and so. Oh it's GONNA end up being a civil war. They were discussing that. I thought that was very interesting. Yeah yeah that's one of the hard parts of doing movie like that is because the events events that are depicted in this movie are over the course of I WanNa say twenty to twenty five years from her initial escape escape all the way up through the civil war the yeah. The scene in the civil work ended. It's always hard to give that sense of time in a movie but actually the the fugitive slave act was one of the things that was sort of rearranged in Harriet They put it later in her life to to add a certain amount.

Harriet tubman Marie Marie Amazon YouTube China Gideon Boardinghouse Marie Harry Captain Marvel IMDB Tomlin Cynthia Ribaud Philadelphia Boarding House Terry
"harriet" Discussed on Are You Just Watching?

Are You Just Watching?

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"harriet" Discussed on Are You Just Watching?

"Do you hear the Voice of God. The movie Harry. It provides a good foundation for discussion on slavery from both historical and spiritual perspective. Are you just watching episode ninety eight. Harriet welcome to the PODCAST. That shares critical thinking for the entertained Christian. I'm e Franklin. I'm Tim Martin. And we're going to go back in time a little bit with this movie or I guess it's more like a fictional version of beckon tie. Well everything everything. I read suggests that some stuff is fictionalized. But it's accurate inasmuch as the story of tells. Yeah Yeah I think that there's a lot of truth Bruce Senate and I think there's some fiction in it as well so it's I think the nice balanced we didn't go to see. A documentary. Went to see a movie. It's so it's not as accurate as documentary would be but it was more entertaining than a documentary so I think that it is best of both worlds granted. There are entertaining documentaries out there. We don't want to buy the art. Yes yes yes this movie was. I thought a pretty good good movie. It is actually fairly clean so I think that there would be a perspective where you could take. Maybe school aged children to cozy this to kind of open up a level of discussion on you know the history of slavery in the United States and an other aspects of the story I think get safe to take kids to. Because they kept the violence down there was teensy bit a language that plugged in online found. But I didn't notice it and there's there's really no sexual content. There's a you know some states of undress for Harriet but Other than that nothing. That's so horrible purpose that you couldn't have kids in the room to see basically a heriot's rated PG thirteen which coming out of A. I was a little surprised because there are much worse. PG Thirteen movies out there. As far as content much much I think this probably could easily have gotten a PG if not even and maybe even a g except for the the difficult content of it well the violence in and there was some language. And I don't Kaji would be a major stretch but PG maybe I could see a PG but pg thirteen is as a good safe rating for it. And I think that you could very well take school aged children to see this movie Obviously really young kids would not be interested in it but it would be a good discussion starter from an educational standpoint important for a school age children. In fact I I was talking to some people at work about this. And they said they'd actually seen whole classes of kids coming out of the theater and they. I thought that they'd gotten to see Harriet. So could see you know being a classroom exercise to see this movie. The music was by another new composer to I've never heard of fits His name. I'm assuming it's a him. Terence Blanchard is very atmospheric. And there were when you listen to it as kind.

Harriet Terence Blanchard United States Bruce Senate Tim Martin e Franklin Kaji