17 Burst results for "Hari Sreenivasan"

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | Last month

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We bring you the final installment in our higher education series. Over the last month. We've heard stories about how students and institutions have been upended by the pandemic. Tonight we take a more hopeful look at students who have been inspired by the events of the last year and return to school. Hari Sreenivasan has this report for our series Rethinking college graduation day at Howard University student Omari Anthony started her senior year in the middle of the pandemic, and this day was not guaranteed. I had some doubts. Sometimes I really did. We didn't find out that we're having in person graduation until The last week of March. So initially, I was thinking that I was going to be, you know, on zoom in my bedroom at home. Walking that way, Anthony majored in journalism and not too long ago hoped to begin a career as an investigative journalist. But in the midst of this unprecedented year, something changed for her. I just felt like you know, there was a lot of people raising awareness. There was a lot of people you know, studying and researching, willing to talk about what was going on. But there weren't enough people who were able to are willing to act at the time, and I felt like that's what I really had to do so after four years of college instead of looking for jobs, She decided to start on a completely new career path this fall should be going back to Howard to begin a master's program in social work. There's not enough people who feel empowered to be able to act on what is going on. Right now. Everyone feels like things are out of their control. A lot of people felt helpless. A lot of people felt alone and I think that I really enjoy working with people and being able to empower them to solve their own issues and come up with their own solutions to what they're facing. For Anthony, part of it was seeing the effects of the pandemic firsthand. I remember at the beginning of the pandemic, my grandfather like got laid off, and he's older. So like he was working past retirement age anyways. And he had started going to the food bank, and he would have to sit in the food bank line for hours to be able to get food and he wasn't even as you know, I guess high need as other people work. Then came the murder of George Floyd.

Anthony Hari Sreenivasan George Floyd Omari Anthony last month last year four years last week of March Howard University Howard Tonight graduation this fall
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on Amanpour

"Hong Kong's leader is shouted down and backlash mounts against Lebron James for backing the NBA over a manager critical of Elizabeth Warren turn in the Cross has what the largest democratic debate yet means for the twenty twenty race going forward and this was a Jew me of evolution that I didn't and I didn't even find mys- attempts actually the integrative medicine grew Deepak Chopra sits down the Hari Sreenivasan talking about his journey and his eighty ninth book metro human unleashing your infant potential welcome to the program everyone I'm Christiane Amanpour.

Hong Kong Lebron James NBA Deepak Chopra Hari Sreenivasan Christiane Amanpour Elizabeth Warren mys
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

15:28 min | 2 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on Amanpour

"Hello everyone and welcome to Amanpour. Here's what's coming off. After about a year of peace talks. President trump cancels a secret meeting with Taliban leaders at Camp David. What does it mean for America's longest war war in Afghanistan eighteen years since nine eleven border then here in Britain suspending parliament leaving critical brexit questions unanswered. My guest is senior aid to the former prime minister. David Cameron says Boris Johnson has overplayed his hand also from Harlem Haberdashery to Gucci Partner Hip hop fashion icon dapper. Dan Speaks with our Hari Sreenivasan. Welcome to the program everyone..

Hari Sreenivasan Harlem Haberdashery David Cameron President trump Camp David prime minister Taliban Boris Johnson Afghanistan Amanpour Dan Britain America Partner eighteen years
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

15:19 min | 2 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on Amanpour

"Hello everyone and welcome to Amman for here's what's coming up thirty thousand people dying while the healthcare our industry tens of billions of dollars profit healthcare at the center of the Democrats bid to unseat Donald Trump but should they fix what exists or go big and bowl. We'll dive into the policy and the political plus U.. S. China trade talks and with no progress atop expert explains what China China is thinking and all of this and she told me I wasn't coming home until I learn respect. How long does that take two years from the Bronx to Nigeria Syria to the most exciting rising chef in America are Hari Sreenivasan speaks with kwami on Watchi- about his incredible journey welcome to the program everyone?.

Donald Trump China China Hari Sreenivasan S. China Amman Bronx Nigeria Syria America Watchi two years
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:56 min | 2 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In the northwest part of the country is leading to new concerns about a lack of vaccinations in some communities and just who may have been exposed to the infectious disease public health officials in Washington across the Columbia River from Portland, Oregon say there are thirty five confirmed cases in Clark county. Twenty five of them are in kids who are ten years older younger at least thirty one of those cases are among those not in United to other cases are confirmed in Oregon and Washington the areas considered a hot spot so to speak when it comes to lack of vaccinations Hari Sreenivasan spoke about that very issue yesterday for news hour weekend with Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci the head of the National Institute of allergy and infectious diseases at the NIH Hari asked Dr vouch if he was surprised that so many of the infected were not immunized. I'm surprised and disheartened that there are so many people still who are not vaccinated against measles. The idea that the. Overwhelming majority of the people who got measles who are unvaccinated is not surprising at all. That's exactly what you would expect. Because the measles vaccine is one of the most effective vaccines of all vaccines that we have if you get the two doses that are prescribed that you should get during childhood one at eleven to twelve months and one at four to six years is ninety seven percent protective. You know? This is Clark county is in the southern border of the state with Portland, Oregon, or I should say the state of Oregon, and it's kind of seeping out their concerns in the Portland area as well. But you know, is up and down the state that in that state. There seemed to be clusters similar to other states. How do you change that? Because there are lots of states that actually give families the option to not vaccinate their children. Well, I think that you have to be much more strict about the flexibility that you give to so so-called philosophical objection to getting vaccinated because that gets abused. And when you. Get below a certain level of the percent of people in the community that are vaccinated. That's a disaster. Waiting to happen. You have to have at least ninety two and as much as ninety five or more percent of everyone in the community vaccinated in order to get that umbrella of what we call her to munity protection. Once you get down below a certain level is just waiting to have the kinds of outbreaks that you're seeing now in Washington state, and that we've seen in New York City and in New York state where among certain populations such as the orthodox Jews who have a lower level of vaccination that same sort of danger and vulnerability so we've got to get past that and get people educated to realize that this is a serious disease. And when you stop vaccinating or give excuses for not vaccinating, these are the kind of things that are going to happen. And the thing that people need to appreciate is that the idea that measles is a trivial disease is. Incorrect before vaccines were available. Measles was one of the most terrifying. Diseases that you could have globally there were millions of deaths each year and in the United States before we have the vaccine that was widely distributed in the sixties. They were a couple of million cases four five hundred deaths a year and a thousand cases of encephalitis, which is an inflammation of the brain. We don't want to go back there, even if it's an individual communities. That's a terrible place to be put measles in perspective. What happens with measles? And why is it? So contagious. Okay. So the typical case of measles is child gets a fever. They get a running knows. They get a conjuncture bias or inflammation of the is they get a cough, and then they get a rash. A couple of days later. They get a rash starts off in the face goes through the body. Most of the time it recovers. It's very uncomfortable for the child. But if you look at the statistics one in ten who get measles get ear infections that can lead to deafness one in twenty get pneumonia. One in two thousand get encephalitis, which is an inflammation of the brain and one two three or so thousand individuals who get measles actually, die from it. So the idea that anybody saying it's not a series of potentially serious disease is just incorrect period to put this number in perspective. This is already about thirty one cases that we're talking about just in the state of Washington. But this is in the larger trend line is. Is this getting better getting worse? It's getting worse. And unfortunately, the anti vaccine in certain segments of the population, certainly not generalized is just growing, and it's getting worse. And it's based fundamentally on misinformation that you don't want to denigrate people who make those kinds of decision and essentially attacked them that doesn't work. You gotta understand. They have these beliefs and the way you try and get them to understand the importance of getting vaccinated is talk about the facts talk about the evidence, don't attack them, and sometimes people tend to put him in attacked them. You've got to understand they have these beliefs. But if present them with the facts, you may be able to win back a substantial proportion of them. I think some of them you never will win back to the to the issue of being able to realize the importance of vaccination, but I think you can try, and I know you can try to get the. Facts to them and some of them will change their mind. One of the things that's really interesting that people don't seem to appreciate that. It's an interesting the bilateral thing. We're on the one hand measles is one of the most contagious infections in history. And on the other hand, we have a vaccine that's one of the most effective axes of any in history. And it just seems such a shame that you have a disease that if left unchecked can rampantly spread and yet you have a tool a safe tool a proven safe tool that can stop it in its tracks. That's the evidence that we've gotta get to people of why it's so important to vaccinate yourself with a safe vaccine, which is the measles vaccine that was Dr Anthony Fauci of the NIH will continue to watch this outbreak in the coming days. The immigration case backlog has been steadily growing, and the recent government shutdown only made the problem worse from Houston public media to Mika Weatherspoon has the story of one man caught in the middle his future unknown since fleeing his home in two thousand seventeen Jose has had a lot of time to think. I remember with tears in my eyes, I left I can't anymore. Yarmuth. He fled violence in his birth country. Nicaragua. Then two months later, he crossed over the US border and requested asylum kitty or throw trusted in God that the opportunity would come and here, I am. Thanks to God. I'm here. But now this country is closing in stores on me. Although he passed a credible fear interview and was allowed to enter the country has been able to get a social security card or driver's license until cases heard immigration court. His life is in limbo. According to his attorney, really powers, he's gone through a lot. And I think he really wants to to make a change. He's been putting his life on hold waiting for for his hearing. Jose is just one of more than eight hundred thousand immigration cases in a backlog, that's grown exponentially. After more than a year of setbacks. Jose had a hearing scheduled an immigration court on January eighth in Houston, Texas. But that morning. His attorney notified him that his hearing had been cancelled that same evening. President Trump addressed the nation. My fellow Americans tonight. I'm speaking to you because there is a growing humanitarian and security crisis at our southern border with a partial government shutdown over, but another one looming three weeks away, the Trump administration, and congress are still debating what to do about border security people wanting to immigrate to the US or cotton the middle during the shutdown tens of thousands of immigration court hearings for canceled. I don't think there's any question that we have a very dire crisis. In terms of our immigration system. Jeffrey Hoffman is the director of the immigration clinic at the university of Houston. We have a humanitarian crisis with respect to people who are frustrated in terms of trying to get their asylum cases heard a client may not be able to hear or get his case heard until two thousand twenty one or twenty twenty two for his part. Jose has no idea when he's hearing will take place he worries that due to the shutdown. His case will go to the back of the line. His biggest fear is being sent back to Nicaragua. What do you think would happen if you had to return to your home country? Me either I fear for my life for the happiness. I have here. Karaguanov to last country foot on KOMO pike. Pizzeria. I would rather go to another planet auto planet for now who say sits and waits even with the government now open. It's unclear how immigration courts are going to address his case in hundreds of thousands of other immigration cases for the PBS NewsHour and to make a Weatherspoon and he in Texas. The government is now reopen the political costs for President Trump are still being tallied. All this as Democrats look ahead to twenty twenty and brace for a potential independent challenger breaking. It down is our politics Monday pair, that's Amy Walter of the cook political report and tamra Keith of NPR, Amy. We're coming off a bruising fight after this shutdown. Now, a lot of that blowback came back to President Trump and the polls aren't looking so good for them right now. What do we know based on what people reacted to well what we know is the president's approval rating now averaging somewhere around forty percent. That's not great. But it's not the worst that the president the shape that he's been in. That was really back in two thousand seventeen he spent a good amount of time down in the high thirties and low forty when is the bigger problem for the president? And for Republicans writ large is that they not only lost the battle over getting funding for the wall. But they lost the war the war on who's going to be better on border security who do Americans trust on the issue. Order security going into the two thousand eighteen election. Obviously, we talked a lot on this show about the caravan. What impact immigration and the debate was going to have on the twentieth. Eighteen election at that time, the ABC news Washington Post poll found that on the issue border security Democrats were behind Republicans by about ten points that people trusted Republicans more now that same ABC poll. Democrats have a two point lead on border security. A Fox News poll you tr- trust Trump on handling border security. He's underwater by ten points. So it's bigger and broader than just well who was responsible for the shutdown. I think that's one piece of it. But if you're losing on ground that the president and Republicans have long held is their most comfortable turf, and where they are the strongest this should be the biggest danger signal for them coming out of this this whole last thirty days. So looking ahead to the next three weeks now. Tam the president has another chance to kind of double down on this to get something. He's been fighting for if they can't come through with some funding at the end of three weeks. What does that mean? Well, and it's unclear whether they won't get any. You know, like it comes down to what is the wall? Anyway, what is border security this conference committee is meeting now the conference committee won't go out beyond what leadership wants, but you know, it's entirely possible that they come up with a five point seven billion dollar or more package that includes a whole lot of border security and not a whole lot of wall..

Measles President Trump president Jose United States Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci Oregon NIH Nicaragua Portland Washington Clark county Houston Hari Sreenivasan attorney Mika Weatherspoon encephalitis Texas
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:17 min | 2 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Federal courthouse in Brooklyn has hosted since November the trial of one of the world's most wanted man. He was a billionaire and cartel boss. He stands accused of ordering murders and running one of the world's most profitable and deadly drug syndicates Hari Sreenivasan caught up with a reporter covering the trial. And the man known as El Chapo. He is the world's most infamous and ruthless drug kingpin and his federal trial in New York has produced one explosive revelation after another with the story line that is equal parts gangster movie and soap opera, Joaquin El Chapo Guzman ran has sent a lower cartel in Mexico, an international drug operation, he used almost as a license to print money and kill anyone who stood in his way whose was repeatedly captured by Mexican authorities and escape from prison twice the last time in two thousand fifteen through a nearly mile long tunnel dug right into the shower of his cell. He was recaptured in two thousand sixteen in extradited to the us for more on all of this. We're joined now by Keegan Hamilton, the US editor of vice news and host of vice news podcast Chapo kingpin on trial. Thanks for being with us. You've been in the courtroom all week, given what just went by? It does read a bit like a telenovela you've got testimony from a mistress. You've got a drug kingpin. You've got his wife in the stands. This is all real life. It was a pretty remarkable week in the courtroom. And like you said it felt like a soap opera at times with was mistress on the witness stand his wife in the gallery and the text between troppo and his mistress displayed on the screen in the courtroom for everyone to see it was quite the drama. There's a bigger picture question here of the levels of corruption that might have existed between El Chapo, the former president of Mexico. And now there's some indication possibly members in the campaign of the current president. That's correct there were several bombshells this week as you mentioned the biggest one was the allegation that chopper when the scene a little cartel paid a one hundred million dollar bribe to regaining NATO, your former president of Mexico. After that, we saw in a court documents that was unsealed an allegation that's in two thousand six a member of the current president of Mexico Andres Manuel Lopez over door member of his campaign may have received a bribe from members at seeing a little cartel. What are the former president in the current president said all this outright denials, a former spokesperson for NATO called the allegations false into family, Tori? The current president Lopez over door has declined to comment on its, but his spokesman said that you know, these comments are coming from a protected witness at a trial in the United States, and therefore should not be believed. One of the things that is interesting is the tech savviness of his infrastructure. We're talking about encrypted cellphone networks the ability to spy on his mistress without her knowing it through her cell phone that was one of the more remarkable revelations of this past month. One of the key witnesses and. One of the most damning witnesses that testified so far was a Colombian who was essentially hired to be the scene, a low of cartels, IT guy, and builds custom encrypted communications network that by all accounts was working rates and tell the FBI approached that guy and turned him into an informant and gave the law enforcement access to the servers which allowed them to record all of these conversations that chopper was having with basically everyone in his business as for the spyware that was chop ozone doing where he installed commercial spyware on the phones of his wife and mistresses and all of those communications were recorded and the same IT guy gave the FBI access to that data as well. Chapel. React in any way. When his voice was playing out through the courtroom. Not when his voice was playing in the courtroom so much normally he's pretty stoic easy. They're staring down whoever's on the witness stand. He's talking with his attorneys or he's trying to catch his wife's attention in the gallery is most notable reaction was at some point when his mistress was testifying. And we were seeing these messages between them that were both embarrassing and highly incriminating, and you could just sort of hung his head a little bit and seem to be staring down in his lap. Which was really the first time we'd seen any sign of defeat on troppo throughout the course of the trial. Let's not forget this is a man who sat on top of a very violent cartel, and it was financed by moving enormous sums of drugs. Put that in perspective. What what's the scale that? We're talking about. Just this week. We saw the FBI give evidence about a drug ledger that was tnd during a raid on one of Chaplin's properties. And in the course of a little over a month. We're talking about three million dollars worth of drugs more or less that moved through the organization, and that's just what was contained in that one ledger that they know about I think it's safe to say tens of millions hundreds of millions of dollars per year are moving through this organization. The US authorities haven't been able to seize the assets of troppo. So who knows how much he has squirrelled away in Mexico and elsewhere, this scale of drugs is enormous hundreds thousands of kilos of drugs the federal prosecutors when they filed these charges have hoped to seize fourteen billion dollars from troppo that seems kind of like a fantasy at this point since they found none of that money. But it gives you a sense of what US authorities think they can prove the worth. Worth of of the drugs that he traffic into the United States over the years is and for people who don't know the landscape how violent how big was this cartel or is this cartel. We see numbers as high as two hundred fifty thousand people killed in this war. I mean, the the scene a little cartel is the largest and most powerful drug trafficking organization in Mexico. They are moving drugs across the hemisphere and in Mexico. They are in the past especially have been responsible for a significant significant amount of the violence in Juarez, for example, along the border with El Paso, Texas. Basically a personal dispute between Chow and another drug trafficker escalated into a war that made what is for a while the murder capital of the western hemisphere Kagan Hamilton, the US editor vice news, and host advice is podcast Chapo kingpin on trial. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. Stay with us. Coming up on the news hour, the internal controversies of the women's March movement. Amy, Walter and hammer Keith break down the latest politics news and on Martin Luther King day revisiting Dr king's poor people's campaign. But I a number of.

United States Mexico president troppo El Chapo Joaquin El Chapo Guzman Mexico Andres Manuel Lopez FBI Hari Sreenivasan Keegan Hamilton editor NATO Brooklyn New York reporter El Paso Dr king Juarez
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on Amanpour

"Way too and veterans do now when when you think about it all the changes in our country have come from movements, you know? And then there's a leader there the channels that emotion, whether it's the anti slavery movement and Lincoln was they had the progressive moment for teddy Al Franklin, the civil rights movement with ABRAHAM LINCOLN with with civil rights men with LBJ. I get my guys. I think now there's a movement. There's a movement. That's a foot with women with veterans with new people coming in with all those people standing on line that they want to see change in the healing divisions of our country that to change our political structure. Let us hope there's no other choice. But to the the pessimism will not do us any good. There you go. I wish we had a lot more time for this optimistic segment of our program, both of you, Doris Kearns Goodwin. Walter isaacson. Thank you so much and now for the relationship between president and the press remember Thomas Jefferson's famous dictum, quote, where it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers or newspapers without a government. I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter. Now that means a lot to our next guest. Of course, she's Barry Weiss, an op-ed staff editor and writer for the New York Times. She calls himself a political centuries. Sometimes inning left sometimes the inning. Right. She was born and raised. In squirrel hill. Pittsburgh eleven Jewish was worshippers with gunned down less than two weeks ago. Barry spoke to a Hari Sreenivasan about the election results. And how Tara came to her own backyard. What explains the outcome last night this country is I'm not the first to say this. We're in the midst of a kind of cold civil war and the outcome. Last night was you can sort of conceive of it as a battle that ended in a stalemate. You know, the lots of people predicted that the Democrats were going to take the house and they did. But we we really saw was sort of the the su- solidification of the Republican party as the party of Trumpism moderate Republicans loss last night, moderate Republicans who stood up to Donald Trump lost. And that is a very very troubling sign for the health of a of a country that sort of built on a two party system audience. Give us some context where do you identify yourself? A find yourself in a political spectrum. I think of myself as being in the center, some people see me as sort of a democrat in the mold of scoop Jackson or Daniel Patrick Moynihan, others see me as a liberal Republican. I don't spend much time. And thinking about what party I belong to. I've always been registered as an independent. I've always voted for people at both parties. I see myself as sort of classical liberal on. And frankly, I see myself in the space where I think a lot of other Americans do which is moderate taking taking things issue by issue not wanting to sort of just ascribe wholeheartedly to any political orthodoxy and right now frankly, politically homeless and unrepresented by both parties in this country powerful voices in the Would bin..

Barry Weiss Republican party ABRAHAM LINCOLN Doris Kearns Goodwin Walter isaacson teddy Al Franklin Hari Sreenivasan Thomas Jefferson scoop Jackson Pittsburgh squirrel hill New York Times Donald Trump Tara president Daniel Patrick Moynihan
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Crime boss James Whitey Bolger is dead one day after being transferred to a federal prison in West Virginia. His death is being investigated as a homicide several news organizations, including the Boston Globe reported. He was murdered in prison today by inmates associated with the mob. Bolger who for years was one of America's most wanted criminals ran gambling and drug rackets across Boston for decades. He was an FBI informant as well Bolger was on the run for sixteen years before he was eventually caught and convicted in two thousand thirteen of participating in eleven murders in the nineteen seventies and eighties, Emily, Rooney of public station. W GBH in Boston as long cover Bolger and his crimes and she joins me now, Emily Rooney. Thank you for talking with us. What is known about how he died while he was only in the new prison. It'd come up from Florida to West Virginia less. Than twenty four hours. He was still in his wheelchair. I have heard some reports that he was surrounded by a mob of gang of people who viciously beat him. I can't corroborate that. But that's what I've heard which says something about the that federal prison. He had more than that. So they say that they transferred him there for a different reason. And there was somebody there waiting for him. We we really don't know a lot of a lot of questions. He started on this criminal path from a very early age. Tell us about his career he was a criminal at age thirteen. And now he was robbing convenience stores. He dropped out of school at the age of fourteen. He ran a criminal enterprise for decades and decades, he had this charm in this sort of appeal that he he he lured people into his his his net, including women he often had two or three women going at a time. It took that one on the road with Anthony tried to take. The other one with him I and she gave up and came home. And then he took Catherine Greg on the road for them. He was he was an FBI informant over what period of his life and how did that develop well in nineteen seventy five became an informant. What had happened was the the DA the Federal Bureau investigations wanted to bring down like CASA Nostra the Italian mafia in order to do. So they enlisted the help of the winter hill gang, which was won by Whitey Bolger and all of his associates, they figured Bill tourney blind. I two rackets and numbers and some of that, you know, busting machines and that kind of stuff, but they also turned a blind eye to nineteen murders. And then in one thousand nine hundred five FBI agent. John Conway who grew up in the same housing project is Whitey Bolger. And was in the FBI tipped him off that he was about to be indicted. But you know, John Conley has always contended to this day. Hey, he was one of the guys he was part of the team. And he feels like he took the fall for something that happened at a much. Much higher level at the FBI you mentioned murders. I mean, he killed people with his own hands. Oh, yes. And then you took naps afterwards killed at least two women, Deborah hussy and Deborah Davis. He was only convicted of one of those murders. But then he would pull their teeth out and bury the remains. So that they couldn't be as easily identified. We didn't have DNA testing back then but the story of his life. I mean, it's been made into movies documentaries about him. He he'll be remembered for all of this. And the woman who was with him at the end, she still serving time, Catherine. Greg is still serving time. She was sentenced to a fairly minimum number of years like seven or eight, but she refused to cooperate with some detail about I don't know other informants or where money was hidden something like that. I can't remember the details of that. And she accepted more time in prison as a result. So she's still I believe she's in a federal prison somewhere locally, I believe. But but what a legacy he has. Can you imagine the Andy I should say, by the way? None of the victims in the greater Boston area. Or lamenting this at all they're cheering. They're popping champagne tonight. But this is not the way his life should have ended. And the federal government is got some explaining to do Emily Rooney with WG be h we thank you. Now should colleges be accountable for the graduation rates of their students. Hari Sreenivasan reports from Florida for the conclusion of our special series on rethinking college, which is part of our weekly focus on education making the grade..

James Whitey Bolger Emily Rooney FBI Catherine Greg John Conley Boston Boston Globe West Virginia federal government Anthony Hari Sreenivasan Deborah Davis Florida Federal Bureau America CASA Nostra John Conway Deborah hussy Bill twenty four hours
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Clinton encouraging rally chance of locker. He's insulted. Former CIA director Brennan as a loud mouth partisan political hack and threatened to revoke his security clearance and a president who often derides the press has singled out CNN for particular sport. Soros. A long time donor to progressive causes around. The world has also long been a target of conservatives in the far right one. Recent film, endorsed by the president's son Donald junior went so far as to label Soros a Nazi collaborator. The billionaire investor survived Nazi occupation in his native, Hungary as a child at a campaign rally in Florida today, a sombre Hillary Clinton said she worried for the direction of the country. But it is a troubling time. Isn't it? And it's a time of deep divisions. And we have to do everything we can to bring our country together for the PBS news hour, I'm on Nevada's. As of this hour, neither the FBI nor other law enforcement officials have provided any motive for the pipebombs late today. CNN president Jeff Zucker criticized the president quote, the president, and especially the White House press secretary. He said should understand their words matter thus far he added they have shown no comprehension of that. Let's check back into New York City this evening about this tense, and sometimes confusing day Hari Sreenivasan is therefore us. He joins us from Columbus circle on the west side of Manhattan horror. You are standing right in front of the Time Warner building. What's the situation there?.

president Hillary Clinton Soros Time Warner building CNN Hari Sreenivasan Jeff Zucker CIA Hungary FBI Donald junior Manhattan Brennan Columbus press secretary New York City Nevada director White House
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Don't know yet what they're gonna do MSNBC's LLC. Thank you this here. Now. It's like I'm running for governor. Of your vote with two weeks until the midterms Democrats are doubling down on state races in Nevada. The party is pushing to elect the first democratic governor in twenty years we've got to turn out voters. And if we turn out the voters that we've identified we're gonna win, but he's their candidate making a convincing case where many going how how are we going to fix this on the next morning edition from NPR news? I'm Sharon Prouty. The European Union's top diplomat says the block is working with a group of seven most industrialized nations to coordinate a response to the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, and she is calling on the Saudis to provide all the information. They have a lawyer says Egypt has arrested prize winning economist I've collect for okay and his publisher over a book that challenges president. I've Delphi tells C's economic policies. The attorney says the tour accused of spreading fake news. This marks the latest in a wave of detentions targeting all forms of dissent in Egypt Yahoos agreed to pay fifty million dollars in damages and provide two years of free credit monitoring services to about two hundred million people in the US and Israel their Email addresses and other personal information stolen as part of the biggest security breach in history. You're listening to here now. Hi, I'm Hari Sreenivasan..

Egypt Hari Sreenivasan Jamal Khashoggi MSNBC Sharon Prouty European Union NPR Nevada US Israel attorney president publisher fifty million dollars twenty years two weeks two years
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on Amanpour

"Well, if you're talking about the region, there's Arabian a turn back towards of authoritarianism since jails, thirteen. In Saudi Arabia, you have to look at the personality of crown prince. Mohammad bin Salman here is a thirty three year old prince who has amassed an a degree of power that is unprecedented in more than half a century in Saudi Arabia. It's a system where power was distributed among different branches of the Royal family in part in the interest ability. He's changed all that in a big rush and really brought it all into his own hands and having done that. He's made a number of previous steps which have shocked the west and even alarm the west. I'm talking about detaining two hundred of the kingdom's richest businessmen and even members of his own family. And the Ritz Carlton hotel without any judicial process leading the three year old war in Yemen, that many in the west call like humanitarian catastrophe and for for a few. As appearing to kidnap, the prime minister of Lebanon and detain him against his will. So those are three things that you would think would have lost him the confidence of the west. And yet until now he's appear to be in good standing. He had a tour of the us. He met with many prominent executives. He's welcome to the White House. So perhaps I don't know what's going through his head. Perhaps he feels that nothing can stop him that he can get away with it. Okay. So we have. We had other hand, he feels that all of the criticism is sticking him and he needs to silence Mr. kashogi for that reason, we have thirty seconds left. Might this change the perception because everybody was looking there were even columnists in the United States writing about a new Saudi Arabia reform Saudi Arabia. He's got his twenty twenty reform plan that all sorts of internationals were engaged with. Could this flip that switch. You know, it's very hard to know whether it will the argument that he was making for reform of the Saudi economy, I think, remains a valid one. And so it's too soon. I think to tell what the final conclusion of international public opinion will be about what happened to Jamaica show. All right. And also what it'll mean for perceptions of Mohammed bin Salman it's a really dramatic story, not least because it involves out colleague and friend, and we still want to know the truth about what happened to him. David Kirkpatrick. Thank you so much indeed for joining us from Ankara in Turkey. So we're gonna switch tone a little bit. Nonetheless, freedom of speech has long, been a topic of debate even within the world of comedy for that time. Few faced more controversy over this then British comedians Monty, python, Eric idle was a founding python. He has been clapping his coconuts for five decades reminding us to always look on the bright side of life in his new sorta biography. Eric, finds his voice. In the sixties cultural revolution and recounts the famous faces and the knights of me that he met along the way. Eric idle took our Hari Sreenivasan on a laugh down memory lane. You've decided on a memoir. Why? Well, our fiftieth anniversary Monty python is coming up next year, and I thought we're going to have to answer questions..

Saudi Arabia Salman Eric idle Mr. kashogi Mohammad David Kirkpatrick United States Ritz Carlton hotel prime minister Hari Sreenivasan Yemen Ankara Lebanon White House Jamaica Turkey thirty three year thirty seconds five decades
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian lehrer on wnyc and with us now is christiane amanpour cnn's chief international correspondent and host of her show on cnn and pbs if you haven't heard the news yet her pbs show is being made permanent after these months of temporary scheduling where the trolley low show used to be we'll talk to christiane now about the media and the world thanks for coming on again christiane when it's a great pleasure and i think i've sort of become part of your public broadcasting family welcome you should have been here a long time ago can you tell us what the new show will be well he's going to be four pbs called i'm important company which means i'll continue to do these media interviews that i've been doing it as an interim basis since december since early december and then it will incorporate four at the moment highly regarded highly experienced contributors who definitely a well known to the pbs and public public broadcasting audience to radio etc for instance michelle martin walter isaacson hari sreenivasan and alicia menendez and i think it's a really good group of diverse views and cultural references and the kind of context they can add to what i've been doing over the last last many months that's the same michelle martin who's our own weekend all things considered host dot believe it is is cnn and pbs be airing the same show yes they will that is the objective at the moment and currently they do the same show it's not it's cnn international so i my my show which is on cnn national called import is broadcast around the world and on cnn go wherever you are and obviously online etc but with the new move to an hour that also is is being preview to err on cnn international as well as on pbs it's really interesting actually is a public network who's audiences in the us cnn international as you were just saying as a commercial network whose audiences almost everywhere almost everywhere but the us programmers would traditionally put different content on for those audiences heli so both at once well no you know it it may be right what you're saying about different know targeting etc but i am sort of in the cnn dna i've been cnn since nineteen eighty eighty three my career on s started before they even was cnn international you know it was a on cnn.

Brian lehrer chief international correspond cnn michelle martin dot us christiane amanpour michelle martin walter isaacso alicia menendez four pbs
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The long long struggle takes when we met dr jupiter he had his monogram jacket which he took off for our interview but he explained how he normally wears the jacket in the hospital because it is one more visual cue to patients that he is a physician something he says people don't always expect from young black male it happens i don't think it's intentional i would like to think is not intentional but is very rare that you can walk into a room as a patient and when you see a black african american male with dreads and his hair and you know that this is my doctor until you formally introduce yourself or you will get the comments you know nurse or you know can you get this from your by you hit a clean room so to speak those things have all have all happened students at xavier hope to change those stereotypes we all recognize that people don't truly see us through we are we use that to motivate ourselves into tries show people you know for a lot more than what you take this is african americans went on to be greatest sports but we can be so much greater in other areas and i just feel like we need to be more representative here's a bright spot for minority transient field the number of black women applying to medical school is on the rise black women have something to prove xavier sophomore rachel hitchens has already been accepted into the university of rochester medical school been objectified for so many years we have to prove that we can be more than video dancers we can actually use our brain and i think that is that's the motivating force that's deep down within so many black women like myself and like the students we spoke to at this small new orleans college had big plans i wanna be orthopedic surgeon i wanna be a pediatric cardiologists i wanna be a role family practice physician best wine paving the way for another generation of african american doctors in new orleans for the pbs news hour i'm hari sreenivasan.

xavier hope rachel hitchens new orleans hari sreenivasan representative xavier university of rochester medica new orleans college
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In two thousand nine it revealed information users thought was private without warning these and other actions led to a two thousand eleven consent decree by the federal trade commission to protect users privacy until now the company has taken a defensive posture saying that all users are aware of what they're sharing and with which apps that users are in essence granting informed consent but most users never bothered to go into the privacy settings and adjust the levels of visibility on the information they generate accessing information about users tastes and preferences is core to facebook's business in a nutshell here is how the company makes money when we like for love or share a video or an article or a brand on facebook generating information that's still in a profile facebook helps advertisers reach very specific audiences based on those tastes and preferences while facebook users may go online to share information with their family and friends the data they generate an intern the advertisers who target based on that data is what helps the company earned forty billion dollars in revenue just last year and has the company valued at nearly half a trillion dollars for the pbs newshour i'm hari sreenivasan in new york joining me now to discuss these latest facebook scandals is up to she's an associate professor at the university of north carolina chapel hill and she studies the way we interact with technology professor welcome to the news hour you know mark zuckerberg is here on capitol hill he's been meeting with senators he's going to testify tomorrow is there anything that he could say that would convince you who've been a very strong critic of the company that that facebook gets this problem and they're going to solve it well the problem we're facing isn't whether or not facebook gets this problem or what its intentions are even the problem is the way they've set up their business in the way they're used to and allowed to harvest our data and use it for targeting pits incentives against incentives of its two billion users at times definitely creates distortions in the public sphere has all these harms for politics so rather than mark zuckerberg telling us something the thing i really wish to see is our legislators and lawmakers stepping up and doing their job and bringing some oversight.

facebook hari sreenivasan new york associate professor mark zuckerberg intern university of north carolina c professor forty billion dollars trillion dollars
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For putin attention is an opportunity he's portrayed himself as the only leader strong enough to stand up to a powerful external enemy but that doesn't mean he can ignore internal crises earlier this week a fire engulfed a shopping center in the siberian town kemerovo this has been a week of funerals and national mourning sixty people died at a memorial a father remember talking to his daughter on the phone as she tried to escape what i was crying to my daughter she said dad i love you i'm suffocating i'm losing consciousness the tragedy sparked morning but also protests residents blame local officials because the malls exits were blocked in the fire alarm disabled so putin visited marovo to pay his respects and present himself as a benevolent leader launching an investigation he met with victims families letting them interrupt and question him he portrayed himself as authentic and local officials as corrupt one hundred investigators are working on this case they will inspect the whole chain of command is a is an accomplished politician who has been very successful over the past eighteen years but a lot of people under here the bureaucracy feel that they are only responsible to up there you responsible candy coal to irresponsible to the population putin's critics accused him of facilitating the kind of low level corruption and ineffectual local governance that led to the fire the fire also shows the limits of putin's control russia is a combination of top down control and anarchy much of the issues around russia is not the poor management which exists on behalf of the authority it's also lawlessness and lack of responsibility among ordinary people those ordinary people director ira at the local government as putin portrays himself is confronting local corruption and simultaneously an aggressive west the us is considering further escalation russia maintains blanket denials neither side wants war but it's not clear how they get out of the cycle of confrontation pbs news hour mixture sure the city of atlanta says it is slowly making progress in restoring its computer networks hari sreenivasan explains how nine days after a cyber attack brought city.

marovo putin russia ira us atlanta director hari sreenivasan eighteen years nine days
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Three days of voting ended today in egypt's presidential election the outcome is not in doubt president ob del fata alsisi ran with no real opposition as hari sreenivasan reports seven years after the uprising there democracy is further from reach amid economic and security problems president elsisi cast his ballot at one of the country's thirteen thousand polling stations but his reelection was never really a question and his lone opponent most of them stafa heads a party that had endorsed cc other opponents were intimidated to withdraw were arrested ali is an attorney who had dropped out of the running all these indicators were pointing towards planned intentions to poison and corrupt the entire operation and to evacuated from it's presumed democratic meaning dozens of opposition figures and seven political parties called for an election boycott turnout a key metric for cece was low still has strong political support at least in parliament more than eighty percent of its members support him and relations with israel and the united states are firm president trump welcomed him to the white house last spring political science professor dalia fahmi specializes in the middle east the future of us egyptian relations is going to have to take into account a couple of things will we really take seriously the democrats democratic aspirations of the people which should lead to further stability or will we rethink your strategy towards egypt and us strategy towards stability the region as a whole in two thousand thirteen cc ousted then president mohammad morsi egypt's first democratically elected president after the twenty eleven uprising the deposed longtime leader hosting lavar a year later cc one more than ninety six percent of the vote cc has led a harsh security crackdown imprisoning thousands cc has gone after a free expression civil society and rivals both in the political and military rome says fani instead of building schools and other infrastructure projects he has actually had to build sixteen new prisons he has had a major clampdown on media both domestic and international but his popularity has been hurt by a bad economy strict economic reforms were enacted in two thousand sixteen to avoid insolvency inflation skyrocketed with food prices rising by thirty percent and while unemployment is around eleven percent almost eighty percent of.

egypt president ali attorney cece israel united states trump white house hari sreenivasan elsisi professor dalia fahmi president mohammad morsi egypt eighty percent ninety six percent eleven percent thirty percent
"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"hari sreenivasan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But walker scheduled the elections for the fall holder suit claims walker is violating voting rights the walker camp insist the governor is abiding by the law european shares moved lower today in anticipation of the us tariff actions to be announced against china tomorrow us tariffs on steel and aluminum imports take effect i'm louise schiavone npr news washington i'm peter o'dowd the effects of cyberbullying can follow a victim for years when somebody bullies you to your face it's an it's painful and visceral and then it's gone when someone believes you online it may never go away or tech companies doing enough to stop it our series on bullying continues next time on here the program of course underway right after our foreign program that's eleven this morning on k q e d a journalist with years of experience in the middle east goes home to paris after the twenty fifteen terrorist attacks i think the more you exposed to it and i think we can see it in europe now with not that familiarity breeds contempt but it becomes less shocking and she writes a novel about surviving the trauma of mass shootings it proceeds a little bit in the sharpness paris metro next time on the world join us for the world this afternoon at two and then at three i'm hari sreenivasan on the next news hour after parkland father of one of the students killed reflects on the tragedy and the activism it has inspired that's thursday on the pbs newshour whether watchers at the national weather service periods of moderate to locally heavy rainfall expected to continue through this afternoon bay.

walker walker camp china us washington paris hari sreenivasan louise schiavone peter o'dowd europe