35 Burst results for "Harman"

Prince Harry and His Wife, Meghan, Expecting Second Child

NBC Nightly News

01:25 min | 3 weeks ago

Prince Harry and His Wife, Meghan, Expecting Second Child

"There's are some happy news today for two british royal transplant. Now making their home here in the us. Prince harry and meghan markle are expecting their second child. Sarah harman is in london with more. It's another royal baby. For prince harry and meghan the couple confirming. They're expecting their second child. Sharing this photo and writing can confirm that archie is going to be a big brother. Megan gave birth to their first son archie harrison in may of twenty eighteen in november. She revealed she had suffered a miscarriage writing of her heartbreak in the new york times and describing and almost unbearable grief after stepping back as working royals last year. The decision i made for my wife and i to step back is not one i made lightly hairy and megan started a new life in california signing multi million dollar deals with net flicks and spotify and swapping royal red carpets for zoom calls and everyone's and mental emotional wellbeing when they stepped away from the royal family harry and meghan gave up their royal highness titles as well as any public funding but harry did not give up his place in the royal line of succession in a statement. Buckingham palace said her majesty. The queen and the entire family were delighted and wish them well. Their new baby will be eight in line to the throne sarah harman. nbc news.

Prince Harry Meghan Markle Sarah Harman Archie Harrison Meghan Archie Megan London Royals New York Times United States Harry California Buckingham Palace Nbc News
Nashville bomber sent packages before killing himself in blast

NBC Nightly News

02:04 min | 2 months ago

Nashville bomber sent packages before killing himself in blast

"We're learning more tonight about the possible motive behind that nashville christmas day bombing the fbi. Now asking for help believing the bomber mailed his writings to people he knew before setting off the bomb. Sarah harmon has details tonight. The first aerial images revealing the extent of the damage from the christmas day bombing in downtown nashville roofs torn apart. Buildings faces. Blown off the fbi confirming that the bomber. Sixty three year. Old anthony quinn warner sent material to acquaintances before the blast. A law enforcement source close to the investigation tells abc news. They're aware of a thumb drive and written pages from the bomber. The fbi now asking anyone who received them to come forward. We've heard about these letters. We've heard of his conversations. And maybe some conspiracies or we still don't really know why he chose this place and why he chose this day to commend this massive bombing. His read westbound sitting on a popular street christmas day blaring music and a warning before an explosion. Only he was killed in the blast. Investigators are exploring several conspiracy theories as potential motives behind the bombing outside and at and t. building including evidence. The bomber believed in lizard people and a so-called reptilian conspiracy to senior law enforcement officials told nbc news last week so for all the people who believe in conspiracy theories oftentimes they don't have the means to execute a violent attack or natural sure how to do it. National residents are now struggling to move forward after more than forty businesses. Were damaged several beyond repair. Leo roses tattoos studio totally destroyed surveillance video capturing the moment of the blast the destruction immeasurable heavens left in over a week. I'm constantly tired tonight. As authorities search for answers nashville residents who lost their homes and businesses are now facing a new year and uncertain future. Sarah harman nbc news.

FBI Sarah Harmon Anthony Quinn Warner Nashville Abc News Nbc News Leo Roses Sarah Harman NBC
Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

Healthcare Triage Podcast

09:05 min | 5 months ago

Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

"Let's start with. Sharon who has not been here before we usually like to struck these podcasts by talking to our guests about specifically what they do and how did they get their sort of talking to the public about how does one become professor of medicine or a division director of nephrology or interested in the research that you do. So I started in research when I was in a froggy fellow at the University of Chicago. I was motivated to be honest by a patient on dialysis who kept having bleeding into their shoulder joint that I had to actually remove the blood for her to be able to use her arm on a weekly basis, and this was due to a rare disease that patients on dialysis get that deposits in the bone called amyloidosis. So that made me start doing research on bone learning about bone I worked in someone's. Lab and then when I came to. INDIANA. University in thousand hundred two I came really because of the strength of the Bone Research Group at Indiana University? Not Necessarily in the nephrology division from there I have held a lot of different administrative positions. I am kind of an organizer and get things done type person. So it comes pretty naturally to be able to put all that together. I could say I've been truly doing. Translational, research since my fellowship, as I hadn't during my fellowship, a clinical research paper and a basic science lab paper published in one year. So sometimes I feel like the word translational isn't really new and novel, but I'm happy that people are finally understanding that when you do something in the lab, you ought to be thinking about who the patient is. That would benefit from this at least some point in their life. So can I get you talk a little bit more about that like what do you? What do you think translational research is because I'd agree with you it it does seem like one of those things that people are treating soften is it's a new thing but it is it. So how what does it mean to you? So it should mean that there ought to be a potential and the back of your head. As to where this was going to go at some point in the future I truly believe there is an important area for research just to do research to understand, for example, and identify new and novel gene, and what does that gene do on the other hand translational means that you actually go from a patient and you work backwards to try to figure out what makes that patient tick? What makes them have this? Disease, what makes them prone to this disease? Both of those kind of approaches from science perspective are absolutely needed. But the whole emphasis of the he sl is really to actually take discoveries into humans and overtake humans back to bench discovery so that we improve their health to see this as something that doesn't do that. There needs to be a focus or we just sort of doing more no I think the difference between. That and very focused research is that in order to really cover that spectrum, you have to have collaboration you have to actually have other people who can work on different pieces of that Longitudinal plan again from patient back to bencher bench to patient, and so it is hard for someone to do all of those facets and so you have to have this ability or desire to get there and you need to collaborate. And that's really what the chess is all about. It creates an infrastructure that people can go to so that they can understand how to take that part that they're doing in that trajectory and make it happen. Can you give me some hard examples of some of the work for structure talking about? Yeah, I mean this is I. It is absolutely fabulous and I give talks and visit places all around the country and. We are truly one of the best and most advanced CPS I in my book from start to finish, you have an idea you think might actually be a drug down the road. We are working to try to figure out how we can actually benefit people who are not sure if it's going to be good. So connecting them with the right people to understand drug discovery, we then want to know if you're doing. An animal work is that gene that you're studying that protein actually present in humans because there's a lot of discrepancy in animal models of human disease, and so we have a giant bio bank samples that people can gain access to to actually measure the DNA and try to understand the Hamas between an animal and human, and then if you do have something and you have an idea and you want to implement a Clinical Research Study, do you need to know how many patients you have? So we have a connection where the Reagan streep data set to help to feasibilities. Do these people that you think exist really exist? Is there something unique about them that you need to know who the people are that you want to study, and then we have a pool of trained research coordinators and infrastructure setup to actually conduct clinical research and? Then from there, we have an ability to help people learn how to communicate how to publish how to write a grant. Harman's all these other things through our professional education opportunities the whole beauty and the fun of research is that it's never a dull moment. So every day you think you're going to be studying this and something send you to a tangent and you go wait a minute maybe I should be doing that. And that's how you end up needing collaborators and resources and methods and infrastructure to learn how to do it. Otherwise, you lose those tangents and discoveries are errors initially and someone takes a different look at it from a different viewpoint and they turn it into something really positive. So the CY is an effort that involves just more than Indiana University School of Medicine Right? Absolutely. So it's really Notre Dame purdue IU Bloomington. And many other hospital systems as well as the medical student campuses. So it it really integrates everything and it's very fun to actually learn what people are doing at different institutions and to actually get people excited and have a pathway forward to maybe something that isn't at their institution. Bring it back to what the research is that they're doing. So Sarah I'm not gonNA ask for full introduction. I think you may be the. Frequent. Guests on our podcast dates. So if the audience is familiar with anyone, it would be you but I would love to hear a little bit about how you became involved in community and translational research as well as what you see is the distinction between say clinical and translational sciences and community in Translational Sciences my research has always focused on vulnerable populations and health equity related issues and started with geospatial concentrations of poor health outcomes among adolescence and I was doing a project that was enrolling team girls on the West Side of Indianapolis and tracking them, and when we recruited from the clinic for the study just to give you an idea, we were using blackberry pearls. So that dates long ago this was. One hundred percent of the girls we had approached agreed to participate so much so that the I R. B thought perhaps the protocol was coercive because we were offering free cell phone service while we attract their locations and they were wondering if even after our main criticism with this grant to the NIH, which was like this grant isn't possible no never is going to let you track them Things have changed since I started asking those questions in any case my point is, is that when we brought it into the community because we didn't want a clinical sample because it can be quite biased for an adolescent population, those who are seeking healthcare, we were not meeting our enrollment targets and so what I learned after a lot of errors that engagement with the community in this case our target population of teen girls on the West Side we realized they weren't seeing sort of the Ir be approved flyers. replastering everywhere. That, there were all kinds of things that we needed to reconsider and it had nothing to do with the protocol itself. So the science was valid. There wasn't anything that was sort of keeping them necessarily from participating in terms of the incentives or what we're asking them to do. It was that we were not effectively engaging with them and as part of that as well as some I think innovative at least at the time collaboration with a faculty member from Herron. School of. Art and design in Santa Matsu we sort of employed this human center design research approaches sort of our how community engagement in any case because of that sort of experience for me personally as a researcher I learned the value of engagement and really beyond just meeting recruitment targets to getting to something much more meaningful from the participant's perspective, and it's just grown from there. So it has taken a lot of different trajectories for me and my own research relating to data, sharing partnerships to what's. Now Research Sham the patient engagement core to various community engagement in between but I guess where my role now as associate Dean as well as CO director of the CSI, plays in Israeli extending that translational spectrum in with the community and back rights as a bidirectional relationship, and so it's extending those collaborations to stakeholders in the community. My definition of team science and sort of that collaborative space is not restricted to individuals within the academy and really absolutely needs to include community folks at all. Levels of the translational spectrum. So this is not just from like clinical to community in my book it's you know community engagement even within the basic science from.

Indiana University Translational Sciences Bone Research Group Disease Clinical Research Study Indiana University Of Chicago Amyloidosis Sharon Professor Of Medicine Hamas Bloomington Division Director Santa Matsu Reagan Streep Associate Dean Harman Faculty Member Herron
Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:32 min | 5 months ago

Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

"Let's start with. Sharon who has not been here before we usually like to struck these podcasts by talking to our guests about specifically what they do and how did they get their sort of talking to the public about how does one become professor of medicine or a division director of nephrology or interested in the research that you do. So I started in research when I was in a froggy fellow at the University of Chicago. I was motivated to be honest by a patient on dialysis who kept having bleeding into their shoulder joint that I had to actually remove the blood for her to be able to use her arm on a weekly basis, and this was due to a rare disease that patients on dialysis get that deposits in the bone called amyloidosis. So that made me start doing research on bone learning about bone I worked in someone's. Lab and then when I came to. INDIANA. University in thousand hundred two I came really because of the strength of the Bone Research Group at Indiana University? Not Necessarily in the nephrology division from there I have held a lot of different administrative positions. I am kind of an organizer and get things done type person. So it comes pretty naturally to be able to put all that together. I could say I've been truly doing. Translational, research since my fellowship, as I hadn't during my fellowship, a clinical research paper and a basic science lab paper published in one year. So sometimes I feel like the word translational isn't really new and novel, but I'm happy that people are finally understanding that when you do something in the lab, you ought to be thinking about who the patient is. That would benefit from this at least some point in their life. So can I get you talk a little bit more about that like what do you? What do you think translational research is because I'd agree with you it it does seem like one of those things that people are treating soften is it's a new thing but it is it. So how what does it mean to you? So it should mean that there ought to be a potential and the back of your head. As to where this was going to go at some point in the future I truly believe there is an important area for research just to do research to understand, for example, and identify new and novel gene, and what does that gene do on the other hand translational means that you actually go from a patient and you work backwards to try to figure out what makes that patient tick? What makes them have this? Disease, what makes them prone to this disease? Both of those kind of approaches from science perspective are absolutely needed. But the whole emphasis of the he sl is really to actually take discoveries into humans and overtake humans back to bench discovery so that we improve their health to see this as something that doesn't do that. There needs to be a focus or we just sort of doing more no I think the difference between. That and very focused research is that in order to really cover that spectrum, you have to have collaboration you have to actually have other people who can work on different pieces of that Longitudinal plan again from patient back to bencher bench to patient, and so it is hard for someone to do all of those facets and so you have to have this ability or desire to get there and you need to collaborate. And that's really what the chess is all about. It creates an infrastructure that people can go to so that they can understand how to take that part that they're doing in that trajectory and make it happen. Can you give me some hard examples of some of the work for structure talking about? Yeah, I mean this is I. It is absolutely fabulous and I give talks and visit places all around the country and. We are truly one of the best and most advanced CPS I in my book from start to finish, you have an idea you think might actually be a drug down the road. We are working to try to figure out how we can actually benefit people who are not sure if it's going to be good. So connecting them with the right people to understand drug discovery, we then want to know if you're doing. An animal work is that gene that you're studying that protein actually present in humans because there's a lot of discrepancy in animal models of human disease, and so we have a giant bio bank samples that people can gain access to to actually measure the DNA and try to understand the Hamas between an animal and human, and then if you do have something and you have an idea and you want to implement a Clinical Research Study, do you need to know how many patients you have? So we have a connection where the Reagan streep data set to help to feasibilities. Do these people that you think exist really exist? Is there something unique about them that you need to know who the people are that you want to study, and then we have a pool of trained research coordinators and infrastructure setup to actually conduct clinical research and? Then from there, we have an ability to help people learn how to communicate how to publish how to write a grant. Harman's all these other things through our professional education opportunities the whole beauty and the fun of research is that it's never a dull moment. So every day you think you're going to be studying this and something send you to a tangent and you go wait a minute maybe I should be doing that. And that's how you end up needing collaborators and resources and methods and infrastructure to learn how to do it. Otherwise, you lose those tangents and discoveries are errors initially and someone takes a different look at it from a different viewpoint and they turn it into something really positive. So the CY is an effort that involves just more than Indiana University School of Medicine Right? Absolutely. So it's really Notre Dame purdue IU Bloomington. And many other hospital systems as well as the medical student campuses. So it it really integrates everything and it's very fun to actually learn what people are doing at different institutions and to actually get people excited and have a pathway forward to maybe something that isn't at their institution. Bring it back to what the research is that they're doing.

Indiana University Bone Research Group Disease Clinical Research Study Amyloidosis University Of Chicago Indiana Bloomington Sharon Professor Of Medicine Hamas Division Director Reagan Streep Harman
Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:01 min | 5 months ago

Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

"Let's start with. Sharon who has not been here before we usually like to struck these podcasts by talking to our guests about specifically what they do and how did they get their sort of talking to the public about how does one become professor of medicine or a division director of nephrology or interested in the research that you do. So I started in research when I was in a froggy fellow at the University of Chicago. I was motivated to be honest by a patient on dialysis who kept having bleeding into their shoulder joint that I had to actually remove the blood for her to be able to use her arm on a weekly basis, and this was due to a rare disease that patients on dialysis get that deposits in the bone called amyloidosis. So that made me start doing research on bone learning about bone I worked in someone's. Lab and then when I came to. INDIANA. University in thousand hundred two I came really because of the strength of the Bone Research Group at Indiana University? Not Necessarily in the nephrology division from there I have held a lot of different administrative positions. I am kind of an organizer and get things done type person. So it comes pretty naturally to be able to put all that together. I could say I've been truly doing. Translational, research since my fellowship, as I hadn't during my fellowship, a clinical research paper and a basic science lab paper published in one year. So sometimes I feel like the word translational isn't really new and novel, but I'm happy that people are finally understanding that when you do something in the lab, you ought to be thinking about who the patient is. That would benefit from this at least some point in their life. So can I get you talk a little bit more about that like what do you? What do you think translational research is because I'd agree with you it it does seem like one of those things that people are treating soften is it's a new thing but it is it. So how what does it mean to you? So it should mean that there ought to be a potential and the back of your head. As to where this was going to go at some point in the future I truly believe there is an important area for research just to do research to understand, for example, and identify new and novel gene, and what does that gene do on the other hand translational means that you actually go from a patient and you work backwards to try to figure out what makes that patient tick? What makes them have this? Disease, what makes them prone to this disease? Both of those kind of approaches from science perspective are absolutely needed. But the whole emphasis of the he sl is really to actually take discoveries into humans and overtake humans back to bench discovery so that we improve their health to see this as something that doesn't do that. There needs to be a focus or we just sort of doing more no I think the difference between. That and very focused research is that in order to really cover that spectrum, you have to have collaboration you have to actually have other people who can work on different pieces of that Longitudinal plan again from patient back to bencher bench to patient, and so it is hard for someone to do all of those facets and so you have to have this ability or desire to get there and you need to collaborate. And that's really what the chess is all about. It creates an infrastructure that people can go to so that they can understand how to take that part that they're doing in that trajectory and make it happen. Can you give me some hard examples of some of the work for structure talking about? Yeah, I mean this is I. It is absolutely fabulous and I give talks and visit places all around the country and. We are truly one of the best and most advanced CPS I in my book from start to finish, you have an idea you think might actually be a drug down the road. We are working to try to figure out how we can actually benefit people who are not sure if it's going to be good. So connecting them with the right people to understand drug discovery, we then want to know if you're doing. An animal work is that gene that you're studying that protein actually present in humans because there's a lot of discrepancy in animal models of human disease, and so we have a giant bio bank samples that people can gain access to to actually measure the DNA and try to understand the Hamas between an animal and human, and then if you do have something and you have an idea and you want to implement a Clinical Research Study, do you need to know how many patients you have? So we have a connection where the Reagan streep data set to help to feasibilities. Do these people that you think exist really exist? Is there something unique about them that you need to know who the people are that you want to study, and then we have a pool of trained research coordinators and infrastructure setup to actually conduct clinical research and? Then from there, we have an ability to help people learn how to communicate how to publish how to write a grant. Harman's all these other things through our professional education opportunities the whole beauty and the fun of research is that it's never a dull moment. So every day you think you're going to be studying this and something send you to a tangent and you go wait a minute maybe I should be doing that. And that's how you end up needing collaborators and resources and methods and infrastructure to learn how to do it. Otherwise, you lose those tangents and discoveries are errors initially and someone takes a different look at it from a different viewpoint and they turn it into something really positive.

University In Thousand Bone Research Group Amyloidosis University Of Chicago Indiana University Sharon Indiana Reagan Streep Chess Hamas Harman
"harman" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

02:12 min | 6 months ago

"harman" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

Freshwater Mussels Are Dying And No One Knows Why

Short Wave

08:50 min | 1 year ago

Freshwater Mussels Are Dying And No One Knows Why

"TALKING FRESHWATER MUSSELS. And the fact that they're dying off. Where should we start so I actually want to take you to South West Virginia right near the border with Tennessee? Mattie put on your waiters done okay because we're about to get into the waters of the clinch river so the clinch river flows at the feet of the southern Appalachian Mountains. The water is cold very clear and that is good news because freshwater mussels live on the bottom of rivers. They're kind of like sorta like the less edible version of their saltwater cousin they don't get the same love but they bury themselves in the sediment and among the rocks on the bottoms of rivers and I went out to find some of these muscles with Jordan Richard a biologist with the US fish and wildlife service who is obsessed with freshwater mussels and it did not take him long waiting out into the water for him to find what he did not want to see how long this is a matter of like. How long does it take until we see something that died very recently won? Shell was just laying there even say it's not buried. That's its footing Jordan. There he'd reached into the water and pulled out that muscle a pheasant shell. That's the species but should be buried in food. Not that's dead and this show is about the size of his palm. It's this beautiful. Golden Brown color But the Muslim side is usually a smooth. Pink is turning Greyish Brown and frayed around Sedgwick's Basically it's rotting in place. I saw that one took a few steps out and by the time I stopped right there at like five expecting not a good way which I'm pretty I'm pretty used to like coming out of your thing and I'm GonNa see just getting completely like bombed with the muscles but it's obsolete lousy you out there finding like dead muscle after dead muscle. Yeah I mean they were everywhere and you heard Jordan say but this is really not what he was expecting. It was not the time of year that they typically see a bunch of mortality You know he was just being nice and taking a reporter but biologists have been going at different sections of the clinch river since it was first noted in two thousand sixteen and in just one section of that river the US Fish and Wildlife Service estimates that the number of pheasant shell muscles that have died is in the hundreds of thousands knee. It sounded like I don't know just hearing his voice on the tape that he was super upset. Yeah I mean he was on the verge of tears when we were talking and then he tried to apologize about later. Which I didn't think was obviously not necessary but it was upset because he's so frustrated by what's happening they don't know what's causing this and there's this kind of feeling of helplessness. This guy is so passionate about freshwater ego systems. It's his entire life. I mean he actually said that he had three fish tanks house one by his bed one by the foot of his bed and one in the living room so yeah very understanding wife. Okay but let's talk a little bit more about why people are trying so hard to save these muscles. They play a really important role in freshwater ecosystems. Right totally so. They don't often get the attention they deserve. Here's someone who knows that all too well. People don't tend to get quite as excited about things that lack burns. Unfortunately that was emily blevins. She's a conservation biologist with Versi Society for Invertebrate Conservation. Which you know besides having a really cool name is a nonprofit that focuses on some of the world's more under loved Chrisny. I'LL SAY AT ONCE. I'LL SAY THOUSAND TIMES INVERTEBRATES. Don't get enough credit. I know I mean I think as vertebrates are a little biased but these muscles do deserve a ton of credit. There are filter feeders so that means that they filter water through them. While they're down they're just chilling on River Bottoms. There's research that shown they can remove pharmaceuticals from the water and pesticides and flame retardants and they remove E. coli from the water. They're like our little water filters exactly so a few of the biologists. I talked to really did say you can think of them. As nature's equivalent to a BRITTA filter cleaning up the water that we drink implant but they all sorts of cool stuff like reducing the size and impacts of dead zones. Those big nasty you know fishing life killing phenomena to keep occurring in the Gulf. They do that by filtering out. Sediment and agricultural runoff They sequester carbon phosphorus heavy metals in their shells. They reduce fecal bacteria from water. And you know like what's not to love about Madonna got it thank God. A single freshwater. Mussel can filter more than fifteen gallons of water in a day and besides that they provide habitat to tons of other species. One biologist described them as like the fresh water equivalent to a coral reef. So these muscles are clearly out here doing a lot of work. We don't have any idea what's causing these die-offs so no I mean we have some hunches but you know Jordan. The biologists set it could be a million different things that is causing this There's a bunch of folks working on this from around. The country. University was constant is doing a lot of work and they've recently identified a virus and bacteria that they say are statistically associated with the dial keywords being you know statistically associated so not enough to say hey dingaling we found it but they're highly suspicious of a pathogenic cause and that is where their research is focused right now. What about the stuff like we? Humans are doing on climate. Change for example. Does that seem to be a contributor at all? Well I mean there's no doubt. The climate change is stressing river ecosystems as it is just about every system everywhere but it does not seem to be the driver of what's going on here as far as scientists can tell But I think it's important to note that there are other human components it sort of brought us to this place as I mentioned freshwater mussels or already on the brink and that is because of human activity fun fact before the Aplastic Freshwater Mussels were actually collected in cultivated by the millions to satisfy a commercial demand for buttons. Their shells were pearly white inside right. Thanks for Buttons Fresh Harman's But even more damaging was just you know the general destruction that was brought along by Human Development. So there was pollution from coal mining in the southern Appalachia Rivers dammed for power streams diverted for agriculture wetlands pay for housing and all of those things have brought freshwater mussels to the point where a mysterious die off can happen and it becomes so crucial to find out why fast because there's so little wiggle room left in the system all right eight. Your bumming me out. What's the plan? So there is a contingency plan all right and there always needs to be a contingency plan But like most contingency plans. It's one that nobody wants to use in this case it's a hatchery or nursery more or less for freshwater mussels one of our living screams So pheasant shells in here. That's the one that really dial so basically this place is like a last line of defense for some of these species they're going to breed them in captivity so at least they're not totally gone from planet earth. Exactly so tim and the other. Biologists are reproducing muscles. Here keeping them safe until they're mature enough to be brought back into the wild they're basically stock and when the recent die off started on the clinch river. They brought a bunch of muscles here from part of the river that wasn't affected And those muscles could not just be used as stock but they could also use a baseline a healthy sample to us as they search for the die-offs 'cause Worst case scenario they have to take some of those muscles and try to repopulate parts of the Clinch River. Where the muscles of Dino are going to stand idly by watching the way we're GonNa do the best we can to help them produce progeny. So of the species isn't going for Jordan Richard. The biologist remitted beginning also is helping with this effort and he says it you know he knows. That muscles aren't as photogenic as a rhinoceros or polar bears but freshwater mussels are crucial to the health of other species. So if they go. We're going to have a lot of problems is not sexy to care about the foundation of Your House and you could renovate your kitchen but he says if that foundation is crumbling and you ignore it by the time you notice a problem because you fall through the floor. It's too late to do anything about it. And then everything else including your fancy. New Kitchen is going to fall through to

Clinch River Jordan Richard Us Fish And Wildlife Service Tennessee River Bottoms Shell South West Virginia Appalachian Mountains Mattie Versi Society For Invertebrate Gulf Britta Reporter Emily Blevins Appalachia Rivers Dino Human Development
"harman" Discussed on Broken Harts

Broken Harts

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"harman" Discussed on Broken Harts

"Struggle <SpeakerChange> with that as <Music> well. <Music> <Music> And then ask <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you a couple of questions <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that we ask everyone kind <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of a speed round. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> J., answer the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> first thing that comes <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> into your head, okay? <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> What's <Speech_Music_Female> the last thing you bought? <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> I'm <Speech_Female> not supposed to say solid, but <Speech_Female> it was a solid, but before <Speech_Music_Female> that I <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> bought <hes> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> trying to think of something sexy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that I bought. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> What did I buy? <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> Spin <Speech_Female> drift in <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> cans <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> cleaver. <Speech_Female> Yellows <Speech_Music_Female> Vendor. <Speech_Female> That limit I think that's lemon. <Speech_Female> Lemon <Speech_Female> I decided <Speech_Female> that I <Speech_Female> wanted to be. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> An adult who <Speech_Female> has cold <Speech_Female> to go <Speech_Female> beverages and I realize <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that's not the best <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> environmental <Speech_Female> decision, but. <Speech_Female> I think that <Speech_Female> that's a step up for me. <Speech_Female> Am I'm a TAP WATER <Speech_Female> GAL? 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"harman" Discussed on Broken Harts

Broken Harts

09:13 min | 1 year ago

"harman" Discussed on Broken Harts

"I WanNa start by asking you what I ask everyone. What are you wearing today? It's great question I'm wearing an Lou Johnson Sh- Mata it's read. It has blue and white flowers and some like burgundy stitching down the seems which I think is pretty cute and then I'm wearing a pair of khloe block heels They're my favorite. They're super comfortable there from a few years ago and I've had to get them refurbish like three or four times at leather spa and for those who don't know leather spot. It is a SPA for leather goods. In New York that can take the most beat up heels and turn them back into what they look like when he bought them and I've had to revert them to their original state three or four times. I love them that much. And for those who don't know what else Mata is. Please define. I think you could probably define it better. Perry smarter is probably a Yiddish word address. Although I feel like we're also kind of negative. Shmatko is like a sack. Well it has sack elements but it's super short so it's like a hotch Mata okay. You're wearing a really pretty. Floral Jess is really what you're wearing. Wild Smarter Smarter. You are going to share a very personal story about what you were when you lost your friend. And how long ago was this? This was in January. My best friend from growing up not so much someone. I was day to day in contact with but someone who just had so much to do with who I was as a person who I am as a person She died at the age of thirty four. I don't WANNA to. I don't want to explain the nature of the death but let's just say it was in her sleep and it It wasn't really from natural causes And she'd struggled a lot with a variety of substance issues. Explain to me what you were in the way that you paid your respect to her so she died in January. I believe it was on the fifth and on December Eleventh I welcome to my second child and I had to have a C. Section I had a C. Section with my first baby and then it sort of whole story but so I guess it's less than a month after it had the baby I found out my friend had died rather suddenly and I had to in a matter of days. Get DOWN TO DC. Where I'm from and pay my respects to her at the synagogue where we went to Hebrew school for five or six years together. We were always together Our parents lived kind of blocks away. We went to the same school. We looked alike. We talked like we did everything together. But I had to figure out what to wear To this funeral and I was larger than my clothing and I didn't want to wear maternity clothes. It was the middle of winter I had to figure out what to wear. That would make sense. Not only for the funeral component. But then there was Shiva and bar thing in between and on top of it all. I was seeing people from home people. I grew up with an ex-boyfriend old friends. Old Crushes all teachers parents of old friends. I wanted to look a certain way. I wanted to look professional and respectful and I wanted to look pretty which I hadn't felt in quite some time so picking out with to wear was challenging and I also didn't want to go buy anything because it wouldn't fit in you know optimistically. It wouldn't fit in a matter of weeks or months so I just try to figure out what to wear from what I had and I also had to be mindful of the scar in my abdomen which was super tender. Still being that I think are still taking painkillers to be honest I also was pumping so I had to wear something that was pump accessible so it was a quite an equation to figure out what to wear to this in so many different elements and so many things. So I wore a pair of PORENTA schooler Trousers that I had gotten Annetta portait years ago and that have been for me a pair of pants that always look good. Somehow they fit. I mean it wasn't like a great fit but I was able to zip them and they're like a nice wolves so they weren't super itchy over the scar and I wore a cropped Victoria Beckham sweater that I've had to again get redone because they wear often. It's navy and it has a little bit of a peplum shape it's cropped and it has ivory around the bottom and ivory around this leaves. I felt good in it. I thought it sort of fake disalow at I didn't really have at the time and then I wore A pair of Aldo booties That are patent that are super super comfortable And they're actually my second pair of those. Booties I've worn them all winter long and unite discussed earlier. That after you have a baby or at least I experienced that my feet changed. They hurt can wear heels so these Aldo shoes comfortable so all in all I figured it out. I felt like I looked nice and respectful but also kind of cute. It was. Yeah it was a hard thing to figure out. Have you ever worn that outfit again? And if so has the meaning of the change for you in any way I haven't worn the sweater again And I probably never will. If I'm being honest I just am now turned off by it and that happens to me. Sometimes there's a lot of emotional significance. I think in the clothes that we wear and when we wear them you know loss and what I wore I. I'll probably give the sweater away. The pants however. I wore a week later on national television when I went on the Dr Oz show I wear the same pants These pants have been with me for five years. They don't mean anything other than a nice pair of pants so I wear those again. But the sweater yeah. I think I'm done with it. The day itself was really hard. So the idea of feeling like you look nice to me isn't necessarily a vanity driven thing. It's more it's a protective layer I didn't want to think about what I was wearing. I didn't want to be insecure. I wanted to feel the feelings. I was feeling which were really confusing. I wanted the last thing that I thought about to be what I was wearing. And I think we all WanNa feel like that we wanna feel comfortable and like were present and the things we have in our body can be a hindrance To that so once I got the outfit figured out. I didn't give it. Actually that much thought anymore. I was comfortable enough. I was warm enough And was appropriately dressed which is obviously the thing of utmost importance but the day itself. I mean it sucked and it continues to suck my friend who I loved. Who is the reason I even knew what style was? She was the ultimate cool girl. Growing up. She taught me everything about Delia. And Steve Madden and I guess part of me wanted her. I don't know I can't even. I don't even know how to talk about it to be honest but she was there I feel her. I hope she thought I looked cute. She always did so. Yeah I understand the sentiment of wanting to look and feel your best even during a trying time and it not being related to then D. Because I kind of feel like even the most miserable circumstance I think a lot of us can be preoccupied with knowing that we don't look right or feel great and instead of giving the event or the instance or wherever you are the respect it deserves. You're stuck thinking about yourself and you're like I I don't feel good in the sweater. It's too tight. I feel like my about looks too big or I'm not and I. I really think that respecting the way you look yourself in turn can make you respect the situation more. I also think as you get older. You RECOGNIZE THAT DRESS. Code Aren't just a buzzkill It's about etiquette and what's appropriate and I think I've definitely shown up at black-tie affairs wearing something. That's not appropriate and I've gone to funerals and maybe not thought about what I was wearing enough and I. I really wanted to be respectful and what I was wearing and it was a hard thing to pull off in a matter of a few days when nothing fit so you know all of this stuff is really interesting because I wish that a funeral uniform was just a part of our culture like that would be much easier. Because I don't know that having to think about these things should be something we spend our time doing but it is and people show up and they look one way or another and you look at them and you see and you make judgments and so it all is interrelated in a really interesting kind of complicated.

Mata Lou Johnson Aldo New York Victoria Beckham painkillers Jess Perry Steve Madden Shiva Delia
Kobe Bryant: Details of fatal helicopter crash revealed by investigators

First Morning News

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Kobe Bryant: Details of fatal helicopter crash revealed by investigators

"National transportation safety board says Kobe Bryant's helicopter drops rapidly for about a minute before it crashed and burst into flames investigators still looking for reasons why the chopper went down here's the latest on the investigation L. correspondent Alex still NTSB investigators are now done on site the twisted burned wreckage of the helicopter is been moved to a secure on site location but before moving it some potentially important pieces of evidence were found since the NTSB is Jennifer Harman day we were able to recover and I pad and a cell phone we do not know if that's the pilots I padded now the LA county coroner has officially identified four of the nine victims including Kobe

Kobe Bryant Ntsb La County
Update on Kobe Bryant Helicopter Crash

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Update on Kobe Bryant Helicopter Crash

"Soon new information on that helicopter crash that killed nine including NBA legend Kobe Bryant NTSB investigators are now done on site the twisted burned wreckage of the helicopter is been moved to a secure or offsite location but before moving it some potentially important pieces of evidence were found since the NTSB is Jennifer Harman date we were able to recover and I've had and a cell phone we do not know if that's the pilots I pad and now the LA county coroner has officially identified four of the nine victims including Kobe Bryant Alex stone

Ntsb NBA Kobe Bryant La County
Kobe Bryant's helicopter tried to climb to avoid clouds before crash, investigators say

Joel Riley

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Kobe Bryant's helicopter tried to climb to avoid clouds before crash, investigators say

"I guess the the pilot of the helicopter that was Kobe Bryant his thirteen year old daughter and the seven other people to crash Sunday morning radio the air traffic controllers in his last message that he was climbing to avoid a cloudless that according to national transportation safety board Jennifer Harman the news conference yesterday how many said the radar indicated the helicopter reached a height of about twenty three hundred feet before before plunging more than a thousand feet into the hillside in Calabasas leading theory has been that the pilot got disoriented in the heavy fog did get special clearance to find those conditions just minutes before they lifted off at home and he said and T. S. B. investigators they're gonna look at all possible factors crews continue to recover remains from the victims from that site yesterday

Kobe Bryant Jennifer Harman Calabasas T. S. B.
"harman" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"harman" Discussed on WRVA

"Jennifer Harman date will look at the airframe instruments wreckage C. configuration and flight controls and now the NTSB is asking for help from the public wanting pictures of the weather here on Sunday morning they could give investigators and idea of conditions a chopper was flying in Alex stone ABC news Calabasas California trying to getting as many Americans as possible out of China's coronavirus quarantines only U. S. charter the jetliner bring more than two hundred back to the states in a rise in the Los Angeles area early Wednesday they'll be quarantined at least three days American Doug parens refused to leave his Chinese girlfriend in Wuhan he's now stuck there things are looking really bad and they're they're they still look bad and especially is really actually does worry me jittery investors drove the Dow four hundred fifty points lower on Monday Asian shares slid in Tuesday trading you're listening to ABC news tonight's forecast mainly clear skies sees the way cool out their lows in the lower thirty sunshine for your Tuesday high temperatures upper forties to near fifty forties again with sunshine for Wednesday from NBC twelve this is meteorologist Tim Duncan for news radio I'm forty WRVA in our ninety six point one I found news radio W. R. V. A. where you're always just minutes away latest news and opinion geico presents left brain verses right brain after much deliberation I've decided we should switch to geico Hey sounds good to me we could save hundreds of dollars on our car insurance which now I'm just lose guide here we can reinvest.

NTSB California China Doug parens Wuhan ABC NBC Tim Duncan W. R. V. A. geico Jennifer Harman Calabasas Los Angeles
"harman" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

11:16 min | 1 year ago

"harman" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"Need specialized help a new roll third party who can look at our situations at our lives fresh eyes and I'm telling you that a wonderful affordable way to do that is with better help counseling better help can connect you to a licensed therapist or counselor online so you can literally get help win ever her and wherever you need it the better help counselor specialize in a huge variety of needs some of those areas you may not even have available to you locally but here they're available to you anywhere thank you to the Internet so better help has also guys financial aid available to those who qualify which is great because cost shouldn't prevent someone from getting the help they need better help has an amazing offer for my listeners they are giving you ten percent off your first month with the code for the love here's what you do go to better help dot com slash for the love and use the code four I love to get the help you need that you want and you deserve right now kate back to our show our wrapping it up here are.

Turkish and Kurdish Forces Said to Clash in Syria

Here & Now

04:08 min | 1 year ago

Turkish and Kurdish Forces Said to Clash in Syria

"President trump lifted sanctions on Turkey this week saying Turkey had assured him it would halt fighting against the Kurds in Syria but there are reports today of clashes between Turkish and Kurdish forces there the fighting started after president trump abruptly pulled American forces out of the border area earlier this months saying it was time to bring US troops home joining us in the studio to talk about this and other stories in the news is former Democratic Congresswoman Jane Harman she's in Town for a Harvard law school over union she is president and CEO of the Wilson Center. Great to see you in person welcome thank you Jeremy I wasn't sure you existed I'm a real person I'm not just a disembodied voice let me ask you about Syria Defense Secretary Mark Esper- said today that the US is going to keep a reduced military presence on the ground in Syria to stop Isis from taking over oil fields there there are reports the White House is considering keeping five hundred troops in northeast Syria which would be a reversal does the US have a strategy there oh we seem to have a process free foreign and security policy which is very dangerous we do have parts of government including AH the National Security Council in the White House led by a guy just met this week Robert O'Brien who seems quite capable and we do have a state armament and we do have a Defense Department and and all of the principals and deputy should have been considering carefully what the day after and the day after that would look like he we took some of our troops out of Syria. I don't believe that happened I think most people were blindsided by the decision and now we're paying the price I mean what's happening here is that plan that was under way to create a security zone between Turkey and Syria which would take care of Turkey's worries about the Kurds in eating Turkey was just about to be put in place and instead of that we took the US troops out of that part of Syria and destabilized all of Syria the long term consequences for the United States. Well we'll find out but what are your concern my concern is that we have destroyed our credibility we also have created axiom filled already by to some extent the Turks plus the Russians and the the Assad government which has used chemical weapons on its people has free rein and oh by the way there's a rumor that chemical weapons have been used during this exercise to to remove the Kurds it's not clear by whom I underpinned by Turkey or Turkish ally now who could that be sounds like assigned to me but I it's being investigated by the UN so I don't know if that's that is just heinous and consequence we might have anticipated if we'd had a reasonable process in place what about Isis how concerned are you that this will now regroup and be a threat to the US or Europe or the West in general very concerned I mean there were prisons in that swath of land that Turkey has been attacking they were prisons there of Isis fighters these prisons were horrendous it is not clear yet got who has escaped but these isis fighters in that area probably came from Europe and if they did what will they want to do if they're free they're going to want to go the the poorest Turkish border back into Europe and stage attacks in Europe and you know possibly through Europe to the US so I think this is set potentially set us back quite a lot do you think that Turkey should be booted out of NATO as a result of what just happened that's a decision for NATO to make I mean Erkki also did another no no recently which is to buy a massive air defense system called the S. four hundred from Russia NATO exists it has a collective defense organization to keep the West free it doesn't exist as an attack you know outfit against Russia but Russia is Given its actions in Ukraine and Crimea a threat to NATO and so now if you have a NATO member purchasing it's major defense system from Russia that's let's say awkward

Syria Turkey Nato United States Europe Congresswoman Jane Harman Donald Trump President Trump Russia Defense Department Isis President And Ceo National Security Council White House Robert O'brien Secretary Mark Esper Jeremy Wilson Center
"harman" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"harman" Discussed on Amanpour

"But in seventeen fifty nine he was the Professor Motor Auto Philosophy at Glasgow University University University and he wrote the theater moral sentiments and in that book he said so what I think is actually still highly relevant to society as a whole he wrote about the community interest he wrote that the business person should not be separate and detached but involved in the community he wrote that the business person should be willing to sacrifice their little interest and he called it. They're little interest in in the interests of the community as a whole and that is sort of Scotland we are. I think very much the fabric of the country is that people care about Community Care About Society Society and so when I read things like the Business Roundtable statement which side I have those words in my head because while for some they'll think the business of businesses business and I respect that was view which was very prevalent as I was growing up. I don't hold that view. I Hold Adam Smith's view that the interests of the community he don't be separate and detached be involved thinking about the community recognize the common interest thought Smith McKenzie and the business roundtable a part out of this movement to say business is not just about return on shareholder value but it's about being part of the larger community. Do you see that as being being the wave of the future I do because I also think it is big business. I mean the phase of doing it by doing well. I think if you look at this issue of short termism I think there's plenty of evidence that says those who take a long-term view ultimately do better and I think a long term view inevitably Dona path that says crude metrics just look at a few economic measures aren't going to tell you whether the health of Your Business Business is actually going to endure and if the community is not doing well in society is not benefiting ultimately. You're not going to benefit either so that's why I believe a nine nine absolutely feel quite strongly and passionately about this notion that business dose of a part to play but we should never think we're politicians. That's where you've got understand and when I don't answer a question because I say that's for the politicians it's because I have a healthy regard for the reality that my vantage point is ultimately one starts from business angle now finally to get back to brexit suppose mackenzie gets called in by a rump group of parliament or something. Stop says you know this is a real mess. Show me the way out. What would you do to figure out how the United Kingdom could deal with the brexit tissue well. I'd remind myself and undermined the politicians when you look at the United Kingdom one of its great challenges productivity it has lied Europe in terms of the productivity for the last decade and if you look at the United Kingdom I'd say let's remind ourselves. What are the fundamental issues. Whether you believe in Brexit you don't believe in Brexit that this this country needs to solve and you'd start productivity and you look at the various elements that Britain needs to address in order to ensure that it is the successful thriving economy that we all wants B whichever sight of that at your own Kevin later thank you so much running. Uh appreciate I meet and brexit still such an intractable label political challenge before we go tune in tomorrow for my exclusive interview which is a rare sit down with boobs. CEO Dara for socialite. It's a company that's had its share of trouble but two years into the job hostal. Shy tells me that he's facing it head on. He's a little preview we have come from a phase in our development where it was all about growth at all costs and Uber did did challenge the authorities because it strongly felt at the time that the authorities were wrong. They were trying to keep the systems as they were not. Allow innovation to to prosper not allow truly new ideas to grow that started. I think from a good place but I think it went too far. and the kind of Challenger became powerful and with power came. You know the belief that you're always right with power. maybe came too much prowess and we went from. I think constructive challenger to a destructive challenger at times and that required a change range you know a a lesson a painful lesson. There's a change in leadership changing leadership of the board. I came on board and I'm still well in the process Copa. It sounds a little like a I think should sound a lot like Medico Listen I. I don't want to beat around around the Bush. We went too far. The full interview tomorrow so tune in them but that's it for now. Remember you can listen to our podcast. Yes online online at Amazon. Dot Com and follow me on instagram and twitter. Thanks for watching and goodbye from New York..

Community Care About Society S Professor Motor Auto Philosoph mackenzie Dara Adam Smith Scotland United Kingdom Glasgow University University Brexit Smith McKenzie instagram Europe Amazon New York CEO Medico twitter Britain Kevin
Boris Johnson and Trump: Whose day was worse?

Amanpour

09:07 min | 1 year ago

Boris Johnson and Trump: Whose day was worse?

"Welcome to the program everyone. I'm Christiane Amanpour in New York where world leaders speaking at the United Nations General Assembly President Donald Trump's speech was heavily focused focused on his domestic reelection agenda lashing out at what he called a permanent political class he railed against China and Iran too and later though he seem to relax at a meeting with his closest European soulmate the British Prime Minister Boris Johnson but both face major crises at home controversies as the call into question their commitment to the rule of law and democracy itself here in the United States the latest scandal to engulf the president his phone call to the Ukrainian leader and request to investigate his political opponent the former vice president Joe Biden and he is now facing renewed calls for impeachment here's what the president had had to say as he arrived at the UN. It's a witch hunt. I'm leading in the polls. They have no idea how they stopped me the only way they can try through impeachment humint. This has never happened to President before. There's never been a thing like this before. It's nonsense and when you see the call when you see the readout of the call which I assume whom you'll see at some point you'll understand. That call was perfect. It couldn't have been nicer and even the Ukrainian government put out a statement. That was perfect call. There was no pressure. Put on them whatsoever. So of course we are waiting for a transcript that call but as for Boris Johnson before he took to the podium the Supreme Court at home home issued a momentous decision that is controversial five weeks suspension of parliament was in fact unlawful and it's another in a string of severe blows that he suffered since becoming prime minister and vowing to push brexit through do or died. Yes obviously this is a voted that oh we will respect and we respect the judicial process so I have to say I strongly disagree with what the justices found I didn't think that right but we will go ahead and Paul comeback and parliament is coming back tomorrow so democracy. Chrissy and rule of law are in focus on both sides of the pond today with me now to discuss share our oh he's the former French ambassador to the United States and also to the United Nations and Jane Harman. She's president and CEO the Wilson Center and she also served nine terms as a member of Congress. Well let us get to the heart of the matter I started by saying both these issues that we've highlighted do in fact speak directly to the commitment of our leaders to the rule of Lauren democracy. Let me ask you first because the president of the United States is in the crosshairs right now well they both fit it was interesting to hear Boris Johnson and just say that he will respect the decision. I think the alternative is to go to jail in Britain. It's very clear what the role of that court is. and I think that means that he may lose his majority because what will happen unless he can pull a no brexit deal together which he doesn't seem to be able to do you may have to extend the deadline is that Farrage Farraj brexit tears will bail from the Conservative Party and I I don't know where the future leadership of what about the president of the United States. I mean here now. There's increased pressure on Nancy Pelosi who stood back from this idea of getting in meshed in an impeachment but this huge amount of pressure on her now right here is ah of course the rule of law should prevail here. I think it's important to see what the whistle blower wrote and I think it will either leak or be given to Congress soon and then we'll we'll have more information. I think a partisan impeachment is a very sad result of this. Should it come to that. I saw the movie in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight against Bill Clinton. what happens is the president gets stronger. This will feed his sense of grievance. You just showed a a piece where he said that hat and and it will keep us divided instead if we wait and get more information and there is a bipartisan way forward. I think that will be much healthier for the country and for the rule Jira aerobic. I WanNa ask you also about well. Let me ask you I actually about the UK Parliament and the You you K- Supreme Court that has determined that it was unlawful and unconstitutional. What Boris Johnson did I know you're looking at it also in a lens of Brexit. How what do you make of the rule of law aspect of it? I think it would be embarrassing. Ears debt for a lot of citizens especially you know the people walk close to the the populist wave that we are facing it could appear as a new attempt by the establishment to block brexit and so I do think whatever my personal feelings towards Brexit of course I would prefer the UK to remain in European Union. I think that the UK has to leave you. You you know fifty. Two percent of the of the British voted for it you know in France we add a referendum in two hundred five here about the EU Constitution Institution fifty five percent of the French said no and eventually it went through the parliament and today the populist are still saying you stole the vote of the French so I I really again. We have to respect the rule of law but we have also to understand that there is a sort of tension between what the citizens want expressed express their anger and decision of the judge really interested to hear you both you on the on the on the Donald trump situation that an impeachment might in fact strengthen him and you're Democrat so I'm saying it in that regard and actually produce a backlash and you're saying that even the Supreme Court ruling might produce a backlash. That's interesting. I mean Boston well. I think there is an alternative. I I think Nancy Pelosi suggested last week that the the procedure of the office of Legal Counsel at the Justice Department that prevents sitting President President from being indicted might be overturned by legislation and if courts consider. Let's come back to court whether Donald Trump pass committed crimes. I think that would be better than a partisan impeachment. What worries me about this is that there will be democratic. Support in the Senate a Dick Durbin has just come out in favor of impeachment and there is growing a consensus in the Democratic Caucus in the house so I think she probably has to move well. I'm a hearing actually that CNN sources are confirming that Speaker Pelosi is going to start an announce the process towards impeachment the formal the process which everyone knows is is basically the beginning of impeachment but what happened in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight was not pretty the better movies to the Democratic Ready President Bill Clinton and Republican stampede to impeach him. several counts were adopted in the house but in the Senate he was not convicted it and what happened was he got stronger and the driving force got weaker. the better movie was in the early seventies when I was a young council in the Senate the Nixon impeachment which was bipartisan bill call in then a freshman in the house later a Republican senator and then Secretary of defense had the courage to join the Democrats crats and the whole inquiry was much more low key in serious and after that the Democratic Senate leaders are the Senate leaders Republican Senate leaders came to Richard Nixon and said you will be convicted and he resigned and that was an orderly process based on whatever were were the facts at the time so I'm hoping that if it comes to this and impeachment is very sad thing to happen but if it comes to this and there certainly are a lot of allegations out there that it will be bipartisan and it we'll be done in a manner that gets the respect of not just our country but the world I mean so far. There is no indication at all that they'll be bipartisanship because the Republican Party has become the trump party in terms of all intensive for people who are leaving running against trying to run against the three of them Gerardo. I would like to play you a couple of soundbites because I want to ask you about the credibility of some of the reasons that president trump is giving for having tried to talk to the Ukrainian president. I'm I going to play the one that that he said earlier the conference talking about a congratulatory they treat message to the Ukrainian president. It's just play that conversation I had was is largely. Congratulatory was largely corruption. All of the corruption fixing play was largely the fact that we don't want our people like the vice. President Biden is done creating big corrupt already in the Ukraine

President Trump Donald Trump Boris Johnson United States President President Vice President Brexit Speaker Pelosi President And Ceo Supreme Court Senate Joe Biden Congress Prime Minister Republican Party Christiane Amanpour United Nations General Assembl Uk Parliament UN United Nations
 UK's Labour Party in turmoil as vote to oust deputy ditched

Monocle 24: Midori House

02:28 min | 1 year ago

UK's Labour Party in turmoil as vote to oust deputy ditched

"So if you thought the Conservative Party was leading the contest of devouring its own stay tuned because the Labor Party is planning on doing the exact same thing there has been heated discussion about eliminating the position of deputy party leader but what that's really all about out is about eliminating Tom Watson who is a voice of opposition within the Labour party to Jeremy Corbyn and someone someone who has also had a I think it's characterized in the papers as a rather spectacular falling out with Len mcklusky the head of the union that is the largest donor the Labor Party they want rid of that kind of high ranking opposition in the Labor Party and so they're going to essentially airbrush airbrush and I'm using that phrase with Mary intentionally for its Stalinist overtones they're going to they're going to airbrush that position -sition out of out of the books and with it. They Hope Tom Watson Mary. I think one of the one of the interesting things I mean it should be pointed out that the story is most prominent in the London Times which of course is no friend whatsoever to the Labor Party and is likely to highlight all it's difficult is that it it's difficulties are not easy for anybody to to play down plus they play into the current the the the the current split in UK politics and we're looking at a week of labor politics dumb dominating the headlines because it's Labor Party conference this week starting this weekend and I think there are two other people who who who whose names and in pictures feature in in the papers today in the Labor Party. One of them is shadow foreign secretary. Emily thornberry and another is Harriet Harman both both of them sort of would be regarded as centrist probably sympathetic to Europe more so far than Jeremy Corbyn his wing of the party so we're looking at really have seeing the split in the Labour party which is really a mirror image of the split in the Tory party being played out in all the headlines through the rest of the next few

Labor Party Labour Party Conservative Party Jeremy Corbyn Tom Watson Mary Tom Watson Len Mcklusky Emily Thornberry Secretary London Times Harriet Harman Europe UK
Protesters dangle from Houston bridge and close part of shipping channel

Rush Limbaugh

00:14 sec | 1 year ago

Protesters dangle from Houston bridge and close part of shipping channel

"Greenpeace USA protesters are causing part of the closure of the Houston ship channel the demonstrators use ropes today go from the top of the friend Harman bridge in Baytown this morning the group posting on Twitter they were shutting down the ship channel to resist president trump and the oil

Harman Bridge Baytown Twitter USA Houston President Trump
California boat fire: Crew interviewed, but no more clarity on what caused disaster

Morning Edition

01:02 min | 1 year ago

California boat fire: Crew interviewed, but no more clarity on what caused disaster

"It could take a year or even to to determine the cause of a boat fire near the Ventura county coast this week that killed more than thirty people as case here W. sterile Samson reports the national transportation safety board says the fact that the boat is submerged in more than sixty feet of water will make the job tougher the NTSB says test for alcohol given to four crew members all came out negative all five surviving crew members have also been tested for drugs and those results are pending the captain in those four crew members were the only people to make it off the conception alive the seventy five foot scuba diving boat caught fire Labor Day morning about twenty yards from Santa Cruz island trapping the passengers inside the NTSB has been interviewing the crew an NTSB official Jennifer Harman D. says investigators have also been meeting with the victims' families the biggest thing I wanted to get across was how sorry we are for their loss I can't imagine what those families are going through right now it is heartbreaking

W. Sterile Samson Ntsb Santa Cruz Island Jennifer Harman D. Ventura County Official Seventy Five Foot Twenty Yards Sixty Feet
33 bodies recovered from California boat fire

Mark Levin

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

33 bodies recovered from California boat fire

"Federal officials still working to determine what caused the fire in a dive boat off the coast of southern California Monday morning killing thirty four people teams are documenting the wreckage which is currently submerged under sixty to sixty five feet of water and it's an inverted Jennifer Harman the with the NTSB all but one of the bodies was

California Jennifer Harman Ntsb Sixty Five Feet
"harman" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"harman" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Jennifer Harman the with the NTSB all but one of the bodies was recovered the consumer protection director for the Federal Trade Commission disputing criticism that the wonder to seventy million dollar fine for Google is too small Andrew Smith says the penalty for Google over privacy concerns for children using YouTube is historic the company has also agreed to limit data collection on users who wants children's programming on its main site even if the user is an adult state police in Pennsylvania have a lead in a murder which has remained unsolved since nineteen ninety one now fifty two year old Theodore deal Donahue as been arrested on murder charges of his van twenty seven year old girlfriend Denise Sharon coal twenty eight years ago her body was found in the woods of an undeveloped coldest sack outside of Philadelphia police believe the body was moved there after the murder but prosecutors re examine the case they use new photo enhancing technology that actually connected a pair of separated socks one of which was found on the victim question at the time of the murder and again in twenty fifteen Donnie who story about when he last saw cold change prosecutors confident that the new evidence along with the change in story might lead to a conviction don his lawyer says his client is not guilty John saucier a fox news a lawyer for rapper a Sam rocky convicted in Sweden for assault after a street fight says his client won't appeal his conviction telling the Swedish news agency rocky does not have the energy to appeal a Sam rocky real name rookie mayors had pled self defense and that he tried to avoid a confrontation with two men who he said were following his entourage one pick.

Donnie Sam rocky fox Philadelphia Denise Sharon Theodore assault Sweden John saucier Jennifer Harman Donahue murder Pennsylvania YouTube Andrew Smith Google Federal Trade Commission director NTSB
"harman" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"harman" Discussed on KTOK

"We just ignore a judge's order but that's the position Democrats are taking and it is fundamentally wrong well we happen to have a Democrat and a former congresswoman Jane Harman I mean it is a fact whether it's Nancy Pelosi whether it's the new democratic mayor of Chicago there are a lot of democratic officials would not only is that these raids a wrong but if the openly advised people who fall into this category how to avoid getting picked up well first let me apply what kellyanne Conway said about the use of the term raid which is unnecessary and she also said family separations are bad so good for her I don't think it's a binary choice between enforcing the border which I'm for I'm a Democrat I'm for it and humane conditions which we don't have I mean why not plan better for this the administration's doing what I know about these eyes went on about to say this is doing quite well with the floods in Louisiana and and miss zippy good for them they can do this so you're asking me about the enforcement actions I think it's fine to do proper enforcement actions but have a process that is humane to people saying those men stand up in the smelly quarters that we just saw on the vice president pants saw and said this is rough is not acceptable Congress has provided money that money should be used before this happens which is what senior DHS a staff recommended also we should be doing more to shore up the governments of the northern triangle something vice president pants was for a couple years ago so that the push factor is reduced and we should be helping Mexico not just a forcing Mexico helping Mexico police at the southern border the flow of immigrants there are lots of things we could do better and let's do them and enforce the law and have a secure border the report the people that a judge has ordered to leave the country don't work against ice and make their job and put their lives in danger that's what Democrats are doing some Democrats are doing it this Democrats thinks that ice has a responsibility to carry out the law but it should be done humanely let's talk about another issue and that is the senses which got a lot of attention the president seemed to flip on the senses he had been pushing very hard to put a question on the census questionnaire are you or.

congresswoman Jane Harman Nancy Pelosi Chicago kellyanne Conway Louisiana Congress Mexico president vice president DHS
Follow live: Final round underway; Tiger on course

CBS Sports Radio

05:03 min | 1 year ago

Follow live: Final round underway; Tiger on course

"Of fact, here to give us a read on the torn amend his point. And specifically going deciding round is the best golf analyst, I know you've been watching the golf channel in the mornings to get ready for the day, even catching remote thing down there. And he joins us now on the golf channel and his syndicated show life. Matt Adams AMA. I'm doing well. How you doing? Good. Appreciate you coming on before we get into the specifics year round number four, I need your take on how the US G A prepped plan prepared Pebble Beach this week today. Get it right to get it wrong deduction train hedge. Their bet what your read on what the course, has been put I three days at US open my readers. They got it right. Which was the first option that you gave me, but it also came from hedging bats because hard is heavily beaches Pebble Beach is only so much that you can do to eight c side. Of course, it's hard to screw it up the way you can, of course, say inland. So the US did a good job of not over engineering, not overdoing the golf course. But the easiest course it set out for US open his. Probably Pebble Beach. So it's kind of a combination of things they did do graduated raw that, we're a couple of fairways players were complaining early in the week, and they and they graduated and a little bit more. So they're being reactive to being sensitive back that they've had stumbles over the past few years. This year twenty nineteen everybody seems to be saying, I happen to agree that set up this US open a okay. Not everybody says that because yours truly disgrace, and I'll give degree. I tell you wouldn't number US open is this. Hundred nineteen hundred nineteen. All right. Mr. golf expert, how many times in the hundred nineteen years of the US, open have, we had a player shoot double digits under par. Well, the last has happened multiple times we've had multiple rows, and it ended in sixteen par including one Tiger Woods, including Bros, CAPCO. So it it's happening what you're referring to not to take away from your answer. But what you're referring to the fact that the US open as compared to the other three major championships. If you took the other three, right? EGA the masters, the open, vastly different setups, vastly different golf courses over the last fifteen years. Those three majors believe they're not gonna blow you way with this stat. They all come in between ten and eleven hundred par for all the variances. They all come in between. Let's stroke apart over the course of fifteen years. The US open is the one glaring difference coming in just over three hundred par now for the national championship. United states. I have no problem whatsoever. If it is the most difficult stern test of Gaul you can possibly have where the problem lies is when a golf courses over engineer, you are no longer identifying the best all around the golf course you're identifying the golf and that's not in most stricken by approval twist of fake where they would take collars rough like they did it. Okay. Fine. And put him in places that the architect never designed to be because they're trying to protect the score against standard of eve. Even par which went out of the best players in the world years ago. So that, that's where I'm probably from his sane right now at the end of this week, you're going to know who is best player was this week in prior US open when it was over engineered you never really one hundred percent. Sure. Okay. I will again, go back to the number that I quoted only nine times in the hundred nineteen year history of those nine seven came two years ago in two thousand seventeen where seven guys went under par kept go on at sixteen. Decky shot twelve Brian Harman shot twelve Pleat was eleven chop was ten Haas was ten fallow with ten only two other times, Rory mcilroy at congressional shot, minus sixteen tiger at Pebble Beach, minus twelve now nineteen years ago that, that did the yet, one year you had seven out of nine and in the other hundred eighteen times you had two guys go under ten. I think they're getting pre today. I think you're gonna see three guys who double digits under par by the end of the day, that tells me on sorry the court too easy. No, no, no. What it's telling you is that for last twenty years, there set up. Have been wrong. The US will admit this at shit o'clock. Last year we let it go too

United States Pebble Beach Golf Matt Adams Analyst Bros Tiger Woods Rory Mcilroy Engineer Haas Decky Brian Harman Pleat Fifteen Years Hundred Nineteen Years Hundred Nineteen Year One Hundred Percent Nineteen Years Twenty Years Three Days
"harman" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"harman" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Sarah Harman says there is appetite for Jane. There are reports of people who own guns voluntarily giving them up. Bring them to police stations voluntarily prime minister just send to Addison announcing the cabinet is made in principle decisions about changes to gun laws. They'll be announced soon the midwest dealing with historical flooding in Omaha homeowner. Russ says he suffered not only physical laws. The family heirlooms and stuff like that. They're priceless and can't be replaced. Three people have died. Hundreds forced to flee their homes as the floodwaters destroy the area. The national weather service says the Missouri and Mississippi River basins have risen to a stork levels. The missouri. River is swelling out of its banks due to heavy rain and melting snow. A Martin county judge is unsealed surveillance, videos and pictures taken inside and out of spas shut down for prostitution and human trafficking. Surveillance video allegedly shows customers on camera engaging a sexual acts which might include New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft, who's charged with two counts of soliciting prostitution at Jupiter day spa. However, an attorney representing more than a dozen of the accused men is fighting to keep the video and pictures from the spa crackdown from going public. In addition, the spokesman for the Martin county sheriff's office says the sheriff does not intend to release the videos to the public. Karen curtis. Newstalk eight fifty W F T L eight fifty W F T L news time is four zero two..

Martin county prostitution missouri Sarah Harman Russ Mississippi River New England Patriots prime minister Karen curtis Omaha Newstalk Jane Robert Kraft Addison attorney eight fifty W
Roundup trial: High-stakes trial over cancer claim begins

Forum

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

Roundup trial: High-stakes trial over cancer claim begins

"A federal trial involving the popular weed killer roundup is set to begin today in San Francisco, kqei acuity is Raquel Maria. Dylan reports more than nine thousand people have sued. Bayer claiming roundup causes non-hodgkin's lymphoma, Edwin Harman's case was picked as a test trial in federal court for years. The sonoma's residents braid round up around his property to control poison oak. He was diagnosed with cancer in two thousand fifteen the EPA says, the primary chemical and roundup glyphosate is not carcinogenic to humans, but researchers with the World Health Organization say it probably is. Bayer says the herbicides has been an essential tool for farmers for the past forty years. It bought Monsanto for sixty three billion dollars last year, but Bayer's stock price plunged after a San Francisco state court awarded. Two hundred eighty nine million dollars to a school groundskeeper from Venetia in August damages were later reduced to seventy

Bayer San Francisco Edwin Harman Raquel Maria Monsanto Dylan Venetia Non-Hodgkin Sonoma World Health Organization EPA Glyphosate Two Hundred Eighty Nine Millio Sixty Three Billion Dollars Forty Years
"harman" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"harman" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Watcher at Harman and pull our savvy new now three times they had a different different weeks. I watch buses coming from the over education knows loaded with south of the border people. And I saw pink cars going in with to what I would call American type of people. No response to some had chain on some had thirty on some at eight on. But I talked to one of the bus drivers. 'cause I was right there at the police station, and he gave me the lowdown. They had six buses run people from the casinos over to this area at Polaris in Harmon avenue. And that's why you guys loss because every person that I thought would have voted for you guys, whereas outnumbered at least eight to one Ron hang on the line. Don't hang up. Let's go to Danny. Let's look, Danny responded. There's there's your your one hundred percent, right. And that happens in, but it's well known and it's not illegal the the casino owners. They. I don't know why you have a way to change it to casino owners put the they they they rent the buses, particularly MGM, very democrat or owners, they they put the the workers on were still Barato bustling, not even just that. But they have their own they provided slate cards of who they should vote for and so forth. And it is it's the union the union workers are very tough to beat. But typically when they turn out Ron thank you so much for the call..

Ron Harman Danny MGM one hundred percent
"harman" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"harman" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"Yeah. Firemen John cheeses Harman's on cheeses cheeses. To my what? We like to pivot off. Boycotting divesting Israel into the cheese surplus right that the nation is facing the unused cheese. We have in this country has reached one point four billion dollars worth of cheese. That is just kicking it waiting for people to consume it g and the like if you did the math they're saying like, it could basically cover the entire capitol building if it as like wallpaper like you could just entirely drape the capitol building in DC, which is that's almost she's we're talking. We're talking about blocks of cheese. Are we talking about craft single? However, you want to cut it down. I mean, just based off the weight depending on how you slice it up cut it up. It's included in the what's mostly processed cheeses. And a lot of the thing is that the the reason the surpluses highs because the dairy industry is just like been in hyper drive, despite them ignoring like, everyone's like, we don't really fuck with milk that much anymore. Right. And a lot of like the fake ass cheese. You make with the milk byproducts people don't like processed cheese anymore, either people like fancy millennials and shit. And worldly people are like I prefer, you know, like. Chaco or some other like all cheeses like. Yeah. Like real cheese made from like, you know, like just cheese, not like our Kraft singles and stuff like that. Yeah. The last time we had a huge cheese surplus in the early eighties following the invention of skim milk. When the dairy industry was just like what the fuck do. We do with all this extra fat. Let's turn it into cheese. They stored it in a cave in Missouri. I think and just waited for a strategy to come along where they could like offload that. And they ended up off loading it into our veins via fast food because like they basically started cutting deals with massive like corporations to just add tons and tons of cheetah will the trade war is aren't helping either right because like exports to China down like sixty three percent Br..

John cheeses Harman Kraft Israel Missouri China milk four billion dollars sixty three percent
"harman" Discussed on KTKR 760AM

KTKR 760AM

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"harman" Discussed on KTKR 760AM

"In Detroit on vacation Harman's back in L A, we've talked about muskrat dinners being quote popular, you know, in in the area surrounding Detroit. It's kind of like this, you know, living in Detroit. You know, we're living in Texas or living in Tennessee or living in Colorado. You know, when you get sushi, you gotta realize boy it's coming from a long way away. And it's gotta get on a plane and get there. The freshness of it. You're the same thing. You know, I I can't I don't know if you can transport muskrats for you know, from Detroit all the way back to Los. And I don't know that I could do that. I packed my suitcase full of muskrats and bring them all the way back to LA. Can we start importing from Venezuela? Some copy Barra. We could feed a lot of people. If we go that route. I I don't think that's the same thing. I I can't. No, I'm saying fully, you you say it's a copy bar. We might be able to cut our unit costs. This is not hamburger, rather, it's horse meat. But don't tell anybody because it's a lot cheaper. But we should be able to set up some traps and start to breed muskrat. You. You need setup subtract. Why do you set up a muskrat trap? Go. What do you do? I don't know figure it out. If I if I thought I could make money at it. I think we'd figure this out and start ourselves a muskrat operation. Here's a muskrat trap. It's you west dressed in all black with with fatigues. And I and I'm and shoe polish all over your head with a sack in the middle of the forest. That's that's your that's a winning formula. And I'm able to walk away with enough muskrat defeat. My ken. We're all good. I I'm doing how to trap muskrats. Okay. Here. We go. Place a foothold trap two or three inches deep where the muskrats slide enters the water. There you go. Okay. All right. So then you set a trap in line with the slide. So that means when the muskrat slide into the water, that's where your trap is. Okay. Still the question is what what's a plate cost? So what are we talking to mashed potatoes? And vegetable on the side a little vegetable I dunno leave. Does.

Detroit muskrat Harman Venezuela Texas LA Colorado Los Tennessee three inches
"harman" Discussed on Double Toasted

Double Toasted

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"harman" Discussed on Double Toasted

"Their ass. So see baby Chris Harman is not so bad after all. They make you feel better about him. You know, what maybe we should show him. Maybe show him Bambi. Yes. I think we should. You know, but the on the on the bright side on the positive side. Is it this treatment actually does work? Then maybe we can cure racism by making Nazis watch, twelve years a slave. Over and over again every year. Twelve years later sedan. That's the best comedy scene. Again. Wow. This is horrible. My way. Well, I'm not racist anymore. I see the air my wages. I did not relate to anybody film at all. I don't wanna kill a black motherfucker. I mean, no, I'm I'm very sympathetic player. The negro. The flight of the new. There's another Disney movie, man. Yeah. That was. The latest children's animated film from Disney fight of the new grow coming soon. Oh, that's under the vote. Double feature would sound..

Chris Harman Disney Bambi Twelve years twelve years
AT&T and HARMAN Launch Advanced Connected Car Device

Your Weekly Tech Update

02:57 min | 2 years ago

AT&T and HARMAN Launch Advanced Connected Car Device

"This is pretty cool. You. Can now turn your car into a whole new ride with Harman's spark and get emergency crash assistance diagnostics location based services, four G L T wifi hotspot, and a whole lot more all with the little tiny Don goal that you plug into your car starting a couple of weeks ago, you can now turn just about any car into a state of the art connected car, and you don't need to upgrade to a new vehicle to hit the road. With the latest technology Harmon spark one is exclusively offered by e t for seventy nine nine thousand nine rate plans start at just five dollars per month for plans without wifi plans, including wifi or offered as both standalone. And as an addition to eligible unlimited and mobile share plans and for a limited time by a Samsung galaxy S nine s nine plus or no nine smartphone. And you get a spark for discount twenty nine nine thousand nine. It's pretty simple to use. Who you just download an out from the app store? Google play plugged the spark in to the obedience to port beneath your steering wheel. And you're ready to go. Many new cars today, come with cloud. Connectivity. Diagnostic security and infotainment. But most vehicles on the road lap connectivity. That's why AT and T in Harbin teamed up on this advanced platform that works with most nineteen Ninety-six models and newer you. Get the standard features plus in out payments on demand roadside assistance, driving tips and a whole lot more. You will essentially feel like you're driving a new car. New features get added automatically as well. With Harman's sparked just about eighty car can be transformed into an L T E connected car. You get the most advanced connected services available on most new cars, plus some that you just can't get. Elsewhere consumers today are looking for simple devices that make their lives efficient. In seamless Harbin. Spark allows them to easily into forcibly transform older vehicles in to smart cars of the future with connected applications. One of the coolest features in my opinion is watch it. It lets you know, if your car's been bumped towed or moved when you're not around it helps thirties located as well. If it's stolen roadside assistance manager is another cool one you can drop a pin at your location and request help twenty four seven pay through the spark up, and you'll be back on the road in no time that also has the wifi hotspot and many other features that

Harman Harbin Samsung Google AT DON Five Dollars Four G
"harman" Discussed on TechtalkRadio

TechtalkRadio

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"harman" Discussed on TechtalkRadio

"The world of home assistance yes i it's like i think for the consumer they're probably torn because they've got well you've got a couple of big choices sure i've got amazon alexa alexa or amazon echo there yeah yeah game is on echo and then you've got you've got the google assistant and then of course there's other little wonders the new one that's coming out with microsoft cortana it's on the i want us as a harman kardon speaker i yeah cortana on it now and it's funny because and then there's siri yeah that's going to be doing some things i found the siri that is on the iphone the new one that i got the eight s plus is great it works just as i intended however one of the things that has been added and for those that don't know you have say you put this amazon echo on your desktop or you put this you know this google assistant and you can ask it a question and it would respond to you and then if you wanna ask it another question you have to ask it again in the same way to turn it on google yeah well you don't have to do that anymore with google assistant as of thursday they kind of change things around and now the google assistant no longer needs you to say hey an okay to get it to activate every time so you can have what's called more of a they don't call it free flowing it's more of a continued conversation so i put the air quotes he's just yeah yeah but you know that that comes in handy because if you don't get the correct answer then.

amazon google microsoft harman kardon
"harman" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"harman" Discussed on WRVA

"The fourth of july my father would wake up every day say we're going down to the parking lot at the local harman's it was a store the veterans are down there cooking breakfast we're gonna go buy breakfast from the veterans so we'd go and we'd spend like all this money on the veterans the veterans pancake breakfasts we need pancakes and weed eat bacon and eggs and drinking orange juice and it was the coolest thing ever because we were giving all kinds of money to the veterans and we'd like eat all pancakes we could because we were supporting the veterans and what they were doing love each other we need not to hate each other anymore we're we've become such a buggered up country that we want to be mean to each other for some reason there's no reason in it people what each other open the door for the guy that's coming in behind you say good morning to somebody smile don't don't don't go out into the world tomorrow somebody that's all i can say speaker to somebody smile tune and say hey shake their hands give him a hug give a big old bear hug yeah i don't know i just i don't know i think people today may think you know because of the cynicism in the country that something like a pancake breakfast by the veterans with something a little silly my father my father wanted to have as good a flag ceremonies we'd go my gosh we'd go to the park sometimes the flag ceremonies on july fourth parker they'd fire the cannons and fire them like ten o'clock in the morning boom and the whole whole ground shook and the flag was going up and the trumpeters were blowing their trumpets and and the military was standing there and and it was just and you get you get a nice a nice little not in your throat when you seeing the military color guard coming in and it was amazing both my parents are buried in the veteran's cemetery asheville north carolina they're side by side and you know what their side by side because they're good people entering the veteran's cemetery my dad was twenty two years naval aviation we in our family believed in government we believed in military away believed in the flag in the love we've got to get it back we don't have more it's not there i don't know why it should be still on because we still hang onto attitudes well but we studied the hang on that child childlike american i don't know i guess i was raised differently i kinda i kinda regret the fact that don't have that anymore is kind of like you know when you get older and you you say to yourself i don't play toys anymore so christmas doesn't mean anything to be around kids in order to enjoy the the magic of christmas fourth of july i enjoy christmas i enjoy in the church i enjoyed the flag i'm gonna tell you something when i was growing up when we went to school the first thing we did we said the pledge of allegiance we had a prayer and then we went on the class you can't do that anymore no i never had prayer in class well we we we released release time where we could go and regan worship if we wanted to we were we have an hour our time to go worship where i went to school right right hey claude i love you and happy fourth of.

harman twenty two years
"harman" Discussed on Windows Weekly

Windows Weekly

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"harman" Discussed on Windows Weekly

"Voice doesn't go away i this is any it's it's like a touch on a laptop you know it doesn't matter you use it it's a it's another way of doing it and for some people it's very natural so it doesn't there's no way it goes away i i don't think that but the problem is just that microsoft's kind of delivery vehicle for this technology is not very good you know google has some size of the markets because eighty five percent of phones or android phones it's the right on there you know that's i'm sure part of the reason samsung is doing bixby's just to take that away from gogol as much as they can syria same thing with the iphone microsoft has this kind of small market i mean it's i know it's a hundreds of millions of computers i it's it shouldn't seem small but compared to these other things it's how mullen edged do either of you use any voices system i screaming out into the room type stuff all only with the harman kardon that's the only speaker that's the only time i ever did all we we actually we have three gogol homes in our house and we use them primarily for music music right pay you know i want to listen to whatever it is and my wife does actually cooking whatever you know that's the primary function right now i will also use it to not voice based but if i wanna play like a podcast right you can an android chrome cast too the device from the system and then play audible and plays out over the you know whatever the speaker might be like i do that for me there's only one place it's just my car it's the only time that's incredibly useful about right right.

microsoft google bixby gogol harman kardon samsung syria mullen eighty five percent
"harman" Discussed on Windows Weekly

Windows Weekly

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"harman" Discussed on Windows Weekly

"So they're hardware the hardware you think microsoft start making i o t hardware no no that's an interesting question though i mean if that's going to be a big market yep there's a little hint about this in todd i should've put this note todd bishop interviewed harry shum this week who runs an research and so harry shum said you know the way we just org it's going to be interesting to see some new first party experiences using our ai capabilities and i'm like so he's not saying surface hardware the harm another harman kardon style invoked so remember the alan kay thing if you're serious offer you make your own harbor and we sort of took that fairly literally like you have to make a laptop or a phone or something and what we've seen over the past couple years is that all the big platform aga's microsoft google apple have all done this and i don't know about amazon in the cloud but maybe certainly those three have created not like computers but chipsets you know that are very specifically designed many cases to do a i neural network machine learning type things and you know puts them in their phone microsoft has them up in the data center google has them up in the data center and actually found two so and they they all have specialty chips and yeah so i is it possible that they could do that on the iot level.

harry shum aga apple amazon microsoft google todd bishop harman kardon alan kay