17 Burst results for "Hari Sreenivasan"

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 3 months ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We bring you the final installment in our higher education series. Over the last month. We've heard stories about how students and institutions have been upended by the pandemic. Tonight we take a more hopeful look at students who have been inspired by the events of the last year and return to school. Hari Sreenivasan has this report for our series Rethinking college graduation day at Howard University student Omari Anthony started her senior year in the middle of the pandemic, and this day was not guaranteed. I had some doubts. Sometimes I really did. We didn't find out that we're having in person graduation until The last week of March. So initially, I was thinking that I was going to be, you know, on zoom in my bedroom at home. Walking that way, Anthony majored in journalism and not too long ago hoped to begin a career as an investigative journalist. But in the midst of this unprecedented year, something changed for her. I just felt like you know, there was a lot of people raising awareness. There was a lot of people you know, studying and researching, willing to talk about what was going on. But there weren't enough people who were able to are willing to act at the time, and I felt like that's what I really had to do so after four years of college instead of looking for jobs, She decided to start on a completely new career path this fall should be going back to Howard to begin a master's program in social work. There's not enough people who feel empowered to be able to act on what is going on. Right now. Everyone feels like things are out of their control. A lot of people felt helpless. A lot of people felt alone and I think that I really enjoy working with people and being able to empower them to solve their own issues and come up with their own solutions to what they're facing. For Anthony, part of it was seeing the effects of the pandemic firsthand. I remember at the beginning of the pandemic, my grandfather like got laid off, and he's older. So like he was working past retirement age anyways. And he had started going to the food bank, and he would have to sit in the food bank line for hours to be able to get food and he wasn't even as you know, I guess high need as other people work. Then came the murder of George Floyd.

Anthony Hari Sreenivasan George Floyd Omari Anthony last month last year four years last week of March Howard University Howard Tonight graduation this fall
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:43 min | 8 months ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"One area hit by covert is higher education. According to our partners at US, a fax 36% of households canceled plans for higher education due to the pandemic as of last month, But there's one area of growth, short term program to develop skills for the workforce quickly. Or a string of Austin reports in this last chapter of our Syriza Rethinking college. When I was in Africa, I was going to college and the terrorist attack my country. And I just read everything. When Amina Abdullah I came to study in the US from the West African nation of she had a big goal. Become a computer scientist, a PhD no less. Only problem. I didn't know anything about computers. I couldn't even use Microsoft the basic that's even middle school. People used to submit homework. Ah, big obstacle, especially since she also didn't speak English. But Amina has always had a strategy for getting what she wants. She takes things one step at a time. This year, I will learn English next year. I will do with Dede. Next year, I was top college. In just four years. Abdel. I is already working here. Wall Street. She's enrolled in a program called Europe and interning at the financial information firm SNP Global. All that without a single day of college. Short term credentials have been around for decades. But in this economic environment with skyrocketing traditional college costs now beyond the reach of many They're having a moment In just a few months. Abdel. I began working toward a certificate in U X or User Experience design. That certificate can be applied toward a degree in the future. But in the meantime, it will help her escape minimum wage jobs and actually alone me toe even having a good job and then I can pay for more education to get more skilled done. If only I started with college. I would have to wait four years to even have entry level job in corporate America. She needs to have economic stability right? That's why Gerald Tra TV in the founder and CEO of Europe made short term credentials, a key part of this program to give low income young people a leg up in the job market. As the U. S economy looks beyond the pandemic, he says students like Abdel, I will be desperately needed to fix a fundamental supply and demand problem in the U. S. Well on the supply side. We have five million young adults who are out of school out of work and don't have more than a high school degree. And on the demand side, we have literally millions of jobs. For that's a technical jobs. Jobs that are requires certain level of skill that are going on fulfilled in that'll get worse rather than better as we recovered from the pandemic. Pandemic destroyed millions of American jobs for all ages. Ah, third of adults say that if they lost their job, they would need more education to get a new one and given that lower income workers have been hit the hardest. They'll need to get them quickly, cheaply and in skills tied directly to available jobs. We're looking at the different schools like Columbus State Community College had been working to ramp up shorter term credential programs for years. Then came covert. 19 Cheryl, Hey, is Columbus States executive director of the Office of Talent Strategy. It's going to become a cornerstone for us because it's about equity and opportunity. Not everyone could stop what they're doing to go to class full time during the day and so shorter programming that kind of helps him stair step a little at a time is where we really meet the need. About 36 million people have completed some college coursework but didn't finish, often leaving their efforts completely unrecognized once they drop out, But now even big Tech wants to drive part of the solution. We actually co created the certificate with Amazon Rue the command line interface after just four classes at Santa Monica College. Student like Sofia. Baka can earn an industry recognize certificate in cloud computing skills. Even if I'm not completed with the four classes. I know that there are employers who are willing to hire me as I'm finishing the program. Those jobs often come with the paychecks between 50 and $80,000 per year. Patricia Remo says the school's dean of workforce and economic development, she says, too few on or underemployed workers realize how quickly they can retrain in today's high tech job landscape. Not everybody is going to need bachelor's degrees and master's degree and graduate degrees. I think that industries like tech are changing so quickly, right? They say, every six months, and now it's even faster. Google recently developed its own short term career certificates, they say will be viewed internally as the equivalent of a four year degree. So could short term credentials really replace college? For some perspective, I called Jay Notes, the president of working Nation and a former Obama administration official in the Department of Labor. If people get the right ones. If they get valuable industry recognized credentials, they can get a job pretty quickly. How does that change the landscape when people starting to see their neighbors saying Wait a minute, I went to school for four years, and this person over here just went for six months, and we're kind of the same job. Well, you know, I think the pandemic could set postsecondary education on a deer because people are really gonna look at Is it worth it for me to go for a two year or four years? Degree, or do these quick credentials that our industry recognized. Get me a quicker bang for my buck. But, she warns, there are thousands of certificates out there. Not all were created equal. People have been scammed in the past, so people should be very careful when they're selecting. Ah, program. Make sure that that credential is recognized by other employers. Yes, e mean Abdel. I will soon graduate the Europe program and is already working towards two certificates. Everyday I said, I'd love to work in corporate America. Exacto have itself to add values eggs after something better for my life shall keep repeating that, she says. One credential at a time until she makes it for the PBS news hour. I'm Hari Sreenivasan in New York. Such an important serious thank you. And that is the news hour for tonight. I'm Judy Woodruff. Thank you. Please stay safe, and we'll see you soon. Major funding for the PBS news hour has been provided by.

Europe Abdel Amina Abdullah US America Syriza Rethinking college Columbus State Community Colle Santa Monica College Hari Sreenivasan scientist Africa Judy Woodruff Microsoft Austin Dede founder and CEO Gerald Tra TV Google Amazon SNP Global
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But after guidance comes out, it's been unprecedented to see political leaders undercutting the guidance, telling people they don't need to follow it that it's that it's overdone that it's too expensive. So the idea that we can open our schools this fall if we not if we don't have this under control, And if we're not providing schools with what they need to know so that our Children are safe and staff are safe and teachers are safe. This is something that we can do is a nation. But it has to be driven by that road map that public health is laying out so clearly I mean, as you know, the CDC has had a few missteps. Their initial viral test malfunctioned. They seemed for a period of time to be double counting both viral tests and antibody tests. Do you think that some of those missteps might have added to the sort of ammunition that is being used to shoot at them now? Well, it's it's definitely ammunition. But I worked at CDC for 13 years and and let emergency response for for there was never a response effort that we had where we didn't make mistakes. But we have the opportunity every day to talk to the public and say, Here's something we tried. We thought this was the right way to go hears. It didn't work. Here's what we learned from that. The CDC doesn't have that opportunity here. So you know, there's so much conversation about old mistakes that CDC made if CDs, he were out front, and we're talking to the press every day, one of the things the press does. It asks the tough questions and make sure that CDC doesn't have blind spots around things. They should be paying attention to. They're not getting that, so not only are they not able to share it built trust their response is not as good because they're not interacting directly. All right, Dr. Richard Besser, CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and former acting director of the CDC. Thank you very, very much for your time. Thank you. Now, the first in a special series of reports about Rethinking college during Cove. It Many students, families and of course, colleges and universities are reconsidering what this fall will be like as the pandemic continues to dramatically reshaped the education landscape are Siri's begins with community colleges, which educate about 40% of undergraduates in the US. Many were already stretched thin before the pandemic, But surveys indicate enrollment is likely to increase a students and workers shift plans. Correspondent Hari Sreenivasan looks at how one community college and its students are coping. Maryland's Montgomery College, just outside D C is eerily quiet these days. During a typical July the school's three campuses would be bustling summer school students, but Like so many colleges and universities around the country, Learning here has shifted from classrooms and labs, two bedrooms and living rooms. Montgomery College is one of the country's most diverse community colleges. It's nestled in a county with pockets of poverty and wealth. About 55,000 students ordinarily attend for accredited degrees and other programs like Workforce development. The school was one of the first in the area to announce it will continue remote learning in the fall with a limited number of small lab classes. It's too early to know how many will attend next year. But the school is already seeing an uptick and interest I'd look at my roommate for summer will probably be about 20% up in terms of where we were this time last year there. Ian Pollard is president of the college, she says. As the school gears up for increased enrollment, she's staying focused on current students. Many of whom were struggling before the pandemic, So our students often times are hungry. They are taking care of multiple generations at any given time. They're trying to figure out how to get to school. Many of them live very fragile lives, and they're often times one paycheck away from disaster in March that disaster struck when businesses began to close, many students and their families lost jobs, and some struggled with the move to online learning. That was the case for 19 year old graphic design Major Kayla Savoy. She says she enjoys creating learning about art classes. But technology issues and distractions at home made it difficult to stay focused on school. The WiFi absolutely atrocious at my hose. Um, there's secondly, five or six of us all living at once. You have a toddler screaming about patrol in the background while you're a M classes going on. Cowboy is paying her own way through school and says she managed to get straight A's last semester. But she's been struggling to find work the last few months, and it's been hard to pay for things like gas and food. On top of those concerns, she and many of her classmates have been deeply impacted by recent events surrounding racial inequities. And up to this point where I was like, I don't know how I'm gonna be able to juggle more than I already have. And then I turned around and I see more senseless killings of my people. And as a black woman, I fear for so many of people that.

CDC Montgomery College Hari Sreenivasan Dr. Richard Besser Maryland US Siri Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Kayla Savoy Ian Pollard acting director CEO president
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Because unlike the US the EU has found ways to redesign vehicles and roads to reduce pedestrian deaths it should not necessitate a death. It should not necessitate a lawsuit for action to occur. At the end of the day, community leaders and advocates like daily Tori say they want government agencies to take a more proactive approach to roadway design, and pedestrian safety and while they keep working to make street safer for pedestrians, the families of Keyshawn Aiden and Christian keep working through their grief. For the PBS news hour, I'm Aren Kimball Sanit with the Cronkite school of journalism in Phoenix. And again, that story came to us from the Howard center for investigative journalism at Arizona state. It's an initiative of the scripts Howard foundation. A New York play. Explores what happens to a family after the father is arrested for downloading and trading child pornography on the internet, Hari Sreenivasan sat down with the actress wife, who has written a motion drama about the searing experience is part of canvas, our ongoing coverage of arts and culture. I see. These decent human beings who have done some unspeakable things in this play. You start out with a line that I want to read out says this isn't one of those shows where I'm here to tell you that I was okay, and then I wasn't. Okay. But now I am. Okay. Where are you for years out? You know, I hate the word journey, but I guess I'm on the journey and I have days where they're both amazing and excruciatingly difficult difficult and complicated Maddie. Corman is a working actress seen in several television, series and movies. Hi, guys. Did you see my brother, including some kind of wonderful and made in Manhattan? Alexander also an actor. But more recently a frequent director of law and order adopts, ferry actor, and TV director has pleaded guilty to child pornography. Charges today in two thousand fifteen Alexander was arrested at home for having child pornography on his computer. He was not charged with any physical or sexual abuse of any children, including his own alexan-. Hinder pled guilty was sentenced to ten years probation and forced to register as a sex offender. Probably one of the first questions that people are gonna have when they watch this or hear about it is, why are you still with him? Why is he helping raise your children? Yeah. You know. And I understand that question it's not a fun question. It's not something I ever thought that I would have to defend or explain it's one of the reasons I think that I can't explain it in a two minute. Soundbite I can barely do it. In my ninety minute show accidentally brave a one act, one woman show is running off Broadway in New York City, Mattie. Recounts learning and eventually reckoning with her husband's use of child pornography. And I start to feel something that I can't quite put into words, but it is compassion. Which I can't feel for my own partner. At least not yet through it all this fight her anger upset, and shame Corman decided to stay with Alexander moving from the suburbs into New York City, and starting over something her family could afford. I am incredibly aware of the privilege and I'm also very aware that there are other victims in this crime. Not just my, my kids, and my family me that there are people who are very badly hurt by child pornography in the play Cormon tries to answer that basic question. Why is she still with her husband, a decision that took many months to reach, this is a person that I love that I had been with for twenty years, who has what I think, is an illness, that he is dealing with and making amends for and. He's a good person who did a bad thing. I mean that's the simple way to say it when this initially happened were you concern for the safety of your children, and balancing that with this person that you loved, I was not concerned for the safety of my children around him. I never thought that he would hurt my children. This is a big thing to have happened in your life. And then to have it be public, which it was. But whether I stayed married to my husband or not this is their father. So they were going to have to deal with this in some way or another, the family had no choice but to deal with the fallout from the arrest, but the play was a choice, one Mattie, made intentionally in the hope she says of helping others as a friend helped her stead of all the people saying I feel so sorry for you. She said I feel sorry with you. And at one point, I said, how could I ever pay you back? And she said, you'll just do it for someone else. I tell him, I will never ever, be okay with the things that you chose to look at what I do is tell stories. So this just seemed like an actual.

Alexander New York City Mattie Corman Aren Kimball Sanit Howard center US Cronkite school of journalism Hari Sreenivasan Arizona EU Keyshawn Aiden Phoenix Tori Howard foundation director Manhattan Maddie partner
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Pushed them for the PBS NewsHour. I'm Hari Sreenivasan in Fresno, California. Mel Everest remains the ultimate achievement for many mountain climbers and the number of people who try it just keeps growing far above the levels of even two decades ago may is the month when many try to reach the summit. But as tells us this year has had a number of fatalities once again, and those deaths are prompting questions about whether there are too many climbers, and how Nepal is handling it. Judy. I'm sure many of our viewers have seen this picture over the weekend tweeted out by a climber, the summit of Mount Everest essentially had a traffic jam this past week once upon a time this kind of crowd was unimaginable. But now there are even more troubles ascending and descending from the top at least eleven people have died this climbing season. Most recently, an American attorney from Boulder, Colorado, who died on Monday for more on what it takes to make it to the top of Everest, and the crowding conditions and the decks, we turn to Alan net amount to near and climbing coach, who summited Everest in twenty eleven he's the oldest American to summit k to the second highest mountain in the world and he joins us via Skype from Fort Collins, Colorado. Alan, welcome to the news hour. We hear this word crowded a lot in reference to what we're seeing there. Why is it? So crowded on Everest right now. Well the highest mountain in the world. And for many people is to pinnacle dream, they corrup- watching national. Geographic documentaries on PBS climbing Mount Everest you read books, and it's a childhood dream, and as the world of intrusion this economic status, the middle classes have more money. We're starting to see more and more people try to go there, so more and more people Allen, of course, wanna get to Everest. The Nepalese government also issued more permits than ever before in history. Is it just the fact that it's more crowded that we're seeing more debts? It's very true that the fall issue record three hundred eighty one permits to foreigners, and they also require that each border hire a sherpa guide so that meant that the eight hundred people attempting the mountain this year now that ended up a self has done a big problem. But the problem was that the Jetstream the high winds aloft normally move off the mountain in mid may last year at a moved off and allowed for eleven consecutive summit days in a record number of people summited with the normal sadly, to say the normal five deaths this year, summit that. Summit windows. They're only five oh. So you had roughly eight hundred people trying to squeeze through a three day window in on may twenty third. It was the worst case scenario at all came together. Not very short period of time. So more people trying to summit in fewer possible days. Look, we've heard a lot of people who are coming off the mountain talking about what it's like up there. What the conditions are like on the ground you have been there. They've talked about chaos, they've talked about stepping over bodies. They've talked about it being like a zoo. What is it like when you're up there in the moment? So I think this year again how what people were experiencing what's the worst case? But there's another phenomenon going on. There's a new generation of guide services, which are offering Everest at thirty thousand dollars instead of the normal forty fifty sixty thousand that low price is attracting, people that has never have had the experiences that they need to have before attempting amount like effort. So honestly, they don't know what they don't know. So. They're up there. They don't realize that they're suffering from altitude sickness, the, the support staff that there with doesn't hasn't been trained in the medical aspects. So they don't know when turn people around. So that's what's getting most people in trouble. And also, that's also influencing the chaos that we're seeing. And this idea that people are, are Josh linked to be able to stand on top of the summit, experienced mountaineers would never do that. And that tells me that this year we have a lot of novices up there that honestly needed more support and more experienced before they arrived Allen. Help us understand is less than a minute left. But I'm hoping you can provide some color for us here when you're there, and you've spent tens of thousands of dollars to do this once in a lifetime summit. What is that pressure, like, because we hear about people who are willing to pass by other climbers, who are having difficulty? What are some of the unspoken rules when you're trying to summit Everest, this is a tough one, because when you climb a mountain, like Everest, it really comes down to self. Survey ship. You're in west called death zone where your body is degrading. You're running out of oxygen when you get into these lines where you're burning up the limited about oxygen that you have your honestly just hanging onto the edge. And if all of a sudden, what should have been a twelve hour, seven day turns into a twenty and you run out of oxygen then you die. And if you get low on oxygen then you made stuffer altitude sickness. So the ability to help other people become very, very limited to those strongest people in the mountain, and those are typically the most experienced service up, there is not the normal person that's climbing at someone like myself, Alan Arnett, who has himself made it to the top of Mount Everest, thank you so much for being with us today. But you're. Finally tonight, we.

Everest Mount Everest Mel Everest Alan Arnett Hari Sreenivasan Nepal Allen PBS Fresno Judy California Colorado Nepalese government Fort Collins Boulder attorney Josh thirty thousand dollars twelve hour
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:08 min | 2 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Credit math has doubled with a new classroom format and Jose saviours is in the top of his class for the PBS NewsHour. I'm Hari Sreenivasan in California. Award-winning writer and historian Jared diamond has spent his career studying the rise and fall of civilizations. In his latest book. He examines major geopolitical events of the recent past looking for lessons that may help navigate an uncertain future. William Brandon recently sat down with diamond to talk about it. For our latest installment of the news hour bookshelf. The cliche says those who don't learn history are doomed to repeat it and in a very overt way. Historian, Jared diamond who also teaches geography at UCLA is trying to use history as he roadmap for the present. The book is called a people turning points for nations in crisis in it diamond explains why he thinks the US is on the brink of crisis rising inequality declining democracy and government seemingly incapable of addressing our biggest challenges. And then using the example. Of six other nations that also dealt with major crises including Finland after its war with the Soviet Union Chile and the Pinochet era and postwar Germany diamond draws lessons from each country's success and suggest how we might do the same today. Jared diamond is best known for his Pulitzer prize winning book guns germs and steel, which looked at why some societies thrived followed by collapse. Which examined in part why some didn't Jared diamond joins me now. Welcome to the news hour. Thank you. The pleasure to be with you. So your book uses the example of these nations and then compares their response to these crises, but you use as a measure how human beings how individual people respond to personal crises, and I was sort of struck is that as a as a lens through which to look at how a nation looks at its own crises. Why did you choose that particular lens? I chose that lens because my wife is a clinical psychologist who did a year. Specialty in a branch of psychotherapy quote crisis therapy, which instead of having several years to work with the person deals with client for just six weeks. Someone who's plunged in a personal crisis, which typically is break up of a marriage death of a loved one setback to career the person realizes that the way they operate is. No longer working will have to change and they have to change fast. But also you can't operate vacuum. And I realize that the outcome. Predictors for personal crises suggest predictive financial crises really that how an individual human response in a moment of crisis tracks in some meaningful way. How a nation response partly. Yes. And partly no, partly. Yes. The obvious cases. We people get help from friends in a personal crisis nations. Either. Do don't get help from allies people either accept responsibility or deny responsibility in which case you don't do. With crisis nations, either accept responsibility or think of the United States today blame their problems on Canada and Mexico rather than the United States. So there's a parallel, but there are also differences, of course, that we individuals do not have leaders, and they have leaders so personal crises. Our starting point. Let's stay with that. How how do you measure how the US is responding? But I do believe that the US is in a crisis or on the brink of a crisis. I would say we have spa we spiraling into a crisis for obvious reasons that we've all noticed the the political polarization the gradual breakdown of democracy, which means compromising win necessary. Not having tyranny or the majority congress passing few laws in recent history, all those of signs of the breakdown of democracy in the United States. You argue in the book that political polarization is the single. The greatest threat to this country. Why that it's the threat that could end American democracy. I lived in this Latin American country of Chile in nineteen sixty seven the most democratic South American country democracy end of the military coup. Todd as an outcome of political polarization in the United States political polarization today, the outcome in the US will certainly not be military day Todd because the American army is never interfered. Instead the end of democracy in the United States. If it happens would be by continuation of what we're seeing. Now, they'd be parties in power locally or in state, preventing citizens likely to vote for the other side from registering to vote and a majority of American voters who can't be bothered to go to the polls. If we don't like what I go to doing. We have only to blame with those low voter turnouts. Your book also deals with what you would refer to. And I think many people would believe as international. Crises things that are beyond the borders of one nation. Climate change is a perfect example. But the extinction crisis gobbling up of natural resources all over the world with so many competing nations with different interests and fractious ideas and territorial governance. How are we going to tackle those issues? If we can't even get our own house in order. That's a really interesting question. In fact, if you look again at by chapter on problems with world and imagine it stopping six pages before it actually stops. It would be a pessimistic chapter. And that was my first raft. But then I learned about the difficult problems of the world has resolved in the last thirty years that give me hope the problem of chlorofluorocarbons being released the atmosphere just point the ozone layer delineating overlapping economic zones. Shallow water God. If this something difficult that the elimination of smallpox, the there's no smallpox in the world, the last mall pox cases were in Somalia, so. World has solved really difficult problems. And that gives me hope that since we saw those we also solve climate change nuclear proliferation sustainable resource use and inequality. So you really are optimistic because your book just as you say does end on an optimistic note. But the book is also full of these enormous seemingly intractable problems that that no one seems to be tackling in any serious way. It seems that no one is tackling them in any serious way. And yet the world problems. We have this recent track record and lots of people are trying to tackle climate change tackle inequality. So yes, most of the book is about the problems. But the book ends on an optimistic note. People me a you an optimist pessimists from my answer is I'm a cautious optimist. I think the chances are fifty one percent of resolve problems. But it depends entirely upon choice. I don't know what people will choose if people make the right choices the chances ninety nine. Percents. Resolve problems. All right. Well, here's topped the book is upheaval turning points for nations in crisis Jared diamond. Thank you so much. Thank you. Finally gave pack Chopra the new age alternative medicine. Doctor and philosopher is the guest on this week's that moment. Win news hours. Facebook watched show. Here's a preview of what he has to say time obsessed with those you construct. The human experience of the wood is of course, it you'll experience in human consciousness, and if life is consciousness and consciousness is ache causes than debts is in the news. I'm hoping that the defy for me will.

Jared diamond United States Hari Sreenivasan California UCLA writer William Brandon Pulitzer prize PBS Jose Facebook Finland congress Somalia Chile Soviet Union Chile Chopra
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Struggling students. We're ready for higher level classes, many students still take those courses, but increasingly there's a sense that classes like remedial math are hurting the prospects of the very student schools. Want to help only a third of the students who are placed in those courses go on to graduate or to complete higher level math. The numbers are even worse for students of color. Hari Sreenivasan has a report for our special rethinking college series. It's part of our regular making the grade segment, you put Prentice around them, and you did that work. I college students like Jose saviour. This isn't just a math class. This is a way around a major roadblock to a college degree. I feel like it's my perception on math just chains for decades survive and others who did poorly in math. We're not allowed to enroll in courses. Like these that. Count toward a bachelor's degree. Instead, they were placed in low level remedial courses, I hated. Although I don't wanna do this story Dominguez professor, I would see them just retaking classes over and over the same class in two thousand sixteen study by the California Public policy institute found that only one in four students enrolled in remedial, math classes, were passing the very courses that were designed to get students. College ready had become barriers to a four year degree. I took a six times, and I couldn't pass it. And so you for minority students Raina Schmitz was particularly troubling. One study showed only two percent.

Hari Sreenivasan Raina Schmitz Prentice California Public policy insti Dominguez professor two percent four year
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:46 min | 2 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's a question with a potential to generate a sea change in American politics can states go too far when they draw election maps that favor one political party over the other. It's an issue. The US supreme court has left unresolved before and heard arguments on again today, I'm gonna vase has more. In a pair of cases that could prove to be the most consequential of the term justices heard challenges to congressional maps drawn by North Carolina Republicans and Maryland Democrats to maximize their chances of winning Marcia. Coyle is chief Washington. Correspondent for the national law journal. She was in the courtroom for the arguments today, she joins me here. Now. Welcome back to our good feedback. So the question is not is this practice partisan. Right. Both sides openly say yes, we did it to improve our chances here. What is the question? The justices are trying to answer. Well, the justices are trying to get at excessive partisanship as you say partisanship is inherent in the process of redrawing, congressional and state legislative lines. But when does it go so far that it violates the constitution, and what part of the constitution? So the justices today we're hearing a variety of different tests from those who challenged the maps in North Carolina and a single congressional. District in Maryland trying to give them what the court has been looking for for decades, a manageable standard to determine whether partisanship has gone too far. When you say been looking at it for decades, it's worth pointing out. This has been an issue. They've considered many times before right? Well, they have they just had two cases last term as a matter of fact challenge to Wisconsin state legislative maps and the Maryland case that was for today also came last term, but the justices there didn't get to the merits of whether these were excessively partisan. Instead, they sent them back to the lower courts on a more technical issues like standing to sue whether the the plaintiffs the challengers had a right to sit the Maryland cases back before then the North Carolina case is new and I want to point something out and drive home. Just what we're talking about. When we mention partisan gerrymandering, take a look at this map. This is from common cause this is one of the groups sexually challenging the political gerrymandering there that line is the district line that cuts. Right through the campus of the nation's largest, historically, black college, basically, buy sex campus, dividing those two populations and deluding them into to strong Republican districts that kind of stuff goes on all the time. It's crazy when you look at a map like that. I have questions, but what were the questions the justices were asking today? Well, again, the the focus is on. Do the courts have a role to play here. The constitution the elections clause does give the authority to state legislatures to redistricting. Do the courts have a role, and if they do have a role, what is that standard the court in prior cases has said at times, it's just not a justiciable issue. We don't have a manageable standard for for weighing excessive partisanship. So the justices where asking a variety of questions Justice Gorsuch, for example. It's like, well, maybe the states are already dealing with this problem. I know in Colorado and some other states he said, they've moved to enact independent bipartisan commissions. So their sense. He said he sends his a lot of movement in this area. But just escaped him was like no now and the challenger said, no also because they're about thirty states that don't have those commissions and the census is coming up, the twenty twenty cents the census, and there will be revisted. Acting right after that as well. So the court has been told they are the only ones that can solve the problem now. And it will matter what they say whether they decide to rein in this practice or not because what what is it stake here in this decision. Okay. Justice Ginsburg has called this are precious right to vote if you as a voter know that the outcome of an election in your district has been preordained you are not going to vote or if you've been as they call packed and cracked into some of those districts, like the one you just showed the value of your vote is eroded the right to vote that precious right to vote is the fundamental of our democracy, and that's what's at stake. And so in the twentieth after the twenty twenty cents this if there are no limits on partisan, excessive partisan gerrymandering, we may continue to see legislatures. Go whole hog in drafting district lines in a way to enhance continued control by the party that is in drafting the lines, Marcia Coyle. The national law journal. Always good to talk to you. My pleasure. This past Sunday Mark world TB day, as to Burke yellows has recently surpassed HIV aids to become the leading infectious killer in the world with more than ten million new cases last year Hari Sreenivasan reports there are new hopes for treatment. D'alene van Delft was leading a happy life. The young South African physician was married to a classmate from medical school and well underway way to being a pediatric surgeon when she got what felt like a bad cold, including a cough that would not go away. I think I just decided before the end of the year. Let's go for right? Walking into the dark room and just seeing.

Maryland North Carolina Marcia Coyle national law journal US Washington Hari Sreenivasan D'alene van Delft Justice Ginsburg cough Wisconsin Justice Gorsuch Colorado Burke
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"How long did it take you to get out of that are you out? No, I still have four thousand nine hundred and eighty two dollars left. Not that I checked this morning. In Maine for the PBS NewsHour. I'm Hari Sreenivasan. Picking up new hobbies can be for many a lifelong habit. And as we grow older, many pursue a new language or become proficient at a game. We never played before. But what happens when we choose a riskier approach tonight, novelist? Jane Hamilton, brings us her humble opinion on just how to weigh that decision. In my fifties. I fell in love, I couldn't believe it. I love without the usual lunacy. Noah sleepless nights, sudden weight loss, no sending reckless notes. My beloved attrac- alpha superlight road bike like any new love. However, there were soon problems beyond maintenance and repair. There was the standard fundamental question is this relationship going to kill me every time I get on the track. I wonder if I'm going to die at the hands of some idiot on the road, and I include myself in that category. I've made some stupendous -ly unconsidered moves and more than once tipped over at a standstill question number two a math problem. How much risk is worth taking for how much joy, for instance. There's my father who started rock climbing in middle age. He was wrapped. Christly obsessed when he fell to his death at age fifty nine in a freak accident. We were in shock not just for a while. But really for years. Everyone said how lucky he was to die doing something. He loved I wasn't. So sure he missed a lot of future rapture such as knowing his grandchildren. What would he say to me? Now, I wonder if he became available for an interview, which is Fort Worth dying for father, look at your grandsons, spitting images of you. And they have your brains to you might say, well, obviously rock climbing was stupid. What was I thinking? Maybe he'd advise me to do. Good works instead of chugging around the county train therapy animals, one for congress volunteer at a detention center. Instead, I pump up the truck tires and say it's a spring morning. I had out the cool air on my bare arms. I swear that. Sometimes all I wish for cool air bear arms and to be free free from the labor of making sentences liberated into a pure self and into the fresh awakening world. What lock this joy at my age. Maybe after all my father with a long view will say, oh, don't be such a worrier and a puritan maybe in the afterlife. He's had time to read George Elliott's middle March the best piety is to enjoy. She wrote in her novel. If you have joy, she said, you were doing the most then to save the earth's character is an agreeable planet. Well, Beth that one around my father, and I is George. Elliott's claim simple. Minded is joy and old fashioned luxury is it selfish? Or is it? My father will offer the reason for being. Novelist, Jane Hamilton. And that's the news hour for tonight. But before we go we have some news to report we are thrilled to announce today. The creation of PBS news hour west we are partnering with Arizona State University to bring our west coast audience regular updates as news warrants and more reporting throughout the region. Stay tuned. We hope to launch the PBS NewsHour west later this year. I'm Judy Woodruff. Join us online and again here tomorrow evening for all of us at the PBS NewsHour. Thank.

Jane Hamilton PBS George Elliott Hari Sreenivasan Judy Woodruff Maine Noah Arizona State University Christly congress Beth eighty two dollars
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:56 min | 2 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In the northwest part of the country is leading to new concerns about a lack of vaccinations in some communities and just who may have been exposed to the infectious disease public health officials in Washington across the Columbia River from Portland, Oregon say there are thirty five confirmed cases in Clark county. Twenty five of them are in kids who are ten years older younger at least thirty one of those cases are among those not in United to other cases are confirmed in Oregon and Washington the areas considered a hot spot so to speak when it comes to lack of vaccinations Hari Sreenivasan spoke about that very issue yesterday for news hour weekend with Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci the head of the National Institute of allergy and infectious diseases at the NIH Hari asked Dr vouch if he was surprised that so many of the infected were not immunized. I'm surprised and disheartened that there are so many people still who are not vaccinated against measles. The idea that the. Overwhelming majority of the people who got measles who are unvaccinated is not surprising at all. That's exactly what you would expect. Because the measles vaccine is one of the most effective vaccines of all vaccines that we have if you get the two doses that are prescribed that you should get during childhood one at eleven to twelve months and one at four to six years is ninety seven percent protective. You know? This is Clark county is in the southern border of the state with Portland, Oregon, or I should say the state of Oregon, and it's kind of seeping out their concerns in the Portland area as well. But you know, is up and down the state that in that state. There seemed to be clusters similar to other states. How do you change that? Because there are lots of states that actually give families the option to not vaccinate their children. Well, I think that you have to be much more strict about the flexibility that you give to so so-called philosophical objection to getting vaccinated because that gets abused. And when you. Get below a certain level of the percent of people in the community that are vaccinated. That's a disaster. Waiting to happen. You have to have at least ninety two and as much as ninety five or more percent of everyone in the community vaccinated in order to get that umbrella of what we call her to munity protection. Once you get down below a certain level is just waiting to have the kinds of outbreaks that you're seeing now in Washington state, and that we've seen in New York City and in New York state where among certain populations such as the orthodox Jews who have a lower level of vaccination that same sort of danger and vulnerability so we've got to get past that and get people educated to realize that this is a serious disease. And when you stop vaccinating or give excuses for not vaccinating, these are the kind of things that are going to happen. And the thing that people need to appreciate is that the idea that measles is a trivial disease is. Incorrect before vaccines were available. Measles was one of the most terrifying. Diseases that you could have globally there were millions of deaths each year and in the United States before we have the vaccine that was widely distributed in the sixties. They were a couple of million cases four five hundred deaths a year and a thousand cases of encephalitis, which is an inflammation of the brain. We don't want to go back there, even if it's an individual communities. That's a terrible place to be put measles in perspective. What happens with measles? And why is it? So contagious. Okay. So the typical case of measles is child gets a fever. They get a running knows. They get a conjuncture bias or inflammation of the is they get a cough, and then they get a rash. A couple of days later. They get a rash starts off in the face goes through the body. Most of the time it recovers. It's very uncomfortable for the child. But if you look at the statistics one in ten who get measles get ear infections that can lead to deafness one in twenty get pneumonia. One in two thousand get encephalitis, which is an inflammation of the brain and one two three or so thousand individuals who get measles actually, die from it. So the idea that anybody saying it's not a series of potentially serious disease is just incorrect period to put this number in perspective. This is already about thirty one cases that we're talking about just in the state of Washington. But this is in the larger trend line is. Is this getting better getting worse? It's getting worse. And unfortunately, the anti vaccine in certain segments of the population, certainly not generalized is just growing, and it's getting worse. And it's based fundamentally on misinformation that you don't want to denigrate people who make those kinds of decision and essentially attacked them that doesn't work. You gotta understand. They have these beliefs and the way you try and get them to understand the importance of getting vaccinated is talk about the facts talk about the evidence, don't attack them, and sometimes people tend to put him in attacked them. You've got to understand they have these beliefs. But if present them with the facts, you may be able to win back a substantial proportion of them. I think some of them you never will win back to the to the issue of being able to realize the importance of vaccination, but I think you can try, and I know you can try to get the. Facts to them and some of them will change their mind. One of the things that's really interesting that people don't seem to appreciate that. It's an interesting the bilateral thing. We're on the one hand measles is one of the most contagious infections in history. And on the other hand, we have a vaccine that's one of the most effective axes of any in history. And it just seems such a shame that you have a disease that if left unchecked can rampantly spread and yet you have a tool a safe tool a proven safe tool that can stop it in its tracks. That's the evidence that we've gotta get to people of why it's so important to vaccinate yourself with a safe vaccine, which is the measles vaccine that was Dr Anthony Fauci of the NIH will continue to watch this outbreak in the coming days. The immigration case backlog has been steadily growing, and the recent government shutdown only made the problem worse from Houston public media to Mika Weatherspoon has the story of one man caught in the middle his future unknown since fleeing his home in two thousand seventeen Jose has had a lot of time to think. I remember with tears in my eyes, I left I can't anymore. Yarmuth. He fled violence in his birth country. Nicaragua. Then two months later, he crossed over the US border and requested asylum kitty or throw trusted in God that the opportunity would come and here, I am. Thanks to God. I'm here. But now this country is closing in stores on me. Although he passed a credible fear interview and was allowed to enter the country has been able to get a social security card or driver's license until cases heard immigration court. His life is in limbo. According to his attorney, really powers, he's gone through a lot. And I think he really wants to to make a change. He's been putting his life on hold waiting for for his hearing. Jose is just one of more than eight hundred thousand immigration cases in a backlog, that's grown exponentially. After more than a year of setbacks. Jose had a hearing scheduled an immigration court on January eighth in Houston, Texas. But that morning. His attorney notified him that his hearing had been cancelled that same evening. President Trump addressed the nation. My fellow Americans tonight. I'm speaking to you because there is a growing humanitarian and security crisis at our southern border with a partial government shutdown over, but another one looming three weeks away, the Trump administration, and congress are still debating what to do about border security people wanting to immigrate to the US or cotton the middle during the shutdown tens of thousands of immigration court hearings for canceled. I don't think there's any question that we have a very dire crisis. In terms of our immigration system. Jeffrey Hoffman is the director of the immigration clinic at the university of Houston. We have a humanitarian crisis with respect to people who are frustrated in terms of trying to get their asylum cases heard a client may not be able to hear or get his case heard until two thousand twenty one or twenty twenty two for his part. Jose has no idea when he's hearing will take place he worries that due to the shutdown. His case will go to the back of the line. His biggest fear is being sent back to Nicaragua. What do you think would happen if you had to return to your home country? Me either I fear for my life for the happiness. I have here. Karaguanov to last country foot on KOMO pike. Pizzeria. I would rather go to another planet auto planet for now who say sits and waits even with the government now open. It's unclear how immigration courts are going to address his case in hundreds of thousands of other immigration cases for the PBS NewsHour and to make a Weatherspoon and he in Texas. The government is now reopen the political costs for President Trump are still being tallied. All this as Democrats look ahead to twenty twenty and brace for a potential independent challenger breaking. It down is our politics Monday pair, that's Amy Walter of the cook political report and tamra Keith of NPR, Amy. We're coming off a bruising fight after this shutdown. Now, a lot of that blowback came back to President Trump and the polls aren't looking so good for them right now. What do we know based on what people reacted to well what we know is the president's approval rating now averaging somewhere around forty percent. That's not great. But it's not the worst that the president the shape that he's been in. That was really back in two thousand seventeen he spent a good amount of time down in the high thirties and low forty when is the bigger problem for the president? And for Republicans writ large is that they not only lost the battle over getting funding for the wall. But they lost the war the war on who's going to be better on border security who do Americans trust on the issue. Order security going into the two thousand eighteen election. Obviously, we talked a lot on this show about the caravan. What impact immigration and the debate was going to have on the twentieth. Eighteen election at that time, the ABC news Washington Post poll found that on the issue border security Democrats were behind Republicans by about ten points that people trusted Republicans more now that same ABC poll. Democrats have a two point lead on border security. A Fox News poll you tr- trust Trump on handling border security. He's underwater by ten points. So it's bigger and broader than just well who was responsible for the shutdown. I think that's one piece of it. But if you're losing on ground that the president and Republicans have long held is their most comfortable turf, and where they are the strongest this should be the biggest danger signal for them coming out of this this whole last thirty days. So looking ahead to the next three weeks now. Tam the president has another chance to kind of double down on this to get something. He's been fighting for if they can't come through with some funding at the end of three weeks. What does that mean? Well, and it's unclear whether they won't get any. You know, like it comes down to what is the wall? Anyway, what is border security this conference committee is meeting now the conference committee won't go out beyond what leadership wants, but you know, it's entirely possible that they come up with a five point seven billion dollar or more package that includes a whole lot of border security and not a whole lot of wall..

Measles President Trump president Jose United States Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci Oregon NIH Nicaragua Portland Washington Clark county Houston Hari Sreenivasan attorney Mika Weatherspoon encephalitis Texas
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:17 min | 2 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Federal courthouse in Brooklyn has hosted since November the trial of one of the world's most wanted man. He was a billionaire and cartel boss. He stands accused of ordering murders and running one of the world's most profitable and deadly drug syndicates Hari Sreenivasan caught up with a reporter covering the trial. And the man known as El Chapo. He is the world's most infamous and ruthless drug kingpin and his federal trial in New York has produced one explosive revelation after another with the story line that is equal parts gangster movie and soap opera, Joaquin El Chapo Guzman ran has sent a lower cartel in Mexico, an international drug operation, he used almost as a license to print money and kill anyone who stood in his way whose was repeatedly captured by Mexican authorities and escape from prison twice the last time in two thousand fifteen through a nearly mile long tunnel dug right into the shower of his cell. He was recaptured in two thousand sixteen in extradited to the us for more on all of this. We're joined now by Keegan Hamilton, the US editor of vice news and host of vice news podcast Chapo kingpin on trial. Thanks for being with us. You've been in the courtroom all week, given what just went by? It does read a bit like a telenovela you've got testimony from a mistress. You've got a drug kingpin. You've got his wife in the stands. This is all real life. It was a pretty remarkable week in the courtroom. And like you said it felt like a soap opera at times with was mistress on the witness stand his wife in the gallery and the text between troppo and his mistress displayed on the screen in the courtroom for everyone to see it was quite the drama. There's a bigger picture question here of the levels of corruption that might have existed between El Chapo, the former president of Mexico. And now there's some indication possibly members in the campaign of the current president. That's correct there were several bombshells this week as you mentioned the biggest one was the allegation that chopper when the scene a little cartel paid a one hundred million dollar bribe to regaining NATO, your former president of Mexico. After that, we saw in a court documents that was unsealed an allegation that's in two thousand six a member of the current president of Mexico Andres Manuel Lopez over door member of his campaign may have received a bribe from members at seeing a little cartel. What are the former president in the current president said all this outright denials, a former spokesperson for NATO called the allegations false into family, Tori? The current president Lopez over door has declined to comment on its, but his spokesman said that you know, these comments are coming from a protected witness at a trial in the United States, and therefore should not be believed. One of the things that is interesting is the tech savviness of his infrastructure. We're talking about encrypted cellphone networks the ability to spy on his mistress without her knowing it through her cell phone that was one of the more remarkable revelations of this past month. One of the key witnesses and. One of the most damning witnesses that testified so far was a Colombian who was essentially hired to be the scene, a low of cartels, IT guy, and builds custom encrypted communications network that by all accounts was working rates and tell the FBI approached that guy and turned him into an informant and gave the law enforcement access to the servers which allowed them to record all of these conversations that chopper was having with basically everyone in his business as for the spyware that was chop ozone doing where he installed commercial spyware on the phones of his wife and mistresses and all of those communications were recorded and the same IT guy gave the FBI access to that data as well. Chapel. React in any way. When his voice was playing out through the courtroom. Not when his voice was playing in the courtroom so much normally he's pretty stoic easy. They're staring down whoever's on the witness stand. He's talking with his attorneys or he's trying to catch his wife's attention in the gallery is most notable reaction was at some point when his mistress was testifying. And we were seeing these messages between them that were both embarrassing and highly incriminating, and you could just sort of hung his head a little bit and seem to be staring down in his lap. Which was really the first time we'd seen any sign of defeat on troppo throughout the course of the trial. Let's not forget this is a man who sat on top of a very violent cartel, and it was financed by moving enormous sums of drugs. Put that in perspective. What what's the scale that? We're talking about. Just this week. We saw the FBI give evidence about a drug ledger that was tnd during a raid on one of Chaplin's properties. And in the course of a little over a month. We're talking about three million dollars worth of drugs more or less that moved through the organization, and that's just what was contained in that one ledger that they know about I think it's safe to say tens of millions hundreds of millions of dollars per year are moving through this organization. The US authorities haven't been able to seize the assets of troppo. So who knows how much he has squirrelled away in Mexico and elsewhere, this scale of drugs is enormous hundreds thousands of kilos of drugs the federal prosecutors when they filed these charges have hoped to seize fourteen billion dollars from troppo that seems kind of like a fantasy at this point since they found none of that money. But it gives you a sense of what US authorities think they can prove the worth. Worth of of the drugs that he traffic into the United States over the years is and for people who don't know the landscape how violent how big was this cartel or is this cartel. We see numbers as high as two hundred fifty thousand people killed in this war. I mean, the the scene a little cartel is the largest and most powerful drug trafficking organization in Mexico. They are moving drugs across the hemisphere and in Mexico. They are in the past especially have been responsible for a significant significant amount of the violence in Juarez, for example, along the border with El Paso, Texas. Basically a personal dispute between Chow and another drug trafficker escalated into a war that made what is for a while the murder capital of the western hemisphere Kagan Hamilton, the US editor vice news, and host advice is podcast Chapo kingpin on trial. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. Stay with us. Coming up on the news hour, the internal controversies of the women's March movement. Amy, Walter and hammer Keith break down the latest politics news and on Martin Luther King day revisiting Dr king's poor people's campaign. But I a number of.

United States Mexico president troppo El Chapo Joaquin El Chapo Guzman Mexico Andres Manuel Lopez FBI Hari Sreenivasan Keegan Hamilton editor NATO Brooklyn New York reporter El Paso Dr king Juarez
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on Amanpour

"Way too and veterans do now when when you think about it all the changes in our country have come from movements, you know? And then there's a leader there the channels that emotion, whether it's the anti slavery movement and Lincoln was they had the progressive moment for teddy Al Franklin, the civil rights movement with ABRAHAM LINCOLN with with civil rights men with LBJ. I get my guys. I think now there's a movement. There's a movement. That's a foot with women with veterans with new people coming in with all those people standing on line that they want to see change in the healing divisions of our country that to change our political structure. Let us hope there's no other choice. But to the the pessimism will not do us any good. There you go. I wish we had a lot more time for this optimistic segment of our program, both of you, Doris Kearns Goodwin. Walter isaacson. Thank you so much and now for the relationship between president and the press remember Thomas Jefferson's famous dictum, quote, where it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers or newspapers without a government. I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter. Now that means a lot to our next guest. Of course, she's Barry Weiss, an op-ed staff editor and writer for the New York Times. She calls himself a political centuries. Sometimes inning left sometimes the inning. Right. She was born and raised. In squirrel hill. Pittsburgh eleven Jewish was worshippers with gunned down less than two weeks ago. Barry spoke to a Hari Sreenivasan about the election results. And how Tara came to her own backyard. What explains the outcome last night this country is I'm not the first to say this. We're in the midst of a kind of cold civil war and the outcome. Last night was you can sort of conceive of it as a battle that ended in a stalemate. You know, the lots of people predicted that the Democrats were going to take the house and they did. But we we really saw was sort of the the su- solidification of the Republican party as the party of Trumpism moderate Republicans loss last night, moderate Republicans who stood up to Donald Trump lost. And that is a very very troubling sign for the health of a of a country that sort of built on a two party system audience. Give us some context where do you identify yourself? A find yourself in a political spectrum. I think of myself as being in the center, some people see me as sort of a democrat in the mold of scoop Jackson or Daniel Patrick Moynihan, others see me as a liberal Republican. I don't spend much time. And thinking about what party I belong to. I've always been registered as an independent. I've always voted for people at both parties. I see myself as sort of classical liberal on. And frankly, I see myself in the space where I think a lot of other Americans do which is moderate taking taking things issue by issue not wanting to sort of just ascribe wholeheartedly to any political orthodoxy and right now frankly, politically homeless and unrepresented by both parties in this country powerful voices in the Would bin..

Barry Weiss Republican party ABRAHAM LINCOLN Doris Kearns Goodwin Walter isaacson teddy Al Franklin Hari Sreenivasan Thomas Jefferson scoop Jackson Pittsburgh squirrel hill New York Times Donald Trump Tara president Daniel Patrick Moynihan
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on Amanpour

"Midterms approach is just a week away. The Republican strategists pollster Frank Luntz has worked with. Some of the most powerful conservative politicians of recent times now working with vice news to try to understand. Why Americans have such difficulty disagreeing with outgoing so-called nuclear on each other. He told a Hari Sreenivasan why the situation is so dire on what needs to change. Franklin's thanks for joining us. So heading into the midterms where are we as a nation or should I say to nations, I don't know if it's two nations because in some ways, it's a dozen or even more. I've never known us to be so angry with each other so disrespectful, so distrusting that we tend to ride each other off within the first moment of what we hear that you've viewers right here that are going to make a decision about whether they like me or not and that decision determine whether or not they stay with the segment. Why have we become so impatient? Why have we become why do we think that we can say anything and do anything because we have the right to be heard? It used to be that we wanted to learn now, we just wanna speak. There's a clip that we have from show that you just did a special for vice news, this is voters in Nevada. Let's take a look via Chauhan's how many of you would say that. You're mad as hell about all the stuff that's going on. It's almost all of you. What are you? So mad at the economy is so good economy is and everything. Yeah. The it's health care. It's the way that they're treating certain classes of people in education. Exactly. These are things that are disturbing economy is only one segment it's great to have money. But if you're living society that doesn't value other things that sad you life. We have to be civil whenever we had discourse. I want my precedent to be civil. I want him to have more than gray. Powers? Right. I don't want him to be laughed that he's gonna stand. Take take. Take take it that way. I mean, he says things we have a I don't like the last. Questions you're talking but civility, and then it goes to hell the moment that Donald Trump has mentioned why is that because we are learning from him. Last people. He all these people. The problem is he's attacked. No, stop by the media every single day. He can't win amount of what he does. I thought we had wasn't doing what he's doing you attack. Okay. Okay. Hold on. Is this America? Do you represent America? You're not has. Yeah. Yes. Prove your point. They can't even stop interrupting each other. And you said this is the beginning of this that was forty five seconds into it. It got worse other way that was them behaving. Well, they don't know each other did never met each other before. And the moment that the word Trump is entered into the discussion it comes apart. But the truth comes apart when you say healthcare it comes apart when you say tax cuts. It comes apart on everything tragically. That's america. Have we become more entrenched? Have we backed into our corners, even more and how much of that is President Trump responsible for his language is unlike any other president his presentation is unlike any other president, and the people who condemn him are like any other critics where are the people who saying enough is enough are the people who are saying, let's calm down get in a room disagree, but come out with some with something. There's an agreement to be made. On immigration. I know it there's agreement to be made on education 'cause I've heard both sides all sides, but nobody wants to come to an agreement for two reasons, they'd rather yell and and be too. So harsh at the people they disagree with and you're punished if you compromise when you talk about the parties in that context in Washington today

President Trump Chauhan America Frank Luntz Hari Sreenivasan Franklin president Nevada Washington forty five seconds
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on Amanpour

"Well, if you're talking about the region, there's Arabian a turn back towards of authoritarianism since jails, thirteen. In Saudi Arabia, you have to look at the personality of crown prince. Mohammad bin Salman here is a thirty three year old prince who has amassed an a degree of power that is unprecedented in more than half a century in Saudi Arabia. It's a system where power was distributed among different branches of the Royal family in part in the interest ability. He's changed all that in a big rush and really brought it all into his own hands and having done that. He's made a number of previous steps which have shocked the west and even alarm the west. I'm talking about detaining two hundred of the kingdom's richest businessmen and even members of his own family. And the Ritz Carlton hotel without any judicial process leading the three year old war in Yemen, that many in the west call like humanitarian catastrophe and for for a few. As appearing to kidnap, the prime minister of Lebanon and detain him against his will. So those are three things that you would think would have lost him the confidence of the west. And yet until now he's appear to be in good standing. He had a tour of the us. He met with many prominent executives. He's welcome to the White House. So perhaps I don't know what's going through his head. Perhaps he feels that nothing can stop him that he can get away with it. Okay. So we have. We had other hand, he feels that all of the criticism is sticking him and he needs to silence Mr. kashogi for that reason, we have thirty seconds left. Might this change the perception because everybody was looking there were even columnists in the United States writing about a new Saudi Arabia reform Saudi Arabia. He's got his twenty twenty reform plan that all sorts of internationals were engaged with. Could this flip that switch. You know, it's very hard to know whether it will the argument that he was making for reform of the Saudi economy, I think, remains a valid one. And so it's too soon. I think to tell what the final conclusion of international public opinion will be about what happened to Jamaica show. All right. And also what it'll mean for perceptions of Mohammed bin Salman it's a really dramatic story, not least because it involves out colleague and friend, and we still want to know the truth about what happened to him. David Kirkpatrick. Thank you so much indeed for joining us from Ankara in Turkey. So we're gonna switch tone a little bit. Nonetheless, freedom of speech has long, been a topic of debate even within the world of comedy for that time. Few faced more controversy over this then British comedians Monty, python, Eric idle was a founding python. He has been clapping his coconuts for five decades reminding us to always look on the bright side of life in his new sorta biography. Eric, finds his voice. In the sixties cultural revolution and recounts the famous faces and the knights of me that he met along the way. Eric idle took our Hari Sreenivasan on a laugh down memory lane. You've decided on a memoir. Why? Well, our fiftieth anniversary Monty python is coming up next year, and I thought we're going to have to answer questions..

Saudi Arabia Salman Eric idle Mr. kashogi Mohammad David Kirkpatrick United States Ritz Carlton hotel prime minister Hari Sreenivasan Yemen Ankara Lebanon White House Jamaica Turkey thirty three year thirty seconds five decades
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

13:10 min | 3 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on Amanpour

"Was the British Foreign Secretary. But for the past five years, he's been head of the International Rescue Committee and he told our Hari Sreenivasan what he learned from his own trip to Yemen and how the world is failing its refugees. David Midland, thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. You were just in Yemen. Impressions is the world's worst humanitarian crisis according to the statistics, and it's heartbreaking when you see it with your own eyes. I mean, this is a country which was always poor. It's got real stress from climate change, but three and a half years of war eighteen thousand bombing. Raids have left a country where eighty percent of the population depend on humanitarian aid where half the population have no access to clean drinking water, where we're three million kids are out school and where the world saw the the largest ever cholera epidemic. Last year, a million people affected and I got this terrible sense that things are more likely to get worse than better fighting. Looks like it's going to intensify in this critical port city of Hodeida. I got within fifty kilometers of it, and that is the port, it's in the north west of the country seventy to eighty percent of all humanity. Terriers supplies and commercial supplies go through the and that is the center of the fighting at the moment between the Saudi led coalition to reestablish control for the heavy government and the who the rebels who took power in two thousand fifteen, and there's been a challenge getting humanitarian aid. There's an folks that there's a choke the and we have good stuck in port. We have the the UN calculates a fraction of the food of the medicines that need to get through are getting through a despite the fact that the port of her Deidra still open Saana airport, which is key for commercial operations is closed, and this war is a stalemate, frankly, because neither side is advancing its position. The only people thriving in the kale saw extremist groups like Al Qaeda or ISIS and the victims all the supports villains of Yemen, seven and a half thousand of them directly killed in the fighting you. You reported last month of this appalling. Bombing or missile attack on the coach of forty plus kids, and then you the wider ramifications for society that frankly, on the edge of meltdown, how can it be a stalemate? It seems like on the one side, the Saudi side, which the US supports his lopsidedly better armed what's lopsidedly strong. It's total monopoly of AB power, but as any conflict asymmetric conflict, the the rebel group, the who 'this who took power on Doug in that dug into the cities, the dug into Sunol the dug into data, and you can't bomb your way to victory against an occupying force on the ground and the Saudi led coalition for obvious reasons. Don't want to fight street by street through data, the port in the city and the who know that. And the terrible thing is that the pain is being felt by the civilians as a u n envoy that extremely experienced British. Diplomat mounting, Griffith. He needs a ceasefire. The allows the humanitarian aid to go through the allows the commercial traffic to be reestablished. And that gives him space to try to broker an enduring peace. D do the Yemenis know that. The world is watching to. They feel like the world is not watch that they won't the world's wake up, but they do know that there's American bombs dropping on them as we drove from Saana to Hodeida. The checkpoints manned sometimes by child soldiers, but sometimes bows one of the kids Johnson as we went through in the UN landcruiser death to America because they say America's bringing death to us, and that is of gives light the idea that what starts into Yemen stays in Yemen. This is how Yemen becomes a center of radicalization that can go further. And this war is making no progress. That's this. I'm not coming on this program to say it's you the costs of a war too high because of the humanitarian cause I'm telling you the coastal to high in humanitarian terms. The was Ladas humanitarian crisis and in geopolitical terms because this is not a war that anyone is winning is a. Oh, lose no-win war, and it's going to take bold leadership to say, we need a ceasefire. We create the space for a political settlement. What is the responsibility of the US in getting to that settlement? I think it's high. I mean, the US is a permanent member of the US announced it's the most most powerful member of the UN Security Council. It's the leading backer of the Saudi led coalition the above. This isn't just about the Trump administration either is important that people understand in two thousand fifteen, the UN pasta resolution which frankly was a cop 'blanche for war, not a road map to peace. It was unbalanced resolution and it came at the time when the Obama administration wanted to reassure the Saudis that they had that back when they were doing the Iran nuclear deal was a pale for the Iran nuclear deal. In some ways we need to start again because it's not the basis for the kind of political settlement. The comp. Flex society like Yemen needs. There are some that you, you've got Syria. You've got the row hinge you've got people migrating out of Venezuela, right? I mean, there are there are my gracious happening all over the world refugees being created by different causes, but it seems the world is on the move in certain way that different. 'cause I mean, the causes conflict. I mean, the biggest driver of extreme poverty today is conflict and some of that scene in the internal displacement. Some of it in refugee flows. The world is on the move for economic reasons which is a different to do with immigration, but it's on the move because of a failure of peacemaking. You've got fragile states that con- contain the ethnic political religious differences that exist within the Mehan. Mom would be a good example of that. That's where the Hinga seven hundred thousand fled across the border into Bangladesh. You've got chew malt inside the Islamic inside significant policy limit world Afghanistan. Syria, big flows of refugees, and you've got a weak and divided into national political system in which the US I'm sorry to say is in retreat the western pounds or in retreat. The POWs of traditionally, at least in word upheld human rights alongside state's rights as the foundation of the international system. Those powers are in retreat and into the vacuum. You've got all sorts of acts as moving Russia moves in to the Syria theater Al Qaeda and ISIS move in in parts of Yemen that I was talking about earlier and this retreat from global engagement under the excuse quote, unquote. All politics is local is dangerous in a world that's more connected than ever before because what starts in Syria doesn't stop in Syria. What start starts in Yemen doesn't stop in part of the Trump. Administration's rationale is listen. Let the rest of the world start picking up some of the slack. We've done our more than our fair share. Maybe we need to focus on our own problems. What does nothing to stop you fixing the bridges and epaulets of New York because you're also doing active diplomacy around the world. Walking and chewing gum at the same time is meant to be started here, and the truth is European countries together. Now spend more on humanitarian aid in America. That's a big change. And the danger is that what Richard Haass the president of the council on foreign relations hit Kohl's the abdication est foreign policy. The retreat from global leadership. The retreat from a rules based international. The great danger is that far from serving America's interests that retreat actually compromises those interests did it makes us more at risk amazing of honorable and also exposes your allies. I put it this way. You can't have the blessings of globalization unless you willing to bad the responsibilities, the burdens of globalization. And so what I would like to see President Trump and his administration, recognizing that find America first. But America I is not served by American retreat. There seems to be an anti refugee movement that's happening, not just in the US but across Europe as well, much more talk of walls, much more talk of borders than bridges. That's a good point. And there's a lesson in the country that are actually hosting refugees. I mean where the most refuge. One percent in the wolves refugees in America, six or eight percent in Europe. AT six percent of the wolves refugees are in developing countries. So Bangladesh when those seven hundred thousand Ringo would driven out minima Bangladesh didn't say, we'll build a wall. They said, well, we're, we're going to look off these people, Kenya. When a million people came from south Sudan, Sudan over the laws often build a wool. They said it could have been us will look after these people. So you'll right to say the in the countries that created the UN refugee convention in nineteen fifty. One US UK off to the second mode will there's a retreat from the values that led to that long period of peace and prosperity, but that doesn't make it right. And I would say one other thing that's going to be careful on this. It's true that the administration here is reducing drastically. The number of refugees were allowed to come in the last week. There was a secretary pump is that it was what the cap is going to be. Thirty thousand the lowest since the refugee act went into effect exempt. What nineteen eighty? Exactly. So the historic average was nineteen. Thousand refugees are arriving to the US. I mean, a small proportion of the twenty five million refugees around the world. They've slashed it to thirty thousand. In fact, this year there's any Twenty-one thousand refugees being not so America retreating from its global responsibility, but we as well as being an international humanitarian aid agency. We resettle refugees the small number of refugees who are allowed to come and the American spirit when a refugee arrives next door is to go out and help them. It's not actually to be fearful, and America has a proud tradition of being a home for a few days. My organization, the International Rescue Committee was founded here in New York by Albert Einstein who was a refugee, he was stuck in America. When Hitler came to power in Germany, couldn't go back. He was Jewish delay, chill, and so that proud bipartisan tradition is under threat. And that doesn't serve America's interests. You're a child of refugees, Charles, right with my parents were lucky because they were allowed into the UK. My dad was allowed in the UK and nine hundred fourteen my mom in nineteen forty six. So I, I know refugee myself, but I was a child refugees and I think that's as it changed the way you look at this work well, I think it I suddenly feel that when I have someone say I fled my country when it was invaded, I think of my dad when I hit people say, I mean hiding, I think of my mom, so I don't want to put myself on a pedestal in any way, but it's maybe a different religion that these people have got these days. They don't Jewish like me. They might be Muslim Amal. They might be actually the number of Christians who being allowed minority Christmas will being allowed into the US salsa being slashed, so it's not just the Muslim populations being talked. So the religion may be different than mine the region of the world maybe different. But the sense of fellow feeling is strong. One of the things that you're working on along with the sesame. To me workshop is creating an education infrastructure. You were both ward at one hundred million dollar grant from the MacArthur foundation. What are you working on? What are you doing wit what? King to address something really telling a child who is traumatized by war and forced to flee the country suffers. What's cool, toxic stress that's affecting the the damage to the brain that comes from being exposed to traumatic experiences. And we're working with sesame workshop because we've shown between the two of us that we can reverse that toxic stress. If you get to those kids early enough, you can help them. So for children between the ages of zero and eight in the Middle East in Jordan and Lebanon in Iraq, and actually inside Syria itself a with setting up a program to reverse the effects of that toxic stress to help at one point, four million children in by visiting them in that tents in there. Inao homes and they're. Well, with the with, yes. Yeah. But with with educational material that includes a sesame guards includes a special new version of Sesame Street that will reach far more than the one point, four million about seven point, nine million. It's a five year program, so it's not the short termism that you went up present quick fix, but with promising that evidence based systematic engagement can actually rescue generation

US Yemen America Syria UN Hodeida International Rescue Committee Bangladesh Secretary UK ISIS cholera Hari Sreenivasan David Midland UN Security Council Ladas
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on ZigZag

ZigZag

08:31 min | 3 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on ZigZag

"This zigzag the podcast about changing the course of capitalism, journalism and women's lives. I'm Newsom Roti and our second season officially kicks off on October eleventh. But we are very glad you're here because we have a special episode this week, why? Well, because the blockchain experiment that we have been part of that we've been documenting all through season. One civil is actually hoping for business. The civil tokens finally went on sale. With that. The civil token sales open. We're going to go behind the scenes at this attempt to use crypto currency to save journalism Ross gonna talk about all the PR that this show has gotten recently and what that means for our business. Is it all good and Jen? And I are also going to talk about men men in public radio in particular, attempting to come back from banishment. After the metoo movement. Jim point, my co-founder and I will be back in a sec. Hades Manezh will be back to zigzag in a sack, but I wanna tell you about another podcast that I'm co hosting medium playback on each episode. We invite a great writer into the studio to perform a recent story that they wrote for medium, then I break it down with them. We talk about their big ideas from the story. So here from future as baritone day, Thurston on tracking down his online data Roxie enga- on choosing to have weight loss surgery this week. Mike Montero explains why he thinks designers should need a license. Check out the show at medium dot com slash playback or search for it. On your favorite podcast app. Happy token day, John happy token day minutiae. Okay. So let's be in not the wherever not transparent, but in that spirit today is Tuesday, September eighteenth twenty eighteen, and this is the day that the cryptocurrency called civil has gone on sale. And if you have no idea what we're talking about, that's okay. PBS NewsHour weekend did a really great feature on civil. It only took us twelve episodes to explain than they did in eight minutes free. Well, I think I mean, granted without the tears and the but they did a great job. So let's play a clip from the host Hari Sreenivasan describing like what's happening with the token sale because I think it's it's pretty clear this week. Civil is offering thirty four million tokens of its crypto currency to the public, which will eventually be traded on exchanges just like bitcoin. The price of each civil will fluctuate depending on. On demand, the company is aiming to raise at least eight million dollars and civilised setting an upper limit at twenty four million dollars to discourage people from speculating. The money will be used by the civil foundation to fund grants to journalism projects. In addition to raising cash, the goal is for the civil token to tie together a community of people creating and supporting journalism in the civil network, we encourage. Yeah, I think I have to tell you, Dan, I got was diving into our in mailbox this morning, and we got an Email from Hillary written in all caps saying, I love you to being transparent kick ass women entrepreneurs who seek to deliver reliable journalism, but because I don't know or care much about civil or tokens, kind of wish that the amount of detail that you've been delivering was a little less and Hillary. I hear you. I feel like I hear you. 'cause you wrote me in all caps, but thank you for writing us. And it's weird done because for every Email that Hillary says, we get twenty emails that say, like, asking about all the gnarly details of this token sale. So Hillary standby, we're going to get to other female kick ass journalism entrepreneurship stuff. But we gotta talk token sell because there are a lot of zigzag listeners who are extremely invested pun intended in the details of this. So Jen, we're gonna turn to you to the civil token news desk manned by woman'd by gen plant chief crypto correspondent, what's the latest John. So there are some announcements that came out over the past few days leading up to the sale that I think are important for listeners to know. Particularly if you're involved in the actual sale and buying tokens civil is extending the sale to October fifteenth, which is two weeks longer than they had originally announced. And that's presumably to allow more people to get in. Involved so that they can ensure that they're going to reach that eight million dollar soft cap or like the lowest amount that they're willing to operate with and sell these tokens for. So that does give them more time. Give await Jan, explain why they've extended the token sale by two weeks. This is going to piss off some of our listeners or a lot of listeners in aren't. Yes. Go ahead. So civil has found a way to accept direct wire transfers with the US dollars to buy civil tokens directly, meaning that you don't have to register with token founder. You don't have to buy e. You still have to register with civil, right, but which a lot of people are going to go. They just went through a bunch of hoops to try it out. We've actually already got feedback, Brian, rotas, an Email that said, glad to see the civil added this option. I only wish it had been there six weeks ago before I went through this whole process, opening a coin, basic count and getting a meta mask account to buy the tokens. My east purchases already declined in value. And then he just basically says, please be consistent and timely. I think that is very fair. I do too. However, however, here we go. Remember you guys back at the beginning of season one. When we talked about this idea of using the podcast as a lab for experimentation, experimentation, one of the reason and yes, one of the reasons why civil has come up with this like work around or why they decided to put so many resources behind getting their idea engineers to figure out different ways to. Make it easier for people to join. The experiment is because of your feedback zigzag listeners. So actually, I think we achieved in many ways. Exactly what we set out to do, which was to test new technology to get regular people out in the world, trying it giving real-time feedback, and then the engineers were listening in. They built it back in, right, I do cool. And I think they zigzag listeners. It's ad venture to say, you know, they really are pushing this as a consumer token zigzag listeners are the consumers here a lot of the consumers. I think a good percentage of the people that are trying this out that just turned my stomach when you said that because then it makes me feel like, wow, we have a responsibility, we do. Absolutely, absolutely. But I, I would say this, I completely understand Brian's perspective, and I also would say, can also see the other perspectives that you know these guys have been working really hard night and day to launch a new thing? Yes, nobody has tried before and. And they're trying to make it easier, and that's kind of part of the process of being an early adopter. Yeah, I think I think that's exactly right. So back to the other news, the other announcement this week, that one hundred percent of the proceeds of this token sale are going to go straight to the civil foundation, the nonprofit entity that writes grants for the civil news room. So the newsroom's will write grants, correct? Yeah, allegedly. Okay. So this is going to inferior, allow the civil foundation to get more good newsrooms onto the platform faster. So what do you think Jen, if the deal is the token sale ends if they hit twenty four million dollars like that's that an as of this moment Tuesday's September eighteenth from the afternoon, we have ninety thousand dollars worth of civil tokens have been purchased.

civil foundation Jen Hillary Brian John Hari Sreenivasan Ross PBS NewsHour US Mike Montero Jim point Thurston writer Roxie enga co-founder Jan Dan founder
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

06:54 min | 3 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on Amanpour

"About hosting this program is exactly what you've just seen tonight. So far the opportunity to pivot from talking with Nancy Pelosi about political leadership to digging into filmmaking with Ethan Hawke. I'm always challenged by the range of stories that I'm able to share with you. So I'm particularly pleased that beginning today we can expand our reach even further into politics and the arts, but also into technology culture, faith and the staggering social changes that are shaking our world. I am thrilled to welcome for new contributors to the show brilliant reporters, diverse voices, and some of America's greatest storytellers. So let me start with the celebrated journalist and biographer, Walter Isaacson. He is a history professor at Tulane university, and he's author. Most recently of Leonardo da Vinci at Menendez is contributing editor at bustle, and she's host of the podcast Latina to Latina Hari Sreenivasan anchors the PBS NewsHour weekend. And he's also host of public television series Sitek now and Michelle, Martin, the ME award winning journalist and weekend host of NPR's all things considered. So welcome to all of you. I say contributors, but really we're a team and we are so excited to be expanding this. This version of this program, this particularly crucial time I just wanted and let me start with you Michelle. What does this mean to you? I mean, what makes you hopefully excited about joining this program for first of all, you stole my thunder because I think our behalf of all of us were very excited to be working together and to be working with you for me, it's the time it's the chance to have an uninterrupted conversation. I think people are hungry for it. I think they're ready for it. I mean, I think we see what the success of podcasts that people are eager to have a conversation that isn't over in four minutes where you can actually dig into some nuance. Maybe maybe get into a place that people don't have time to talk about otherwise. So I think can't wait, hey, you know, you're right about the podcast and you do host. It causes. I said, you know, it is a time when people seem to be just really thirsty. I mean, really sort of drinking up to sort of slake their thirst on trying trying trying to make sense of what I think anyway is a massively complicated practically upended world right now. I think people look at the news and they wonder, what does it mean? What does it mean for me? What does it mean for my children? And how can the person sitting in front of me? Give me a window into the world that we are entering. Michelle says this great thing that I think about a lot, which is that very often when someone interviews a gas, they interview the job, and I think one of the luxuries that we all have as we'll actually get to interview people to see them in their totality and to bring that to the audience. It's interesting because you both have hit on the luxury of time and we all in a medium where whether it's radio or television or not so much podcast, but is quick quick. Quick sound bites. Get the get the interview done in three minutes rather than fifteen eighteen thirty hour long. It takes you used. To be my boss, you were head of CNN and a different era, and you presided over that kind of rapid fire mandate. What do you see is the challenge in the opportunity around this table of you began show with at this particular time? It's so important. It seems to me to pause her second and go a little bit deeper to figure out the background able to drill down a bit with somebody and not make them talk only inside and bites. And there's so many places nowadays where people are chasing the latest tweet, trying to get at talking point comment. If we can get people discussing real ideas. I think we will satisfy as Michelle said a wheel hunger that's happening in this nation for wait a minute. We're exhausted by this shallowness and the discord we have, let's have something more serious. I think, discord, you hit the nail on the head because they didn't. The discord is something that is coming at us at warp speed all the time. They're just seems to be corners of organized opposition to just about anything. Wherever you look, you are a specialist in tech and technology, and we're seeing tech really under the microscope right now for good and often bad reasons. What do you want to bring to this conversation? I think that there's been a lack of understanding on how this technology that we're taking for granted is really affecting us on a day-to-day basis more not just on the personal level on your privacy or security, but really on when you think about this on a on a global scale, when Facebook becomes the only way that Aboke of an entire country, like say, the Philippines gets their internet, they have an enormous amount of power. So when there might be something we'd say, oh, it's disinflation campaign. It doesn't really affect a lot of people in one particular state or one particular city. The United States. When you start to look at this globally, you're like, wow, this, these are big forces here, and it's not just a group of journalists fact checking that are going to be able to stop it. So how do we make sure that as we embrace these new technologies as they help our lives, that there's also a level of responsibility and accountability that goes with that and you know not to put too fine appoint on it, but I think we've gathered a really important diverse group of all of our semi. We all represent different ages, different experiences, different ethnicities, different specialities and expertise. And I don't think we see quite enough of that on the air right now again in a very divisive sort of me and then left and right, black and white kind of gay and straight kind of environment that the seems to be so much division that I think this is really healthy this table and is not the kind of table we see at your average dinner party. Frankly, you know, in our diversity is a strength as a country. And we've sort of forgotten that in the past few years. And I think that's what causes creativity to happen is when people from diverse backgrounds come together. It's also the ability to have civil discourse with a diverse group of people. And so I congratulate you and putting together the show. Walter saying here, I do think that both and is important. The fact that we were standing up for civil discourse. The fact that we're standing up for classic principles. We all represent different backgrounds faces are all look different, but we all share some common ideals and one is that the truth does matter. The facts do matter and civil discourse does matter. It's not one of these old fashioned corny, ideal ideas. It's a value that endures, and I think that people, I think most people agree with that, and I think this is going to be an opportunity for us to show that it still matters, which leads me perfectly. You very good at this into us giving little exit of what some of what you're going to be a showing showing us over the next few weeks. So Michelle, let me start with you because some of the interviews that we've been seeing the next few weeks, you've spoken to RJ young. He's someone who's written a book called, let it bang a young black man's reluctant odyssey into guns. I mean, that is pretty provocative. I want to play a clip and then we'll ask you what led

Michelle Walter Isaacson Nancy Pelosi Ethan Hawke America Tulane university Hari Sreenivasan professor Leonardo da Vinci CNN NPR Sitek Facebook United States Menendez contributing editor Philippines RJ Aboke