35 Burst results for "Harlan"

Trump mounts bizarre and misleading White House return despite warnings

The Daily 202's Big Idea

03:08 min | 3 weeks ago

Trump mounts bizarre and misleading White House return despite warnings

"President trump left one of the world's most elite medical centers on Monday evening at Walter Reed. Even as his doctors acknowledged that they were entering uncharted territory and citing privacy laws continued to withhold vital information, the could eliminate the president's prognosis for recovering from covid nineteen. Trump's determination to appear in control in the waning weeks of presidential race in which he is trailing significantly left unclear whether he or his doctors were calling the shots especially because members of his medical team continued to Cherry pick what they're sharing with the American people they say, his oxygen levels are normal and he has no fever, but they refuse to answer questions about results from long scans when his last negative test was or why he's receiving the steroid decks methadone, which is typically reserved for patients with the most severe cases. Several doctors told my colleagues Francis Sellers Lori. Arianna Cha and amy. Goldstein that the president has returned to the White House at a fraught moment in his recovery before he has escaped a period when some patients are known to crash Harlan Krumholz. A cardiologist at Yale says the problem with covid nineteen is that people's conditions deteriorate rapidly even after days of Stability Jonathan Reiner George Washington University cardiologist said that in an emergency, the White House medical unit can do what an emergency room can do in the first fifteen. Minutes someone can be resuscitate and stabilize during a heart attack, for example, and then transferred to a hospital. Still for ongoing treatment, he says, it would be wise for trump to remain hospitalized at a Monday afternoon news conference White House Dr Shawn Conley said the team is cautiously optimistic and hung guard about trump's discharge but he said he's looking to this weekend for assurance that trump has cleared rough waters and he said he won't breathe a sigh of relief until next Monday. Daniel call in infectious diseases expert at the University of Michigan says people of Trump's age and with similar severity of illness to the extent that we know and to the extent that the White House is telling us the truth usually have a pretty slow recovery with weeks and sometimes months of cognitive difficulties shortness of breath in severe fatigue. Like other experts call said, it's highly likely that trump has cova pneumonia. At the briefing Conley selectively invoked health privacy laws known as hippo when questions arose about the president's respiratory system scans or whether he remains infectious. For his part trump minimized the dangers of the virus that has killed more than two, hundred, nine, thousand of our fellow Americans President tweeted quote don't be afraid of covid. Don't let it dominate your life. We have developed under the trump administration some really great drugs and knowledge I feel better than I did twenty years ago. Health officials from current and past administrations agree that the White House medical unit can bulk up on staffing and equipment to ensure that it can care for again at least stabilize a patient who takes a turn for the worse. But a former White House doctor tells us that it's really inefficient and very risky compared to staying Walter Reed.

Donald Trump White House President Trump Walter Reed Dr Shawn Conley Arianna Cha Francis Sellers Yale Harlan Krumholz George Washington University Methadone Goldstein Jonathan Reiner University Of Michigan Fever Cherry Pneumonia
"harlan" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

01:35 min | Last month

"harlan" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"I think the word dreaming was tossed around a little bit. Hair down the middle No that wasn't mid eighties. Seventies, but you know that's the way we wore a hair back. But Yeah I would say early nineties I started to kind of come into my own there. I'm shocked at John. Senden didn't get a Pete Rozelle. Award. I got a new campaign, a new crusade now I'm I remember saying that Steve Sable. Before he passed away, get him in the hall of fame. His Dad was one the Roselle award you know back in the eighties I think but to get into the hall of fame with even don't have to have a bust of John. But he should have won this award. I'm guessing what do people think of the Kevin Harland contest a former NFL quarterback was very confused about who is who I will tell you. Though like somebody didn't realize. Yes. That it was fritzy or Kevin. Harland. Yes. alrighty. Boy That's not that'll keep you in your car for next hour two hours in the books. One More to go on this Thursday Seton Paulie Fritzy mclovin and Kevin Harlan on the Dan Patrick Show zai-qing what's going on I know it's been a while since you may have been out of the house living life like you used to but you know what? There is the open road that still is out there. And you should probably reintroduce yourself to in a Mazda I was lucky enough to drive around in a nine the last couple of months and I have to say the C. UV lineup, Mazda is pretty wonderful..

Steve Sable Kevin Harlan Kevin Harland Mazda Seton Paulie Fritzy mclovin Pete Rozelle Kevin NFL Dan Patrick Senden
"harlan" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

05:46 min | Last month

"harlan" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"Texted Joe last week after that announcement and of course, you know he just looks up to his dad and things is dad hung the moon and rightly. So that was a wonderful relationship between father and son, and the fact that Sun has almost become more popular than the father and as you know Jack Buck in the sixties, seventies and eighties nineties was like the Voice of sports in this country with so many sports covered football baseball everything else. So but that Pete Rozelle award is one coveted by every broadcaster if the Senate is not in. I. I would be shocked I. Know Disables are in at and Steve that took although for them to get in, which is a shame but I mean. Hollywood you check and say I don't think John. Facilities in the hall of fame but I I mean his contributions with. Those. Highlights I mean that he should be in there in the hall of fame we're talking to Kevin Harlan play by play voice for NBA on TNT. NFL CBS he's got the jets in the colts this Sunday. Yeah. Let me see. Make that sound like a interesting game. Good luck. With that, Kevin. No crowd noise you're going to have to really ratchet up there a little bit I know I know but those are the great challenges you've you've been you've done play by play. You know what? That's like. Sometimes you get a you know we had a great game going in the last week and it really wasn't much of a Game Baltimore at Houston. We think you know to great young quarterbacks and only Lamar Jackson really was the one that made a dent in on this week we got this and actually Tennessee Pittsburgh which might Be Pretty good at least on paper. So you never know what you're GonNa get actually the Raider norlander game. We didn't Vegas a couple of nights ago. That should be a terrific game with the raiders looking really good. So so you never know what you're going to get you just always go in as you know is prepared as possible and do the best job you can. We have a contest here and called the Kevin Harlan game so it's good that we have you on with us for the Kevin, Harlan gain yes so so Joe Buck was on. It would be really odd to do the Kevin Order. Game. Wouldn't do it? Okay. So you and todd are GonNa have some calls and play by play calls and then we the audience has to figure out is it Kevin Harlan making this call or Todd Fritz now we don't know who's GonNa go first. So contested number one, you may approach the microphone with your. play-by-play. Call. Jason Tatum from the quarter, he buries the three. In the Celtics double digit lead Erik Spoelstra will gather the troops here and try to stop the bleeding we step away briefly this is the NBA on TNT right contest at number two. I robot cory berries the three in the Celtics. Take a double digit leads cultural gathered the troops here and try to stop the bleeding is we step away this is the NBA on t and G K..

Kevin Harlan Joe Buck raiders NBA Kevin colts Pete Rozelle Kevin Order Jack Buck John Celtics Jason Tatum Erik Spoelstra Steve Todd Fritz Senate NFL Sun sports Vegas
Interview With Barbara Kopple

Filmspotting

04:11 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Barbara Kopple

"I, know I'm not alone this. I'm on record as naming Harlan, county USA, one of the best documentaries ever. Made I taught it and American dream once in a class on cinema verite. So Barbara Cop bullets genuinely thrilled to have you on film spotting. Thanks for coming on That's nice to hear. Thank you very much. Of course I was four when the events of desert one played out. So I guess I'll use that as my excuse but I, have to confess I really had no idea. Story was going to unfold when I started watching and the story I did get surprised me. So was that partly what drew you to this story that it's a mission that a lot of Americans may not be aware of or have forgotten about chosen to forget about Exactly, the history channel is GonNa do hundred feature found based on history that people really wouldn't know that much about And so does it one was one of them they ended up on these doing for five and so. We're rocky that we got to do this. and. I just love death because I just felt that desert one really is a story that needed to be if you know for me. Story of heroism, a reminder of the horrors of war and it also. It's so rennaissance today because it looks the roots of the conflict between the US and the Iranian government. And plus I just really wanted to do. Because the guys are so incredible, their their diet who'd never really got do and they went because they wanted to rescue fifty two hostages who had been you know taken by the Iranian students. So not knowing the story, I'll also confess I, assumed it was going to be a story of American triumph and in some ways it is you mentioned it is a tale of heroism. It's definitely a tale of great courage but it is a failed mission and the failed missions aren't the ones history typically remembers or wants to revisit. It sounds like that was also an angle that appealed to you. Yeah. from people have this motto had the guts to try. And From this. Ham. A lot of really incredible things like it's organization called the Special Operations, Warrior Foundation and also was really the first time that special forces wherever put together you know marine and navy and everybody in now special forces are together you know on different missions that they go and so it was the start of that. Thinking about desert one in relation to some of the other documentaries you've made the to mention. For example, you give a voice there to people who are often voiceless overlooked. I'm thinking of course of the of the miners and the meatpackers, and it's not the soldiers whose missions are unsuccessful as we touched on whose stories are typically told, but that's what you've done and so I'm curious if that was a conscious choice on your part or are you just naturally drawn to telling those kinds of stories and giving voice to those people? Yeah. That's what I love doing more than anything is. Really getting to know people that you narrowly. No are you have stereotypical feelings about and let them tell their story and let them think D- I've done two other films about the military one was. Found with the collective of people called winter soldier, which was about Vietnam veterans, telling stories about what happened in Vietnam, and then another one in two thousand and fifteen called shelter, which was about homeless veterans and a really wonderful friend of Mine Day of Marist. News did a lot of the singing and Harlan County USA was a homeless that and he was sorted the center of the film as we went to different places where they were homeless and he saying he told stories than it was quite

Vietnam Harlan County Harlan Barbara Cop United States Warrior Foundation
#19 James Noll The Teacher Author Musician - burst 01

WhyWeWork BrianVee

08:57 min | 3 months ago

#19 James Noll The Teacher Author Musician - burst 01

"Trying out short stories always your first story when you I mean not so much the first one that you can. Write maintenance sixteen and Seventeen I was reading science fiction I. there's a there's a story called repent Harlequin said the tiktok man by Harlan Ellison and it was in one of those you know world's greatest science fiction's nineteen, sixty, six, nineteen, Sixty, seven is a collection. And I would read those things back and forth I just loved them. I remember sitting in bed. Reading that story again but TIKTOK man story and I thought I could probably do something like this and And went downstairs and got on the Family Commodore Amiga. which had at that point had been just used for defender of the crown and there was you know a pre wordpress or not were pressed but a pre word program that we had on there and I sat down and wrote a story and it was a science fiction story it was absolutely horrible. It was something about trying to be. Satirical without even knowing satire was at that point is trying to be funny without really having a sense of irony or I had it but I didn't know how to portray it online on on the page. Yeah. and I. Remember. It took it took me a couple of hours and finished it. brought. To my girlfriend at the time I said, hey read this she looked at it. She read it kind of is like, what are you like you should keep trying? All right. At least you didn't say stop. Yeah Yeah exactly. Yeah. It was very nice her was there someone in your family because I mean getting into English and you're talking about some of the books that you read and then into writing? was there someone in your family that? Product you towards. Your joy for reading. Would you even define it as a joy for reading because absolute our devour books? Yep well, maybe not as fast as some people but yeah, I am constantly reading Yeah my mother she she got me into reading very very early I I. What I finally decoded everything figured it out. I, brought a stack of my. You know my doctor seuss books down to her while she was watching the. Cable Net. So I think and just started reading to her out loud and and from that point on there was always a there's always book around it was something that I could always retreat to I didn't know it at the time but just personality wise I'm fairly introverted doesn't mean that I don't like people just means I need to have some alone time and that's where I would get it. I could go home. I'd read a Stephen King Book Re. Short Stories I. Got Into. A. Clockwork. Orange. And all those dystopia novels and you could use that to kind of relax and recharge by between her and my brother. My brother was the one who also use like, Hey, you should read this your one flew over the CUCKOO's nest. Now here's a coke orange like I said, hey, did you get the new Stephen King? They would just feed me stuff and then you know there's All over the house and so I just had my pick I just walk around and you know. GonNa re I didn't know Stephen King wrote four books. You pick that one up and move on from there and then start developing your own tastes and and move on. I think you might mention of it. What was your first piece of writing that you handed into someone besides your girlfriend for a critique? That was junior year. and we're supposed to write a fictional story I ended up fictionalized event that. You know that we want to up at my mother's Relatives House up in Jersey and that crashed and burned really really. Well, it's. I was I was up against another kid in class meaning we we've been partners. and. He wrote this amazing piece of course and then and he wrote I of course to read his out loud and then I read mine and it was just frigates. Suddenly found in this as well But he you know go ahead go ahead. Well I. got the feedback that that at the time. I needed you know. Every writer when they go into writing for the first time especially that age you don't know what revision means you don't know really what constructive feedback means, and so that's that's what the teacher is trying to say look it's not going to be perfect. The first time this is a rough draft, and so you get the positive stuff in the negative stuff and you go back and Redo it and I I went back and wrote a different story instead because I was embarrassed and I didn't know how to you know handle that particular situation. But I I, I, put it through three or four drafts, and then my teacher was like, yeah, that's what I'm talking about it. That's that's how you do it, and so you learn from those particular situations. How is your your balance of confidence with your writing even though it needed Some revision is standing there in reading in front of your your classmates, the confidence. Could did you have a balanced with that because personally I remember my first year university might first communications class in my knees were shaking and I was scared forty people in the class I looked at my communication Susan. Shut up. Even. Though I had a paper here in front of me. How was your balance with that? Probably. Mighty pen. Yeah, exactly you know naked in front of the class. Yeah well, that's that's exactly I. I. Don't know if if my voice was shaking, my knees were knocking at that point I? Do Remember one of the things I was trying to make sound. Funny. Did Not come off as funny. and there is just silence and it was that the that feeling in the pit of your stomach in front of your, you know this is an advanced English class eleventh grade and. I was like Oh man I blew it. You know from that point on he's going to. And finishes. Waiting for you to be over. And there's been plenty of those moments too. Yeah exactly especially following the other guy who? It was he was I. think he ended up being the Valedictorian and just he just knew what he was doing at an early age You know. There wasn't any ever like any jealousy of my my half. I was just always like man he's so much better. But that takes humility right like just to say no. That guy's talented. Suppose just recognizing it. Yeah. Recognizing I mean acknowledged that wow, that guy's talented I have some ways to go. Yeah and Also. Just being a nice person but also I think. It wasn't a secret how good he was everybody knew that because he was he was killing across all of the subjects and it was just one of those things I have no idea where this guy came from it he's amazing. and I think he had transferred over freshman year so we didn't know. Nobody knew who why non horses exactly. Wow. You're awesome in everybody's Askar you. Just for you just to realize, okay, you gotta work on it a little bit more and then you'll succeed. Yeah that's why people like that exist. It's it's. A It's what gives you drive sometimes I. I gotta hit that level. So after university, what was your? What was your mission? I was a drummer and punk rock bands and we were touring up and down the east coast playing basements in bars and small clubs, and we recorded a whole bunch of albums and that was what we were trying to do. I did that for about three and a half four years? Yeah. Yeah Absolutely yeah. It in me see in. One of the band's had a few in there even though I did not play guitar if I got a base and I kind of plunked around and figure out what the notes were and showed it to the guys who knew better than me and we fashion. A song out of that, I could I could yell scream. Or sorry y'all sing. With some sort of melody in there, some sort of harmony. Another band was I started getting more confident. Now is a fifty percent songwriter with that group. and then you know, 'cause you hop around from band abandoning. You know they last a year or two so that there was another band you know those those I who were punk rock ish or just rock bands then got into like an old country band where I was a one third singing partner in writing partner. After that, I got kind of got tired of of writing and I just WANNA play drums. I played A. Backup not. WanNa sing right now I, just want to play drums. I'm already doing five things at once and adding in their six so. Let. Me just play drums but yeah, it was it was a Lotta Fun. How much will even bringing up the confidence level? How much was that good for you to be on stage? I mean. Did that add

Stephen King Tiktok Harlan Ellison Harlequin Partner Relatives House Writer Susan WAN
Octavia E. Butler born - June 22, 1947

This Day in History Class

03:01 min | 4 months ago

Octavia E. Butler born - June 22, 1947

"June twenty, second, nineteen, forty seven. Science fiction author Octavia e Butler was born in Pasadena California. Butler addressed themes of gender sexuality and race through her speculative fiction over the course of her writing career. She received several awards, including the Hugo and Nebula awards. Butler's mother was a domestic worker in growing up Butler recognised racism and economic inequity that affected her family. By the time she was ten. She was already writing her own stories anti. She was interested in science, fiction, magazines and stories. As a young adult Butler pursuit pass besides writing and work temporary jobs, but she wrote when she wasn't working. Through the open door program at the writers guild. Butler was able to attend a class taught by science fiction author Harlan Ellison. He encouraged her to pursue writing further by attending clearing and science fiction writers workshop in Pennsylvania. Though Ellison had offered to publish one of her stories in an anthology. That anthology was never published. When she left Clarion, she began working on the novels that became part of the pattern EST series. The book in this series published by Doubleday. Nineteen, seventy six was patterned master in the book. telepathic people known as pattern EST are dominant over mute spor, non telepathic humans as well as over mutated humans call Clark's. The next two books in the series mind of my mind and survivor or published, nineteen, seventy, seven and nineteen, seventy eight. The books sold will, but she took a break from the series to right kindred. In the novel, a Black Woman named Dana travels back in time to slavery era Maryland there she meets a white ancestor, whom she has to repeatedly rescue to make sure that he survives. But her trouble, placing the book with the publisher, because it didn't fit neatly into the science fiction category, but in one thousand, nine, hundred ninety nine doubleday published kindred as fiction. The book was received well when it was published, and it became a text that students read in high schools across the US. After kindred Butler continued to publish books in the pattern master series, including wild seed and clay's Ark. Many of her characters were black women, and she explored themes like control and post colonialism in dystopia settings. In one, thousand, nine, hundred four, she won a Hugo Award for the short story speech sounds and blood child when the Nebula Hugo and locus awards. But worked on Zeno. Genesis trilogy in the late Nineteen Eighties and in the one thousand, nine, hundred ninety, she published parable of the sower and parable of the talents, which followed the protagonist Lauren Amina as she escapes a walled community in Fouls Inoue. Butler once said quote I don't write utopia science fiction because I don't believe that imperfect humans can form a perfect society. Fledgling a science fiction vampire novel published in Two Thousand Five. Was Butler's last publication. She died of a stroke in two thousand and six.

Octavia E Butler Harlan Ellison Nineteen Eighties Hugo Award Lauren Amina Hugo Pasadena Writers Guild California United States Clarion Clark Fouls Inoue Zeno Dana Publisher Maryland Pennsylvania
Seven Generations - With Karl Dockstader (Oneida)

Iroquois History and Legends

06:50 min | 4 months ago

Seven Generations - With Karl Dockstader (Oneida)

"Hello and welcome everyone and we're so glad to have you today. Joining me is Carl docstater and just to give you a little background on this guy he's a member of the United. Nation, and he's the program called for the four year Fellowship Center about four years ago. He and a colleague of his started a podcast called one dish one Mike, and since then it's transformed into a weekly on air radio show, and recently he. He became a recipient of Canadian Journalism Foundation CBC. Fellowship for his. Outstanding Work I've been on his show before the ever since our show started. We've communicated back and forth, and finally it's my delight to introduce this man, and on top of that all he's an avid buffalo bills fan, so I would like to give a big severely to Mr Pro docstater You're very kind to Gaydos in the youngest log into low to Jota, what's the? What can I do? GEICO Ajayi? That translates to many Ms Carl. Just kidding There's there's a lot more in there. that I I like to introduce myself with Mitch official name is often as possible because our our language is under threat. I think that using any language like even if you only know Golly, even if you only know gateway when you're saying goodbye to someone or or something similar to goodbye, or or if you're seeing Jawa, thank someone. I think that every bit of language revitalization is is important, so so thank you for for having me on your show I have a gigantic fan. If you go into the archives, you can find an episode where we interview Andrew Shannon I may podcasting Betsy Andrew and I think that it's really just forty five minutes of meat gushing lick offend will. So but but you're worth it I mean it, it's it's really be concept. Your show that that you're doing at I'm I'm glad to be on for for something. Maybe a little outside of the box of avoid normally, so they are having beats danger. It's it's outside of the box, but i. feel like when we started the show. This is more of what we wanted. It's easy to talk about dead people because if you. You get something wrong well. They're not around to defend themselves. What's really hard for me? Is from a loving history and background is a lot of times. We try as hard as we can to point out. The the members of the six nations are still around today. There's still a vibrant part of our communities. They still contribute still here at not not like two or three of them left and on our show I have to. To purposely save the holding. The schone are instead of the haughtiness. SCHONE did and a lot of times we use the past tense. I I apologize to it now. You know when you're talking about past historical events that happens a lot, but we'd like to point out all the contributions that people have made in the past, and how the influenced our history and culture and society, and so it's just good to have somebody from today. Today that can can speak for today. I know you're just one person I. Know You don't speak on behalf of all indigenous people on the continent. I know you don't speak on behalf of everyone from the Oneida nation. You probably don't speak on behalf of your family either. It's good to have other perspectives because Caleb. I realized that we're limited in our scope. I wanted to have somebody come on. That could give me an. Update, but just what is Oneida culture like today? And what are the issues that your people are facing today? And then I also WANNA. Look towards the future a lot of times we get bogged down today's issues. Today's Oracle stuff, and as this podcast is recorded as different, but I realized that years from now decades from now hopefully, when people are still listening to you and me working back through the archives that you know we can, we can look forward and see what what does the future stand? What does the to row treaty mean for both our peoples in the future going forward. So that's a long winded. Introduction, BUT I want to turn over your Harlan just give you really open ended just give me a background about yourself and your upbringing. Yeah, thank you, thank you for the opportunity again. I think that what you said is probably key at. If if you're just tuning in if tuning in because of me than you've heard me, say this before if tuning into your recoil, ledges, mystery podcasts, and you're hearing me for the. The first time I think it is important that we're hitting on that concept. The Ngoni people are are still here and I, even like like I had to check myself I was helping my daughter my my nine year old at the time ten year old daughter. Do you a project for history? And it's it's difficult to sift through the history texts and to see them. Talk about how we were as people like, say we. We are as a people like we were still doing. Ceremonies were still. I'm literally trying to grow white corn, even as we speak like I'm. I'm sitting here. Thinking created rain last night because we're not something that their lives in a textbook sitting on sitting on a shelf somewhere, that's something that we want to bring a so having opportunity to come on with you today to to really remind people that can onto says about about living. Living History. History is something we're still living right now is super cool I. one of the reasons I like to get on. This side of the microphone is is that I don't have to talk about myself, so it's it's different since since I now you're the one that's technically behind the Mike but I mean I can say is that it's What it really pride myself on is is activity in my own community. I went and I volunteered tirelessly from a friendship center work at the forgery native. Friendship Centre by day. I volunteered there before I worked there I volunteered at the other friendship center in our region, the Niagara Regional Native Center and that for everything we do is indigenous people I. Think I think it's really evaluated on a on a community level and I. think that's something that we've actively done. Is that individuals? Success is just not the metric. That's not the measurement for for who we are as. at least in in the community circles that I that I hang out so so for me. My production into community was movement called idle no more if you will see American listeners after how how familiar they'll be with that movement, but there was an effort in in two thousand, twelve, twenty, thirteen to to really got environmental measures to take away protection from wire to fundamentally changed the relationship between the government and indigenous people. In four women stood up and said that we're not going to be idle anymore. We will be idle, no more and we need to. We need to put a stop to this. And our people got behind those women and all of our people. It felt like like there was a total consensus in our community that had an off and I saw the seismic shift almost ten years ago. Where people like we have to do something so so for me, that was almost may may rebirth into community I was I was just living regular life, and you know trying to trying to hold down a good job trying to buy a house and worrying about the things that normal people. People worry about and then. I saw this groundswell of activity in our community, and it really opened. My Eyes Act that we need to work together to federal sell change

Mike Carl Docstater Canadian Journalism Foundation Gaydos Fellowship Center Geico Ms Carl Friendship Centre Golly Mitch Andrew Shannon Niagara Regional Native Center Caleb Jawa Official Forgery Oracle Betsy Andrew
Seven Generations - With Karl Dockstader (Oneida)

Iroquois History and Legends

05:39 min | 4 months ago

Seven Generations - With Karl Dockstader (Oneida)

"Hello and welcome everyone and we're so glad to have you today. Joining me is Carl docstater and just to give you a little background on this guy he's a member of the United. Nation, and he's the program called for the four year Fellowship Center about four years ago. He and a colleague of his started a podcast called one dish one Mike, and since then it's transformed into a weekly on air radio show, and recently he. He became a recipient of Canadian Journalism Foundation CBC. Fellowship for his. Outstanding Work I've been on his show before the ever since our show started. We've communicated back and forth, and finally it's my delight to introduce this man, and on top of that all he's an avid buffalo bills fan, so I would like to give a big severely to Mr Pro docstater You're very kind to Gaydos in the youngest log into low to Jota, what's the? What can I do? GEICO Ajayi? That translates to many Ms Carl. Just kidding There's there's a lot more in there. that I I like to introduce myself with Mitch official name is often as possible because our our language is under threat. I think that using any language like even if you only know Golly, even if you only know gateway when you're saying goodbye to someone or or something similar to goodbye, or or if you're seeing Jawa, thank someone. I think that every bit of language revitalization is is important, so so thank you for for having me on your show I have a gigantic fan. If you go into the archives, you can find an episode where we interview Andrew Shannon I may podcasting Betsy Andrew and I think that it's really just forty five minutes of meat gushing lick offend will. So but but you're worth it I mean it, it's it's really be concept. Your show that that you're doing at I'm I'm glad to be on for for something. Maybe a little outside of the box of avoid normally, so they are having beats danger. It's it's outside of the box, but i. feel like when we started the show. This is more of what we wanted. It's easy to talk about dead people because if you. You get something wrong well. They're not around to defend themselves. What's really hard for me? Is from a loving history and background is a lot of times. We try as hard as we can to point out. The the members of the six nations are still around today. There's still a vibrant part of our communities. They still contribute still here at not not like two or three of them left and on our show I have to. To purposely save the holding. The schone are instead of the haughtiness. SCHONE did and a lot of times we use the past tense. I I apologize to it now. You know when you're talking about past historical events that happens a lot, but we'd like to point out all the contributions that people have made in the past, and how the influenced our history and culture and society, and so it's just good to have somebody from today. Today that can can speak for today. I know you're just one person I. Know You don't speak on behalf of all indigenous people on the continent. I know you don't speak on behalf of everyone from the Oneida nation. You probably don't speak on behalf of your family either. It's good to have other perspectives because Caleb. I realized that we're limited in our scope. I wanted to have somebody come on. That could give me an. Update, but just what is Oneida culture like today? And what are the issues that your people are facing today? And then I also WANNA. Look towards the future a lot of times we get bogged down today's issues. Today's Oracle stuff, and as this podcast is recorded as different, but I realized that years from now decades from now hopefully, when people are still listening to you and me working back through the archives that you know we can, we can look forward and see what what does the future stand? What does the to row treaty mean for both our peoples in the future going forward. So that's a long winded. Introduction, BUT I want to turn over your Harlan just give you really open ended just give me a background about yourself and your upbringing. Yeah, thank you, thank you for the opportunity again. I think that what you said is probably key at. If if you're just tuning in if tuning in because of me than you've heard me, say this before if tuning into your recoil, ledges, mystery podcasts, and you're hearing me for the. The first time I think it is important that we're hitting on that concept. The Ngoni people are are still here and I, even like like I had to check myself I was helping my daughter my my nine year old at the time ten year old daughter. Do you a project for history? And it's it's difficult to sift through the history texts and to see them. Talk about how we were as people like, say we. We are as a people like we were still doing. Ceremonies were still. I'm literally trying to grow white corn, even as we speak like I'm. I'm sitting here. Thinking created rain last night because we're not something that their lives in a textbook sitting on sitting on a shelf somewhere, that's something that we want to bring a so having opportunity to come on with you today to to really remind people that can onto says about about living. Living History. History is something we're still living right now is super cool I. one of the reasons I like to get on. This side of the microphone is is that I don't have to talk about myself, so it's it's different since since I now you're the one that's technically behind the Mike but I mean I can say is that it's What it really pride myself on is is activity in my own community. I went and I volunteered tirelessly from a friendship center work at the forgery native. Friendship Centre by day. I volunteered there before I worked there I volunteered at the other friendship center in our region, the Niagara Regional Native Center and that for everything we do is indigenous people I. Think I think it's really evaluated on a on a community level and I. think that's something that we've actively done. Is that individuals? Success is just not the metric. That's not the measurement for for who we are as.

Mike Carl Docstater Canadian Journalism Foundation Fellowship Center Gaydos Geico Friendship Centre Niagara Regional Native Center Ms Carl Forgery Golly Mitch Andrew Shannon Jawa Caleb Official Oracle Betsy Andrew
CRISPR Office Hours with Hamid Ghanadaan

CRISPR Cuts

06:57 min | 5 months ago

CRISPR Office Hours with Hamid Ghanadaan

"However presently the new thing in everyone's lives is over nineteen pandemic most of us are working from home and a distinct to this new non but we know it is difficult especially for scientists whose daily routine is to work in the lab and now they after transition to award from environment so in this episode. We're going to do something. Different can have a crisper officer session a platform to come together and discuss the impact of Covid nineteen on science and scientist Kevin Harlan head of signs at Santiago and additive empathy. Vp of marketing. It's Anthonio will host the session and our special guest is how Meka Don. Ceo of the Liners Group. I hope you enjoy this episode and feed supported by the scientific community despite being confined to homes right now so let's get started. Good morning everybody. We're all actually working from if you will but more likely in reality were trying to work in poem through a crisis pandemic so my name's Kevin Holding I'm the head of scientists go so hopefully this'll be the first of many of these weekly chats we can do. We'd like to engage you. The scientific community and people working specifically either genome engineering or maybe a working in a different area science just interested to talk to us and let us keep you company through this time so awesome. Thank you hi everyone. My name is Hamid Gone. I'm the founder and CEO of the strategy and insights firm. Linus and we are focused on the life science and health and wellness industry and we provide insights and strategy and innovation for this industry. And I'm delighted to be here with our friends at San Diego and to participate in this crisper office hours. I'm very passionate about science and looking forward to seeing what I can provide to help. Everybody get through this time. Great thank you to meet in elementary myself. My name is empty and I'm the VP of marketing Ago One of the biggest reasons why unbelievable scientific community is just the power to invoke change the power to really push humanity forward and while we are in a pandemic. I feel this is one of those moments where we can get together as a community as humans and make a difference so as we're going through this there's actually some interesting things that meet in. His team have done in this pandemic to really understand the community. What we're going through in. How can support one another? Do you WanNa take a moment to start off with. That means. Sure I'll just very quickly tee it up so as all of these stay at home. Guidances and shelter in place guidances. Were coming out in the early half toward the end of March. My team decided to deploy a global survey about what's happening in how the life science community is feeling. And so I'm here with the initial results of that to share with your ten season and going forward and Kevin is going to ask me some questions about it and we're just gonNA share some of the key findings with all of you and will go from there great. Yeah Actually Hamida difficult question. Actually I about Linus the company Wide You. Call it minus. Thanks for asking. So I'm the founder of blindness in the company is almost twenty twenty four years old and I was looking to pay homage to one of the great scientists that had influenced me and my life who is Linus Pauling. And there's a couple reasons why he really stood out to me as somebody who is really unique is that he is the only scientists to win two unshared. Nobel prizes one for his work in Chemistry and then the other one. He won the Nobel Peace Prize for his anti nuclear proliferation. Work and also what's unique about him is that he won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for a body of work that he had done not for a specific experiment and so he really struck me as somebody who is a renaissance person. And so I WANNA pay my loose on mosh to Linus Pauling and so and the name. Linus is easy to say. It's simple and I really liked it and so linus it is. I was hoping be Charlie Brown referencing there but I guess you know it's funny. You say that when I was doing research on the name it did invoke a lot of Linus Van Pelt. I think is the name of the Charlie Brown character and what I found is. I didn't know who this character was. I had to watch a whole bunch of Charlie Brown to figure out if this is a good person or not and I. I found him to be graded. He's he's a wonderful person. When people make that connection with Charlie Brown they actually remember the name of the company more and even if they've never heard of us they think they've heard about so. I thought it was all positive that that connection exists in even though that wasn't the original intention or the inspiration. I'm all very happy about it. Thanks for thanks for sharing that so I would say probably a lot of our audience. They're here most of them. I would assume are working from home. And they're not in the lab right now and so many of them actually will be genome engineers who are utilizing crisper for a bunch of different reasons in their research. Can you maybe tell us what inspired you to do this? Poll specifically now that we're entering this pandemic. Yes so my colleague and President Kristen Apple and I were actually on March twelfth on our way to a meeting here in Boulder and we received a call from the person with whom we were going to meet and that person decided to cancel the meeting and within a matter of minutes many of our meetings got cancelled and so we decided that we needed to find out what's happening within the life science community and to provide this information for the community for all sides of the community so the so that we can all understand and anticipate what's happening and more importantly for people not to make decisions based on panic or anecdote and so we want to provide at least some grounding on what's going on and what to expect so that decisions get made and better decisions get made and maybe even opportunities arise out of this. Pandemic that was the original impetus behind. We moved really quickly so I mentioned we had this experience on March twelfth. We launched a survey on March thirteen and we had an initial baseline so march thirteenth was a Friday and we had an initial baseline by the end of the day that Monday. And then we've taken to time points since then and we're going to publish the Knicks major time point at the end of next week so we're starting to look at how this thing is progressing within the life science community in what the community is doing. Great maybe when it started in and start talking about the work that you've done so we were able to gather just over a thousand respondents for what we're calling. The baseline study almost two thirds of the respondents were academics or working in university and then the remainder work in a variety of different institutions. Many of them private business like Pharma Biotech. Cro's and manufacturers of other

Linus Charlie Brown Linus Pauling Linus Van Pelt Founder And Ceo Nobel Prize Vp Of Marketing Kevin Harlan Meka Don Vp Of Marketing Ago One CEO Kevin Holding San Diego Knicks Liners Group Covid Officer Pharma Biotech Hamid
Bitter Taste For Coffee Shop Owner, As New $600 Jobless Benefit Closed Her Business

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:15 min | 6 months ago

Bitter Taste For Coffee Shop Owner, As New $600 Jobless Benefit Closed Her Business

"Six hundred dollars a week. That is what the federal government is now offering to people who've lost their jobs because of the corona virus for many workers and employers. That money is a godsend way to keep food on the table. While also cutting payroll costs the extra money can create some awkward situations though some businesses that want to keep their doors open. Say it's hard to do so when employees can make more money by staying home here's NPR's Scott horsely when sky. Marietta opened coffee shop and Internet cafe last year in Harlan Kentucky. A lot of people wanted to work there. Nearly a hundred applied for just a handful of openings. Harlan is one of the poorest communities in the country stripped bare of coal mines and Opportunity Sky and her husband Jeff. We're hoping to change that. We're very committed to helping. Transform the downtowns of main streets and Eastern Kentucky. The job had been open for just a few months. When the corona virus hit married told her workers to wash their hands every time they use the cash register and take their temperature at the start of every shift eventually she stopped letting customers into the shop instead delivering orders to the curb. You have all these different trade-offs to make sure we say open. Are they safe? If we're open a same time you know the number one people that were serving right now. We're healthcare workers and I feel like they don't have a lot of options and they certainly deserve elise some coffee in this right but even though she had customers. Marietta reluctantly closed the coffee shop. Just over a week ago with the federal government now offering six hundred dollars a week on top of the state's unemployment benefits. Her former employees can make more money staying home than they did on the job. We're very committed to paying. They living wage. It happens that wage in Harlan Kentucky is not exactly the same thing as it is in other parts of the country. We basically have this situation where it would be a logical choice for a lot of people to be unemployed. Some Republican lawmakers warned about this. When the relief bill was being drafted they noted that six hundred dollars a week amounts to fifteen dollars an hour more than twice the federal minimum wage on top of that state unemployment benefits vary widely from a maximum of two hundred thirty five dollars a week in Mississippi to seven hundred ninety five dollars a week in Massachusetts

Harlan Kentucky Federal Government Harlan Kentucky Marietta Opportunity Sky NPR Scott Horsely Mississippi Jeff Massachusetts Elise
"harlan" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

05:30 min | 7 months ago

"harlan" Discussed on WEEI

"Kevin Harlan he was very nice we were very nice to him but he's also very nice to us and I don't anticipate hearing any Kevin Harlan with her anytime soon you doubt it seemed like he was down for the Joe Buck idea now his daughters all over Twitter a livia Harlan decker she's married to Eric are not Eric decker I Sam Dekker Sam Dekker who what team to send decker is any playing hoops international well he's not in there anymore I don't think so last time I remember figuring out where decker was I think the last time I remember seeing him was the Iraq it yeah I was drafted by the rockets last time I remember it was a book he actually was never on the box Sam Dekker he is an American professional basketball player corners wikipedia lower the old school bond the V. D. B. United league in the eurocup well so they're they're doing a long distance relationship and he's playing in Russia I I'd imagine he's back home now because there's no basketball in Russia going on I thought he was he was really really good in college he was was he was sensational with captain he was on the Wisconsin team that upset the undefeated Kentucky team Frank Kaminsky was out in the elite eight at the apple of Michael Jordan's I Frank Kaminsky and I also I think he arm I thought he was going to be a perfect fit for the rockets cerita early that did not work out well for them and then he got dumped in that Chris Paul trade so they didn't overturn the clippers and bounced around the idea yes so what actual basketball Arlen I'm trying to look up a Libya Harlan because she he was a five star recruit out of high school a livia Harlan decker yeah I got that right and your name is a live issue works for ESPN as you said in the interview and she's a sideline reporter for Westwood One so I remember I think it was either last year the year before she worked the game with her dad her dad was on the play by play I think Kurt Warner was doing the color in the booth and she did stylized for Westwood One just gonna work other data broadcast which is awesome now this is going to be nope it's not spelled the same way at all I was gonna ask how far away on the decker tree is Eric decker and his wife but it's spelled dispel differently after a friend of the the J. Gaskin show Eric decker really Adam on an implant several two years ago if Eric decker had taken the hit that he had taken at Minnesota in today's NFL and we played it over and over and over and over again on social media I and this is the I I have no basis for this is the guest I think he would have dropped like a full round or two in the draft just because we didn't care as much when he took that giant hit at Minnesota we don't care as much about head injuries instead from and stuff like that but if that had been like a widely publicized thing he went to third run I think you'd like literally lost around people would've been afraid that he had like long term concussion I gotta be honest I don't even remember the play oh my gosh I'm a show to you the break I just remember he was a sensational Denver Bronco playing with Peyton gets signed him and him and Brandon Marshall teamed up for the best one to year in jets history at wide receiver in twenty fifteen V. the fella that hit him was a guy named Sean cat al's from cal I'm gonna I'm a I'll get to the point where okay so I think this will be I think this will show you how to play it for you live so you can react to live on the air to Eric decker I meet John Wilder had hit a guy that's hard like that's how hard Eric decker got hit all right so I think this'll work could you see if I can all right okay just an absolute just and he just kind I am thoroughly enjoying this just down on the ground I honestly really moving that data that was not as hard as I thought it was gonna be all right well my maybe oversold I was palace level which is rubbing off on you know I just impressed check or you haven't seen the play either you have no right to speak with the play you look it up on the play our software not me right in our member different I mean it was a big did don't get me wrong he got crushed in the corner of the end zone but I was envisioning like throw over the middle I got jacked up like you know trying to make a play by a DB or something middle of the field going up for a pass blindsided it wasn't quite for Apollo killing this right on the property yes it was not quite that what is another friend of the program yes yes yes he is yes good stuff from Kevin Harlan wants him on social media but what we do here and that means it will be a lot of fun because I mean sports will be back yeah I can call in the playoffs in Kong football is right in the world when Kevin Harlan on the call for something you know what some I I would be fascinated know how much paperwork he has like just like Connolly around his his house like to the to do list that he put together because the dudes busy what mostly here when you think about it R. yeah I mean when this can hardly have time off over the summer to for an MBA starts in before football starts yet two months or so probably two two and a half months or so maybe I imagine he's probably getting to all a ton of the to do list most often that I noticed when you don't do stuff right basis everything it's dusty every room is dusty do you think Kevin Harlan talks to himself why does chores around the house he strikes me as a throw record on and seeing what I would.

Kevin Harlan
"harlan" Discussed on Cars That Matter

Cars That Matter

02:45 min | 9 months ago

"harlan" Discussed on Cars That Matter

"Welcome to cars that matter. I'm Chris Porter producer and editor on the show late last year. Robert Robert Ross sat down with William Bruce Meyer and Brett Anderson to record an episode on location at the Napa Valley Reserve would follow just some of the highlights from their conversation to hear more about their history and memories of collecting cars and an even deeper discussion about the philosophy and approach to developing the Napa Valley Reserve. Subscribe to cars that matter and listen into the full episode called William Harlan and the Napa Valley Reserve. Enjoy the ride. We are Meta with Napa Valley. So we're not quite of a studio in fact we've got some frogs and woodpeckers and all kinds of things going on around us and it just reminds us what a beautiful place we're in. Am I mistaken was there. was there to seventy five. Gt Be story that you guys could share. It's a great story and let me tell the story before that though the second car that I ever saw was a two seventy seventy five gt be. I saw that car in about three years later I was able to buy one slide. Kept it for a few years and it was nineteen eighteen sixty five. I guess it had the drive. Shaft has always get any out of balance and I couldn't afford to keep it going on the car and also keep it driveshaft driveshaft and balance and everything else so I ended up selling it really what I wanted was yellow and so I sold it at about Nineteen seventy-one I'd say seventy or seventy one one. So that's the story on me selling Redmond to get a yellow one but I never could quite the Ford of the things I wanted to keep my life going until one day I call Bruce. So so this is I mean this is like a divine story okay. The big boy upstairs define line. I got a call from Beverly Hills policeman and I think I know every garage in Beverly Hills and he said Bruce there's a lady. Her husband been died eleven years ago. She has a Ferrari and the garage and she wants to sell it. I said you know I'm not a dealer. I'm not sure I'm the right guy and I'm thinking it's a car that I probably know nothing about. So he just said please just go and talk to her and make nice okay. I get to the house. This lady was so sweet. Her husband was an Austrian Olympian skier. She had can funky motor home. She moved out of the way the garage. She opens up the garage and the garage is full of litter and boxes. And there's this car covered and she rolls back the cover. You could knock me over with a feather here is a alloy. Everybody'd to seventy five. Gt torque tube six carburetor outside gas cap ally all.

Napa Valley Reserve William Bruce Meyer Napa Valley Beverly Hills William Harlan Robert Robert Ross Chris Porter Shaft Brett Anderson producer editor Redmond
The Ferrari 275 GTB Story

Cars That Matter

02:01 min | 9 months ago

The Ferrari 275 GTB Story

"I mistaken was there. was there to seventy five. Gt Be story that you guys could share. It's a great story and let me tell the story before that though the second car that I ever saw was a two seventy seventy five gt be. I saw that car in about three years later I was able to buy one slide. Kept it for a few years and it was nineteen eighteen sixty five. I guess it had the drive. Shaft has always get any out of balance and I couldn't afford to keep it going on the car and also keep it driveshaft driveshaft and balance and everything else so I ended up selling it really what I wanted was yellow and so I sold it at about Nineteen seventy-one I'd say seventy or seventy one one. So that's the story on me selling Redmond to get a yellow one but I never could quite the Ford of the things I wanted to keep my life going until one day I call Bruce. So so this is I mean this is like a divine story okay. The big boy upstairs define line. I got a call from Beverly Hills policeman and I think I know every garage in Beverly Hills and he said Bruce there's a lady. Her husband been died eleven years ago. She has a Ferrari and the garage and she wants to sell it. I said you know I'm not a dealer. I'm not sure I'm the right guy and I'm thinking it's a car that I probably know nothing about. So he just said please just go and talk to her and make nice okay. I get to the house. This lady was so sweet. Her husband was an Austrian Olympian skier. She had can funky motor home. She moved out of the way the garage. She opens up the garage and the garage is full of litter and boxes. And there's this car covered and she rolls back the cover. You could knock me over with a feather here is a alloy. Everybody'd to seventy five. Gt torque tube six carburetor outside gas cap ally

Beverly Hills Bruce Shaft Redmond
"harlan" Discussed on The MMQB Podcast with Peter King

The MMQB Podcast with Peter King

04:26 min | 10 months ago

"harlan" Discussed on The MMQB Podcast with Peter King

"They have been there in those hot summer days. They've been in a cold December days. You know disappointed year after year after year and then finally with with what has happened from the quarterback to the head coach so the overall significance that the team has had this season the way they finished they finally after fifty years into that journey and have gotten back to a super bowl. So I mean there was unbelievable relation here to me when I saw Peter her norma hunt who has been to every super bowl and we'll go to super bowl fifty four with her chiefs the wife of the late Lamar Hunt when she kissed the Lamar Hunt Trophy At the fifty yard line it Arrowhead Stadium the stadium that he helped build. It has his team that he founded finally go back that to me was the most poignant moment in one that that is a chief's fan of football football fan. You had to appreciate an embrace Kevin Harlan's been really really fun. I appreciate your dedication to your craft and I think someday when you give this broadcasting stuff you could be a writer. I don't know I read. I read you every Monday. And and I'm amazed at at How you put things I I love the the setting? You always put your stories contacts. You have the inside look the experienced. I mean I could go on and on about it and you know what I feel about you as a person in this business but just a a a great person to know outside the business and and I'm honored you'd asked me to be on thank you so much and Peter Look forward to seeing you in Miami where you have been too many super bowls but I have a feeling this one is going to be terrific. I if the bill is anything like it's been for the past in these two teams represent This could be the super bowl for the ages in to know that you'll be covering it writing about that Monday. I'll look forward to that very very much so I can't wait to see it down in south Florida. Thanks so much Kevin all the best to you. Thank you Peter Fonda beyond your appreciate the Opportunity Really Fun interesting an educational conversation with John Lynch and Kevin. Harlan I've always kind of wondered about how guys really do a schedule the way Kevin Harlan does because most of these really good announcer Kevin. Harlan I in Eagle and I mean they're they're you're not doing just one game a week you know. They're they're kind of singing for supper. All through the course in this case of the fall and winter so really enjoyed that both those conversations so before we get out. I just want to remind you a few things coming up in the coming days as that you'll want to be aware of we've got a on. NBC Sports Dot Com Right. Now you can find my podcast Monday the FM. I A mini pod. Where I've got a conversation a short one with Patrick mahomes sort of in the bowels of Arrowhead Stadium after the biggest win of his life? If you'll enjoy that We've got so much going on in Super Bowl Week at NBC. All through CERTA. The podcast empire. You're really GonNa WanNa hear Mike Florio with all of his podcast elements now. He's got Michael David Smith he's got Chris Simms. And the Chris Simms Unbutton podcast where he goes over. You know the real strategy the real stuff that happens in the game just remember this one thing. The reason y you've got to listen to Chris. Simms is because one of his best friends in college. Life was a little known wide receiver at the University of Texas. Named Kyle Shanahan. So he's got some big institutional knowledge about Kyle Shanahan also on Wednesday next Wednesday Super Bowl Week in Miami. You can be part of a show that mcflurry. Oh and Chris Simms will be doing together. It's their podcasts. Live show that you can.

Kevin Harlan Chris Simms Lamar Hunt Peter Fonda Arrowhead Stadium Kyle Shanahan NBC Lamar Hunt Trophy Miami Harlan I football norma hunt Mike Florio writer south Florida Patrick mahomes University of Texas Michael David Smith
Kansas man asks judge to let him engage in sword fight with ex-wife, her lawyer

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 10 months ago

Kansas man asks judge to let him engage in sword fight with ex-wife, her lawyer

"Five after saying he was cut to ribbons in a legal battle with his ex wife the man once more old school sharp edged fights nirvana Chuck severance and explains how man as as the Shelby County Iowa judge to let him engage in an actual physical fight with his ex wife and her attorney using these that's the sword fight scene from the classic movie the princess bride David Ostrobothnia ola Kansas says his ex Bridget Ahlstrom of Harlan ia and her attorney had destroyed him legally on custody visitation and property issues so he wants to fight them with swords legally with the judges okay too and Austin's words brand their souls from their bodies is sexes lawyer

Shelby County Attorney Kansas Bridget Ahlstrom Austin Chuck Severance Iowa David Ostrobothnia
Kansas man asks judge to let him engage in sword fight with ex-wife, her lawyer

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 10 months ago

Kansas man asks judge to let him engage in sword fight with ex-wife, her lawyer

"Five after saying he was cut to ribbons in a legal battle with his ex wife the man once more old school sharp edged fights nirvana Chuck severance and explains how man as as the Shelby County Iowa judge to let him engage in an actual physical fight with his ex wife and her attorney using these that's the sword fight scene from the classic movie the princess bride David Ostrobothnia ola Kansas says his ex Bridget Ahlstrom of Harlan ia and her attorney had destroyed him legally on custody visitation and property issues so he wants to fight them with swords legally with the judges okay too and Austin's words brand their souls from their bodies is sexes lawyer

"harlan" Discussed on Cars That Matter

Cars That Matter

10:38 min | 10 months ago

"harlan" Discussed on Cars That Matter

"So. That's that's the foundation to try to build a winegrowing state not own. The land was not something I was interested in this first forty years of the two hundred year plan was really about trying to identify and capture some of the very best land in America which I feel is not values. They produce higher quality wine in for a long period of time red wine Cabernet baseline than anyplace in America. And so I wanted to be here and I wanted to try to figure out how to uncaptured this land in a way that we create something beyond what had done up until now so that was the dream bit presumptuous. But that was the idea what were your first steps Persepolis to start to learn about the wine business what I was looking for land so he started a winery by buying fruit from different growers to get to understand the land and over over the next five years. Did this research started making wine. Learn about the wind business. Everything from growing grapes making wine to understanding how the distribution abuse network works in wind business. This winery had turned into a warehouse. So acquired the property and converted into a winery where we could learn and so had that property property for about thirteen years we grew up from about four hundred and fifty cases to about forty five thousand cases made every mistake known to man but We learned a lot. We bought fruit from over sixty different growers probably closer to eighty different growers over that period of time. And so we really got to understand the the lands of the Napa Valley's what about the land in the Western hills of Oakville drew you to it. The best way to the Napa Valley was on the west side of the valley. What they call the bench lands oakville rather for the bit so I wanted to be as close to there but the most valuable vineyards in the world were always in the hills especially they've done the most amount of research over the longest period time well over a thousand years is in Burgundy and you'll find the ground crews the finest vineyards are on on the slopes not down floor the Bali or the top of the hill but what I think of his at tenderloin so that was kind of land? I wanted to own land like that. Would I've been in the Western hills but they were all in forest and woodland so I was able to acquire a piece of land I forty acres and from there began to grow. And at the time that you acquired hired the land you had a hunch but you didn't really know that it was able to produce the kind of wine you wanted no. He didn't so try to hire the people that knew more about these things and certainly certainly more than I did at that time. So we acquired that land cleared the land brought into roads brought in the infrastructure planted the vineyards And began Dan making line. That was nineteen eighty-four. So here we are thirty five years later so That's Harlan the state and we have a good start The challenge now is working on bringing the next generation along. So we've been and working on that now for about Really twenty years but with our own family about twelve years at. What point in that process did you? You realize that you really did have something special and unique land that expressed a very unique character from the time we acquired the land planted bend in your until we sold. Our first bottle of wine was twelve years. You don't really get a crop for the first two or three years but starting nineteen eighty-seven. We made our first wine. By the the time we got to ninety the fourth vintage we could see that the Weinstein Rini coming along. I ninety one. They had made another jump by ninety four. We were convinced not only. Could we make good wine but we had two or three vintages backing it up by one thousand nine hundred ninety six this when we first came to the market. She got her voice as I felt like this risk may have paid off. Yes that's after twelve years of money going in without a Nikola revenue but then after that took another eight years before started to be profitable. But it's really about the second generation and in a way bond began even before Harlan estate because that project evolved out of your experience working with different vendors for so many years and your first project when we sold the property. Start Out Sunday. Selena winery when we sold let a ball. Those vineyards that we brought fruit from there was one or two that were head and shoulders above all the others and so we kept those two vineyards and that was the the beginning of bond those vineyards deserve to have their own label so that was the beginning of bond. We slowly grew bond over the next decade from two properties to five and so out of about a hundred different vendors that we bought fruit from and made wine we were able to capture five about one in twenty and then promontory also began early in your career to in a way because although it took decades before it was realised as a project you had discovered the land about the same time that you acquired this property Meta would this property and metal it was seventy nine and eighty eighty. The first time I walked onto the property which would become promontory was in nineteen eighty-four hiking in the hills in Western hills of oakville assembling. Land that would be Harlan Estate. But this property wasn't adjacent to that land analysts much larger and we weren't even sure at that time if the land in the Western hills we're going to be as good as we hope they could be so over the years. I kept my eye on that property. Took US twenty four years before we were able to acquire and before we had really built a team that had the capability of understanding it and before we had produced wine at the quality that we hope to and even maybe beyond but we very fortunate. The time of the depth of the recession really property became available and that was the beginning of promontory and it was also the beginning any of the next generation. So it's really about the next generation taking on responsibility of promontory and in their own way taking it to what they're working on now to the potential the promontory of our two hundred year plan we put together in nineteen eighty. Were now about forty years into and soon. It's going to be there turn. You've been involved than somebody other businesses and I know you were speaking with Robert About cars and the car world is when we're new models come out every year it's about speed of innovation with wine. It's such a different. You said it. Change Your Perspective on time but I would say that the change in time perspective happened for me very quickly up until all the time I was forty everything was working toward that point of disequilibrium of not knowing what's going to happen the next fraction of a second. That's where it's very very very exciting to live to live in zone. It seems like you need to continue to take pretty big risks to keep you in that zone of just just living in the moment so from the time I seventeen until I was forty I lived in that world time I was forty and went on this trip to seve properties that had been in these families hands for some time as many as well been fourteen generations it just gave you hold perspective. The cars do come out every year with a new model. But with where human nature nature delivers. You knew hand every year so we do our best to express a character not only the place from from where the wind comes from but the time that growing season certainly the difference between any automotive manufacturer and what you do in your wind. Businesses bill is is that the no automotive manufacturer has two hundred year plan and I think your vision is clearly one. That's strategic not just for the near term but for the long term but interesting thing. You're a big thinker. You're a long range thinker but you're also detail man and those are interesting characteristics to share the same mind most people people don't have that ability and I look at for instance even the labels of your various wines. Harlan estate promontory bond. These are amazing. Things you're aesthetically driven driven on every level someone sale. What is the vision? What is it all about? And what are you trying to do. And so we're kind of giving answers to that wish. This idea of creating a first growth has evolved into creating a domain of producing wines at the very highest level from a few different properties. I would say the things that they have in common more have to do with. Why the reason why for us? It's really too. I think over time we can delight white people. If we can with a little more depth we can begin to help enrich their lives maybe indirectly and if we can do that at high enough level to inspire them to maybe go beyond but I think of as elevating the spirit and we talked about these cars aesthetically if you have a car hi this beautiful it it makes you feel good even when you're not in it and once you're in a car that you've become at one with it you just feel great. They're so both awesome are about elevating the spirit. You know you think about throughout history what has elevated the spirit more than anything else and it really gets down down to art and so when you think of these fantastic cars you were talking about with Bruce and talking about the Peterson Museum. The automobile is going to be recognized is as a work of art. This great automobiles. I think some day wine will be recognized in the realm of art so if we can be working toward word producing something at that level that can have that kind of impact on how people cognitively think about things but also aesthetically. The emotional emotional connection is really about why we're in this business. And how those two relate I feel Bill Brett. This was a very rare insight and kind of special special quiet moment to get to really understand the depth behind the wines certainly the winds that you produce a remarkable but I think more remarkable still as the vision behind them and the in fact this mission is certain to endure for not just a century but centuries and more thanks for giving us that insight. Thank you thank you Roberts pleasure here to be at the table with you again. Well cheers thanks to bill. Harland Bruce Meyer and Brett Anderson for joining us on cars that matter and thank you to the Harlan family family and the Napa Valley reserved for hosting us. We'll see you next time to continue talking about the passions that drive us and the passion. We drive.

Western hills Oakville Napa Valley Harlan estate Harlan estate promontory America Harland Bruce Meyer Persepolis US Bill Brett Harlan family Selena winery Weinstein Rini Nikola Roberts Peterson Museum Brett Anderson
"harlan" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

03:40 min | 11 months ago

"harlan" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Thank you Harlan sacris for more in the Marshall Islands we're joined now by Kathy Jack no Kitchener poet climate envoy for the Marshall Islands here at the climate summit also daughter of the president of the Marshall Islands we welcome you to democracy now ground zero for the climate crisis or catastrophe and you in the Marshall Islands have declared a client emergency to explain yeah so we declared a climate crisis this past September before the September climate summit nam and this really shows that on a national level we're recognizing how serious of an issue it is for our country and we're trying to signal that to the international community by declaring explain how climate change affects the Marshall Islands and how large is this archipelago of islands well in tiny one anywhere or coral atoll nation so we're one of the smallest nations on earth for only two meters above sea level there's no mountains and right now many islands over sixty coral atolls yeah the last I checked about but I don't have the exact number there's quite a few it's spread across a lot of motion but it's impacting us in a lot of different ways first off just two weeks ago before I came here we had sixteen foot swells of inundations that displaced over two hundred people we're having disease and health outbreaks we had over a thousand cases of dengue outbreaks right to the crime well apparently the misty to related illnesses Miskito borne illnesses increased with climate change and sold these kinds of disease outbreaks are going to increase as climate change worse and and so these are kind of the some of the impacts that was seen for also developing our national adaptation planned and this is the national and we're calling in our survival plan so we're not just looking at mitigation you know lowering our CO two emissions and you know on solar panels are looking at actually changing the entire physical landscape of our island so that we can stay above water Kathy two years ago at the climate summit in Bonn Germany that was actually hosted by Fiji yeah we were joined by you and your mother the president John Marshall Islands held a Heine I asked her about the legacy of nuclear testing in the South Pacific and Marshall Islands yes yeah we need to Theo the legacy of the nuclear testing program freeing the whole issue of colonialism and how the U. S. S. colonized even on the Marshall Islands to this day we're still struggling with the legacy of the area you know what he called silly piece the sale of babies we have people this is babies Florence that one point my women least of the islands that were contaminated and we still have people who have not returned to their homelands at fifty years of being displaced from their homelands we have violence there were favor a spy in the end nuclear testing program foresees Allen's belong to people and always can never be recovered so we still seeking nuclear justice for the people of the Marshall Islands is is one of the the legacy of the U. is a presence in our country and it seems like we repeating with the climate change issue coming on also same forests from outside being brought to in full is our dream alive Marshallese dance.

Marshall Islands Harlan sacris
Lamar Jackson cements MVP candidacy in rout of Rams

America in the Morning

01:09 min | 1 year ago

Lamar Jackson cements MVP candidacy in rout of Rams

"Till Johnstone assess sports good morning John well there are number of candidates in the NFL for the prestigious Most Valuable Player award at the end of the season but there's no one more deserving right now than Baltimore Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson who only strengthened his MVP candidacy in last night's forty five to six blow out of the Los Angeles rams on Monday Night Football thirteen goal time emotions six Westwood One sports Kevin Harlan on the call Jackson's five touchdown tosses tied a career high and he also added ninety five yards on the ground on just eight carries after the game Jackson talked about being the league's MVP this okay you know but I'm from one symbol and we take in a game at a time I'm not really in the penal fickle Macomb I'll be satisfied but I'm from which to borders the ravens are now nine into winners of

Johnstone John NFL Lamar Jackson Kevin Harlan MVP Ravens Baltimore Ravens Los Angeles Football Ninety Five Yards
Adorable cat runs on field at Major League Baseball game

Colleen and Bradley

01:13 min | 1 year ago

Adorable cat runs on field at Major League Baseball game

"I one of the big things that was training this week that actually as a cat lover I was so excited by was the black cat and the NFL yeah if you're watching the Monday Night Football game between the giants and the cowboys you saw the black cat Lebanon to met life the old it was so entertaining because Kevin Harlan had an incredible call of it he was talking about the lateral quickness cat even forty touchdown solicited it the cat still at large they haven't found the cat yet despite multiple attempts to humanely capture it and also the giants were up nine to three when the captain on the field and then they got outscored thirty forty nine so bad luck the guy had luck okay just and I have to ask a question about the cat because this is been what's been haunting me and I'm wondering if Google has this answer somewhere how the heck did the cat get on the field in the first place I know I know I know I'm wondering if somebody like playing the cat they're all like smuggled the cat looks but obviously the security not hide in my life the lines get in there without a ticket yes and I will say this is not quite the same but we had our own sort of version of this with the squirrels yeah that was on the twins get handed down the

Giants Lebanon Kevin Harlan Google NFL Football
Sports broadcaster Kevin Harlan gives dramatic play by play of black cat's MetLife Stadium invasion

KYW 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Sports broadcaster Kevin Harlan gives dramatic play by play of black cat's MetLife Stadium invasion

"For him cowboys beat the giants somebody they football thirty seven eighteen but New York was winning ninety three in the second quarter when this happened all there's a head on a black cat is taking the field of white kid is running for the twenty to the near side the ten players became spectator watching the camp one in six and all over the field the black cat is at the other end of the feeling that cat police state troopers come on the field we know the giants are bad but maybe the black that was a big reason they lost last night Kevin Harlan with their brilliant play by play Westwood One Brandon and maybe it was Jerry Jones cat movie brought it with them I I he he seems like a guy with a

New York Giants Kevin Harlan Football Westwood Jerry Jones
Black cat takes the field during Monday Night Football

Z Morning Zoo

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Black cat takes the field during Monday Night Football

"There last night Monday football Dallas in New York to play the giants and for some reason the cowboys could get going in the first half could get a any touchdowns anymore they have a field goal but they were down by six ninety three with about five minutes of the first half it looked like the night was not going too well for Dallas and then completely out of nowhere a black cat ran onto the field and halted play here's the Kevin Harlan from Westwood One Cup making the calls walking to the three he's at the two state troopers we think yeah cross the field and then

Dallas New York Giants Cowboys Kevin Harlan Five Minutes One Cup
Jets turn to Falk as Siemian (ankle) set for MRI

Zach Gelb

01:11 min | 1 year ago

Jets turn to Falk as Siemian (ankle) set for MRI

"Salad with jets quarterback Sam Donald out with mononucleosis Trevor Simeon made the start last night against the Browns in the second quarter Simeon was knocked out of the game suffering an ankle injury on a late hit that left it to the third string a look fall to go the rest of the way this game would turn in the third quarter the jets were trailing six to sixteen to three but or in the red zone facing big but make a bowl fourth down for the June. when you go to pass the bill. since the ten inside the numbers he's close to the first down but I think well it's zero the spot is it you may be shot they were already marked in shock to the tennis Kevin Kevin Harlan Tony to sell in the third quarter courtesy of Westwood One the jets turned it over on downs at the eleven yard line and on the very next play Baker Mayfield it Odell Beckham junior with a slant pass and Beckham did what Beckham does he took it eighty nine yards to the house the Browns up twenty three to three and at stood up as the final score the only jets points a forty six yard Sam Ficken the field goal Falk twenty of twenty five four hundred ninety eight yards Simeon will undergo an MRI the jets are now into the Browns up to one

Sam Donald Trevor Simeon Browns Jets Kevin Kevin Harlan Tony Westwood One Baker Mayfield Sam Ficken Falk Tennis Odell Beckham Twenty Five Four Hundred Ninet Eighty Nine Yards Forty Six Yard Eleven Yard
"harlan" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

15:41 min | 1 year ago

"harlan" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"Oh you all of that organization you are alone individual without influence and without recognition of any kind irritating us like we're animals dogs well we are we're american citizens in nineteen fifty four writer michael wilson director herbert j bearman and producer paul jericho released a movie called salt of the earth and extraordinary anomaly in the history of american movies wilson bieber men and jericho were all blacklisted from hollywood due to their alleged alleged communist leanings but that didn't stop them from making an independent film at a time when there was no independent film scene salt of the earth is a black and white drama about a long and difficult difficult minor strike at the empire zinc company in grant county new mexico as a sharp political bent taking their cues from the italian neorealist movement the filmmakers cast actual miners in their families as actors which may lead to some stilted performances but the trade off authenticity is worth it but what's especially fascinating got salt of the earth is the focus on women as the backbone of the labor movement without their organization instead fast on the picket line. The strike was doomed to failure. I was thinking of salt of the earth when revisiting barbara cobbles harlan county u._s._a. For this podcast because their focus is the same both are films about men on strike but both are are more interested in the women who may not be inhaling coal or zinc dust every day but who are powerful stakeholders their families futures the difference is that there's a woman behind the camera this time to barbara coppel produced and directed the film and stretched a twelve thousand dollar loan into a twenty thousand dollars sixteen millimeter project that took four for years to finish. There's no doubt that the presence of a film crew helped end the strike after thirteen months if only for bearing witness violence and bloodshed that might otherwise have been quietly mopped mopped up but coppell and her crew were fearless immersing themselves in the lives of poor appalachians and her subjects intern grew to trust her and bring her inside the movement for the long haul and one of almost famous scenes in documentary history we witnessed coppell and her crew get attacked by violence scabs who worked to bust up the picket line coppell would later say she was unhurt because sir nagara recording case was taking the brunt of the blows but we see guns cocked on both sides many times in harlan county u._s._a. And the atmosphere is thick with the potential for violence. It's no doubt political and creative conviction is holding coppell inner team in place but it may also be a case where the camera itself provides a false sense of security. If it's only a movie the danger singer can't be real kennett in broad strokes. Harlan county u._s._a. Is about minors at brookside mine wanted better pay and working conditions from the duke power company life for local coal miners has always been difficult with many deaths from black lung and pervasive poverty ravishing the area as the strike drags on the company brings in gun toting strikebreakers to bust picket line including the fearsome basil collins a snarling scab who waves his pistol around and threatens everyone site including koppel but perhaps the most mesmerizing summarizing figure. The documentary is lois scott. The outspoken leader of a group of miners wives who end up stepping out to the forefront of the movement at one point scott yanks out a handgun. She has tucked in her brassiere. Working for the mazel school of direct cinema coppell is inclined to use talking heads or titles to give information and she doesn't much care to put together a comprehensive apprehensive tick tock of what happened when her instinct is to evoke the area and it's unforgettable faces as strongly as possible and capture the beating heart of the labor movement and appalachia i show she winds up discovering it and lois scott and other women who are holding their families together and keeping the picket line populated for as long as it takes to get a contract. This is a life for death situation for them in harlan county u._s._a. It's clear that it could go either way burland there..

harlan county lois scott michael wilson paul jericho herbert j bearman kennett barbara coppel hollywood writer mazel school mexico director producer sir nagara brookside mine intern appalachia basil collins koppel twenty thousand dollars
"harlan" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

The Next Picture Show

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"harlan" Discussed on The Next Picture Show

"Movie of the week podcast to a classic sick film and how it shaped our thoughts and our release. I'm scott tobias here with tash robinson keith ups and genevieve caskey so great to have all of us here together to talk about harlan county the u._s._a. An american factory to documentaries about labor relations the difficult fight for unionization solidarity team. Yeah sorry we're going on strike. We what we're family. The film spotting podcast network has been very supportive from the beginning and our patriots subscribers very generous. It's not that it's the working conditions additions. They're unsafe yeah. Rachel handler has black lung. That's the real reason she left the show. You made us tell us no. She moved to new york. If you think i'm gonna compromise the audio quality of this show oh for safety reasons forget it. That's the problem with unionization of the company gives in the product suffers. It's got to record at the bottom of his mineshaft. It's really really dark down here and the canary we brought down here died weeks ago. There are dozens of podcasters like a replace you all with and nobody would know the difference but my trenscient insight yes. Where would we be without keeps trenscient insight and tasha's contrarian streak not to mention my production and doing all of the things skills you in charge anyway well it would would appear that union busting is not my strong suit but do you think you guys can stay on for another couple of weeks to complete this podcast pairing. It's a good one tasha. What are we talking about. In her mid twenties. He's director barbara coppel had discovered a twin passion for activism and filmmaking participating in anti war protests as a college student and learning her trade alongside documentary legends albert david maizels on classics like salesman and give me shelter in nineteen seventy-two she heard about a community of coal miners in harlan county kentucky who were striking for union recognition from a company that was hostile title to their efforts to put it mildly for years later coppola merged with harlan county u._s._a. Which won the academy award for best documentary and has since become the gold standard for nonfiction films films about labor relations. The new documentary american factory is funnier than harlan county and not nearly as fraught with violence but many of the core tensions between workers and their corporate bosses remain the same set in a former jam factory in dayton. It's been taken over by chinese glass company named how the film is about a clash between cultures on issues like salaries safety conditions shins and workers rights on today's show will dig into the grit and grime of harlan county u._s._a. And the perseverance of workers who held out for thirteen months and atmosphere of poverty and violence. What's the next week will bring in american factory and talk about what has and hasn't changed for the working stiff. Oh which side are you on scott which side you you on. A beautiful voice start so does that mean. I'm getting a bonus and my paycheck this week. Nope <music>. This episode is brought to you by it. Chapter to only in theaters on september six witness the end of it hit hit chapter to the terrifying conclusion to the highest grossing horror film of all time brings the second half of stephen king's groundbreaking novel to the screen twenty seven years after the losers club defeated the evil clown pennywise it as return to terrorize the town of dairy once again as kids begin to mysteriously disappeared from their hometown. The nowadays losers are called back to derry fulfil their below two of requiring them to face their darkest fears in an attempt to destroy the murderers pennywise once and for all but the losers losers club will quickly come to find that penny wise is more dangerous than ever the incredible cast is led by jessica chastain james mcevoy and bill hader. You know this is the movie everyone will be talking about so don't miss the musc- epoch event of the year and experienced the terror of it it chapter two rated r. under seventeen not admitted needed without parent in theaters september sixth. Holland.

harlan county barbara coppel Rachel handler scott tobias stephen king tasha genevieve caskey derry new york jessica chastain Holland tash robinson bill hader albert david maizels james mcevoy dayton salesman coppola director kentucky
Undocumented immigrants in Mississippi live in fear of an ICE raid

All In with Chris Hayes

03:53 min | 1 year ago

Undocumented immigrants in Mississippi live in fear of an ICE raid

"Least twenty four immigrants have died an ice custody during trump's administration that number doesn't include five children who've died in the custody of other federal agencies. She's now here are two new cruelties yesterday. Ice agents rated seven worksites mississippi arresting about a seven hundred six hundred eighty people. They say are undocumented immigrants. The raid conducted just days. After a gunman targeted hispanic shoppers pass a walmart is the largest rate in any single state in american history and those six hundred hundred eighty arrests left hundreds of terrified american children alone to wonder if they would ever see their parents again meanwhile the trump administration deported a detroit resident to iraq even though he had never been there before jimmy aldo was an iraqi national was born in greece. You came to u._s. When he was six months old legally he'd never lived within iraq didn't speak arabic. He was an american in every conceivable way. He was a man who was a member of a persecuted christian group in the middle east. I says he had at least twenty convictions convictions over twenty years but friends say he also suffered from schizophrenia and other mental health issues in on diabetic my after throwing up throwing up speaking in the trump and i got nothing over the concealed. I was kicked in the back of the lady. Get off the guy's property sleeping on the ground. You know i begged him. We've seen this now. That man that you just saw is dead half because apparently is unable to get insulin in baghdad treat his diabetes so my question is how do any of those things help the people trump said he would help who has made better by those kids crying for their parents mississippi the traumatize children. They're american citizens. The president is hurting those americans a dead man on the streets of bad gag baghdad who was lonely and scared and sick whose life did that make better in america whose the job did that bring back whose income rose because of that who no longer has to deal with the ravages of opioid addiction their family because that man is dead on the streets of baghdad because those kids are wailing because they don't know oversee their parents again. The answer is no one and that's a fundamental con the donald trump he says i'm going to hurt these people people and i'm going to help you and he can deliver on the first part but he's done just about nothing on the second. There are hundreds of people close mine and wyoming sitting around with no paycheck. We covered them. We're in the second week of the miners down. Harlan county not letting the coltrane through because there might have shut down and their pensions are rated in their owed back pay. The people more sound ohio who told trump told not sell their own homes. They had their factory shut down and farmers across the country are struggling with unplanted fields having to make up on trump's welfare handouts the economic growth that trump is so happy to tout has disproportionately happened in precisely the same areas it was already happening before in large metro areas areas among people who had already participated from the boom is help those who are already reaping the benefits fact. There's one group of people trump did say he would go after where he has broken that promise and that is the titans of corporate america and the globalist deletes because the banks are running wild in corporate america got a trillion dollars in tax cut so so the immigrants it's punishment and misery and humiliation and for the owners well apparently get this. The people who own the chicken plant mississippi that were rated to it employed all these unauthorized immigrants agrements the apparently we're not arrested. Ice won't comment but when you think about it. How could they be arrested. Donald trump has been doing the same thing in his own businesses for years. Exploiting immigrant labor in fact the six hundred eighty people detained in mississippi was the largest trade since three hundred eighty nine people in two thousand eight and the owner of that plant was subsequently currently convicted of money laundering but president trump community sentence in two thousand seventeen.

Donald Trump Mississippi Iraq Baghdad Jimmy Aldo President Trump America Middle East Walmart Schizophrenia Detroit Titans Wyoming Harlan County Greece Ohio Coltrane Trillion Dollars
Kentucky coal miners block train tracks in protest for pay from bankrupted company

All Things Considered

03:18 min | 1 year ago

Kentucky coal miners block train tracks in protest for pay from bankrupted company

"No pain no coal coal company black tool one of the country's largest declared bankruptcy suddenly earlier this month many of its employees haven't been paid in weeks the company it's still loaded up a train with coal the protest I did with five minors blocking the tracks on Monday now there are many tents set up there's a first aid kit and port a potties a generator or food tent that's reporter Sidney bowls of the Ohio valley resource she spoke to us from Harlan county earlier today designers have not officially been laid off by a black jewel they were just essentially told not to come into work one black jewel went bankrupt on July first these matters are really frustrated this is not the way that a call bankruptcy typically goes typically miners would stay working even if they had a new employer and they might not even notice the difference but these guys really haven't been told what's going on there even thousands of dollars in in back wages and they're hurting you know it's back to school season I've spoken to minors who feel that they may not be able to get their kids new shoes I mean clothes for the school year and miners who just bought a new house and can't make payments or who are behind on on other expenses that they didn't expect to be behind on you spoke with Felicia crests her husband worked at a mine in Harlan county here she is it was around the fourth of July that Friday Hey you know guys payday cashed it came home on Saturday morning we were alerted that our banking account was I would record three thousand dollars so the company paid workers and bad checks am I getting that right yeah many actually had those checks and they thought the money was was solidly in their account to the text and bounced and they didn't have access to that some miners spent a lot of that money on normal life expenses only to find themselves pretty far in the red and responsible for that with their banks there is a history in eastern Kentucky of coal miners pro testing if they haven't done anything like this in a long time and I want to come back to that person you spoke to Felicia crest because she honestly sounds angry at the leadership of black jewel who she is or what this Kobe going to was a statement here if I was making a statement well at all this money be going to let's get all of it this one a lot these men that work for it and get nothing from it how common is that sentiment that's a really common sentiment ID folks here are really frustrated that big companies are continuing to profit while they're really stranded with not much recourse and you're right there has been a long history of labor organizing here Harlan county where I'm sitting right now was that the site as bloody mine was back in the nineteen thirties and eastern Kentucky was the site of a lot of early union activism miners have also rally to to support black long legislation they've also been really instrumental in working for a stronger better conditions for this hard work so I will say that the brotherhood among minors is really strong and and they're familiar with what it takes to stand up to these companies what has black tool set about all this so out to representatives for black tool and I've been directed to statements have been issued to employees those statements encourage minors to dip into their retirement savings to make ends meet in the short term I've also specific questions about when the standoff might and what might happen with the coal and when miners can expect to be paid and I have not received answers to those questions that Sydney bowls reporter with the Ohio valley resource public media collaborative thank you for your reporting thanks

Three Thousand Dollars
"harlan" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

13:43 min | 1 year ago

"harlan" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"Harlan junior died at twenty years old due to complications from tonsillitis. The great killer. Yep. The eight eight the early nineteen hundreds version of eights, is it. What was it terrible? No. But I was recently for whatever reason, I may have been on Wikipedia searching, which MLB players had died while they were players. And a lot of them died of really common shit really. Yeah. Yeah. But you did reveal that you're a real weirdo. I mean, sometimes you get on a whole. Yeah. Sometimes it starts bed. Dave. Hold on. I just got a check something real quick. That's crazy. Sometimes you is sometimes someone sends you a link of the Cincinnati player went to sleep during a game on the field. And then you look that up. And then all of a sudden, you're looking at which players died during a baseball quite a leap, which prove back to this. But But you you and and I. I after maybe do. Okay. That's fair. So. The deficit on puts a pretty big strain on the marriage Harlem becomes a huge fixture in Corbin. He joins the rotary club. He served volunteering at an orphanage and alcoholics anonymous, he didn't drink. He wasn't a drinker volunteered as a county, inspector and became friends with a lot of poor residents in the town. Okay. He started a side business delivering babies at low cost for families who couldn't afford, real doctors shirt. Yep. Note, just keep going date. What about owns a gas station? He knows. He knows what you're saying. No, he doesn't. He knows law. He worked on a train. Yeah. He worked on a trade and he was fired insurance salesman. Yes, he, he learned about the law from letters. He we did a lot of jobs. So a lot of that translates, your baby, baby. Yeah. Yeah, but it's all we're saying act opposite thing. But it all comes together and painted. It does not do that for agreeing. We are disagreeing. Quote, got me a lard bucket and puts mush is a terrible start. This is tying. Let me largely lady up, maybe jump on her tummy till the thing goes squish squish and hits the pillar. What got me lard bucket and puts in my sheers, and Gaultier's. Well, I motor trimmer. And then we're gonna Larder that's where the ability, Gordon still or the sheep. Listen, when you start with the bucket a large, assuming you're going to seem the umbilical cord is pretty ambitious. If you if you tell me, you've got a bucket alert and cheers, I'm like Friday night. Let's go. Let's do it. Perfect. Oh, I don't even think you need the lard this year's will do. Well, however, you wanna do it Dr. No. I'm gas station. Attendant got me a large bucket and puts in machines. And GAAS vaseline and kept it ready. When I got a call, I would grab that bucket and take off, I had at least one baby, and then hills named after me. Okay, so one baby lived for sure for sure. But then he quit delivering a children after he delivered one who was conceived at a wedlock. That's what did it. Yeah. Yeah. Or, or Greece went up too much. I think he agrees went up too much. And it just shot out the window. I assume he was using the large without Greece. The shoot by the way, I'm picturing, lard would like a brush, and he's just kind of painting on Elliott. That's what does it. Yeah. That he's just sort of like how they used to hang up wallpaper. They probably. Harlan learned Krupp cop was arresting tourists in town on fake charges. The local Justice of the peace and county attorney would then convict them, and they'd split the fines with the cop got a racket going up. Corbin getting a bad reputation would hurt his business. So using his legal expertise. He larded up the bars in the grip. The people out of the cell larded up the people Harvard made forms explaining how tourists could ask for a change of trial venue, and the county attorney then sued him for practicing law without a license, even though he was just offering legal tips. Right. So Harlan them, requested a change of venue, as I read in his own pamphlet. And they were like where did you learn all my God? And he's a genius. He's been reading letters. And the charges were dismissed. Okay. The racket continued, so our than put up a sixteen foot tall sign outside the gas station. That read quote, avoid Corbin and Whitley county constable and feed. Grabbers may get you Walter, Ray Smith county, attorney receives forty percent of all fines, this is I think this is out of the business model this. You know, he's going he's yes. He's got to fight these gotta fight so Smith suit Harland for twenty thousand. Okay. They settle that settled out of court. But this was this whole scenario. The whole thing was written up in newspapers in Kentucky, and in all the neighboring states. So he's a hero. Well, he got tons of publicity. Right. Right. Okay. So it just makes gestation more popular. Right. So business starts booming. Okay. Interesting. PR. Yep. And he got an idea, he would combine foot and foot. He would combine food and gas so truckers would only have to make one stop. Does were boiled peanuts camper. This is when gas stations started to serve egg sandwiches for now. It's the rolling hotdogs in, in seven eleven. Well, we should think this guy for being the guy who gave us the rolling dogs in the seven eleven and diarrhea of big time. Yeah. Anytime you bind someone at a seven eleven who's, like, also I just doesn't wings like buddy. It's this is they're they're everywhere else is better to go. It's fucking death. Well, look that hotdog covered in everything didn't they don't look like dogs. They're hot hotdogs, covered in adjust shit. Yeah, I call them pigs in a puddle. That's a callback. No was come on. I was giving you nothing for it. Yeah. I need. You, Aaron you step in. So, so he cleared on a small room in the gas station, and filled it with his family's dining room table and six chairs. Okay. How restaurants works. Sharing chairs on the table. So is he is he talking about selling food, or he's talking about family suppers in the back when people are loaded up make food and sell it? Okay. And he thinks he needs to table just because, well, you got to have in place to sit for the people. She exactly the restaurant, right buffoon, or food, or sitter place. Yes. Exactly. It's a food cooked up, what he knew how to cook biscuits, string beans and fried chicken word spread about amazing fried chicken, this gas station got a reputation as a dining spot. Okay. He shut down the gas station and opened the Harlem cafe. The gas station part is done. Now. He finished with the gas state this, the people are coming for the food so much to Yeah. do. Okay soon. The restaurant was just raking in money, and in nineteen thirty five the Kentucky governor gave Harlem, the honorary title of Kentucky, Colonel. What is going on? What? No. What this? Learning about the origin story of grimace. Okay. So he gets out for his contribution to the states, and it's not a big deal to get that title, there, thousands of Kentucky, colonels at that point. Sure, he didn't think much of it. So nineteen thirty seven he bought the lot next door and turn it into a seventeen room motel. Got a motel restaurant the chicken in what's your called the Highland court cafe. Okay. Huge hit. Okay. Part of that was because of Jim crow. Okay. Jim crow was actually a pet crow that an early motel guest had owned and Harland like the crows antics, and bought the crow from the customer. Wait, what the guy was staying in the hotel, motel and the other pet crow Holiday Inn, and he and Harlan liked wacky. The crow was so he bought him. Okay. It's another attraction for the crowd doesn't talk. That's me talking. I'm Harlem now. So what? So here's crow do customers put US Super smart. Super very, very smart. So they would people pennies in the cups of their pants and Jim throw really weird start and racist. And Jim crow would run behind them trying to grab the penny with his beak. So the he would chase them and try to grab the penny out of their pant cuff. The reason why it's named the crows named resits black. Right. Right. I can only say that it's horrible racist rights, right? Yeah. Which is normally the safe bet for this era, you wouldn't find if you're in Kentucky at this time. No, no, no. Or, or now, no? So. If somebody didn't give the Coa penny, particularly if a woman didn't Jim crow would angrily peck at their ankles. So it's fun. Is it fun at no? Okay. Right. Just to be clear, and once Jim crow snuck into a guest room while the guess was at the cafe. Okay. This is now crossing a line tries. What is like this is now no longer show. This is robbery. A horror or. Harlan quote. I'll be God. Damn if that crow didn't get to session around the room and see himself in the mirror. And when the sales, this is crazy theory when the salesman got back to the room. It was a mess that crow torn up everything to fight the other crow he'd seen in the mayor. This is black doodle this his his the Colonel as we can theory is that the crow saw himself in the mirror. It is like I'm gonna destroy this room to show that other crow. That's right. Okay. So Harlan after that, and had to give Jim crow. Okay, there's also a donkey out behind the motel for a while to muse guests Hollywood bring them in back, where the donkey would he haw? And apparently, this was a great fun shirt for people. There wasn't TV. So this is where you would what are we gonna watch tonight logo? Watching down kicking out. We'll be all about that with that adrenaline, rush that was fun. Look at him. Man, I, I from laughing and having a good Tammy to store when you south danke old here. Okay. So he's. I'm on the building. Oh man. I miss Kentucky. Then what a great play Seeven secondhand. It's a winner. There was a racist crow. Oh, Oh, well well. women, f course mistakes racist crow. Yeah, pretty great place. Yeah, this is in this era. That's fine. Yeah. For sure. So early nineteen thirty nine a fire broke out on the restaurant and it spent to the motel most of it was destroyed. But it was insured Highland coat got to thinking to myself, you can sleep, a man only once in twenty four hours but you can feed him three times. Yes. Sort of. So he built a hundred and forty two seat restaurant motels gone. Okay. What did he call this establishment? Taco bell. That's right. Right. The restaurant became a huge success. Now, Harland still is holding a grudge against his wife for the time she left him and tore down the house. Will I feel like we buried that I feel like we buried the hatchet on that he was still holding on? We did he didn't k-. Quote, her leave me out so much, they did quote her leaving me just because I had lost a job had a cut in effect, where love was young and tender when our love was young and tender, I guess, never really got over it, and nine hundred forty eight after thirty nine years of marriage. They divorced Harlan would later, right? What happened next quote, I never intended to marry then but after a year and a half I began to lose buttons on my coat. I could so them on. But then Masako needed darn I couldn't darn socks Taylor. I realized I needed a wife, they need Taylor or life. You need a Taylor. Claudia had been one of our early employee's not love. I had don't marry this poor person occasion to observe her knew how to Pendle she was you need to tailor..

Harlan junior Jim crow Kentucky Harland Harlem salesman baseball Cincinnati MLB Greece Dave rotary club attorney Corbin Wikipedia Aaron Whitley county
"harlan" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"harlan" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"Westwood One. And any of you radio fans, all ready know that also called the Super Bowl for CBS first year HD the ravens giants in two thousand one. So this will be his tenth the the patriots and Rams will be his tenth Super Bowl. Call Kevin Harlan as many people know has seventeen thousand employers. Some of them include CBS sports must been one Turner sports and the NBA two K video game series since two thousand and five Kevin Harlan has been a guest on this podcast before. And I welcome back to the sports media podcast. Kevin good of you to take the time to do this. Thank you, Frankie, Richard for asking always a pleasure to visit with you as well. Our kevin. I the reason I emailed you and want to John I am fascinated by the radio call of the Super Bowl because it obviously does not get anywhere near the publicity of television. Call it. There are so many people in the US and beyond who rely on your call and Kurt Warner's call to to figure out to enjoy the game to figure out. What is what is happening? So first and foremost, how do you approach this Super Bowl call for Westwood One differently? If it is indeed different than your call when you would be doing an NFL game for CBS. As a great question CBS entails. Probably a lot more attention to detail with the information that is given to us throughout the week. Our reading of the beat writers stories and the respective team cities, certainly the release a lot of difference to typical packages that come our way throughout the week. I wanna make sure that for my partner at CBS rich in that. I know. At least imprint what is available on any given week. So for the giants had been knocked out of playoff contention the week before, but there was lots world around UI manning would ode L Beckham junior play or not they shelve him for the rest of the season with just a couple of weeks left saquon Barkley, and what his impact has been many stories, and that really felt was was the responsibility of me. Make sure that I could be the trigger man to get riches thoughts. And so knowing those story lines in all the various components of game from tip detail for both teams becomes necessary with radio, the attention to detail is more focused on numbers names, formations who's up who's in who's out and and more of the chronicling of the game itself. Everybody knows I think that the stories of of these two teams going in will certainly have a list of the top storylines, but my job is to be reporter conveyor of emotion, making sure that that I I've been clear with my description on a kind of catch or the type of run or the defensive formation or the way the quarter. Bac is looking over defense or communicating with his line all the things that the listener cannot see you know, my goal. My main objective is to make sure that that my words around target. So throughout the week knowing these players knowing when they come in knowing that formations there in are far more important than for TV where the viewer can see and it's just accent in what they're watching accenting. The story lines making sure that I ask the appropriate questions to set up which again, and and get a guy who's been an MVP and the league to talk about it an accent the picture because in TV is unite have talked before the picture is. I the analyst is second the graphics and replay third, and then you've got the play by play guy who's ten of the underneath traffic cop to make sure you can tie and thread, these things all together radio. I'm number one. One the play by play guy is number one. In your words..

CBS Kevin Harlan Kevin good giants patriots US Kurt Warner ravens Rams NFL analyst Barkley NBA MVP Frankie John I Bac partner
"harlan" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"harlan" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Asked. Oh my gosh. You're desperate. But here's a random feel like before there's a good business opportunity for somebody who's listening to us to start their own housekeeping, cabins service, get a car drive around pickup clients, be reliable. And that's that is something that you could do we could use an Uber. Driver up there. Okay. Cleaned during the day. I am something for new parents out there. Okay. And this is going to concern you if you are expecting a newborn child on September ninth. If you want to win the eleven thousand dollars, all you have to do is be the first person to name your child Harlan. Why you ask because Harlan is the name of one. Colonel Sanders, the founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken, and he was born on September nine how much money do you? Get eleven thousand dollars. Do it in a heartbeat. Really? I was going to say not enough. I know some Harland's I was raised around name. Now, you're just eligible, I don't know. How is it Harlan? Colonel sanders. Harlan be the middle name. I mean, how would they changed cert? Yeah. Harland original recipe. Yes. Harlan is really cute name. But the thing is is if you legally name your kid Harland, you're just put in a pool to be eligible to win the eleven thousand dollars. But would you want to tell the story of that you named your kid Harlan, and I put the eleven thousand dollars in the Bank the day, you were born in now you're graduating from college, and you have twenty five million dollars. That's how it works out. You thank you Kentucky Fried Chicken. Chicken and scholarships, right? I would never do it. But I mean, it's not a bad. So many people are going to do this. I just know it. So many people would do it. I'm not gonna do it. I gotta be honest. It would depend on your situation. Sure. But that's a good investment eleven thousand dollars a day..

Harlan Colonel Sanders founder eleven thousand dollars twenty five million dollars
"harlan" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"harlan" Discussed on The Frame

"Composer perfect checking with harlan ellison among your odd jobs hired gun for a wealthy neurotic a nutjob took a liking to me when i was in i was in high school and he packed me with a walter kaye and sent me out on what i thought were stupid jobs and i thought it was a gag until somebody took a shot at me you love judge judy i used to well two things happened judy reach menopause and it didn't sit well with her and she's a cranky old lady the other thing is i grew old and i grew restless with the human race i grew impatient with a species that can send someone to the moon that can paint the sistine chapel ceiling that can write moby dick and also has to worry about whether the taylor shrunk their their their coat or they're stupid pit bull bit somebody else's yorkie and so i can't watch judge judy anymore that was one of my guilty pleasures now it's something stupid like pawn stars or love fon stars that's odd says talk about this lexus families jesus and we haven't savage each other into oblivion by now i don't know enough fact checking i've been reading a particular genre for years i have only just read in preparation for this interview read thousands of stories and i somehow missed i have no mouth and i must scream which you wrote in the nineteen sixties and in credibly bleak story about the computer that man built to wage its final war which saves for five people from death and keeps them underground and tortures them forever forever i don't know that i've ever read anything that bleak it's one of my many stories of this an atheist tracked and what it basically says is machines are only as good as we are i postulated a future society which was at odds with itself divided into three major parts which were the mid east of the far east and the rest of the the world and each of them had a supercomputer and at some point the supercomputers gained sentence and all linked up and they program the war so that the human race would lose and am this omnicompetent god basically human and basically evil because it has no purpose it's been built but it's got nowhere to go brought down five human beings to torture them endlessly to show them what they had created and what was left for them and i we related to disappear see game it's called i have no mouth and i'm a scream and you cannot win it there's no way you can get out of that game winning the only thing you can do is play it nobly i did it as an exercise in saying to the human race look how good you can be and look stupid you are that's my job to end tag anais the complacent it's my job on this planet to annoy people i'm not here to tell you how wonderful you're doing all you have to do is look out at raja at the good things you've done and you'll know how good when you do bad here are my smart s ellison to tell you what you've done bad i'm john rabi in today for john horn and what we're listening to is a conversation i recorded with the late science fiction writer harlan ellison in his home back in two thousand thirteen we're sitting in your living room in your in your house the lost as tech temple of mars looking at a case of miniature soldiers this historical miniatures what used to be called toy soldiers from all periods from kessel cooper to world war two this house i'm on two hundred acres of watershed land which will never be built on and i've added to this house we now have something like two hundred and ten thousand square feet in this house secret rooms underground passages tower three story tower the front wall which is the last set lost aztec temple of mars we got gargoyles on.

harlan ellison two hundred acres
"harlan" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"harlan" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Well he comes in at number six but i can't say his name it's it's i'll clean it up it's crap head but that's a different word that's what he named his i haven't seen that movie in a really long time i that was a funny movie that was a funny movie the jerk so let's see what about this one we got cujo comes in at number seven and really lovely picture of cujo here around these that's after he's all been bitten by the bat and he's all rabi how nice covered in slime that's the picture now you might have a better memory this than i do but killer from half baked yeah i use a great dog if you remember the scene in it is he was a rottweiler he's a rottweiler and they find him dead i think but then they come up with this whole backstory of like how it could have happened because they're like wait because they think it's the the whoever the group pushing those drugs within their like wait but what if and it was who's oh my gosh who's the guy who was always high harlan harlan no uhhuh killer killed himself down a window because he was dealing with issues because he had a fight his brother i i gotta say i have not seen this movie enough i've not seen half baked enough that that one and i have to say you know this probably better than anybody that was on comedy central all the time sure oh that was like on heavy heavy heavy rotation and i've only seen it a few times it's a funny movie it's a good i mean it's on on the list of pot movies it's pretty high.

harlan harlan
"harlan" Discussed on SwiftCoders: Weekly Interviews with Swift Developers

SwiftCoders: Weekly Interviews with Swift Developers

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"harlan" Discussed on SwiftCoders: Weekly Interviews with Swift Developers

"Yeah thank you and where can people contact you online twitter's probably the best place yeah just harlan haskins on twitter all right cool so thank you so much harland for coming on the show today and telling us a little bit about how you got into programming with links getting into lennox and not being able to boot up and then right and i guess probably learning how to fix that and then getting into pom pom web os right in the middle sounding board and then doing was s and making the alpha calculator and you know and and you know you're in school now you're gonna graduate soon you've been working at apple google contributing to swift being a mentor to other swift contributors talking different conferences really just an awesome part of this with community you really are you so thank you so much and good luck with your podcast with us yeah we're we're excited we're going to record another episode in the next couple of days and we're excited to get back on the saddle nice and then for those of you wondering if i'm going to have another episode i'm going to be trying to interview as many try swift san jose mentors as possible so if i can get a hold of it any of them and they want to be interviewed all interview them and so we potentially can look forward to you know few episodes more episodes i'm still on on hiatus and really just enjoying my time focusing on what i'm doing and trying to figure out how to push my personal life forward bring everything into focus in alignment within like with my goals still helping people out though maybe just not the podcast people are still hitting.

twitter harlan haskins lennox google apple
"harlan" Discussed on SwiftCoders: Weekly Interviews with Swift Developers

SwiftCoders: Weekly Interviews with Swift Developers

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"harlan" Discussed on SwiftCoders: Weekly Interviews with Swift Developers

"Hello and welcome to the swift coders podcast i'm your host garrick in today's guests is harlan haskins harlan is an undergraduate at rochester institute of technology studying computer science he's interned at apple three times and to those times he was working on swift and currently he's working on some really exciting stuff related to swift acura goal welcome to the show harland hey thank you so much for having me i'm excited to be here my pleasure i'd scream louder but like the room in i wanna be too loud but i got me too super excited haven't done a podcast the soda all time but i'm duma right now 'cause you also special and i wanna talk to you i'm flattered yes so haven't done a long time actually really really like the the drill in is going right now feel in the rush of being live at least like you know you and i are kinda live recording it it's going to go live at some point yet all this is going to be on because i don't do editing now editing yes so why is harley why am i doing episode i've been on hiatus for a while if you wanna learn a little bit about that i did episode with fireside swift where talk about that on that was recent episode and so why am i doing episode right now this is a special episode with harlan because harlan is going to be at trice with san jose two thousand eighteen.

apple san jose harlan haskins harlan rochester institute of technol
"harlan" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"harlan" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Of they are his family's very prominent families foams maturing journal he became an attorney general they had kind of an automatic political dynamic going on with i think the move wigs one time of course the weeks went out with dodo bird then they went to the no nothing party than the union part i think he was elected attorney general's under the union party and then he became finally a republican he himself on meeting harlan uh had kind of a a unusual approach i mean it's he is not somebody who you could defying in cookiecutter fashion yes he wrote some of the great dissents with respect to civil rights but he's also somebody who appealed miscegenation laws in a piece rozelle obama he also had a kind of unfortunate elocution with respect to of chinese where he did sing loud the chinese races being so race that's different from everyone else and wasn't necessarily really interested in acknowledging that someone who is born to some of chinese descent became an american citizen so this is someone who was um very interesting in those respects probably what informed much of his jurisprudence was not only is family background and personal experience with respect to his halfbrother but also he was someone who today they would call a fundamentalist christian home he was a deeply religious man presbyterian and if you look at some of his writings of his two cents you can see some of them fact in the mail which was described how we read is to seventy was in of passion furry fashion almost as if he was preaching from pulpit he would instruct his law clerks that according to biblical prescription you should not treat one as a jew or greek or black or white but all god's creatures and believe that the declaration of independence was the seeds for the entire evolution's mmhmm and that's will also talk about i think he reads he married a woman who was decidedly antislavery so i think that's another important key influence on high so i mentioned that you are what makes this shows interesting for us i hope you will participate it can join us by found 202 seven four eight nine hundred if you live in the eastern or central time zones 202 seven four eight eight nine zero one if you live.

obama attorney harlan