22 Burst results for "Harper Lee"

The Establishment Welcomes Godless Hollywood Liberal Jeff Daniels

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:34 min | 2 months ago

The Establishment Welcomes Godless Hollywood Liberal Jeff Daniels

"Now you may remember jeff daniels from the movie dumb and dumber and if you ever wondered while watching that movie will who's dumb and dumber. Let's listen to this clip and you will know exactly who i think. The bloody sunday for people of color was george ford's murder and white people said. I had no idea that we were only taught one side of american history. Better look into that. So i started reading isabel. Wilkerson tana coats. Carol anderson get educated. Because there's a whole we have an opportunity in this country right now to welcome in a america we really do. I feel the same way that there is strangely. Not only in america not in our the way we approach our civic society but in the arts There's there's reasons and opportunity where things are reopened. That never closed ever before to re dedicate yourself to first principles and white people are the ones who need to hear it. So mockingbird is harper lee to white point of view and it certainly is the story of atticus coming to grips with the fact that one of the big central questions of the play is. There's goodness everyone you just have to care enough to look for it. Is that true today. In two thousand twenty one. Is there goodness everyone not so sure. But you have to choose. Now you have to decide whether you're for eliminating or at least marginalizing systemic racism or you against you have to choose. You can't just sit back and go. Please cut my taxes. Look the other way. Well there's also a choice before that which is to acknowledge exists acknowledge it exists

George Ford Wilkerson Tana Carol Anderson Jeff Daniels Isabel America Harper Lee Atticus
"harper lee" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"harper lee" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Set a watchman both in terms of it as a novel but also if you have your own sort of theories having some insight now into Harper Lee has to was this a draft of of Tequila mockingbird did she do you think she actually intended for it ever to see the light of day. Yeah it's interesting hearing Laura be able to tell you exactly what? She did between certain drafts of her novel Because one of the most interesting things about Harper Lee life at the time when she was first setting down the Macomb story So nineteen fifty. Seven really is when she got. Go set a watchman shaped into a book and it was the first version of the Macomb Story. She told MOCKINGBIRD was That's not quite fair to say. It was a revision but it took that story and reshaped and over a period of two and a Half Years Harper Lee. Worked with this incredible editor. It's so funny to think about her story being the untold one in my book because actually think this woman Tejo Hof. This extraordinary editor Lippincott publishing house is is really one of the unsung heroes of American literary history. She's up there with Maxwell Perkins. She took a writer who had never taken a creative writing course and helped her make a better book and it was a very slow deliberate process chapter by chapter page by page figuring out the problems of perspective or the way the setting should be constricted or expanded and and making sense of kind of you know aesthetic and political decision about what was going to go on in the novel. So Harper Lee had this vision of the world in the story. She wanted to tell but it was only thanks to this editor. Tejo Hof that she figured out how to do it so I don't think there's anything mysterious about watching. It is the very first version of the book she delivered to her agents. Who tried to sell it. No one wanted to publish it familiar experience. Maybe to some of the writers in the room she walked into her agents and they were enthusiastic and they liked the characters but nowhere. They send to was interested. Tejo Hof read. Go set a watchman and said. I don't want to publish this book but I WANNA help you make a book. We can publish. I like these characters. I like the story I WANNA help you. Make it into a better book and it took two and a half years but they made to kill mockingbird and that's the book that Lippincott up published and there's a little bit of material in the archives for a while they were GonNa Call it atticus and they're these kinds of in-between periods where they didn't quite know what the book was. But at the end of the day the the easiest way to explain it is she walked in with go. Set a watchman and two and a half years later. The book that went to press was to kill mockingbird think of go set a watchman. What did I think of it? You Know I. It's interesting to see all those and I was absolutely fascinated by it. I think it is an incredibly interesting literary time capsule or artifact of a writer's process so I'm sure you know at some point people will be reading your drafts and someone will want to know. When did she decide? You know she was going to actually have two parallel geographies going. Or when did she change this detailer? That and it's rare that we really get to see that process for a writer the wasteland land. But you're looking at pounds edits. You can really see specific things that change and become better and so grateful for the opportunity to see it. I think it's a little grievous that it was published. As a sequel and the way that book was marketed was hardly for decades and decades has slave over the sequel to her beloved book. And now we present it to you because it's not that it's a very rough version of the story and I think you know the first third is really great in the last two thirds are kind of rubbish. They're worth reading. They're fun and again they're interesting but I don't think it should be taught anywhere that's not a kind of history of politics in this country or even even better kind of MFA course of. How does revision work? You know. What's the ideal relationship to an editor? How can we improve the ideas? We have and make better books out of them. All right. I'M GONNA ask you one one more question on. Go set a watchman which he will disapprove of Harper Lee. I'm sure we'll disapproved on have been very conservative about not you know Psychology and offering too much conjecture into someone else's mind. But do you think that from what you learned reporting on? May Come in what you learned about Harper Lee that she wanted this to be published before she died. You all seem really nice so I hate to do this to you but the thing I will say is you know keep looking for my byline in the New Yorker. Because I'll have more to say about it. I'm not. I'm not a tease about the book. I'll tell you anything that's in at all spoil every single plot there is but yeah unfortunately on that one up to say you know. Keep the story and you're interested in her affairs Keep your eyes subscribe now exactly One final question for you. Because Casey you mentioned earlier about wishing in a way that you had the freedom of fiction to did you summarily reject that. I'm sure you knew this was going to be a novel from the get-go did you find that. You know in addition to all the research that you did and everything that's based in fact that sort of having that freedom to make things up enabled you to flesh out the story in ways you wouldn't have been able to do and nonfiction. I think absolutely an happened. My characters or purely fiction characters and then there are real people that existed in the book but even if reading all the the letters and all of the primary resources and firsthand accounts part of me like the novelist and me really wanted to know what is Olga Saito. Boris the moment after he wins the Nobel Prize. That's not recorded and so the amazing thing about historical fiction is that you can. You can go there and you can try to capture the essence of these real people but at the same time imagine. What would they say to each other? How would they react? And I think within the real story of my novel. That's where I was most interested in trying to respect their legacy of who they were. Also you know what happens behind closed doors all right. I have many more questions but I'm sure all of you have questions too so I want to open it up to your questions. This raise your hand. Someone has a microphone. Alright right up here in front Casey. This is for you. So when I read watchmen. After forty five fifty years I felt like I was hearing this voice again. Hadn't heard and all this time so I was pretty darn sure. That's Harper Lee. And in fact I heard Scout Right which was such a joy and yet there are people that said it wasn't hers and at the same time there are people that think that maybe she wrote in cold blood. So why do you think that is and what do you think of those conspiracy theories and is it because it's a woman because she's described as a recluse is it just because she only had one novel that she published before this? Yeah that's a great question and it's interesting. When I first started working on my book I very often got asked if I thought Harper Lee actually wrote to kill a mockingbird or if I thought Truman capote did so that was that was the starting place a lot of people nurse this.

Harper Lee editor Tejo Hof writer MOCKINGBIRD Macomb Story Casey Maxwell Perkins Laura American literary history MFA Lippincott Lippincott publishing Truman capote Nobel Prize Olga Saito atticus
"harper lee" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

07:17 min | 1 year ago

"harper lee" Discussed on The Archive Project

"And that's when to to pamelas point you know this. This story was one lives out in fear and terror in this small town mostly because people didn't know who all the reverend had life insurance policies on how he was getting away with things and actually I interviewed a guy who was the who employed the reverend when he was doing this pulpwood in business for timber and that guy said to me you know I always used to tell a joke about the reverend when people would ask me if I was afraid of him and I said you know really what was the joke and he said I had insurance on him which was true because you have to ensure your employees and that kind of work and so so when the reverend was gunned down that vigilantes trial was kind of sensation in Alabama. And that's when Harper Lee found out about it and came down and tried to turn not only the original criminal story in the Life Insurance Fraud. And this kind of stuff and into a story but the Reverend's lawyers so the lawyer who had defended the Reverend for ten years not only in these criminal investigations but in a lot of civil litigation too because you can believe if the police were upset about the Reverend William Maxwell the life insurance companies were even more upset and had tried to stop payment and the reverend ended up having to take many of them to court so his lawyer then defended the vigilante him and so Harper Lee have found another complicated lawyer Not Unlike the atticus finch of go set a watchman So that's that's the story that drew her to this part of Alabama but she was trying to turn it into a book like in cold blood she was. She was not initially trying to write a novel much. Like Boris Pasternak was at a point in her career where she was trying to do something new so what she did in the time he was in. This town was the same kind of investigative reporting that I did to write a nonfiction book about it. She gathered documents. She sat in on the trial of the vigilantes. She interviewed the lawyers. The coroner's folks who had known the victims of of the Reverend's murders and people who worked for the insurance companies and just gathered a tremendous amount of material to turn into a nonfiction book. There's so much in their event one needs to follow up on a lot of it is obviously in your book but among the many shocking things about this is that as we know from Tequila mockingbird and our history. It's was awfully easy to convict black man of murderer of any crime especially in Alabama at that time and whether he had done the crime or committed the crime or not and this is a case where you have an African American man who did commit the crime and yet got off several times over. Yeah I mean I think it's one of the curiosities if you've read. Go set a watchman out of curiosity. I'M GONNA assume most of the people in this room of Red Mockingbird but how many of you all have read Goethe watchmen. Okay so you know walking me ask how many for it to kill a mockingbird. Oh Wow how many of road doctor Zhivago okay just. Because you're not a good silence won't ask him. How many have read their books? Because I'm sure after this panel it will be everyone very soon well at any event. Even if you didn't read go set a watchman you probably learn from the coverage you know at the times and everywhere else. That watchmen was a much more politically ambitious and a much more morally complicated version of the the MOCKINGBIRD STORY AND THE CHARACTER OF ATTICUS. Finch had absolutely you know disastrous politics for the grownups scout to encounter and make sense of and scout has gone to live in New York. You know in this incredibly integrated society and she's come home as an adult Alabama and she's trying to make sense of you know the mandate to integrate and her father's resistance and the kind of Genteel racism of the White Citizens Council and that is all say that Harper Lee in the one thousand nine hundred seventy s when she found out about the Reverend William. Maxwell was looking for a complicated story about race. And that's why I think one of the things that was interesting to her was this a symmetry between the experience of the Reverend who was never convicted of any of these murders and who prevailed and more than a dozen civil cases and the case of the vigilante. Because if you can believe that the same lawyer who got the reverend off managed to get the vigilante off too so you are talking about two black defendants who got away with murder. And it's certainly the way that it's still talked about in these communities and it is one of the peculiarities of this case. And there are very very specific. Things to talk about talk about the jury pools that were involved about the lawyer who represented these two men and so I think that complexity though and that surprises part of what attracted or to because she did not want to continue to be the author of mocking bird. This this this kind of moral imperative for the culture and she had lived for a long time as the author of Tequila Mockingbird as the civil rights hero which was not a comfortable mantle for her to wear and so I think one of the things she was trying to do was remodel herself. Not as a kind of you know. She had been pejoratively painted into this corner of Children's book author and I think what she wanted to say is no. I am Harper early. The writer and I am Harper Lee. Who has a complicated story to say about race? In America race in the American south so flannery O'connor who it might be said was probably jealous of. She's the box off. Two Games mockingbird very. I can't remember if she reviewed it in the Times Booker View. It's possible but she did not have nice things to say about it and essentially wrote it off as a children's book and I'm curious since you've mentioned that is that how Harper Lee. Thought of her book. No not at all I mean I I think not. Surprisingly you know any novelist who writes about children we'll tell you having child characters does not make necessarily for child fiction and so I think she was grateful for the amount of attention. The book had and she interacted quite lovingly with with children. Who would write to her about reading the book in school or when adults would write her to say that reading that book as a teenager you made me into a reader made me into a writer or even more satisfying really made me into the kind of person who looks for different than diversity in the world but she did not set out to write a children's Book. I mean for the for the record the way that most of us in the book world sort of think about what makes a book about children. A children's burr versus what makes a book about children and Adult Book is perspective? And it's whether you're fully immersed in it if it if you're fully immersed in the voice and perspective of that character that Child Carter. Then it's a children's book but if there is some distance then it's an adult book. Which by that definition to kill. Mockingbird isn't adult book but what she did so factory wasn't habit the mind of that child during those parts that I think may be confused people in terms of nation. You know God bless Flannery O'connor but I think you know there was just a bit of professional jealousy. I don't think flannery O'connor got anywhere near the New York Times Bestseller Lists and Harper Lee sat on it for a year and then the film came out and she sat on it for another year and then over and over again she's just returned to it..

Harper Lee Alabama flannery O'connor Adult Book William Maxwell murder Boris Pasternak writer Child Carter Fraud New York White Citizens Council doctor Zhivago Finch burr New York Times Bestseller
"harper lee" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"harper lee" Discussed on The Archive Project

"She surprised me so we associate Harper Lee with obviously to kill a mockingbird to lesser extent with. Go set a watchman but the story that you write about is a real story a real nonfiction story that that is less well known Laura same with you you're writing about a nonfiction story since most people here probably are familiar with doctor Zhivago. What is the story of what happened with the CIA and Doctor Zhivago? Yes so Boris Pasternak just to put it into some context. He was one of the most famous. Soviet writers of his time and he was famous for being a poet first and foremost and he was so famous he would sell out these huge packed auditoriums and when he was reading his poetry people would start to shout out the lines before he could finish him. And what was the time period? That you're talking about. Boris will so it was nineteen fifty-six when he finished doctor Zhivago his first and only novel and when he finished it on and off during the time it took him to write the book he kept saying it's never going to be published to. Maybe there's some hope. After Stalin died in one thousand nine hundred eighty three that there could be a thought that could allow his book but when he sent it off to the state publisher which was what you had to do to get approval to be published. It was just crickets he. He didn't hear anything back. And this is this is a most famous living right at the time in in the area and he just knew that this was not going to be published and Lo and behold during this time when the Soviets are pretty much going to ban the book the Italian show up at his doorstep his literal doorstep in the country homey lived in about twenty miles outside of Moscow and filtering let Feltrinelli Was the Italian publisher. The I bring Doctor Zhivago to the world had a scout that lived in Moscow and he took the book and he smuggled it out of the Soviet Union into East Berlin into West Berlin and met up with Feltrinelli and wants the Soviets heard that they had the Italian. This book. They're like you have to give it back to us. They're pressuring and Feltrinelli and Pasternak both held strong and so the Italians publish it in nineteen fifty seven and it was a huge worldwide sensation. Number One New York Times bestseller knocking will lead off the top of the charts and much to number gloves Chagrin. He hated Doctor Zhivago and very much. So and the CIA sees this and they sent an opportunity and they had what they called their books program and they said we're going to take this band book of the Soviets most famous living writer. And we're going to print it in. Its native Russian and smuggle it back behind the iron curtain for the Soviets to read and question why the Government banned this book from them. And that's what they did and it was quite a success for them and so for those who have not read doctor Zhivago. What was it that so terrified the Soviet regime about this novel? Yeah so many people think of Doctor Zhivago is just a love story. They've seen the David Lean film which is amazing. But it's also a war story and it's also what makes it actually. The most subversive isn't that it's critical of the Russian revolution at different vigils throughout the book have different opinions about the Russian revolution and they've been affected by some have prospered because of it some have been downgraded because of it but everyone has their own opinion which is flying in the face of the collective thought and it talks about group. Think and how dangerous it can be. And even if it's not you know these people giving speeches about how detrimental the revolution was. It's just that they had the opinion in the first place that made it subversive. Okay I'm not going to get you to reveal the entire plot of your novel that said sticking again to the real story. How did they get the novel into the Soviet Union? So yes through various ways and the one of the first way's is that they use the world's fair in Brussels in one thousand nine hundred fifty eight as a staging ground to smuggle these printed novels back behind the Iron Curtain and they use the Vatican's pavilion they. They partnered up with the Vatican which actually the CIA CIA did often and posed as clergy within the Vatican's pavilion and Soviet Sudan. Brown's actually I know I was when I was reading these memos. This is stranger than fiction. How am I gonNA put off writing this? No one's GONNA believe it. They're they're posing so they would identify. Soviet visitors because Soviets couldn't travel as often as they could since this world's fair was a staging ground. They had this giant pavilion. There are members of the bullshit by lay the symphony that attended. They would identify them coming into the Vatican pavilion and escort them behind into a secret chapel. Where they would give them a copy of Doctor Zhivago and soon like they were. These blue linen covered copies of Zhivago and soon all of the Blue Linen covers were ripped off and spread throughout the fair because they were taking the covers off and ripping into pieces so they can better conceal it and sure enough. A few of them made it back back into the Soviet Union and immediately went into the underground world of Psalmist odd people copying and typewriters and basements and kitchens and then started spreading it because everyone wanted to read it so Aston this story for half as in the novel Casey Tequila. Mockingbird is obviously agreed story but this other story have to say is. It's insane I mean Tells the story about the true story about the Reverend the book that surely bad panel for clergy. I think they're just under cover and some of them are in in my book. I mean it must be said a childhood preacher of mine. You know said I wasn't doing any favors for the ministry with this book. So the the serial killer at the heart of this story is a Baptist minister who was not able to do that. Full-time for living. He had a number of other jobs to and You know he was an itinerant preacher but he also worked for a textile mill and he served in the army and that textile mills actually the one that made his uniform and when he came back to Alabama he went to work for the Milanese worked at a rock quarry and he also worked in the timber industry in Alabama. He did what's called Pulpwood in which you know. I know I'm in timber country up here might surprise you to learn how much of it is based in the southeast to but You know this is an African American man who was incredibly ambitious very intelligent but who had limited opportunities when he returned Alabama and he was married for about twenty five years and was known. Simply as the Reverend William Maxwell but That far into a marriage his wife was then found murdered and he was the prime suspect and the police thought they were going to convict him of the murder. They had a neighbor of his. Who is supposed to testify? That he had been out all night and in fact he lured his wife to the very place where her body was found but that woman changed her testimony. That neighbor did and the police were confused until she became the second Mrs Maxwell. And so that was why she had changed her testimony and then she was found dead under some always suspicious circumstances and then a nephew of a brother and then finally a sixteen year old stepdaughter. This reverend were all found dead and The the the through this plot is that the reverend health life insurance policies on all these individuals so he made about a half a million dollars in life insurance. Money and Harper Lee did not come to know historian until nine hundred seventy seven when he was gunned down at the funeral of his last alleged victim. And that's when Harper Lee found out about the story because of vigilant stood up at the funeral of that sixteen year old and murdered the reverend in cold blood..

doctor Zhivago Soviet Union CIA Boris Pasternak Harper Lee Vatican pavilion publisher Soviet Sudan Feltrinelli Laura Moscow Alabama One New York Times Government Lo William Maxwell Blue Linen Stalin Mockingbird
"harper lee" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

07:37 min | 1 year ago

"harper lee" Discussed on The Archive Project

"City am so. I spent a lot of time in Alex City and went to Montgomery and went to Birmingham and so a lot of ongoing reporting but my original trip was to Monroeville to see that town and I think she's an interesting example in it's fascinating to hear Laura talk about the things. She needed to experience for herself. Because you know to kill a mockingbird is is not memoir very autobiographical fiction and I think for me. One of the fascinating things to think about over and over again was the ways in which novelists poets take the world that exists and make it their own. Because it's true one of the reasons I took that assignment was. I loved MOCKINGBIRD and I wanted to go see this town that was the model for Macomb. And it's it's it's surreal. You you get out of your car and you look up at the courthouse and it's exactly like the one. In the film that Gregory Peck was in and you walk around the Courthouse Square. And you can go and see the street. That Harper Lee grew up on where Truman capote was living right next door across a stone fence and it's uncanny and yet it's also not the novel you know there's so much that never took place that town and moreover so many things that thousands of other people experienced over and over again that they never shaped into a story quite as beautiful as Mockingbird so as a pleasure to be there and I did spend a lot more time and these other parts of the state over the years that I was reporting but I did some from home. You know you can do interviews from home and you can read a lot a lot of books history and you know. I didn't have to be in Alabama Hartford to be reading about the History Life Insurance. You know you take it with you and you know. Sometimes if you're really lucky you can take your work. You know to a beach or something and you can learn just as well there. So some of it was just Archival and academic work but quite a lot of it was being there to Laura's point those those evocative details you just you you never know how useful they'll be and how you'll use them and what texture they'll bring to the story so. I think it's it's pretty clear the to real common threads between these two books one the research and I want to talk more about the research that each of you did but also the fact that in different ways you are each writing about real writers real books and not unknown ones. You know ones that people have a lot of thoughts and feelings about and many much has been written about them and I did that intimidate you going in. Did you think of did that concern you? Yes I think when I was first starting to write this novel it was almost I. It took me months and months before I said yes. I am writing. A novel was always the project. And just trying to explore this this this little bit of history the head come out because everyone has some sort of the they know what doctor Zhivago is either scene. The David Lean film or they've read the book so Stan the thing that people didn't know is in two thousand fourteen the CIA released all of their documents. Detailing how they use this book as a weapon. And that's what kind of prompted me into writing the book in the first place because I was so obsessed with propaganda having been a almost a propagandist myself working in political campaigns that I really wanted to avoid an really fiction. Writing is my penance for writing all those political ads so but I did feel like I feel like I ask some of my mentors. I was in my MFA Program. It was like. I don't know like I can pull this off or if I have the right to and a really amazing writer. Elizabeth mccracken was here at the festival. She said you just do. You can do what you want. Just just do it from your heart. You're passionate about and so I held close to that to that feeling of of not having the right to write about this did that. Did you have that same concern because because this was harper? Lee's story that she never. I mean Harper Lee is interesting. Because it's it's kind of one of these perverse ironies. It's like monks who wanna live in poverty but then get quite wealthy Harper Lee. Wanted to live in obscurity but it only made her more famous so one of the initial challenges of this book was figuring out. You know on the one hand. Everyone knew something about her. And on the other hand very little was known deeply about her and the people who knew the most about her were the ones who had never shared their stories or talked about her publicly so so I felt like there was this peculiar problem of of everyone thinking. They knew something about her but most of what they knew was wrong. And that included me So so the challenge was to figure out how to learn as much and as as as I could but pamelas asking about this other problem as it were. Which is my book is about this book. Harper Lee failed to write. And you better believe over and over again. I wondered if I could do it because she hadn't been able to And it seemed like there were very good structural reasons particular to the story that made it hard for her to complete her project and then of course it turned out there. Were all of these personal reasons that had to do with her relationship to write in and and her relationship to the world and In that sense it felt like okay. I don't struggle with those things. These are not My burdens was someone. She was a perfectionist and she suffered from depression and she had a drinking problem and there were a constellation of things that made it difficult for her to do any work. Not just this particular project and I feel very lucky not not to have those same needs or concerns and to have a support system that you know. She didn't So so there were things about it that worried me but no ongoingly. It felt like At the end of the day I was just writing such a different book which was a book that had her in it and to the point of pathological privacy. She would never have given you. The you know kind of Nancy drew version of Harper Lee. You know true crime reporter so there was always a space for me and my book. That would be quite distinct from the one that she was trying to write. You said that you your idea that you had of Harper Lee. Like many people's idea that your idea of her was wrong. Like what did you learn about her? That surprised you the sure I mean. I think that the the unfortunate word that got attached to Harper Lee long about nineteen sixty four was rick loose. And it's a very perverse word. It rarely applies to the people on whom it is placed in her case. Not Wanting to talk. The New York Times did not mean. She didn't WanNa talk to anyone. Didn't I know shot talk to the press? Actually do want to talk to people and so I think when I say I was wrong. You know one of the first things. Someone told me about her earliest time in this town. Alex City so she she moves this down for nine months and specifically trying to do what she helped capote due out in Kansas. She's trying to gather enough material for a narrative nonfiction project and one of the first stories. Somebody told me about her time in this town was. They met her at the grocery store. She introduce herself first of all which was shocking and then she agreed to comfort. Palmetto cheese sandwiches for lunch and then she signed a copy of Mockingbird for the woman's children and right away. I thought that's not a recluse right. You know that's not. She has opened herself up to conversation and she sociable and she wanted to talk about the history of the lake where this had happened so right away it was just clear she was not reclusive and also that she was ambitious in a way that. I think even though I loved mockingbird but I think I had underestimated her as a writer that this was a very ambitious project had undertaken so I felt like over and over again..

Harper Lee Truman capote Laura writer Alex City Gregory Peck Monroeville Elizabeth mccracken Courthouse Square doctor Zhivago Birmingham Alabama Hartford CIA MFA depression History Life Insurance David Kansas The New York Times
"harper lee" Discussed on Charlotte Readers Podcast

Charlotte Readers Podcast

07:46 min | 1 year ago

"harper lee" Discussed on Charlotte Readers Podcast

"Didn't you know this is a great point and a couple of things said in conversation Press Bill. You said right to publish to get your message into the world. Take joy everyday and your chance to right right every day and this is the one. I really like hut down new ideas with a passion and you use used Jack. London an example. You said he wanted. He used a club or something and Picasso. The canvas was scared of him. Not Him scared of the Canvas. And that's how you approach when you walk out there. You want the piece of paper to be afraid of you not you. I mean the two that immediately come to mind. Are the one with Jack London. Like Eddie says you. Don't wait around for motivation. You go out and hunt with a club is what you do and then at one from Picasso. Of course what somebody asked him they said. Are you ever intimidated by that blank? Canvas in the morning and he looked at him and said that that blank canvas better be afraid of me in the morning. Look at. That's the way you kind of little you have to look at. It is like this embracing of this this the gratitude that you should have as a writer to have the ability to jump on there and really get the chance to do this. I mean it's so absolutely marvelous. It just it's it's it's like breathing it's like eating like at. It's like all of the things making love it. It's it's an essential part of who you are and what you'll be like that And Once you embrace that then. I think it it gets rid of a lot of those worries. That the really aren't there. I mean I hear people talking about the writer's block thing and I'm like you know writer's block is just not knowing what happens next you know and if you've got an outline are you've done the research that you've done all of those things that you needed to do before you started working. Writers Writer's block doesn't exist no such thing as lazy writer. You'd rather go out and you know go for a walk or something like that. There's nothing wrong with that. Sometimes you need to go out and take a walk and come back but No such you know and I could sit here and talk all day with you about this but I'm not GonNa get clean out horse stall or do something. No one a of Hell is you told us what your idea of hill was when you were in this conference You said my hell is being stuck somewhere without a book. Your your big raider right. I mean I don't think you could be a writer without being a big reader. I I think that that's one of the joys of my life is Is the reading. I mean that that kind of has to be it informs. You know it's going to inform your right. I mean I can't imagine you know all of the authors that have had such a large scale effect on who it is that I am as a writer. John Steinbeck you know Jack London You know George MacDonald Fraser. I mean you know I go through a dickens. I mean there are just so many like at Harper Lee like at I mean. There's so many like at that are so important to me but I think you know you have to have to get to that point where it's just you know Yeah and that's I. Guess that's another one of the benefits also looked at because you can also read and if anybody gives you a hard time about reading you can say hey. I'm doing research here. This is important. You know you can lay there on the Sofa in further wood-burning stove and it's almost impossible to tell whether it is. I'm taking a nap like reading. You know and so I've kind of honed it down. You know to a absolute ability but I I love to read like I've got like reading stations all over the ranch. I've got a pile of books down here on the kitchen table. I've got a pile of books on my nightstand up in the bedroom. I've got a pile of books on my writing desk I've got. I've got books down in the tax yet in the bar. So if I'm waiting for the stock tank to fill up I can pull out one of those and read The assemblage of those words on a page at there. That's that's where the art work kind of comes to it. You know. What kind of a balanced do you have between narrative descriptive passages like at dialogue? And you know You know the the length of the dialogue and all these different things like there's so many artistic aspects that you can take into consideration that I feel like I can do this for the rest of my life and I'll never fully figure it all out but I'm willing to pick up the gauntlet and try and give it a shot what I'm hearing which makes me Really hopeful. Dan have a book a year for the next. How many ever years is you? Don't really treat this as much like a job. You're enjoying this. You're not thinking about quote retirement. You're going to keep writing right because we know it's I I wouldn't know what to do I I I'd be wandering around the streets of you cross trying to find something to do. And that's That's a dismal prospect. Exactly they be really tired of hearing me. I the big would be judy. I'm sure she would shoot me again. If you know if I can have something that took me away and something to do that would occupy my time and energies. No for a certain portion of the day but But Yeah it's you know I I. There's never a day that goes by the word that comes immediately to mind. His gratitude The opportunity to you know to be able to do what it is that I do and And there's so many people you know that I I. I rely on know to to do what it is that I do look at the readers being a number one like the people that have embraced this world these characters and dutifully wait for the next installment to come out the next installment of course being the next to last stand which is not the next last and there's lots of stands left. Don't worry about that But the next let's dam which will be out on September twenty second. I believe they've actually already given me a pub date and everything but I'm I'm looking forward to that look forward. Hopefully you know the quarantine and all his foolishness will be over with and I can go out and you know and be on tour like able to to see those people because I really enjoy meeting and seeing those people on a yearly basis like it. It's a it's a blast from every aspect of the work is a blast for me. Ask where you've been very generous with your time today. we're going to have information in the show notes links to your website and other ways they can find out remember listeners. That that next book comes out and September two thousand twenty whether there is a virus or not. It'll it'll become you can read it in the price of your home but hopefully crackle be out on the trail. You still riding a motorcycle do I do. That's one of the things. My wife is trying to get rid of it but so far. She hasn't so we just spent time with us today. My pleasure land is. This was a joy as usual. Thank you well. That's it for today. Another found author giving voice to the written word next Tuesday. We'll have another in-depth episode with readings and conversations about the written word and the writing life of a local or regional author before the be on the lookout for another under the covers episode where we do much the same thing we do here but quick and sometimes away from the studio because there are just too many good authors. Not enough time if you like what we're doing. Please consider leaving a short written review on Apple podcasts or the podcast platform of your choice. Because when you do our authors voices travel much farther and wider in podcast land. And if you're inclined to help US help authors give voice to the written words and you'd like some member only content cultivate authors and millions are. Thanks please consider becoming a member supporter. You can find out how to become a member supporter and more about today's show and all previous episodes at Charlotte readers podcast dot com and keep up with news about the show by joining our email lifts and engaging with us on social media we promise to Spain because well that takes too much time and if you do join.

writer Jack London London Harper Lee US Eddie John Steinbeck Charlotte Spain Dan George MacDonald Fraser
"harper lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"harper lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That affecting this little town in Alabama rate is rooted in like a few angry super violent people and really absolves attic has the town sheriff the judge of their roles in this whatsoever and she says Harper Lee's other book go set a watchman is more honest about systemic racism so she says students should read that too so how are teachers framing this performance for their students well the book is supposed to be taught in most New York City schools but each school has control over its own curriculum so I'm not sure how it's being taught but there is this group called facing history and ourselves and they have a teaching curriculum specifically for to kill a mockingbird one thing they talk about is including more black voices because those voices are largely missing from the book and the play so what about the N. word well the play does use it a lot and the actors say it's meant to be disturbing does the education department have a position on when it should be used in teaching the play or the book there is official guidance on this and it says not to delete the word from primary sources that it's important for students to understand quote the dehumanizing power of this term but it also says teachers should develop guidelines on how to handle it when reading out loud in class a lot of teachers as a policy don't let students say the word out loud they pause or say the N. word in class but I've also heard about teachers who say it's important to be true to the text and to the history and that's what the people behind the play tell me they're trying to do all right thousands of students will be about a thousand square garden later this afternoon for to kill a mockingbird just Google thank you so much thanks.

Harper Lee Google Alabama New York City official
Jamie Foxx on his latest film 'Just Mercy'

Popcorn with Peter Travers

09:26 min | 2 years ago

Jamie Foxx on his latest film 'Just Mercy'

"Is popcorn where we tell you what's happening at the movies and there's a great movie out right now for your c called just mercy that has Michael Jordan and then also this ask Jamie Foxx. Yes you're not from give it up now you either are or execute chicks you have to face. This is all right Jamie before I lose complete control interview which would be fine but you made a great movie and Jess Mercy you dead. I think this is a true story. True story I think this is the opposite is this is the most important movie I've ever done Yeah I got yes because of who it's about and what it's about Brian Stephen. A lawyer of WHO's played wonderfully about Michael Jordan. who his whole life is? A Journey is exonerating people that are on death row of wrongly accused and and when I met Bryan Stevenson I was blown away about how much he's done. And what is and it's been sort of under the radar so I applaud Michael Jordan for being the biggest star in the world But always coming back to the movies like this for our cultural for us to educate is to uplift us to give us hope and like I said it is the most important movie I've ever the and who do you play. Play Walter mcmillen Watson Watt's McDonald's amendment south in in Alabama who own pulping business chop down trees for living on his way home on a country road he gets pulled over by the sheriff. And the sheriff says you killed someone it city he's never been in Never met this person. They say you're going to jail. And they put him in jail. Put him on death row without a trial he was on death. Row without a trial for six years and I've been death row before studying for movie and the one thing that I knew about death row was at the worst thing you give. A person is hope because they know that at some point At any point they could be taken off to either electric chair or however they're going to be a or expired but hope walks in in the form of Bryan Bryan Stevenson. Who has played wonderfully Michael Jordan? He takes the case. This is a nineteen eighty six. which wasn't that long ago and They pulled off the miraculous And exonorated a person who had never been in. This has never happened in Alabama person to be exonerated off of death row. And that's the store and what was amazing about how our director destination destined and Michael Be put the movie together on how it brings. Everybody and you saw this Toronto in Toronto. Where just make people crazy and you got I? I don't know eight minutes and thirteen minutes standing ovation but what I really appreciated about the movie. Was it allowed everyone in this movie tested in front of a all black audience at a ninety seven now we expect it for that to be in a high number then they tested in the mid West in front of mostly white audience and we what they say it tested at a ninety eight so that lets you know that the work that was done in the movie as the adapt tation of a book really really got it done. It really worked. Let's look at a clip from your performance Sir Ingest Mercy Screen Actors Guild nominated for I godless. So let's look list from Harvey all know what it is here. You get from the moment you ball buddy over these white folks and make them laugh and try to make him like it. Whatever that is and you say yes or no man but when it's your turn ain't got no thanks take evidence and all the witnesses they got eight thing another matter when all your thank is I looked like a WHO could kill somebody? That's not what I think the way. You're not looking at him and then you do. It's just it's devastating because he wants to get it out. He wants him to hear what was going on in in this soul and then that look. I'm sure he's done it a few times that look to see if what I told hold him really landed. Sometimes people can be in those positions and it's no pad pencil numbers. You're just another person. I'm on my way. But when he looked up so Michael be looking back at him. Engaged young ready ready to take on whatever this whatever this monster is designed to do at the end it was another thing too. I studied a film that that move to me was made famous to me by Al Pacino in The Godfather and if you remember I think it was Zena he was when he was getting ready to kill him at the dinner table. Yeah when he says. I'm going to talk Doc Italian till Michael foresaken and as he goes to talk. Al Pacino Leans up to listen but he looks this way first and and then he engaged so as you study the the art. There's certain things that you bring along with you. That are really effective. Well it sure sure works and that's what you want. You don't just see this movie and say you want to talk to people about it and you see this. You gotTa feel it because there's instead of just anger and just rage. There's a sense of. We can do something about it if we fail. Were trying to do something it. Listen the thing about. This is what I enjoyed about the way. The movie plays out is said when people leave this movie. They feel like they want to get involved. What can I do? What can I do to change his narrative? What can I do to pull back to mass of some of these injustices? And that's what's been so fulfilling with this film because Brian I Steve Isn't who still going out there every day of about his job. He needs it. He needs that people to know that these things are going on because it helps in his endeavors in taking these people and trying to you know put their lives back together. Well Walter Your Johnny on on these calls a lot of things. But he's the kind of person that grows up in this Alabama neighborhood and it was. It's very ironic in the movie. How everybody there even racist Alabama is saying? This is Monroe Kennedy. This is where Harper Lee wrote to them walking bird right which is about Wow this racist that. They don't even say dangerous sort of bouncing off her celebrity. What well here's the thing is like like I'd say all the time there were some very interesting things that wall to sit? Did I looked like a man that could kill somebody. This is the perception that were attacking what tackling the perception that a black man automatically you feel like there is some some of villainous or ominous thing that he possesses therefore of when he is accused of something. We sorta turn the other way. You know we don't necessarily we give them the benefit of the doubt. I can't tell you how many times when when there's something going on on television and there's there's some type of crime every black person to tell you man. I hope it's not a black person. Listen you know why because it continues the narrative but continues The procession so that's what we're what we were tackling in in the movie Walter. Walter says you're guilty from the day you were born now. That was something that we actually ad-libbed in the in the script really. Yeah because yes that's my line Growing up in a southern place in Texas in Texas and being met with early age age racism being called As a young kid it baffled me I was eight years old. My grandfather told me go. Get some gas and gas like twenty five cents a gallon. So he's bringing some gas. I I had to walk on the other side of the tracks. Go get the gas but I think the gas only came up to eighteen cents and I need to get to seven cents back but I didn't WANNA leave the gas out you know so I had to walk into the place I walk in and the guy says. Hey what are you doing while you bring the gas. And I looked at him. I said hey eight. I'm only eight nine. Remember marching back to my grandfather and told him what happened. My grandfather went over and talked to the man told him. You know. That's not nice and whatever you told them what He. He squatted. But I couldn't couldn't wrap my mind around a grown man looking at a child insane and saying that and so that's where I got the line I said I don't have nothing to do with this. I was just born. How can I change this? Why are you so angry at me just because because I was born? Yeah so when you're born into the world and this label is on you just because you're born. I thought that that was something that Walter that we should Add to the to the layer of his character saying I was just born because that's all of us were only just

Walter Mcmillen Watson Watt Alabama Michael Jordan Bryan Bryan Stevenson Michael Jamie Foxx Brian Stephen Al Pacino Jess Mercy Toronto Mcdonald Screen Actors Guild Harper Lee Director Harvey Monroe Kennedy Michael Foresaken Texas Doc Italian Zena
"harper lee" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

10:32 min | 2 years ago

"harper lee" Discussed on The Archive Project

"She took a writer who had never taken a creative writing course and helped her make a better book and it was a very slow deliberate process chapter by chapter page by page figuring out the problems of perspective or the way the setting should be constricted strict or expanded and and making sense of kind of you know aesthetic and political decision about what was going to go on in the novel. So Harper Lee had this vision of the world in the story. She wanted to tell but it was only thanks to this editor. Tejo Hof that she figured out how to do it so I don't think there's anything mysterious about watching. It is the very first version of the book she delivered to her agents. Who tried to sell it and no one wanted to publish it familiar experience maybe to some of the writers in the room she walked into her agents and they were enthusiastic and they liked the characters but nowhere they sent? It was interested. Tejo Hof read. Go set a watchman and said. I don't want to publish this book but I WANNA help you make a book. We can publish wish. I like these characters. I like the story I WANNA help you. Make it into a better book and it took two and a half years but they made to kill mockingbird and that's the book that Lippincott up published and there's a little bit of material in the archives for a while they were GonNa Call it atticus and they're these kinds of in-between periods where they didn't quite know what the book was. But but at the end of the day the the easiest way to explain it is she walked in with go. Set a watchman and two and a half years later. The book that went to press was to kill mockingbird think of go set a watchman. What did I think of it? You Know I. It's interesting to see all those and I was absolutely fascinated by it. I think it is an incredibly interesting. And Literary Time Capsule or artifact of a writer's process so I'm sure you know at some point people will be reading your drafts and someone will want to know. When did she decide? You know she was going to actually have two parallel geographies going. Or when did she change this detailer. That and it's rare that we really get to see that process for a writer You know it's like the waste land but you're looking at pounds edits. You can really see specific things that change and become better and so I was grateful for the opportunity community to see it. I think it's a little grievous that it was published as a sequel and the way that book was marketed was hardly for decades and decades has slave leave over the sequel to her beloved book. And now we present it to you because it's not that it's a very rough version of the story and I think you know the first third is really league rate in the last two thirds or kind of rubbish. They're worth reading. They're fun and again they're interesting but I don't think it should be taught anywhere that's not a kind of history of of politics in this country or even even better kind of MFA course of. How does revision work? You know. What's the ideal relationship to an editor? How can we improve? Move the ideas we have and make better books out of them. All right. I'M GONNA ask you one one more question on. Go set a watchman which he will disapprove of Harper Lee. I'm sure we'll disapproved on have been very conservative about not you know Psychology and offering too much conjecture into someone else's mind. But do you think that from what you learned reporting on May come in what you learned about Harper Lee that she wanted this to be published before she died. You all seem really nice so I I hate to do this to you but the thing I will say is you know keep looking for my byline in the New Yorker. Because I'll have more to say about it. Yeah I'm not. I'm not a tease about the book. I'll tell you anything that's in at all spoil every single plot there is but yeah unfortunately on that one up to say you know if if you're into the story and you're interested in her affairs Keep your eyes subscribe now. Exactly Laura one final question for you. Because Casey you mentioned earlier about wishing in a way that you had the freedom of fiction to did. Did you summarily reject that. I'm sure you knew this was going to be a novel from the get-go did you find that you. In addition to all the research that you did and everything that's based in fact that sort of having that freedom to make things up enabled you to flesh out the story in ways you wouldn't have been able to do you and nonfiction. Yeah I think absolutely an happened my characters or purely fiction characters and then there are real people all that existed in the book. But even if I'm reading all the the letters and all of the primary resources and firsthand accounts part of me like the novelist and we really wanted to know what is Olga Saito. Boris the moment after he wins the Nobel Prize. That's not recorded and so the amazing thing about historical fiction is that you can. You can go there and you can try to capture the essence of these real people but at the same time imagine what would they say to each each other. How would they react? And I think within the real story of my novel. That's where I was most interested in trying to respect Their legacy of who they were. Also you know what happens behind closed doors all right. I have many more questions but I'm sure all of you have questions a two so I want to open it up to your questions. This raise your hand. Someone has a microphone. Alright right up here in front Casey. This is for you so when I read you watch men. After forty five fifty years I felt like I was hearing this voice again. I hadn't heard and all this time so I was pretty darn sure. That's Harper Lee. And in fact I heard scout right right which was such a joy and yet there are people that said it wasn't hers and at the same time there are people that think that maybe she wrote in cold blood so so why do you think that is and what do you think of those conspiracy theories and is it because it's a woman because she's described as a recluse is it just because she only had one novel that she published before this. Yeah that's a great question and it's interesting. When I first started working on my book I very often got asked if I thought Harper Lee actually wrote to kill a mockingbird or if I thought Truman capote did so that was that was the starting place a lot of people nurse this and you're right to call it a conspiracy theory? There was no evidence at all really for it but there was the sense that the book was too good and since she hadn't been able to do it again. And you know she and Capote were friends and he had experienced the a lot of that life within Monroeville that she had so we would have had the kind of fodder for it and so the thought was well he must have written it and then she went quiet because she never wanted anyone to no no and she could never admit that he had had actually written it. I can tell you the Truman capote kept no secrets. He would never have been able to keep the secret that he wrote a Pulitzer Prize winning bestseller. He he could not keep secrets. You know the number of letters in his mailbox on any given day so and actually if you are interested in that theory. There's a wonderful letter that the the local museum in Monroeville has put up at Truman capote's writing a letter to some of his family. Who lived in Monroeville? Who Knew Nell? And he's almost disgusted that she's written a book that's so good. He's ready to let them know he's just had a chance to read it so it's one of the very straightforward source materials. That suggest you know there is no evidence events that he even saw it pre publication and right around the time she had delivered the the revisions to mockingbird the like pre press provision is when she went out to Kansas to help him with in cold blood so it is interesting to me this this new question of does she get enough credit for her work on in cold blood and I. I think that's another. It's like the story of Tejo Hof and Harper Lee. You know the relationship between a writer and an editor. I think we don't have much language for the kinds of literary collaborations. That happen all the time you know we talk to people about our work. We have friends. We have conversation partners. Who help make our work better? Sometimes even research assistants who collaborate on these things and so because we have a language for that the only option is well should she have gotten a CO author credit or did she really write it and if you go to the New York Public Library which you can you can do. And you don't have to have a research project to motivate it but you can go and see the hundred and fifty pages of notes that Lee made for Capote you know all of her records from the interviews and they're wonderful so when you talk about missing her voice and I think you're absolutely right. It's clear she wrote. Go set a watchman. It's not as beautiful as Tequila mockingbird but the voices they're the textures there the writer Lee talented there. It's unrefined and it gets better and tighter and she pulls the shoelaces together on Mockingbird and away. She didn't didn't in watchmen. But if you go and you look at those notes they're fascinating and she's giving capote notes on the jury selection and on the legal appeals process. And you know. She's measuring the height of different mirrors and the number of pairs of socks in a drawer. And it's incredibly detailed. It was a real gift but I think here is where you know. Harper Lee struggled. She did not write in cold blood and I say that because she could not write the reverend the book. She was trying to write about the Reverend Willie Maxwell and no amount of material no amount of notes. No amount of research equals was a book and that is where Capote succeeded. And she couldn't with her story so I would. I would draw distinction between that kind of collaboration and you know look he did he code dedicated aided in cold blood to her the dedication shared with his long term partner Jack Dunphy and Harley so he acknowledged her and it's probably fair to say he could have given her more credit. You you know it is not generous to call someone your assistant research but I. I don't think it borders on you know does is she co author. Did she secretly write a cause. The corresponding responding thing to notice about in cold blood as it's a very different style than the one she had and again when you think about those deeper structural decisions he was making about who deserves sympathy or who was a hero. And how protagonist operate in the world. He's making the kinds of moral decisions that she rejected after Tequila mockingbird meaning she did not want easy heroes and what he did was craft agent Dewey into an easy hero you know. He a lot of the agents who had worked on that case where upset when the book came out because they felt his literary decisions about who had done what undermine the richness of the story and how it had actually unfolded in real time. Do you think tormented her that she was was unable to write the reverend and you mentioned that she suffered from depression. I think there was a lot of torment and Harper lose. Life in this book was one small part of it and this book was one of many. She tried to write and couldn't unfortunately we are out of time around of applause please. To these two very.

Harper Lee Truman capote writer Tejo Hof editor Monroeville Casey MFA Pulitzer Prize Nobel Prize Lippincott depression Willie Maxwell Olga Saito New York Public Library Laura atticus
"harper lee" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

10:19 min | 2 years ago

"harper lee" Discussed on The Archive Project

"And so- Harper Lee have found another complicated lawyer Not Unlike the atticus finch of go set a watchman So that's that's the story that drew her to this part of Alabama but she was trying to turn it into a book like in cold blood she was. She was not initially trying to write a novel. Much like Boris Pasternak's. She was at a point in her career where she was trying to do something new so what she did in. The time he was in this town was the same kind of investigative reporting wording that I did to write a nonfiction book about it. She gathered documents. She sat in on the trial of the vigilantes. She interviewed the lawyers. The coroner's folks who had known the victims uh-huh of of the Reverend's murders and people who work for the insurance companies and just gathered a tremendous amount of material to turn into a nonfiction book. There's so much in their one needs to follow up on a lot of it is obviously in your book but among the many shocking things about this is that as we know from Tequila mockingbird and our history. It's was awfully easy to convict black man of murderer of any crime especially especially in Alabama at that time and whether he had done the crime or committed the crime or not and this is a case where you have an African American man who did commit the crime and yet got off several times over. Yeah I mean I think it's one of the curiosities if you've you've read. Go set a watchman than out of curiosity. I'M GONNA assume most of the people in this room of Red Mockingbird but how many of you all have read Goethe watchmen. Okay so you know actually walk me. Ask How many of ridiculing Mockingbird Oh wow road doctor Zhivago okay just because you're not a good silence asking how many have read their books because I'm sure after this panel it will be everyone very soon well at any event. Even if you didn't read go set a watchman you probably learn from the coverage you know at the times and everywhere else. That watchmen was a much more more politically ambitious and a much more morally complicated version of the the MOCKINGBIRD story and the character of Atticus finch had absolutely you know disastrous politics for the grownups scout to encounter and make sense of and scout has gone to live in New York. You know in this incredibly integrated society. Heidi and she's come home as an adult Alabama. And she's trying to make sense of you know the mandate to integrate and her father's resistance and the kind of Genteel racism of the the White Citizens Council and that is all say that Harper Lee in the one thousand nine hundred seventy s when she found out about the Reverend William Maxwell was looking for a complicated story about race. And that's why I think one of the things that was interesting to her was this a symmetry between the experience of the Reverend who was never convicted of any of these murders and who prevailed and more than a dozen and civil cases and the case of the vigilante. Because if you can believe that the same lawyer who got the reverend off managed to get the vigilante off too so you are talking about two black defendants defendants who got away with murder. And it's certainly the way that it's still talk about in these communities and it is one of the peculiarities of this case. And there are very very specific things to talk about and talk about the jury pools that were involved about the lawyer who represented these two men and so I think that complexity though and that surprises is is part of what attracted or two because she did not want to continue to be the author of mocking bird. This this this kind of moral imperative for the culture and she had lived it for a long time as the author of Tequila Mockingbird as the civil rights hero which was not a comfortable mantle for her to wear and so I think one of the things she was trying to to do was remodel herself. Not as a kind of you know. She had been pejoratively painted into this corner of Children's book author and I think what she wanted to say is no I am. Harper Harper. Ly- The writer and I am Harper. Lee Who has a complicated story to say about race in American race in the American south so flannery O'Connor or who it might be said was probably jealous of. She's the box off two games mockingbird very I can't remember if she reviewed it in the Times Book Review. It's possible but she did not have nice things to say about it and essentially wrote it off as a children's book and I'm curious since you've mentioned mentioned that is that how Harper Lee Thought of her book. No not at all. I mean I I think not. Surprisingly you know any novelist who writes about children. We'll tell you having child characters it does not make necessarily for child is fiction and so I think she was grateful for the amount of attention. The book had and she interacted quite lovingly with with with children. Who would write to her about reading the book in school or when adults would write her to say that reading that book as a teenager? You made me into a reader or made me into a writer or even more satisfying really made me into the kind of person who looks for different than diversity in the world but she did not set out to write a children's book I mean for the for the record the way that most of us in the book world sort of think about what makes a book about children a children's burr versus what makes a book about Children Children and Adult Book is perspective. And it's whether you're fully immersed in it if it if you're fully immersed in the voice perspective of that character that child all character then it's a children's book but if there is some distance then it's an adult book which by that definition to kill a mockingbird isn't adult book but what she did so factory was inhabit the mind of that child during those parts that I think may be confused people in terms of nation. You know God bless Flannery O'connor but I think you know there was just a bit of professional jealousy. I don't think flannery O'connor got anywhere near the New York Times Bestseller Lists and Harper Lee sat on it for a year and then the film came out and she sat on it it for another year and then over and over again she's just returned to it. It's kind of fun for me. In the years I was working on my book I had. What probably a lot of nonfiction writers in the room room? have which is a google alert for the subject of my book. And in the case of William Maxwell. There's rapper named Fatty Web. Whose legal name is Willie Maxwell? And I can't tell you the number of times feddie arrested when I was working on my book but Harper Lee. You see her pop back onto the bestseller lists every fall and every spring. Because it's those she's on every syllabus syllabus and again I don't know that she would have put herself on the syllabus for seventh and eighth graders and in fact she would have said if you're giving it to children to read you're probably underestimating the sophistication of the story when you I think she's When you are talking about Harper Lee and her approach approach to the The Reverend and sort of her interest in it you sort of saying well I think she thought and I think she. How did you get into her mind? Did she keep a diary where their letters like. How were you able to trace her relationship to this sir not only going to get my come up and spin being on this panel with Laura? Because I've always I thought that if I had simply been writing a novel it would have been easier just project and come up with conjecture and one of the interesting things about Harley and nonfiction both about this book she was trying to write about in cold blood. This book that she helped Capote put together as she had very conservative the ideas about nonfiction and fiction and the difference between the two and was very disapproving of the way that the culture has moved towards a kind of the kinds of liberties that nonfiction writers sometimes take. And I don't mean fake news I mean in the sense that nonfiction writers often inhabit a perspective. They can't possibly acidly have access to and they are willing to give psychological projection or fill out details or to embellish a scene to make it more literary. And that's the thing I have in common with Harper Lee. I'm pretty conservative about it. So the truth of the matter is if it's in the book and I tell you it's something she thought it's because I have a letter where she said it or interviewed somebody and she set it to them. And there's very little in the way of projection and I tried over and over again to be very responsible because I think she's right about true crime beena the John row where those kinds of liberties are particularly transgressive. They're often on the part of marginal communities or they are on the part of victims and deceased individuals who will have no recourse us for the misunderstandings that are put forward on their behalf. So I think it's a way she and I have something in common And I tried to honor that over and over again and the book and the truth. This is not just a problem for Harper Lee. Everybody in the book was dead. By the time I found the story for the most part right I mean. It's she set herself up a tall order to model it after in in cold blood because Truman capote of course had a distinct advantage He had access to the two killers. But I'll tell you I mean. I called some letters in the book we're Harper. Lee is very disapproving of in cold blood and the thing to know about it as she. She didn't just help in the sense that she went out. Once you know if you've seen capote or infamous you know that she accompanied Capote actually disparagingly called her his assistant researcher. I was the Cayenne title. He gave her and he said condescendingly Enderle wants to George Plumpton that she had just been helpful with the wives as if the wives weren't characters and their own writer. You know to Laura's beautiful book that women have these incredible intellectual. Lives lives of their own. But she's very disapproving. Because she went back several times with Capote and she was with him for the reporting and she knew what people had said and she knew the position they had on the murderers and the victims and over and over again in the book she could see the fabrications that he added to the story and the embellishments that he added to the story and over and over again the kind of ethical posture he took towards a story that was supposed to be about this murdered family and became a kind of apology of for the two men men who murdered them probably for good for good reason we might say you know. He was anti death-penalty and he was using the book to make an argument about capital punishment. And the way the judicial system system works but Harper Lee was very disapproving so in some ways. Her book was the Anti in cold blood. What she wanted to do was hugh closely as closely as possible?.

Harper Lee Harper Harper Adult Book Truman capote Alabama flannery O'Connor writer murder William Maxwell Boris Pasternak Laura Lee Who White Citizens Council Willie Maxwell Atticus finch google New York doctor Zhivago
"harper lee" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

11:23 min | 2 years ago

"harper lee" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Not just this particular project and I feel very lucky not not to have those same needs or concerns and to have a support system that you know. She didn't So so there were things about it that worried me but no ongoingly. It felt like At the end of the day I was just writing such a different book which was a book that had her in it and to the point of pathological tickle privacy. She would never have given you. The you know kind of Nancy drew version of Harper Lee. You know true crime reporter so there was always a space for me and my book. That would be quite distinct from the one that she was trying to write. You said that you your idea that you had of Harper Lee. Like many people's idea that your idea of her was wrong like what did you learn. What about her? That surprised you th that sure I mean I think that the the unfortunate word that got attached to Harper Lee long about nineteen sixty four was ric loose. It's it's a very perverse word. It rarely applies to the people on whom it is placed in her case not wanting to talk. The New York Times did not mean. She didn't WanNa talk to anyone. Didn't I know shot talk to the press. Actually do want to talk to people and so I think when I say I was wrong long. You know one of the first thing. Someone told me about her earliest time in this town. Alex City so she she moves this down for nine months and specifically trying to to do what she helped capote due out in Kansas. She's trying to gather enough material for a narrative nonfiction project and one of the first stories. Somebody told me about her time in this town was. They met her at the Grocery Grocery store she introduce herself first of all which was shocking and then she agreed to comfort Palmetto cheese sandwiches for lunch and then she signed a copy of Mockingbird for for the woman's children and right away I thought that's not a recluse right. You know that's not. She has opened herself up to conversation and she's sociable and she wanted to talk about the history history. The lake where this had happened and so right away it was just clear she was not reclusive and also that she was embedded in a way that I think even though I loved mockingbird but I think I had underestimated underestimated her as a writer that this was a very ambitious project. She had undertaken so I felt like over and over again. She surprised me. So we associate Harper Lee with breath obviously to kill a mockingbird maybe to lesser extent with go. Set a watchman but the story that you write about is a real story a real nonfiction in story that that is less well known Laura same with you you're writing about a nonfiction story since most people here probably are familiar with doctor Zhivago. What is the story of what happened with the CIA and Doctor Zhivago? Yes so Boris Pasternak just to put it into some context. He was one of the most famous Soviet writers. There's of his time and he was famous for being a poet first and foremost and he was so famous he would sell out these huge packed auditoriums and when he was reading his poetry people would start to shout out the lines before he could finish him. And what was the time period. That you're talking about so Boris will so it was nineteen fifty-six when he finished doctor Zhivago which was his first and only novel and when he finished it on and off during the time it took him to write the book he kept saying. It's never going got to be published to. Maybe there's some hope. After Stalin died in one thousand nine hundred eighty three that there could be a thought that could allow his book but when he sent it off to the state publisher assures which was what you had to do to get approval to be published. It was just crickets he. He didn't hear anything back. And this is this is a most famous living right at the the timing in the area and he just knew that this was not going to be published and Lo and behold during this time when the Soviets are pretty much going to ban the book the Italian show up at his doorstep his literal doorstep in the country homey lived in about twenty miles outside of Moscow and filtering let Feltrinelli He was the Italian publisher of the first to bring Doctor Zhivago to the world had a scout that lived in Moscow and he took the book and he smuggled it out of the Soviet Union into East Berlin into West Berlin and met up with Feltrinelli and wants the Soviets heard that they had the Italian this book. They're like you have to give it back to us. They're are pressuring and Feltrinelli and Pasternak both held strong and so the Talian publish it in nineteen fifty seven and it was a huge worldwide sensation number one New York Times bestseller seller. Knocking will lead off the top of the charts and much to number gloves Chagrin. He hated Doctor Zhivago and very much. So and the CIA sees this and they sent an opportunity and they had what they called their books program and they said we're going to take this band handbook of the Soviets most famous living writer. And we're going to print it in. Its native Russian and smuggle it back behind the iron curtain for the Soviets to read and question why the Government banned this book from them. And that's what they did and it was quite a success for them and so for those. WHO's here who have not read Doctor Zhivago? What was it that so terrified the Soviet regime about this novel? Yeah so many people think of Doctor Zhivago is just a love story worry. They've seen the David Lean film which is amazing. But it's also a war story and it's also what makes it actually the most subversive isn't that it's critical of the Russian Revolution Russian. It's that different. Individuals throughout the book have different opinions about the Russian revolution. And they've been affected by some have prospered because of it some some have been downgraded because of it but everyone has their own opinion which is flying in the face of the collective thought and it talks about group. Think and how dangerous it can be. And even if it's not you know these people giving speeches about how detrimental the revolution was. It's just that they had the opinion in the first place that made it subversive. Okay I'm not going to get you to reveal the entire plot of your novel that said sticking again to the real story. How did they get the novel into the Soviet Union so yes through various ways and the one of the first way's is that they use the world's fair in Brussels muscles in one thousand nine hundred fifty eight as a staging ground to smuggle these printed novels back behind the Iron Curtain? And they use the Vatican's pavilion they. They they partnered up with the Vatican which actually the CIA did often and posed as clergy within the Vatican's pavilion and Soviet Soviet Zuhdi. Dan Brown's actually. I know I was when I was reading. These memos I was like is this. This is stranger than fiction. How am I gonNA put off writing this? No one's GONNA I believe it. They're they're posing so they would identify Soviet visitors because Soviets couldn't travel as often as they could since this world's fair was a staging ground. They had this giant pavilion. A billion there are members of the bullet Bio Ballet Symphony that attended. They would identify them coming into the Vatican pavilion and escort them behind Hind into a secret chapel. Where they would give them a copy of Doctor Zhivago and soon like they were these blue linen covered copies of Zhivago and soon all of the Blue Linen covers were ripped off and spread throughout the fair because they were taking the covers off ripping into pieces so they can better conceal it and sure enough? A few of them made it back back into the Soviet Union and immediately went into the underground world of Psalm Assad people copying and typewriters and basements and kitchens ends and then started spreading it because everyone wanted to read it. So Aston this story for half as in the novel Casey Tequila Tequila. MOCKINGBIRD is obviously agreed story but this other story have to say is. It's insane I mean Tells all is the story about the true story about the Reverend the book that surely bad panel for clergy. I think they're just you know undercover cover and some of them are in in my book. I mean it must be said a childhood preacher of mine you know said. I wasn't doing any favors as for the ministry with this book. So the the serial killer at the heart of this story is a Baptist minister who was not able to do that. full-time for living. They had a number of other jobs to and You know he was an itinerant preacher but he also worked for a textile mill and he served in the army and that textile L. Mills. Actually the one that made his uniform and when he came back to Alabama he went to work for the Milanese worked at a rock quarry and he also worked in the timber industry in Alabama. I'm he did. What's called Pulpwood in which you know? I know I'm in timber country up here might surprise you to learn how much of it is based in the southeast too but You know this is an African American can man who was incredibly ambitious very intelligent but who had limited opportunities when he returned Alabama and he was married for about twenty five years and was known simply as the Reverend William Maxwell but That far into a marriage his wife was then found murdered and he was the prime suspect and the police thought they were going to convict him of murder murder. They had a neighbor of his. Who is supposed to testify? That he had been out all night and in fact he lured his wife to the very place where her body was found But that woman changed her testimony. Tony that neighbor did and the police were confused until she became the second Mrs Maxwell and so that was why she had changed her testimony and then she was found dead under Shimon suspicious circumstances and then a nephew of a brother and then finally a sixteen year old stepdaughter. This reverend were all found dead and The the the thread through this plot is that the reverend health life insurance policies on all these individuals so he made about a half a million dollars in life. Insurance money and Harper Harper Lee did not come to know historian until nineteen seventy seven when he was gunned down at the funeral of his last alleged victim. And that's when Harper Lee found out about the story because of vigilant stood up at the funeral of that sixteen year old and murdered the reverend in cold blood. And that's when to to pamelas point. You know this. This story one lived out in fear and terror in this small town mostly because people didn't know who all the reverend had life insurance policies on how he was getting away with things things and actually I interviewed a guy who was the who employed the reverend when he was doing this pulpwood in business for timber and that guy said to me you know I always used to to tell a joke about the reverend when people would ask me if I was afraid of him and I said you know really what was the joke and he said I had insurance on him which was true because you have to ensure your your employees and that kind of work and so so when the reverend was gunned down that vigilantes trial was kind of sensation in Alabama. And that's when Harper Lee found out about outed and came down and tried to turn not only the original criminal story in the life insurance fraud. And this kind of stuff and into a story but the Reverend's lawyers so so the lawyer who had defended the Reverend for ten years not only in these criminal investigations but in a lot of civil litigation too because you can believe if the police were upset about the Reverend William Maxwell the life insurance companies were even more upset and had tried to stop payment and the reverend ended up having to take many of them to court so his lawyer then defended the vigilante who murdered him..

doctor Zhivago Harper Harper Lee CIA Soviet Union Boris Pasternak Alabama William Maxwell The New York Times Soviet Soviet Zuhdi writer publisher reporter Vatican pavilion Grocery Grocery Feltrinelli Nancy Moscow Government
"harper lee" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

12:02 min | 2 years ago

"harper lee" Discussed on The Archive Project

"The greatest writers of the Twentieth Century Harper Lii and Boris Pasternack from the Portland Book Festival in Twenty Nineteen. And No. Unfortunately this is not a conversation by these writers. But it's the next best thing. This this is a conversation between Casey set and Laura Prescott who bring us fresh insight into the enduring relevance of these iconic writers discussed the political ramifications of their work at the time the publication and reflect on what their work means today okay. Now here's the backstory in the Nineteen Seventies Harper Lee traveled back to to her native Alabama with the idea of writing her own in cold blood. It was a project she would never actually right but infuriates hours. Casey set brings this story to life from the murders to the courtroom drama to the racial politics of the deep South at the same time. She offers a moving portrait. And one of the country's most beloved writers inner struggle with fame success and the mystery of artistic creativity. Laura Prescott the secrets it's we kept is a tale of secretaries. Turn spies of love and duty and of sacrifice inspired by the true story of the CIA plot to infiltrate title trait the hearts and minds of Soviet Russia not with propaganda but with the greatest love story of the twentieth century. The novel Doctor Zhivago here's is our moderator Pamela Paul Editor of The New York Times book so both of you are debut authors and this is this is a rarity pretty also New York Times bestselling authors with your first book. I'm curious for each of you. Was this the book that you always plan to right. Did you know this was going to be your first book or was there in some other book. That didn't happen. I'll go first. Thanks for having me everyone. I love Portland so it's been great to be here. No I have another book. That's in the drawer when I was working in political campaigns as an operative but that just meant you know I was writing stump speeches and ad copy for political candidates and and I quit that job to pursue fiction because I was miserable in Washington. DC and. I didn't know how to begin. I didn't have an. MFA never studied creative in writing. So I just started by saying I'm going to write this novel. And so there's an novel in the jurors about An outsider artist named Helen Martins. Who lived in South Africa for kind of up still obsessed with but that kind of Tommy how to write the next novel so this this novel came as a surprise to me? Well she come back. I maybe maybe not for the next one but maybe the third one. But she's still I still have. She created this her house until a work of art and it was called. Hold the Owl House. I still have her house in. My office is like kind of a inspiration This was certainly the first project that kind of took the form of a book. But I guess if you had asked me as a child or even when I was first starting outright in what I thought my first book would be about. I probably would have said the eastern shore of Maryland Maryland. And that's of course Pamela. Paul the Editor of The New York Times Book Review knows an idea when she hears one versus a sudden. That's to say I never had a book in mind but I'm very interested in regionalism and really like the idea of place and like to think about how it shapes us and so I feel like I got to do some of that Ed and furious hours. It's not the place where I grew up. But this book is very much about Alabama and how people who live there and make sense of their lives and so I got to scratch that. It's but I I think if you'd asked me I would have thought my first book would be about fishermen on the eastern shore or about the ecology the Chesapeake Bay and. I hope to still right about that place someday. Okay but I guess Laura I feel like I learned a lot by writing about something that wasn't my primary passion. Both of you wrote about places that you are not from I mean Washington. Yasu because he'd worked there but obviously not Russia. You traveled there as part of your research. I did so yeah I lived. It didn't work in Washington. DC for about a decade. And in my mind I know how to get from Georgetown to the East Street complex where the CIA was and it just know that city you by heart. I've walked it so many times but I don't know Russia and so during my first draft. I traveled there during my spring. Break of my MFA as one does yeah And it was just an amazing experience to visit Moscow but then also go to parallel Keno where pasternack lived and visit his grave even and just see his house which is kept as a museum and the snow coming down and just having that atmospheric experience really solidified itself in my heart. You're so when I came back I kind of see like I know what the Birch trees smelled like I know with the snow felt like how long how far into the writing and research process did. Did you go there and change what you were doing. That was about six months into the writing process. I started the Washington. DC story so the story story of my book and then quickly. I realized I was missing half the story if I wanted to tell the story of why Doctor Zhivago was used as a weapon during the Cold War. I couldn't tell about the CIA agents that used it as a weapon. I wanted to show why it was so versa and so I knew it had to have an eastern threat head to the novel and I quickly began researching Olga. Even sky was Boris Pasternak's real life mistress muse and inspiration for Lara. I'm in Doctor Zhivago who I was named after so she quickly became my my next news. And that's why when I went there it definitely kind of changed the trajectory projector. How much of that story is going to be in the book? And did you start your book from the Eastern Shore of Maryland and then at some point travel down to Alabama so my book grew out of some reporting. I did in two thousand fifteen hours. Go set a watchman was announced so for Years Harper Lee had said she was never going to publish a book after to kill a mocking looking bird. But in two thousand and fifteen harpercollins made the shocking announcement that this new book would be coming out and I went down to Monroeville where Harper Lee was born and raised used and where she was at that time living in an assisted living facility and I went down to do some reporting and then there's down there for about two and a half weeks and the book is actually about ballot. Not Go set a watchman but different project. That Harper Lee got interested in the seventies and eighties. And that takes place in a town in Alabama called Alexander City. I am so I spent a lot of time in Alex City and went to Montgomery and went to Birmingham and so a lot of ongoing reporting but my original trip was to Monroeville to see that town town and I think she's an interesting example in. It's fascinating to hear Laura talk about the things she needed to experience for herself. Because you know to kill a mockingbird is is not memoir but it is very autobiographical fiction and I think for me. One of the fascinating things to think about over and over again was the ways. In which novelists novelists poets take the world that exists and make it their own. Because it's true one of the reasons I took that assignment was. I loved MOCKINGBIRD and I wanted to go see this town that was the model title for Macomb. And it's it's it's surreal. You you get out of your car and you look up at the courthouse and it's exactly like the one. In the film that Gregory Peck was in and you walk around the courthouse. How Square and you can go and see the street? That Harper Lee grew up on where Truman capote was living right next door across a stone fence and it's uncanny and yet it's also not the novel will you know there's so much that never took place in that town and moreover so many things that thousands of other people experienced over and over again that they never shaped into a story quite as beautiful awful as Mockingbird so as a pleasure to be there and I did spend a lot more time and these other parts of the state over the years that I was reporting but I did some from home. You know you can do interviews from from home and you can read a lot a lot of books history and you know I didn't have to be in Alabama Hartford to be reading about the history life insurance you know you can't take it with you and you know sometimes if you're really lucky you can take your work you know to a beach or something and you can learn just as well there so some of it was just Archival and academic Amac work but quite a lot of it was being there to Laura's point those those evocative details you just you you never know how useful they'll be and how you'll use them and and what texture they'll bring to the story so I think it's it's pretty clear the two real common threads between these two books one. The research rich and I want to talk more about the research that each of you did but also the fact that in different ways you are each writing about real writers real books and not unknown ones. You know ones that people have a lot of thoughts and feelings about and many much has been written about them and I did that intimidate you going in did you. Thank you know. Did that concern you. Yes I think when I was first starting to write this this novel it was almost I. It took me months and months before I said yes I am writing. A novel was always the project. And just trying to explore this this this a little bit of history the head come out because everyone has some sort of the doctor Zhivago is either scene. The David Lean film or they've read the book so then the thing that people didn't know is in two thousand fourteen the CIA released all of their documents detailing how they use this book as a weapon and that's what kind of prompted me into writing the book in the first place because I was so obsessed with propaganda having been a almost muscle propagandists myself working in political campaigns. That I really wanted to would've really fiction in writing is my penance for writing all those political ads so but I did feel like I feel like I asked some of my mentors I was in my MFA program it was like. I don't know Oh flake I can pull this off or if I have the right to and a really amazing writer. Elizabeth mccracken was here at the festival. She said you just do. You can do what you want. Just just do it from your heart. You're passionate about so. I held close to that to that feeling of of not having the right to write about this did that. Did you have that same concern because because this was harper. Lee's story that she never. I mean Harper Lee is interesting in because it's it's kind of one of these perverse ironies it's like monks who wanna live in poverty but then get quite wealthy harper Lee wanted to live in obscurity but it only made her more famous miss So one of the initial challenges of this book was figuring out you know on the one hand everyone knew something about her and on the other hand very little was known deeply about her and and the people who knew the most about her were the ones who had never shared their stories or or talked about her publicly so so I felt like there was this peculiar problem. Some of of everyone thinking they knew something about her but most of what they knew was wrong and that included me So so the challenge was to figure out how to learn as much which and as as accurately as I could but pamelas asking about this other problem as it were. Which is my book is about this Book Harper Lee failed to write it and you better believe over and over again? I wondered if I could do it because she hadn't been able to And it seemed like there were very good. Structural reasons is particular to the story that made it hard for her to complete her project and then of course it turned out there. Were all of these personal reasons that had to do with her relationship to write in and and and and her relationship to the world and In that sense it felt like okay. I don't struggle with those things. These are not My burdens she was someone. She was a perfectionist actionist and she suffered from depression and she had a drinking problem and there were constellation of things that made it difficult for her to do any work..

Harper Lee Laura Prescott CIA Doctor Zhivago Washington Portland Book Festival MFA Alabama Pamela Paul Maryland Harper Lii The New York Times Book Review Casey Soviet Russia Editor Chesapeake Bay Portland Russia Monroeville
Tony Awards Preview

Popcorn with Peter Travers

12:40 min | 2 years ago

Tony Awards Preview

"Hi, everybody. It's Peter Travers than welcome to our special popcorn Tony award show. Now, I've gotta say, before we get into the nominees about who will win and who should win. This is been the most amazing year in Broadway history. It has made over two billion dollars at the box office that never happened. And why is it? I think it's Hollywood heat everybody from TV from movies from us. It wants to be on Broadway. They wanna be on that stage. You got this year. Kylo Ren and driver on Broadway. You have Walter, white Bryan, Cranston, there, Jeff Daniels who played Harry done in too, dumb and dumber movies. They're all fighting to be best, dramatic actor, what kind of stuff is happening on Broadway. Well, let's start with the major categories, and I'm gonna start with best musical the nominees are ain't too, proud the life and times of the temptations Beetlejuice remember that movie Haiti's town, the prom, and Tootsie. You remember that movie too? Well. I think the winner is Haiti's town. It's a rigid. It's basically the myth of Orpheus ritzy, but it's got a score by a woman named Naess Mitchell who doesn't come from Broadway, at all and kind of revolutionizes it. So what would happen what could spoil the fun? There's a little musical called the prom. It's really it's totally original. It's about these bunch of Broadway veterans, and they're really hard bitten, and they're not getting any press, and they decide to go to Indiana and help, a lesbian high school student take her girlfriend to the prom. That's it. How good is it? It's really good. And in terms of the Hollywood connection, Ryan Murphy, went to see it fell in love with it, and he's making a movie of it. So how about that? Then we have best play the Ferryman choirboy, Gary a sequel to Titus andronicus. What the constitution means to me an ink. I'm telling you people, the Ferryman is got to be a movie soon. It's an Irish play. It's about the troubles, and in on a stage. We get to see an entire family deal with violence deal with their own feuds. We've got babies onstage. We've got live alive goose. We have everything there's nothing like I don't think there's any competition for it at all except there was a snub, the most successful play in Broadway history. That's not a musical is to kill among bird, and for some reason, the Tony nominee said, let's not nominated what I want. Answer on that one best revival of a play. Arthur, Miller's all my sons the boys in the band, burn this torch song and the Waverley gallery. I think Arthur Miller's all my sons which brought a net. Bending back to Broadway is a show that he wrote in one thousand nine hundred forty seven a bout a guy who was manufacturing airplane, parts and was to rush to do it. And so the planes crashed and killed pilots during the war. We live in the world of Boeing. Now, how timely could this be? So I think that's really up there. And I in terms of seeing a show that by playwright Arthur Miller who says, let's deal with the world we live in this one really, really did it then we have bible of musical. This is easy, because there's only two there's Oklahoma Rogers and Hammerstein Oklahoma and kiss me. Kate. Of course, they were both movies. We saw Oklahoma with Gordon MacRae and Shirley Jones in the fifties. But kiss me, Kate is done in a traditional way. Kelli o'hara's in it, Oklahoma is directed by guide named Daniel fish who find darkness. We're Rogers and Hammerstein only found light. It's a revelation to watch this. It's not the Oklahoma you've ever remembered, and it sung in the kind of country western way, look, if you ever get to see this on Broadway or win a tours get there get there quick. Okay. Okay. Best actor in a musical. And so, we'll do alphabetically Brooks as Mantas in the prom, Derrick Baskin and ain't too, proud the life and times of the temptations Alex Brightman and Beetlejuice. Remember when Michael Keaton had their part, Damon down, oh in Rogers and Hammerstein, Oklahoma. And send Tino fun Tanna into okay? The favorite is Tino, Tanna who is playing the part that destined Hoffman immortalized in the movie in the nineteen eighties. But what Centeno Tanna doesn't remember him on TV in crazy ex girlfriend like I'm saying everybody's from TV, or he does so much more. He sings as a man sees a woman, he does physical comedy does everything but stand on his hat. And I say, you know, who's out there that can spoil the win for Santino Tanna. And my answer is no one because this is one of the great performances you'll ever see on a musical, comedy stage. He's the winner. Best actress in a play Benning in Arthur, Miller's all my sons, Laura, Donnelly, in the Ferryman. Elaine may in the Waverley gallery, Janet mcteer in Bernhardt hamlet, Laurie Metcalf in Hillary Clinton, and Heidi Shreck in what the constitution means to me. Okay. Elaine may doesn't win this Tony. You're going to hear from me. She's eighty seven years old. She's returned to Broadway. After decades to play the part of a woman fighting Alzheimer's, and everything is no perfect about what she's done. She started with Mike Nichols doing comedy. She was starring in movies of like the new leaf directed things like the heartbreak kid. She's just one of the best actors I've ever seen anywhere. And if she loses and, you know, I feel bad for an bending because if Elaine may wasn't here this year, I think she would be the winner, but come on. Attention must be paid people. And I also wanna talk about a snub how. How does Glenda Jackson who won the Tony last year for three women returned to Broadway as King Lear? We talk about the age of hashtag metoo and time's up Glenda. Jackson is playing king. Lear gets rave reviews and the Tony committee says we're not gonna nominate her now. No, we're paying attention. And we're gonna come back and get you our best actress in a musical. Stephanie, j block in the share show Caitlyn Kanoun in the prom Beth level, in the prom, Eva nobles, ADA in Haiti's town, and Kelley O'Hara and kiss me cake. Stephanie j block who is that theater veteran is playing share in a way that sometimes she's more share than share. You might think this is just an escapist show thing to know she finds the character of who she is share shows up at this show often does numbers with her, and pus share. There's who's a bigger Hollywood. Name who is coming to Broadway with the show about herself. It takes three actresses to play here. But Stephanie j block plays the central one. And she plays the hell out of it. So she has just got to win. I'm sorry, people. All right. Best featured actress in a play for new of Flanagan in the Ferryman seal, you keep. And Bolger into kill a Mockingbird. Christine Nelson, Gary a sequel to Titus andronicus Julie white and Gary sequel to Titus andronicus and Ruth Wilson and King Lear people if you see if you see to kill among bird, and you should seal, you Keenan Bolger is very controversial because she's playing scout scout in the book and in the movie remember is in eight or nine year old girl. A C Keenan Bolger is in her forties. And yet, what she finds in this character who grew up to be Harper who wrote this novel is the heart and soul of the peace. So I'm telling you people this, this has got to happen. See Keenan Bolger remember that name best featured actor in a play birdie Carville and ink, Robin to hasten boys in the band getting Glick into kill a monkey bird, Brandon your Ranna wits in burn this Benjamin Walker in Arthur Miller's. All my sons birdie, Carville in ink. Those of us, those of you who actually went to Broadway couple of years ago and saw of any kind of a musical where you were shocked at a man playing a woman, you saw birdie, Carville in Matilda, and he played this woman, this horrible headmistress, and now he's playing Rupert Murdoch. So every who in Hollywood, who in politics would anyone hasn't been in an Rupert Murdoch publication or paper and who hasn't been rolled over the coals in it that performance and in London when he played it in one and Olivia ward, he had to play it in front of Rupert Murdoch. It's just an incredible job. I wanna talk a little about the snubs in this category. The non nominees there isn't actor named Bengal Arghanab into Killa mugging bird who plays Tom Robinson. He is the black man who is on trial for raping a white woman, a crime never committed. And he's defended. By Jeff Daniels. Atticus Finch when Aaron Sorkin adapted Harper Lee's novel to the stage. He did it so that he could expand the role of the black characters as he did here. And again, the Tony committee, decided only to nominate the white actors from tequila, Mockingbird ignoring the two black actors who are just brilliant in their roles. You people you're going to get called on the carpet. You need to all right? Best featured actress in a musical, Lilli Cooper in Tootsie, amber, gray and Haiti's town Sarah, styles Tootsie, alley stroke, or in Rogers and Hammerstein Oklahoma and Mary, Testa in Rogers, and Hammerstein Oklahoma there, something totally remarkable that happened this year in stroke, and Oklahoma. This is a woman who when she was two years old was in an automobile crash, and was never able to walk again. And now on Broadway playing eight oh Anne who is like the sexual. Time bomb in Oklahoma, the one who sings, I can't say, no, the part went to Allie. Stroke, she plays it in a wheelchair and you would think that's inspiring enough. But when you watch her play at you, forget the wheelchair exists, and you're watching her take over the stage like Dolly Parton. She, it's just an amazing thing to watch and it works on so many levels. So I wanna be there when she wins that Tony, and I want to be standing up and applauding and going Bravo. She deserves all right. Best featured actor in a musical Andre shields in Haiti town and a groups Luccin. That's a good name into Patrick page in Haiti's town germy, pope in into proud the life and times of the temptations and Ephraim Sykes ain't too, proud the life and times of the temptations, the favorite, the one, I think will win is under the shields and Haiti's town. He's seventy three years old. He stands on that stage is the narrator in like a silver suit. In total control of body and every movement and pulls you in till you're memorized. Your mesmerizing you not take your eyes off of hundred shields. This is a veteran actor who needs to get this Tony. But what if he didn't who would go to there's a young actor named Jeremy pope who plays Eddie kendricks in the into proud the life and times of the temptations? And who does he's playing a difficult man. One of the most difficult of the temptations. But one of the most talented as well. He's also nominated this year as best actor in a in a play in choir, boy, this is to me, the brightest newcomer that you will see on the stage and you're going to see him everywhere, stage movies television. It's just the beginning. So if you get to see this, you're going to be able to tell your friends, I was there win. Okay. Best director of a play Rupert Gould for Inc. Sam Mendes for the Ferryman Bartlett. Fair for to kill a mocking bird Ivo von Hosver for network, and George C Wolfer Gary a sequel to Titus andronicus Sam Mendis in the Ferryman this play. Does a job on stage that equal to his first movie which was American Beauty, which you may remember won the best picture? Oscar and once Mendis the Oscar as best director.

Haiti Oklahoma Arthur Miller Hammerstein Oklahoma Hollywood King Lear Rogers Keenan Bolger Jeff Daniels Elaine Glenda Jackson Titus Andronicus Tony Award Rupert Murdoch Waverley Gallery Peter Travers Gary Harper Lee Centeno Tanna Stephanie J
Jeff Daniels ('To Kill a Mockingbird') on playing Atticus Finch

Popcorn with Peter Travers

13:33 min | 2 years ago

Jeff Daniels ('To Kill a Mockingbird') on playing Atticus Finch

"Hi, everybody. I'm Peter Travers. And this is popcorn where we tell you. What is popping in the culture? And my guest today. Jeff Daniels who has multiple wards and the way I looked at it, he's too modest to say he's just been nominated for Tony Ward as best actor for tequila Mockingbird on Broadway, which is totally deserved. I don't even have to blow smoke with you. You know, I actually loved this, you know. Well, it's very nice. I think too. So are you just completely in Newark to all this now? It's you have your Emmys. You've been nominated for Tony before for God of carnage. Does it? What impact does getting nominated for an award have, you know, it's, it's? It is an honor to be nominated because I've been there when I wasn't and, and this was a big season for drama big season for drama Broadway, there, a lot of them and, you know, Mockingbird didn't get in as best new play did that make you stomp around for a couple of minutes when they will stop arounds big phrase. But, but it it goes to whatever the reasons are it goes to show that it's not automatic. You can't just go on, then I'll get nominated, and it's still you wake up in the morning. Bill ness. You wanna be invited to the big party, you know, and, and it is an honor to be there. And I, I noticed that when I was nominated for God carnage. I was probably the first big award. I'd ever been Emmys came later and all that. But I was in that room in Radio City Music hall, and I looked around at all the great work. That was all in one place. And these are just the people were nominated. There's other work that didn't get in that was, and you just feel I'm just glad to get it took it to the party. You really now anything after that, you know, would be great, but it really is to get in. Take something to well, and there's something about the Broadway the theater community, and I'm speaking to you as theater guy. Because back in Michigan. You have your own gross theater. You know this is something that matters to you. And you have even before we start talking about to kill a Mockingbird. You've signed on for one year doing this show. Nobody does anymore all stars. Don't know. Working after's, who need the job or in Evan Hansen, their second year and all of that. So it is, you know, it used to be what was done. Jason Robards Brian Dennehy comes to mind. Fonda Henry Fonda did mister Roberts for over a year looked at up league Cobb death of a salesman. Pretty sure over a year those guys were good. But that was kind of expected, you know that's what you did. And you and it's a big long commitment, but it's not that long when it's Atticus Finch, it's not that long when it's to kill a Mockingbird is not that long when you see what this play, and this production does to an audience night after night after night after night to get to be Atticus Finch, on Broadway six months, wouldn't have been enough so was happy to sign for your, and I'm interested to see what happens to the performance. Over the course of your I'm six months in now, and it's changed. It's deepened and it's gotten smarter and more, it's just gotten better. And so I'm interested to see where it is at the end when that happens when you have a director whose, they always use the phrase in the theater, okay after rehearsal. We've now frozen this show. This is now the way we do it, but can any actors really do that, because you are discovering something he's actor you can do it. You call it the mule on the trail performance going down the Grand Canyon. The mule didn't even have to look, you know, the meal just goes down. And then I do it this way. And then I get to here, and I do it that way. And you think about where you're going to eat throughout the whole show. I've seen that. I have ten that's the trap, you can get into that. You can literally your mind, just floats away and your thing and you go and stay here. Stay here stay here because, you know it so Bart. Shared the director Mockingbird. Basically, he's saying this is going to move around. I expect you to move it around expect you to explore a little bit here and there. You gotta you gotta have enough sense of story and experience to know when you're, I think Ellen all called stuffing the dog when you're just suddenly we've added four minutes to the show and it's probably you. You got it. You gotta is what you're doing. Is this thing you found in month two? And does it lead to something else? And now as a better place or do we need to go back here to where you gotta kinda gotta stay in the lane. But you get to move around and Bart has given us permission to do that. But I think this cast is really don't agree job of serving story. So they're in while it moves and changes a little bit. It always seems to be pointed in the direction of serving story, not some individual. Whereas my light kind of thing, not in this cast, but what I noticed when I was at this show was that there are people that I had seen at the theater before because of this property because of what Harper Lee wrote, there are suddenly because we read it in school, you know, but it wasn't work and there's just something about it. And watching, what Aaron Sorkin has done to take what Harper Lee did. And to update it without updating it. But just. Making something that's going on in this play speak to us. Now you had a lot of controversy with that in the beginning. You know there were people doing you can't around with the, the state, who was there say is the lawyer for the estate one person had some issues with an early draft. I think he ended up with twenty two drafts. By the end of it. So pretty good chance some of that stuff would have gone away anyway. But, but in whatever it, we got it settled and the risks for us. I thought once the lawsuit went went away was three adults playing the kids. Are we going to get away with that? Are we going to overcome Gregory Peck? And the last third third act of this thing, basically. Deviates is this is a play based on the book. And now we're gonna put out of his through something that the move in either the movie nor the book put him through in by putting him through that, that I think, is where Aaron was able to relate it to today. Is there goodness in people that we can rely on will the better angel in all of us? Rise to the top in twenty nineteen that isn't necessarily true. And I think you're on was forcing Atticus to face that, that sometimes you can't just wait for them to do the right thing. No, there's not much and Atticus does some things in this play that aren't very Gregory Peck. Yeah, there's flaws in him. But it makes it just so more mature engaging because I'm seeing somebody with human flaws doing this. Yeah. And, and to be more than fair to pack who only won an Oscar for it was a different time, early sixties. And it was from the point of view of a young scout nine years old. Whatever she is in the book looking up her great father. So he really kind of stayed up on a pedestal throughout the book and pretty much for the movie and we weren't we were a small town. Lawyer gets paid in vegetables and trying to raise two kids and he handles land dispute service agreements for closures inning. And right will, and then the judge comes over to his house in his life changes. That's how we approached it. But do you feel competitive in any of these awards with other actors that are nominated in your category? In other words, you and Bryan Cranston. Now just cold staring. Each other because everybody was nominated wants to win. Everybody wants to make the speed. Everybody wants to take on that toll because it's called it anyone who's ever stepped on stage. Once that it's there's, it's so special it, it's I've never been nominated for an Oscar, but I started in the feeder, high school and community college, and my purples theater companies twenty years old and off Broadway. And coming back to Broadway. Keep returning to it. And now forty two years later, you get to Atticus Finch you get to do the role of a lifetime on Broadway in the theater, that's a lot to be proud of. So this sit there with, with Brian and Patty and, and all the other guys. Adam driver all them. Yeah. The kid Jeremy pope. But you know, it's a great group and you're part of a lot of great work that competitive thing, nobody scores the most points. These things we're doing five different things really, really well, go back to the day that you decided you were going to be Atticus Finch on Broadway. Was there any terror about that ultimate decision that had nothing to do with you committing for year because it's one of the great roles it's a great character? And despite the fact that we see flaws in him, there's virtue in him to me, as watching actors all my life and reviewing them the hardest thing to plays virtue. There's, you know how do you play good and make good interesting? And you get and maybe Atika struggle to remain. Good to remain take the high road and there's a bit of a struggle. This is a helps that yeah, but that's his aim because while he sitting on that porch this world in the south in nineteen thirty four in Alabama KKK's there. He's not initially he's kind of letting it happen. He's not going. He's not out there trying to change it. He's not carrying plan. No, he's I thought that was really interesting. Certainly where he starts. He knows that if he takes this case to defend Tom Robinson. And he sits in front of a jury of white Christian farmers men. He knows what he's going, this is no longer just executing will or foreclose and, and he's avoided that just raised his kids. I'm just raising my kids without a wife. I'm raising my kids, and he knows that will change thing unpleasant, things will be sent to us, and it's going to go beyond that you're gonna have the KKK come up and visit you on your porch and go, what are you doing? And I did a lot of research to kind of understand that kind of just keep your head down and don't get involved and stay out of trouble as family and just raise your kids and don't get involved. There was a lynching last Tuesday night, we missed you there. We got another one Friday, common and Atticus has to either say, no, I'm not or tied up that evening. Bob can't make. And there's a lot of there are a lot of people, especially in today's America that are don't wanna look go wanna see don't want to. I. I don't wanna know about Russia. I don't wanna know any, we'll do errands kind of speak into that, that American that decent honest, hardworking American lose just doing this, and it's not enough to just look the other way not now wasn't for Atticus and it isn't for us. Now there's denial and there's a combination and enabling. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And that's why I think people sit there watching this like this, you know, this is somehow speaking to us right now involve you gonna get. Yeah. Yeah. What was what was your first encounter with this story? Did you read the book? I did you the first encounter really was? I probably had seen the movie as a kid. I don't remember we didn't read the book, we read, Lord of the flies and farewell to arms, which wasn't on the public school curriculum where I was at Aaron said, do you wanna play? Atticus finch. And I didn't blink. Absolutely. I think partly because the last five years ten years now. I've been taking chances are been. Challenging myself doing things that I wouldn't that other people think I can do, but I don't know how to do. So say yes.

Atticus Finch Aaron Sorkin Gregory Peck Jason Robards Brian Dennehy Bart Tony Ward Oscar Peter Travers Jeff Daniels Newark Radio City Music Hall Harper Lee Michigan Fonda Henry Fonda Director Bill Ness Grand Canyon Bryan Cranston Evan Hansen Jeremy Pope
"harper lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"harper lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And that was in one of those insurance cases. And it's easy to tell a story like this and think that the fraud and predation was only on the part of customers. But of course, this was an extremely expletive time in the life insurance industry, and they denied coverage to black clients or they overpriced the policies are they sold them, sub-standard policies, and a lot of that a lot of that inequality and discrimination was only solved a few years ago with these class action lawsuits. But Fred gray who had represented, Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King junior steps up and takes this case with the Reverend because there is an insurance company trying to deny payment, so not that the Reverend was a poster boy for civil rights by any means. But you know again Tom Brady was in good company. Fred gray, represented, the reverent and, you know, it was an interesting time in the history of Alabama. And I think the way this case looks from from today is not how it looked at nineteen seventy nine hundred seventy two when you know, you had an upstanding Reverend who was, you know, who had made his policy payments, and, you know, deserve. Payout. Now, again, folks change their opinion of the Reverend once, you know, wife, number two, is found murdered and, you know, all these all these deaths were attributed to him but yeah, Tom Randy's political career forms of the second part of the book and he served in the legislature with folks, like Fred gray. So it's nice to just take this small town story and have collide with, you know, maybe the Alabama politics, folks. No from the gubernatorial years of George Wallace, and what was going on in the kind of larger narrative of the deep south at this time, then any of the book is furious hours murder fraud, and the last trial Harper, lay its by Casey Sep. She is my guest is a lot. You spent a lot of time on the friendship between Harper Lee, and Truman Capote and Harper Lee's assistance. Yes. Researches. Condescending that Capote used very told it to George Plumpton George Clinton was writing about him for the New York Times and. Yeah. Not, not really the, the line credit. You might want if you had made several reporting trips with your dear friend and given over one hundred pages of reporting notes to help him with his book, but yeah. Assistant researches. How do you think do you think in cold blood was partly written by Harper Lee? Oh, gosh. I'm just delighted you know what I, I started writing this book, people would say did. I think that Truman, Capote wrote to kill a Mockingbird utter Canard that, you know, absolutely not. True. And I love it. Now. People are asking me that. No, you know, there's a lot of correspondence that these letters, she wrote to people in Kansas and Capote's fact checker at the New Yorker and I, quote from a lot of that in the book and it's very clear. She didn't write it. But which he did do is sit in on all of these interviews came with him in nineteen Fifty-nine. She came back with him in sixty two and sixty three and she really helped him make sense of this case, and she helped him get to know the people in garden city and Holcomb, and she's a tremendous asset. But, you know, part of the tragedy of her work on the Reverend is, it's one thing to do a lot of reporting, it's another to write a book. And so I don't think it's fair to say that, that she wrote any any portion of in cold blood, but she did help Capote amass all of the material that. That made that tremendous book. She also had an issue with his sort of a less city of the truth. Yeah, what an elegant right there. You know, it's, it's, it's the kind of language, she would've used. So in addition to, quote, assistant, researches Capote, what around using this phrase, nonfiction, novel, which was an Athens her because she believed Harper Lee, believe there was this tremendous distinction between fixing a nonfiction, and you shouldn't invent dialogue. And you should invent scenes, and you should you should never go beyond what, what the facts bear out, if you're ready nonfiction. And so she was left with some objections to in cold blood because having been there for all of the reporting and having gotten to know the principal players and having sat through the trial of Hitchcock.

Truman Capote Harper Lee Fred gray Alabama fraud George Wallace George Plumpton George Clinton Tom Brady Rosa Parks Harper Tom Randy Martin Luther King New York Times Athens Holcomb principal Kansas
"harper lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"harper lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all of it on WNYC. I'm Alison Stewart. Here's a story for you. There's a small town of Alabama or the rumor was a local clergyman named Reverend Willie Maxwell, use voodoo two members of his family of our a period of seven years. It started with the murder of his first wife, Mary, Lou. And then he married the next door neighbor, and she died two, you got the idea for years. The Reverend evaded punishment and kept collecting insurance money with each new death that wasn't till the Reverend was shot to death while attending a funeral of his last victim. It gets a little crazier. The reverend's killer was exonerated in large part due to attorney a notable politician, whose president client was wait for it. The, Reverend himself the case was the subject of a project called the Reverend by an Alabama, novelist, trying her hand at true crime, but the book was never finished. Why? And how Harper Lee didn't finish something. She worked on for years as a mystery itself, one that is explored a new book for my next guest. Casey Sep is an investigative reporter for the New Yorker, the New York Times, and she has written furious hours murder fraud, and the last trial of Harper Lee. Casey, welcome to Oliva. Thanks for having me. How did you come upon the story of the Reverend Harper -ly? Yeah. I mean, what an unlikely thing to learn Harper Lee was up to in the years after to kill a Mockingbird. I found out about this case in two thousand fifteen when, like a lot of other reporters, I went ala Bama to look into this other manage, crypt of Harper Lee's, that had been found and was about to be published her novel go set a watchman and, you know, there were a lot of questions about the provenance of that manuscript and about her ability to consent to publication. And so a lot of reporters, I was, you know, nosing around town, trying to find out about her life, and about the folks who were overseeing her affairs. And while there, I learned this other projects she had undertaken in the nineteen seventies on the other side of the state involving the new preacher. So was always was myth down. There was the people know about this, or is this something that, that you stumbled upon? Yeah. I mean, it's one of these kind of interesting incongruities it was very well known in the area, obviously Harper Lee, during her reporting interviewed dozens of people encountered, a lot of folks who had worked, these cases, as law enforcement officers, or they had been attorneys who work these civil or criminal cases. And she just went around town, she went to cocktail parties and had dinner with folks, and so everyone around like Martin knew this, he was working on this book, but that knowledge had not permeated the outside world. And so there's a little bit of a footnote in the in the other biographies and biographical writings about her. And so I was completely surprised by it and the more I learned the more substantial it seemed her effort had been, she really had, you know, moved to town for almost a year and then spent years after that tried to turn her reporting and investigative work into a book. It is so interesting when you go to small communities like that, and like. Oh, yeah. Everybody knows that. Yes. The phenomenon of everybody knows that. And of course, nobody outside of their knows that. So, yeah, I mean really, really richly rewarded to get to hear those stories that quote everybody knows. And same thing is true, New York. Actually, I, I hope that one of the truly delightful things for readers of this book is to realize that, you know, Harper Lee live most of her adult life in New York City, and she made her way around town. She was at the match at the Frick. She was drinking elaine's and same thing, quote, everybody knows, but nobody knew it. And I'm I was gonna ask the fan but we were just talking about it. She was neighbors with hall notes..

Harper Lee Alabama Alison Stewart murder Willie Maxwell New York Times New York City New York Casey investigative reporter Bama elaine Mary attorney Lou president Martin
"harper lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"harper lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all of it from WNYC. I'm Alison Stewart a huge new exhibit called Auschwitz not long ago. Not far away is ripping and intense and necessary at them Ziam of Jewish heritage and battery park, the curator's of this multi level multi media exhibit will join us. There's a true crime book that Harper Lee never finished, we think the author who became rich and famous from tequila Mockingbird, lead a reclusive life. But Harper Lee did go to Alabama for a time when she became interested in writing about a multiple murder in her home state journalists Casey set picked up the story and has written a page Turner, a book called furious hours murder fraud, and the last trial of Harper Lee Casey will be in studio. And that's all of it for this hour. I'm Alison Stewart, I will meet you on the other side of the news. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Nora raum. President Trump has issued a memo ordering US intelligence agencies to cooperate with a turn each other William bars probe into surveillance used during investigations into Russian interference in the twenty sixteen election in the Trump campaign. NPR's Timor Keith reports President Trump wants the investigators to be investigated themselves. He's gone so far as to accuse several of them of treason. And now at this memo he's empowering. The attorney general to declassify government secrets related to his audit of the investigation, typically intelligence agencies, resist this sort of declassification, but Trump's memo says they have to cooperate house intelligence committee, chairman democrat Adam Schiff called the move unamerican and said Trump and bar are conspiring to quote, weaponize, law enforcement and classified information against their political enemies. The thority granted to the attorney. General is set to expire. When bar vacates, the post Tama, Keith, NPR news. The Justice department Thursday filed more charges against WikiLeaks, founder, Julian Assange, NPR's Carrie Johnson has more. Remember Julian Assange, already faced one charge conspiracy to engage in computer hacking for his role in the leak by former army private Chelsea Manning. Manning gave Wiki leaks State Department cables, warlords and assessment of detainees at Guantanamo. A grand jury in Virginia slap Julian Assange with seventeen more charges, these are extremely serious alleging violations of the espionage act that includes conspiracy.

President Trump Harper Lee Alison Stewart NPR Julian Assange Harper Lee Casey US Chelsea Manning Timor Keith murder Nora raum attorney Adam Schiff Guantanamo Virginia Carrie Johnson Washington Justice department President
"harper lee" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"harper lee" Discussed on KPCC

"Frame I'm John horn. We'll pick up my conversation with screenwriter and playwright Aaron Sorkin about his stage version of tequila Mockingbird back in the spring of last year. Harper Lee's state headed by lawyer Tanya Carter sued the producer, Scott Rudin saying that Sorkin adaptation deviated too much from the novel. There were a couple of minor changes that the west wing creator agreed to but Sorkin wouldn't budge when it came to how he'd written novels to main black characters. Tom Brady Anderson falsely accused of raping a white woman and the finches housekeeper. Pernia sorkin. I talked about the concerns the estate had with his version of Atticus. Who initially swore drank whiskey and owned a gun in the book in the movie, Atticus, carved out of marble. He's the man with all the answers in the play. I wanted him to be wrestling with questions, and I wanted him to be more human and things like Atticus having sitting on the porch having a glass of whisky by himself after he's lost. The case seem very human to me the gun in the closet is the end of the first act when we all know the moment when he finds out that Tom Robinson has been moved to the local jail a night early. And that the clan the bad guys have been tipped off. So Advocacy's to go to jail and save Tom from being lynched. I had a moment where he grabs a shotgun from the closet. Hesitates looks at Purnea says you'd better take that with you at advocates puts it back and the note was Atticus would never have a gun in the house. Again, it first of all that note. I didn't understand because in the book and in the movie, he's dead. I shot shoots the rabid dog from two hundred yards. So it's not like Atticus gun objector. Notes like that. I reluctantly agreed to because I could live with them and the play wouldn't have happened unless I did I remember talking to you while you're working on the adaptation more than a year ago. And you're the midst of releasing the movie molly's game and the time that you were giving Tom Robinson Copernican more of a voice in the story, especially when it comes to the issue of racial injustice. I remember saying to you, what is the state of Harper Lee think about that? And you said they've been great to work with. We've got a pretty good deal and a couple of weeks later the. To play. So you're timing was a little bit. Your optimism was maybe a little bit falsely placed, but it does sound like you were able to resolve the dispute how would you characterize what the takeaway was for you as a playwright through that dispute ended it leave you with the play that you were a hundred percent happy with did you feel like you had to compromise in terms of what the estate wanted and what you wanted in the story. No the that lawsuit. Dad, no effect on the play. And neither I nor Scott, nor director share would have gone forward with the play. If now going back to the beginning, the novel has to only to a significant African American characters Tom Robinson, the defendant cow Purnea the mate. And this is a story about racial friction in the Jim crow south. Neither of the two African American characters really have much to say on the subject in the novels really most concerned with whether scout is going to wear address or overalls to school. Tom Robinson gets to plead for his life. And neither of them have agency. And the me that got scared by the lack of quality of my own. I draft one of the things I've Oude was I'm not going to pretend that I'm writing this nine hundred sixty and I'm not going to try to do a Harper Lee impersonation, neither of those two things will get very far. So I thought that in in nineteen sixty using African American characters only atmosphere is the kind of thing that would probably go largely unnoticed. But today, it's it's not only wrong, but it's a missed opportunity. You want to hear from those characters my favorite scene in the book, and my favorite scene in the movie. It's a lot of people's favorite scene in the book is the end of the trial Atticus. Packing up his briefcase. Everyone has left courtroom everyone except the people in what was called the colored section the balcony up where all the African American citizens of may come are standing.

Atticus Tom Robinson Pernia sorkin Harper Lee Tom Brady Anderson Scott Rudin Tom John horn Tanya Carter producer Purnea Jim crow director two hundred yards hundred percent
Inside Aaron Sorkin's 'Mockingbird' story

The Frame

07:22 min | 2 years ago

Inside Aaron Sorkin's 'Mockingbird' story

"Playwright and screenwriter Aaron Sorkin says he was eager to adapt. Harper Lee's to kill a Mockingbird for Broadway. But he still had some serious. Reservations about the job. I said yes, knowing really it was a suicide mission because people have a very special relationship to the novel. And it's a great book. What could I do but make it less than than what it was? And the acting future of Jesse smollet is still unknown. But his character on empire just made TV history all that up on the frame. Welcome to the frame. I'm John horn when Tony nominations are revealed next week to kill a Mockingbird will likely get a lot of attention almost certainly for Jeff Daniels who plays Atticus Finch, but the adaptation by earned Sorkin was far from easy. Scott Rudin secured, the rights to the patient and got Harper Lee's personal approval of Sorkin. It's the playwright. But then things started to go awry following Lee's death three years ago the estate eventually sued to stop the production. We'll get to the lawsuit in a bit. But when I spoke with Sorkin about to kill a Mockingbird. He I told me why his first draft didn't work. I simply try to do. No harm. I I took the most essential scenes that you need to tell the story, and I stood them up and dramatize them and the whole thing felt like a greatest hits album done by tribute band. And I turned it in and Scott who usually at that point. Would meet with me for days and ended up with hundreds of notes to go back and do the second draft with he met with me for less than thirty minutes and gave me two notes. And the second note was the one that changed everything. What Scott said was that Atticus can't be advocates from the beginning of the play to the end of the play. He's got a change. That's what protagonist does a protagonist has a flaw protagonist put through something and changes as a result. And I thought well, of course, Scott's right? That has to be what happens in a play. I wonder how Harper Lee got away with an Abacus who's the same. At the beginning of the book is at the end of the book, how Horton Foote got away with an Atticus in the movie who's the same at the beginning of the movie is the is at the end of the movie. And that's when I realized that advocates isn't the protagonist in the novel or the movie scout is she's the one who changes her flaws that she's young and the changes that she loses someone for innocence. And while I wanted scout. And dill to remain protagonists in the play. I wanted advocates to be the central protagonist. I wanted him to be put through something. I wanted him to have a flaw on. I wanted him to change is a result. And what happened in that moment was that? I simply stopped thinking about the word adaptation that it. No longer was my goal to gently swallow the novel in bubble wrap and transfer it to a Broadway stage that I was going to write a new play taking the circumstances that Harper Lee put on the table. And that's when things started to take off. So I'm gonna ask you this. Obviously, it's a period piece. But I'm gonna talk about it's modern relevance of which there is a tremendous amount. What was happening in the world as you were adapting or reimagining, but ever we're gonna do whatever verb are gonna use to describe what you were doing with harp. Elise novel to make it a play. Yeah. Well, what was happening in the world. Was Trump was elected president Charlottesville was happening. Charlottesville became an important touchdown in this. And I'll tell you why Atticus in the in the novel. This was in thinking about what flaw can Atticus half. Does he go from being a bad lawyer to a good lawyer, a bad father to a loving father a racist believing injustice in a quality, and obviously no on all three? What I realized was that Atticus already had a flaw. Harper Lee gave him one. It's just that. When we were learning the book, we were taught that it was a virtue advocates says throughout the book that there's goodness in every single chicks, go get along better with all kinds of folks never really understand it until you consider things from his point of view. Climates out of his skin woke rounding he excuses. Bob, Buell's racism by saying the man just losses WPA job. You know, it's he excuses. Mrs Dubose is racism by she recently stopped taking her medicine or morphine. He excuses. The town's racism. This is the deep south things happen slower here, you know, give gift people time and thinking about all that at the same time at Charlottesville happened in it started. What Atticus was saying was starting to sound to me like there were fine people on both sides. Right. And that's when the bells rang, and and I was really able to kind of go from a walk to a gallop. We're talking with earned Sorkin about his ad obtain of Harper Lee's novel to kill a Mockingbird. I wanna play a scene between Atticus Finch and Tom Robinson who's been accused of raping a white woman. And the story can't tell you how to plead, but I can't. And I must give you my best advice. You won't be my lawyer. Very less thing. I won't the world be your lawyer right now negro man, what teenage girl wouldn't be going in with a win hands. But I'm compelled to defend us an officer of the court, and in that capacity of taken Salamo to give him a best council, which is that you cannot and you must not lead guilty and go to jail for a crime that you did not could not commit. So how do you figure out a way to dramatize what Atticus is going through? And how he's changing the way that he sees an excuses behavior through the play. What tricks? What are the things that you are able to do with the text and through new dialogue and putting dialogue and other characters mouse, they get you to that place where he can evolve for me, a big part of Attica ses journey in this play is going from someone who says, I know these people these are our, friends and neighbors sure some of them may be stuck in the old ways. But there are none of them that are so far gone. They would send an obviously innocent man to the electric chair, and he discovers that he doesn't know his friends and neighbors that to me does a really good job of of reflecting. I think how a lot of us no matter where you are on the political or ideological spectrum the way, a lot of us have felt these last few years that we thought we knew our fellow Americans. But we didn't we were wrong about our friends and neighbors, and that's one of the reasons why this play based on a book that sixty years old that takes place ninety years ago feels so much like today.

Atticus Finch Harper Lee Aaron Sorkin Scott Rudin Charlottesville Jesse Smollet Horton Foote Dill Jeff Daniels Elise Officer Mrs Dubose Salamo John Horn Donald Trump Morphine President Trump BOB Tom Robinson Tony
"harper lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"harper lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You did your ticket like especially fast that time? I think the whole run I did take it fast. I was obsessed by one thing I wanted to shake up that all score. I wanted to get to the extreme of that story. I wanted to. I still want when I conduct carrot comment. Just some of the moments are so sensual and have you have to just keep and take time in them in revel into them. But some others you have to have this kind of drive. That's just like the character. And I did not realize so much that it was so fun for the house the upper house of the met. But in a very interesting way. I think that made also that the ears were just immediately paying attention. No musician in the orchestra ever told me it was that fast. But they probably looked at. Oh, here's someone who has energy and fast forward ten years later where this is where I am. So I guess. I made the right choice. So I was working when you're masterclasses on video, and you were talking Juilliard. You're talking to one of the singer about how they seem to be sliding from one note into the other, and you said, and I think that usually conductors fault when you do that. I remember this. And then you said, and I quote, my profession has twisted so many things. So what were you referring to? Yeah. Well, I'm referring specifically to the fact that conducting is a way to enable people to give their best. And of course, that takes a certain amount of control. i talked to you terry and i just think of very much similarities between what you do what i do and you're prepared you have some questions but then you know if i go somewhere like any guest you will just go with the flow and try to just bring it back and this this very interesting relationship so take it in my world between conductor and singer i think we're there to also understand that each singer's different way to breathe a singer of different color in divorce different placement of the voice and you want the speed that will make the most beautiful for them and not having such a plan that all this is my temple this is my way you should read their and this because i decided so and that comes from insecurity for conductors because this is actually very difficult to opinion self up to the succession of the other and what i was referring to precisely there is that sometimes conductors become to control freaks and they actually want to make sure that everything will will be happened at this moment and then you force the singer to show you a certain way the way they will do it because they can't trust that you will be with them and when i work with younger singers younger musicians i want them to set the standard for also younger generation of conductors to be actually talking about making music together not one imposing to the other we're listening to the interview i recorded tuesday night with uniqueness again the conductor and music director of the philadelphia orchestra and the metropolitan opera will hear more of the interview after a break this is fresh air w._n._y._c. is supported by the world premiere on broadway of harper lee's to kill mockingbird jeff daniels atticus finch.

harper lee philadelphia terry director ten years
"harper lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"harper lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"League. Harper lee. Harper Lee has exactly right. Very good. You didn't get that quick death that she had had. Wonder? Try this when try this. When Paula telling quote from this local luminary people had an image of me as old then I was forty two. The only tired I was was tired of giving in. Oh is that? But that was Rosa Parks. That was exactly grows approx. Very good. And finally dry this one. Alan, Bo Jackson. Asked what he do upon retirement this Alabama. This alabamian prophetically replied, probably croak in a week red barber at barber. Okay. Could you say it again when asked what he do upon retirement this hour, Bamiyan prophetically replied, probably croak in a week was Hank Aaron an Alabama. And he wasn't alabamian. But it wasn't Hank. Aaron. Retirement was retirement from a business or a sport. Can I ask that? And I'll take a point. You can get the points. And I will tell you what was from a sport. Our this retirement. Which one? This is also the same man. When asked when he was returning the Alabama many years before that said Hank Aaron I mean, the baseball baseball player he was baseball players. Ballplayer when he was returned Alabama. They ask him why he said because momma called.

Hank Aaron Harper lee Alabama baseball Bo Jackson Paula Rosa Parks momma Bamiyan Alan
"harper lee" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

06:13 min | 3 years ago

"harper lee" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"With. Took place. Harper Lee dead at the age of eighty nine. Road alto. Be a lati- is the coffee king whose name is synonymous with that icon, aluminum stove top Expresso maker. He has died at the age of ninety three and in a very unusual and strangely befitting tribute. The ashes of this Italian coffeemaker impressario placed in a giant moka pot. Which he made famous Chinese man has held a funeral for himself. Just to see how many people would turn up. Zing Zang organized a mock celebration and told us friends and family to show up. He's sixty six years old. He pretended to be dead. They all came hundreds of people. They're going to have to do it for real for him. Virgin galactic is unveiled the latest of its spaceship to space plane. It's amazing. The space plane is designed to take a crew of two pilots and six passengers into space in one day. That'll be a much bigger plane were hundred and fifty people will go up into space and then back down you'll go from LA to New York in an hour in an hour. It'd be crazy. Peter Davenport heads up the national UFO reporting center. Boy, we're going to see you over reports. When those things start flying, Peter. Yeah. I'll say I hope they don't start too soon. I've got enough on my plate. What do we got this week? Oh, we have some really really interesting reports. But I I liked it. Start with a spot of old business. You may recall during my last update last week I requested that any coast listeners down in Los Angeles and San Diego area if they saw that blue green object on Thursday morning submit just a short report of where they were and what they saw on so on boy, did they do a nice job. And I just updated the national UFO reporting center website tonight and put a very nice complimentary. Thank you know to all of them who did such a wonderful job. They're great group of people. One guy went to the trouble of finding actually finding video of the object than I think we can fairly conclude now, George that it was a meteor, but interestingly going from west to east most of them, I believe go the opposite direction. Generally, that's a general rule of thumb, but have some really interesting reports to follow up with here and some breaking news out of Phoenix this time. My breaking news has nothing to do with Santa Claus. Is it did on Chris, of course? But three nights ago, we just received a very nicely. Composed report from a senior airline pilot and his first officer at about seven forty four pm on the seventeenth of February. So just three nights ago. Over Hong Kong, they were at thirty three thousand feet flying to the north and. And their attention was suddenly drawn to an extremely bright blue distinctly blue light halfway up from the horizon. They continued to watch it for a couple or three minutes. They estimated suddenly they became aware of the fact that the object was moving now towards them or in their general direction. It's suddenly did a left hand turn and accelerated and became very bright accelerated to the east and just suddenly disappeared from their site. They got on the radio and described the event another pilot came on the same frequency and said that he had seen the same thing. So very interesting report. About twelve hours later Welton eras Zona down in the southwest corner of Arizona, just probably twenty or thirty miles east of Yuma. To people to adults were driving on the highway I presume to the west they became aware of two very distinctly orange lights hovering above the desert. I've mentioned those things got only knows how many times, of course. But as they watched them there was suddenly a flash of white light. They report beneath the orange lights very close to the ground. The object that apparently had flashed or been created by the flash rose up slowly and took a position between the two orange lights very complex event. They drove down the highway another fifteen minutes or so and suddenly saw four more orange lights hovering in the nighttime sky early evening, citing. A report from the Cincinnati area tonight. This is a very interesting one. And then I'll close with the Phoenix events that occurred just three or four hours ago. Okay. Gentlemen was driving near Cincinnati to the western an object overtook his car, and it suddenly stopped then accelerated stopped again, accelerated stopped again, and then streaked off in the night sky. We'll have that report posted and last report almost as if to acknowledge and commemorate the international UFO congress. They're they're a very dramatic saving of about a dozen very bright golden lights to the south west of Phoenix possibility they were flares over the Hebron firing range. But I don't think so they described them quite differently from flares. I'll be able to tell more in a few days after we've gotten more reports. Great, thanks up next. By the way, we are going to be talking about strange creatures you full of doctrines before we get into open lines later on tonight. Butch Witkowski back with us on coast to coast. I am..

Phoenix national UFO reporting center Cincinnati Los Angeles Peter Davenport Harper Lee Virgin galactic Zing Zang Butch Witkowski Hong Kong Arizona George Yuma Chris officer Welton San Diego New York